Staff Development Programme 1995-6 - (3) to No 4373



<br /> Oxford University Gazette: Staff Development Programme 1995-6<br /> (supplement)

Oxford University Gazette

Staff Development Programme 1995–6

Supplement (3) to Gazette No. 4373

Thursday, 21 September 1995



Contents of the supplement:

  • THE STAFF DEVELOPMENT OFFICE
  • SEMINARS ORGANISED BY THE ACADEMIC STAFF
    DEVELOPMENT
    COMMITTEE
  • OTHER TRAINING
  • SEMINARS ORGANISED BY THE STAFF COMMITTEE

    To
    Gazette
    No. 4373 (Thursday, 21 September 1995)

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    THE STAFF DEVELOPMENT OFFICE

    Who are we?

    The Staff Development Office is a small unit based in the University
    Offices.

    • Ms Rebecca Nestor, Head of Staff Development and Training:
      (2)70562
    • Ms Kay McIntyre, Staff Development Officer: (2)70245
    • Mrs Auriel Knight, Course Administrator (all course enquiries):
      (2)70086
    • Miss Luvena Nunn, Secretary: (2)70565

    What do we do?

    Courses:
    we organise a yearly programme of training courses
    for
    which
    there is no charge.
    Information:
    we hold information about courses offered by
    external
    organisations.
    Resources:
    we have a range of videos and packages which may
    be
    borrowed.


    SEMINARS ORGANISED BY THE ACADEMIC STAFF
    DEVELOPMENT
    COMMITTEE

    These seminars are organised for the holders of university and
    college
    teaching posts.

    Graduate students, academic-related and non-academic staff (who
    are on
    the university payroll) are welcome to attend these seminars if there
    are
    places available after the needs of academic staff have been met. In
    practice
    you will be asked to keep the dates free in your diary and we will
    contact
    you
    two weeks before the course to confirm or cancel your provisional
    booking.

    subject-specific seminars: in addition to this
    programme of
    seminars the Academic Staff Development Committee (ASDC) will arrange
    subject-specific sessions on teaching for individual faculties,
    departments
    and colleges as required. Anyone wishing to arrange such seminars
    should
    contact Ms Rebecca Nestor, Head of Staff Development and Training
    (telephone:
    (2)70562).

    Other resources: The Staff Development Office holds
    information about training offered by external organisations, and has
    a range of videos, books, and training packages---on teaching and
    learning as well as more general subjects---which may be borrowed.

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement



    Applications for funding from the new
    research
    councils

    Thursday, 19 October 1995, 10.15 a.m.–12.30 p.m. (Week 2,
    MT)

    This session will provide information about applying for research
    grants from
    the new research councils, and will include presentations by staff of
    the
    University's Research Services Office and representatives from the
    research
    councils.

    Organised jointly with the University Research Services Office.

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement



    New course: Information overload—beat
    the
    bumph

    Monday, 13 May 1996, 9.15 a.m.–5 p.m. (Week 0, TT)

    In one week we get more information thrown at us than the average
    nineteenth-century European had to cope with in an entire year. Do
    you have a reliable strategy that makes you confident, assertive and
    relaxed in dealing with this information overload? Or are you snowed
    under with piles of paperwork, unnecessary meetings and
    indecision?

    This seminar will equip you with a clear approach to face the
    information jungle, remove clutter from your life and become focused
    on what matters to you. At the end of the seminar you will have
    acquired a technique to handle written documents, learned how to
    sharpen your short- and long-term memory and practised how to assess
    priorities.

    The sessions are presented by Kathryn Redway who currently
    runs
    our Rapid Reading seminar. Participants who want to gain maximum
    benefit from the Beat the Bumph sessions are recommended also to
    attend the Rapid Reading seminar, as the two seminars are designed to
    complement each other.

    This new seminar is based on Ms Redway's latest book Beat
    the Bumph
    . Each participant on the one-day seminar will be
    given a copy of this book.

