Oxford University Gazette:27 May 2004

Oxford University Gazette, Vol. 134, No. 4698: 27 May 2004

Note: due to the requirements of the Data Protection Act, some elements of the printed Gazette are not reproduced in the Web Gazette.

GENERAL PURPOSES COMMITTEE OF COUNCIL

Changes in Regulations

The General Purposes Committee of Council has made the following changes in regulation, to come into effect on 11 June 2004.

In Part 2 of Council Regulations 25 of 2002 (Statutes, 2000, p. 670, as redesignated as regulations by Decree (5) of 11 July 2002, and renumbered by the changes published on 14 November 2002, Gazette, Vol. 132, p. 1461; Vol. 133, p. 404), insert new § 207 as follows and renumber §§ 207–13 as §§ 208–14:

`§ 207. Leo Blockley Memorial Rowing Fund

1. The gifts received to establish a fund in memory of Leo Blockley together with any further donations for this purpose, shall be known as the `Leo Blockley Memorial Rowing Fund'.

2. The University shall apply the capital and income of the Fund for the support of lightweight rowing in the University of Oxford.

3. The administration of the Fund, and the application of its capital and income, shall be the responsibility of the Sports Strategy Committee which may apply capital and shall apply the income of the Fund for the following purposes:

(i) the support of training and coaching for lightweight rowing;

(ii) the acquisition and maintenance of equipment.

4. In the application of funds, the Sports Strategy Committee shall pay particular regard to safety issues including safety guidance published from time to time by the Amateur Rowing Association and the Council for Oxford University Rowing.'

[This regulation establishes the Leo Blockley Memorial Rowing Fund to promote safe lightweight rowing in the University.]


CONGREGATION 22 May

Conferment of Honorary Degrees

The Degree of Doctor of Letters, honoris causa, approved by Resolution of Congregation on 23 March 2004, was conferred upon the following.

(1) IVON ASQUITH, MA (PH.D. London), formerly Managing Director, Academic Division, Oxford University Press.

(2) PETER MOTHERSOLE, MA status (B.SC. (ECON.) London), formerly Managing Director, English Language Teaching Division, Oxford University Press.

¶ The speeches made by the Public Orator when presenting the recipients of honorary degrees are published in `Notices' below.


COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of Congregation:

Evenett, S.J., Corpus Christi

Fay, J.K., Faculty of Physiological Sciences

Jayawant, S.,Green College

Jenkins, L.S.C., Hertford

Knight, J.C., MA, D.Phil., Christ Church

McCloskey, R.H., Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Quelch, S.C., Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Taylor, S., Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • CONGREGATION 27 May 2004
    • Elections
  • CONGREGATION 1 June 2004
    • Notice
    • Declaration of approval of Resolution approving the conferment of an Honorary Degree
  • CONGREGATION 23 June
    • *1 Encaenia
    • *2 Honorary Degrees
  • Degree Days 2005–6: corrigenda
  • * List of forthcoming Degree Days
  • * List of forthcoming Matriculation Ceremonies

CONGREGATION 1 June 2004

Notice

The meeting of Congregation is cancelled. The sole business comprises a question to which no opposition has been notified and in respect of which no request for an adjournment has been received, and Mr Vice-Chancellor will accordingly declare the resolution carried without a meeting under the provisions of Sect. 7 (1) of Statute IV (Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4633, 9 October 2002, Vol. 133, p. 100).

Declaration of approval of Resolution approving the conferment of an Honorary Degree

That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Music, honoris causa, upon SIR PETER MAXWELL DAVIES, KT, CBE, composer and conductor, be approved.


DEGREE DAYS 2005–6

Corrigenda

Unless otherwise indicated, degree ceremonies will be divided, the first part beginning at 11 a.m., not 11.30 as previously stated.

The doors of the Sheldonian Theatre will normally be open to visitors half an hour before the start of the ceremony, not one hour as previously stated.

Members of the University should note that from Trinity Term 2005 names of candidates must be entered, through the authorities of a college or other society, with the Student Records and Degree Conferrals Office, University Offices, Wellington Square, not later than 12 noon fifteen days before the ceremony. The present deadline is ten days before the ceremony.

SPEECHES BY THE PUBLIC ORATOR

The following speeches were delivered by THE PUBLIC ORATOR in a Congregation held on Saturday, 22 May 2004, in presenting for the Honorary Degree of Doctor of Letters

Mr IVON ASQUITH

Former Managing Director of the Academic Division,Oxford University Press

Si quis hoc sibi sumat, homines academicos interrogare qua re praecipue nobis Oxoniensibus superbiendum esse videatur, tum, credo, alii Academiae nostrae vetustate, alii doctrinae copia glorientur quae et ipsa praestantissima est et cum ceteris mortalibus communicata, haud pauci autem Preli nostri virtutes iactandas esse declarent; quos omnes, etiam si inter se aliquatenus discrepent, tamen incredibili modo consentire cognoscimus. nam de Prelo Oxoniensi, haud minus quidem quam de Academia ipsa, iisdem verbis uti libet quibus apud Maronem poetam pastor ille humanissimus de urbe Roma, qui

Haec tantum alias inter caput extulit urbes, inquit,
quantum lenta solent inter viburna cupressi.

quid enim? Academiae ipsius meritis, quae maxima esse nemo nescit, vix aut ne vix quidem cedit Preli academici auctoritas gloria vetustas; hoc autem inter se similitudine quadam conferuntur, quod neque hoc neque illa sine hominum excellentium cum opera deditissima tum iudicio sapientissimo adeo florere ullo modo posset. quorum hic quem produco nemini secundus dux exstitit et signifer, qui cum se annalium studio primum et hic et Londini contulisset, Prelo accessit, librorum historicorum provinciam accepit, quam diu otio quodam ne dicam somno consopitam ita excitavit ut brevi tempore libros plurimos proferret et eosdem praestantissimos, quorum nonnulli praemiis notabilioribus sunt insigniti, alii stilo austero conscripti lectoribus eruditioribus magis arridebant, alii etiam indoctioribus ita placebant ut doctrina saluberrima refertos dimitterent; ita numquam ex animo amisit noster Horatianum illud,

Omne tenet punctum qui miscuit utile dulci.

sed ne historia quidem diu huius virtutibus satis amplum praestitit campum, qui mox officiorum cursu honorifico peracto ad summum cacumen provectus librorum editores tam docte elegit, libros conscribendos tanto acumine curavit, rem denique pecuniariam tanta diligentia administravit, ut nescio an ullum iam sit in orbe terrarum prelum cuius et labores et benefacta cum hac nostra possint iure comparari. dies me deficiat si coner exponere quot optimae notae libros hic produxerit, sed ut de paucis omnino taceam ab animo impetrare non possum. liceat mihi igitur cum praeclarum illud linguae Anglicae thesaurum commemorare correctum, tum hominum nostratium vitas summa diligentia descriptas, tum denique voluminum copiam amplissimam et de legis studio et de omni scibili conscriptorum quibus Preli Oxoniensis et fisco et laudibus summa accessit amplitudo.

Praesento annalium sospitatorem diligentissimum, doctrinae fautorem perspicacissimum, et Preli et Academiae ministrum optime meritum, Ivon Asquith, ut admittatur honoris causa ad gradum Doctoris in Litteris.


Paraphrase

If anyone were to conduct an enquiry among the academics of Oxford and to ask them what was their special point of pride, then some, no doubt, would talk about the venerable age of the University, others of its outstanding achievements in scholarship and their communication to the rest of the world; many would surely claim as our especial glory the Oxford University Press. There would thus be some apparent disagreement on the surface, but really an extraordinary degree of unanimity; for we can say of the Press, no less emphatically than of the University, that (in the words of the cultivated shepherd in Virgil, speaking of the city of Rome in comparison with other cities)

For this of ours all others overtops
As does a mighty oak some lowly copse.

The distinction of Oxford University, great as it is universally admitted to be, yields hardly, if at all, to that of the Press, in age, reputation, or authority; and both have in common that they could not flourish as they have without the devotion and skill of outstandingly able people. Second to none among the leaders and inspirers of such people is the man whom I now present. Mr Ivon Asquith studied history at Oxford and London Universities. He joined the Press and took on its history list, which had for some time been allowed to become rather somnolent, if not actually asleep. He awoke it to such effect that within a short time books were forthcoming in large numbers and of outstanding quality, many of which proceeded to win major literary awards. Some were works of austerely scholarly cast, aimed at an academic readership; others were meant for a more popular market, combining solid instruction for the reader with an enjoyable read. Mr Asquith never lost sight of the saying of the poet Horace: `He wins all votes, who links delight with use'. Soon he outgrew history as his area, and after holding a series of important positions he reached the summit of his career as Managing Director of the Academic Division. He showed such ability in the appointment of members of staff, such flair in the choice of authors, and such scrupulous control of the financial side of operations, that one can hardly think, nowadays, of a press in the world which could stand comparison, in scale or in excellence, with our own OUP. A single day would hardly suffice, if I were to embark on a list of the outstanding publications for which Mr Asquith has been responsible; but I cannot bring myself to pass in silence over the revision of the Oxford English Dictionary, that treasure-house of the language, or the new and highly scholarly Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. In addition, he has overseen a flood of legal publications and indeed of books on every subject imaginable, which have greatly increased both the income and the reputation of the Press.

I present Mr Ivon Asquith, who has done so much for the study of history, who has been a perceptive supporter of scholarship of all kinds, and who has shown himself an outstanding agent both of the Press and of the University, for admission to the honorary degree of Doctor of Letters.


Mr PETER MOTHERSOLE

Former Managing Director of the English Language Teaching Division, Oxford University Press

In Bibliotheca Bodleiana, quam honoris causa nomino, scalae sunt lectoribus notissimae qua laborant homines doctrinae studiosi ut ad tabulatum supremum, Musarum arcem, Olympum ipsum curiositatis ascendant; quam qui aggrediuntur hanc sententiam in muro inscriptam lectitant, a Daniele Propheta repetitam: Plurimi pertransibunt, inquit vir Divina providentia instinctus, et multiplex erit scientia. quod promissum ut conservetur, Academiae autem ipsius commodis inserviatur, librorum copiam quam amplissimam desiderari nemo est quin intelligat, vinculo igitur necessario conligari hinc homines academicos hinc librorum artifices, neque enim illos sine his neque hos sine illis vel unum pedem progredi posse. nihil ergo Academiae optatius, nihil pretiosius, nihil magis necessarium dixeritis quam Prelum quo excudatur librorum copia doctrina saluberrima refertorum. haud obscurum est, quo ducat oratio: hic enim quem produco triginta paene annos Prelo adscriptus est nostro, de quo etiam meliori iure quam Flaccus poeta de Iove suo hoc proclamare possimus, Non viget quicquam simile aut secundum; et quidem huius egregiis laboribus plus fortasse quam cuiquam alteri acceptum referimus quod nomen Oxoniense ita toti orbi terrarum innotuit ut permulti, ni fallor, cum audierint prius de Prelo quam de ipsa Academia cogitent. librorum autem tot paene sunt genera quam hominum; hic, cum alia tractaverit plurima, tamen illi praecipue se contulit quod homines peregrinos linguam doceat nostram, quo beneficio nullum maius excogitari potest. quid si hoc aio, unius libelli, cui titulus Via Capitalis, exempla venisse plura quam quadrigenties centena milia? quis est nostrum quin hoc audito caput quodam modo titubare, menti autem numeri tam ingentes tenebras quasdam offudisse videantur? sed hic quae perfecit adeo solida ac vera sunt ut inter remotissimas gentes homines peregrini occurrant qui suam linguae nostrae notitiam alter alteri huius libelli editioni se debere profitentur, qui ita idem semper remansit ut persaepe mutatus sit atque correctus. animi mihi conscius essem ingratissimi, nisi hoc adderem: huius praecipue laboribus effectum esse ut Prelum nostrum Academiam ipsam, his temporibus paupertate et angustiis laborantem, pecunia amplissima iterum atque iterum sustentarit. sed hoc ipsum, cum sit maximum, tamen minoris est momenti quam quod linguae nostrae fines adeo promovit ut ceteras hodie longe superare videatur; quae omnia mehercle ita effecit hic ut numquam libellos promulgari iusserit quorum acumen genus dicendi doctrina nomine Oxoniensi non dignissima esse videantur.

Praesento virum cuius merita cum erga Prelum tum erga Academiam nostram sunt insignissima, linguae nostrae patronum potentissimum, rei pecuniariae magistrum egregium, Petrum Mothersole, ut admittatur ad gradum Doctoris in Litteris honoris causa.


Paraphrase

In the Bodleian Library, a place not to be mentioned without reverence, there is a staircase, well known to readers, up which scholars toil on their way to the top floor, that strong-hold of the Muses, that veritable paradise of the inquisitive. Those who climb it find inscribed on the wall these words from the Prophet Daniel: `Very many shall pass through, and knowledge shall be multiplied'. It is clear that the fulfilment of this inspired utterance, no less than the urgent needs of the University, calls for the constant production of a great stream of books. It follows that there is a most intimate link connecting, on the one side, academic persons and, on the other, those who actually publish books: neither, in fact, can advance without the other. Nothing, therefore, is more desirable for a University, nothing more precious, nothing indeed more vitally necessary, than a Press to publish books full of sound learning. The tendency of these remarks is easy to see. I am presenting a man who was attached for more than thirty years to the OUP, a Press of which we might truthfully say what the poet Horace says of Jupiter himself: None can its equal be, nor yet its second. It is due to the labours of Mr Peter Mothersole, whom I now present, more perhaps than to anyone else, that the name `Oxford' has become so famous internationally that to many people, I fancy, it would bring the Oxford University Press to mind sooner than the University itself. Books are as various as people. Mr Mothersole has been active in many areas of publishing, but he has been especially associated with that branch which teaches English as a foreign language. It is impossible to think of an activity more important. What is our reaction, when we hear that a single such publication, Headway, has sold more than forty-four million copies? Such colossal numbers make one's head reel and one's mind giddy. This achievement is so genuine and so solid that in the most far-flung places natives appear and claim to have learnt their English from one or another edition of this publication, which has been repeatedly revised while retaining its original character. It would be an act of great ingratitude if I did not add that it is to Mr Mothersole's activities, above all, that the University, in this period of poverty and retrenchment, has received from the OUP repeated and very substantial financial subsidies. That is a benefit of enormous significance; but even that is less historically important than the fact that our honorand has been responsible for the massive extension of the reach of the English language, which now far outstrips that of any other in the world; and I add that he has achieved it while insisting that all the English Language Teaching publications of the Press should be of a standard, in accuracy, information, and style, which is worthy of the name of Oxford.

I present a most successful champion of our language, an outstanding figure in finance, Mr Peter Mothersole, who has a strong claim on the gratitude both of the Press and of the University, for admission to the honorary degree of Doctor of Letters.


GENERAL NOTICES

WIDOWS OR WIDOWERS OF FORMER MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY'S PENSION SCHEMES

From time to time the attention of the University is drawn to individual cases of financial hardship among widows or widowers of former members of the Federated Superannuation System for Universities (FSSU) and the University of Oxford Employees Pension Scheme (EPS). Limited resources are available to alleviate proven cases of hardship and any enquiry should be addressed to the Superannuation Officer, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD. All cases are dealt with in the strictest confidence.


