Report of Working Parties on University Sites - (1) to No 4448



<br /> Oxford University Gazette: Report of Working Party on Sites<br /> (supplement)

Oxford University Gazette

Report of Working Party on University Sites

Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4448

Wednesday, 8 October 1997



Contents of the supplement:

Note. Annexes C, D, and E are not reproduced here.

To Gazette No. 4449 (9
October 1997)

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The following report has been sent for comment to colleges, faculty
boards, and other bodies of the University. Members of Congregation, who wish
to make individual comments, should send these to the Surveyor to the
University before the end of Michaelmas Term. All comments received will be
considered by the Buildings Committee which will then report to Council.


Executive Summary

This report considers the University's needs for space over the next twenty to
twenty-five years and makes recommendations for the acquistion of sites for
expected developments and to constitute a land bank for future expansion. The
report goes on to consider a broad strategy, capable of modification as
circumstances change, for the allocation of sites to faculties and
departments. The recommendations are summarised at Annexe A to this report and
the estimated costs of implementing the main recommendations are shown in
Annexe E [not reproduced here].

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1 Introduction

(i) At its meeting on 5 May 1995, Council approved the establishment of a
working party with the following terms of reference:

`To review the requirements for, and availability of, sites for development by
the University, and to propose, with the assistance of professional
consultants as appropriate, an outline development plan for the next 20 years,
having regard to:

(a) in particular, but not exclusively, the Radcliffe Infirmary
site, and to such sites within the University's estate as may be freed by the
relocation of activities to that site or elsewhere by the achievement by parts
or all of the three-site strategy, and

(b) the needs for space and facilities, and opportunities for
rationalisation, across the University as a whole;

and to advise on the financial implications of its proposals and of
alternative options.'

The membership of the Working Party was:

Vice-Chancellor-elect (Master of Balliol) (Chairman)

Mr A B Atkinson (Warden of Nuffield)

Professor R J Cashmore (Balliol)

Professor C M Perrins (Chairman of the Buildings Committee)

Dr P A Slack (Chairman of the General Board and, from October 1996, Principal
of Linacre)

[Dr L G Black was co-opted onto the Working Party in October 1996 as the new
Chairman of the General Board]

Secretary: Surveyor to the University

In attendance: Registrar

(ii) The full Working Party met 21 times between 25 July 1995 and 1 July
1997. It received written and oral evidence as listed in Annexe B. It has not
called for assistance from professional consultants beyond the advice
available from a number of services inside the University.

(iii) This final report has been delayed by continuing uncertainties about
the timetable and procedures for vacating and selling the Radcliffe Infirmary
site and also by the need to identify a site for the Business School. Council
referred the latter question to the Working Party which undertook a further
review of available sites and recommended that the site now occupied by the
Railway Station car park be purchased and allocated for this purpose. As for
the former uncertainty, it has not yet been resolved at the time of this
report's presentation.

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2 Future Requirements for Space

(i) The Working Party has been unable to identify a strategic plan for the
University's academic activities over the next 20 years upon which it might
base a projection of requirements for space. It has therefore sought guidance
in other sources.

(ii) The University's strategic four-year forecast in its 1995--6 return to
HEFCE assumed that student numbers would continue to grow at about 1 per cent
per annum with most of that increase being in postgraduate students. Apart
from Management Studies, no academic area was singled out for growth in
student numbers and it has therefore to be assumed to be an across-the-board
increase. Any assumption about the longer period of 20 years in this domain is
necessarily insecure. However, in light of the doubling of numbers in Higher
Education in Britain since 1990, the Working Party considers that it is
reasonable to assume a continuing trend to growth in student numbers in
Oxford, though the distribution between undergraduates and postgraduates and
between subject areas cannot be predicted. As a working assumption, the
projection of a modest 1 per cent per annum growth in total student numbers
amounts over 20 years to 22 per cent or over 3,000 students. Such a growth
must mean a significant requirement for expansion in teaching and laboratory
space, libraries, administration and other central facilities. It will also
mean a requirement for increased residential accommodation. The Working Party
considers that its terms of reference do not extend to examining whether this
growth should be met by the expansion of existing Colleges or whether other
forms of accommodation and affiliation could be used. This is a question which
the University should address separately and directly.

(iii) In order to try to identify future functional space needs in terms
of both research activity and increased students numbers, the Working Party
invited all faculties, departments and other academic units of the University
to predict their space needs for the next 20 years. They were asked to pay
particular attention to the 1 per cent growth scenario and whether increases
in these needs could be met on the sites they presently occupied or expected
to occupy under plans already approved, such as the three-site strategy. A
summary of the responses is attached at Annexe C to this report [not
reproduced here]. The Working Party was conscious that the colleges make a
significant contribution to the provision of the space required by the
academic business of the University. However, it has felt that the colleges'
experience in the provision of space could be most effectively consulted by
the University as part of the reflection on the recommendations of this
report.

(iv) The Working Party felt that the estimates in these responses tended to
be somewhat conservative, especially in science departments. It speculated
that the year 1995--6 might have coincided with a moment of anxiety and
perplexity about the future in a context of major funding cuts and depressive
public rhetoric. Certainly, responses from the sciences contrasted with the
perceptions of a Steering Group on the Radcliffe Infirmary Site in 1989--90
(which did not publish a report). Similarly, the responses contrast with the
substantial flow of projects in response to an enquiry by the Planning and
Resources Sub-committee in 1996--7.

(v) It is difficult to predict growth in research activity and no such
forecast appears in the University's return to HEFCE. However, it is clear
that there has been and continues to be a rapid expansion in the volume of
research across the whole University. The Working Party believes that Oxford's
success in the recent Research Assessment Exercise and in the size of research
funding from different sources indicate that this trend will continue.
National policies on the concentration of funding may well accelerate that
trend together with its accompanying increase in numbers from postgraduates
through to contract research staff. Continuing expansion of sponsored research
will generate new research groups, especially though not exclusively in
science disciplines. There are clear implications in terms of increased space
requirements.

(vi) The Working Party believes that the recent past may also shed light on
future space needs. Over the last 20 years, the University has expanded its
functional space by 14 per cent and has approved plans for a further 10 per
cent increase in the next 3 years. Student numbers have increased by 29 per
cent. Established academic staff have increased only by 4 per cent but
non-established staff by 340 per cent. A direct projection forward is not of
course reliable but the orders of magnitude are instructive. The growth in the
number of students expected to attend the Department of Continuing Education
is forecast to rise by 30 per cent to 20,000 per year within 15 years. The
floor area of science departments has been increasing at an average of over 1
per cent per year (16 per cent in the ten years 1985--95) and the rate shows
no sign of slackening. At the present rate of growth, a further
50,000m2 nett (70,000m2 gross) of floor space (30 per
cent increase) would be needed for science in the next 20 years.