    Beat the bumph: follow-up

    Tuesday, 18 June 1996, 9.30 a.m.--1 p.m. (Week 9, TT)

    Intended for those who have already attended the one-day seminar,
    this session will provide an opportunity to discuss the question of
    memory in more detail and practise some of the techniques for
    strengthening your memory.

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement



    Dealing with the media (radio): introductory

    Tuesday, 28 May 1996, 9.30 a.m.–1 p.m. (Week 6, TT)

    You may be rung up out of the blue by a journalist asking about your
    work.
    Or
    you may want some publicity for a piece of your own research that you
    think
    is
    of interest to a wider audience than the readership of the specialist
    journals
    in which you publish. How do you cope?

    During the session each participant will have the opportunity to
    record
    a
    short interview with a radio journalist on a topic of his or her
    choice.

    Topics covered will include:

    • the media—what they are and how they work;
    • help is at handthe role of the University Press Office;
    • how to write a press release;
    • handling requests for interviews;
    • what to say and how to say it.

    Participants will be asked to prepare a press release on a topic
    of their
    choice in advance of the session, using a set of notes for guidance
    provided
    by the presenters. The number of participants will be restricted to
    twelve, so
    that everyone has the chance to be interviewed.

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement



    Dealing with the media (television):
    advanced

    Tuesday, 25 June 1996, 9.30 a.m.–1 p.m. (Vacation)

    Even experienced interviewees, such as politicians, take advantage of
    professional advice to hone their skills. Academic staff who find
    themselves
    in the limelight from time to time can also benefit from taking a
    little time
    to think about how they face the press. By acquiring an understanding
    of
    how
    journalists work, and by recognising how much power lies with the
    interviewee,
    you can develop a strategy for fruitful media relations that will
    stand you in
    good stead whether the news is good or bad.

    Each participant will be interviewed on video on a subject of
    his or her
    choice, once at the beginning of the session and again at the end.
    The taped
    interviews will be played back and discussed.

    Topics covered during the session will include:

    • at your convenience—when you can choose the time and place;
    • how to make sure you put your story across effectively;
    • when to say no;
    • dress and deportment on TV;
    • the difference between live and recorded interviews.

    Participants will be asked to prepare a press release on a topic
    of their
    choice in advance of the session, using a set of notes for guidance
    provided
    by the presenters. The number of participants will be restricted to
    eight, so
    that everyone has the chance to be interviewed twice.

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement



    Dealing with the media: crisis management

    Monday, 26 February 1996, 9.30 a.m.–1 p.m. (Week 7, HT)

    This is a practically-orientated course which will equip participants
    with a
    range of skills to deal with the presentation of relevant `bad news'
    issues,
    such as drug abuse, radioactive waste disposal and animals in
    research.

    The course will cover:

    • dealing with journalists;
    • what to say and how to say it;
    • `managing' a bad news crisis;
    • retaining security over sensitive information;
    • coping with the unexpected.

    This course will involve practical work based around case
    studies.

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement



    Gender in teaching

    Monday, 4 December 1995, 9.30 a.m.–1 p.m. (Week 9, MT)

    Thursday, 21 March 1996, 2–5.30 p.m. (Vacation)

    This half-day seminar will provide an opportunity to discuss the ways
    in
    which
    gender issues may affect teaching and learning, to review
    participants'
    individual experiences and difficulties in this area, and to develop
    objectives and skills for non-sexist teaching.

    A discussion paper will be circulated before the seminar,
    summarising
    some of the recent thinking on the subject of gender in teaching
    (particularly
    at Oxford and Cambridge). The seminar itself will include a short
    presentation
    and discussion, followed by group work outlining the skills needed
    for non-
    sexist teaching and case study exercises to enable participants to
    develop
    these skills.

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement



    Introduction to the University

    Monday, 2 October 1995, 9.30 a.m.–2 p.m. (Week 0, MT)

    This session begins with a general introduction to the workings of
    the
    University. There are brief talks on the topics listed below followed
    by
    discussions and the opportunity to meet colleagues in an informal
    setting:

    • the relationship between the University and the colleges;
    • undergraduate admissions;
    • graduate admissions;
    • the University Counselling Service;
    • the organisation of teaching within colleges.

