Staff Development Programme, Academic Year 1996-7 - (1) to No 4410

Oxford University Gazette

Staff Development Programme
Academic Year 1996-7

Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4409

Thursday, 26 September 1996


Note, January 1997: additional material published in Supplement (3) to Gazette No. 4422 (13 January 1997), covering Hilary and Trinity Terms, has been incorporated into this supplement. Information on those courses which are `fully booked' or `almost full' has been added at the same time.


Contents of the supplement:


THE STAFF DEVELOPMENT OFFICE

  • Mrs Rebecca Nestor, Head of Staff Development and Training: (2)70562
  • Ms Kay McIntyre, Staff Development Officer: (2)70245
  • Ms Luvena Nunn, Training Administrator (all course enquiries): (2)70086
  • Miss Ruth White, Assistant Training Administrator: (2)70565
  • Dr Peter Neumann, Chairman of the Academic Staff Development Committee

Office e-mail: training@admin.ox.ac.uk
Office fax: (2)80300
Office address: University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD

We provide:

training - an annual programme of training courses;

resources - we have a small library of books and videos which you can borrow: please see the Staff Development Programme for details;

advice - if you would prefer one-to-one advice rather than attending a course;

information - we hold information on external courses.

We can carry out training needs assessments for an entire department or section and help in drawing up training plans.

We are also happy to design and deliver training courses or seminars for individual departments and faculties. These can be versions of sessions from the central training programme, or training designed specifically for the needs of the department or faculty.

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SEMINARS ORGANISED BY THE ACADEMIC STAFF DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE

Eligibility to attend

These seminars, organised by the Academic Staff Development Committee (ASDC), are designed for holders of university and college teaching posts. Graduate students, academic-related and non-academic staff may also attend if there are places after the needs of academic staff have been met.

To book a place, please telephone or e-mail the Staff Development Office.

If a session is fully booked

More sessions can be arranged if there is enough interest. Those who wish to attend are invited to contact the Staff Development Office to register their interest.


Admissions interviewing

Wednesday, 2 October 1996, 9.30 a.m. - 5 p.m. (Vacation)
Friday, 4 October 1996, 9.30 a.m. - 5 p.m. (Vacation)

The abolition of the entrance examination means that effective admissions interviewing is more important than ever. This practical seminar will include the basic concepts and techniques of interviewing and two practice interviews - using volunteer student candidates - at which some of the techniques can be tried out. A session on equal opportunities in admissions will also be included. There will be plenty of opportunity for experimentation, questions and discussion. The ASDC organises this seminar on behalf of the Oxford Colleges Admissions Office.

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Appraisal

Tuesday, 7 January 1997, 9.30 a.m. - 12 p.m. (Vacation)

This session is intended for both appraisees and appraisers. It is designed to help you understand how the appraisal scheme works and what both parties need to do to make it an effective process. The session will start with an explanation of the appraisal scheme itself, and go on to consider the stages in the appraisal cycle and the skills required. There will be plenty of time to ask questions or raise any concerns that you may have.

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Dealing with the media (newspapers and radio): introductory

Wednesday, 5 March 1997, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. (Week 7, HT)

When the media contact the University for information or comment on a specific topic, you may be the best person for them to speak to: either because of your position or the work you do. You might also want to publicise your work to a wider audience, or you may simply wish to be prepared in case you are contacted unexpectedly.

This seminar is intended for staff who may be asked to speak to the media, but who have limited or no experience in this area. It offers a brief introduction to dealing with the media, and to the University Press Office.

The seminar will cover writing a press release, handling requests for interviews, what to say and how to say it. Each participant will have the opportunity to record a radio interview.

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Dealing with the media (television and crisis management): advanced

Wednesday, 14 May 1997, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. (Week 3, TT)

This seminar is for people who already have some experience of the media and would like to face future interviews or media-related crises with increased confidence. It aims to develop practical skills in handling the media and giving interviews, especially on television. It will also consider how to present `bad news' stories, such as drug abuse, radioactive waste disposal, animals in research, and student and staff fatalities. Each participant will have the opportunity to record a short interview on video.

