Oxford University Gazette: 23 September 2004

Oxford University Gazette, Vol. 135, No. 4706: 23 September 2004

Note: due to the requirements of the Data Protection Act, some elements of the printed Gazette are not reproduced in the Web Gazette.

The following supplements were published with this Gazette:

  • (1) to no. 4706: Recognition of Distinction 2003-4: successful applicants
  • (2) to no. 4706: University's Corporate Planning Statement 2004

COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of Congregation:

Ahmad, B., Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Axford, J.G., MA, Kellogg College

Ball, L.J., BA, MA, Hertford

Bannon, M.J., Wadham

Bingham, R.G., Faculty of Physical Sciences

Chalmers, Sir Neil, MA, Wadham

Chamberlain, G.F.L., MA, St Benet's Hall

Coates, G., Faculty of Social Studies

Denzer, W., Sub-department of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Farmery, A.D., Wadham

Fox, R.A., Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Gardam, T.D., MA, St Anne's

Guo, K., Structural Genomics Consortium

Holmes, J., Faculty of Physical Sciences

Jaffe, H.W., St Cross

Kerr, M.A., St Hugh's

Kim, T., Faculty of Physical Sciences

Konig, A., Saïd Business School

Linieres-Hartley, P.A., Wadham

MacManaway, N., MA, Somerville

May, R., D.Phil., Merton

Miller, E.J., Magdalen

Milstein, J., Faculty of Physical Sciences

Moher, M., Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Murphy, V.A., Kellogg College

Neville, D.E., Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Phillips, R.R., Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Pila, J., St Catherine's

Povey, T., University

Rampton, E., St John's

Rueda, F.D., Merton

Sheddick, A.S., Department for Continuing Education

Stears, M.D., MA, D.Phil., University

Taylor, C.W., MA, Green College

Todryk, S.M., Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine

von Delft, F., Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine

Wildon, M.J., University

Wimalaratna, S.H., Faculty of Clinical Medicine


DIVISIONAL BOARDS AND BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 8 October, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • CONGREGATION 5 October 12 noon [Note: Congregation will meet in the University Church]
    • 1 Retiring Vice-Chancellor's Oration
    • 2 Admission of Vice-Chancellor for 2004–9
    • 3 Admission of Pro-Vice-Chancellors
    • 4 Admission of Clerks of the Market
  • CONGREGATION 12 October 2 p.m.
    • 1 Voting on Statute: University Discipline
    • 2 Voting on Changes in Congregation Regulations: Conduct of Business in Congregation
    • 3 Voting on Resolution concerning the Review of Governance
  • * List of forthcoming Degree Days
  • * List of forthcoming Matriculation Ceremonies

CONGREGATION 5 October 12 noon

Due to the need to carry out urgent repairs to the ceiling of the Sheldonian Theatre, the meeting of Congregation will be held in the Univesity Church of St Mary the Virgin, High Street.

1 Retiring Vice-Chancellor's Oration

Mr Vice-Chancellor will address the House.


2 Admission of Vice-Chancellor for 2004–9

J.A. HOOD, MA, M.PHIL. (BE, PH.D. Auckland), will be admitted to office as Vice-Chancellor for five years from October 2004.


3 Admission of Pro-Vice-Chancellors

The following persons will be nominated by the Vice-Chancellor to be his deputies for the year 2004–5 and will be admitted to office:

W.D. MACMILLAN, MA (B.SC., PH.D. Bristol), Fellow of Hertford College (Academic)

PROFESSOR P.A. SLACK, MA, D.PHIL., Principal of Linacre College (Academic Services and University Collections)

PROFESSOR S.D. IVERSEN, MA, D.PHIL., D.SC. (MA, PH.D., SC.D. Cambridge), Fellow of Magdalen College (Planning and Resource Allocation)

SIR PETER NORTH, CBE, QC, DCL, Principal of Jesus College

R.G. SMETHURST, MA, Provost of Worcester College

DAME FIONA CALDICOTT, DBE, BM, B.CH., MA, Principal of Somerville College

PROFESSOR A.M. CAMERON, CBE, MA (PH.D. London), Warden of Keble College

SIR ALAN BUDD, MA, D.PHIL. (B.SC. London, PH.D. Cambridge), Provost of Queen's College

PROFESSOR R.W. AINSWORTH, MA, D.PHIL., Master of St Catherine's College


4 Admission of Clerks of the Market

W. HAYES, MA, D.PHIL. (M.SC., PH.D. Dublin), Honorary Fellow of St John's College, nominated by the Chancellor, and M.H. KEEN, MA, D.PHIL., FBA, FSA, F.R.HIST.S., Emeritus Fellow of Balliol College, nominated by the Vice-Chancellor, will be admitted to office as Clerks of the Market for the year 2004–5.


CONGREGATION 12 October 2 p.m.

¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that written notice of any intention to vote against, or any proposed amendment to, the statute at item 1 below, to the proposed changes in Congregation regulations at item 2 below, or to the resolution at item 3 below, signed in each case by at least two members of Congregation, must be given to the Registrar by noon on Monday, 4 October (see the note on the conduct of business in Congregation at the end of `University Agenda').

1 Voting on Statute: University Discipline

Explanatory note

The following changes, promoted by Council on the recommendation of the Committee on the University Statutes and Regulations, amend the existing Statute concerning University discipline in the light of further experience of the new disciplinary procedures which came into effect on 1 October 2002.

Section 1 provides that a student member who is banned, rusticated or suspended under Statute XI is debarred from entering or participating in any University examination unless a University Court otherwise orders. Section 2 enlarges the membership of the Appeal Court from two members to five members.

Section 3 provides for action to be taken in the event that a breach of the disciplinary regulations relating to conduct in examinations is neither intentional nor reckless.

WHEREAS it is expedient to amend certain existing provisions in the statute concerning University discipline, THE UNIVERSITY ENACTS AS FOLLOWS.

[Note: new wording is indicated by underlining.]

1 In Statute XI, concerning University Discipline (Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4633, 9 October 2002), as amended on 21 January 2003 (Gazette, Vol. 133, p. 663), 18 May 2004 (Gazette, Vol. 134, pp. 966–7) and 29 June 2004 (Gazette, Vol. 134, p. 1144), in Part A delete existing section 1 and substitute as follows:

`1. (1) In this statute unless the context otherwise requires the following words and expressions shall have the following meanings:

(a) for the purposes of this statute and of any regulations made under this statute, the words "member of the University" or "student member" mean any person so defined under the provisions of Statute II or any other person who, though not a member or student member under those provisions, is a candidate for any university examination;

(b) "ban" means withdraw the right of access to specified premises or facilities of the University for a fixed period or pending the fulfilment of certain conditions;

(c) "college" means any college, society, or Permanent Private Hall recognised by or established under Statute V;

(d) "expel" means deprive a member permanently of his or her membership of the University;

(e) "harassment" means unwanted and unwarranted conduct towards another person which has the purpose or effect of:

(i) violating that other's dignity; or

(ii) creating an intimidating, hostile, degrading, humiliating or offensive environment for that other; (f) "in a university context" means any of the following:

(i) on university or college premises;

(ii) in the course of university activity within or outside Oxford whether academic, sporting, social, cultural, or other;

(g) "rusticate" means withdraw the right of access to the premises and facilities of the University for a fixed period or until the fulfilment of specified conditions;

( h) "suspend" means withdraw the right of access referred to in sub-section (g) above for a fixed or indeterminate period or until the fulfilment of specified conditions where action is taken as an interim measure pending further investigation, or where action is taken under the statutes or regulations for non-disciplinary reasons.

(2) Unless a University court otherwise orders a student member who is banned, rusticated or suspended under this Statute shall not for so long as the ban suspension or rustication is in force be entitled to enter or participate in any University examination for the award of any degree, diploma, certificate or prize or other award of the University or any qualifying examination for entry into such examination.

(3) For the purposes of sub-section (2) above "examination" includes the submission and assessment of a thesis, dissertation, essay, practical work, or other coursework and any other exercise which is not undertaken in formal examination conditions that counts towards or constitutes the work for a degree or other academic award.'

2 Ibid., in Part B, in section 26(1), delete the word `two' and insert the word `five'.

3 Ibid., in Part C, in section 32, insert a new sub-section (3) as follows and renumber existing sub-sections (3)–(4) as (4)–5):

`(3) If it appears to the Proctors after due investigation that a student member has committed a breach of the regulations referred to in section 6(2) above (disciplinary regulations relating to conduct in examinations) but are satisfied that the breach is neither intentional nor reckless they may remit the case to the examiners with a recommendation that they do one or more of the following:

(a) reduce the mark awarded to any piece of work;

(b) award no mark to or disregard any piece of work;

(c) substitute an alternative mark for any piece of work;

(d) reduce by one or more classes any degree classification;

(e) permit a student member to re-sit an examination or resubmit a piece of work on such conditions as they think fit;

(f) award a pass degree instead of an honours degree.'

Regulations to be made by Council if the Statute is approved

In Council Regulations 37 of 2002, concerning appeals to the Appeal Court, (Supplement (2) to Gazette No. 4630, 24 July 2002, p.1526) renumber existing regulation 1.4 as 1.4(1) and insert new sub-sections 1.4(2) and (3) as follows:

[Note: new wording is indicated by underlining.]

`(2) the High Steward shall invite each member of the Appeal Court in rotation to hear and determine an application for permission to appeal and any subsequent appeal sitting alone.

(3) the application and any subsequent appeal shall be heard by the first member of the Court who is able to accept the High Steward's invitation.'


2 Voting on Changes in Congregation Regulations: Conduct of Business in Congregation

Explanatory note

The following changes to Parts 1–4 of Congregation Regulations 2 of 2002 (Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4633, 9 October 2002, p.160) aim to clarify and streamline some of the procedures in the light of experience.

[Note: new wording is indicated by underlining.]

Congregation Regulations 2 of 2002

REGULATIONS OF CONGREGATION FOR THE CONDUCT OF BUSINESSS IN CONGREGATION

Made by Congregation on 5 March 2002

PART 1: Definitions and General Provision for Meetings

1.1. In these regulations:

(1) references to `members' are references to members of Congregation; and

(2) the expression `a legislative proposal' means a proposal made by Council under section 1 (1) or (2) of Statute IV to amend or repeal a statute or add to the statutes.

1.2. Meetings of Congregation shall be held on Tuesday in each of the first, second, fourth, sixth, and eighth weeks in each Full Term, on the second Tuesday after each Full Term and at such other times as the Chancellor or Vice-Chancellor may determine.

1.3. If there is no business for a meeting it shall be cancelled.

1.4. Notice of every meeting of Congregation and of the business to be conducted at it shall be published by the Registrar in the University Gazette not later than the day specified in the relevant Part of these regulations.

1.5. (1) A notice published under regulation 1.4 above must state a period, beginning with the date of the notice, within which notice of opposition to any item of business or of a proposed amendment must be given or a request for an adjournment must be made by any member.

(2) If no notice of opposition is given amendment proposed or request for an adjournment made by at least two members the provisions of section 7 of Statute IV shall apply and the meeting may be cancelled.

1.6. When—

(1) a legislative proposal is made; or (2) a regulation is proposed under section 1(2) of Statute IV; and

(3) the passing of the proposal or the making of the regulation will involve additional expenditure from University funds Council shall either in the notice of the proposal or in a separate notice published with it state whether the expenditure can be met without the curtailment of existing services or of services for which money has already been allocated.

Adjournments

1.7. The discussion of a question at a meeting of Congregation may be adjourned in accordance with regulations 1.8–1.12 below.

1.8. In the case of any question on the agenda for a meeting in respect of which a notice of objection must under any statute or regulation be given before the meeting of Congregation any twenty members of Congregation may, not later than noon on the eighth day before a meeting of Congregation, give notice in writing to the Vice-Chancellor that they request the adjournment of that question.

1.9. (1) Whenever a request is received under regulation 1.8 above, the Vice-Chancellor shall refer it to the Proctors, who shall decide whether or not it shall be granted.

(2) The Proctors' decision shall be published in the University Gazette not less than four days before the meeting of Congregation to which the question or questions concerned was or were originally due to be submitted.

(3) If the Proctors decide that the request shall not be granted, any two members of Congregation may, by rising in their places at the meeting, demand that a vote be taken on whether or not the question or any of the questions in respect of which the request was submitted shall nevertheless be adjourned; and, if such a demand is made, the Chairman shall, after any debate on the question of adjournment, put that question to the vote in accordance with the provisions of regulation 1.11 below.

1.10. Consideration of any question adjourned under the provisions of regulation 1.8 above shall be resumed at the next meeting of Congregation (or at such later meeting as the Chairman may determine), and the Registrar shall give not less than five days' notice in the University Gazette that the debate will be resumed.

1.11. (1) At any meeting of Congregation the Chairman may at any time propose the adjournment of the House.

(2) The motion shall be put immediately, and, if it is carried, the House shall be adjourned.

(3) After any meeting has lasted two full hours the Chairman shall have the power of adjourning the House without question put.

(4) Any adjournment of the House under this regulation shall be to the following day, unless the Chairman shall fix another day.

1.12. No question shall be adjourned more than once.

Speaking at meetings

1.13. No member of Congregation shall without leave of the Chairman speak more than once on any item, except that the mover of an item shall have the right to reply at the close of the debate on that item.

1.14. If the Chairman considers that a speaker's remarks are irrelevant to the question concerned, the Chairman may direct the speaker to confine his or her remarks to that question, and the speaker shall comply with the Chairman's direction.

1.15. (1) Any student member, as defined in section 4 of Statute II, may speak at a meeting of Congregation, if called upon to do so by the Chairman at the Chairman's discretion.

(2) The Vice-Chancellor may make rules governing speaking by student members in Congregation. [See Gazette 10 June 2004]

(3) The Chairman may, nevertheless, at any time terminate a debate on the floor of the House and proceed to the final speeches and the taking of a vote.

1.16. Council may make rules governing the circulation of flysheets on matters before Congregation, or Convocation in regard to the election of the Professor of Poetry, or relating to matters of general interest to the University. [See Gazette 10 June 2004]

Correction of errors, slips, and omissions

1.17. If the Vice-Chancellor is satisfied that the text of a legislative proposal made or passed under Part 2 or of a resolution proposed or passed under Part 3 of these regulations contains a clerical error or other accidental slip or omission, he or she may, after consultation with the Registrar and the Proctors, correct the error, slip, or omission without further reference to Congregation, and the correction made shall be as fully effective as an amendment duly passed under the Part in question.

PART 2: Legislative Proposals

2.1 The provisions of this Part in addition to those of Part 1 shall apply to legislative proposals.

2.2. Every legislative proposal to be submitted to Congregation shall be preceded by a preamble shortly stating the principle of the measure.

2.3. The Registrar shall publish in the University Gazette notice of every legislative proposal not less than nineteen days before the date of the meeting at which it is to be considered.

2.4. Any two members may not later than noon on the eighth day before the date of the meeting:

(1) give notice in writing to the Registrar that they intend to vote against the proposal in question; or

(2) submit to the Registrar in writing a proposed amendment signed by the mover and seconder; or

(3) both.

2.5. (1) If no notice is given or amendment proposed in accordance with regulation 2.4 above, the legislative proposal in question shall unless Council has decided otherwise be declared at the conclusion of proceedings on it to be passed without question put.

(2) Paragraph (1) of this regulation does not exclude or limit the exercise of the Vice-Chancellor's powers under section 7 of Statute IV.

2.6. The Vice-Chancellor shall report to Council all amendments which in his or her judgement are not inconsistent with or irrelevant to the principle of the proposal in question as stated in the preamble, and Council shall forward them to Congregation together with any amendments which Council itself may propose.