    The Vice-Chancellor will deliver a brief talk after lunch to
    conclude the
    session.

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement



    Lecturing skills: the use of audio-visual
    aids

    Thursday, 20 June 1996, 9.30 a.m.--12.30 p.m. (Week 9, TT)

    The first half of the seminar will involve short presentations on the
    following topics:

    • overheads, slides, and the interactive use of computers;
    • videos;
    • copyright.

    The second half of the session will be practically based giving
    participants the opportunity to experiment with the use of
    audio-visual aids.



    New seminar---managing and developing
    effective teams

    Friday, 7 June 1996, 9.15 a.m.--3.30 p.m. (Week 7, TT)

    This new seminar is part of a series aimed at developing the
    leadership skills of academic and research staff who lead research
    teams. Topics covered will include:

    • components of an effective team;
    • stages in team development;
    • motivation;
    • setting objectives for your team;
    • monitoring performance and giving feedback.


    New seminar---methods of assessment

    Friday, 31 May 1996, 2--5 p.m. (Week 2, TT)

    Intended primarily for those new to examining, this new seminar will
    focus on the principles and practice of student assessment at Oxford.
    It will offer some insights into the theory of assessment and an
    opportunity to consider the implications of the theory for
    participants' own examining responsibilities.

    The seminar will be run by Mr Michael Wakeford of the University of
    Cambridge, who ran a successful pilot seminar for those involved in
    examining for the M.Sc. in Forestry earlier this ear. Mr Wakeford is
    an experienced presenter and has a background of advising on
    assessment methods.

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement



    Refreshing lecturing

    Thursday, 28 September 1995, 2.15–3.30 p.m. (Vacation)

    A lecture on lecturing techniques will be followed by general
    discussion. The
    lecture will given by Richard Pring, Professor of Education.

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement



    Small group teaching

    Thursday, 22 February 1996, 9.30 a.m.–1 p.m. (Week 6, HT)

    The seminar will look at:

    • the purpose of teaching in small groups;
    • appropriate methods;
    • factors which help or hinder learning;
    • the relationship of small group teaching to other forms of
      teaching.

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement



    The structure of the University

    Monday, 18 March 1996, 9.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m. (Vacation)

    This session is intended to provide information about the
    decision-making
    processes within the University. An explanation will be given of the
    respective roles of Congregation, Hebdomadal Council, the General
    Board and
    a
    number of key committees. The links between the colleges and the
    University
    will be explored and funding mechanisms and financial procedures will
    also be
    described. After brief talks there will be an opportunity for
    questions and
    discussion.

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement



    Supervising D.Phil. students

    Wednesday, 14 February 1996, 9.30 a.m.–1 p.m. (Week 5, HT)

    This session is intended to support the work of supervisors, by
    identifying
    some of the expectations of funding bodies, the resources available
    within the
    University, and common problems experienced by supervisors and
    candidates.
    The
    half-day seminar will involve brief presentations, short plenary
    sessions and
    discussion of case study material. There will be an opportunity to
    explore
    appropriate approaches to supervision and to exchange experiences.
    The
    seminar
    will draw on reports from the British Academy and the Economic and
    Social
    Science Research Council, and on the General Board's Memorandum of
    Guidance
    for Supervisors and Research Students.

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement



    Time management for academic and research
    staff

    Wednesday, 12 June 1996, 9.30 a.m.–1 p.m. (Week 8, TT)

    This session is intended to help staff achieve a balance between
    teaching
    duties, creative research and more routine administrative tasks and
    explores
    the practical application of forgotten or overlooked well-tried
    techniques.

    The session will cover:

    • delegation, not abdication;
    • communication and meetings;
    • dealing with insufficient information;
    • interruptions and the telephone.