(vii) From the responses to its enquiries, its own observations and
discussions with selected Chairmen of Faculty Boards and Heads of Department,
the Working Party has concluded that, irrespective of projected future
requirements, the current provision of space is decreasingly able to satisfy
current needs in a number of areas. Pressure on space is a fact of life in any
busy university. However, at some points the shortage has reached critical
proportions, especially though not exclusively in the Arts. By way of
illustration here, the Working Party notes the serious underprovision for
Modern History and Classics. The failure of two small units (Humanities
Research Institute and the Brazilian Studies Centre) to find accommodation in
University space in 1996--7 is symptomatic of the level of the shortage. The
Working Party is also alarmed that the report of the Working Party on the
Ashmolean Site recognizes that not one of the units on that site will have
adequate space. As for the Science Area, apart from a few pockets of
developable land reserved for the Biosciences, the Working Party notes that
this area is close to saturation. The Headington Site appears to contain
sufficient expansion space for predicted needs in medical science. These
matters are discussed further below.

(viii) The Working Party reviewed the current allocations and use of space.
It noted that there was no mechanism within the University for examining
whether space was used in the most efficient manner, as space was allocated on
a block basis to Departments and Faculties to control and to manage. The
Working Party noted that, when judged by the HEFCE-recommended space
standards, the University in general appeared not to use efficiently the space
used for teaching and that there might therefore be some space available for
reallocation. The Working Party considers that the University ought to address
whether the usage of teaching space during term-time and vacation could be
improved. Any space released would, however, be in the form of small pockets
in different buildings and would not assist in strategic planning. The Working
Party considers therefore that reallocation, rationalisation or more intensive
use of existing space offer no solution to the general space requirements of
the University.

(ix) Therefore, the Working Party concludes that the University's future
development over the next twenty years and beyond requires the acquisition of
substantial additional space. The unbuilt or unused space available within the
central perimeter of the University is insufficient to meet predictable
expansion as well as the assumed developments which are as yet unforeseen but
can be expected in a dynamic university. The failure to acquire additional
space would be a failure to invest in the future and would be seriously
detrimental to innovation and vitality in the University.

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3 Basic Considerations for a Site Strategy

(i) The terms of reference for the Working Party assume the acquisition of
the Radcliffe Infirmary site. The site is approximately 10 acres and currently
provides 48,000m2 gross floor area. The strategic value of this
large central site to the University's future is self-evident. As noted in the
Introduction, the future of this site remains uncertain at the time of this
report. Therefore, the Working Party recommends


(One) that the University continues to accord the highest priority to
the acquisition of the whole Radcliffe Infirmary site.

(ii) Nonetheless, the Working Party does not believe that the acquisition
of this site will necessarily absorb all the unforeseen developments that can
be expected in a growing and vigorous university. Furthermore, it believes
that the University should act positively to preserve its development options
for the medium and longer term future by acquiring over time a strategic
landbank. These options will become immediately important if it proves
impossible to acquire the whole or even any part at all of the Radcliffe
Infirmary site. Therefore, the Working Party recommends


(Two) that the University seeks actively to constitute over time a
landbank of strategic sites for its future expansion.

(iii) The importance of the Radcliffe Infirmary site emphasizes also the
significance for the University of the land between the Woodstock Road and the
Banbury Road enclosed on either side by the Infirmary and the Keble Road
Triangle. The Working Party believes that the University ought to extend its
holding in this area in order to achieve a continuous sweep of property from
the Science Area to the Walton Street end of the Infirmary site. It therefore
recommends


(Three) that the University should seek to acquire sites between the
Radcliffe Infirmary site and the Science Area.

(iv) The Working Party understands that the continuing growth of the Oxford
University Press is causing a shortage of space in its Walton Street
buildings. If the Press should eventually decide to move to a larger site
outside the city, these buildings would offer a substantial net addition of
space whether for departmental/faculty use or for accommodation (possibly, a
new college). [Note: it should be noted that the Press has no current
plans to move from Walton Street.]

(v) The ability of the University to expand beyond its current perimeter in
a continuous or at least closely planted way is severely constrained by
planning and other considerations. The protection of residential areas
inhibits expansion north and south, except for a few isolated sites. Expansion
eastward not only meets similar difficulties but also encounters the Oxford
Brookes University campus and its legitimate claim to expansion sites. Beyond
that, it appears possible to satisfy future expansion requirements of the
University's biomedical units in the Headington area provided that the
National Health Service continues to hold the land currently earmarked for
health care use (see below, section 11) and makes part of it available for
University use. The Working Party recommends


(Four) that in the event that the National Health Service disposes of
its surplus land in Headington, the University should seek to acquire part for
the expansion of medical research.

(vi) It is clear, however, that the natural direction for expansion open to
the University is towards the west, specifically from the perimeter
constituted by Worcester, Nuffield and the Castle towards the railway station
and tracks, and beyond. There are few good-quality buildings and few
well-rooted businesses here, at least between the city and the station. In an
interim report accepted by Council 3 February 1997, the Working Party
recommended the purchase of three significant sites in this area either known
or expected to be on the market. Furthermore, the Accommodation Committee has
constructed student accommodation at Rewley Abbey by the station and wishes to
increase its holdings in this general area. In addition, the University has
recently completed the acquisition of one unit on the Osney Mead Industrial
Estate. The Working Party believes that the University should continue
actively to make strategic purchases in West Oxford and to collaborate with
colleges which own property there in the elaboration of a plan for the use of
space. Accordingly, it recommends


(Five) that the University proceeds actively to acquire sites to the
west of the present perimeter towards the railway station and beyond, in
collaboration with colleges owning property in this area.

(vii) The option of moving the whole Science Area to a remote location did
not commend itself to the Working Party. Quite apart from the costs involved,
it believes that such a choice would eventually result in a substantial and
unwelcome modification of the University through a separation of Arts and
Sciences. Similarly, the option of separating research and teaching functions
on this basis appeared to the Working Party to be both unworkable in practice
and to lead the University in a direction that would modify the character of
the University in an unwelcome direction. The Working Party believes,
therefore, that the acquisition of a remote site for the whole of science
should only be actively pursued if it proves impossible to acquire the
Radcliffe Infirmary site and if other estate strategies within the city are
insufficient.

The Working Party has also considered whether the University should seek to
establish a large greenfield site with the specific purpose of relocating a
significant part of science. In this context, it met the Vice-Chancellor of
Cambridge University and discussed the Cambridge West Site strategy. However,
it does not believe that the Cambridge situation is properly comparable to the
Oxford one in terms either of the geographical relationship of the West Site
to the present centres of university activity or of the existing ownership of
appropriately sited blocks of land. The Working Party concluded that such a
site was only to be found outside the Ring Road (for example adjacent to the
Magdalen Science Park) or else further away (for example, in association with
the existing science activities at Culham). It discussed these options with a
number of heads of science departments, who advised that sites outside the
Ring Road were too remote from the present Science Area for successful
collaboration. It would however be a prudent policy to acquire one or more
major sites in North or West Oxford as an insurance against the Radcliffe
Infirmary site not becoming available. The Working Party therefore
recommends


(Six) that the University should examine the possibility of acquiring
development sites in North or West Oxford and retain them until the Radcliffe
Infirmary site is secured.