OXFORD CENTRE FOR COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE

McDonnell Visiting Fellowships

The McDonnell Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience is closely integrated with the Medical Research Council Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience at Oxford and supports work on many aspects of brain research relevant to human cognition in several departments at Oxford University as well as at other institutions.

The McDonnell Centre encourages work in all areas of cognitive neuroscience across all relevant disciplines and embraces research on experimental, theoretical, and clinical studies of perceptual analysis, memory, language, and motor control, including philosophical approaches to cognition. Current and fuller information on the Centre is available on the Web at http://www.cogneuro.ox.ac.uk.

The Centre offers several forms of support including Visiting Fellowships for distinguished researchers from overseas or elsewhere in Britain who wish to work within the Oxford Centre for periods between a week and several months. A Visiting Fellowship can include a modest grant to help with costs of travel and accommodation (but not a stipend), and to pay a bench fee to the host department.

Applications for Visiting Fellowships may be submitted either by a member of the Oxford Centre, or by the intended visitor. There is no special form for applications but they should include the following information: name, address, and status of applicant (in the form of a very brief curriculum vitae); names and addresses of collaborators in Oxford; a brief description (a page or two) of the proposed research; a list of any publications that have already resulted from the area of research; an outline plan of visit/s and expenditure, with total estimated budget, other sources of funding and the amount requested

Applications can be submitted at any time (e-mail is acceptable) to Sally Harte (Administrative Secretary), McDonnell Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, University Laboratory of Physiology, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT (telephone: Oxford (2)72497, fax: (2)72488, e-mail: admin@cogneuro.ox.ac.uk).


ISIS INNOVATION LTD

Technology Transfer

Ewert House, Ewert Place, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7SG

Isis Innovation Ltd is the technology transfer company of the University of Oxford, commercialising the research generated within and owned by the University. Established in 1988, Isis is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the University, founded to evaluate, protect, and market the University's intellectual property (where there are no pre-existing exploitation arrangements). In 2002, Oxford University Consulting became part of Isis, matching business consulting needs with University researchers. Isis provides researchers with commercial advice, funds patent applications and legal costs, negotiates exploitation and spin-out company agreements, and identifies and manages consultancy opportunities for University researchers. Isis works on projects from all areas of the University's research activities including the life sciences, physical sciences, humanities, and social sciences. Isis welcomes contact from any researcher interested in technology transfer and consultancy opportunities. Visit www.isis-innovation.com to learn more about Isis' activities, including its portfolio of technologies and spin-out companies, and to see the `Information for Oxford Researchers' resource.

For more information contact one of Isis' Group Heads: Linda Naylor, Life Sciences (telephone: (2)80910, e-mail: linda.naylor@isis.ox.ac.uk); David Baghurst, Physical Sciences (telephone: (2)80858, e-mail: david.baghurst@isis.ox.ac.uk); or Mark Taylor, Business Innovation and Consulting (telephone: (2)80824, e-mail: mark.taylor@isis.ox.ac.uk).


OXFORD UNIVERSITY CAREERS SERVICE

Careers Advice Service for Contract Research Staff

This service, provided by the University Careers Service at 56 Banbury Road, aims to encourage and enable academic-related research staff, employed directly by the University on fixed-term contracts (contract research staff), to make and implement well-informed decisions about their careers by:

* providing impartial, professional, careers advice

* supporting them in recognising and developing the attributes necessary for successful career development

* enabling them to appreciate and explore the range of opportunities available

* assisting them to clarify their values, interests, abilities and skills and to relate these to possible career options

* providing access to a wide variety of careers information and resources to facilitate the formulation and implementation of career plans

The service operates flexibly in an attempt to cater for individual personal needs, whether researchers are:

* generally uncertain about the career options open to them

* considering reviewing or changing their career direction

* thinking about finding a new job in academia, commerce, industry, the public sector, or becoming self-employed, etc.

* requiring practical advice on CV design, job search, or interview/selection techniques

Following registration with the Service (which is free) individual researchers have access to up to four, confidential, one-to-one meetings with a careers adviser to help clarify personal and career objectives and to identify the main career options open to them. They may also drop-in to see the Duty Adviser at the Careers Service to help resolve brief queries and make use of the wide range of careers resources in the well resourced Information Room, including the Prospects Planner computerised careers guidance system. Psychometric ability testing and personality type profiling for career development purposes (using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) can also be arranged on an ad hoc basis. In addition, two one-day career development workshops, designed specifically for contract research staff who are looking to review their career options or to brush up on their job search and interview skills, are run at various times throughout the year, and researchers also have access to activities in the student `What's On' term programme of careers talks, short skills sessions and other events.

Full details of the service (including how to register and book confidential career discussions) can be found on www.careers.ox.ac.uk. To reserve a place on any of the career development workshops or seminars/briefings below (which are run in conjunction with the Institute for the Advancement of University Learning), contact the IAUL (telephone: Oxford (2)86808, e-mail: services@learning.ox.ac.uk).


Career Development Workshops

The following workshops, provided as part of the Careers Advice Service for Contract Research Staff, supplement the individual careers guidance and information provisions available.


Career Review and Planning for Contract Research Staff

Tuesday, 15 June 2004, 9.30 a.m.--4 p.m. (Week 8, TT)

This workshop has been designed specifically for academic-related contract research staff employed by the University. It is particularly suitable for researchers, at any stage in their career, who are starting to consider what their future options might be. It will provide participants with the opportunity to step back and reflect on their careers in the context of their personal experience and factors in the academic research and wider employment environment. Through a combination of short individual exercises and small (informal) group discussions participants will be encouraged to explore the key aspects of effective career decision making. This will include reviewing motivations and transferable skills and considering factors affecting job mobility. By the end of the day each participant should be in a position to further their career objectives by beginning development of a realistic personal career plan. Previous participants have often built on this workshop by using one-to-one career discussions to develop and focus their ideas and to access further resources regarding particular career options. There will usually also be the opportunity to explore the wide range of careers resources available for use by contract research staff at the Careers Service.


Job Search and Interview Skills for Contract Research Staff

 

Friday, 2 July 2004, 9.30 a.m.--5 p.m. (Vacation)

This workshop has been designed specifically for academic-related contract research staff employed by the University and is particularly suitable for those who are considering, or seeking, alternative employment and wish to brush up on the practicalities involved. While more emphasis is given to finding employment outside academic research, those intending to apply for posts in academia may also find the programme useful.

An interactive day, it will explore the skills and techniques used in searching for jobs effectively, finding sources of job information, utilising networking techniques, writing appropriate CVs, and covering letters. Emphasis will be given to understanding the processes which UK employers are increasingly using to select staff and the importance of tailoring applications and approaches accordingly. Participants will also explore the skills and attributes required for effective performance at interview: preparation, self-presentation and how to deal with typical interview questions, etc. Where possible, supportive practice in applying interview techniques will normally form part of the day and there will usually be the opportunity to explore the wide range of careers resources available for use by contract research staff at the Careers Service. Previous participants have often built on this workshop by using one-to-one career discussions, to review intended applications and to practice for interviews.

Note: the content of the above workshops may be varied in the light of feedback and other workshops may be added in due course.


APPOINTMENTS

MARSHAL FOCH PROFESSORSHIP OF FRENCH LITERATURE

MICHAEL HUGH TEMPEST SHERINGHAM (BA, PH.D. Kent at Canterbury), Professor of French, Royal Holloway, University of London, has been appointed to the professorship with effect from 1 October 2004.

Professor Sheringham will be a fellow of All Souls College.


J.R.R. TOLKIEN PROFESSORSHIP OF MEDIEVAL ENGLISH LITERATURE AND LANGUAGE

VINCENT ANTHONY GILLESPIE, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Anne's College and Reader in English Language and Literature, has been appointed to the professorship with effect from 1 October 2004. Dr Gillespie will be a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.


PROFESSORSHIP OF RUSSIAN

ANDREI L. ZORIN (MA, PH.D. Habilitation, Moscow State University), Professor of Russian, Russian State University for Humanities (RGGU), Moscow, has been appointed to the professorship with effect from 1 October 2004.

Professor Zorin will be a fellow of New College.


AREA STUDIES

The Social Sciences Board has appointed PROFESSOR R. GOODMAN, Fellow of St Antony's College and Nissan Professor of Japanese Studies, as Head of Area Studies for two years from 1 October 2004.


QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

The Social Sciences Board has appointed PROFESSOR B. HARRISS-WHITE, Fellow of Wolfson College and University Lecturer in Agricultural Economics, to the Directorship of Queen Elizabeth House for three years from 1 October 2004.


ELECTORAL BOARD

The composition of the electoral board to the post below, proceedings to fill which are currently in progress, is as follows.

PROFESSORSHIP OF MATHEMATICAL BIOLOGY


                                                 Appointed by

Professor S.D. Iversen                           Mr Vice-Chancellor [1]
The President of St John's                       ex officio
Professor M. Ferguson                            Council
Professor C.A. Gilligan                          Council
Professor D.C. Clary                             Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board
Professor M.C. Mackey                            Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board
Professor S.J. Chapman                           Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board
Professor J.M. Ball                              Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board
Dr A.J. Boyce                                    St John's College

[1] Appointed by Mr Vice-Chancellor under the provisions of Sects. 10 and 11 of Stat. IX (Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4633, 9 October 2002, Vol. 133, p. 108).

NORMAN HEATLEY LECTURE

PROFESSOR ROBERT TJIAN, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, Berkeley, will deliver the Norman Heatley Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Thursday, 17 June, in the Lecture Theatre, the Medical Sciences Teaching Centre.

Subject: `Deconstructing and reconstituting the Metazoan transcriptional apparatus.'


WEIDENFELD VISITING PROFESSOR OF EUROPEAN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

The temptation of the impossible: Victor Hugo's Les Misérables

MARIO VARGAS LLOSA, Weidenfeld Visiting Professor of European Comparative Literature 2003–4, will continue his series of lectures on the following days in the Nelson Mandela Lecture Theatre, the Saïd Business School. Unless otherwise indicated, the lectures will begin at 5 p.m.

Wed. 2 June: `Civilised barbarians.'

Fri. 4 June: `From heaven above.'

Wed. 9 June: `The temptation of the impossible.'


CLARENDON LECTURES IN FINANCE

Default risk

PROFESSOR DARRELL DUFFIE, the Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, will deliver the Clarendon Lectures in Finance at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Saïd Business School.

Mon. 14 June: `Bankruptcy probabilities.'

Tue. 15 June: `Default risk pricing.'

Wed. 16 June: `Default correlation.'


DEUTSCHE BANK LECTURE

PROFESSOR AILSA RÖELL, Senior Research Fellow, Bendheim Center for Finance, Princeton, will deliver the Deutsche Bank Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 8 June, in the Saïd Business School.

Subject: `Corporate governance and economic performance.'


LUBBOCK LECTURE IN MANAGEMENT STUDIES

GAVYN DAVIES, former Chairman of the BBC, will deliver the Lubbock Lecture in Management Studies at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 10 June, in the Saïd Business School. The event is open to the public and free to attend. No ticket or registration is necessary.

Subject: `The economics of public service broadcasting: market failure and the scale and scope of the BBC.'


CLASSICS

Postponement of lecture

It is regretted that the lecture due to have been given by Dr A. Vlachopoulos, University of the Pelopponnese, at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 8 June, in the Headley Lecture Theatre, the Ashmolean Museum, on the subject of `The wall paintings from the Xeste 3 building at Akrotiri, Thera. Towards an interpretation of its iconographic programme', has been postponed to Michaelmas Term.


ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

Romantic Realignments

The following seminars will be held at 5.30 p.m. on Wednesdays in Room 11, English Faculty, St Cross Building. Two papers will be given at the meetings on 2 and 16 June.

Convener: Leonard Epp.

R. HEWITT
2 June: ` "Dreaming o'er the map of things": William Wordsworth and the Irish Ordnance Survey.'

C. THROSBY
2 June: `Flirting with flame: Byron's fan letters.'

DR L. VARGO, Saskatchewan, USA
9 June: `Mary Shelley and "The great work of life": reception and re- vision.'

D. FALLON
16 June: ` "What mov'd Milton?": Blake's Milton and eighteenth century Miltons.'

R. MARCH
16 June: `The (in)significance of Lady Caroline Lamb.'

D. O'SHAUGHNESSY
16 June: `Godwin and theatricality: radical self-censorship in the 1970s.'


ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE, MUSIC, AND HISTORY OF ART

The Bible in art, music, and literature

The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Danson Room, Trinity College.

Conveners: Professor C. Rowland and Dr C. Joynes.

DR D. ROOKE, King's College, London
31 May: `Solomon and his women: a Handelian triptych.'

PROFESSOR S. PRICKETT, Baylor
14 June: `Redrawing the boundaries of experience: biblical illustration from Rembrandt to Tiepolo.'


HISTORY OF ART AND PHILOSOPHY

Philosophy and theory of the visual arts

Seminars in this interdisciplinary series will be given at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Danson Room, Trinity College.

Conveners: Dr J. Hyman, Queen's, and Dr K. Reed-Tsocha, Trinity.

DR P. GOLDIE, King's College, London
28 May: `The experience of conceptual art.'

PROFESSOR G. POLLOCK, Leeds
4 June: `The aesthetics of difference.'


MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Soft Matter, Biomaterials, and Interfaces

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 4 p.m. on Tuesdays in the John Rowlinson Seminar Room.

Convener: Professor J. Klein.

DR J. MACPHERSON, Warwick
1 June: `High resolution electrochemical imaging of interfacial processes.'

PROFESSOR F. DE SCHRYVER, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Holland
8 June: `Visualisation and study of single molecules.'

PROFESSOR B. EISENBERG, Rush Medical College, Chicago, USA
Fri. 11 June, 2.15 p.m.: `Ion channels as devices: crowded charge model of selectivity.'


MEDICAL SCIENCES

Clinical Trial Service Unit: open day

The Clinical Trial Service Unit will be holding an Open Day on Tuesday, 22 June, 10.30 a.m.–4.15 p.m., in the Martin Wood Lecture Theatre.

Attendance at the meeting is by prior registration only. For further details see: http://www.ctsu.ox.ac.uk/openday.

Speakers include:

RICHARD PETO: `Smoking and death fifty years on.'

PAUL MCGALE: `Treatment of early breast cancer.'

SARAH DARBY: `Radiotherapy and heart disease.'

SUE RICHARDS: `Meta-analyses in childhood leukaemia.'

SARAH PARISH: `Lipids and myocardial infarction.'

ZHENGMING CHEN: `The Kadoorie Study.'

MIKE CLARKE: `The Cochrane collaboration.'

ROBERT CLARKE: `The PROCARDIS Study.'

GARY WHITLOCK: `Obesity and death.'

GEORGINA BUCK: `Genetic randomisation in leukaemia.'

SARAY LEWINGTON: `Blood pressure and death.'

JANE ARMITAGE: `Large-scale Statin trials.'

MARTIN LANDRAY: `The SHARP Study.'


Institute of Musculoskeletal Sciences, the Botnar Research Centre

Unless otherwise indicated the following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the Botnar Research Centre, the Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre.

PROFESSOR S. GORDON
11 June: `Macrophage heterogeneity and tissue homeostasis.'

PROFESSOR A. HOLLANDER, Bristol
18 June: To be announced. (Postponed from 27 February)

PROFESSOR C. BOSHOFF
25 June: `Incorporating pharmacogenetics and genomics into clinical cancer care.'

DR S. OPPENHEIMER
2 July: To be announced.