2.7. All amendments forwarded to Congregation under regulation 2.6 above, and any notice of opposition given under regulation 2.4, shall be published by the Registrar in the University Gazette not less than four days before the date of the meeting at which the legislative proposal is to be considered.

First meeting

2.8. At the first meeting at which the legislative proposal is considered Congregation may:

(1) pass the legislative proposal; or

(2) reject it; or

(3) approve or reject amendments to it which have been duly proposed in accordance with regulations 2.4, 2.6, and 2.7 above.

2.9. Where an amendment is proposed the Chairman in consultation with the Proctors shall decide:

(1) whether each amendment is a true amendment or in substance an alternative proposal;

(2) whether, if more than one amendment is proposed, the amendments are inconsistent with each other or may be taken cumulatively; and

(3) in the light of (1) and (2) above the order in which they should be put to the vote.

2.10. (1) If amendments to a legislative proposal are approved by Congregation under regulation 2.8 above, the proposal in question shall be republished in the University Gazette and printed so as to show the amendments made, and there shall be further proceedings on it at a second meeting in accordance with regulations 2.11–2.16 below.

(2) If amendments have been proposed but are rejected or under regulation 2.17 below have lapsed, Congregation may then at the first meeting pass or reject the legislative proposal in the form in which it was originally proposed.

Second meeting

2.11. The second meeting shall take place on a date to be fixed by the Chairman which is at least fourteen days after the date on which the amendments were passed.

2.12. The Registrar shall publish notice of the second meeting in the University Gazette at least eleven days before the date on which those proceedings are due to take place.

2.13. At any time before the date fixed for the second meeting under regulation 2.11 above Council may propose further amendments or submit to Congregation the choice between contradictory or inconsistent provisions which may have been introduced into the legislative proposal.

2.14. All proposals or submissions made by Council under regulation 2.13 above shall be published by the Registrar in the University Gazette not less than four days before the meeting at which they are to be considered.

2.15. On the date fixed for the second meeting under regulation 2. 11 above Congregation may:

(1) accept or reject any amendments proposed under regulation 2.13 above; and

(2) if any amendment has been approved, accept or reject the legislative proposal as amended by that amendment.

2.16. If an amended legislative proposal is approved by Congregation under regulation 2. 15 (2) above, the amended proposal shall come into effect.

Other provisions

2.17. Any amendment proposed under any of the preceding regulations which is not moved and seconded in Congregation shall lapse.

2.18. A legislative proposal made by Council under section 1 (1) of Statute IV may be withdrawn by Council at any time.

2.19. At any meeting of Congregation the Chairman shall have the right to withdraw a legislative proposal made under section 1 (1) of Statute IV at any time before it has been submitted to a vote, and Council may resubmit the proposal to Congregation at a subsequent meeting.

2.20. Council shall not be entitled to reintroduce a legislative proposal which has been rejected by Congregation earlier than the beginning of the fourth term after the term in which it was rejected.

2.21. A statute shall come into effect on the date on which it is approved by Congregation, or (if it is so approved) on such later date as may be specified in that statute, or (where applicable) on the date on which it is approved by Her Majesty in Council, whichever is the latest.

Voting

2.22. (1) The rules for voting on any legislative proposal are as follows.

(2) In the case of:

(a) a proposal made by Council under section 1 (1) of Statute IV, or

(b) a proposal which Council is instructed to make under section 1 (2) of Statute IV which is supported by or acceptable to Council, or

(c) an amendment which is proposed or supported by or acceptable to Council,

the proposal or amendment shall be deemed to have been passed unless at least 125 members vote against it and constitute a majority against it.

(3) All other proposals made under this Part shall be determined by a simple majority.

(4) The rules for the casting of votes and postal voting set out in Part 4 of these regulations apply to legislative proposals.

Part 3: RESOLUTIONS

3.1. This Part applies to resolutions submitted under section 1 (2) of Statute IV by twenty or more members of Congregation that Council should be instructed to make legislative proposals, and to all other resolutions which are not legislative proposals.

Resolutions for the suspension of statutory procedures

3.2. Council or any twenty or more members of Congregation may at any time submit a resolution providing for the suspension of the operation of sections 5–7 of Statute IV or any regulations made by Congregation under them including these regulations.

3.3. (1) A resolution proposed under regulation 3.2 above shall be published in the University Gazette not less than four days before the meeting at which it is to be moved.

(2) The resolution shall contain both a reference to any statute or regulation to be suspended and a statement of the procedure to be followed if the suspension is approved. 3.4. If the resolution is published not less than nineteen days before it is to be moved, Council may include in the notice of the resolution a requirement that any member who intends to oppose the resolution must, by noon on the eighth day before the meeting at which the resolution is to be moved, give notice in writing to the Registrar of his or her opposition.

3.5. If notice is received under regulation 3.4 above from at least two members in respect of a resolution for which Council has imposed such a requirement, the Registrar shall publish that notice in the University Gazette not less than four days before the meeting.

3.6. (1) If no notice is received under regulation 3.4 above, the resolution shall unless Council has decided otherwise be declared by the Chairman at the conclusion of proceedings on it to be carried without question put.

(2) A resolution proposed with less than nineteen days' notice shall not be moved if twenty or more members signify their objection by rising in their places after the resolution has been read by the Registrar.

(3) Paragraph (1) of this regulation does not exclude or limit the exercise of the Vice-Chancellor's powers under section 7 of Statute IV.

3.7. Council shall be bound by the vote on a resolution providing for the suspension of the operation of statutes or regulations.

Other resolutions

3.8. Council or any twenty or more members of Congregation may at any time submit a resolution on any topic.

3.9. If a resolution is submitted by twenty or more members, the Vice-Chancellor may rule that resolution inadmissible:

(1) if it is not in his or her opinion on a topic concerning the policy or administration of the University; or

(2) if it relates to a particular college, society, or Permanent Private Hall, or (subject to paragraph (1) above) to a particular person other than the Vice-Chancellor.

3.10. For the purposes of regulation 3.9 above a resolution calling upon Council or any other body or person to propose, amend, or repeal a regulation shall be deemed to concern the policy or administration of the University.

3.11. Notice of a resolution proposed by twenty or more members, signed by all the members concerned, shall be delivered to the Registrar not later than noon on the twenty-second day before any stated meeting of Congregation at which they propose to move it.

3.12. Subject to the provisions of regulation 3.3 above and of regulation 3.13 below, notice of a resolution shall be published in the University Gazette not less than nineteen days before the meeting of Congregation at which it is to be moved.

3.13. (1) A resolution submitted by Council conferring a Degree by Resolution under the provisions of Part 7 of these regulations shall be published in the University Gazette and shall be deemed to have been approved without opposition at noon on the fourth day after the day on which it was published, unless by that time the Registrar has received notice in writing from two or more members that they wish the resolution to be put to a meeting of Congregation.

(2) If such notice is received, Council may either withdraw the resolution (in which case the Registrar shall publish notice of this withdrawal in the University Gazette) or republish the resolution not less than four days before it is to be moved in Congregation.

Amendments to resolutions

3.14. (1) Any two members may propose an amendment to any resolution, except a resolution submitted under the provisions of regulation 3.2 or regulation 3.13 above.

(2) Notice of any such amendment, signed by the proposer and seconder, shall be delivered to the Registrar not later than noon on the eighth day, and published in the University Gazette not later than five days, before the meeting of Congregation at which the resolution is to be moved.

3.15. Members proposing an amendment under the provisions of regulation 3.14 (1) above shall state whether or not they would oppose the resolution if their amendment were rejected.

3.16. (1) If an amendment is proposed under regulation 3.15 above, Council may decide that proceedings on the resolution and the proposed amendment shall be adjourned to a meeting of Congregation held not less than fourteen days after the meeting at which the resolution was originally to be moved under regulation 3.11 above.

(2) (a) If proceedings have been adjourned under paragraph (1) above, Council may also, by publication of a notice in the University Gazette not later than the twelfth day before the meeting of Congregation to which the proceedings have been adjourned, require that any two members who intend to vote against the amendment shall give notice in writing to the Registrar of that intention not later than the eighth day before the meeting to which the proceedings have been adjourned.

(b) Notice received under sub-paragraph (a) above shall be published by the Registrar in the University Gazette not later than the fourth day before the meeting.

(3) Unless notice of opposition has been received under paragraph (2) above, and unless Council has decided that the proposed amendment is unacceptable to it, Council may publish a notice to that effect in the University Gazette not later than the fourth day before the meeting; in which case:

(a) the amended resolution shall, at the conclusion of any proceedings on the amendment and the resolution, be declared by the Chairman to be carried without question put; or

(b) Council may nevertheless decide that a division shall be taken on the amended resolution at the conclusion of those proceedings.

Amendments acceptable to Council which are unopposed

3.17 If—

(1) no notice of opposition to an amendment has been received under regulation 3.16(2) above; and

(2) Council decides that the amendment proposed is acceptable to it

Council may publish a notice to that effect in the University Gazette not later than the fourth day before the meeting.

(3) In a case to which paragraph (1) of this regulation applies

(a) the amended resolution shall, at the conclusion of any proceedings on the amendment and the resolution, be declared by the Chairman to be carried without question put; or

(b) Council may nevertheless decide that a division shall be taken on the amended resolution at the conclusion of those proceedings.

Voting on amendments

3.18 Where an amendment is proposed the Chairman in consultation with the Proctors shall decide

(1) whether each amendment is a true amendment or in substance an alternative proposal;

(2) whether, if more than one amendment is proposed, the amendments are inconsistent with each other or may be taken cumulatively; and

(3) in the light of (1) and (2) above the order in which they should be put to the vote.

3.19 (1) At the conclusion of any debate and voting on any proposed amendments, the resolution shall be put.

(2) If an amendment has been carried, the resolution as finally amended shall be put to the House as a substantive resolution, and the proposer of the resolution shall have the right to speak first in the debate on the amended resolution.

(3) If all amendments have been rejected or have lapsed, the unamended resolution in the form in which it was originally proposed shall be put without further debate.

Opposition to resolutions

3.20 (1) Except in the case of resolutions to which regulations 3.2–3.6 and 3.13 above apply, any two members may, not later than noon on the eighth day before the meeting at which the resolution is to be moved, give notice in writing to the Registrar that they intend to oppose the resolution; or Council may instruct the Registrar to give notice that the resolution is unacceptable to Council.

(2) Such notice (whether of opposition by members or of unacceptability to Council) shall be published by the Registrar in the University Gazette not less than four days before the meeting.

(3) If such notice has not been given, and unless Council has decided otherwise, the resolution shall, at the conclusion of proceedings on it, be declared by the Chairman to be carried without question put.

Resolutions and amendments which lapse

3.21 Except in the case of a resolution declared carried without question put under the provisions of regulation 3.16 above or regulation 3.20 below, any resolution or amendment to a resolution which is not moved and seconded in Congregation shall lapse.

Obligations of Council

3.22 (1) Except in cases to which regulation 3.2 or regulation 3.13 above apply, if a resolution is:

(a) carried on a division with at least 125 members voting in favour, or

(b) carried without a division at a meeting at which at least 125 members are present on the floor of the House at the time when the resolution is declared by the Chairman to have been carried, or

(c) declared by the Vice-Chancellor to have been carried without holding the meeting under the provisions of section 7 of Statute IV, Council shall be bound, not later than the eighth week of the Full Term after the term in which the resolution is carried, to submit to Congregation a legislative proposal, or to make a regulation, or to take any other action it considers appropriate, as the case may be, in order to give effect to the resolution.

(2) For the purposes of paragraph (1) (b) above, the Proctors shall, whenever a resolution is carried without a division, certify the number of members present on the floor of the House [See regulation 4.3 below] at the time when the resolution is declared by the Chairman to have been carried.

3.23 (1) If Council is required by a resolution of Congregation to make a regulation under regulation 3.22 above, the regulation shall be put to Congregation for approval.

(2) Such a regulation shall be published in the University Gazette not less than nineteen days before the meeting, and amendments may be proposed under the same procedure as that laid down for amendments to resolutions in regulations 3.14–3.19 above.

PART 4: Voting

Votes at meetings of Congregation

4.1. (1) Every vote in Congregation shall be taken immediately after the close of the debate (if any) on the question concerned, unless that question has been adjourned under regulation 1.7 or regulation 1.8 in Part 1 of these regulations.

(2) Every question shall be settled by a simple majority (with the Chairman having a second or casting vote in the case of an equality of votes) except where the statutes or regulations provide otherwise. 4.2. (1) When any question has been put to Congregation by the Chairman he or she may direct that a division be taken, or may announce that in his or her opinion the proposal is accepted or rejected, as the case may be.

(2) If the Chairman's opinion so declared is challenged by at least six members rising in their places, he or she shall direct that a division be taken.

4.3. For the purposes of any regulation which refers to the number of members present `on the floor of the House', that expression shall, in the case of a meeting held in the Sheldonian Theatre, mean the Area and Semicircle of the Theatre.

Postal votes

4.4. (1) Any question decided or resolution carried or rejected at a meeting of Congregation shall, in the absence of provision to the contrary in the statutes and regulations, be submitted for confirmation or rejection to a postal vote of the members if, not later than 4 p.m. on the sixth day after that meeting,

(a) Council so decides, or

(b) the question has been decided, or the resolution has been carried or rejected on a division, at a meeting at which not fewer than twenty-five members were present on the floor of the House at the time when the division was taken and if a requisition for such a postal vote signed by at least fifty members is delivered to the Vice-Chancellor.

(2) For the purposes of paragraph (1) (b) above, the Proctors shall, whenever a division is taken at a meeting of Congregation, certify the number of members present on the floor of the House at the time of the division.

4.5. No decision taken, or resolution carried or rejected, by Congregation on a division otherwise than by a postal vote under regulation 4.4 above shall be deemed to be operative or to have been carried or rejected:

(1) before 4 p.m. on the sixth day after the meeting of Congregation at which the question was decided or the resolution carried or rejected; or

(2) where a postal vote is required to be taken under regulation 4.4 above, before the decision has been confirmed by that vote.

4.6. A postal vote shall not be taken on:

(1) any decision of Congregation relating to the adjournment of the House;

(2) a resolution approving the conferment of a degree of the University (including a Degree by Diploma or an Honorary Degree);

(3) an election under the provisions of Part 8 of these regulations;

(4) appointments or reappointments to the Vice-Chancellorship; or

(5) the presentation of the Vice-Chancellor's Oration or the Annual Review of the University under the provisions of Part 9 of these regulations.

4.7. The Registrar shall publish in the University Gazette a verbatim record (or if the Vice- Chancellor shall so decide, a summary record approved by the Vice-Chancellor) of the proceedings of Congregation relating to any question on which a postal vote is to be held under the provisions of regulation 4.4 above.

4.8. Where a question is submitted to a postal vote under the provisions of regulation 4.4 above the Vice- Chancellor may submit any other question decided at the same meeting of Congregation (whether decided on a division or not) to a postal vote at the same time if it appears to him or her that the questions are so related that they should be submitted for confirmation or rejection at the same time.

4.9. The procedure for the conduct of a postal vote shall be as follows.

(1) (a) The Registrar shall dispatch to every member, not less than four days before the day fixed by the Vice-Chancellor for the vote, a voting paper on which shall be specified the latest time by which it must be delivered to the Registrar.

(b) The time specified under (a) above shall not be earlier than seven days after the publication of the University Gazette referred to in regulation 4.7 above.

(2) The form of the voting paper (including the manner in which the question is to be put), and the method of recording votes, shall be prescribed by the Vice-Chancellor.