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Examining and assessing undergraduates

Thursday, 27 February 1997, 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. (Week 6, HT)

Examining is an important, complex and demanding task. This seminar offers some information and ideas on the theoretical background to assessment, including sampling, validity, reliability, generalisability, peer- and criterion- referencing, and fairness. It also covers current issues in assessment, in particular its relationship to student learning, planning examination content, marking essays, and combining marks from different examination components.

Members of academic staff who are new to examining at Oxford are particularly encouraged to attend this seminar, which will also be useful for more experienced members of staff who wish to update their knowledge of assessment. If you are planning to attend the linked seminar on `New approaches to the assessment of undergraduates' on 5 June, it would be helpful to attend this seminar first.

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New approaches to the assessment of undergraduates

Thursday, 5 June 1997, 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. (Week 6, TT)

Building on the theoretical background to assessment explored in `Examining and assessing undergraduates', this seminar will review:

  • approaches to student assessment other than unseen essays (eg multiple - choice questions, modified essay questions, critical reading questions, problem-solving questions).
  • the use of technology to improve the efficacy of assessment (eg computer- presented tests, computerised self-assessment, video-recordings of candidates).

Familiarity with the principles of assessment is helpful for this seminar. You are therefore encouraged to attend the earlier seminar on `Examining and assessing undergraduates'.

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Financial management

This new programme consists of two half-day and four full-day modules. Participants with little or no experience of financial management are encouraged to attend all six; those with some experience may prefer to attend the most relevant for them. Each module is self-contained. Overall the programme aims to provide those who have financial management responsibilities with the skills and knowledge they need to plan, manage and control budgets. Based on materials produced by the Chartered Institute of Public Finance Accountants specifically for higher education, the programme has been tailored to meet Oxford's needs.


Introduction to financial management I

Wednesday, 23 October 1996, 2 - 5 p.m. (Week 2, MT)

This module provides an overview of the financial management regimes in higher education and outlines the sources from which the University receives its income.


Introduction to financial management II

Wednesday, 30 October 1996, 2 - 5 p.m. (Week 3, MT)

Building on the foundations offered in the first session, this module provides a review of basic financial management and accounting principles.


Financial and business planning

Monday, 10 February 1997, 9.30 a.m. - 4.30 p.m. (Week 4, HT)

This module explains the different types of planning and describes the contexts in which they can be used; it identifies the role non-financial managers play in relation to developing financial and business plans, and provides practical experience in preparing plans through a case study exercise.


Project planning and management

Tuesday, 15 April 1997, 9.30 a.m. - 4.30 p.m. (Vacation)

In this module the basic principles underpinning project planning and costing are identified. An introduction to cost benefit analysis and investment appraisal techniques is also provided together with an outline of project management requirements. The case study, focusing on a research proposal, offers the opportunity to practise some of the techniques described.


Budget preparation

Wednesday, 28 May 1997, 9.30 a.m. - 4.30 p.m. (Week 5, TT)

This module describes the principles behind preparation of budgets and the link to the University's resource allocation mechanisms. It also provides practical experience of preparing budgets through a case study.


Budget monitoring and control

Wednesday, 9 July 1997, 9.30 a.m. - 4.30 p.m. (Vacation)

The actions required to monitor and control a budget are identified in this module. Practical experience in the use and interpretation of variance analysis is also provided.

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Gender in Teaching

Friday, 18 April 1997, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. (Vacation)

Why do women perform significantly less well than men in the Oxford Final Honour Schools? The first part of this seminar will discuss recent research on this subject. Thereafter its main focus will be the practical question: what can tutors do to help both male and female students perform to the best of their ability?

The seminar is highly participative and is designed to help tutors and lecturers to deal with the issues of gender that arise in their own teaching.

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Induction programme for academic staff

The induction programme consists of three sessions which newly-appointed members of academic staff are encouraged to attend.