DR G. MCCARTHY, Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland
15 July: To be announced.

DR M. SUNDSTROM, Chief Scientist, Structural Genomics Consortium
3 Sept.: `From structure to function: the Structural Genomics Consortium.'

PROFESSOR T. CHAMBERS, St George's Hospital Medical School, London
24 Sept: To be announced.

MR M. SNEAD, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge
15 Oct.: `Genetics and clinical features of Stickler's syndrome.'

DR P. BOWNESS
5 Nov.: `Why does HLA-B27 predispose to inflammatory arthritis?'

PROFESSOR L. CARDON
12 Nov.: To be announced.

DR J. URBAN
19 Nov.: To be announced.

PROFESSOR D. KERR
3 Dec., 2 p.m.: To be announced.


Oxion Seminar Series

PROFESSOR JOHN JEFFERYS, Birmingham, will give a seminar at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, 1 June, in the Lecture Theatre, the Department of Pharmacology.

Subject: `Network oscillations, synchronisation, and epilepsy.'


MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

Italian Graduate Seminar: amended notice

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in Lecture Room 2, Christ Church.

The seminar originally scheduled for week 8 has been brought forward to Tuesday, 8 June (week 7).

Conveners: Professor M.L. McLaughlin and E. Tandello.

E. ARCARI, Venice: `Castelvetro e la Ragione contro il Caro: studio per un'edizione critica.'

E. ANNALORO, Siena: `Palazzeschi: il poeta el la folla.'


ROTHERMERE AMERICAN INSTITUTE

Esmond Harmsworth Lecture in American Arts and Letters

RICHARD FORD will deliver the Esmond Harmsworth Lecture in American Arts and Letters at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 8 June, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `The things that help, the things that hurt: a memoir.'


SAID BUSINESS SCHOOL

Oxford Finance Symposium

The third Oxford Finance Symposium will be held between 8 and 17 June inclusive in the Saïd Business School.

For details of the Deutsche Bank Lecture, to be given on 8 June by Professor Ailsa Röell of Princeton, and of the Clarendon Lectures in Finance, to be given on 14, 15, 16 June by Professor Darrell Duffie of Stanford, see above.

Conveners: Professor William Wilhelm, Professor Colin Mayer, and Professor Oren Sussman.

C. PARLOUR, Carnegie Mellon
Tue. 8 June, 9 a.m.: `Information acquisition in a limit order market.'

H. POLEMARCHAKIS, Brown
Wed. 9 June, 9 a.m.: `Intertemporal optimality.'

S. BHATTACHARYA, LSE
Wed. 9 June, 5 p.m.: `Knowledge disclosure patents and optimal organisation of research and development.'

T. RAMADORAI
Thur. 10 June, 9 a.m.: To be announced.

P. BOLTON, Princeton
Thur. 10 June, 5 p.m.: `Bounded rationality and incomplete contracts.'

J. CAMPBELL, Harvard
Fri. 11 June, 9 a.m.: `Bad beta, good beta.'

J. GEANAKOPLOS, Yale
Fri. 11 June, 5 p.m.: `Liquidity, default, and crashes: endogenous contracts in general equilibrium.'

T. FOUCAULT, HEC, Paris
Mon. 14 June, 9 a.m.: `Does anonymity matter in electronic limit order markets?'

M. PETERSEN, Northwestern
Tue. 15 June, 9 a.m.: `Does the source of capital affect capital structure?'

H. OZSOLYEV
Wed. 16 June, 9 a.m.: `Knowing thy neighbour: social interaction and rational expectations in financial markets.'

A. LJUNGQVIST, Stern, NYU
Thur. 17 June, 9 a.m.: `Underwriting relationships.'


Complex Adaptive Systems Group Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 12.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in Seminar Room A, the Saïd Business School. Two papers will be given at the meeting on 8 June.

Convener: F. Reed-Tsochas.

PROFESSOR T. HALPIN-HEALY, Columbia, USA
1 June: `The dynamics of conformity and dissent.'

DR P. ANDRIANI, Durham Business School
8 June: `Cellular neural network simulations: the evolution of technology and the emergence of novelty.'

DR F. CONTI, Catania
8 June: `Cellular neural network simulations: the evolution of technology and the emergence of novelty.'

DR A. BYDE, HP Labs UK
15 June: `Market-based control for utility data centres.'


OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC STUDIES

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies.

PROFESSOR J. CESARI, Harvard and CNRS, Paris
2 June: `Imam wanted: global Islam and the crisis in religious authority.'

LORD PUTTNAM, film director
Thur. 3 June, the Auditorium, Magdalen: `The tales of Robin Hood.'

PROFESSOR Y. HADDAD, Georgetown
9 June: `Are Muslims a "Fifth Column" in the United States?'

PROFESSOR T. RAMADAN, Geneva
16 June: `Solidarity, loyalty, and co-citizenship with non-Muslims in Islamic sources.'


CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES

Interdisciplinary conversations

DR NGAIRE WOODS will give the fifth seminar in this series at 4 p.m. on Monday, 4 June, in the Seminar Room, the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies.

Subject: `Accountability.'


ALL SOULS COLLEGE

Chichele Lectures

In its pomp: All Souls 1914–15

DR SIMON J.D. GREEN, Fellow of the college, will deliver the Chichele Lectures at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Old Library, All Souls College.
4 June: `Imperialists and Commonwealth men.'

11 June: `Philosophers and Young Turks.'

18 June: `Appeasers and anti-appeasers.'


WOLFSON COLLEGE

Annual Isaiah Berlin Lecture

SIR TOM STOPPARD will deliver the annual Isaiah Berlin Lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 10 June, in the Hall, Wolfson College. The lecture is open to the public.

Subject: `Drawing on the wall of Plato's cave.'


SOCIETY FOR THE HISTORY OF MEDIEVAL TECHNOLOGY AND SCIENCE

Medieval Science in Oxford Forum

DR EMILIE SAVAGE-SMITH, Oriental Institute, will give a gallery talk at the exhibition `Medieval Views of the Cosmos', at 11.30 a.m. on Saturday, 12 June, in the Exhibition Room, Bodleian Library (Old Schools Quadrangle).

DR STEPHEN JOHNSTON, Assistant Keeper of the Museum of the History of Science, will present a demonstration entitled `An introduction to the astrolabes and other early instruments in Oxford', at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 12 June, in the Museum of the History of Science.

RESEARCH SERVICES

Oxford University Research Services is based in the University Offices, Wellington Square (with satellite offices in the Medical School Offices of the John Radcliffe Hospital and at 9 Parks Road). Research Services is part of the Finance Division of the University's central administration.

In connection with the acceptance of research awards and signature of research-related contracts, the University's Statutes, section 14 of Statute XVI (Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4633, 9 October 2002, Vol. 133, pp. 131--2), provide that `(1)...no officer of the University, or any other person employed by the University or working in or in connection with any department or body within or under the control of the University, shall have authority to make any representations on behalf of the University or to enter into any contract on behalf of the University, except with the express consent of Council. (2) No such consent given by Council shall be operative until a copy of the resolution of Council, certified by the Registrar, has been delivered to such officer or other person.'

Research Services is authorised to process all applications to outside bodies for research grants and to sign research-related agreements on behalf of the University. It can also provide advice for those seeking external research funding or requiring information about specific initiatives (e.g. LINK, EU research programmes, etc.).

Research-related contracts with industry and other external sponsors are negotiated through Research Services. Such contracts include agreements covering the sponsorship of research, collaborative research, clinical trials, services to industry, intellectual property issues, confidentiality issues, material transfer, and consultancy.

Information about Research Services, their publications and administrative processes is available at: http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/.

Research Funding and Research-related Information

Research Services produces a weekly Web-based bulletin of funding opportunities with forthcoming deadlines for applications, electronic Research Funding News (eRFN), which is available to members of the University via the internet at: http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/erfn/.

Non-funding research-related information is publicised via the Web-based Bulletin Board. To receive regular e-mails summarising the contents of both these publications, please contact the Information Officer (see contact details below).

The University also has access to various online research funding databases and other sources of research-related information, available from the Web site at: http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/information/.

If you would like to receive a weekly e-mail reminder summarising the contents of electronic Research Funding News, and also those of the Bulletin Board, please e-mail research.services@admin.ox.ac.uk with the subject line `join eRFN mailing list'. Please note that this service is only available to members of the University with an `ox.ac.uk' e-mail account. The Funding Information Officer (telephone: (2)70082) is also the first point of contact for all research funding information queries.

Research Grant Applications

All applications for external research funding must be endorsed by the University before they are despatched to the sponsor, whether or not this is required by the funding body. In order to do this, the University requires all applications made to funding bodies (such as the research councils, government departments, UK and overseas charities and foundations, and industry) to be checked and endorsed by Research Services on behalf of the University. The reasons for this are to ensure that:

* the funds requested are sufficient to cover the research being undertaken (e.g. that correct and up-to-date salary scales have been used);

* the costing rules of the University have been applied correctly (e.g. that the appropriate level of indirect costs have been applied);

* the guidelines of the funding body have been followed correctly (e.g. that the funds requested may be used for the purpose proposed); and that

* the University would be in a position to accept the grant should the application be successful (e.g. that appropriate facilities are available to house the project, or that the proposed research does not contravene university policy).

In addition, Research Services can:

* advise on the factors which should be taken into consideration when costing research projects;

* provide information on funding body guidelines; and

* advise on the completion of the necessary application and internal forms prior to submission to the Research Grants Office (RGO).

The administrative arrangements for submitting research funding applications are available from the Research Services Web site at: http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/grants/.

In summary, these are as follows: applicants should submit the original plus one copy of their application, together with a completed copy of the University's Outside Grants (OG) form, to Research Services, or, in the case of certain clinical departments, to the Research Services Medical satellite office at Level 3 of the John Radcliffe Hospital, leaving three clear working days for it to be processed.

Application administration

Enquiries relating to the day-to-day processing of research grant applications should be addressed to the Research Grants staff of the main Research Services office at Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70146), or, in the case of certain clinical departments, to the Research Services Medical satellite office, Level 3, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington (telephone: (2)22544). A list of grants administrators for each department is available on the Web at: http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/oxonly/grants/deptlist.shtml.


Research Contracts

The Research Contracts section is responsible for negotiating and approving the terms on behalf of the University of all research-related agreements, including those governing:

* sponsored or commissioned research;

* collaborative research;

* clinical trials;

* confidentiality and non-disclosure of information;

* transfer of materials;

* research-related services to industry;

* personal consultancy.

In addition, the contracts team takes lead responsibility within Research Services for:

* checking intellectual property rights and preparing the assignment of new technologies to Isis Innovation for exploitation, through licences or spin-out companies;

* authorising royalty payments to inventors;

* advice on matters connected with research-related contracts.

The administrative arrangements for University research-related agreements are available from the Research Services Web site at: http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/contracts/.

Research-related contracts

Enquiries relating to research-related contracts should be addressed to the Research Contracts Administrator (telephone: (2)70039).

General enquiries

General enquiries to Research Services may be addressed, in the first instance, to Ms Sarah-Jayne Beedall (telephone: (2)70143, e-mail: sarah.beedall@admin.ox.ac.uk), who will be pleased to direct queries to the appropriate member of staff.


Information on Research Funding

Oxford University's Research Services offers the following Web-based resources for those looking for external research funding:

electronic Research Funding News (eRFN) (http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/erfn/)

This is a Web-based bulletin, updated weekly, of current research funding opportunities across all subject areas with forthcoming deadlines for applications. It includes an at-a-glance guide to deadlines and a searchable archive of previous issues.

If you would like to receive a weekly e-mail reminder summarising the contents of the bulletin, please e-mail research.services@admin.ox.ac.uk with the subject line `join eRFN mailing list'. This service is only available to members of the University with an `ox.ac.uk' e-mail account.

Subscribers also receive monthly updates about the contents of the RSO Bulletin Board (http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/oxonly/information/bboard.shtml) which lists non-funding research-related information, such as details of conferences, training opportunities, and changes in the policy of major research funding bodies.

Community of Science (http://www.cos.com/)

The University subscribes to the `Funding Opportunities' service offered by the Community of Science (COS). This is a fully searchable database of grant-making organisations world-wide, providing information about research funding across all subject areas. Despite the misleading title, this source of information about funding opportunities also covers the social sciences and humanities.

This service may be accessed by any member of the University from within the university computer network.


Online research funding and information resources (http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/information/)

This page on the Research Services Web site collects together links to COS and other online databases and information services to which the University has access. These services provide information about current research funding opportunities and sponsors.

If you would like more information about these or any other services provided via Research Services, please visit its Web site at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/ or contact the Research Funding Information Officer (telephone: (2)70082, e-mail: research.services@admin.ox.ac.uk).


SAID BUSINESS SCHOOL

Barclays Capital David Newton Memorial Prize

The prize, of £1,000, is to be awarded for one year only (2004). The prize will be awarded to the student who achieves the best results in the Economics Prelims paper on the Economics and Management degree in year 1, as determined by the exam results. Students will be notified of the result in early July 2004. The Prize will be awarded at the Business Projects reception at the Saïd Business School in September 2004.

MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES BOARD

Supplementary subjects for Chemistry

The following subjects will be taught and examined during 2004–5.

Aromatic and heterocyclic pharmaceutical chemistry

Lectures: 16 hours in MT; 16 hours in HT

Examined: end of HT

History and Philosophy of Science

Lectures: 8 hours in MT; 8 hours in HT

Examined: end of HT

Quantum Chemistry

Lectures: 16 hours in MT; 16 hours in HT

Examined: end of HT

Chemical Biology

Lectures: 16 hours in MT; 16 hours in HT

Examined: end of HT

Modern Language—German

Lectures: 16 hours in MT; 16 hours in HT

Examined: end of HT


BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

Special subjects in the Honour School of Modern Languages and the related Joint Honour Schools

The Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages gives notice, under the provisions of the regulations in Examination Decrees, 2003, p. 342, that the following Special Subjects will be available in the examination in Trinity Term 2006. Certain subjects are marked with a language identifier (Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 378, ll. 27–8 refers). The numbers in the left-hand column are those used by the Examination Schools to identify papers. The letter in the right-hand column indicates the method of examination for that special subject: a key to the letters is given at the end of this list.

Depending on the availability of teaching resources, not all Special Subjects will be available to all candidates in every year.

For details of mutual exclusions and other restrictions, denoted by numbers in square brackets ( [] ), see below.

2011 [1] Modern literary theory. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with major theories in this field since 1918.