It is clearly the case that if more space is not found for the science
disciplines, they will be unable to grow properly. This does require the
location of some science units on a site or sites not contiguous to the
present Science Area. Nonetheless, the Working Party believes that a remote
second site would be more detrimental than beneficial to the development of
Oxford science. The idea of a second Science Area was addressed and rejected
by the Committee on Requirements and Sites in its report on the future
requirements of the science departments (1962). This was endorsed by the
Holford Report (1963). This Working Party believes that the science
disciplines are even more closely related now than they were then and that
there is increasing interpenetration or overlap between areas of disciplines
that were originally distinct. Most innovative research and disciplinary
development is now being done at the interface between traditionally defined
disciplines. The Working Party accepts that the separation of broad areas of
science (e.g. physical sciences and biological sciences, though the precise
character of the boundary between them is not everywhere easy to determine)
into two locations remote from each other would cut across the perceived
future of science research. It was suggested to the Working Party that the
University should provide sites for joint ventures with industry but the
Working Party feels that there is not enough space in Central Oxford for such
developments and that they would more appropriately be located on a Science or
Business Park.

(viii) In considering the strategic needs of the University, the Working
Party believes that there is a need to provide flexible, short-tenancy space
in which new initiatives in the Arts and Sciences (whether cross-disciplinary
groups, small institutes, new programmes or individual scholars on term
funding) may be given the opportunity to grow and prove themselves. It
believes that such provision would enhance the flexibility of the University
to accommodate new growth. It believes that there is considerable advantage in
locating space for this purpose very close to the major disciplinary resources
on which such initiatives depend considerably in their early stages. Proposals
in this sense are made in later sections of this report.

(ix) In making those recommendations of detail which involve moving
academic units, the Working Party has been aware that the cost of relocation
is not simply to be calculated in terms of money or even the time and effort
of individuals. It has been mindful that the local form of a discipline may be
to some extent defined by the spatial relationships in which it has developed
over time and that to relocate may be to bring that definition into question.
Equally, the Working Party is conscious of the strong attachment that some
departments, faculties and other units have to the space they currently
occupy. In making recommendations, the Working Party has sought to respect
these considerations as far as possible. In some cases, however, the general
balance of advantage favours a move which is, in reality, over a small
distance.

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4 Principal Specific Needs and Availability of Sites


4.1 Needs

On the basis of its enquiries and observations, the Working Party concluded
that the major needs for space could be summarised as:

(i) The expansion of the Science Area

As reported above, the Working Party felt that, on the evidence of historic
trend, science departments had rather under-evaluated their future space needs
over 20 years, especially in terms of the growth of interdisciplinary research
and teaching. At the same time, it noted that, apart from a few pockets of
developable land reserved for the Biosciences, the Science Area was close to
being full. Moreover, it is clear that the quality of space will need remedy
in some places. In particular, the Working Party notes that the case appears
to have been made for a large-scale rebuilding programme for Chemistry.
Finally, the Working Party notes the project to provide a new building for the
University Club near the Science Area would free the present site for
redevelopment.

As for the availability of space in the Science Area, there is a limited
amount of scope for minor extensions and infilling; but this can only increase
the sense of overcrowding. Expansion of the perimeter of the Science Area is
not an option for reasons of planning restrictions, conservation and, in the
case of the former Merton Playing Field, resolution of Congregation. The main
areas for potential development are:

(a) Central Car Park Buildings of about
12,000m2 gross floor area could be fitted onto this site.

(b) Halifax House Site About 10,000m2 of
floor space could be created in the site of Halifax House/8 South Parks Road
and in the gardens behind. Part of this was reserved for the Brain and
Behaviour project, but this allocation has now lapsed.

(c) Old Observatory Site A building of about
5,000m2 floor space could be fitted in between the Physiology and
Old Observatory buildings and this space is provisionally allocated for
Genetics. Further development on this site might be possible if planning
consent for the demolition of the Old Observatory could be obtained.

(d) Sir William Dunn School of Pathology Sites exist
along the boundary with the University Parks for a further
10,000m2 of new buildings.

(e) Keble Road Triangle A building of about
4,000m2 could be erected on the site of 44--6 Banbury Road and one
of about 5,000m2 on 12--15 Parks Road. Taking into account the
existing buildings, the net gain would be about 6,000m2. The
Working Party considers that users of the Science area already suffer from
lack of open space and from the buildings being too close to one another. It
reiterates its belief that further loss of open space through infilling rather
than redevelopment would be undesirable.

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(ii) Faculty centres for the Arts and Social Sciences

In 1991, Congregation approved Council's recommendation that increased
provision of space and other facilities was needed for teaching and research
in the Arts and Social Studies Faculties. The outcome of this recommendation
is the three-site strategy, which provides for faculty centres for Law, Social
Studies, Classics and Modern Languages, and on a temporary basis for English.
Construction is to begin on Phase 1 on the St Cross site in 1997 and on the
Ashmolean site in 1998.

No provision was made to improve facilities for Modern History, Philosophy
and Theology because of lack of space on the central site. The Working Party
considers that those needs, plus those of funding a permanent home for
English, should be given high priority in an estate strategy. The requirement
to replace Queen Elizabeth House before 2005 should also be included in this
category. Finally, the Working Party believes that the issue of overcrowding
on the Ashmolean Site must be addressed. It makes recommendations on these
matters later in the report.

No significant space for new building is available on the central site
beyond that which has been committed for the completion of the projects for
the Ashmolean and St Cross Sites and this report assumes that both
developments will be completed.

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(iii) Improvements to the facilities of the Bodleian Library

The Working Party noted the public criticism of these facilities and had
discussions with Bodley's Librarian as to how improvements might be made by
the provision of extra space. The option of following the Cambridge model and
relocating the whole of the Bodleian Library onto a single site was considered
unrealistic. Bodley's Librarian and the Chairman of the Libraries Board felt
that a continuation of the present policy of establishing satellite specialist
libraries such as the Bodleian Law Library and the proposed Social Studies
Library was the most practicable way of relieving pressure on Bodleian
facilities on the central site. Bodley's Librarian considered that the next
subject category to be moved off the central site should be the remainder of
the Oriental books, but the Working Party felt that there was also scope for
moving out the English, History and Theology books in the Radcliffe Camera to
be co-located with enlarged faculty libraries. Subsequent discussion with the
Director of University Library Services confirmed his predecessor's advice but
the Director expressed some uncertainty as to how much could be moved from the
holdings in the Radcliffe Camera in the light of the needs of researchers
working in the Bodleian reading rooms. The Working Party noted the
recommendations of the Libraries Board to establish a central preservation
service for all University libraries and to continue to develop out-of-town
storage.

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4.2 Availability

The available sites and buildings owned or leased by the University are listed
at Annexe D [not reproduced here]. However, except for those listed above in
the Science Area, the only significant site currently in the possession of the
University to become available according to forecasts is Ewert House,
Summertown. This provides about 5,500m2 gross of floor space and
has good parking facilities. It was purpose-designed for the printing and
handling of examination papers and is suited for book-related activities. The
Working Party considered it to be too isolated from the centre of the
University to be used by a single academic department or faculty, but highly
suited for administration, support and similar use. It is leased to Cambridge
Local Examinations Syndicate until 2000 and Council has agreed to extend this
lease until 2001 or at the latest 2002.