Session I: The Vice-Chancellor's Welcome is the opening event. It will offer an opportunity to learn something of the complex structure of Oxford and hear about the main strategic issues facing the University. With input from the Vice-Chancellor and other senior members of the University, this session aims to welcome the new member of staff to Oxford.
Monday, 7 October 1996, 2 - 5 p.m. (Week 0, MT)

Session II: will look at the services available to members of academic staff to assist in teaching and research. This will include input from staff from the Counselling Service, Graduate Studies, Libraries, Research and Commercial Services and Undergraduate Admissions. There will also be an optional (but fascinating) tour of the Bodleian Library.
Tuesday, 22 October 1996, 12 - 4 p.m. (Week 2, MT)

Session III: Funding and finance builds on session I by expanding on the funding mechanisms for Oxford and how the University manages its finances. This is complemented by a discussion of financial management within a college. The session is presented by senior university and college finance staff.
Tuesday, 12 November 1996, 2 - 5 p.m. (Week 5, MT)

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Information overload: beat the bumph!

Tuesday, 18 February 1997, 9.15 a.m. - 5 p.m. (Week 5, HT)

This seminar will equip you with a clear approach to face the information jungle, remove clutter from your life and become focused on what matters to you. At the end of the seminar you will have acquired a technique to handle written documents, learned how to sharpen your short- and long-term memory and practised how to assess priorities.

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Information overload: beat the bumph follow-up

Tuesday, 11 March 1997, 2 - 5.30 p.m. (Week 8, HT)

Intended for those who have already attended the one-day seminar, this session will provide an opportunity to discuss the questions of memory in more detail and practise some of the techniques for strengthening your memory.

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Lecturing skills practice

New to lecturing? Then come and learn the basics in a supportive environment.

More experienced? Then come and refresh your skills.

The seminar provides the opportunity to discuss a wide variety of lecturing skills and styles. Participants deliver a short lecture and receive constructive feedback, together with a video-recording of their presentation.

The video playback sessions are slightly different in that the video recordings of each presentation will be replayed during the seminar, to give participants the opportunity to discuss their performance.

General:

Tuesday, 8 October 1996, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. (Week 0, MT)
Tuesday, 14 January 1997, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. (Week 0, HT)

Arts:

Tuesday, 8 October 1996, 2 - 5.30 p.m. (Week 0, MT)
Tuesday, 18 March 1997, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. (Week 9, HT)
Tuesday, 22 April 1997, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. (Week 0, TT)

Sciences:

Thursday, 12 December 1996, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. (Week 9, MT)
Tuesday, 14 January 1997, 2 - 5.30 p.m. (Week 0, HT)
Tuesday, 22 April 1997, 2 - 5.30 p.m. (Week 0, TT)

Video playback:

Thursday, 7 November 1996, 2 - 5.30 p.m. (Week 4, MT)
Thursday, 13 February 1997, 2 - 5.30 p.m. (Week 4, HT)
Tuesday, 20 May 1997, 2 - 5.30 p.m. (Week 4, TT)

Lecturing to conferences:

Tuesday, 24 June 1997, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. (Week 9, TT)

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Audio-visual aids to lecturing

Thursday, 20 March 1997, 9.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. (Week 9, HT)

How do I get overhead transparencies or projector slides made? Can I make use of video in my lectures? How can my students see the effects on a theory of setting different parameters?

Whether you barely know how to switch on the overhead projector or whether you want to use state-of-the-art computer projection facilities in your lectures, this seminar will offer you the opportunity to see and discuss a wide range of audio-visual aids for teaching. Participants will be able to experiment with the different methods and meet staff from the main university support services for the production of materials.

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Management skills for research team leaders

A programme of three seminars has been designed for people who are leading research teams:

Managing and developing effective teams

Tuesday, 26 November 1996, 9.15 a.m. - 3.30 p.m. (Week 7, MT)

This seminar aims to give participants an understanding of what makes an effective team and also increase awareness of their personal management style. Topics will include motivation, setting objectives, monitoring performance and giving feedback.