Method of assessment: C (1)

2195 European cinema. An introduction to some of the major movements and landmarks in the evolution of European cinema. In the work submitted for assessment, candidates will be expected to show evidence of having worked on film study and analysis.
Method of assessment: C (1)

2030 (L) Syntax.
Method of assessment: A

2009 (L) Semantics.
Method of assessment: A

2031 (L) Phonetics and Phonology.
Method of assessment: A*

2032 (L) Sociolinguistics.
Method of assessment: A

2033 (L) Translation Theory.
Method of assessment: A

2034 (L) Psycholinguistics.
Method of assessment: A

2012 (F, I, L, P, S) Romance philology and linguistics. Candidates will be expected to show a detailed knowledge of the methods of comparative Romance linguistics and to illustrate their answers with examples from more than one Romance language. Texts for linguistic commentary in `Vulgar Latin' (G. Rohlfs, Sermo vulgaris latinus, Tübingen, 1969: II, VII, XVIII, XX, XXXIV) and unseen passages from `lesser known' Romance varieties (Sardinian, Romanian, Romansch and others) will also be set each year.
Method of assessment: A

2013 (F) Anglo-Norman language and literature. [PM]
Method of assessment: A

2029 (F) Old Provençal. Prescribed text: F.R. Hamlin, P.T. Ricketts, J. Hathaway, Introduction à l'étude de l'ancien provençal, Geneva 1967 and 1985, with particular reference to nos.2,3, 4, 8,10,12,14,15,17,18,20,25,26,27,28,31,33,34,36,39, 40, 42, 44, 46, 48, 49, 53, 54, 56, 57, 59, 65, 67, 70, from which passages will be set for translation. In addition, candidates may answer questions on either literary or linguistic topics or both. [PM]
Method of assessment: A

2034 (F) The Old French epic. [PM]
Method of assessment: A

2014 (F) The twelfth- and thirteenth-century Grail Romances. [PM]
Method of assessment: A

2015 (F) French historical writing to 1515. [PM]
Method of assessment: A

2016 (F) French poetry of the mid-sixteenth century. [PM]
Method of assessment: C (2)

2017 (F) Dramatic theory and practice in France 1605–60. [PM]
Method of assessment: C (2)

2019 (F) [2] Jean-Jacques Rousseau. [PM]
Method of assessment: C (2)

2035 (F) French satire from Rabelais to Beaumarchais. [PM]
Method of assessment: C (2)

2020 (F) Honoré de Balzac.
Method of assessment: C (3)

2021 (F) French poetry 1870–1918.
Method of assessment: C (3)

2022 (F) French literature and Modern War.
Method of assessment: C (3)

2023 (F) [3] Marcel Proust.
Method of assessment: C (3)

2024 (F) Surrealism.
Method of assessment: C (1)

2025 (F) The `Nouveau Roman'.
Method of assessment: C (1)

2026 (F) Literature and the visual arts from Diderot to Zola.
Method of assessment: C (1)

2027 (F) French women writers.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2028 (F) Advanced French translation: theory and practice.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2036 (G) Old Norse. Candidates will be expected to have made a special study of F. Ranke and D. Hofmann, Altnordisches Elementarbuch (Sammlung Göschen No.1115), pp. 80–135. Candidates will also be expected to have read the Völsungasaga and related material from the Poetic Edda. Written work must show knowledge of the texts in the original language. [PM]
Method of assessment: B (2)

2037 (G) Old High German, with either Gothic or Old Saxon or Old English. Prescribed texts: Gothic, Gospel according to St Mark, chapters 1–9; Old Saxon, Heliand, ll. 4025–5038; Old English, Beowulf, ll. 1–1049. [PM]
Method of assessment: B (2)

2041 (G) Walther von der Vogelweide and the Origins of the German Love Lyric. [PM]
Method of assessment: B (2)

2042 (G) Gottfried's Tristan and Medieval German Court Society. [PM]
Method of assessment: B (2)

2071 (G) Mechthild von Magdeburg and women's writing in German 1150–1300. [PM]
Method of assessment: B (2)

2044 (G) German poetry and drama of the seventeenth century. [PM]
Method of assessment: B (2)

2045 (G) Eighteenth-century German aesthetics from Baumgarten to Schiller.
Method of assessment: B (1)

2072 (G) Weimar Classicism 1794–1805.
Method of assessment: A

2047 (G) The Bildungsroman.
Method of assessment: B (2)

2048 (G) German political writing in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.
Method of assessment: B (2)

2050 (G) The poetry of Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Stefan George, and Rainer Maria Rilke. Candidates will be examined on the poetry of two of these authors and will be expected to have read the works listed in any two of the sections below. (a) Hofmannsthal: Gedichte und Lyrische Dramen, ed. Steiner (Fischer Verlag, 1952), pp. 7--136, 467--529. (b) George: Hymnen, Pilgerfahrten, Algabal; Das Jahr der Seele; Der Teppich des Lebens und die Lieder von Traum und Tod mit einem Vorspiel; the sections `Zeitgedichte', `Gestalten', `Gezeiten', and `Maximin' from Der siebente Ring; Das neue Reich omitting the section `Sprüche'. (c) Rilke: Das Stunden-Buch; Neue Gedichte (both parts); Requiem für eine Freundin; Requiem für Wolf Graf von Kalckreuth; Die Sonette an Orpheus; Duineser Elegien.
Method of assessment: A

2073 (G) Shorter modernist prose fiction 1901–27.
Method of assessment: B (2)

2079 (G) German Expressionism in literature and the visual arts.
Method of assessment: B (1)

2056 (G) German poetry from 1945. Candidates will be expected to have a general knowledge of the field, and a detailed knowledge of works written in or after 1945 by three of the following authors: Bachmann, Benn, Biermann, Bobrowski, Volker Braun, Brecht, Celan (the collections of poetry from Mohn und Gedächtnis to Atemwende inclusive), Enzensberger, Grass, Huchel, Sarah Kirsch, Kunert, Sachs.

Note: The paper will include a compulsory section containing general questions and commentary passages taken from the authors being offered; candidates will thus be required to attempt either a general essay or a commentary. Brecht's poetry from 1945 to 1956 may be offered as one of the three authors selected for detailed knowledge in this paper by candidates offering Brecht as a prescribed author in paper X.
Method of assessment: A

2070 (G) Narrative Identities in the German Novel since 1945. Participants will be expected to demonstrate a general knowledge of the field and to have read a range of German-language novels from the post- 1945 era. Each portfolio shall consist of two essays, only one of which may be on a single text.
Method of assessment: B (2)

2080 (G) Literature in the GDR.
Method of assessment: B (2)

2081 (G) Advanced Translation: Theory and Practice.
Method of assessment: B (2)

2049 (G) Nietzsche and his impact.
Method of assessment: B (2)

2078 (G) Nineteenth-century German Drama.
Method of assessment: B (2)

2196 (G) Contemporary German Literature. Candidates will be expected to have a general knowledge of writing in German from the last decade and to have read a range of texts from the same period . Each portfolio will consist of two essays, only one of which may be on a single text.
Method of assessment: B (2)

2083 (I) Italian lyric poetry of the thirteenth century.
Method of assessment: B (3)

(I) Italian culture during the Fascist period.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2085 (I) `Questione della lingua'. Candidates will be expected to have read: Dante, De Vulgari Eloquentia; Bembo, Prose della volgar lingua; Manzoni, Scritti sulla lingua.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2086 (I) Women writers of the Italian Renaissance.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2088 (I) The works of Carlo Emilio Gadda.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2096 (I) Sicilian literature 1945 to the present day.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2097 (I) Italian women writers 1945 to the present day.
Method of assessment: B (3)

(I) Italian poetry from 1956 to the present day.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2103 (S) Spanish drama before Lope de Vega. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with the works of: Juan del Encina, Lucas Fernández, Lope de Rueda, Juan de la Cueva, Bartolomé de Torres Naharro, Diego Sánchez de Badajoz, Juan de Timoneda, Miguel Venegas, Miguel de Cervantes, and the Spanish works of Gil Vicente. Candidates will be expected to have read the Portuguese and bilingual texts of Gil Vicente, but passages for comment, which will not be compulsory, will not be set from these. [PM]
Method of assessment: A

2105 (S) The discovery and conquest of Mexico and the Antilles. Candidates will be expected to have read: Cristóbal Colón, Textos y documentos completos (ed. Consuelo Varela), Nuevas cartas (ed. Juan Gil, Madrid: Alianza Universidad, 1984); Hernán Cortés, Cartas de relación de la conquista de Méjico (ed. A. Delgado Gómez, Castalia, Madrid), Letters two and three, pp. 159--453; Bernal Díaz del Castillo, Historia de la Conquista de la Nueva España (Porrúa, Mexico, 1960), vol. i, pp. 174--501 and vol. ii, pp. 1--60; Bartolomé de las Casas, Brevísima relación de la destrucción de las Indias (Madrid: Cátedra, 1991); Toribio de Motolinia, Historia de los Indios de la Nueva España (Porrúa, Mexico, 1969), pp. 77–109; Bernardino de Sahagún, Historia general de la Nueva España (Porrúa, Mexico, 1956), Libros 3, 7, and 8. [PM]
Method of assessment: B (3)

2106 (S) Spanish devotional and mystical writing 1577--88. Candidates will be expected to have read: Santa Teresa de Jesús, Moradas del castillo interior; Fray Luis de Granada, Introducción del símbolo de la fe (ed. José María Balcells, Madrid, Cátedra, 1989), pp. 125–231; Fray Luis de León, Rey de Dios, Esposo, and Jesús, from De los nombres de Cristo; San Juan de la Cruz, Llama de amor viva (candidates will also be expected to have read the poem), Malón de Chaide, La conversión de la Magdalena (three vols., ed. Félix García, Clásicos Castellanos, Madrid, 1958), III, 83--178, 190--219. [PM]
Method of assessment: B (3)

2108 (S) Modern Catalan literature. Candidates will be expected to have a general knowledge of the field and a detailed knowledge of at least three authors. Details of the authors and works prescribed for detailed knowledge will be available in the Modern Languages Faculty Office, 41 Wellington Square, at the beginning of the Michaelmas Full Term of the academic year of the examination.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2111 (S) Modern Galician literature. Candidates will be expected to have a general knowledge of the field and a detailed knowledge of at least three authors. Details of the authors and works prescribed for detailed knowledge will be available in the Modern Languages Faculty Office, 41 Wellington Square, at the beginning of the Michaelmas Full Term of the academic year of the examination.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2112 (S, L) Modern Catalan. Candidates will be required to show knowledge of the descriptive analysis of the contemporary language, and will have the opportunity of discussing the historical development of the language where this illuminates present-day usage. Candidates will study the structure of Catalan as spoken and written at the present-day (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics); an overview of the external history of the language and the regional varieties, the current sociolinguistic situation, standardisation and language policy.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2113 (S, L) Modern Galician. Candidates will be required to show knowledge of the descriptive analysis of the contemporary language, and will have the opportunity of discussing the historical development of the language where this illuminates present-day usage. Candidates will study the structure of Galician as spoken and written at the present-day (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics); an overview of the external history of the language and the regional varieties, the current sociolinguistic situation, standardisation and language policy.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2100 (S, L) Bilingualism: Spanish and English. Candidates will study Spanish and English in contrast; Spanish and English in a bilingual context.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2109 (S, P) [4] The work of Alfonso the Wise as author and patron of literature and learning. There will be a compulsory commentary question. Passages for commentary will be set from Primera crónica general (ed. R. Menéndez Pidal, Madrid, 1955), caps. 814--967; Las siete partidas (ed. Real Academia de la Historia, Madrid, 1807), I (Prólogo and i—both versions), ii; II (i, iii-v, ix- xi, xv, xviii, xxi-xxii, xxiv, xxxi); III (xix-xx); Cantigas (ed. Jesús Montoya, Letras hispánicas, 293, Madrid, Cátedra). [PM]
Method of assessment: A

2110 (S, P) [4] Spanish and Portuguese prose romances of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Candidates will be expected to have a knowledge of the field and to have made a special study of at least one romance from each of the following groups: (a) sentimental, (b) chivalric, and (c) pastoral. [PM] (a) Diego de San Pedro, Cárcel de amor (ed. Whinnom); Juan de Flores, Grimalte y Gradissa (ed. Waley); Bernardim Ribeiro, Menina e moça; (b) Spanish Grail Fragments (ed. Pietsch); Amadís de Gaula, Part I (ed. Place); Palmeirim de Inglaterra (ed. Rodrigues Lapa); Tirant lo Blanch, Book I; (c) Jorge de Montemayor, Los siete libros de la Diana (ed. López Estrada); Gil Polo, Diana enamorada (ed. Ferreres); Samuel Usque, ConsolaçÆo às tribulaçäes de Israel, vol. i.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2114 (S, P) [4] Latin American fiction from 1940. Candidates may limit themselves to either Spanish American or Brazilian fiction. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with the broad evolution of this fiction over the period since 1940. They wil also be expected to undertake a specialised study of at least three of the following authors: Jorge Amado, Jorge Luis Borges, Alejo Carpentier, Julio Cortázar, Fernando del Paso, Carlos Fuentes, Gabriel García Márquez, JoÆo GuimarÆes Rosa, Clarice Lispector, Mario Vargas Llosa.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2130 (P) The Galician-Portuguese Cancioneiros. [PM]
Method of assessment: B (3)

2131 (P) The Literature of Portuguese Expansion in Asia. Candidates will be expected to have read four of the following: the texts in Portuguese contained in T.F. Earle and John Villiers, Albuquerque, Caesar of the East (Aris and Phillips, 1990); JoÆo de Barros, Décadas, ed. António BaiÆo, vol. I (Sá da Costa, 1945) (candidates are advised to consult also the electronic edition of the Décadas published by the Centre for the Study of the Portuguese Discoveries); Diogo do Couto, O soldado prático, ed. Rodrigues Lapa (Sá da Costa, 1954); FernÆo Mendes Pinto, PeregrinaçÆo, chaps. 1, 36--104, 203--26; Camäes, Os Lusíadas. [PM]
Method of assessment: B (3)

2133 (P) The Brazilian novel of the North-East 1880--1960.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2134 (P) Twentieth-century Portuguese and Brazilian women writers.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2135 (P) The literature of Portuguese-speaking Africa.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2137 (R, L) [5] Old Church Slavonic in relation to Common Slavonic and Russian. [PM]
Method of assessment: A

2138 (R, L) Comparative Slavonic Philology. Candidates will be expected to show a detailed knowledge of the methods of Comparative Slavonic Philology and to illustrate their answers with examples from more than one Slavonic language. [PM]
Method of assessment: A

2149 (R, L) [6] The structure and history of one of the following languages: Bulgarian, Czech, Macedonian, Polish, Serbo-Croat, Slovak, Slovene, Sorbian, Ukrainian, White Russian. [PM]
Method of assessment: A

(R) The Russian Literary Language, 1648–1917.
Method of assessment: A

(R) Russian Literature of the twentieth century (1890 to the present day).
Method of assessment: A

2170 (R) Russian women's writing.
Method of assessment: B (1)

(R) Russian Drama of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Method of assessment: A

2176 (Gr) The School of the Ionian Islands 1797–1912, with special reference to the works of Solomos, Kalvos, Laskaratos, Matesis, Valaoritis, and Mavilis.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2177 (Gr) The New Athenian School of Poetry 1880–1912, with special reference to the works of Palamas, Drosinis, Gryparis, Krystallis, Malakasis, and Hadzopoulos.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2178 (Gr) The Greek novel 1918--40, with special reference to the works of K. Theotokis, G. Theotokas, Karagatsis, Myrivilis, Venezis, K. Politis, and G.N. Abbot.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2179 (Gr) Greek women writers.
Method of assessment: B (3)

2184 [7] Medieval Welsh tales and romances.
Method of assessment: A

2185 [7] The poets of the Welsh princes.
Method of assessment: A

2186 [7] The poetry of Dafydd ap Gwilym.
Method of assessment: A

2187 The Ulster Cycle of tales.
Method of assessment: A

2188 The classical Irish bardic tradition.
Method of assessment: A

2189 (L) The structure and history of the Welsh language.
Method of assessment: A

2190 (L) The structure and history of the Irish language.
Method of assessment: A