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5 Future use of the Radcliffe Infirmary Site

(i) The Radcliffe Infirmary site is the largest piece of land in central
Oxford likely to come on the market in the foreseeable future. For much of its
work, the Working Party has assumed (as it was invited to do by its terms of
reference) that this site will be acquired by the University. It regards its
allocation as the key to any estate strategy. On the basis of the information
available to it at the time of writing this report, the Working Party believes
that the University would not have possession of the site before 2002 at the
earliest.

(ii) The existing buildings on the site comprise both Grade 2 listed
buildings fronting the Woodstock Road and a miscellaneous collection of
buildings of different dates and quality between the listed buildings and
Walton St The site is 10 acres in area and currently provides
48,000m2 gross floor area.

(iii) Faculty Centres for the Arts

The listed buildings contain about 8,000m2 of floor space which
could be converted for office and teaching use but would be difficult to
convert to laboratories. Apart from the ground level, the floors are generally
not strong enough for libraries or heavy equipment. The Working Party
considered that, in the absence of sites elsewhere for faculty centres, part
of the Radcliffe Infirmary site should be earmarked for such use and that this
was an appropriate use for the listed buildings. The Working Party accepted
the advice of the Surveyor that two such centres could be accommodated
provided that the associated libraries were housed in a new extension behind
the listed building.

The Working Party considered that three faculties were the best candidates to
move to the Radcliffe Infirmary site: English, Modern Languages and Modern
History.

There is insufficient space in the planned St Cross development for English to
be given adequate facilities and the St Cross Working Party's recommendation
that the long-term centre for English should be elsewhere has already been
accepted. Therefore, this Working Party believes that the Faculty of English
and its Library should be one of the new faculty centres. The St Cross site
could then be reserved for Law and Social Studies, including the international
part of Social Studies now undertaken in Queen Elizabeth House.

The Working Party noted that projected occupancy of the Ashmolean Site
involved palpable overcrowding (and hence lack of opportunity for further
growth in each of the units there). It noted that the space requirements
reported to the Working Party by Modern Languages could not be met in the
Modern Languages Centre next to the Taylor Institution as current proposals
stand. Therefore, it seemed to the Working Party that Modern Languages would
benefit considerably from the relocation of its faculty centre and library to
more spacious accommodation alongside English. This in turn would free space
for reallocation in the Ashmolean Site. However, in discussion with the
Chairman of the Faculty Board, it was made clear to the Working Party that the
Board and the Curators of the Taylor Institution were strongly opposed to any
such move. In particular, it was made clear that the members of the Modern
Languages Faculty were deeply attached to the Taylorian as the original site
of their foundation. The Working Party acknowledges the strength of this
sentiment. More especially, it believes it to be essential to the raising of
the funds needed for the development of the Radcliffe Infirmary site that a
Faculty participating in such a move should give the proposal active support.
Under these circumstances, it did not therefore proceed further with the idea
to relocate Modern Languages and the Taylor Institution in this way.

As for the Faculty of Modern History, a discussion with the Chairman of the
Faculty Board indicated that the space needs of the Faculty were now so acute
that it would accept the penalties of being further from the books in the
central Bodleian site in order to have adequate space. Therefore, the Faculty
of Modern History should be relocated to the second faculty centre. It would
also be necessary to move the Faculty Library. Furthermore, from the
perspective of general space needs, it would also be highly desirable to move
the History and English books from the Upper and Lower Radcliffe Camera to the
faculty centres. The space released in the Camera would then be available to
improve Bodleian facilities.

The Working Party therefore recommends


(Seven) that the listed buildings on the Radcliffe Infirmary site be
converted to provide Faculty Centres for English and History with provision
for their Faculty Libraries in an adjacent new building.

The Working Party notes the wish of Hertford College to acquire the old
Indian Institute building. It is conscious that issues of University patrimony
and the intentions of original donors are involved here. However, it is not
opposed to this idea and, indeed, feels that the proceeds of the sale could
usefully be put towards the redevelopment costs of the Infirmary building.
Nonetheless, it recommends


(Eight) that the old Indian Institute be offered to the Bodleian
Library, which should be invited to put forward proposals for using the
building to improve library facilities and to release space in the New
Bodleian building in accordance with the proposals that the Working Party
makes for the central site (see Recommendations sixteen and
seventeen)

(iv) Science in the Radcliffe Infirmary Site

It seemed to the Working Party that the part of the Radcliffe Infirmary site
between Walton Street and the listed buildings contains few buildings worthy
of retention and that this area could best be developed for Science use. There
appear to be three possible ways of expanding the area available for Science:

(a) By allowing Departments to develop annexes and
inter-disciplinary institutes as and when the need arises and funding is
available. The advantages of such an approach are that it retains maximum
flexibility for the response to unpredicted development and that it allows
existing buildings to be reused for the medium term, thus reducing costs. The
disadvantage is that this would maintain or create a hotch-potch of buildings
similar to much of the present Science Area and lead to further fragmentation
of Departments between buildings at a time when cost pressures demand
rationalisation and avoidance of duplication. The Working Party recognises
that if funds cannot be raised for an integrated development of the site, this
may be the only option but it is not the preferred recommendation.

(b) By relocating a function from all Departments through the
creation on the Radcliffe Infirmary site of a centre for the teaching of all
Science undergraduates (on the model of some North American universities). The
Working Party sought the views of the Heads of Science Departments on this
proposal, irrespective of whether it would be sited on the Radcliffe Infirmary
site or in the Science Area. Although some Departments, notably those in the
Chemistry Sub-faculty, were supportive, the general response was negative.
Concerns were expressed about the loss of contact with students. The Working
Party noted that the space to be freed up in each Department by the removal of
teaching functions would be in the form of `puddles' rather than
`pools' of space, which would require costly conversion and
consequential rationalisation. More especially, it felt once again that broad
and active support would be a prerequisite for raising the very large sum of
money needed to provide a centre for the teaching of 4,000 students and,
without this support, it is unable to recommend this proposal whether for the
Infirmary site or for the Science Area.

(c) By relocating one or more whole Departments. The Working Party
considered that Engineering Science and Chemistry were possible candidates;
Engineering Science because it is dispersed over 13 buildings mainly on the
Keble Triangle site which has little capacity for further development, while
recent reviews of Chemistry have recommended that its buildings urgently need
rebuilding to bring them to modern standards. The Head of Engineering Science
saw advantages for the Department in a move to purpose-built accommodation
shared with the Department of Materials on the Radcliffe Infirmary site but
only if the University was able to make a firm commitment and provide the
resources to complete the move within a short period. In discussion with the
Chairman of the Interdepartmental Committee for Chemistry, it was agreed that
the Radcliffe Infirmary was close enough for successful interaction with other
areas of Science to continue and that moving to new buildings on this site
would help to create a departmental identity. However the need for modernising
its buildings was now so urgent that Chemistry wished instead to move ahead
with reprovision in the Science area starting with building of new
laboratories on the 2--4 South Parks Road car park site and the Working Party
accepts that acquisition of the Radcliffe Infirmary site is too uncertain and
too distant to be a solution to Chemistry's immediate problems.