Dealing with conflict and negotiation

Tuesday, 28 January 1997, 9.15 a.m. - 3.30 p.m. (Week 2, HT)

This seminar will explore the most common causes of conflict, and will look at how to identify early warning signs and intervene effectively. Participants will also consider their own style of conflict management and negotiation.


Management of change

Tuesday, 6 May 1997, 9.15 a.m. - 3.30 p.m. (Week 2, TT)

This seminar aims to increase participants' understanding of the change process and their confidence in their own ability to initiate and facilitate change.

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Small group teaching

Friday, 10 January 1997, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. (Vacation)
Thursday, 6 March 1997, 2 - 5.30 p.m. (Week 7, HT)

Increasingly, classes and small groups (of between, say, four and twelve) are supplementing - even, in some cases, replacing - the tutorial. How do such teaching groups differ from tutorials? What is the purpose of this form of teaching? What techniques and skills are required of the tutor? What factors help or hinder students' learning? This seminar aims to help participants formulate their own approach to small group teaching by focusing on these questions.

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Supervising D.Phil. Students

Tuesday, 19 November 1996, 2 - 5.30 p.m. (Week 6, MT)
Thursday, 17 April 1997, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. (Vacation)

Graduate supervision can be one of the most interesting and enjoyable aspects of university teaching. It can also be one of the most frustrating. This seminar will identify some of the expectations of funding bodies, the resources available within the University, and common issues faced by supervisors and candidates. Working mainly in groups according to subject, participants will have the opportunity to pool their approaches to supervision and discuss suggestions from experienced supervisors.

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Time management

Tuesday, 5 November 1996, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. (Week 4, MT)
Thursday, 3 July 1997, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. (Vacation)

This session is intended to help staff achieve a balance between teaching duties, creative research and more routine administrative duties. It will explore the practical application of well-tried techniques which may have been forgotten or overlooked. Topics covered will include delegation, communication and meetings, dealing with insufficient information, and dealing with interruptions.

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Tutorial teaching

What techniques and methods might be appropriate in this key form of teaching at Oxford? What is the role of the tutorial in developing study skills? How can students be encouraged to get the best out of tutorials? What problems may arise and how can they be dealt with? Focusing on these questions, participants will be encouraged to articulate and develop their own approaches to tutorial teaching.

General:

Tuesday, 29 October 1996, 2 - 5.15 p.m. (Week 3, MT)
Tuesday, 25 February 1997, 2 - 5.15 p.m. (Week 6, HT)

Sciences:

Tuesday, 10 December 1996, 9.30 a.m. - 12.45 p.m. (Week 9, MT)

Arts:

Thursday, 16 January 1997, 9.30 a.m. - 12.45 p.m. (Week 0, HT)

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Writing research grant applications

The Staff Development Office can organise a half-day seminar on this topic for particular departments or faculties, especially in the arts and social sciences. Please contact Rebecca Nestor, Head of Staff Development and Training on

(2)70562 if you are interested.

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Writing research papers, abstracts and posters

Friday, 13 December 1996, 9.15 a.m. - 4.45 p.m. (Week 9, MT)
Wednesday, 16 April 1997, 9.15 a.m. - 4.45 p.m. (Vacation)

This session is aimed at scientific research and academic staff. It is designed to help those new to writing scientific papers and to act as a `refresher' for more experienced writers. It will cover:

  • the peer review and publication process;
  • choosing the right format;
  • components of a research paper and how to write them;
  • good style in scientific writing;
  • conference posters and abstracts.

For those in the biomedical disciplines there is a follow-up course called `Advanced biomedical communications'.

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Advanced biomedical communications

Wednesday, 11 June 1997, 9.15 a.m. - 4.45 p.m. (Week 7, TT)

This workshop is aimed at academic and research staff who have experience of writing biomedical papers and abstracts, or who have previously attended the course on `Writing research papers, abstracts and posters'. It will cover:

  • improving your writing style;
  • slimming down `fat papers';
  • increasing your chances of publication;
  • review articles and book chapters;
  • writing for magazines and the `lay' press.