2074 Medieval Hebrew prose and poetry. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the historical background and literary production of Jews in medieval Spain, Provence and Italy. They will be expected to undertake a specialised study of at least two of the following topics: Isaac ibn Sahula, Meshal Haqadmoni, ed. and English translation Raphael Loewe, Oxford 2004. Megillat Ahimaaz, ed. and English translation M. Saltzman, New York, 1924. Judah ibn Tibbon, Ethical Will, ed. I. Abrahams, Philadelphia 1948, vol. 1, pp. 54–99. The Gazelle, medieval Hebrew poems on God, Israel and the soul, ed. R. Scheindlin, Philadelphia, 1991. Wine, women, and death: medieval Hebrew poems on the good life, Raymond P. Scheindlin, Philadelphia, 1986.
Method of assessment: A

2075 Early twentieth-century Hebrew literature. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the work of Central and East European Hebrew writers (some of whom settled in Palestine in the early decades of this century) and in particular of their literary development in the environment of Austrian, Russian, and Polish literature, and their influence in shaping contemporary Hebrew literature. Candidates will be expected to have read stories by Y.H. Brenner, M. Berdyczewski and S.J. Agnon; David Vogel's novel, Hayei nisu'im; a selection of poetry by H. N. Bialik, Saul Tschernichovsky and Leah Goldberg. Texts will be selected from the following works: Y.H. Brenner, Kovetz sippurim (Sifrei Mofet); Y. Lichtenbaum (ed.), Sofreinu (Ahiasaf); T. Carmi (ed.), The Penguin Book of Hebrew Verse; S.J. Agnon, Sefer hama'asim. Sholem Aleichem: Gants Tevye der milkhiker (Vilna: B. Kletskin, 1925 or any other full Yiddish edition); Sh. A-ski (Shloyme-Zanvl Rappoport): Der dibek (in Di yidishe drame fun tsvantsikstn yorhundert (New York, 1977), vol. ii; Dovid Bergelson: Opgang, ed. Joseph Sherman (New York: Modern Language Association, 1999); Selections from the poetry of Dovid Hofshteyn, Peretz Markish, Leyb Kviko and Moyshe Kulbak in A shpigl oyf a shteyn (Tel Aviv: Petez-farlag, 1964); Isaac Bashevis Singer, selected stories from cDer shpigl un andere dertseylungen (Jerusalem: Magnes Press, 1979).
Method of assessment: A

Postwar Polish Literature
Method of assessment: A

Any other subject approved by the Modern Languages Board. Application must be made in writing, and with the support of the candidate's tutor, to the Chairman of the Modern Languages Board, Modern Languages Faculty Office, 41 Wellington Square, not later than the Wednesday of the second week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination.

Key to abbreviation letters

Language identifiers

L Linguistics

F French

G German

I Italian

S Spanish

P Portuguese

R Russian

Gr Greek

Method of assessment

A Three-hour unseen written paper. (* The examination for the Subject `Phonetics and Phonology' will additionally involve a half-hour practical phonetic transcription exercise.)

B An essay or portfolio of essays (the number in parentheses shows the number of essays required), aggregating to about 6,000 words and not exceeding 8,000 words, to be delivered by noon on the Friday of the ninth week of Hilary Term next before the examination.

C An essay or portfolio of essays (the number in parentheses shows the number of essays required), aggregating to about 6,000 words and not exceeding 8,000 words, on a title or titles from a list circulated by the examiners on the Friday of the fifth week of Hilary Term next before the examination, to be delivered by noon on the Friday of the ninth week of Hilary Term next before the examination.

Paper XII subjects which have been designated as Pre-modern are marked [PM] after the paper description.

Notes on mutual exclusions and other restrictions

[1] No candidate in the Honour School of English and Modern Languages may offer both the Special Subject `Modern literary theory' and the Special Topic `The History and Theory of Criticism' from the Honour School of English Language and Literature.

[2] No candidate in the Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages may offer both the Special Subject `Jean-Jacques Rousseau' and the Further Subject `Political and Social Thought' from the Honour School of Modern History.

[3] No candidate in the Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages may offer both the Special Subject `Marcel Proust' and the Further Subject `Literature, Politics, and Society in France 1870-1914' from the Honour School of Modern History.

[4] Candidates offering this paper under the provisions of Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 378, ll. 27--8 as a paper bearing a language identifier for Spanish or Portuguese should answer with especial reference to the respective language.

[5] No candidate in the Honour School of Modern Languages or in a joint Honour School involving Modern Languages may offer both the Special Subject `Old Church Slavonic in relation to Common Slavonic and Russian' and option (1) (`The Old Church Slavonic language') in the Linguistic Studies paper II in Russian (Russian paper V from the Honour School of Modern Languages).

[6] Candidates offering Czech (with Slovak) will not be permitted to offer either of those languages in the Special Subject on the structure and history of one of certain specified languages.

[7] No candidate in the Honour School of English and Modern Languages may offer the papers `Medieval Welsh Language and Literature I or II' from the Honour School of English Language and Literature with any of the Special Subjects `Medieval Welsh tales and romances', `The poets of the Welsh princes' and `The poetry of Dafydd ap Gwilym'.

OBITUARIES

Christ Church

CHARLES THOMAS JOYCE CRIPPS, 24 April 2004; commoner 1935. Aged 87.


Merton College

PIERRE JOSEPH VICTOR BEAUMONT, 1 October 2003; commoner 1970–2. Aged 65.

CHARLES GRAHAM MARTIN, January 2004; commoner 1953–5. Aged 76.

PETER RICHARD WYNDHAM LEIGH, 29 March 2004; commoner 1928–33. Aged 93.

CYRIL POTTER, 4 December 2003; commoner 1943. Aged 77.

DAVID JOHN RADCLIFFE, 25 April 2004; Postmaster 1972–9. Aged 51.

CHARLES JAMES MYDDLETON RICKARDS, 17 April 2004; commoner 1931–4. Aged 91.

JAKE PRESCOTT SMITH, 7 April 2004; commoner 1972–4. Aged 58.


MEMORIAL SERVICE

Linacre College, Merton College, New College, St Antony's College, St Catherine's College, Wadham College, and Wolfson College

A Memorial Service for ALAN LOUIS CHARLES BULLOCK, MA, D.LITT., FBA (the Rt. Hon. Lord Bullock of Leafield), formerly Vice-Chancellor, Founding Master of St Catherine's College, Honorary Fellow of Merton College, Wadham College, Linacre College, New College, St Antony's College, and Wolfson College, will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 12 June, in the University Church of St Mary the Virgin.

After the service refreshments will be served in St Catherine's College.