The Working Party concludes that, though desirable, the relocation of one or
more whole Departments in a single move is not a realistic objective, given
the large capital cost. At the same time, it remains of the opinion that an
unplanned development of the site on a `first-come, first-served' basis would
not be in the University's long-term interests for the reasons already
advanced. It believes that this part of the Radcliffe Infirmary site should be
designated as the long-term expansion space for the Physical Sciences. In
particular, mindful of the expressed needs and perceived future of Engineering
Science and Materials, the Working Party envisages that, over the time period
covered by this report, these Departments should be provided with
purpose-built space on this site. To this end, the Working Party believes both
that new space for expansion of these Departments should be located henceforth
here and that future needs for major refurbishment or modernisation of their
existing buildings should instead be met by relocation here. This requires
from the beginning the adoption of an architectural design capable of
providing appropriate space in successive stages over time. Such space as will
be vacated by these Departments should become expansion space for Physical
Science Departments currently located further east in the Science Area.
Accordingly, the Working Party recommends


(Nine) that the Walton Street side of the Radcliffe Infirmary be
designated as expansion space for Physical Sciences and more particularly for
the long-term expansion and reprovision of Engineering and Materials.

As stated earlier in this report, the Working Party believes that there is
a need for short-term, flexible space to house new developments in Science.
Some of the buildings on the Radcliffe Infirmary site are worth retaining, for
example the Gibson and Harkness buildings which were purpose-built in the
1970s for biomedical research. In the short and medium term, the Working Party
sees the existing buildings as offering this sort of space for initiatives in
Physical Science. Therefore, it recommends


(Ten) that existing buildings on the Walton Street side of the
Radcliffe Infirmary site be allocated as flexible short-tenancy space for the
Physical Sciences, as far as is compatible with recommendation Nine.

Furthermore, the Working Party also perceives an equal need for such space
for new developments in the Biological Sciences. In the medium term, it
expects that need to be met in the central and eastern parts of the Science
Area either in space vacated through reprovisioning Chemistry or in new
builds. However, there is clearly a short-term need that should be met on the
Radcliffe Infirmary site, where the requirements of Physical Science will not
immediately occupy all the available existing space. Accordingly, the Working
Party recommends


(Eleven) that in the short term a share of the existing buildings on
the Walton Street side of the Radcliffe Infirmary site be allocated as
flexible, short-tenancy space for the Biological Sciences.

(v) Other uses of the Radcliffe Infirmary Site

The Working Party also had discussions with the Heads of the colleges
adjoining the Radcliffe Infirmary site (Green and Somerville Colleges) and the
President of Kellogg College.

The aspirations of Kellogg College are closely linked to those of the
Department of Continuing Education and together would have needed the
allocation of the whole of the listed building complex. The Working Party
feels that the needs of Continuing Education/Kellogg College cannot be met on
this site, but it makes recommendations elsewhere in this report.

Somerville College wishes to acquire a small strip of land to improve access
to the buildings on its northern boundary. The Working Party considers that
this improvement in access can be provided through the University's site
without transfer of land but recognises the College's desire to get the main
boiler house moved from alongside its northern boundary.

Green College wishes to expand onto the Radcliffe Infirmary site in order to
improve its facilities. The Working Party believes that the quadrangle
incorporating the nurses accommodation and the chapel does not lend itself to
functional use and might be sold to the College, subject to confirmation that
the space is not required for the faculty centres. The main access to the site
off the Woodstock Road passes between the existing curtilage of Green College
and this area of the Infirmary site. The Working Party
recommends


(Twelve) that the Nurses Home quadrangle of the Radcliffe Infirmary be
sold to Green College if not needed for University use but that it should be
made a condition of acquisition that the access to Woodstock Road should
remain open.

The Oxford University Press submitted a proposal to expand across the road
from its main site by constructing an office block of about
3,000m2 to house around 200 staff. The Press anticipated that this
would meet its needs for space for 10--15 years , after which it would be have
to move outside central Oxford. The Working Party does not foresee an
immediate requirement for the University to develop the south-west corner of
the Radcliffe Infirmary site (the present Ophthalmology Laboratory and Eye
Hospital) and recommends


(Thirteen) if at the time of acquisition the Press has a need for
extra space, it be allowed to develop the south west corner of the Radcliffe
Infirmary site on the understanding that it is for a limited period, after
which the building would revert to the University.

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6 Future of the Central Site

(i) The creation of free space on the central site can only be achieved by
moving out those activities which do not need to be there. The Working Party
identifies these as being the conservation, acquisitions and cataloguing
sections of the Bodleian Library. Bodley's Librarian (and subsequently the
Director of Library Services) also believes that there is scope for relocating
some of its special collections.

Furthermore, the proposed move of the History Faculty and Library will release
the old Indian Institute building. As stated in the previous section, it is
recommended that the Bodleian Library be invited to put forward proposals for
the use of the old Indian Institute.

The Working Party recognizes the difficulties in dividing books between
research and undergraduate libraries. It is also conscious of important issues
of reader convenience. Nonetheless, it believes that as much as possible of
the Camera should be emptied in favour of faculty libraries in order to
provide new space for the Bodleian Library. It is clear that the growth of
book stock and greater intensity of use will increase the need for more book
storage as close as possible to central Oxford. The Working Party
recommends


(Fourteen) that the University should actively consider its long term
policy for book storage and examine where any new storage should be
sited.

Return to List of Contents of the supplement


(ii) Old Bodleian Library

The Working Party notes that the Library has drawn up plans to improve
facilities for visitors. However, it does not believe that this or the use of
space in the Old Library have any consequences that fall within its remit.

(iii) New Bodleian Library

The bulk of the activities which could be moved from central Oxford are in the
offices grouped around the main book stack in the New Library. The Working
Party has already stated its view that Ewert House would provide suitable
accommodation for such facilities which could include a central conservation
facility for all libraries (and possibly museums), for acquisitions and
cataloguing (with the expectation that these should also be run on a
centralised basis) and for other library services, including the Libraries
Automation Service temporarily housed in 65 St Giles. There would also be
space for certain collections which researchers can use with prior booking.
The Working Party recommends


(Fifteen) that the Director of Library Services be invited to come
forward with proposals for using Ewert Place to improve library services and
to release space in the New Bodleian building for other uses by the relocation
of library support facilities.

The Working Party believes that the space freed in the New Bodleian
Building by moving elements of the Bodleian Library to Ewert House should be
used to create a centre for research in the Humanities. This would have a
double function. On the one hand, it would provide space for researchers and
research groups on a short-term basis, thus offering a base in which new
initiatives could begin. On the other hand, some reading rooms could be turned
to providing desks or carrels bookable on, for example, a daily basis for
members of the English and History Faculties needing a desk close to the
Bodleian Library. This could help to reduce pressure on the reading rooms in
the Old Bodleian. The Working Party recognizes that the management and funding
of such a facility requires consideration by the General Board. It also
recognizes that there are significant issues of security and fire precautions
to be addressed. However, it believes that there are great gains in terms of
the flexible short-tenancy space for small groups and new enterprises that is
so lacking in the Humanities area in the University and therefore
recommends


(Sixteen) that a Centre be created in the New Bodleian Library
building to provide short term accommodation for new developments in the
Humanities.