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UNIVERSITY OF WARWICK SEMINARS

Staff with teaching duties may take advantage of a new scheme with the University of Warwick. Under this scheme, certain seminars (given below) from Warwick's academic staff development programme are open to Oxford staff if there are places available after the needs of Warwick staff have been met. There is no charge, except for travelling expenses.

Small group teaching in the mathematical sciences

Wednesday, 22 January, 2–4.30 p.m.

Course leader: Alyson Stibbard

Venue: Staff Club Quiet Room

Most departments in the Mathematical Sciences spend some time teaching their undergraduates in small groups; the definition of small being anything from two to thirty. The general idea behind these groups is that they are not lectures, but places where students can ask questions and interact with the teacher. However, anybody who takes such a group will realise that this interaction does not always occur spontaneously. If you ask a class for `Any questions?, you are more likely to be met by silence. It is tempting then to spend the rest of the time writing model solutions grimly down on the board as the students dutifully but passively copy them down. In this session we will discuss how you can improve on this situation and run a class that is educational and enjoyable for the students and for you. In particular, we will consider how to cope with a mixed-ability group, so that everyone takes something useful away from the class.

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ESRC and related bidding

Wednesday, 29 January, 2–4 p.m.

Course leader: Professor R. Higgott, PAIS

Venue: Jack Martin 4, Residences

Presenters all have extensive knowledge of the working of ESRC, both from the inside and as successful applicants. Speakers, such as Professor Bob Burgess and Professor Robin Wensley, will deal with ESRC policies and themes, describe the work of the grants board and discuss the process of making a successful application. It will be suggested that the process of completing the forms and making the application is not as forbidding as it first appears!

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Dealing with difficult situations/students: effective skills for tutors/personal tutors

Wednesday, 12 February, 2–4 p.m.

Course leader: Pauline McManus, Senior Tutor's Office

Venue: Jack Martin 4, Residences

As an Academic or Personal Tutor, you may on occasion encounter problematic situations or difficult students; for example the student who is failing his/her course, allegations of unfairness or harassment, students who are facing a crisis such as bereavement or illness. In this workshop, the range of responses/interventions which might be effective in difficult situations will be considered and participants' particular concerns will be addressed.

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Assertiveness for women

Wednesday, 12 February, 9.30 a.m.–4.30 p.m.

Course leader: Sue Habeshaw

Venue: Radcliffe House

This workshop will provide an opportunity to look at your place within the institution and reflect on your interaction with students, colleagues and management. You will be able to practise presenting yourself assertively, speaking for what you believe in and saying what you feel. Learning will be experiential and will consist of talking things through, trying things out and receiving feedback about how you come across. The central learning technique will be role play. The workshop will be for women only; a single-sex group allows women to practise new behaviour in a situation where there is less risk of slipping into traditional gender roles. The facilitator, Sue Habeshaw, is a senior lecturer and course adviser in the Humanities faculty of the University of the West of England. She works as an educational consultant and has considerable experience in running workshops on assertiveness, counselling, personal development and interpersonal skills.

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Voice and the lecturer

Friday, 14 February, 9.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m.

Course leader: BSPS Training

Venue: Scarman House

This lecture-demonstration is designed to provide valuable strategies for projection, care of the voice and variety in speech when lecturing. Participants will gain useful advice on the following topics: common vocal problems; tension in the voice; breathing techniques; the speaking mechanism; voice projection and modulation—how to avoid monotony. Groupwork exercises will be used and there will be opportunity for questions throughout the session.

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How to land your first big research grant

Wednesday, 19 February, 9.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m.

Course leader: Annabel Eccles, RDSO

Venue: Scarman House

This workshop is aimed principally at academic staff (in all faculties) who have yet to land their first significant research grant or contract. The workshop will cover choosing the right sponsor and targeting your application to maximise success. Participants are invited to bring a draft application for a research grant or contract to the session, if they have one available.