Volunteers Sought

Oxfam Cowley Road is looking for volunteers. Do you have time to help us? We particularly need people with an interest in, or knowledge of, porcelain, ceramics, pictures, music (especially classical music and collectable vinyl) or books. Share your skills and develop new ones, and help Oxfam overcome poverty and suffering. If you are interested, please call. We appreciate any amount of help—from an hour or two pricing records to someone coordinating internet sales. Tel.: 01865 722951 or call in.
Are you female aged 18–45? We are currently seeking healthy female volunteers to participate in research studies examining factors influencing body image and the relationship between personality and eating behaviour. Studies vary in duration, and expenses are reimbursed. Contact Liz Payne at the Department of Psychiatry. Tel.: 01865 226386, email: elizabethpayne@psych.ox.ac.uk.
Have you ever wondered why some people develop depression? We need healthy, male volunteers (25–60 years) who have NEVER suffered from depression, but have parents, siblings or children who have, to help with research into susceptibility to depression. Participants will be given an honorarium and travel expenses will be reimbursed. Contact Helen at the Department of Psychiatry: 01865 223778 or email helen.scrutton@psych.ox.ac.uk.
Talk: `Why does our planet have mountains?' Speaker: Simon Lamb, Department of Earth Sciences at Oxford University. Blackwell's coffee shop, Tue. 8 June, 7 p.m. High mountain ranges are some of the most prominent features on our planet. Yet geologists are still struggling to understand their origin. What determines their heights, when did they form, and what determines where they occur? Using simple practical demonstrations, this talk explores both the history of ideas about mountains and some of the latest geological thinking.
Marshall & Galpin Solicitors, Family Department. We are an established Oxfordshire private client firm with offices in Oxford, Thame and Abingdon. We have seven specialist family lawyers who advise on a wide range of issues: divorce and separation, children, financial agreements on divorce, pre-nuptial agreements, cohabitee disputes, separation agreements and pensions. Our lawyers are members of the Solicitors Family Law Association. Two members of the team are Deputy District Judges and three are trained mediators. We offer a range of competitive rates and a short free initial interview. French, Spanish and Italian spoken. Other services provided by the firm include property adviceconveyancing, wills & probate, personal injury & medical negligence, employment and businesscommercial. For further information visit our website at: www.marshallgalpin.com or contact Mary Wakem on 01865 792300 (Oxford), Simon Bassett on 01235 555345 (Abingdon), James Stonham 01844 261966 (Thame).
Town and Country Trees: arboricultural contractors; modern arboricultural techniques; local authority approved; safeguarded by full Public Liability insurance. Free advice and quotations. Tel.: 0845 458 2980 or 07976 261850 (mobile).
For general property repairs, odd jobs and maintenance (shelving, cupboards, basic plumbing, decorating and electrical work), give me a call. Excellent references. Contact Anthony Swift on 01865 762576.
Home Architect: Reveal the architectural beauty of your home! When buying a house you often consider making some changes. You want your home to reflect your own individuality. It is a highly personal thing. On the other hand, it is easy to overlook the architectural potential of a house. A few simple professional hints might gain you more space, functional logic and beauty. Sometimes even the smallest changes can make a big difference. Home architect offers assistance and design services for small projects of home improvements, conversions, and extensions. Individual approach to every home, hand drawn design, and affordable costs are our policy. Contact Kasia Brückman de Renstrom DipArch PhD, 7 Carlton Road, Oxford OX2 7RZ. Tel.: 01865 513734.
Museum of the History of Science. We are looking for a part-time cleaner who is available to work three hours a day, Monday to Friday, 9 a.m.–12 noon. The duties involve cleaning the offices and galleries at the Museum premises in Broad Street in the centre of Oxford. Would suit a fit, reliable and trustworthy person who is looking for a part-time post based in a historic building within the University. Ancillary Grade To1: Salary £10,466 p.a. (pro rata). A job description for the post can be seen in the vacancies section of the Museum web site at http://www.mhs.ox.ac.uk/about, or may be obtained from the Museum Administrator. Closing date: Fri. 11 June. Interviews will take place during the week beginning 14 June. When applying (preferably in writing), please include your contact details, information about your previous experience, and the names and contact details of two referees. Applications should be made to Margaret Hauser, the Administrator, Museum of the History of Science, Broad Street, Oxford OX1 3AZ. Tel.: 01865 277280, email alicia.chiu@mhs.ox.ac.uk.
Christ Church seeks an assistant gardener to join the small team caring for its extensive gardens, many of which are seen by thousands of visitors each year. A keen interest in gardening is essential; some plant knowledge is desirable. The benefits include a salary of £12,000–£12,500 per year, 5 weeks' holiday and membership of a contributory pension scheme. Christ Church is an equal opportunities employer. Further details from: The Treasury, Christ Church, Oxford OX1 1DP. Tel.: 01865 276178.
Nuffield College requires 2 hard working and reliable Domestic Assistants (Scouts) to keep offices, staircases, corridors, bathrooms/toilets and public rooms clean. The college offers generous holidays with closed periods at Christmas and Easter, contributory pension scheme, bus pass scheme and car parking. £5.41– £6.14 p.h. 17.5 hours per week (times flexible). Closing date: Fri. 11 June 2004. The College is an equal opportunities employer. For an informal discussion of the post, please contact the Housekeeper, Gill Gardener, on 01865 278 973. For further information and an application form, please contact Jane MacAlister, Personnel Assistant, Nuffield College, New Road, Oxford, OX1 1NF (01865) 278 699.
Central North Oxford. 4/5 bedroom house on 3 floors in a stunning location between the canal and Port Meadow. Walking distance to city centre, near playgrounds and schools. Excellent condition, less than 2 years old, 3 bathrooms, 2 showers, fully fitted kitchen. Would suit family. No smokers or pets please. Available from 16 July 2004 for 1 year. £1,940 p.c.m. Contact: 01865 513569 / 07900 988150 or email irini.skaliora@physiol.ox.uk.
Cumnor. Beautiful house situated in a side street of Cumnor Hill. 5 bedrooms. 3½ bathrooms, 3 large reception rooms, exceptional and secluded garden. Unfurnished, but furnishing may be possible. Rent will depend on length of tenancy and requirements. For further information, contact: 01865 438422 or email yellowsocks@ntlworld.com.
Central North Oxford. Very large family house with spectacular glazed open-plan living space. 3/4 reception rooms, 5/6 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, shower room, well furnished, fully equipped, nice garden, off-street parking for 3 cars, use of small boat on the Thames. Available from August for the 04/05 academic year. £3,750 p.c.m, cleaner and gardener/handyman included. Contact: 01865 316202 or email jj@jjteam.demon.co.uk for photos and further details.
Florence Park. Recently refurbished 1930s house with attractively designed garden. Close to local amenities, park and river. Easy access to central Oxford. Light and cosy; furnished with 2 large bedrooms and dressing room. Available from May for one year or less. Ideal for professional or family. £850 p.c.m. + bills. Ms Jo Dixon. Tel.: 01865 760907, mobile: 07932 724232.
Headington, Kiln Lane. Furnished and newly renovated 2-3 bedroom semi- detached house with c.h., kitchen, bathroom, lounge, dining room, garden, etc. Easy access for bus/car routes to city centre, university departments and the M40 to London. Close to shops, hospitals. Would suit professional university or medical couple. Available for rent initially for 1 year, with renewal possible. No smokers or pets. References required. Available now. £800 p.c.m. plus bills. Contact: 01865 735540.
An Englishman's home is his castle—so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or email us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: 01865 764533, fax: 764777, email: info@qbman.co.uk.
Cowley. Fully furnished 3–4 bed-roomed house with 2 bathrooms, gas c.h., extended fully-equipped kitchen. Small gardens, garage, and off-street parking. Suit family or graduate students. Available 1 July. £1,100 p.c.m. plus bills. Long lease available. References required. njwood@hotmail.com. Tel: 01865 464254 or 07929 003819.
Iffley Fields. Attractive unfurnished 4-bed family home. With accommodation over four floors this house comprises entrance hall with door to drawing room (10 by 4.2m) and stairs down to kitchen/dining area, further door to utility room and basement storage/playroom. 2 doubles and 1 single bedroom together with family bathroom on the first floor, stairs to master bedroom with ensuite bathroom. Gas c.h., secluded garden. Available from end Aug./Sept. for 1 year in the first instance and for at least 3 years if required. £1,450 p.c.m. info@collegeandcounty.biz or Tel.: 01865 722277.
Divinity Road. Large 4-bed family home, completely refurbished to high standard. 2 bathrooms, fully fitted kitchen, living room, and dining room. Small garden. Available 1 July for short let (until end Aug.). £2,000 p.c.m. incl. utilities. info@collegeandcounty.biz.
Temple Cowley area. 3-bedroom semi-detached Victorian house with lovely 100 ft. garden. Open fires, g.c.h., and stripped wooden floors. 2 reception rooms. Local amenities include library, swimming pool and sports centre, parks and primary school. Frequent city centre buses. £840 p.c.m. Available 6 Sept. 2004–14 Feb. 2005. Would suit couple or family. Contact Nic on 01865 776530 or nicbrim@nicbrim.fsnet.co.uk.
Central West Oxford. A choice of two furnished 4-bedroom houses ideal for a visiting family or postgraduate sharers to rent. Presented to an excellent standard throughout and both currently owner- occupied. Available from June/July for 1 year. Please contact Pearce Alder & Co for further details on these and other properties available. Tel.: 01865 246502. Fax: 01865 248482.
6-month let. Tastefully furnished 2-bedroom Victorian terrace available June–Dec. 2 double bedrooms, study, spacious sitting room and separate dining room. Pretty private garden. Ideal for visiting academics £895 p.c.m. Contact Gay Hawley, Finders Keepers Letting Manager. Tel.: 01865 297999 or gayh@finders.co.uk.
Divinity Road. Quality 4-bed home for professionals—sharers or family. Wooden floors, lovely garden, excellent location. Furnished or unfurnished. Also, a good selection of houses in all areas. Premier 01865 792299 or www.Premier- residential-letting.co.uk.
Sutton Courtenay luxury home, ideal for European School and easy access to all areas, Abingdon etc. Stunning, must be viewed. Offers invited over £2,000 p.c.m. Furnished/unfurnished. Premier 01865 792299 or www.Premier- residential-letting.co.uk.
Inner London house available 15 Sept.–15 Dec. 2 bedrooms, study, garden, cat, books. Good transport and shopping. Close to high street with coffee shops, bookstores etc. Direct buses to British Library, West End/theatres and City (25–40 min. in traffic). Reasonable rent to reasonable tenants. Contact 0207 254 7337 or l.brake@bbk.ac.uk.
Inspirational space to do your research/write book. Summertown, North Oxford, light, airy, Scandinavian style house on 2 floors with idyllic romantic garden. 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms with good quality fittings, 2 reception rooms, large, light study, g.c.h, and a piano. Fully equipped, including linen, off-street parking. Lovely walks nearby. Available to non-smoking academic couple from 1 September 2004 for 1 academic year. £1,100 p.c.m (plus 6 week deposit). Contact: 01865 558166 or email karmunia@hotmail.com.
The Wharf House: a range of elegantly furnished 1, 2, and 3 bedroom canal side apartments within a secure gated development. A convenient city base for a short stay with serviced options available. Let Finders Keepers make your time in Oxford a pleasant one. Finders Keepers, 226 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 7BY. Telephone: Oxford 311011. Web site: www.finders.co.uk.
Central North Oxford: 10 minutes' walk from city centre, all main university buildings and parks, also very close to the river: available now for short/long lets in extremely quiet, civilised, large Victorian house in this exclusive, leafy, residential Victorian suburb with large, light airy rooms: 2 luxury fully furnished flats, furnished to a very high standard; each has large double bedroom, drawing room, kitchen, bathroom; on first and second floors. Both available end June. Also: lovely ground floor flat, large double bedroom, large single bedroom, large drawing room, kitchen, bathroom. Available end Sept. Off-street parking, large secluded garden. Tel./fax: 01865 552400.
Upper Wolvercote. Self-contained comfortable modernised one bedroom flat on second floor of old family house overlooking Port Meadow in pretty location. Light and airy, all mod. cons., stunning views. Convenient for University and Oxford city, with rural surroundings. Bedroom with en suite shower, kitchen/dining room. Parking, cycling and/or bus ride 15–20 min. to city centre. Suit non-smoking academic/professional. £695 p.c.m. excl. telephone. Available July. Refs. required. wrldco@aol.com.
Sunny, 1 (double) bedroom first floor flat with garden in Headington. Newly decorated and fully furnished to a high standard, open-plan living room with sofa beds and computer desk, Sky TV, night storage heating, kitchen with breakfast bar and all mod cons. New bathroom with bath and electric shower. The flat has its own entrance and is close to shops, bus routes, hospitals, and Oxford Brookes University. Residential on-street parking easily available. Ideal for professional, lecturer, or post-grad. £695 p.c.m.. Available immediately. Telephone: Sioux Sharpe 07940 397220.
Central North Oxford. 1 and 2 bedroom spacious apartments in a charming grand and secure Victorian converted house, ample parking and within minutes' walk from most central university and hospital departments. Best suited to mature professional and visiting academics. 1-bedroom flats available from July and from mid-Sept. from £750 p.c.m., 2-bedroom flats available from early and late Sept. from £875 p.c.m. All available for the next academic year. Tel.: 01865 516144. Fax 01865 437996. a.fiorentino@ntlworld.com.
Spacious south-facing flat in quiet area of South Oxford, 5 min. from beautiful open-air, fully-heated swimming pool, and only 15 min. walk from city centre. 1 spacious bedroom, tastefully designed large kitchen/sitting area with pitch roof and velux window. Light and airy, fully equipped and refurbished. South-facing terrace garden. Suitable for mature couple or single person. £650 p.c.m. Available from July. Tel.: 01865 429284.
Bardwell Road. Set in this period conversion, a 2-bedroom light and bright apartment with off-street parking and use of communal garden. Within walking distance of university departments and city centre. Available immediately. £1,050 p.c.m. Contact Finders Keepers: Tel.: 01865 302304. www.finders.co.uk.
Central Oxford. 1-bedroom flat available for short-term let. Christ Church only 2 min. walk, Carfax 5 min. walk). Fully furnished and equipped. From £850 p.c.m. incl. (based on 2 month minimum let). Phone calls/broadband/cleaning services extra. Tel.: 07812 156799.
Jesus College offers flats sleeping 3 or 4 persons to visiting academics between 21 July and 14 Sept. All flats are self-contained and fully furnished, incl. pans, crockery, bed linen, etc. The flats are situated in 2 blocks, one off the Woodstock Road and one off Cowley Road. £201.27 p.w. plus VAT for a 3-person flat, £268.36 p.w. plus VAT for a 4-person flat. Gas and electricity are charged separately. Contact the Accommodation Officer at Jesus College, Tel.: 01865 279690 or jo.knighton@jesus.ox.ac.uk.
Central Oxford. Attractive 2-bedroom, 2-bathroom unfurnished luxury flat in Rowland Hill Court, on second floor overlooking communal gardens and St Thomas' Church. Sitting room/dining room, hall, kitchen, bedroom with en suite bathroom, second bedroom, second bathroom, parking place. Very convenient for train station, Saïd Business School, and central Oxford. Available £875 p.c.m. Tel.: 01865 277959. robert.young@wadh.ox.ac.uk.
West Oxford. 3-bedroom furnished house with garden and patio, kitchen, dining room, living room, bathroom with shower/bath, all mod. cons., parking. 15 min. by bike to city centre, frequent buses from end of road, convenient for station. £650 p.m. Suitable for non-smoking visiting couple or small family. Available for July and Aug. 2004. Tel.: 01223 742155. sab52@cam.ac.uk.
Central North Oxford. Light, spacious Edwardian family house overlooking picturesque college playing fields. 3 bedrooms (sleeps 5 + sofabed), 2 bathrooms, large kitchen with Aga, sitting room, garden with big trampoline. Close to city centre. Available 31 July–28 Aug. £500 p.w. Tel.: 01865 512397. mj@martinjennings.com.
OxfordShortlets offers a portfolio of high quality self-catering short let properties as an excellent alternative to hotel/guesthouse and bed and breakfast accommodation in Oxford and the surrounding villages. We have a wide selection of quality homes available for short stay lets from 1 week up to several months. OxfordShortlets provides property rental on a short-term basis for professional individuals, groups or families requiring housing while visiting Oxford for holiday/vacation, business/academic, relocation purposes or temporary accommodation in between homes. For more information, please contact us on tel: 0870 1602325, fax: 0870 1602327, email: admin@oxfordshortlets.co.uk or visit our website at www.oxfordshortlets.co.uk.
Paying guests, visiting academics, welcomed for short or long stays in the comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple, in exclusive, quiet, leafy central north Oxford, within walking distance of all main university buildings, town centre, parks, river, good shops, and restaurants. All rooms have colour TV, tea- /coffee-making facilities, microwave, and refrigerator and/or deep-freeze availability, c.h., and independent heating. Breakfast included in the very moderate terms. Tel./fax: 01865 557879.
Academic Year 2004–5. Looking for shared house or family home? Premier is pleased to invite you to view our excellent selection. Mostly furnished. All comply to safety regulations etc. Premier 01865 792299 or www.Premier- residential-letting.co.uk.
Single room in lovely, furnished, non-smoking house in Iffley, sharing with 2 considerate females in 20s. Garden, parking, and garage for bikes. Very near bus route to city centre and shops. Available 1 July–30 Sept. £330 p.c.m. incl. all bills except telephone. Tel.: 07763 617745.
North Oxford . Attractive, self-contained bedsit with cooking facilities. £70 p.w. plus council tax (at present £10.10 p.w.), electricity and telephone. Tel.: 01865 515264. elsiearnold@hotmail.com.
Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us: 01865 764533, fax us: 764777, or email us: info@qbman.co.uk. Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.
Summer accommodation required. Canadian professor plus research assistant require accommodation in central Oxford between 15 July and 30 Aug. (Dates adjustable). Please contact Professor Nicholas Hudson, Department of English, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1ZI, Canada. Tel.: (604) 822-4084. email: nhudson@interchange.ubc.ca.
Three- to four-bedroom house sought by newly appointed fellow with family. North Oxford, ideally catchment area for SS Philip & James or Wolvercote primary. Required from early Summer, long term preferred, if possible unfurnished. Tel.: 07970 803376. email: guido.bonsaver@pmb.ox.ac.uk


Accommodation Exchange

USA (East Coast). Professor and family looking for house-swap in Oxford for the first two weeks of Aug. Seeking accommodation for 4–6 people (my girls are 10 and 13). We are able to exchange our house in New Haven, Connecticut or/and our house outside Great Barrington, Massachussetts. Our home in Great Barrington has 5 bedrooms, screened porch, and 50 acres of woodland. In the summer Tanglewood (The Boston Symphony orchestra) has its nightly performances only 15 min. away. There are three theatre companies nearby and Jacob Pillow Dance centre is only 20 min. from the house. Downtown Great Barrington is 5 min. away — great shopping facilities, many excellent restaurants. Our 4-bedroom home in New Haven is near downtown and Yale University—plenty of restaurants, museums, theatres. Also, New York City is easily accessible on the train. mnemerson@snet.net or call our local contact Catherine on 01865 514842.
University of California, Santa Barbara. Professor desires house/flat exchange with similar in Oxford. Our Santa Barbara home is a fully-furnished 2-bedroom 2-bathroom semi-detached condominium (all on one floor) in a quiet neighbourhood. 2-car garage, washer and dryer, patio with BBQ. Walking distance from shops, restaurants, and public transportation. 10 min. drive to the University and the beach. No pets, please; non- smokers only. Contact Professor Sue McLeod at McCleod@writing.ucsb.edu.
Old Tuscany: two charming apartments with shaded terraces and orchard, on edge of small hill town near Siena. Short walk to restaurant and shops. Glorious countryside. Flat A (sleeps 4) £350 p.w. Flat B (sleeps 2), £260 p.w. Flats A and B together, £525 p.w. For more information and a brochure, telephone: 01428 714363 or: +39 333 123 6091. Email: uliviera@hotmail.com.
Naples, Florida: rent our beautiful 4-bedroom, 3-bathroom house, on the Gulf Coast, in southwest Florida. This spacious home is located on one of the best private golf courses in the area. The house sleeps up to 8 people, has a huge south-facing heated swimming pool, and comes fully furnished and equipped. The house is available all year round from £800 p.w. (minimum 2-week let, discount for longer lets), Tel. Mark on: 07802 754154. Email: mark@bayrock.co.uk. Web site: website: www.golf-in-naples.com.
Experience the Greek islands of Sporades with Thalpos Holidays. Local villa specialist offers lovely houses and villas in the beautiful islands of Skopelos and Alonissos in the Aegean Sea. Whether you are 2 or 20 persons in the party, and whether you wish to stay in the picturesque town, by the clear blue sea or in the breathtaking countryside, we have just what you are looking for. With more than 10 years of experience we are proud to offer high quality holidays and the very best service. See our programme for 2004 on: www.holidayislands.com, or contact us on email: thalpos@otenet.gr. Tel.: 0030 24240 29036. Fax: 0030 24240 23057.
Live in comfort near the Thames, a short walk to the city centre. Beautiful Victorian house, 4 bedrooms, (two doubles), c/h, large split level living room, dining room, modern and fully equipped kitchen. Bathroom 1: large bath, bidet and WC; Bathroom 2: shower and WC. South facing garden. Possible use of bicycle(s). Available 7+ weeks, Tuesday 13 July–Thursday 2 September 2004. Price negotiable. Telephone: +44(0) 01865 725193.
Heart of Tuscany: 20 min. from San Gimignano, 50 min. from Florence, Pisa and Siena. Beautifully restored farmhouse, 2 apartments, 1–2 bedrooms. Quiet, lovely views of countryside—vineyards and olive groves, woods and fields. Email: giglioli@dsc.unibo.it; Website: www.poderesangiusto.com.
Recharge your batteries in Andalucia! Enchanting mill beside waterfall in foothills of the Sierra Nevada. Spectacular views, peace and inspiration amongst trees and birdsong. Ideal for walkers/writers/artists. 20 min. from fascinating city of Granada; 30 min. from sea. 2 double and 2 twin-bedded rooms, study, terraces, comfortable sitting rooms with log fires. £400–600 p.w. depending on season. Tel.: 01865 274103 or email bobygitha@terra.es.
Headington. 3-bedroom Victorian family house. Sleeps 6 (2 double, 1 twin). 2 bathrooms. Washing machine, fridge/freezer, TV/DVD, BBQ, bicycles. Enclosed garden. Resident cat. 10 min. walk to shops and London/Airport bus stops. 10 min. to Oxford centre. Available 24 July–14 Aug. £350 p.w. Tel.: 01865 226 910 or 01865 744 020. anthea.craven@dphpc.ox.ac.uk.
Barcelona. Beautiful flat available for weekends and breaks in central Barcelona. Sleeps 6. 3 bedrooms, fully equipped kitchen, 2 bathrooms, 2 balconies, large sitting room and stunning dining room. 16ft high ceilings, tiled floors throughout. Great for children: English videos, toys and bilingual babysitter (if needed). Please see www.barcelona-breaks.com or call Chris on 07855 323 934.
Costa del Sol. Available 3–17 July. 2 storey apartment, 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms. Sleeps 8. Main bedroom (en suite) leads to sun terrace, overlooking landscaped gardens and sea. Second bedroom (en suite). Third bedroom (separate bathroom). Fully-equipped kitchen. Living/dining room (ground floor) leads to patio overlooking gardens and sea. Apartment is air conditioned throughout with Sky TV, DVD, CD player. Facilities include communal pool, tennis court, gym, restaurant, bar, parking. 30 min. drive west of Malaga airport. Puerto Cabopino is a 2km walk along the beach. Marbella, Puerto Banus, Mijas are close by. £750 p.w. Tel.: 07971 098 690.
Cévennes: Ardèche/Gard/Lozère borders. 2 spacious, recently refurbished apartments in stone Cevenol `mas', on the periphery of Mont Lozère National Park. Set at about 1,000 ft, in over 2 acres of mature gardens and trees, the house is on the edge of a very quiet hamlet, near a village with shops. Dramatic mountain scenery, with attractive river-swimming, though Uzes, Nimes, Pont du Gard, Avignon, Arles, Montpellier, Southern Rhone vineyards, and Gorges du Tarn are all within easy reach. Easy access via TGV or cheap flights. The larger flat has a vine-covered terrace, adjoining modern kitchen, salon, 3 double bedrooms (sleeps 8+), bathroom and 2 shower- rooms. The second, smaller flat has a large living area, shower-room, a cool covered terrace, and two bedrooms (sleeps 4 or 5). Though entirely separate from the larger flat—and available separately—this may be of particular interest to two families who enjoy holidays together but appreciate privacy and independence. Non-smokers only. Full c.h. available for autumn and winter lets. Prices from £210 p.w. Limited availability in June, July and Aug. Please contact 01527 541360.
Barga, Tuscany. Still availability in June and Sept.! Charming 2-bed, 2- bathroom cottage (sleeps 4) in hills overlooking Garfagnana Valley and Carara mountains, with panoramic views and surrounded by vines and olives. 5 min. from bustling market town of Barga, which offers cultural events, swimming, sports and shops. Comfortable accommodation with rustic charm. Sorry, no children under 12. Please contact Mrs J. Collett on 01672 541147 or jane@casacollett.fsnet.co.uk.
Athens. Accommodation for the 2004 Olympic Games. Newly decorated apartment, situated in Pagrati, a cosmopolitan area close to the metro and all public transport. Pagrati is near the Panathinaiko Stadium (15 mins. walk), Goudi Olympic Complex (15 min. bus ride), central Athens (25 min. walk), and Plaka old Athens (20 min. walk). 1 bedroom (with king size bed), sitting room, dining room/study, fully fitted kitchen with all mod cons, bathroom, and balconies all around, air-conditioning, TV and VCR, washing machine, and linen and bedding provided. Cleaning service available once a week. Available in August. For further information, please contact Vicky at: vicky_samara@hotmail.com.