(3) If a postal vote requires votes to be cast on one or more amendments to a resolution in addition to the resolution itself, the sequence in which votes are to be cast in the postal vote shall, with such procedural explanation as may be necessary, follow the sequence in which votes were cast at the relevant meeting of Congregation.

(4) No postal vote shall be deemed to be invalid owing to misdirection or non-receipt of any voting paper.

(5) The Registrar shall be responsible for the counting of the votes, but the Vice-Chancellor and Proctors shall decide on the validity of any vote which, in the opinion of the Registrar, is in doubt.

(6) The result of the vote shall be published in the University Gazette.

4.10. (1) Any question submitted to a postal vote shall be determined by the majority of the votes cast, notwithstanding any provision of any statute or regulation relating to the number of persons required to vote for or against a proposal in order that it may be passed or rejected.

(2) In the event of an equality of votes the Vice-Chancellor shall have a second or casting vote.


3 Voting on Resolution concerning the Review of Governance

Explanatory note

In Trinity Term 1999, Congregation approved thirteen resolutions covering the main points of principle of the changes in university governance which were subsequently implemented with effect from 1 October 2000.

Resolution 13 stated `that there should be a review of the operation of the new governance structure after five years with the remit and composition set out in para. 71(m) of the report' [of the Governance Working Party, i.e. the working party which was set up following the report of the Commission of Inquiry chaired by Sir Peter North to pursue the governance changes proposed in that report].

The terms of para. 71 (m) were that there should be a review after five years `to pay especial attention to [the] transparency, efficiency and democracy of the new governance structure, by a body consisting of members directly elected by Congregation for this purpose (two from each constituency), to be chaired by a retiring or recent Proctor.'

`Each constituency' in this context meant the three constituencies for elections by Congregation to Council, namely members of faculties in the natural sciences, in the humanities and social sciences and members of Congregation not nominated in a divisional capacity.

At its meeting on 13 September 2004, Council discussed this decision, bearing in mind developments since 1999, and agreed to seek Congregation's approval by a new resolution of more comprehensive terms of reference for the review, and for changes from those agreed by Congregation in the arrangements for the chairmanship, timing and method of appointment of the members of the review committee.

1. Terms of reference. Council believes that it would be desirable to spell out more fully the terms of reference of the review and the resolution below seeks to do this. It believes that the intention in 1999 was that attention should be focused on how the new system was working and whether relatively modest changes were needed. It does not believe that a root and branch review was intended (unless of course experience had shown that the new system did not work which, in Council's opinion, is not the case). The scope suggested is thus a review of the operation of the current structure with proposals for changes within the existing broad framework. Council has noted, however, that larger issues might arise. Discussions about university governance are taking place nationally, in the light of the Lambert Review of Business–University Collaboration and the Charities Bill. The review committee may have to take matters such as these into account if firm conclusions have emerged while it is in being, but it should concentrate as far as possible on the detailed workings of the present structure. It is also possible that broader issues will be raised by members of the University during the consultation process which Council believes must include the opportunity for all members of Congregation to make representations and for the report of the review to be put to Congregation for debate (see 4 below). The review committee must be open to these and provision is accordingly made in its terms of reference, but Council's assumption is that if fundamental questions of structure and organisation seem to the review to require substantive attention, the committee will have to report accordingly and ask Council how it wishes to pursue them.

2. Chairmanship. When the arrangements for review were approved by Congregation, it was not known that the next Vice-Chancellor would be appointed from outside the University. Council is clear that, given the appointment of Dr Hood who has had no part in the governance of the University since 2000, it would be proper for him to chair the review. Indeed, it might be argued that this is essential as part of his familiarisation with the University and to enable him to make an appropriate contribution to the work of the review committee on the basis of his wide-ranging experience. Council therefore asks Congregation to agree that Dr Hood should chair the review.

3. Timing. The resolution approved by Congregation in 1999 envisaged a review after five years. Council is clear that, given the appointment of Dr Hood with effect from Michaelmas Term 2004, it is essential for the review to take place during his first year of office and not delayed. It therefore proposes that the review should start as soon as possible. It is hoped that it can be completed well within the academic year 2004–5 (say by the beginning of Trinity Term) but time must be allowed for the necessary widespread consultation.

4. Method of appointment of members of the committee and number of members

Council acknowledges that the intention of Resolution 13 was to recognise the democratic ethos of the University through the direct election by Congregation of members of the review committee. It thinks it important, however, both to recognise developments since 1999, which seem to suggest that the constituencies agreed in Resolution 13 are not now entirely appropriate, and also to ensure that the committee should largely consist of those with relevant experience of the way in which the system has operated while not having borne significant central functional responsibility over the last four years. Council therefore wishes to propose to Congregation that it should submit names of members of the review to Congregation for approval rather than that they should be directly elected.

The developments since 1999 which should be taken into account are as follows. The first is that the number of external members of Council has been increased from two to four since the governance changes were first introduced. It is important in Council's view that this should be recognised by including one such member in the review committee and Council proposes that this should be Mr B. Taylor. The second is the various developments in university/college relations since 2000. It is arguable that this is one of the most important areas for examination by the review. Although the non-divisional constituency for elections to Council (one of the constituencies proposed for election to the review committee) can be seen to allow for college interests, Council thinks that the review should include the Chairman of the Conference of Colleges (the Principal of Somerville) explicitly to recognise the importance of the collegiate nature of the University.

Council is clear, bearing in mind the decisions made in 1999, that the current Senior Proctor (Dr J.F. Wheater) should serve on the review and that he should continue to serve in his personal capacity if the review had not completed its work by the end of his period of office as Proctor. Council then proposes that there should be two further members, drawn from those elected to Council by Congregation, namely Professor Womersley and Professor Burnett (i.e. one from the humanities and social science community and the other from the natural sciences). Both have extensive experience in various capacities within the University, Professor Womersley being chairman of a faculty board and a former Proctor and Professor Burnett (a new member of Council) being head of a major department.

The committee proposed by Council will thus consist of six people (i.e. the Vice-Chancellor plus five) rather than the seven envisaged under the 1999 Resolution).

In proposing that members should be nominated by Council and approved by Congregation rather than being directly elected by Congregation, Council is clear that it is all the more important that the review committee should consult very widely and in particular must give all members of Congregation the chance to make submissions. The report of the review committee should also be referred by Council to Congregation for discussion. These points are specifically provided for in the resolution below which, on the basis of the above explanatory note, Congregation is asked to approve.

Text of Resolution

That General Resolution 13 of 27 May 1999 (concerning the review of governance arrangements) be repealed and that the review of governance arrangements should take place in 2004–5 with the following membership and terms of reference.

1. Membership

Vice-Chancellor
Principal of Somerville
Senior Proctor (Dr J.F. Wheater)
Professor K. Burnett
Mr B. Taylor
Professor D.J. Womersley

2. Terms of reference

(a) Bearing in mind that the aims of the changes made in the University's governance arrangements in 2000 included

(i) the establishment of more effective decision-making;

(ii) the provision of an integrated approach to strategy in areas such as planning, resource allocation, educational policy and standards, and personnel, so that the University could respond swiftly, clearly and appropriately to new opportunities and new issues;

(iii) the devolution of more power and operational responsibility to subject areas, in line with the general principle of subsidiarity;

(iv) the enhancement of institutional accountability and transparency in decision- making; and

(v) the improvement of coordination and communications between the University and the colleges

the committee should review the operation since 2000 of the governance machinery of the University to determine whether these aims have been achieved and to make recommendations to Council in the first instance for changes where necessary. (b) The committee should pay particular attention

(i) to the terms of reference and constitution of Council, its major committees, the divisional boards, the Continuing Education Board and to the arrangements for Academic Services and University Collections;

(ii) to the links and relationship between these various bodies;

(iii) to the provision for college representation on university bodies and to the general arrangements for consultation between the University and the colleges and for the conduct of business where agreement between the University and the colleges is necessary.

(c) The committee should keep in mind as far as is possible broader issues which may arise (whether from internal comment or externally) about university governance, while giving priority to its work under (a) and (b) above.

(d) Bearing in mind the University's tradition of democratic accountability

(i) the committee should consult widely and in particular should offer all members of Congregation the opportunity to make submissions to it;

(ii) Council should refer the report of the committee to Congregation for debate.

GENERAL NOTICES

SOCIAL SCIENCE LIBRARY

The new Social Science Library, on the ground floor of the new Manor Road Building, will be open from 9 a.m. on Friday, 1 October. The library is an amalgamation of the former Economics, Politics, IR and Sociology, Social Policy and Social Work, Criminology and Socio-Legal Studies libraries.

The library's opening hours during term (from 2 October) will be: Monday–Thursday, 9 a.m.–10 p.m.; Friday, 9 a.m.–7 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.

For more details see http://www.ssl.ox.ac.uk.


CAREERS SERVICE

Careers Advice Service for Contract Research Staff

This service, provided by the University Careers Service at 56 Banbury Road, aims to encourage and enable academic-related research staff, employed directly by the University on fixed-term contracts (contract research staff), to make and implement well-informed decisions about their careers by:

* providing impartial, professional, careers advice

* supporting them in recognising and developing the attributes necessary for successful career development

* enabling them to appreciate and explore the range of opportunities available

* assisting them to clarify their values, interests, abilities and skills and to relate these to possible career options

* providing access to a wide variety of careers information and resources to facilitate the formulation and implementation of career plans The service operates flexibly in an attempt to cater for individual personal needs, whether researchers are:

* generally uncertain about the career options open to them

* considering reviewing or changing their career direction

* thinking about finding a new job in academia, commerce, industry, the public sector, or becoming self-employed, etc.

* requiring practical advice on curriculum vitae design, job search or interview/selection techniques

Following registration with the Service (which is free) individual researchers have access to confidential, one-to-one meetings with a careers adviser to help clarify personal and career objectives and to identify the main career options open to them. They may also drop-in to see the Duty Adviser at the Careers Service to help resolve brief queries and make use of the wide range of careers resources in the well resourced Information Room, including the Prospects Planner computerised careers guidance system. Psychometric ability testing and personality type profiling for career development purposes (using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) can also be arranged on an ad hoc basis. In addition, two one-day career development workshops, designed specifically for contract research staff who are looking to review their career options or to brush up on their job search and interview skills, are run at various times throughout the year, and researchers also have access to activities in the student `What's On' term programme of careers talks, short skills sessions and other events.

Full details of the service (including how to register and book confidential career discussions) can be found on www.careers.ox.ac.uk. To reserve a place on any of the career development workshops or seminars/briefings below (which are run in conjunction with the Institute for the Advancement of University Learning, IAUL), telephone or e-mail, the IAUL (telephone: Oxford (2)86808, e-mail: services@learning.ox.ac.uk).

Career Development Workshops

The following workshops, provided as part of the Careers Advice Service for Contract Research Staff, supplement the individual careers guidance and information provisions available.

1. Career Review and Planning for Contract Research Staff

This workshop has been designed specifically for academic-related contract research staff employed by the University. It is particularly suitable for researchers, at any stage in their career, who are starting to consider what their future options might be. It will provide participants with the opportunity to step back and reflect on their careers in the context of their personal experience and factors in the academic research and wider employment environment. Through a combination of short individual exercises and small (informal) group discussions participants will be encouraged to explore the key aspects of effective career decision making. This will include reviewing motivations and transferable skills and considering factors affecting job mobility. By the end of the day each participant should be in a position to further their career objectives by beginning development of a realistic personal career plan. Previous participants have often built on this workshop by using one- to-one career discussions to develop and focus their ideas and to access further resources regarding particular career options.

There will usually also be the opportunity to explore the wide range of careers resources available for use by contract research staff at the Careers Service.

Tuesday, 28 September 2004, 9.15 a.m.–4 p.m. (Vacation)

Wednesday, 8 December 2004, 9.15 a.m.–4 p.m. (MT week 9)

Wednesday, 26 January 2005, 9.15 a.m.–4 p.m. (HT week 2)

Friday, 4 March 2005, 9.15 a.m.–4 p.m. (HT week 7)

Friday, 6 May 2005, 9.15 a.m.–4 p.m. (TT week 2)

Thursday, 30 June 2005, 9.15 a.m.–4 p.m. (Vacation)

2. Job Search and Interview Skills for Contract Research Staff

This workshop has been designed specifically for academic-related contract research staff employed by the University and is particularly suitable for those who are considering, or seeking, alternative employment and wish to brush up on the practicalities involved. While more emphasis is given to finding employment outside academic research, those intending to apply for posts in academia may also find the programme useful.

An interactive day, it will explore the skills and techniques used in searching for jobs effectively, finding sources of job information, utilising networking techniques, writing appropriate curricula vitae and covering letters. Emphasis will be given to understanding the processes which UK employers are increasingly using to select staff and the importance of tailoring applications and approaches accordingly. Participants will also explore the skills and attributes required for effective performance at interview: preparation, self-presentation and how to deal with typical interview questions, etc. Where possible, supportive practice in applying interview techniques will normally form part of the day and there will usually be the opportunity to explore the wide range of careers resources available for use by contract research staff at the Careers Service. Previous participants have often built on this workshop by using one-to-one career discussions, to review intended applications and to practice for interviews.

Tuesday, 5 October 2004, 9.15 a.m.–4.45 p.m. (MT week 0)

Wednesday, 15 December 2004, 9.15 a.m.–4.45 p.m. (Vacation)

Friday, 11 February 2005, 9.15 a.m.–4.45 p.m. (HT week 4)

Tuesday, 19 April 2005, 9.15 a.m.–4.45 p.m. (TT week 0)

Friday, 20 May 2005, 9.15 a.m.–4.45 p.m. (TT week 4)

Thursday, 7 July 2005, 9.15 a.m.–4.45 p.m. (Vacation)

Note: the content of the above workshops may be varied in the light of feedback and other workshops may be added in due course.

3. Induction Seminars for New Contract Researchers

This seminar for researchers, in their first year or so of employment with the University, will provide an introduction to the career and professional development opportunities available for contract research staff at the University. It will also give an overview of the developing national and local context of research work and clarify contractual issues related to being a contract researcher, including the Fixed Term Employees (Prevention of Less Favourable Treatment) Regulations 2002 and the University's expiry of fixed term contracts procedures. Staff from Oxford University Careers Service and the Institute for the Advancement of University Learning will facilitate the session and it is hoped that it will assist researchers in considering and planning, from an early stage in their careers, what professional and career development resources they might wish to access. The seminar will be held on the following dates (venues will vary):

Monday, 4 October 2004, 12.30–2 p.m. (MT week 0)

Thursday, 14 October 2004, 3.30–5 p.m. (MT week 1)

Friday, 21 January 2005, 12.30–2 p.m. (HT week 1)

Tuesday, 25 January 2005, 3.30–5 p.m. (HT week 2)

Friday, 13 May 2005, 12.30–2 p.m. (TT week 3)

Monday, 23 May 2005, 3.30–5 p.m. (TT week 5)


OXFORD UNIVERSITY COMPUTING SERVICES

Address: 13 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6NN
Telephone: Oxford 273200
Web site: http://www.oucs.ox.ac.uk
Opening hours: Monday--Friday, 8.30 a.m.–8.30 p.m.

Academic Computing Development Team

The Academic Computing Development Team (ACDT) works collaboratively with individuals or groups of academics to develop technology-based teaching and/or research resources. The ACDT holds a twice yearly proposal process to choose the projects it will take on for development, and the next call will be in November 2004. See the Web site for information on previous projects, and how to apply once the call is announced: http://www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/acdt/


Courses

OUCS offers an extensive programme of practical IT courses, covering introductory and specialised uses of computers, common operating systems, and popular application software. Full details of the OUCS IT Learning and Training programme can be found at www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/courses/ where it is also possible to book online. A printed copy of all the training courses can be obtained by e-mailing courses@oucs.ox.ac.uk. Details and bookings are available online at www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/courses/.