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement



    Tutorial teaching

    Wednesday, 1 November 1995, 9.30 a.m.–1 p.m. (Week 4, MT)

    Wednesday, 17 January 1996, 2–5.30 p.m. (Week 1, HT)

    Thursday, 25 April 1996, 9.30 a.m.–1 p.m. (Week 1, TT)

    The session provides an opportunity to consider the vital role
    of this
    form of teaching. The issues to be explored will include:

    • the advantages and disadvantages of different tutorial methods;
    • the relationship of tutorial teaching to assessment;
    • the role of the tutorial in developing study skills;
    • the relationship of the tutorial to other forms of teaching,
      including
      lectures and seminars.

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement



    OTHER TRAINING


    Careers service

    Graduate students are welcome to register with the Careers Service
    and to use
    its services.

    In addition to a large and very well stocked Information Room,
    these
    services include individual contact with Careers Advisers and a
    termly
    programme of talks, presentations and workshops. Included in this
    programme
    are a number of skills training events on topics such as Time
    Management,
    Communication Skills, Making Presentations, and Problem Solving.
    These are
    run
    by employers and focus on the skills required in the work situation.

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement



    Computing Services

    Training courses

    Oxford University Computing Services (OUCS) runs a wide range of
    courses
    including:

    • Computing for the terrified;
    • Introduction to computers: basics and beyond;
    • Spreadsheets, databases, word processing, desktop publishing;
    • Electronic mail and other Internet services;
    • programming.

    You can choose which modules you attend to suit your needs. Many
    of
    the
    courses are just half a day.

    The courses are run regularly throughout the year. The dates are
    advertised in the OUCS course calendar and booking form which is sent
    to all
    departments at the beginning of each term. Please phone (2)78800 if
    you would
    like a copy. Your department will also have copies of the booklet
    describing
    all the course modules. Full details of all the courses, together
    with the
    current term's timetable, are held on the University Networked
    Information
    Service at URL http://info.ox.ac.uk/oucs/courses.

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement


    Booking a place

    All members of staff can attend these courses and, as with the Staff
    Development courses, your department will not be charged for this
    training.

    As the courses are popular it is essential that you book a
    place. If you
    want to go on a course you must book with the Computing Services,
    either by
    completing the booking form or sending an e-mail to
    courses@oucs.ox.ac.uk,
    indicating which courses you would like to attend.

    Learning and Resource Centre (LaRC)

    A range of learning facilities is available in the LaRC including
    video courses, computer-based tutorials, and application programs.
    Many of the taught courses can be followed in the LaRC, in a
    supported environment, at your own pace and in your own time.

    Further details about OUCS and the many facilities offered are
    available on the University Networked Information Service at URL
    http://info.ox.ac.uk/oucs/.

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement



    Counselling Service

    The University Counselling Service offers a range of seminars for
    academic
    staff.

    Introduction to the Counselling Service and Making a Referral

    Tuesday, 14 November 1995, 5.15–6.30 p.m. (Week 6, MT)

    This seminar will cover a brief introduction to the work of the
    Counselling
    Service and look at some of the issues involved in making a referral
    to the
    Service.

    Common Student Problems

    Tuesday, 28 November 1995, 5.15–6.30 p.m. (Week 8, MT)

    This seminar will focus on some of the most common psychological
    difficulties
    experienced by students during their university courses, and possible
    ways
    of
    alleviating them.

    Examination Stress—A Psychological Approach

    Thursday, 1 February 1996, 5.15–6.30 p.m. (Week 3, HT)

    This seminar will focus on anxiety management, revision techniques
    and basic
    support as well as possible psychological tensions behind the anxiety
    and why
    students may be sabotaging themselves.

    A Psychological Approach to Study Skills

    Monday, 5 February 1996, 5.15–6.30 p.m. (Week 4, HT)

    This seminar will focus on psychological obstacles to studying and
    highlight
    some practical ways of approaching study difficulties.

    The Tutoring Role—A Counsellor's Perspective

    Wednesday, 21 February 1996, 5.15—6.30 p.m. (Week 6, HT)

    This seminar will look at the boundary and potential areas of
    conflict between
    academic/personal tutoring and counselling. There will be an
    opportunity to
    think about the dynamics of the tutoring relationship and to consider
    factors
    which can make this effective or problematic.