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ETUG case studies: making a success of IT in teaching

Wednesday, 26 February, 12.30–2.30 p.m.

Course leader: Jay Dempster

Venue: Council Chamber, Senate House

ETUG members will present several short case studies of their own experiences of using technology-based teaching methods. Presenters such as Trevor Hawkes, Loredana Polezzi, Dennis Leech, Sarah Richardson, Sallie Goetsch and Alan Boucher will suggest the factors that they believe can contribute the success or otherwise of the implementation of educational technology. There will be plenty of opportunity for discussion.

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Choosing and using videos

Wednesday, 5 March, 2–5 p.m.

Course leader: Martin Adderson, Video Arts

Venue: Jack Martin 4, Residences

This course is designed to provide an overview of the use of video material within a teaching and learning context. During the session, participants will be guided on what to look for when choosing videos for formal lectures, independent-learning, distance-learning and other training needs. The session will also address the question of how to ensure that you get value for money.

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Helping students learn in mathematically- based subjects

Wednesday, 12 March, 1.30–4.30 p.m.

Course leader: Alyson Stibbard

Venue: to be announced

Students find mathematics difficult; they may not understand the motivation behind what they are studying. They may find lecture notes and textbooks hard to read; they may feel isolated in their work because mathematics is not a `talking' subject. How can you address these problems? In this session we will look at investigative exercises written to help motivate a new technical or mathematical idea before it is introduced in lectures; study guides to help steer students through course material and techniques for encouraging students to think and talk about their work together, both inside and outside lectures.

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OTHER TRAINING

Counselling Service

The University Counselling Service offers a range of seminars for academic staff. To reserve a place on these seminars, please contact the Counselling Service on (2)70300.

Introduction to the Counselling Service and making a referral

Tuesday, 19 November 1996, 5.15 - 6.30 p.m. (Week 6, MT)

This seminar will offer a brief introduction to the work of the Counselling Service and look at some of the issues involved when making a referral to the Service.

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Common student problems

Tuesday, 3 December 1996, 5.15 - 6.30 p.m. (Week 8, MT)

This seminar will examine some of the most common psychological difficulties that students bring to the Counselling Service and then discuss possible ways of alleviating them. Further training sessions for Hilary and Trinity Terms will be announced in the Gazette.

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STAFF COMMITTEE COURSES

The list below gives details of the courses, organised on behalf of the Staff Committee, for academic-related and non-academic staff. Academic staff are welcome to attend these courses, if there are places available after the needs of academic-related and non-academic staff have been met. In practice you will be put on the waiting list and contacted shortly before the course if there are spare places.

October:

Wed. 23, 9.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. Week 2 History and Structure of the University
Wed. 30, 2.15 - 5 p.m. Week 3 Introduction to Oxford Libraries

November:

Mon. 4, 9.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. Week 4 Personnel and Health and Safety
Wed. 6, 9.30 a.m. - 4.30 p.m. Week 4 Managing Employee Absence
Wed. 6, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. Week 4 Time Management: General Skills
Tue. 12, 9.15 a.m. - 5 p.m. Week 5 Information Overload: Beat the Bumph!
Wed. 13, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. Week 5 Skills for Appraisees (Clerical, Library and Secretarial Staff)
Fri. 15, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. Week 5 Telephone Skills
Tue. 19, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. Week 6 Proof Reading (Clerical, Library and Secretarial Staff).
Thur. 21, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Mon. 25, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Week 6 and
Week 7
Presentation Skills
Wed. 27, 9.30 a.m. - 1.30 p.m. Week 7 Assertiveness (Non- Academic Staff).
Wed. 27, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. Week 7 Writing Skills
 

December:

Wed. 4, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. Week 9 Manual Handling
Wed. 4, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. Week 9 Presentation Skills Practice
Mon. 9, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. Week 9 Dictation Techniques
Wed. 11, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Fri. 13, 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Week 9 and
Vacation
Training Skills
Tue. 17, 9.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. Vacation Appraisal (Academic-Related)
 