For details of the IT Learning Programme, see below.


Digital Projects in Oxford

Digital Projects in Oxford is a series of informal lunchtime talks which present information about electronic projects at the University of Oxford. The series is organized by the Learning Technologies Group. Lecture Room 1, OUCS, Wednesdays, 1–1.45 p.m., weeks 1–8. Further details can be found at: http://www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/ltg/events/.


European Computer Driving Licence

The European Computer Driving Licence (ECDL) establishes standards for everyone who uses a computer in either a professional or personal capacity. It is a qualification that verifies a person's competence, declares their computer skills and makes them readily mobile within business and across the European Union. OUCS courses have been updated to reflect the newly revised ECDL syllabus providing traditional training opportunities which require individual booking. An intensive course is available in week 10. Drop-in training sessions run during Michaelmas Term on Tuesdays from 12 October to 30 November between 9.30 a.m. and 1 p.m., and on Wednesday evenings from 13 October to 1 December between 5.30 p.m. and 8 p.m. Personal assistance is available during this time for any queries with the ECDL. No booking is required. For further information about the ECDL at OUCS contact Ian Miller at OUCS on (2)83435, or e-mail ecdl@oucs.ox.ac.uk.

ECDL Advanced

Four individual modules are now available covering Word-Processing, Spreadsheets, Databases, and presentations. These modules explore the richness and complexities of the various packages and examines their use within complex documents. OUCS runs regular training days or candidates can attend the relevant OUCS courses prior to taking the tests. Specific training days are taking place during Michaelmas on 3 December for Databases, and on 10 December for Presentations. Contact Ian Miller at OUCS on (2)83435, or e-mail ecdl@oucs.ox.ac.uk for more details.


Help Centre

The Computing Services Help Centre is open between 8.30 a.m. and 8.30 p.m. It provides a variety of specialist equipment (scanners, zip drives) as well as access to terminals for e-mails, Web browsing, and use of specialist or standard software. Advisors are on hand between 8.30 a.m. and 8.30 p.m., Monday–Friday to answer queries, and hardware support can be sought through a booking system. See www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/help/. E-mail: help@oucs.ox.ac.uk; telephone: (2)73200.


HFS: Hierarchical File Server

The HFS is centrally funded service providing backup and archive services to senior members, post- graduates and staff. To protect your data on the HFS, you can register on-line, then install and configure the software on your computer. See www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/hfs/.


IT Support Staff seminars

A series of seminars organised by the ITS3 section at OUCS, the themes are predominantly aimed at IT Support Staff but all are welcome to attend. Thursdays, Lecture Room 2, weeks 1--8. See http://www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/its3/ for details.


NSMS: Network Systems Management Services

NSMS provides a variety of chargeable IT support services to the University and its associated institutions. It can manage file servers, workstations, anti-virus software installations, holiday cover for support staff, web services, and web based conference registration. See www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/nsms/.


Personal Computer Maintenance Service

We offer a very competitively priced maintenance service for PC and Macintosh personal computers, as well as their printers and other peripherals. It is available to University Institutions, Colleges and to University members on a personal basis for their privately owned equipment, including a discount for students. Full details can be found at www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/maintenance/.


Printing facilities

OUCS operates a colour printing service from a wide range of PC and MAC applications onto laserprinters or a large format inkjet printer, from A4 to A0 paper sizes. The poster printing service is the most popular, with choices of heavy-coated or glossy paper for the largest print. Prices start at only £21 for an A0 poster. To find out more see www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/printing/.


Security

Oxford University Computer Emergency Response Team (OxCERT) responds to break-ins, system compromises and network abuse. Available 9 a.m.--5 p.m., Monday--Friday; other times on a best efforts basis. E-mail: oxcert@ox.ac.uk; voicemail: (2)82222; Web: www.ox.ac.uk/it/compsecurity/oxcert/.

Note: OxCERT does not handle virus-related problems unless they have a major impact on e-mail servers or the network infrastructure. (Virus incidents and assistance—see www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/viruses/.)


Shop

The Computing Services Shop provides a counter service for the sale and distribution of computer hardware, software, consumables, and stationery. All current members of the University are entitled to use the Shop; however, sales of software are restricted to full members. The Shop is just inside the main entrance to OUCS. Opening hours are 9 .m.–4.45 p.m., Monday–Friday (except Thursdays, 9.30 a.m.–4.45 p.m. Telephone: (2)73200; fax: (2)83401; Web: www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/shop; e-mail: shop@oucs.ox.ac.uk.


Working lunch

Working Lunch is designed for academics to get together and examine various aspects of teaching including such things as using a Virtual Learning Environment, Introduction to HTML, and posting course notes on the Web. This term, the series focuses first on building Web sites and then Online Learning and Teaching. Working lunch runs in weeks 2–9 on Tuesdays, 12.30–1.30 p.m., in Lecture Room 1 at OUCS.


IT Learning Programme

We have updated and restructured the courses in our IT Learning Programme. From Michaelmas 2004 we are introducing a new modular system. Full details on all modules can be found at http://www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/courses/, where it is also possible to book online. Any queries regarding the IT Learning Programme can be addressed to: courses@oucs.ox.ac.uk.

MODULES WITH ONE-HOUR SESSIONS AT LUNCHTIME

E-mail

E-mail Level 2: Lists and Newsgroups. Monday, 25 October, 12.30 p.m.

E-mail Level 2: Security. Monday, 1 November, 12.30 p.m.

E-mail Level 2: Preventing Viruses. Monday, 8 November, 12.30 p.m.

E-mail Level 2: Filtering. Monday, 15 November, 12.30 p.m.

E-mail Level 2: Webmail. Monday, 22 November, 12.30 p.m.

E-mail Level 2: Outlook. Monday, 29 November, 12.30 p.m.


Working with Word

Word Level 2: Tables, Tabs and Indents. Monday, 18 October, 12.30 p.m.

Word Level 3: Styles and Tables of Contents. Monday, 25 October, 12.30 p.m.

Word Level 3: Mail Merge. Monday, 1 November, 12.30 p.m.


Publishing for Print

Publishing Level 2: Looking Good in Print. Monday, 8 November, 12.30 p.m.

Publishing Level 2: PDF with Acrobat. Monday, 15 November, 12.30 p.m.

Publishing Level 2: Graphics for Print. Monday, 22 November, 12.30 p.m.

Publishing Level 2: From Design to Production. Monday, 29 November, 12.30 p.m.


Programming Made Easy

Programming Level 2: Basic Structures. Wednesday, 27 October, 12.30 p.m.

Programming Level 2: Concepts and Terminology. Wednesday, 3 November, 12.30 p.m.

Programming Level 2: What Programs Do. Wednesday, 10 November, 12.30 p.m.


Linux

Linux Level 2: An Introduction. Thursday, 21 October, 12.30 p.m.

Linux Level 2: Web and E-mail. Thursday, 28 October, 12.30 p.m.

Linux Level 2: Office Software. Thursday, 4 November, 12.30 p.m.

Further Linux Level 3: Command Line. Thursday, 11 November, 12.30 p.m.

Further Linux Level 3: Text Editors. Thursday, 18 November, 12.30 p.m.

Further Linux Level 3: Shell Scripting. Thursday, 25 November, 12.30 p.m.


Electronic Awareness Sessions

Introduction to OxLIP. Thursday, 14 October, 12.30 p.m.

A Gateway to Library Riches: Searching Online Catalogues. Thursday, 21 October, 12.30 p.m.

Databases for Research into Education. Thursday, 28 October, 12.30 p.m.

A Tour of OxLIP Science Resources. Thursday, 4 November, 12.30 p.m.

Electonic Resources in Teaching and Learning. Thursday, 11 November, 12.30 p.m.

Introduction to the Web of Knowledge. Thursday, 18 November, 12.30 p.m.

A Tour of OxLIP Social Science Resources. Thursday, 25 November,12.30 p.m.

Electronic Journals: an Introduction to Oxford's Collections. Thursday, 2 December, 12.30 p.m.

Keeping up-to-date with Literature. Thursday, 9 December, 12.30 p.m.


Working Lunch Series for Tutors and Lecturers

Teaching and/with the Web. Tuesday, 19 October, 12.30 p.m.

Web site Building Blocks I: HTML. Tuesday, 26 October, 12.30 p.m.

Web site Building Blocks II: Dreamweaver. Tuesday, 2 November, 12.30 p.m.

Creating and Using Digital Images. Tuesday, 9 November, 12.30 p.m.

Web Site Accessibility and Good Design. Tuesday, 16 November, 12.30 p.m.

Research Resources. Tuesday, 23 November, 12.30 p.m.

The Web and Plagiarism. Tuesday, 30 November, 12.30 p.m.

Collaborative Learning and Teaching. Tuesday, 7 December, 12.30 p.m.


MODULES WITH ONE-HOUR SESSIONS

Welcome to IT

Click IT: Entry Level. Tuesday, 9 November, 3.30 p.m.; Tuesday, 23 November, 2.30 p.m.


Weblearn

Introduction to WebLearn. Thursday, 30 September, 2 p.m.

Developing your Site in WebLearn. Tuesday, 2 November, 9.15 a.m.; Tuesday, 14 December, 2 p.m.


MODULES WITH THREE-HOUR SESSIONS

Note: the figure in round brackets shows the number of sessions of the module.

Operating Systems

Apple Mac Level 2: An Introduction (1). Wednesday, 27 October, 9.15 a.m.

Apple Mac Level 3: Further Use (1). Wednesday, 10 November, 9.15 a.m.

Linux Level 4: Installing Linux (2). Tuesday, 26 and Wednesday, 27 October, 5.30 p.m.

Windows, File Management and Tools Level 1: Fundamentals (1). Wednesday, 13 October, 9.15 a.m.; Thursday, 21 October, 9.15 a.m.


Web Technologies

Web and E-mail Level 1: Fundamentals (1). Thursday, 14 October, 9.15 a.m.; Wednesday, 17 November, 2 p.m.

Web Publishing Level 2: Introduction to HTML (1). Monday, 18 October, 2 p.m.; Thursday, 28 October, 2 p.m.

Web Publishing Level 2: Introduction to Cascading Style Sheets (1). Tuesday, 19 October, 2 p.m.; Thursday, 4 November, 2 p.m.

Web Publishing Level 2: Using Images on a Web Page (1). Monday, 25 October, 2 p.m.; Thursday, 11 November, 2 p.m.

Web Publishing Level 3: Advanced Cascading Style Sheets (1). Thursday, 18 November, 2 p.m.

Web Publishing Level 3: Building a Web site (1). Thursday, 25 November, 2 p.m.

Web Publishing Level 3: Accessibility in Web Design (1). Thursday, 2 December, 2 p.m.

Web Publishing Level 2: Web Authoring Tools (1). Tuesday, 26 October, 2 p.m.

FrontPage Level 2: An Introduction (1).Monday, 1 November, 9.15 a.m.

FrontPage Level 2: Site Content and Management (1). Monday, 8 November, 9.15 a.m.

Dreamweaver Level 3: An Introduction (1). Thursday, 4 November, 2 p.m.; Monday, 15 November, 2 p.m.

Dreamweaver Level 3: Layout and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) (1). Thursday, 11 November, 2 p.m.; Monday, 22 November, 2 p.m.

Dreamweaver Level 3: Site and Content Management (1). Thursday, 18 November, 2 p.m.; Monday, 29 November, 2 p.m.

JavaScript Level 3: Learning JavaScript.(2). Wednesday, 24 November and 1 December, 9.15 a.m.

Web Publishing Level 4: Creating Interactive Web Pages (3). Mondays, 15-29 November, 9.15 a.m.


Databases

Access Level 1: Fundamentals (1). Tuesday, 19 October, 9.15 a.m.; Wednesday, 3 November, 9.15 a.m.

Access Level 2: Database Structure (1). Thursday, 4 November, 9.15 a.m.; Monday, 8 November, 9.15 a.m.

Access Level 2: Introduction to Queries, Forms and Reports (1). Thursday, 11 November, 9.15 a.m.; Monday, 15 November, 9.15 a.m.

Access Level 3: Designing Forms and Reports (1). Thursday, 18 November, 9.15 a.m.; Monday, 22 November, 9.15 a.m.

Access Level 3: Analysing Data (1). Thursday, 25 November, 9.15 a.m.; Monday, 29 November, 9.15 a.m.

Database Level 3: Relational Database Theory (1). Wednesday, 27 October, 9.15 a.m.


Bibliographic Databases

Bibliographic Level 1: Creating Bibliographic Databases with Endnote (1). Thursday, 28 October, 2 p.m.; Tuesday, 2 November, 2 p.m.; Tuesday, 30 November, 2 p.m.

Bibliographies Level 2: Styles and Citation Formats (1). Tuesday, 9 November, 2 p.m.; Thursday, 2 December, 2 p.m.


Managing Numerical Data

Excel Level 1: Fundamentals (1). Wednesday, 20 October, 9.15 a.m.; Wednesday, 27 October, 2 p.m.

Excel Level 2: Charts, Functions and Pivot Tables (2). Wednesday, 10 and 17 November, 9.15 a.m.; Friday, 29 October and 5 November, 9.15 a.m.

Excel Level 3: Advanced Procedures (2). Tuesday, 23 and 30 November, 9.15 a.m.

Matlab Level 3: Learning Matlab (6). Friday, 29 Oct-3 December, 5 p.m.

SPSS for Windows Level 3: An Introduction (2). Dates to be arranged.


Programming

Programming Analysis and Design Level 3: An Introduction (1). Monday, 11 October, 2 p.m.; Thursday, 21 October, 9.15 a.m.

C Programming Level 4: Learning C (6). Monday, 25 October–29 November, 2 p.m.

Perl Programming Level 4: Learning Perl (6). Monday, 25 October–29 November, 9.15 a.m.

Java Programming Level 4: Learning Java (6). Thursdays, 28 October–2 December, 9.15 a.m.


Word-processing

Word Level 1: Fundamentals (1). Wednesday, 20 October, 2 p.m.; Tuesday, 2 November, 2 p.m.

Word Level 3: Thesis, Reports and Long Documents (2). Mondays, 25 October and 1 November, 9.15 a.m.; Tuesdays, 9 and 16 November, 2 p.m.


Digital Presentations, Imaging and Print Technologies

Powerpoint Level 1: Fundamentals (1). Wednesday, 27 October, 2 p.m.; Monday, 8 November, 2 p.m.

Powerpoint Level 2: Tools and Templates (1). Thursday, 28 October, 9.15 a.m.; Thursday, 25 November, 2 p.m.

Powerpoint Level 3: Animation and Design (1). Thursday, 2 December, 9.15 a.m.

InDesign Level 2: An Introduction (1). Wednesday, 24 November, 2 p.m.

LaTeX Level 3: Document Preparation (1). Tuesday, 16 November, 9.15 a.m.

Digital Video Level 2: An Introduction (1). Wednesday, 27 October, 2 p.m.; Wednesday, 3 November, 2 p.m.; Wednesday, 10 November, 2 p.m.

Photoshop Level 2: An Introduction (2). Mondays, 18 and 25 October, 2 p.m.; Tuesdays, 26 October and 2 November, 9.15 a.m.

Photoshop Level 3: Images for Documents and the Web (1). Wednesday, 10 November, 9.15 a.m.