The Bodleian Library occupies most of the Clarendon Building and, as this
building is in the centre of the Bodleian Library central site group, the
Working Party considers that it should remain predominantly for library use.
Accordingly it recommends


(Seventeen) that the Clarendon Building, less the Delegates Room and
other rooms required for ceremonial use, be allocated to the Libraries
Committee.

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(iv) Old Boys' High School building (Social Studies Faculty Centre)

The Faculty Centre and Library is to move onto the St Cross site in Phase 2 of
the St Cross site development. The Old Boys' High School building is well
suited as a medium-sized faculty centre and as Philosophy has outgrown 10
Merton Street, the Working Party recommends


(Eighteen) that the Old Boys' High School building be used to house
the Philosophy Centre and Library.

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(v) 10 Merton Street (Philosophy Centre)

The Working Party notes that University College has expressed a wish to
acquire this site. It does not think that such a sale is possible unless and
until site acquisition in the western area offers alternative accommodation.

10 Merton Street is well-equipped to be a small faculty
centre and library. The Working Party recognises the convenience of having the
Theology Faculty near the theological institutions in St Giles', but sees no
other sensible way of providing the Faculty with additional space in its
present location. It recommends


(Nineteen) that 10 Merton Street be allocated to Theology as a Faculty
Centre and Library.

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7 Future uses of the Ashmolean/Taylorian site and
Wellington Square/St Giles' area

(i) The future use of the Mathematical Institute building is considered in
the next section because of its proximity to the Keble Road Triangle and
Science Area. Queen Elizabeth House is to be handed back to St John's in 2005
and the accommodation for International Studies is considered later.

(ii) Ashmolean/Taylorian site

Mention has already been made that the Working Party considers that, if the
recommendations of the Three-Site Strategy report are carried out, the site
will not be able to provide for the long-term space needs of all the
occupants. In the absence of support from the Modern Languages Faculty for a
move away from the present Taylor Institution building, the Working Party
considers that Modern Languages should remain in the Taylor Institution and in
the Taylorian Annexe in Wellington Square and not move to the proposed Modern
Languages Centre behind 65--7 St Giles' which in any case could not
accommodate the Faculty's present needs for space. This would allow the
proposed Classics Faculty Centre additional space on the site and provide for
some expansion of Archaeology and further development of the Ashmolean Museum.
The Working Party recommends


(Twenty) that the present plan for the development of the
Ashmolean/Taylorian north site should be amended in the light of the
recommendations in this paper.

The Working Party notes that History of Art is looking to the proposed
Visual Studies Centre to provide additional teaching and research space, some
of which is currently being provided on a temporary basis at 59 George Street.
The Department is also anxious to maintain a foothold near to the Ashmolean
Museum and Sackler Library. If the Visual Studies Centre project is not
realised, then the Working Party recommends


(Twenty-one) that the Department of the History of Art be moved to 43
St Giles and that History of Art's present space in Beaumont Street be
allocated to Archaeology.

(iii) Continuing Education

The Working Party believes that the demand for continuing education will grow
much faster than that for the rest of the University and that, however the
University chooses to respond to this, there is little prospect of being able
to meet the demand by providing sufficient space on the Wellington Square
site. The Working Party also believes that other factors should influence the
location of Continuing Education's future development. The nature of its
outreach activity and the profile of many of its students require a site with
easy access for outside Oxford and close to public car parks. A site close to
Oxford railway station would meet these requirements and yet be within easy
reach of other University departments. The Working Party
recommends


(Twenty-two) that the University seeks to purchase a suitable site in
West Oxford and develop it for Continuing Education.

(iv) Wellington Square and Dartington House

The Working Party has already concluded that there would be insufficient space
for Modern Languages on the Ashmolean site and notes that the Faculty wishes
to remain close to the Taylor Institution and its library. Additional space
could be provided in Wellington Square from that to be released by the moves
of Continuing Education (see (iii above) and Applied Social Studies. The
Working Party therefore recommends


(Twenty-three) that Modern Languages remains in Wellington Square in
the present Taylorian Annexe and that additional space is provided in
Wellington Square from that to be released by the move of Continuing Education
and by the planned move of Applied Social Studies to the St Cross
site.

The Working Party recognises that the University offices in Wellington
Square are presently over-crowded. It recognises also that the Central
Administration may increase with the demands made upon it, though it notes the
future organisation of the University now under debate may require less of the
administrative activity to be centrally housed in Wellington Square. The
Administration is currently allocated 4850m2 nett in the
Wellington Square area and 600m2 nett of leased space in Oxenford
House for the Development Office. As the Administration already has some space
in Dartington House and there is a link through to the University Offices, the
Working Party recommends


(Twenty-four) that, when Mathematics and International Development
move from Dartington House, the remainder of this building should be allocated
to Central Administration in order to bring the Development Office in to join
the remainder of the Administration.

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8 School of Management Studies

In an interim report the Working Party has recommended


(Twenty-five) the Station Forecourt site be purchased and allocated
for the development of a building for Management Studies.


9 Future use of the Keble Road Triangle and Science
Area (including the Mathematical Institute)

In discussing the future use of the Radcliffe Infirmary site, the Working
Party considered that there were three options for relieving pressure on space
in the Science Area. As previously stated, the Working Party initially
considered that the relocation of the Chemistry Sub-faculty might offer the
most effective way of providing more space for science but now recognises that
the uncertainty and timescale of acquiring the site will force the University
to meet the urgent needs of Chemistry by a redevelopment of the existing
buildings with new laboratories being constructed on the car park at 2--4
South Parks Road. The extent of the rebuilding and the feasibility of
upgrading the remaining Chemistry buildings is to be studied by outside
consultants in an exercise starting later this year. Accordingly the Working
Party recommends


(Twenty-six) that the rebuild of Chemistry should proceed on its
present sites plus that of the car park at 2--4 South Parks Road and that on
completion Chemistry should release some of its existing space.

The recommendation that the Walton Street part of the Radcliffe Infirmary
site for the long term development of Engineering and Materials does not
release space in the Science area in the shorter term. The Working Party notes
that there is the potential to provide some 25,000m2 of extra
space in the areas reserved for the Biosciences and that further space will
become available from the redevelopment of Chemistry. The Working Party
recommends


(Twenty-seven) that the space to be vacated by Chemistry be kept as
flexible and short-term space for developments in the Biosciences and that to
be vacated in the long term by Engineering and Materials be kept for similar
developments in Physical Sciences.

The Working Party supports the view of Mathematics that it needs to be
consolidated onto a single site but remain close to the Science Area and to
the Science developments recommended for the Radcliffe Infirmary site. In
Recommendation 3 the Working Party supports the acquisition of sites to
provide a link between the Science Area and the Radcliffe Infirmary. These
sites could not be used for wet laboratories because of planning constraints.
The Working Party therefore recommends


(Twenty-eight) that Mathematics, preferably including Statistics but
not the Computing Laboratory, should be consolidated onto a single site in the
general area between the present Science Area and the Radcliffe
Infirmary.