    Postgraduate Study—The Impossible Profession?

    Tuesday 7 May 1996, 5.15–6.30 p.m. (Week 3, TT)

    Based on the issues which graduate students bring to the Counselling
    Service,
    this seminar will reflect some of the most common graduate problems,
    their
    psychological significance, and ways of addressing them.

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement


    Dealing with harassment

    The Advisory Panel provides short training courses for any university
    or
    college harassment adviser.

    Any advisers who have not already attended one of these training
    sessions
    will be contacted and offered several possible dates.

    These short sessions aim to equip you to fulfil your role as an
    adviser,
    confidently and effectively. Using case study examples, participants
    will be
    able to discuss the issues that arise out of dealing with real cases
    and
    explore any concerns they may have about their roles. There will also
    be an
    opportunity to find out about support available from the Advisory
    Panel and
    to
    discuss the aims and objectives of the University's policy for
    dealing with
    harassment.

    You will be sent a short questionnaire to complete before the
    session.
    This will help the presenters to ensure that the course is relevant
    to your
    needs.

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement



    Educational Technology Resources Centre
    (ETRC)

    The ETRC provides a central service for all members of the University
    covering
    most aspects of audio-visual activity. In particular it operates a
    loan/hire
    service for a wide range of equipment and provides a `do-it-
    yourself' video
    editing facility to simplify the use of video-recordings in lectures.

    The ETRC also provides professional video production facilities
    including
    advice and assistance in the preparation of scripts and expertise in
    the development of computer-based multimedia material. Other services
    include videotape duplication, including conversion between PAL and
    NTSC if required, audiotape duplication, audio-visual support for
    conferences, and consultancy to both both individuals and departments
    regarding the selection and use of audio-visual facilities.

    Workshops run by the ETRC

    The ETRC runs a number of workshops during term time, each of which
    is
    devoted
    to a single topic such as:

    • basic audio recording techniques;
    • editing video material recorded `off-air' for use in lectures
      and/or
      tutorials;
    • an introduction to using a camcorder.

    The workshops are open to all members of the University and are
    free
    of
    charge. It is recommended that those wishing to attend reserve a
    place in
    advance, as numbers are very strictly limited. Full details of each
    term's
    workshops, some of which are run more than once each term, are
    printed in
    the
    Gazette, and are also provided in the ETRC's World Wide
    Web pages (http://etrc.ox.ac.uk), from where it is also possible to
    book places directly.

    Further information about any of these services can be obtained
    from the
    ETRC at 37 Wellington Square (phone (2)70526, e-mail:
    ETRC@etrc.ox.ac.uk).

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement



    Language Centre

    The centre specialises in helping people to speak and understand a
    language
    rather than in written communication.

    Classes

    During full term there are classes in French, German, Modern Greek,
    Italian,
    Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, and English as a Foreign Language. The
    courses
    run for the full academic year, increasing in level of difficulty
    each term.

    As the courses are very popular, priority is given to students
    and those
    needing language skills for their research. Unfortunately, courses
    are
    normally fully booked by these groups, but places may become
    available later
    on in the year for anyone who already has some knowledge of the
    language. Please contact the Information Officer on (2)83360 for
    further information.

    Weekend/summer courses

    Weekend courses are arranged from time to time in Oxford, usually in
    Trinity
    Term. These courses are open to the general public, and a fee is
    charged for
    them.

    Two one-week summer courses in French are held in France, for
    which
    a fee
    is also charged.

    Library and language laboratory

    The library has a large collection of audio- and video-cassettes and
    books in
    over ninety languages. There are semi-private rooms with listening
    and
    viewing
    facilities for individual study.

    New users must register, and all users will be shown how to use
    the
    materials and equipment. The librarian can give you advice on what
    material
    may be most suitable for you.

    This facility is free of charge to university members and staff.
    The
    opening hours are given below.