Photoshop Level 3: Creating Montages (1). Wednesday, 17 November, 9.15 a.m.

Photoshop Level 3: Creating Original Artwork (1). Wednesday, 24 November, 9.15 a.m.

Illustrator Level 3: An Introduction (2). Wednesday, 10 and 17 November, 2 p.m.


European Computing Driving Licence (ECDL)

ECDL Drop-in Sessions. Tuesday, 12 October–30 November, 9.30 a.m.; Wednesday, 13 October–1 December, 5.30 p.m.

ECDL: Intensive. Monday, 13 December–Friday, 17 December, 9.30 a.m.

ECDL: Advanced—Databases. Friday, 3 December, 9.30 a.m.

ECDL: Advanced—Presentations. Friday, 10 December, 9.30 a.m.


APPOINTMENTS

BODEN PROFESSORSHIP OF SANSKRIT

CHRISTOPHER Z. MINKOWSKI (AB, PH.D. Harvard), Professor of Asian Studies and Classics, Cornell University, has been appointed to the professorship with effect from 1 July 2005.

Professor Minkowski will be a fellow of Balliol College.


PROFESSORSHIP OF CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE

NICHOLAS BARRIE LA THANGUE (B.SC. Birmingham, M.SC. Reading, PH.D. London), Cathcart Chair of Biochemistry, University of Glasgow, has been appointed to the professorship with effect from 1 April 2005.

Professor La Thangue will be a fellow of Linacre College.


VISITING PROFESSORSHIP OF e-DEMOCRACY

STEPHEN COLEMAN (BA, PH.D. London) has been reappointed to the Visiting Professorship with effect from 1 October 2004 for a further period of fifteen months.

Professor Coleman is a fellow of Jesus College.


CONFERMENT OF THE TITLE OF VISITING PROFESSOR

The Humanities Board has conferred the title of Visiting Professor in Philosophy on PROFESSOR ROBERT M. ADAMS, Clark Professor Emeritus of Moral Philosophy and Metaphysics, Yale University, for a period of three years from 1 October 2004.


RECONFERMENTS OF THE TITLE OF VISITING PROFESSOR

The Life and Environmental Sciences Board has approved the reconferral of the title of Visiting Professor in Biology on SIR BRIAN FOLLETT, FRS, for a period of three years from 1 August 2004.

The Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board has reconferred the title of Visiting Professor in Materials upon PROFESSOR JOHN V. WOOD, Chief Executive of CCLRC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, for a period of five years from 1 October 2004.

The Life and Environmental Sciences Board has approved the reconferral of the title of Visiting Professor in Plant Pathology on DR IAN CRUTE (PH.D.), Director of Rothamsted Research, for a period of five years from 21 January 2005.

The Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board has reconferred the title of Visiting Professor in the Principles of Engineering Design upon R.J. BREWER, Manager, Analog Devices UK Design Centre, Newbury, for a period of five years from 1 December 2004.


DEPARTMENT OF POLITICS AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

The Social Sciences Board has appointed PROFESSOR S.N. MACFARLANE, Fellow of St Anne's College and Lester B. Pearson Professor of International Relations, to the headship of the department for three years from 1 October 2005.


DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS

The Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board has conferred the Headship of the Department of Statistics upon PROFESSOR C.J.H. MCDIARMID, MA, M.SC., D.PHIL., Fellow of Corpus Christi College and University Lecturer in Operations Research, for a period of three years from 1 September 2005.


ELECTORAL BOARD

The revised composition of the electoral board to the post below, proceedings to fill which are currently in progress, is as follows.

NUFFIELD PROFESSORSHIP OF COMPARATIVE POLITICS


                                                 Appointed by

The Provost of Worcester                         Mr Vice-Chancellor [1]
The Warden of Nuffield                           ex officio
Professor E. Meehan                              Council
Professor D. King                                Council
Professor V. Shue                                Social Sciences Board
Professor G. Evans                               Department of Politics and International
                                                 Relations
Professor W.L. Miller                            Department of Politics and International
                                                 Relations
Professor C. Hood                                Department of Politics and International
                                                 Relations
Professor M. Philp                               Department of Politics and International
                                                 Relations
Mr L.A. Whitehead                                Nuffield College

[1] Appointed by Mr Vice-Chancellor under the provisions of Sects. 10 and 11 of Stat. IX (Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4633, 9 October 2002, Vol. 133, p. 108).

CLARENDON LECTURES IN MANAGEMENT STUDIES

The logic of position, the measure of leadership

JOEL PODOLNY, Novartis Professor of Leadership and Management, Harvard Business School, will deliver the Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies at 5.30 p.m. on the following days in the Saïd Business School.

The lectures are open to the public, and admission is free. Further information is available from Liz Buckle, Saïd Business School (telephone: Oxford (2)88852, e-mail: liz.buckle@sbs.ox.ac.uk), or Sophie Austin, Oxford University Press (telephone: Oxford 353859, e-mail: sophie.austin@oup.com).

Tue. 19 Oct.: `The logic of person v. the logic of position.'

Wed. 20 Oct.: `The meaning of leadership.'

Thur. 21 Oct.: `The measure of meaning.'


WELDON MEMORIAL LECTURE

PROFESSOR SIR RICHARD PETO, winner of the Weldon Memorial Medal 2003, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 1 November, in Lecture Theatre A, the Zoology/Psychology Building. Tickets are not required for admission.

Subject: `Halving premature death.'


CLASSICS

Archive of Performances of Greek and Roman Drama

TONY HARRISON, poet and playwright, will appear in conversation with PROFESSOR OLIVER TAPLIN at 2.15 p.m. on Wednesday, 17 November, in the Auditorium, Magdalen College. All members of the University are welcome.

For further information, telephone Oxford (2)88210 or e-mail: apgrd@classics.ox.ac.uk.


MEDICAL SCIENCES

Institute of Musculoskeletal Sciences, the Botnar Research Centre

Unless otherwise indicated the following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the Botnar Research Centre, the Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre. Postgraduate presentations will be given at the meeting on 26 November.

PROFESSOR T. CHAMBERS, St George's Hospital Medical School, London
24 Sept.: `A role for antioxidants in the biology of bone.'

MR M. SNEAD, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge
15 Oct.: `Genetics and clinical features of Stickler's syndrome.'

DR P. BOWNESS
5 Nov.: `Why does HLA-B27 predispose to inflammatory arthritis?'

PROFESSOR L. CARDON
12 Nov.: To be announced.

DR J. URBAN
19 Nov.: To be announced.

PROFESSOR D. KERR
3 Dec., 2 p.m.: To be announced.


MUSIC

Hambro Visiting Professor of Opera

SIR JOHN ELIOT GARDNER will lecture as follows in Michaelmas Term.

11 Nov., 5.30 p.m., Jacqueline du Pré Music Building: `Opera: why bother?' (Inaugural Lecture)

12 Nov., Holywell Music Room: `Purcell's Dido and Aeneas dissected.' (Two masterclasses, 11 a.m.–1 p.m. and 2–5 p.m.)

Graduate Students' Colloquia

Unless otherwise indicated, the following colloquia will be held at 5.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Denis Arnold Hall, the Music Faculty.

J. CROSS
12 Oct.: `Myth, memory, modernism: reinventing Orpheus.'

B. HEBBERT
19 Oct.: `The Tudor violin 1540–1600.'

PROFESSOR J. BAILY, Goldsmiths' College, London
26 Oct.: `Rebuilding Afghanistan's music culture: some ethical and musicological issues.'

L. MACY, New Grove Dictionaries
2 Nov.: `Pietro Aretino, Venice, and the madrigal.'

J. MILSOM
9 Nov.: `Analysing Josquin II.'

B. JONCUS
16 Nov.: `A star is born: Kitty Clive and female representation in eighteenth-century English musical theatre'

R. MOSELEY
23 Nov., 5 p.m.: `Plotting Brahms' finale: the snake in the prater.'

C. HAILEY, Franz Schreker Foundation
30 Nov.: `Schreker, technology, and the transformation of his style.'


Ethnomusicological studies of Muslim societies

The following public lectures will be given at 4.30 p.m. on Fridays in the Examination Schools.

PROFESSOR R. QURESHI, Alberta
22 Oct.: `Music, the state, and Islam in Pakistan: negotiating identities through the sonic arts.'

PROFESSOR M. STOKES, Chicago
29 Oct.: `Ethnomusicology and Islam: some historical and theoretical perspectives.'

PROFESSOR J. BAILY, Goldsmiths' College, London
12 Nov.: `The dutar of Herat: the transformation of an Afghan lute, 1950–65.'

PROFESSOR O. WRIGHT, SOAS, London
19 Nov.: `The "classical tradition" in modern Turkey.'

DR L. NOOSHIN, City University, London
26 Nov.: `Islam, modernity, and nationhood: music and the play of identities in post-revolutionary Iran.'


SOCIAL SCIENCES

Promoting the well-being of children at risk of social exclusion

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Violet Butler Seminar Room, the Department of Social Policy and Social Work.

Convener: Dr A. Buchanan.

DR A. BUCHANAN and F. BENNETT
12 Oct.: `The impact of government policy on children aged 0–13 at risk of social exclusion: overview.'

T. SMITH
19 Oct.: `Early years research and policy for children at risk of social exclusion.'

G. SMITH and DR C. RITCHIE
26 Oct.: `Education research and policy for children at risk of social exclusion.'

DR BUCHANAN
2 Nov.: `Family support child protection research and policy.'

M. MACLEAN
9 Nov.: `Research that has informed the "contact" debate.'

PROFESSOR K. SYLVA
16 Nov.: `The EPPE research on the effects of pre-school education on children's development.'

DR F. GARDNER
23 Nov.: `US/UK research on children with anti- social behaviour disorders.'

DR BUCHANAN
30 Nov.: `Are there some key messages? Bringing the research together.'


SAID BUSINESS SCHOOL

Finance Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursday in Lecture Theatre 5, West Wing, the Saïd Business School. For further details e-mail: professorial.secretary@sbs.ox.ac.uk.

Convener: Dimitrios P. Tsomocos.

PROFESSOR C.D. ALIPRANTIS, Purdue
14 Oct.: `Some applications of Riesz spaces to economics, finance, and econometrics.'

PROFESSOR H. SABOURIAN, Cambridge
21 Oct.: `Herd behaviour in financial models with sequential trades.'

PROFESSOR F. CORNELLI, London Business School
28 Oct.: `Investor sentiment and pre-issue markets.'

PROFESSOR M. HABIB, Montpellier II
4 Nov.: `The role of know-how acquisition in the formation and duration of joint ventures.'

PROFESSOR H. HAU, INSEAD
11 Nov.: To be announced.

R. REPULLO, CEMFI
18 Nov.: `Policies for banking crises: a theoretical framework.'

PROFESSOR M. HELLWIG, Mannheim
25 Nov.: `On the treatment of capital in cost- oriented access price regulation in network industries.'

M. PAGANO
2 Dec.: To be announced.


OXFORD CENTRE FOR HEBREW AND JEWISH STUDIES

David Patterson Seminars

The David Patterson Seminars will be given at 8 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor.

Convener: Dr Joseph Sherman.

The OCHJS minibus will leave the Playhouse, Beaumont Street, at 6.40 and 7.30 p.m., and will return from Yarnton at 9.45 p.m. A single fare costs £1.60 (students £1.20).

DR R. RASKIN, Aarhus
13 Oct.: `A child at gunpoint: a case study in the life of a photo.'

T. ARGOV
20 Oct.: `Losing the (Israeli) plot: contemporary Israel in the prose of Orly Kastel-Bloom.'

PROFESSOR R. HIEBERT, Trinity Western University, Canada
27 Oct.: `The Septuagint as a reflection of its Hellenistic Jewish context.'

PROFESSOR S. PARUSSA, Wellesley College
3 Nov.: `Hybridism of sounds: Primo Levi between Judaism and literature.'

PROFESSOR G. TRODESCHINI, Trieste
10 Nov.: `Representing medieval Jewish usurers: from a theological to an economic vocabulary.'

DR J. MIDDLEMAS
17 Nov.: `The geber's correction in Lamentations 3 as proto-Midrash.'

M. NEVADER
24 Nov.: ` "Appoint a king to govern us, like other nations"—the problem with kingship in the Hebrew Bible.'

DR S. SELA, Bar-Ilan
1 Dec.: `The twelfth-century Renaissance of the Hebrew language: strategies for the creation of a new scientific Hebrew terminology.'


MAISON FRANÇAISE

Political Theory and International Relations Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Department of Politics and International Relations.

S. MUTHU, Princeton
12 Oct.: `Enlightenment against empire.' (Discussant: Dr M. Philp)

R.E. LEBOW, Dartmouth College
19 Oct.: `Interests and ethics.' (Discussant: Professor A. Hurrell)

N. MALCOLM:
26 Oct.: `Seventeenth-century theories of sovereignty and international relations.' (Discussant: J. Robertson)

P. HASSNER, Institut d'études politiques, Paris
2 Nov.: `International order as the result of an historical process.' (Discussant: Professor A. Roberts)

J.-W. MUELLER
9 Nov.: `International law, nomos and sovereignty.' (Discussant: N. Krisch)

PROFESSOR FRED HALLIDAY
16 Nov.: `Post-national citizenship or international relations: a critical review of the legacies of cosmopolitanism and internationalism.' (Discussant: T. MacDonald)

M. CANTO-SPERBER, EHESS, Paris
23 Nov.: `Morality, normativity and international relations.' (Discussant: D. Miller)

J. WELSH
30 Nov.: `Conservatism and international relations.' (Discussant: L. Foisneau)


Early Modern French Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5.15 p.m. on Thursdays in the Maison Française.

A. VIALA
14 Oct.: `Rousseau face à la modernité: le livre, l'imprimerie, la lecture.'

R. DARNTON, Princeton
28 Oct.: `Mlle Bonafon and the private life of Louis XV: what the butler saw and what the public read in eighteenth-century France.' (Oxford–Princeton Partnership in the History of the Book)

K. LANINI, Paris III–EHESS, Paris
11 Nov.: `La vanité, une catégorie moderne?'

E. HERDMAN
25 Nov.: `History in the making: fact, fiction and propaganda during the French religious wars.'


Conferences

The following conferences will be held as shown in the Maison Française.

Sat. 2 Oct., 10 a.m.–5 p.m.: `Du papier à l'archive, du privé au public: France et Iles Britanniques, deux mémoires.'

Thur. 14 Oct., 10 a.m.–4 p.m.: `Cent ans de relations culturelles franco-britanniques.'

Fri. 22 Oct., 9.30 a.m.–5 p.m., and Sat. 23 Oct., 9.30 a.m.–4 p.m.: `Psychologie, psychiatrie, psychanalyse et médecine: jalons pour une histoire (XIXe- XXe siècles).'

Fri. 5 Nov., 9.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m., and Sat. 6 Nov., 9.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m.: `Effets spéciaux: artifices et tours de main.'

Fri. 19 Nov., 10.30 a.m.–6 p.m., and Sat. 20 Nov., 9 a.m.–4 p.m.: `Spin, image and the media: political communication in France and Britain.'

Fri. 26 Nov., 2–6 p.m., and Sat. 27 Nov., 9.30 a.m.–6 p.m.: `La place de l'atomisme dans la philosophie médiévale.'


Lectures

Unless otherwise indicated, the following lectures will be held in the Maison Française.

P. JACOB, Institut Jean Nicod, CNRS, Paris
Fri. 15 Oct., 4.30 p.m., Philosophy Faculty Centre: `The scope and limits of Chomsky's naturalism.' (Discussant: W. Brewer, Warwick)

G. DE BROGLIE, Académie Française, and J. ROGISTER, Durham
Thur. 21 Oct., 5.15 p.m.: `L'Entente Cordiale: de l'événement au concept.'