FACULTY OF PHILOSOPHY

Fixed-term Junior Lecturership in the Philosophy of Physics

Applications are invited for a Junior Lecturership in the Philosophy of Physics. The appointment is for a period of one year, from 1 October 2004, and is not renewable. The successful candidate will be expected to give twenty-four lectures per year on topics within the philosophy of physics and introductory philosophy of science, to give an average of three hours per week of classes and tutorials during term time (the ability to give tutorials/classes in some other subject area would be an advantage but is not essential), and to undertake examining duties as required. Salary £18,265--£19,279 per annum.

Further particulars are available from the Faculty's Web site
(http://www.philosophy.ox.ac.uk), or from the Administrator, Faculty of Philosophy, 10 Merton Street, Oxford OX1 4JJ (telephone: Oxford (2)76925, e-mail: enquiries@philosophy.ox.ac.uk, fax: Oxford (2)76932). There is no application form. Applications, which should include a curriculum vitae, a list of publications, a description of the subjects the applicant is qualified to teach, an account of his or her research interests, and the names and addresses of two referees, should be sent to the Administrator at the above address. The closing date for receipt of applications is Friday, 11 June. Applicants should ask their referees to write to the Administrator by the same date.


BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES AND COMMITTEE OF MANAGEMENT OF THE LANGUAGE CENTRE

Instructorship in Italian

The post is available from 1st October 2004 or as soon as possible afterwards. The appointee will be required to give up to sixteen hours language instruction in each of the ten weeks of the University's three terms each year. In addition to a first degree in a relevant subject, the person appointed will be expected to have experience, and preferably professional qualifications, in language teaching, and to have native competence in Italian. Salary £18,893--£21,852 per annum.

The closing date for applications is 18 June. Further particulars are available from Mrs N. Huffman, 41 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JF (telephone: Oxford (2)70752, e-mail: Noreen.Huffman@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk ).


BALLIOL COLLEGE

Six-hour Stipendiary Lecturership in Ancient Philosophy

Balliol College proposes, if a suitable candidate applies, to appoint a six-hour Stipendiary Lecturer in Ancient Philosophy for the academic year 2004--5. (If a candidate applies who could also provide teaching for the Ethics paper, Balliol may wish to proceed instead to a single ten hour position, salary £14,866; candidates should state whether they would wish to be considered for such a position.)

The lecturer will be required to teach Plato's Euthyphro and Meno; Plato's Republic; and the Nicomachean Ethics. The successful applicant will be expected to teach an average of six hours a week over the academic year. He or she will receive a stipend of £8,920 and certain common room rights.

Applicants should provide a letter of application supported by a curriculum vitae, and should state which parts of the syllabus they would be willing to teach. (The syllabus is available online at http://www.philosophy.ox. ac.uk/links/undergraduate.shtml). They should provide the names of two referees, whom they should ask to write directly to the Senior Tutor. Applications and references must reach the Senior Tutor, Balliol College, Oxford OX1 3BJ, by 11 June. Any prospective applicants wishing to discuss details of the post should contact Dr Helen Steward (e-mail: helen.steward@balliol.ox.ac.uk).


Four-hour Stipendiary Lecturership in Philosophy

Balliol College proposes, if a suitable candidate applies, to appoint a four-hour Stipendiary Lecturer in Philosophy for the academic year 2004--5. (If a candidate applies who could also fulfil the requirements of the six hour lecturership in Ancient Philosophy advertised above, Balliol may wish to proceed instead to a single ten hour position, salary £14,866; candidates should state whether they would wish to be considered for such a position.)

The lecturer will be required to teach the Ethics paper. Ability to teach certain optional papers which are popular in Balliol (e.g. Aesthetics, Philosophy of Religion) would be an advantage.

The successful applicant will be expected to teach an average of four hours a week over the academic year. He or she will receive a stipend of £5,946 and certain common room rights.

Applicants should provide a letter of application supported by a curriculum vitae, and should state which parts of the syllabus they would be willing to teach. (The syllabus is available online at http://www.philosophy.ox. ac.uk/links/undergraduate.shtml.) They should provide the names of two referees, whom they should ask to write directly to the Senior Tutor. Applications and references must reach the Senior Tutor, Balliol College, Oxford OX1 3BJ, by 11 June. Any prospective applicants wishing to discuss details of the post should contact Dr Helen Steward (e-mail: helen.steward@balliol.ox.ac.uk).


Four-hour Stipendiary Lecturership in History

Balliol College proposes, if a suitable candidate applies, to appoint a four-hour Stipendiary Lecturer in Medieval History for Michaelmas Term 2004 and Hilary Term 2005, with the probability of renewal for Trinity Term 2005.

The lecturer will be required to teach either History of the British Isles I (c.300--1087) or II (1042--1330) and either General History I (370--900) or II (1000--1300) in Prelims, and to offer teaching in these periods in the Final Honour School. The lecturer will also be expected to participate in the teaching of the Approaches to History and Historiography papers in Prelims, and the Disciplines of History paper and the Thesis in the Final Honour School.

The successful applicant will be expected to teach an average of four hours a week over the two/three terms. He or she will receive a stipend of £5,946 for the two/three terms and certain common room rights.

Applicants should provide a letter of application supported by a curriculum vitae, and should state which parts of the syllabus they would be willing to teach. (The syllabus is available online at http://www.history.ox.ac.uk/currentunder/ .) They should provide the names of two referees, whom they should ask to write directly to the Senior Tutor. Applications and references must reach the Senior Tutor, Balliol College, Oxford OX1 3BJ, by 11 June. Any prospective applicants wishing to discuss details of the post should contact Dr Simon Skinner (e-mail: simon.skinner@balliol.ox.ac.uk).


CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE

Lecturership in English

Corpus Christi College would like to appoint a twelve-hour Lecturer in Renaissance Literature for Michaelmas Term 2004 only. The lecturer would be required to teach Finals Paper 4 (1509--1642) for Corpus and another college with whom the college has a `swap' arrangement. The person appointed would also teach Mods Paper 1 (1500--1600) for Classics and English Mods. Preference may be given to a candidate who would also be able to give some college classes for English Mods Paper 1 (Text, Context, Intertext).

The lecturer will receive a retainer of £4,332 for the term plus piece-rates for teaching over nine hours per week. He or she will also be entitled to free lunches and dinners in term.

Applications (together with the names of three referees) should be sent to the College Secretary, Corpus Christi College, Oxford OX1 4JF, by 10 June. It is the candidate's responsibility to ask referees to submit their references direct to the College Secretary by the same date.


EXETER COLLEGE

Usher Cunningham Studentship in Medical Sciences

In association with the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology

Exeter College, in association with the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, expects to elect to an Usher Cunningham Studentship for graduate work in Oxford in Medical Sciences.

The studentship would be tenable from 1 October 2004 for one year, renewable for up to three years, and would pay full fees plus a grant for maintenance at the Medical Research Council rate for Home and EU students.

Applicants must be under twenty-five years of age on 1 October 2004, and the holder of the studentship must be or become a member of Exeter College. The successful candidate must also be accepted by the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology to read for a postgraduate degree in medical science.

The further particulars may be obtained from the Academic Administrator, Exeter College, Oxford OX1 3DP (e-mail: academic.administrator@exeter.ox.ac. uk), or on the Exeter College Web site, http://www.exeter.ox.ac.uk/news/.

Applications should include a curriculum vitae and should be made in writing by Friday, 11 June, to the Academic Administrator, Exeter College, Oxford OX1 3DP. Applications should also include the names of two referees, whom applicants should ask to write directly to the Academic Administrator by the closing date.


GREEN COLLEGE

Joan and Richard Doll Medical Tutorial Fellowship

Green College intends to appoint a Medical Tutorial Fellow responsible, as the focal point within the college, for the provision of supplementary college-based teaching to Oxford University graduate entry medical students who become members of the college. Appointment will be for two years initially and may be renewable for a further two years. The fellowship will be available as soon as possible after selection has taken place. It is expected that it will be held in conjunction with another appointment. The college looking for someone with an enthusiasm for working with medical students and prepared to teach science in the context of medicine. The fellowship is open equally to clinicians and to non-clinicians familiar with the learning needs of medical students.

The Medical Tutorial Fellowship is a non-Governing Body Fellowship which provides access to all college facilities, dining rights, and an honorarium of £2,250 per annum. The duties will include both the direct teaching of graduate entry medics and co-ordinating their teaching by other medically or scientifically qualified fellows. The Medical Tutorial Fellow will thus work closely as part of a college team which includes Clinical Tutorial Fellows, other fellows, and a small group of clinically qualified Teaching Associates. The commitment is four to five hours per week on average to be spent on these responsibilities, though the loading in any one week is likely to be variable.

Application forms and further notes for applicants are available from the Warden's Secretary (telephone: Oxford (2)74775, e-mail: romola.coope@green.ox.ac.uk). They should be returned with a full curriculum vitae to the Warden, Green College, Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6HG, no later than 8 June.


JESUS COLLEGE

Appointment of Admissions Officer

Jesus College has created a new post for a full-time, responsible and efficient Admissions Officer to handle both undergraduate and graduate admissions, and to assist with its academic administration. The post offers an interesting opportunity for someone with excellent organisational, IT, and interpersonal skills to have a significant role in one of the college's most important functions, the selection of its students.

Applicants should have a high level of competence in database work (in particular, experience in Microsoft Access and excel), together with word-processing using Microsoft Word. The post-holder will need good organisational skills, with the ability to use his/her own initiative, to work under pressure at busy times, and to meet deadlines. Knowledge or experience of the University and/or its colleges would be an advantage.

It is hoped to fill the post from July 2004 or as soon as possible thereafter. The hours of work are thirty-five per week, with flexibility require to work longer hours during undergraduate admissions (time off allowed in lieu). The salary is on the academic-related 1 scale (18,893--£21,009 per annum). Other benefits include a contributory staff pension scheme (the Oxford Staff Pension Scheme), holiday entitlement of thirty-eight days, and free lunch when on duty.

Further particulars are available from the Assistant Bursar, Jesus College, Oxford OX1 3DW (telephone: Oxford (2)79716, e-mail: rosemary.frame@jesus.ox.ac.uk), or from http://www.jesus.ox.ac.uk. Applicants should submit an application form (available from the Assistant Bursar), a curriculum vitae, and a covering letter to the Assistant Bursar by the closing date of Tuesday, 8 June. Applicants should also ask two referees to write to the Assistant Bursar by the closing date. Short-listing will be completed on Wednesday, 9 June, and it is expected that interviews will take place on Tuesday, 15 June.


MANSFIELD COLLEGE

Fixed-term Fellowship in Politics

Mansfield College invites applications for a three-year fixed-term Fellowship in Politics, with effect from 1 October 2004. The successful candidate will be a member of the college's governing body. The salary will be on an age-related scale, up to a maximum of £27,174 (under review). A housing allowance of £2,664 is also payable.

The post is available as a result of the award to the Fellow and Tutor in Politics, Professor Michael Freeden, of an ESRC Professorial Fellowship for three years. The appointee will work with the college's other Politics Philosophy and Economics and Modern History Tutors.

The fellow appointed will be required to undertake up to twelve hours' teaching per week, averaged over three eight-week terms, of which eight will be for the college and four for the Department of Politics and International Relations. The appointee will be expected to teach Theory of Politics and one other core paper (except Comparative Government) and at least two option papers.

Further particulars and details of the application and interview process may be obtained from the Academic Administrator, Mansfield College, Oxford OX1 3TF (telephone Oxford (2)70982, e-mail: linda.given@mansfield.ox.ac.uk), and on the college's Web site, http://www.mansfield.ox.ac.uk.

The closing date for applications and references is 21 June. It is hoped to hold interviews in the second half of July.

Mansfield College and the University of Oxford are equal opportunities employers.


MERTON COLLEGE

Stipendiary Lecturership in Ancient History

Merton College proposes to appoint a Stipendiary Lecturer in Ancient History for one year from 1 October 2004, to teach up to eight hours per week. The lecturer will be paid at a point on the stipendiary lecturers' scale (currently £12,177--£14,084 per annum, plus a book allowance of £637), with entitlement to join USS and membership of common room with the right to take lunch and dinner free of charge.

The successful candidate, who should have completed (or be about to complete) his/her doctoral studies, will be able to teach over a wide range of Greek and/or Roman History. Some knowledge of Greek/and or Roman archaeology would be an advantage. In addition to his/her teaching duties, the successful candidate will be expected to attend Warden and Tutors' meetings during term, to help with the organisation of Classics, Ancient and Modern History and Classical Archaeology and Ancient History within college, to lend pastoral support to students reading for these degrees, and to assist with admissions.

Applicants should send a copy of their curriculum vitae, including a statement of their teaching range to the Tutorial Secretary, Merton College, Oxford OX1 4JD (telephone: Oxford (2)76329, fax: Oxford (2)86500, e-mail: clare.bass@admin.merton.ox.ac.uk), by 10 June, and should ask two referees to write directly to the Tutorial Secretary by this date. Interviews will be held in college in the week beginning 21 June.


ST CROSS COLLEGE

Appointment of Junior Dean

St Cross College proposes to appoint a Junior Dean with effect from 1 October. The Junior Dean will be required to reside in college, free of charge, and will also receive free lunches, free telephone line rental and a stipend of £1,250 per annum.

The Junior Dean will assist the college officers in the smooth running of the college, with particular responsibility for the supervision of the main site at night. Applicants must be graduates and it is expected that they will be pursuing advanced study or research.