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement


    MICHAELMAS TERM AND HILARY TERM

    First week to eighth week
    • Monday, Thursday, Friday: 9.30 a.m.–6.30 p.m.
    • Tuesday, Wednesday: 9.30 a.m.–9 p.m.
    • Saturday: 10 a.m.–1 p.m.
    Noughth week and ninth week
    • Monday, Thursday, Friday: 9.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m.
    • Tuesday, Wednesday: 9.30 a.m.–9 p.m.

    TRINITY TERM

    First week to eighth week
    • Monday–Friday: 9.30 a.m.–6.30 p.m.
    Noughth week and ninth week
    • Monday–Friday: 9.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m.

    VACATION

    • Monday–Friday: 9.30 a.m.–1 p.m. and 2–5.30
      p.m.

    For more details, telephone 12 Woodstock Road on (2)83360, e-mail
    on admin@lang.ox.ac.uk, or see the WWW pages for information on
    http://info.ox.ac.uk/departments/langcentre.

    .

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement



    Safety Office

    First aid courses

    All departments are encouraged to arrange for their staff to receive
    training
    in emergency first aid.

    The Safety Office can arrange for your staff to attend courses
    run by the Oxford University First Aid Unit,
    at a cost of £7 per person. The course lasts between two and
    three hours, depending on the number of people attending (between
    three and twelve people per session), and are held either in the
    morning or the afternoon. Each participant
    receives
    a certificate of attendance and a first aid reference book.

    Use of fire-fighting equipment

    The University has a legal duty to provide employees with information
    and
    training in the use of fire-fighting equipment. To encourage this the
    Health
    and Safety Committee have approved short training courses run by the
    Oxfordshire Fire Service.

    These courses last two hours and are run either in the morning
    or the
    afternoon, weekdays or Saturdays. They are held in Horspath, Oxford,
    at a cost of œ17.05 plus VAT per person.

    The course involves a classroom introduction to general fire
    precautions
    and the safe use of fire extinguishers. There will also be a
    practical
    exercise using fire fighting equipment.

    Alternatively there is a short two hour course run by John
    Hewitt of the
    Safety Office on the use of fire extinguishers. This involves a short
    talk and
    a film followed by a demonstration and practice. There is no charge
    for these
    courses and they are normally held at or near your department.

    If your department would like to book anyone onto these courses
    please
    contact the Safety Office (telephone: (2)70881).

    Videos

    The Safety Office has a range of videos on health and safety issues.

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement



    Undergraduate admissions

    Selection Interviewing

    Wednesday, 27 September 1995, 9.30 a.m.–5 p.m. (Vacation)
    Thursday, 28 September 1995, 9.30 a.m.–5 p.m.
    (Vacation)

    This one-day session aims to provide a forum for the exploration of
    effective
    selection interviewing in respect of undergraduate admissions.
    Information
    will be available on schools' perceptions of the Oxford admissions
    system and
    on the requirements of equal opportunities legislation. The main
    focus of the
    day will be an outline of effective interviewing techniques coupled
    with
    opportunities to prepare for and practise mock interviews, using
    volunteer
    candidates, and to experiment with the suggested techniques.

    Further details may be obtained from the Oxford Colleges
    Admissions
    Office, Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70207).

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement



    SEMINARS ORGANISED BY THE STAFF COMMITTEE

    These courses are organised for academic-related and non-academic
    staff who
    are on the university payroll.

    Academic staff are welcome to attend if there are places
    available after
    the needs of academic-related and non-academic staff have been met.
    As with
    ASDC seminars a provisional booking system will operate.