R. BRANCHE, Rennes
Thur. 18 Nov., Modern History Faculty Building: `The French army and torture during the Algerian war (1954--62).'

J.-C. SCHMITT, EHESS, Paris
Tue. 23 Nov., 5.15 p.m.: `Social rhythms in the Middle Ages.'


Other meetings

Unless otherwise indicated, the following meetings will be held as shown in the Maison Française.

Tue. 12 Oct., 5.15 p.m.: EDOUARD GLISSANT, writer, presents his work. (Littérature Française à Oxford)

Sat. 30 Oct., 10.30 a.m.–4 p.m.: `Art and the festival: Durkheimian perspectives' (study-day), with J.-L. Fabiani, EHESS, Paris, and J. de Lannoy, Linacre College.

Wed. 10 Nov., 5.15 p.m.: `The war for Muslim minds: Islam and the West' (debate), with Gilles Kepel, CERI-Sciences Po, Paris.

Wed. 17 Nov., 2–7 p.m., Modern European History Research Centre, Radcliffe Infirmary: `France and Algeria since 1945' (study-day).


CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES

Socio-legal approaches to law and development

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Mondays in Seminar Room D, the Manor Road Building.

Convener: Dr Tobias Kelly.

PROFESSOR P. MCAUSLAN, Birkbeck College, London
11 Oct.: `In the beginning was the law ... an intellectual Odyssey.'

PROFESSOR B. HARRISS-WHITE
18 Oct.: `De- and re-regulating business in rural West Bengal: capitalism under the left front.'

PROFESSOR J. FAUNDEZ, Warwick
25 Oct.: `Why has the law and development movement failed to revive?'

DR A. MANJI, Warwick
1 Nov.: `The rebirth of law and development: a feminist critique.'

L.-H. PIRON, Overseas Development Institute
8 Nov.: `Donors' approaches to justice sector reform.'


GREEN COLLEGE

McGovern Annual Lecture in the History of Medicine

PROFESSOR VIVIAN NUTTON, Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine, University College London, will deliver the McGovern Annual Lecture in the History of Medicine at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 28 October, in the E.P. Abraham Lecture Theatre, Green College.

Subject: `To dissect or not to dissect? Some ancient responses to a modern dilemma.'


MANSFIELD COLLEGE AND BALLIOL COLLEGE

Adam von Trott Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR T. GARTON ASH will deliver the Adam von Trott Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 30 November, in the chapel, Mansfield College.

Subject: `Are there moral foundations of European power?'


ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

European Studies Centre

Europe: what kind of power?

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Seminar Room, the European Studies Centre, 70 Woodstock Road. The series is arranged jointly with the Maison Française and the Department of Politics and International Relations.

Convener: Dr Jan Zielonka.

PROFESSOR T. SNYDER, Yale
12 Oct.: `Power politics in Eastern Europe: past and present.'

PROFESSOR B. LAFFAN, Dublin
19 Oct.: `Organising power in Europe: multilevel governance.'

M. VAN ORANJE, Director, EU Affairs, Open Society Foundation, London
26 Oct.: `Europe as a normative power.' (To be confirmed)

G. ANDRÉANI, Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Paris
2 Nov.: `Europe as a diplomatic power'

F. HEISBOURG, Director, Fondation pour la Recherche Stratégique, Paris
9 Nov.: `Europe as a military power.'

PROFESSOR A. SAPIR, European Commission
16 Nov.: `Europe as an economic power'

I. KRASTEV, Director, Centre for Liberal Strategies, Sofia
23 Nov.: `What kind of power appeals to Eastern Europe? EU versus US.'


Eastern Europe under Communist rule

PROFESSOR RICHARD CRAMPTON will lecture at 2.15 p.m. on Thursdays, weeks 1–8, in St Antony's College.


Workshop

A workshop, convened by Knick Harley, will be held on Thursday, 21 October, 2–5 p.m., and on Friday, 22 October, 9 a.m.–5 p.m.


Conference: Entente Cordiale

A conference, convened by Dr Kalypso Nicolaïdis and Professor Alexis Tadié, will be held on 6 and 7 December in the Lecture Theatre, the Nissan Institute.


Other lectures

PROFESSOR NORMAN DAVIES and PROFESSOR TIMOTHY SNYDER will lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 13 October, in the European Studies Centre.

Subject: `Where on earth does Europe end?' (Centre Evening)


H.E. BERNARD R. BOT, Foreign Minister, the Netherlands, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 1 December, in the Lecture Theatre, the Nissan Institute.

Subject: `What should be European foreign policy?'


Russian and Eurasian Studies Centre

Twenty years of political change: the USSR and Russia, 1985–2004

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

Convener: Professor Archie Brown.

PROFESSOR BROWN
11 Oct.: `Institutions, ideas, interests, and leadership in the Soviet and Russian transition.'

DR L. SHEVTSOVA, Carnegie Moscow Center
18 Oct.: `Comparing Yeltsin and Putin as leaders.'

SIR RODRIC BRAITHWAITE, British Ambassador to Moscow, 1988–92
25 Oct.: `The view across the river, 1988–92.'

DR W. SMIRNOV, Institute of State and Law, Moscow
1 Nov.: `Civil society in post-Soviet Russia.'

DR J. HUGHES, LSE
8 Nov.: `Federalism in post-Soviet Russia: from accommodation to control?'

DR A. GRACHEV, Paris and Moscow
15 Nov.: `The rise and fall of the new political thinking.'

MS TINA PODPLATNIK, Moscow
22 Nov.: `Big business and the state under Yeltsin and Putin.'

DR A. LEDENEVA, University College London
29 Nov.: `Informal politics in Russia in the 1990s.'


ST CROSS COLLEGE AND ALL SOULS COLLEGE

St Cross–All Souls Lectures

Who owns objects? The ethics and legality of collecting

Unless otherwise indicated, the following lectures will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Dining Hall, St Cross College.

The series will conclude with an all-day workshop, to be held on 6 December in All Souls College. Registration forms for this will be available at the lectures.

Further information may be obtained from Roz Britton-Strong (e-mail: coin- room@ashmus.ox.ac.uk).

Conveners: Luke Treadwell, St Cross College; Eleanor Robson, All Souls College; and Christopher Gosden, St Cross College.

PROFESSOR LORD (COLIN) RENFREW
11 Oct.: `Collecting and looting in the past: the effects of self-indulgence.'

DR L. AL-GAILANI
18 Oct.: `Archaeological theft in Iraq.'

DR K. POLITIS
25 Oct., Pitt Rivers Museum Research Centre (64 Banbury Road): `The political and economic realities of looting ancient sites.'

DR U. KAMPMANN
1 Nov.: `Dealing in coins: problems and opportunities for a serious and responsible coin trade.'

DR D. GAIMSTER
8 Nov.: `UK government measures against the illicit trade: examining the new regulatory framework.'

G. ORTIZ
15 Nov.: `Overview and assessment after fifty years of collecting in a changing world.'

DR P. ROBERTS
22 Nov.: `Barriers or bridges? Museums and acquisitions in the light of new legal and voluntary codes.'

DR M. O'NEILL 29 Nov.: `Repatriation and its discontents: the Glasgow experience.'


WOLFSON COLLEGE

Panel discussion

The college will host a panel discussion in conjunction with the college charity, the African Medical and Research Foundation (AMREF), at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 7 October, in the Haldane Room.

The discussion will highlight the importance of three areas to the prevention and mitigation of the epidemic: scientific research, social policy, and accessto essential medicines. The event is part of Oxford Africa Week.

The panellists will be Dr Lucy Dorrell, Medical Research Council Human Immunology Unit; James Sandham and Doreen Tembo, Department of Social Policy and Social Work; Duncan Matthews, Senior Lecturer and Senior Research Fellow, Intellectual Property Research Institute, Queen Mary College, London; Matthew Ngunga, AMREF Programme Directorate, Nairobi.

Subject: `Tackling HIV/AIDS: a multidimensional approach.'


Ronald Syme Lecture

PROFESSOR WERNER ECK, Institut für Altertumskunde, University of Cologne, will deliver the annual Ronald Syme Lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 28 October, in the Hall, Wolfson College. The lecture is open to the public.

Subject: `Augustus' Germany: a new province is born.'


FRIENDS OF THE BODLEIAN

Thirty-minute lectures

The following thirty-minute lectures will be held at 1 p.m. on the days shown in the Cecil Jackson Room, the Sheldonian Theatre.

Wine and sandwiches will be served after the lectures at a cost of £4 per person, for which bookings should be made in advance with Geoffrey Groom, Secretary, Friends of the Bodleian, Bodleian Library, Oxford OX1 3BG (telephone: Oxford (2)77022, e-mail: fob@bodley.ox.ac.uk).

MISS L. FORBES and DR J. JOHNS
Wed. 20 Oct.: `The Bodleian Book of Curiosities: some answers and many new questions.'

DR G. WALKER
Wed. 10 Nov.: `Seven million volumes described: editing the new subject guide to the Bodleian's collections.'

MS J. ROBERTS
Tue 30 Nov.: `Does the Bodleian Library deserve John Selden (16 December 1584–30 November 1654)?'


Literary Evening

MICHAEL HOLROYD and JENNY UGLOW will read from and discuss their work, from 8 p.m. on Friday, 29 October, in the Holywell Music Room. There will be an opportunity to talk to the speakers after the meeting.

Tickets, costing £20 (a limited number of tickets are available to students at £10), may be obtained on application to Geoffrey Groom, Secretary, Friends of the Bodleian, Bodleian Library, Oxford OX1 3BG (telephone: Oxford (2)77022, e-mail: fob@bodley.ox.ac.uk). Proceeds will go to the funds of the Friends of the Bodleian.

CENTRE FOR BRAZILIAN STUDIES

Hardship Fund: Brazilian Studies

Applications are invited from postgraduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Life and Environmental Sciences Divisions of the University whose research is on Brazil and who, because of unexpected difficulties, need financial assistance to complete their postgraduate studies.

Please note that financial assistance is only available to postgraduate students who are already at the University and awards are not normally made to students in their first year of study. Amounts do not normally exceed £2,000 per annum.

There is no application form. Candidates should apply in writing to Professor Leslie Bethell, Director, Centre for Brazilian Studies. The letter should include: (i) name, college, degree being studied, and terms of admission; (ii) the faculty/department under which the applicant is studying and the subject of the thesis; (iii) details of actual or estimated income and expenditure in the year for which financial assistance is requested; (iv) the amount of the grant requested.

Letters of application must be accompanied by separate and reasoned recommendations from the student's supervisor and from the head, senior tutor, or tutor for graduates from his or her college.

Applications for financial assistance for 2004–5 should be submitted by the end of noughth week in Michaelmas Term or at the end of noughth week in Hilary Term, and will be considered by the Committee in first week of each term.

Applications should be sent to Julie Smith, Administrator, Centre for Brazilian Studies, 92 Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 7ND (e-mail: julie.smith@brazil.ox.ac.uk).

APPOINTMENTS, REAPPOINTMENTS, AND CONFERMENT OF TITLE

With the approval of the relevant divisional board, the following appointments and reappointments have been made for the periods stated.

Life and Environmental Sciences Division

Conferment of title

VISITING LECTURER

DR MAUREEN TAYLOR (PH.D.). In Biochemistry. For three years from 1 September 2004.


Medical Sciences Division

Appointment

UNIVERSITY LECTURER

Human Anatomy and Genetics

SHANKAR SRINIVAS (B.SC. Hyderabad, MA, M.PHIL., PH.D. Columbia), Fellow of Jesus College. In Developmental Biology/Embryology. From 1 October 2004.


Social Sciences Division

Appointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

DAPO AKANDE (LL.B. University of Ife, Nigeria, LL.M. London School of Economics). Fellow-elect of St Peter's College. in Public International Law. From 1 September 2004 to 31 August 2009.

TAREK COURY (BS Austin, Texas, BA Univ of California Santa Barbara, PH.D. cornell). fellow-elect of university college. in economics. from 1 october 2004 to 30 september 2009.

NIELS DECHOW (BIMA, M.SC., PH.D. Copenhagen Business School). Fellow of Keble College. In Management Studies (Accounting). From 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2008.

HUBERT ERTL, M.SC. (PH.D. Munich). Fellow-elect of Linacre College. In Educational Studies. From 1 October 2004 to 30 September 2009.

BEN MCFARLANE, BCL, MA. Fellow-elect of Trinity College. In Property Law and Trusts. From 1 October 2004 to 30 September 2009.

VICTORIA A. MURPHY (BA Queen's University, ma, ph.d. McGill) . Fellow of Kellogg College. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition. From 1 May 2004 to 30 April 2009.

IAN JAMES NEARY (BA Sheffield, D.PHIL. Sussex). Fellow-elect of St Antony's College. In Japanese Politics. From 1 September 2004 to 31 August 2009.

ALEXANDER JAMES NICHOLLS, MBA (BA, MA, PH.D. King's College, London). Fellow of Harris Manchester College. in Management Studies (Social Entrepreneurship). From 22 March 2004 to 21 March 2009.

DON OPERARIO (BA UCLA, MS, PH.D. Massachusetts). Fellow-elect of Wolfson College. in Evidence Based Interventions. From 1 September 2004 to 31 August 2009.

HAN OZSOYLEV (B.SC. Birkent, Turkey). Fellow-elect of Linacre College. In Financial Economics. From 1 September 2004 to 31 August 2009.

JUSTINE PILA (BA, LL.B., PH.D. Melbourne). Fellow-elect of St Catherine's College. In Intellectual Property Law. From 1 July 2004 to 30 June 2009.

THOMAS POWELL (BA Southern Methodist University, M.PHIL., PH.D. New York University). Fellow-elect of St Hugh's College. In Strategy. From 1 December 2004 to 30 November 2009.

F. DAVID RUEDA (BA, M.SC. SOAS, MA, PH.D. Cornell). Fellow-elect of Merton. In Quantitative Political Science. From 1 September 2004 to 31 August 2009.

MARTIN SEELEIB-KAISER (MA, PH.D., HABIL. Munich). Fellow-elect of Green College. In Social Policy. From 1 September 2004 to 31 August 2009.

KEVIN KEITH SHEPPARD (BA, B.SC. University of Texas, Austin). Fellow-elect of Keble College. In Financial Economics. From 1 August to 31 July 2009. JOHN THANASSOULIS, MA, M.PHIL., D.PHIL. Student-elect of Christ Church. In Economics. From 1 October 2004 to 30 September 2009.

JAMES TILLEY, BA, D.PHIL. Fellow-elect of Jesus College. In Quantitative Political or Social Science. From 1 September 2004 to 31 August 2009.

MARC VENTRESCA (AB, AM, PH.D. Stanford). Fellow-elect of Wolfson College. In Strategy. From 1 July 2004 to 30 June 2009.

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS (CUF)

SUSAN BRIGHT, BA, BCL. Fellow-elect of New College. In Law. From 1 October 2004 to 30 September 2005.

PAULA ROSALIND GILIKER, MA (BCL, PH.D. Cambridge). Fellow-elect of St Hilda's College. In Law. From 1 October 2004 to 30 September 2009.

FELLOW

GLEN LOUTZENHISER (BC Saskatchewan, LL.B. Toronto, LL.M. Cambridge). Fellow-elect of Christ Church. McGrigors Career Development Fellow in Tax Law. From 1 October 2004 to 30 September 2007.


Reappointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

DR LAURA EMPSON. In Management Studies (Strategic Management). From 1 April 2004 until the retiring age.