The Working Party does not at this stage make any recommendations as to the
future use of the present Mathematical Institute building but notes that it
would provide suitable accommodation for a medium-sized arts or humanities
faculty centre or institute.

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10 Future use of the St Cross Site

The Working Party endorses the plans of the St Cross Working Party for the
development of this site and accepts the recommendation that in the longer
term the English Faculty be moved to another site. It has already recommended
that the Faculty be moved to the Radcliffe Infirmary site. In place of
English, it considers that the International Development Centre now in Queen
Elizabeth House should be co-located with the Social Studies and Law Faculties
on the St Cross site. The Working Party does not accept the suggestion that
the present St Cross building should be completely allocated to the Law
Faculty so as to house the Oxford Institute of Legal Practice, the latter
being a joint venture with Oxford Brookes University, and considers that there
would then be adequate space in the building for International Development. It
therefore recommends


(Twenty-nine) that the International Development Centre be moved to
the St Cross site when English moves out.

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11 Headington Area

The Working Party notes the view of the Clinical Medicine Board that it may be
necessary to acquire land additional to that recently bought for the Institute
of Health Sciences and the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics if medical
research continues to expand at the present rate and the move of the Radcliffe
Infirmary to Headington takes place. The University has an understanding with
Oxford Brookes University not to compete for land in the Headington area. The
rationalisation of the Mental Health Trust might release significant amounts
of land which may be enough to satisfy the needs of both universities as well
as the three hospital trusts and the NHS Executive has initiated discussions
with all the interested parties on the future use of surplus NHS land. At
present, there is no identified requirement or funding for further new
buildings for clinical teaching or research and an NHS Working Party has
concluded that there is sufficient capacity on present Hospital Trust sites in
Headington to meet the needs of the move of the Radcliffe Infirmary and
associated University departments. In view of the uncertainty of the need and
timing for additional space for medical teaching and research, for example,
for a clinical teaching block, the best course for the University would be one
in which the NHS Executive is persuaded to retain the land for future
healthcare development. The Working Party feels unable to make a
recommendation for the acquisition for more land in the Headington area at
present but considers that, if the NHS Executive subsequently decides to
dispose of its surplus land, the University should then consider acquiring
some to set aside for future use. (See recommendation four.)

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12 Future use of Other Sites

(i) Banbury Road

The Working Party endorses the proposals to consolidate the School of
Anthropology and Museum Ethnography in 58--64 Banbury Road and gardens. It
notes the wish of Engineering and Earth Sciences to bring their annexes back
into the Science Area if space is available, but make no specific
recommendations as to the future use of the University's properties on Banbury
Road as it is not clear when they might become available.

(ii) School of Geography

The Working Party notes that the future space needs of Geography, excluding
the Environmental Change Unit, could be met by use of its present premises in
the School of Geography and 13 Bevington Road together with an extension in
the car park of the former building. The Environmental Change Unit has been
allocated temporary space in 5 South Parks Road, but the Working Party does
not consider it possible to provide it with permanent accommodation close to
Geography. It has not been possible to identify a permanent site for the
Environmental Change Unit, but one of the Banbury Road houses or 1 and 2 South
Parks Road might be suitable. The Working Party feels itself unable to make a
recommendation at this stage but notes that the Mathematical Institute
building could become available.

(iii) Music Faculty

No recommendation is made, as the future needs of the Faculty and the Bate
Collection could be met by extensions to the present building.

(iv) Museums Central Storage

A working party of the Committee for Museums and Scientific Collections has
identified a need for 3,500m2 of space for off-site storage during
the next 15--20 years. Such space should be equipped with working areas for
curators and researchers, have adequate security and have a controlled
environment. This Working Party notes that 2,000m2 of this space
is to meet the needs of the Pitt Rivers Museum and that the Museum's Banbury
Road site has sufficient capacity for another 5,000m2 of space. If
a central storage site is provided, then the Working Party feels it should be
combined with book storage, as there are similar requirements for security and
environmental control, and a joint repository developed after the Nuneham
Courtenay book repository is filled in about 2002. The Working Party considers
that such a repository should not occupy prime space in central Oxford but be
sited for example in the Osney area which is easily accessible from the
museums and libraries. The Working Party has already commented on the
desirability of combining conservation facilities for both libraries and
museums.

(v) Ruskin School

The Working Party notes the School's wish to move from 128 Bullingdon Road and
74 High Street onto a single site as proposed in the Visual Studies project.
Unless this project is successful, the Working Party considers that the best
option for the Ruskin School would be to remain in its present sites and, if
necessary, extend 128 Bullingdon Road to provide extra space.

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Conclusions

The Working Party intends that its recommendations should be seen as a broad
strategy for the development and allocation of sites over the next twenty or
twenty-five years. This strategy is formulated in function of future needs as
far as they can be predicted and of those problems that already constrain
future development. The report provides a general `map' of the disposition of
departments and faculties across the University area. However, it does not
enter into the detail of the internal organisation of sites. The Working Party
expects that consultation with departments and faculties will accompany the
progressive implementation of this strategy, once accepted.

The Working Party is acutely aware that this broad strategy is based upon
premises and priorities which events and circumstances may well come to
disrupt or modify. New research and teaching can produce new needs; changing
patterns of funding can rearrange timetables. Nonetheless, the Working Party
believes that its proposals are broad enough to incorporate change and
flexible enough to accommodate innovation.

The strategy is ambitious though measured. It involves significant capital
expenditure. Although that expenditure should be related to a twenty or
twenty-five year period, it is true that some large items of expenditure must
occur quite early in that period. It might seem unwise to adopt such a
strategy at a time when the future funding of universities appears so
uncertain. However, in light of the present situation of sites in Oxford and
of the current patterns of change here, the Working Party believes that a bold
strategy is the necessary condition of the University's health and development
over the next two decades.