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement


    CALENDAR


    Michaelmas Term 1995

    October

    Tue. 10, p.m.      Manual Handling 
    Wed. 18, a.m.      History and Structure of the University 
    Thur. 19, a.m.     Assertiveness (Clerical/Library/Secretarial) 
    Tue. 24, p.m.      Guided Tour of the Bodleian 
    Wed. 25, all day   Introduction to Supervisory Management
    
    November 

    Wed. 1, a.m. Personnel Issues and Health and Safety Tue. 7, a.m. and Tue. 21, a.m. Stress Reduction Programme (Academic-related) Wed. 8, a.m. Appraisal Briefing (Clerical/Library/Secretarial) Mon. 13, all day Rapid Reading (Academic and Research) Thur. 16, a.m. Skills for Appraisees (Clerical/Library/Secretarial) Tue. 28, all day Writing Research Papers

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement


    December

    Thur. 7, a.m. Skills for Appraisees (Clerical/Library/Secretarial) Mon. 11, all day Minutes and Agendas Thur. 14, all day Skills for Appraisers (Clerical/Library/Secretarial)

    Return to List of Contents of the supplement



    Hilary Term 1996

    
    
    
    
    
    January 

    Tue. 16, a.m.      History and Structure of the University 
    Wed. 17, a.m. and 
    Wed. 24, a.m.      Counselling Skills 
    Thur. 18, a.m.     Appraisal Briefing (Technical) 
    Tue. 30, all day   Writing Research Papers (Research and Academic    
    
                        Staff)
    Tue. 30, p.m.      Guided Tour of the Bodleian
    
    
    

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    February

    Fri. 2, a.m. General Time Management Skills Mon. 5, all day Dealing with People Wed. 7, a.m. Personnel Issues and Health and Safety Thur. 8, all day Skills for Appraisers (Technical) Fri. 9, a.m. and Mon. 12, a.m. Presentation Skills (Research) Wed. 14, a.m. Health Surveillance Thur. 15, a.m. Assertiveness (Technical) Fri. 16, all day Time Management for Clerical and Secretarial Staff Tue. 20, all day Influencing People Thur. 22, a.m. Effective Communication Wed. 28, a.m. Appraisal Briefing (Clerical/Library/Secretarial) Thur. 29, all day Career Review and Planning—for Research Staff

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    March

    Wed. 6, a.m. Dictation Techniques Thur. 7, a.m. Skills for Appraisees (Clerical/Library/Secretarial) Mon. 11, a.m. Manual Handling Wed. 13, a.m. Introduction to Discipline Tue. 19, all day Skills for Appraisers (Clerical/Library/Secretarial) Thur. 21, a.m. Proof Reading Tue. 26, p.m. Travel Safely on Business Thur. 28, a.m. Skills for Appraisees (Technical)

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    Trinity Term and Long Vacation 1996

    April 

    Mon. 22, all day and Mon. 29, all day Managing Teams

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    May

    Wed. 1, a.m. History and Structure of the University Tue. 7, p.m. Guided Tour of the Bodleian Wed. 8, all day Discipline at Work Thur. 9, all day Rapid Reading Thur. 9, a.m. Appraisal Briefing (Clerical/Library/Secretarial) Tue. 14, p.m. Skills for Appraisees (Clerical/Library/Secretarial) Wed. 15, a.m. Personnel Issues and Health and Safety Wed. 29, all day Patents Thur. 30, a.m. Skills for Appraisees (Academic-related)

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    June

    Wed. 5, a.m. Assertiveness (Academic-related) Tue. 11, a.m. and Tue. 25, a.m. Stress Reduction Programme Tue. 11, a.m. Skills for Appraisees (Clerical/Library/Secretarial) Wed. 12, a.m. Time Management for Academic and Research Staff Fri. 14, a.m. Effective Communication Tue. 25, all day Skills for Appraisers (Clerical/Library/Secretarial) Wed. 26, a.m. Skills for Appraisers (Academic-related) Thur. 27, all day and Fri. 28, a.m. Recruitment and Selection—for Acacademic-Related and Non-Academic Posts July

    Wed. 3, a.m. Recruitment and Selection Follow-up—for Academic-related and Non-Academic Posts Wed. 3, all day Minutes and Agendas Fri. 5, a.m. and Mon. 8, a.m. Presentation Skills Mon. 15, a.m. Presentation Skills: Video Practice Mon. 1, p.m., and Team building Wed 3, a.m.

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