DR A. GUMBEL. In Management Studies (Finance). From 1 October 2004 to 30 September 2007.

DR ERNESTO MACARO. In Educational Studies (Modern Languages). From 1 October 2004 until the retiring age.

DR SUJOY MUKERJI. In Economics. From 1 October 2004 until the retiring age.

DR K.A. NICOLAIDIS. In International Relations. From 1 April 2004 until the retiring age.

DR N.E. STAVROPOULOS. In Legal Theory. From 1 October 2004 until the retiring age.

DR MARGARET STEVENS. In Economics. From 1 October 2004 until the retiring age.

DR J.W. TAYLOR. in management studies (decision science). From 1 October 2004 until the retiring age.

DR JENNIFER M. WELSH. In International Relations. From 1 October 2004 until the retiring age.

DR R.K. WESTBROOK. In Management Studies (Operations Management). From 1 October 2003.

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS (CUF)

N.C. BAMFORTH. In Law. From 1 October 2004 until the retiring age.

DR T.A.O. ENDICOTT. In Law. From 1 October 2004 until the retiring age.

J.J.W. HERRING. In Law. From 1 October 2004 until the retiring age.

DR L.C. H. HOYANO. In Law. From 1 October 2004 until the retiring age.

TUTOR

TREVOR ANDREW MUTTON. In Educational Studies (Modern Languages and Professional Studies). From 1 September 2004 until the retiring age.


M.SC. IN NEUROSCIENCE

Advanced Modules

Hilary Term

Module A1: Strategies for the analysis of synapses, neurons and networks (Organiser: Professor J.P. Bolam)

Module A2: Cognitive neuroscience (Organiser: Dr A.C. Nobré)

Module B1: Motor systems (Organiser: Professor J.F. Stein

Module B2: Computational neuroscience (Organiser: Professor E.T. Rolls)

Module C1: CNS Development, plasticity, and repair (Organiser: Dr J.S.H. Taylor)

Trinity Term

Module A3: Cellular signalling (Organiser: Dr O.K.H. Paulsen)

Module B3: Sensory systems (Organiser: Dr A.J. King)

Module B4: Animal models and the clinic (Organiser: Professor J.N.P. Rawlins)

Module C2: Molecular neuroscience (Organiser: Dr M.J.A. Wood)


MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES BOARD

M.Sc in Mathematics and the Foundations of Computer Science

The Supervisory Committee has approved the following courses for 2004–5.

SECTION A

Schedule I

Analytic Topology

Axiomatic Set Theory

Enumerative Combinatorics

Finite Groups and Their Representations

Gödel's Incompleteness Theorems

Group Theory

Lambda Calculus and Types

Lie Algebras

Model Theory

Schedule II

Algebraic Number Theory

Analytic Number Theory

Order, Topology and Computer Science

SECTION B

Schedule I

Applied Probability

Communication Theory

Complexity

Concurrency

The Logic of Multi-Agent Information Flow

Schedule II

Automata, Logic and games

Computational Algebra

Computational Number Theory

Computer Aided Formal Verification

Further courses may be announced later.


Revision to the list of Supplementary Subjects in the Honour School of Natural Science 2004--5

Contrary to the notice published in Gazette, Vol. 134, p. 1209, 25 June 2004 (which superseded an earlier notice in Gazette, Vol. 134, p. 1112, 27 May 2004), Chemical Biology will not be available as a Supplementary Subject in the Honour School of Natural Science (Chemistry) in 2004--5.


STANDING COMMITTEE FOR ENGINEERING, ECONOMICS, AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED SCHOOLS

Honour School of Engineering, Economics and Management Part II 2005

The Standing Committee for EEM and Related Schools has approved the following arrangements for the optional Group M and Group C papers. Candidates selecting the Group M paper(s) must select from the following:

M2 Finance
M3 Accounting
M4 Marketing
M5 Strategic Management

Candidates selecting the Group C paper are restricted to selecting one paper or the equivalent of one paper only from the following:

C1A Thermofluids
C1B Mechanics of materials

C2A Structures and fluids
C2B Geotechnics

C3A Opto-electronics
C3B Advanced Electronics

C4A Control systems
C4B Information engineering

C5A Chemical processes
C5B Chemical technology

C6A Production engineering
C6B Engineering mathematics
C6C Biomedical engineering

Each of the papers in the series C1 to C5 will assume knowledge of the material examined in the corresponding Part I paper, B1, B2, B3, B4, or B5. Information about content of the various papers is published in the General Scheme of Lectures for Engineering Science.


BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF THEOLOGY

Honour School of Philosophy and Theology and Honour School of Theology 2005

In accordance with regulation changes for paper 35 already announced in Gazette, Vol. 134, pages 897–8 (Supplement (3) to No. 4692, 21 April 2004), the Board of the Faculty of Theology will offer a Final Honour School paper in `Science and Religion' with effect from October 2004 for examination in 2005, as paper 40.


CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, and, where applicable, of divisional boards, the following changes in regulations made by divisional and faculty boards will come into effect on 8 October.

1 Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board

(a) Honour School of Engineering Science

(i) With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first Part I examination in 2006)

In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 158, delete ll. 15--29 and substitute:

`Candidates shall be required to submit a portfolio for Engineering and Society coursework (A7) comprising three essays on:

(a) a management case study

(b) a safety assessment

(c) a sustainability assessment

as specified by the Chairman of the Sub-faculty of Engineering Science. Details of the portfolio will be published not later than Friday of the fourth week of Hilary Full Term in the academic year preceding that in which the written examination is to be taken. Each essay shall be typed and must not exceed 3,000 words except where specified by the Chairman of Sub-faculty.'


(ii) With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first Part II examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 159, ll. 24--7, delete from `The Sub-faculty will divide' to `one of the other lists.'


(b) Honour School of Engineering and Computing Science

(i) With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first Part I examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 167, delete ll. 1--2 and substitute:

`The examiners will not provide calculators, but for Engineering papers and ECS1, will permit the use of one hand-held calculator as specified in the Honour School of Engineering Science. The use of calculators is generally not permitted for Computer Science papers ECS2-ECS5, but certain kinds may be allowed for certain papers. Specifications of which papers and which types of calculators are permitted for those exceptional papers will be announced by the examiners in the Hilary Term preceding the examination.'

(ii) With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first Part II examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 168, delete ll. 41--2, and substitute:

`The examiners will not provide calculators, but for Engineering papers will permit the use of one hand-held calculator as specified in the Honour School of Engineering Science. The use of calculators is generally not permitted for Computer Science papers, but certain kinds may be allowed for certain papers. Specifications of which papers and which types of calculators are permitted for those exceptional papers will be announced by the examiners in the Hilary Term preceding the examination.'


(c) Pass School of Engineering and Computing Science

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 169, delete ll. 30--1 and substitute:

`The examiners will not provide calculators, but for Engineering papers and ECS1, will permit the use of one hand-held calculator as specified in the Honour School of Engineering Science. The use of calculators is generally not permitted for Computer Science papers ECS2--ECS5, but certain kinds may be allowed for certain papers. Specifications of which papers and which types of calculators are permitted for those exceptional papers will be announced by the examiners in the Hilary Term preceding the examination.'

2 Ibid., l.27, delete `Paper ECS7 (Engineering Practical Work);' and substitute `Paper ECS7;'.


2 Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board and Social Sciences Board

Honour School of Engineering, Economics, and Management

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first Part II examination in 2005) In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 174, l. 39, delete `Statistical Methods in Social Science' and substitute `Statistical Methods in Economics'.


3 Medical Sciences Board

Honour School of Physiological Sciences

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 24, after l. 5 insert:

`Physiological Sciences    Medical Sciences Division'.

2 Ibid., delete l. 22.

3 Ibid., p. 371, delete l. 14.

4 Ibid., p. 374, delete from `The examinations' on l.22 to `Physiological Sciences.' on l. 24.

5 Ibid., l. 34, delete `Physiological Sciences:'.

6 Ibid., delete from p. 388, l. 14 to p. 390, l. 40.

7 Ibid., p. 392, delete from l. 12 to l. 32.

8 Ibid., after p. 466, insert:

`SPECIAL REGULATIONS FOR THE HONOUR SCHOOL OF PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

A

1. The subject of the Honour School of Physiological Sciences shall be all aspects of the scientific study of the development and functioning of living organisms with particular but not exclusive reference to mammals. 2. No candidate shall be admitted for examination in this school unless he or she has either passed or been exempted from the First Public examination.

3. The examination in this school shall be under the supervision of the Medical Sciences Board, which shall prescribe the necessary regulations.

4. The examiners shall be the Public Examiners for the Final Honour School of Medical Sciences.

5. Any candidate offering an optional subject based on courses provided within the Honour School of Experimental Psychology shall be examined in that subject by the Public Examiners in Experimental Psychology.

6. Candidates may offer themselves for examination in one or more of the Supplementary Subjects specified for the Honour School of Natural Sciences. A candidate's results in any such subject shall be published, and account shall be taken of those results in the production of the class list for the Honour School of Physiological Sciences according to the regulations of the Honour School of Natural Sciences.

7. Every candidate shall give notice to the Registrar of all papers being offered not later than Friday in the eighth week of Michaelmas Term in the academic year in which the candidate intends to sit the examination.

B

1. The options of the school shall be as specified for the Honour School of Medical Sciences. This list may be varied from time to time by the Medical Sciences Board, and such variations shall be notified by publication in the University Gazette by the end of Week 8 of Trinity Term of the academic year two years preceding the first examination of the changed options. Each option shall be divided into themes that will be taught starting in Michaelmas Term. The list of themes to be taught in each option in any one academic year shall be published no later than Week 0 of Michaelmas Term of that academic year. Most themes will be specific each to a single option, but some may be shared. The total number of themes to be examined in each option shall be at least 8 and no more than 11, taking account of shared and changed themes (see para. 2 below). Each candidate will be expected to have studied 8 themes in order to address the synoptic questions of Paper 2, and to have prepared sufficient of those themes in depth to be able to address the requirements of Paper 1 (see paras 2, 3, and 5 of Part B of the Special Regulations for the Honour School of Medical Sciences).

2. The written papers of the school shall be as specified for the Honour School of Medical Sciences. To account for any minor change from year to year to the themes within any option, the question papers for the Final Honour School of Physiological Sciences shall be set so as to address the themes included in the options both in the academic year of the examination and in the preceding academic year.

3. Each candidate must offer four written papers:

Paper 1 for two chosen options, Paper 2 and Paper 3.

In place of one Paper 1, candidates may offer a written paper based on courses provided within Parts I and II of the Final Honour School of Experimental Psychology. The subjects of the papers to be available for this purpose shall be published no later than the end of Week 5 of Hilary Term in the year preceding the examination.

In addition, each candidate must both:

(i) undertake and be examined in a research project on the subject of which a dissertation must be submitted, and

(ii) submit an essay.

The weighting of marks for the six exercises required of each candidate shall be 25 per cent for the research project and 15 per cent for each of the other five exercises. If, in any part of the examination, a candidate presents essentially the same information on more than one occasion, then credit will be given in only the first instance. This regulation elaborates the specific regulations relating to the submitted essay and answers in Papers 1 (see para. 5.i) and to the dissertation (see para. 4.iv).

4. Research project

(i) Form and subject of the project The project shall consist in original experiments done by the candidate alone or in collaboration with others (where such collaboration is, for instance, needed to produce results in the time available).

The subject of the project shall be approved and the work shall be supervised as specified for the Honour School of Medical Sciences (see para. 4.i of Part B of the Special Regulations for the Honour School of Medical Sciences). For students reading for the Honour School of Physiological Sciences, a list of potential supervisors and their interests shall be published in Week 3 of Hilary Term of the academic year preceding the intended year of examination. Candidates should normally arrange their own projects and seek approval to start work through the Director of Preclinical Studies or his or her deputy. Otherwise, candidates may make use of the list of approved projects published according to the Special Regulations for the Honour School of Medical Sciences in Trinity Term of the academic year preceding the year of the examination. When choosing a research project, candidates must bear in mind the prohibition on duplicating material in different parts of the examination (see para. 4.iv).

(ii) Registration Candidates must register the title of their projects through the Preclinical Studies Office no later than noon on Friday of Week 8 of Michaelmas Term in the academic year in which they intend taking the examination.

(iii) Examination Candidates shall submit to the examiners a dissertation based on their project according to guidelines that will be published by the Medical Sciences Board in Week 1 of Trinity Term in the academic year preceding the examination. The length of the dissertation excluding tables, figures, diagrams, and references shall not exceed 10,000 words.

In addition each candidate shall make a brief oral presentation of their project to a group of three examiners (or examiners and assessors appointed to ensure an adequate representation of expertise), after which, the candidate shall be examined viva voce on the project. The form of the presentation to the examiners shall be specified in guidelines published by the Medical Sciences Board in Week 1 of Trinity Term in the academic year preceding the examination.

(iv) Submission and assessment of project-based written work Dissertations (two copies in either case) must be sent to the Chairman of Examiners, Honour School of Physiological Sciences, c/o the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the Friday of Week 8 in Hilary Term of the academic year in which the candidate intends to take the examination. The copies shall be accompanied (in a separate sealed envelope) by a certificate signed by each candidate indicating that the research project is the candidate's own work and that the supervisor commented on no more than the first draft of the dissertation. In the case of laboratory-based work that has been produced in collaboration, the certificate shall indicate the extent of the candidate's own contribution.

In all cases, the examiners shall obtain and consider a written report from each supervisor indicating the extent of the input made by the candidate to the outcome of the project and also any unforeseen difficulties associated with the project (e.g. unexpected technical issues or problems in the availability of materials, equipment, or literature or other published data). Material in a candidate's dissertation must not duplicate material that has been included in the submitted essay and nor may it be duplicated in any answer given in a written examination paper.

Dissertations previously submitted for the Honour School of Physiological Sciences may be resubmitted. No dissertation will be accepted if it has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another Honour School or degree of this University, or for a degree of any other institution.

5. The submitted essay

(i)Form and subject of the essay The submitted essay shall be of not more than 3,000 words, excluding any tables, figures, diagrams, or references. It must be typed and bound according to guidelines that will be published by the Medical Sciences Board in Week 0 Michaelmas Term in the academic year preceding the intended year of examination.

The subject matter of a candidate's essay shall be within the scope of the school. The essay may relate to any of the themes taught in the options of the school, regardless of the candidate's chosen options for Paper 1. However, in their Papers 1, candidates shall be excluded from answering any question set on a theme registered as subject matter for their submitted essay. Likewise, the dissertation on the research project may not duplicate material in the submitted essay.

A list of suggested essay titles, and the themes to which they relate, approved by the Chairman of Examiners in consultation with the option organisers, shall be published no later than the end of Week 0 of Michaelmas Term in the academic year preceding the intended year of examination. A candidate wishing to offer an essay with a title not on the approved list, must apply for approval of their proposed title at any time, but not later than the end of Week 0 of Hilary Term in the academic year of the examination. Application shall be made via the Preclinical Studies Office and shall include the proposed title, a brief outline of the subject matter, and the main themes to which it relates. Decision on the application shall be made by the Chairman of Examiners in consultation with the option organisers and shall be communicated to the candidate as soon as possible and in any case not later than Week 4 of Hilary Term in the academic year of the examination.

(ii) Registration No later than the end of Week 8 of Hilary Term in the academic year of the examination, every candidate must register through the Preclinical Studies Office the title of their essay and confirm the main themes to which it relates.