Applications, with a full curriculum vitae, should reach the Master, St Cross College, Oxford OX1 3LZ, by Monday, 14 June. Applicants should inform the Master of the names, addresses, and telephone numbers of two referees and arrange for their referees to write directly to the Master by 14 June. If the applicant is a registered graduate student, one of the referees should be the applicant's university supervisor.


ST HILDA'S COLLEGE

Appointment of Academic Office Secretarial Assistant

St Hilda's College is seeking to appoint a Secretarial Assistant from 1 August 2004 to work in the college's Academic Office. Duties will include work for tutors and students, and providing general clerical support for a very busy office.

Applicants should be discreet, well organised, have a good standard of education, relevant secretarial and IT skills, and the ability to work quickly, accurately, and independently.

The salary will be within the university clerical grade 3 scale (currently £13,547-- £15,603 per annum or pro rata). The post is for one year in the first instance, but with the possibility of continuation. The job is full time (thirty-five hours per week) but a part-time post would be considered if the hours could be shared between two people. The college is an equal opportunities employer, and the post is open to both men and women.

Further particulars and an application form should be obtained from the college's Web site
(http://www.sthildas.ox.ac.uk/news) or from the Academic Office, St Hilda's College, Oxford OX4 1DY (telephone: Oxford (2)76815, e-mail: college.office@st-hildas.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for applications is Tuesday, 15 June.


ST HUGH'S COLLEGE

Fixed-term Stipendiary Lecturership in Modern History

Applications are invited for a Stipendiary Lecturership in Modern History (principally eighteenth-century) for two years beginning on 1 October 2004. The average teaching expected will be seven hours per week, made up of tutorials and classes. The person appointed will be expected to teach the History of the British Isles 1685--1830 and General (European) History 1715--99, for St Hugh's and for colleges with which St Hugh's has a reciprocal arrangement. An ability to teach earlier periods of General (European) History and Theories of the State would be an advantage. The person appointed will also be expected to assist the other tutors at St Hugh's in teaching first- and second-/third-year papers in Approaches to History and Disciplines of History. The person appointed will be expected to share responsibility for the organisation of undergraduate history teaching, and to participate in undergraduate admissions procedures.

The lecturer will be paid on the stipendiary lecturers' scale (currently equivalent to £11,752 for a seven-hour post---under review). The lecturer will have Senior common room rights, including a meal entitlement.

Applications, together with a curriculum vitae and the names and contact details of two referees, should be sent by post to Dr John Robertson, St Hugh's College, Oxford OX2 6LE, by Monday 7 June. Further Particulars are available from Dr Robertson (e-mail: john.robertson@history.ox.ac.uk, telephone: Oxford (2)74976). Candidates should state in their applications which papers they are able to teach (details of papers are available on the Modern History Faculty Web site at http://www.history.ox.ac.uk). They should ask their referees to write to Dr John Robertson by 7 June.

St Hugh's College is an equal opportunities employer.


ST JOHN'S COLLEGE

Appointment of Academic Administrator

Applications are invited for the post of Academic Administrator. The successful applicant will have responsibility for the general supervision of the College Office, which looks after the academic affairs of the college. The post will offer a challenging opportunity to work with a wide range of people within and without the college, to deploy high-level personal, management, and communications skills across the wide range of the college's affairs, and to play a part in the development of the college's procedures. The successful applicant will have good experience in administration, preferably (but not essentially) in a university or educational environment. It is hoped that the successful applicant will be able to be in post by the beginning of September 2004. The salary will be within the range £28,498--£36,712 (ALC grade 3/4).

Further particulars may be had from the College Office, St John's College, Oxford OX1 3JP (e-mail: college.office@sjc.ox.ac.uk), or from the college Web site, http://www.sjc.ox.ac.uk. The closing date for applications is Monday, 21 June.


ST PETER'S COLLEGE

Stipendiary Lecturership in Politics (fixed-term and part-time)

St Peter's College wishes to appoint a Stipendiary Lecturer to replace part of Gavin Williams' teaching for two years with effect from October 2004. The average teaching requirement will be three hours per week, in tutorials and classes. The person appointed will be expected to teach: Introduction to Politics (Prelims); at least one of the following three core papers in the Final Honour School: Comparative Government; British Politics and Government in the Twentieth Century; Theory of Politics; and at least one Politics option in the Final Honour Schools of PPE and Modern History and Politics (details are available at http://www.politics.ox.ac.uk/tea ching/ug/readinglist/.)

The successful candidate will also be expected to share responsibility for the administration of undergraduate Politics teaching in the college.

Remuneration will be pro rata on points 1 or 2 of the college's scale for Stipendiary Lecturers (currently £4,459 or £4,723 for a three-hour post) . The lecturer will have senior common room rights, including an entitlement to free meals in term, and in the vacation at times when the kitchens are open, and the shared use of a room in college for teaching purposes.

Letters of application, together with a curriculum vitae and the names and contact details of two referees, should be sent to the College Secretary, St Peter's College, Oxford OX1 2DL (telephone: Oxford (2)78864, e-mail: olivia.henley@spc.ox.ac.uk), by Wednesday, 9 June. Candidates should state in their applications which undergraduate papers they are able to teach. They should ask their referees to write to the College Secretary by the closing date (e-mail is acceptable for references, but applications should be sent as hard copy). Interviews are likely to be held during the week beginning 21 June.

Question concerning the appointment may be directed to Dr Hartmut Mayer (e-mail: hartmut.mayer@spc.ox.ac.uk).


Stipendiary Lecturership in Biological Sciences (fixed-term and part-time)

St Peter's College wishes to appoint a Stipendiary Lecturer in Biological Sciences for one year from October 2004. It is expected that the teaching requirement will be three to six hours per week, with the precise amount depending on whether the college's vacancy for a new Tutorial Fellow in Biological Sciences has been filled by October.

The person appointed to the lecturership will be required to teach in at least two of the following areas: environmental biology, animal biology, biology of plant and animal disease, evolution, biostatistics, plant and microbial biology, cell and developmental biology. He or she will also be expected to report on students' progress, set and mark collections, participate in admissions-related activities (including interviewing and Open Days) and undertake organisational duties for the undergraduate Biological Sciences degree course within the college. Should the appointment of the new Tutorial Fellow be delayed beyond October, the Stipendiary Lecturer would be asked to take on the role of Director of Studies for the undergraduate Biological Sciences degree within the college, with responsibility for arranging additional external teaching as necessary.

Remuneration will be pro rata on the college's scale for stipendiary lecturers (currently £17,839--£21,852 per annum for a twelve-hour post). The lecturer will have senior common room rights, including an entitlement to free meals in term, and in the vacation at times when the kitchens are open, and use of a room in college for teaching purposes.

Letters of application, together with a curriculum vitae and the names and contact details of two referees, should be sent to the College Secretary, St Peter's College, Oxford OX1 2DL (telephone: Oxford (2)78864, e-mail: olivia.henley@spc.ox.ac.uk), by Friday, 18 June. Candidates should state in their applications which undergraduate papers they are able to teach. They should ask their referees to write to the College Secretary by the closing date (e-mail is acceptable for references, but applications should be sent as hard copy).

Questions concerning the appointment may be directed to the Senior Tutor, Dr Stuart Turnbull (e-mail: stuart.turnbull@spc.ox.ac.uk).


QUEENS' COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE

Appointment of Development Director

Founded in 1448, Queens' is a friendly and welcoming college in the centre of Cambridge.

Queens' combines an outstanding academic record with a tradition of being a stimulating and inclusive college. It is an architecturally varied college with buildings dating from its foundation up to the 1990s.

Its 550th anniversary appeal raised over £5 million to fund bursaries for students.

Queens' College now seeks an outstanding individual to establish and run the college's development activities, building on the success of its Q550 Campaign. The Development Director will lead the development agenda, reporting to the President.

The post-holder will develop and implement a fund-raising strategy and create the case for support in line with the college's overall strategic objectives. The Development Director will establish appropriate systems and structures for the development office, incorporating the current alumni team.

As a fellow of the college, the post-holder will work closely with the governing body and senior management.

Personal presence and credibility will enable the Development Director to engage the support of Queens' community. The Development Director will play a leading role in cultivating and requesting major gifts.

Candidates should have a track record in income generation and the ability to work with alumni, benefactors and donors at the highest levels. Applicants will have outstanding communication, entrepreneurial, leadership and managerial skills as well as a high degree of self-motivation. Salary: circa £45,000--£55,000, plus benefits

A commitment to the vision and values of Queens' College will be key to success in the role.

Applicants should send a curriculum vitae to Joanna Logan, Execucare, 34 Ebury Street, London SW1W 0LU (e-mail: queens@execucare.com), by 4 June.

Friday 28 May

CONFERENCE: `History and the public understanding of science', Maison Française, 9.30 a.m.–6 p.m. (continues tomorrow, at the same time).

MR RECEP TAYYIP ERDOGAN (Prime Minister of Turkey): `Why the European Union needs Turkey' (European Studies Centre Lecture), Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's, 5 p.m. (admission by ticket only—applications to: dev.office@sant.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR P. BOITANI: `Dante, Milton, and the poetry of Christian Europe' (Oxford Italian Association: Rowe Memorial Lecture), Grove Auditorium, Magdalen, 5 p.m. (entrance through Longwall).

FR. TIMOTHY RADCLIFFE, OP: `The crisis of truth-telling in our society' (Eric Symes Abbott Memorial Lecture), the chapel, Keble, 5.30 p.m.


Saturday 29 May

CONFERENCE: `History and the public understanding of science', Maison Française, 9.30 a.m.–6 p.m. (second day).

ORGAN RECITAL: Malcolm Pearce, the chapel, Magdalen, 5.25 p.m. (admission free).


Sunday 30 May

THE REVD CANON PROFESSOR GEORGE PATTISON preaches the Sermon for Whit Sunday, Cathedral, 10 a.m.

EDITHA KONWITSCHNY (violin) and LLYR WILLIAMS (piano) perform music by Schubert and Janácek, the hall, Balliol, 9 p.m.


Monday 31 May

J.-L. LEUTRAT: `Alain Resnais: Hiroshima mon amour' (lecture series: `Les cinéastes de la "modernité" en France'), Maison Française, 5 p.m.

DR D. ROOKE: `Solomon and his women: a Handelian triptych' (seminar series: `The Bible in art, music, and literature'), Danson Room, Trinity, 5 p.m.


Tuesday 1 June

E.E. LEACH: `Can dogs sing? Music, hunting, and princely advice-literature in fourteenth-century France' (Graduate Students' Colloquia), Denis Arnold Hall, Music Faculty, 5.15 p.m.


Wednesday 2 June

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `The history of the University', 11 a.m. (see information above).

MARK WILLIAMS: organ recital, the chapel, Queen's, 1.10 p.m. (admission free, with retiring collection).

MARIO VARGAS LLOSA (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor of European Comparative Literature): `Civilised barbarians' (lecture series: `The temptation of the impossible: Victor Hugo's Les Misérables'), Nelson Mandela Lecture Theatre, Saïd Business School, 5 p.m.

Y. ZARIFI: `Peaceful demonstrations: problems of choral identity and location in Aristophanes' Peace' (seminar series: `Dionysus recast'), Fraenkel Room, Corpus Christi, 5 p.m.

BILL SHEEHAN: `The transit of Venus of 8 June 2004: a once (or twice) in a lifetime event, and why it will be so worth watching' (illustrated talk, including videotape of the last transit in 1882), Lecture Theatre, University Museum of Natural History, 5 p.m.

DR E. BAIGENT: `Geography' (Oxford Dictionary of National Biography seminars: `Problems and methods in biography'), Modern History Faculty Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR C. KUZNITZ: `Yiddish scholarship and politics: YIVO in inter-war Eastern Europe' (David Patterson Seminars), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor, 7 p.m.


Thursday 3 June

STUDY-DAY: `Les écrivains devant l'image', Maison Française, 9.30 a.m.–4 p.m.

DR D. JOSHI: `Feminist research: breaking shackles—whose and why?' (International Gender Studies Centre seminars: `Research methodologies: theories—realities'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

W. VAUGHAN: `After Napoleon: Turner's Continental tours' (lecture series: `Turner and Napoleon'), Headley Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean Museum, 5 p.m.

LORD PUTTNAM: `The tales of Robin Hood' (lecture), the Auditorium, Magdalen, 5 p.m.

R. FABER: `The Oxford DNB online': a demonstration of the online dictionary to be published in September 2004 (Pre-publication seminars: `The Dictionary of National Biography past, present, and future'), Rainolds Room, Corpus Christi, 5 p.m.


Friday 4 June

MARIO VARGAS LLOSA (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor of European Comparative Literature): `From heaven above' (lecture series: `The temptation of the impossible: Victor Hugo's Les Misérables'), Nelson Mandela Lecture Theatre, Saïd Business School, 5 p.m.

JOHN MONKS (General Secretary, European TUC): `Is Europe still the workers' best friend?' (lecture), Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

DR SIMON J.D. GREEN: `Imperialists and Commonwealth men' (Chichele Lectures 2004: `In its pomp: All Souls 1914–15'), Old Library, All Souls, 5 p.m.


Saturday 5 June

ORGAN RECITAL: Mark Swinton, the chapel, Magdalen, 5.25 p.m. (admission free).


Sunday 6 June

THE REVD JOHN BUDD preaches the Sermon for Trinity Sunday, Queen's, 10 a.m.


Monday 7 June

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Setting objectives', 12.45 p.m., and `Assertiveness'—day 1, 2 p.m. (see information above).

J.-L. LEUTRAT: `Alain Resnais: L'Année dernière à Marienbad' (lecture series: `Les cinéastes de la "modernité" en France'), Maison Française, 5 p.m.


Tuesday 8 June

SAÏD BUSINESS SCHOOL: start of third Oxford Finance Symposium, 9 a.m. (continues until 17 June; details from Dr Peg Katrizky, SBS).

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Presentation skills'—day 1, 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

RICHARD FORD: `The things that help, the things that hurt: a memoir' (Esmond Harmsworth Lecture in American Arts and Letters), Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

G. KREUZER: `Voices from beyond: trimming Verdi's Don Carlos in German-language theatres' (Graduate Students' Colloquia), Denis Arnold Hall, Music Faculty, 5.15 p.m.


Wednesday 9 June

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Recruitment and selection for administrators'—day 1, and `Time management—for those who manage their own time', both 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

DANIEL TURNER: organ recital, the chapel, Queen's, 1.10 p.m. (admission free, with retiring collection).

MARIO VARGAS LLOSA (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor of European Comparative Literature): `The temptation of the impossible' (lecture series: `The temptation of the impossible: Victor Hugo's Les Misérables'), Nelson Mandela Lecture Theatre, Saïd Business School, 5 p.m.

H. EASTMAN: `Greek tragdy in contemporary political theatre', and A. WILLIS: `Trojan Women in performance: adapting Euripides' play for the modern stage, 2004' (seminar series: `Dionysus recast'), Fraenkel Room, Corpus Christi, 5 p.m.

DR J. MADDICOTT: `Medieval history' (Oxford Dictionary of National Biography seminars: `Problems and methods in biography'), Modern History Faculty Building, 5 p.m.

DR D. MATT: `The Zohar, masterpiece of Kabbalah: a new annotated translation' (David Patterson Seminars), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor, 7 p.m.