January:

Wed. 8, 9.30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Vacation Minutes and Agendas
Tue. 9, 9.15 a.m. - 5 p.m. Vacation Information Overload: Beat the Bumph!
Mon. 13, 9.30 a.m. - 4 p.m. Week 0 Stress
Thur. 23, 9.30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Week 1 Team Leadership (Day 1)
Tue. 28, 9.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. Week 2 History and Structure of the University
Wed. 29, 9.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. Week 2 Managing People: Counselling Skills (Part 1)
 

February:

Wed. 5, 9.30 a.m. - 2 p.m. Week 3 Skills for Appraisers (Clerical, Library and Secretarial Staff)
Wed. 5, 2.15 - 5 p.m. Week 3 Introduction to Oxford Libraries
Fri. 7, 9.30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Week 3 Discipline (Introductory)
Tue. 11, 9.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. Week 4 Personnel and Health and Safety
Wed. 12, 9.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. Week 4 Managing People: Counselling Skills (Part 2)  
Thur. 13, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. Week 4 Recruitment and Selection Follow-Up
Thur. 20, 9.30 a.m. - 4.30 p.m. Week 5 Time Management (Clerical and Secretarial)
Thur. 20, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. Week 5 Team Leadership (Day 2) .
Mon. 24, 9.15 a.m. - 5 p.m. Week 6 Career Review and Planning (Research Staff).
Wed. 26, 9.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. Week 6 Managing People: Counselling Skills (Part 3)  
 

March:

Mon. 3, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Week 7 Managing People: Dealing with People
Wed. 5, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. Week 7 Proof Reading (Academic- Related Staff)
Fri. 7, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. Week 7 Skills for Appraisees (Technical Staff)
Mon. 10, 9.30 a.m. - 1.30 p.m. Week 9 Assertiveness (Academic-Related Staff)
Wed. 12, 9.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. Week 9 Managing People: Counselling Skills (Part 4)  
Thur. 13, 9.30 a.m. - 2 p.m. Week 9 Skills for Appraisers (Technical Staff)
Mon. 17, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Week 9 Managing People: Influencing People
Thur. 20, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. Week 9 Skills for Appraisees (Clerical, Library and Secretarial Staff)

April:

Wed. 23, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. Week 0 Proof Reading Follow-up
Wed. 23, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. Week 0 Time Management: General Skills
Tue. 29, 9.30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Week 1 Minutes and Agendas
Wed. 30, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Week 1 Training Skills (Day 1)

May:

Fri. 2, 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Week 1 Training Skills (Day 2)  
Wed. 7, 9.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. Week 2 History and Structure of the University
Fri. 9, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. Week 2 Manual Handling
Tue. 13, 2 - 5 p.m. Week 3 Managing People: Project Presentations
Wed. 14, 2.15 - 5 p.m. Week 3 Introduction to Oxford Libraries
Fri. 16, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Mon. 19, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Week 3 and
Week 4
Presentation Skills
Tue. 20, 9.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. Week 4 Personnel and Health and Safety
Thur. 22, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. Week 4 Writing Skills
Tue. 27, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. Week 5 Presentation Skills Practice
 

June:

Tue. 3, 9.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. Week 6 Appraisal (Academic-Related)
Tue. 17, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. Week 9 Telephone Skills
Mon. 23, 9.15 a.m. - 5 p.m. Week 9 Career Review and Planning (Research Staff).
Wed. 25, 9.30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Week 9 Team Leadership (Day 1)
Fri. 27, 9.30 a.m. - 4 p.m. Week 9 Stress
 

July:

Wed. 2, 9.30 a.m. - 5 p.m. and
Thur. 3, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Vacation Recruitment and Selection
Tue. 8, 9.30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Vacation Discipline (Advanced)
Wed. 16, 9.30 a.m. - 1 p.m. Vacation Team Leadership (Day 2)

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