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ANNEXE A


Summary of recommendations

(One) that the University continues to accord the highest priority to the
acquisition of the whole Radcliffe Infirmary site.
(Paragraph 3(i))

(Two) that the University seeks actively to constitute over time a landbank
of strategic sites for its future expansion.
(Paragraph 3
(ii)
)

(Three) that the University should seek to acquire sites between the
Radcliffe Infirmary site and the Science Area.
(Paragraph 3
(iii)
)

(Four) that in the event that the National Health Service disposes of its
surplus land in Headington, the University should seek to acquire part for
the expansion of medical research.
(Paragraph 3
(v)
)

(Five) that the University proceeds actively to acquire sites to the west
of the present perimeter towards the railway station and beyond, in
collaboration with colleges owning property in this area.
(Paragraph 3
(vi)
)

(Six) that the University should examine the possibility of acquiring
development sites in North or West Oxford and retain them until the Radcliffe
Infirmary site is secured.
(Paragraph 3
(vii)

(Seven) that the listed buildings on the Radcliffe Infirmary site be
converted to provide Faculty Centres for English and History with provision
for their Faculty Libraries in an adjacent new building.
(Paragraph 5
(iii))

(Eight) that the old Indian Institute be offered to the Bodleian Library,
which should be invited to put forward proposals for using the building to
improve library facilities and to release space in the New Bodleian building
in accordance with the proposals that the Working Party makes for the central
site.
(Paragraph 5
(iii)
)

(Nine) that the Walton Street side of the Radcliffe Infirmary be designated
as expansion space for Physical Sciences and more particularly for the
long-term expansion and reprovision of Engineering and Materials
(Paragraph 5
(iv)
(c)
)

(Ten) that existing buildings on the Walton Street side of the Radcliffe
Infimary site be allocated as flexible short-tenancy space for the Physical
Sciences, as far as is compatible with recommendation Nine.
(Paragraph 5
(iv)
(c)
)

(Eleven) that in the short term a share of the existing buildings on the
Walton Street side of the Radcliffe Infirmary site be allocated as flexible,
short-tenancy space for the Biological Sciences.
(Paragraph 5
(iv)
(c)
)

(Twelve) that the Nurses Home quadrangle of the Radcliffe Infirmary be sold
to Green College if not needed for University use but that it should be made a
condition of acquisition that the access to Woodstock Road should remain open.
(Paragraph 5
(v)
)

(Thirteen) if at the time of acquisition the Press has a need for extra
space, it be allowed to develop the south west corner of the Radcliffe
Infirmary site on the understanding that it is for a limited period, after
which the building would revert to the University.
(Paragraph 5
(v)
)

(Fourteen) that the University should actively consider its long term
policy for book storage and examine where any new storage should be sited.
(Paragraph 6
(i)
)

(Fifteen) that the Director of Library Services be invited to come forward
with proposals for using Ewert Place to improve library services and to
release space in the New Bodleian building for other uses by the relocation of
library support facilities.
(Paragraph 6
(iii)
)

(Sixteen) that a Centre be created in the New Bodleian Library building to
provide short term accommodation for new developments in the Humanities.
(Paragraph 6
(iii)
)

(Seventeen) that the Clarendon Building, less the Delegates Room and other
rooms as required for ceremonial use, be allocated to the Libraries
Committee.
(Paragraph 6
(iii)
)

(Eighteen) that the Old Boysþ High School building be used to house the
Philosophy Centre and Library.
(Paragraph 6
(iv)
)

(Nineteen) that 10 Merton Street be allocated to Theology as a Faculty
Centre and Library.
(Paragraph 6
(v)
)

(Twenty) that the present plan for the development of the
Ashmolean/Taylorian north site should be amended in the light of the
recommendations in this paper.
(Paragraph 7
(ii)
)

(Twenty-one) that the Department of the History of Art be moved to 43 St
Giles and that History of Artþs present space in Beaumont Street be allocated
to Archaeology.
(Paragraph 7
(ii)
)

(Twenty-two) that the University seeks to purchase a suitable site in West
Oxford and develop it for Continuing Education.
(Paragraph 7
(iii))

(Twenty-three) that Modern Languages remains in Wellington Square in the
present Taylorian Annexe and that additional space is provided in Wellington
Square from that to be released by the move of Continuing Education and by the
planned move of Applied Social Studies to the St Cross site.
(Paragraph 7
(iv)
)

(Twenty-four) that, when Mathematics and International Development move
from Dartington House, the remainder of this building should be allocated to
Central Administration in order to bring the Development Office in to join the
remainder of the Administration.
(Paragraph 7
(iv)
)

(Twenty-five) the Station Forecourt site be purchased and allocated for the
development of a building for Management Studies.
(Paragraph 8)

(Twenty-six) that the rebuild of Chemistry should proceed on its present
sites plus that of the car park at 2--4 South Parks Road and that on
completion Chemistry should release some of its existing space.
(Paragraph 9)

(Twenty-seven) that the space to be vacated by Chemistry be kept as
flexible and short-term space for developments in the Biosciences and that to
be vacated in the long term by Engineering and Materials be kept for similar
developments to Physical Sciences.
(Paragraph 9)

(Twenty-eight) that Mathematics, preferably including Statistics but not
the Computing Laboratory, should be consolidated onto a single site in the
general area between the present Science Area and the Radcliffe Infirmary
(Paragraph 9)

(Twenty-nine) that the International Development Centre be moved to the St.
Cross site when English moves out.
(Paragraph 10)

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ANNEXE B


Organisations and Individuals submitting written or
oral evidence to the Working Party

In response to an invitation to estimate the need for extra space over the
next 20 years, submissions were received from the following:

Faculty Boards:

Clinical Medicine

English Language and Literature

Law

Literae Humaniores

Medieval and Modern Languages and Literatures

Modern History

Music

Oriental Studies

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Other Boards and Committees:

Biosciences Research Board

Interdepartmental Committee for Chemistry

Libraries Board

Committee for Museums and Scientific Collections

Academic Departments and Institutes:

Research Laboratory for Archaeology and the History of Art

Department of Biochemistry

Computing Laboratory

Department of Continuing Education

Department of Earth Sciences

Department of Engineering Science

Department of Experimental Psychology

School of Geography

Department of History of Art

Department of Human Anatomy

Centre for Linguistics and Philology

Department of Materials

Mathematical Institute

Sir William Dunn School of Pathology

Department of Pharmacology

Department of Physics

Department of Physiology

Department of Plant Sciences

Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art

Department of Statistics

Department of Zoology

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Museums and Scientific Collection:

Ashmolean Museum

Museum of the History of Science

Pitt Rivers Museum

University Museum of Natural History

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Other Departments and Centres:

Central Administration

Computing Services

Language Centre

Veterinary Services

Individuals:

Mr G.G. Barber

The Working Party or its sub-groups had discussions with the following
organisations and individuals
(in chronological order).

Dr D.E. Olleson, Chairman of the Libraries Board

Sir Christopher Tickell, Warden of Green College

Principal
(Mrs C.E. Hughes) and Mrs M.T. Griffin, Somerville
College

President and Dr A.B. Hawkins, Kellogg College

Dr G.P. Thomas, Director of the Department for Continuing
Education

Professor M.L.H. Green, Chairman of the Inter-departmental
Committee for Chemistry

Professor R.E. Eatock-Taylor, acting Head of the Department of
Engineering Science

Mr R.C. Boning and Mr C.K. Hall, Oxford University Press

Mr D.G. Vaisey, Bodley's Librarian

Dr V.A. Gillespie, Chairman of the English Faculty Board

Dr D.G. Pattison, Chairman of the Modern Languages Faculty Board

Mrs R.G. Lewis, Chairman of the History Faculty Library Committee

Sir John Elliott, Chairman of Modern History Faculty Board

Professor J.A.D. Welsh, Chairman of Mathematics Institute

Dr P.J. Collins, Chairman of the Mathematical Sciences Faculty
Board

Mr R.P. Carr, Director of University Library Services and
Bodley's Librarian

Professor D.W. Clarke, Head of Engineering Science

Professor B. Cantor, Head of Materials

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