(iii) Authorship The essay must be the candidate's own work. Candidates' tutors, or their deputies nominated to act as advisors, may discuss with candidates the proposed field of study, the sources available, and the method of treatment, but on no account may they read or comment on any written draft. Every candidate shall sign a certificate to the effect that this rule has been observed and that the essay is their own work; and the candidate's tutor or advisor shall countersign the certificate confirming that, to the best of their knowledge and belief, this is so.

(iv) Submission Essays (two copies) must be submitted to the Chairman of Examiners in Physiological Sciences, c/o the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the Friday of Week 0 of the Trinity Term in the year of the examination. Each essay shall be accompanied (in a separate sealed envelope addressed to the Chairman of Examiners) by certification of authorship as specified in the preceding paragraph and an electronic copy of the text of the essay.

6. Candidates may be examined viva voce; the topics may include the subject of any written paper taken by the candidate, or the research project or submitted essay.'


4 Social Sciences Board

(a) M.Sc. in Sociology

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 762, l. 39, delete `,to be specified jointly by supervisor and student'.

2 Ibid., l.42 delete `15 August' and substitute `1 September'.


(b) M.Phil. in Sociology

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 601, ll. 39--44, delete `Candidates who fail'..whole test or parts thereof.' and substitute:

`Candidates who fail the qualifying test are allowed to retake the test before the beginning of the first week of the next academic year. Such candidates are required to retake only those elements of the qualifying test that they have failed.'

2 Ibid., p. 602, delete ll. 14--17 and substitute:

`(a) The satisfactory completion of a course of practical work including (i) statistical methods; (ii) survey methods; (iii) qualitative methods; (iv) research design.'

3 Ibid., delete ll. 18--20 and substitute:

`Candidates shall submit reports of the practical work completed to the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford, by the following deadlines: for (i) statistical methods by 12 noon on Friday of the fifth week of the second term of the course; for (ii) survey methods by 12 noon on Friday of the ninth week of the second term of the course ; and for (iii) qualitative methods, assignment 1 by 12 noon on Friday of the ninth week of the second term of the course and assignment 2 by 12 noon on the Friday preceding the first week of the third term of the course. The reports must be accompanied by a statement that they'.

4 Ibid., l. 21, after `indicated.' insert `For (i) statistical methods, candidates will also be required to take a two-hour open book in-class test to be held on the Friday preceding the first week of the second term of the course.'

5 Ibid., l. 27, after `(b)' insert `For (iv) research design,'.

6 Ibid., l.33, after `submit' insert `two copies of'.


5 Board of the Faculty of Classics

Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 124, l. 3, delete `1000' and substitute `1100'.


6 Board of the Faculty of English Language and Literature

(a) Special Regulations for the Moderations in English Language and Literature

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 54, delete ll. 34--7 and substitute:

`Candidates will be expected to answer two questions drawn from a list covering a range of different literary concepts, and will be required to use specific examples to illustrate their answers.'


(b) Honour School of English Language and Literature

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 198, l. 50, delete `and linguistic'.

2 Ibid., p. 199, l. 7, delete `, but not to have studied in detail'.

3 Ibid., l. 11, delete `and linguistic'.


7 Boards of the Faculties of English Language and Literature and Medieval and Modern Languages

Honour School of English and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 185, l. 43, after `Subject 7].' insert:

`Within the confines of the themes set for the paper, candidates may write on a topic combining the modern language with English as long as the modern language element takes up no more than half the essay.'

2 Ibid., p. 186, after l. 2 insert:

`With the exception of those Paper 8 options for which a timed examination is the prescribed mode of assessment, and within the confines of the themes set for the paper, candidates may write on a topic combining the modern language with English as long as the modern language element takes up no more than half the essay.'

3 Ibid., after l. 3 insert:

`(v) An extended essay on a topic combining the modern language and English (to be examined under the regulations for the Honour School of Modern Languages).'

4 Ibid., ll. 8--9, delete `or ... English'.

5 Ibid., l. 23, after `examination.' insert:

`Candidates taking subject B7 may write on a topic combining the modern language with English as long as the modern language element takes up no more than half the essay.'

6 Ibid., l. 34, after `Literature).' insert:

`Within the confines of the themes set for the paper, candidates taking subject B6 may write on a topic combining the modern language with English as long as the modern language element takes up no more than half the essay. or

(c) An extended essay on a topic combining the modern language and English (to be examined under the regulations for the Honour School of Modern Languages).'

7 Ibid., ll. 43--44, delete `or ... English'.

OBITUARIES

Christ Church

DR ROBERT WILLIAM BURCHFIELD, CBE, 5 July 2004; Lecturer 1953–7; lexicographer and Editor of the Supplement to the Oxford English Dictionary 1957–86; Emeritus Fellow, St Peter's College. Aged 81.

KEITH ROWLAND LUDLOW GOODMAN, 13 August 2004; commoner 1952.

DAVID HANKEY, 14 August 2004; commoner 1958. Aged 66.

PETER BINGHAM INCHBALD, 2 July 2004; commoner 1937. Aged 85.

GORDON KIDD, 2 February 2002; commoner 1955.

HIS HON. JUDGE JAMES CHARLES BERESFORD WHYTE LEONARD, 20 July 2004; commoner 1923; retired Circuit Court Jude and former Deputy Chairman of Quarter Sessions, Inner London and Middlesex. Aged 99.

ALEXANDER CHRISTOPHER RIPPINGHAM, 30 June 2003; commoner 1943. Aged 78.

DAVID GEORGE SAWER, 23 June 2004; commoner 1959. Aged 63.

REBECCA ANNE SLATER, 27 August 2004; commoner 1993. Aged 28.


Exeter College

RAY LIVINGSTONE ARMSTRONG, November 1999; commoner 1930. Aged 89.

EDWARD MARTIN BATCHELOR, 1 October 2003; commoner 1942. Aged 79.

MICHAEL BERRY, 2004; commoner 1946.

ERIC DAVID MACKIE BISHOP, 2004; commoner 1936.

REGINALD MICHAEL DOUGLAS CARDEW, 22 August 2003; commoner 1956. Aged 67.

HENRY FREDERICK KNOWLES CHEALL, 30 March 2004; commoner 1953. Aged 69.

ROGER KEITH COOKE, 27 February 2003; commoner 1956. Aged 67.

MARTIN ERROLL CORNISH-BOWDEN, April 2004; commoner 1958. Aged 64.

DOMINGO MARIA DE EPALZA ARANDAZI, 2002; commoner 1930.

PATRICK VINCENT FEDDEN; commoner 1936.

PETER AMY FILLEUL, 2 January 2004; commoner 1948. Aged 74.

JOHN MICHAEL HAMMERSLEY, 2 May 2004; incorporated 1949. Aged 84.

ANDREW CHRISTOPHER HOLDEN, 10 December 2003; commoner 1954. Aged 69.

IAN HOWARTH, 21 September 2003; commoner 1953. Aged 69.

ANDREW BERNARD KING, May 2003; commoner 1959. Aged 61.

CHARLES MARTIN LE QUESNE, 3 April 2004; exhibitioner 1936. Aged 86.

IAN MURDOCH MACLEAN, 11 January 2004; commoner 1946. Aged 81.

RICHARD ALLEN SCARTH MOSS; commoner 1933.

THOMAS JOHNSON NOSSITER, 12 January 2004; Waugh Scholar 1958. Aged 66.

LOUIS HOOKER PALMER JR, October 2003; commoner 1936.

JOHN CORFE LINTON PALMER, 8 April 2004; exhibitioner 1933. Aged 89.

ANTONY EDWARD PATON WALSH, 30 December 2003; open exibitioner 1955. Aged 67.

JOST ELKHART REXHAUSEN, 6 October 2003; Visiting Student 1987.

WILLIAM ANTONY RICHARDS, 10 March 2004;; commoner 1949. Aged 75.

JOHN BASIL ROSCOE; 23 december 2003; commoner 1939. Aged 83.

PATRICK JOHN RUMFITT, 11 February 2004; commoner 1946. Aged 81.

ROBERT BRYAN SMITH, January 2004; commoner 1954. Aged 69.

ROBIN HORTON JOHN THORNE, 11 May 2004; scholar 1936. Aged 86.


Lincoln College

CLIFFORD ANGELL, 20 June 2000; commoner 1947–9.

ANTHONY JOHN DAVIES, 30 June 2004; commoner 1953–6. Aged 69.

GEOFFREY WALTER ELMS, 6 February 2004; commoner 1947–50. Aged 80.

ALAN GRENVILLE FINCH, 19 August 2004; commoner 1946–9. Aged 85.

GEOFFREY GRENVILLE GRIFFITH, 26 June 2004; commoner 1946–8. Aged 87.

IAN FRANCIS HALLIDAY, 14 June 2004; commoner 1946–9. Aged 76.

DENIS CECIL HILLS, 26 April 2004; 1932. Aged 90.

MEBELO KASUKA NHEKAIRO MUTUKWA, 6 August 2004; Graduate Commoner 1989–91. Aged 36.

GORDON RAYMOND O'LOUGHLIN, 22 June 2004; commoner 1953–7. Aged 71.

ANTHONY JOHN COOPER PAINES, 17 January 2004; commoner 1947–9. Aged 78.

JOHN VICTOR OSWALD REID, 9 August 2004; commoner 1946–52. Aged 77.

MICHAEL HUGH ALBAN SCOTT, OBE, 3 June 2004; 1937. Aged 85.

JOHN STOCKTON, 19 June 2003; commoner 1949–52. Aged 74.

GEOFFREY TOMLINSON, 29 July 2003; 1934. Aged 88.

JOHN ALEXANDER WRIGHT, 10 April 2003; 1947. Aged 80.


Merton College

RONALD BEAUMONT, July 2004; commoner 1935–8 and 1945. Aged 88.

JAMES ALEXANDER BARRY HESLOP, 12 June 2004; commoner 1943–4 and 1947–50. Aged 80. JOHN GREAVES HILDER, 11 June 2003; commoner 1948–50. Aged 78.

ALASTAIR (ROBIN) GRANT MCGIBBON, 18 June 2004; commoner 1953–6, 1956, and 1961. Aged 72.

KEVIN MCGUINNESS; commoner 1959–62.

CHRISTOPHER DAVID MILLING, 7 July 2004; commoner 1949–52. Aged 73.

DAVID HALLAM PRIMROSE PEEL, 14 August 2004; postmaster 1929–33. Aged 94.

THE HON. MARK JULIAN PETRE, 22 May 2004; commoner 1989 and 1998. Aged 35.

RACHEL ANN TURNER, 8 July 2004; commoner 1932–6. Aged 39.

JONATHAN WALTERS, 11 August 2004; postmaster 1967–71 and 1975. Aged 56.


St Anne's College

MRS EVA WINNETON BRUCK (née Mergenstern); member of St Anne's Society 1944-- 7.

LADY AUDREY JOYCE CHADWICK (née Lenfestey); Home-Student 1930--3. Aged 93.


St Hugh's College

MRS JEAN MARGARET BEEDEN, MBE (née Riach), 15 July 2004; Mathematics 1957. Aged 65.

MRS URSULA WIEMANN (née Watson), 14 July 2004; PPE 1932. Aged 90.


MEMORIAL MEETING

Nuffield College

A Memorial Meeting for SIR DONALD MACDOUGALL, CBE, FBA, formerly Fellow and Honorary Fellow of Wadham College, Fellow and Honorary Fellow of Nuffield College, and Honorary Fellow of Balliol College, will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 9 October, in Nuffield College.

After the Meeting tea will be served in the senior common room.

To assist the college with seating arrangements, it would be very much appreciated if those who wish to attend the Meeting would inform the College Secretary in advance (telephone: Oxford (2)78542).


MEMORIAL SERVICES

Keble College

A Memorial Service for JAMES WILLIAM HARRIS, MA, PH.D., DCL, FBA,formerly Fellow and Tutor in Jurisprudence and Professor of Law, will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 9 October, in the University Church of St Mary the Virgin.

Refreshments will be served afterwards at Keble College


Somerville College

A Memorial Service for AGATHA RAMM, MA, D.LITT. (MA London), F.R.HIST.S., formerly Tutor, Fellow, and Emeritus Fellow, will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 30 October, in the chapel, Somerville College.

Funeral of Mrs Clare Drury

Clare Drury died peacefully on Friday evening, 17 September. The funeral will be in Christ Church Cathedral at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, 28 September. All are welcome. Instead of flowers, donations may be made towards undergraduate hardship funds at University College—whether at the funeral or by cheque payable to University College. A Memorial Service will be held in University College next term.


Oxford University Newcomers' Club

The Club welcomes the wives, husbands and partners of visiting scholars, graduates and members of the University who are new to Oxford. It aims to offer help, advice and information, and the opportunity to meet others socially. Informal coffee mornings are held at 13 Norham Gardens every Wednesday 10.30 a.m.–12 noon except for two weeks at Christmas and Easter. Newcomers with children (0–4 years) meet every Friday in term 10.15 a.m.–12 noon. Other term-time activities include a Book Group, informal Conversation Group and tours to colleges, museums, and other places of interest, also country walks, garden trips and a visit to an antique centre. Second-hand items can be bought on Wednesday mornings 10.30 a.m.–12 noon from the equipment room. Visit our website: www.ox.ac.uk/staff.


Volunteers Sought

Would you like to take part in our studies on fat and muscle metabolism over a 24-h-period? The study includes tissue-specific analyses of fat and muscle metabolism before and after three meals. You need to be healthy and above 18 years. Please contact Toralph Ruge at OCDEM, Churchill Hospital, University of Oxford. Tel.: 01865 857262. Email: enquiries@oxlip.ox.ac.uk.

Would you be willing to take part in our studies on diet and blood fats? We are studying links between diet and heart disease. If you are healthy and aged 18–65 years, we would like to hear from you. Please contact Alex or Mary at OCDEM, Churchill Hospital. Tel.: 01865 857262. Email: enquiries@oxlip.ox.ac.uk.


Orang-Utan Appeal Talk

Sabah's shrinking forests spell disaster for the orang-utan, the only ape on the critically endangered list of the world's threatened species. A presentation entitled þConservation of the Orang- Utan—Securing Their Future' is being hosted at Oxford Brookes University (26 Oct.). The speakers are Mr L. Ambu, Deputy Wildlife Director and Dr S. Nathan, Chief Veterinarian, both from the Sabah Wildlife Department (Malaysia). The aim of the talk is to increase awareness of the essential conservation work being carried out by the Sabah Government to ensure the survival of the orang-utan and its habitat. This is the first time the Malaysian Government have given permission for these ambassadors of Sabah to leave their country in order to share their knowledge. Further information: Sepilok Orang-Utan Appeal UK, Charbury, Orestan Lane, Effingham, Surrey, KT24 5SN. Tel.: 01372 453153. www.orangutan-appeal.og.uk


St Giles' Thursday Lunchtime Talks

The Art of Writing: 14 Oct., Writing: escape or engagement?, Tim Pears; 21 Oct., The splinter of ice, Veronica Stallwood; 28 Oct., Sneaking past the guard dogs: avoiding the enemies of writing, Salley Vickers; 4 Nov., Writing the past: an Oxford childhood, Charlotte Mendelson; 11 Nov., Writing a crime novel, P.D. James; 18 Nov., Working with three prime ministers and the rest of the world, Douglas Hurd; 25 Nov., Writing the story of a life, Shirley du Boulay; 2 Dec., Speedy's dog: poetry and place, Henry Shukman. The talks will be held at St Giles' Church at 12.30 p.m. Everyone is welcome. In order to help us with our costs, a small donation would be appreciated. Web site: http://www.st-giles.church.org.


Events

Varsity Rugby Match on 7 Dec. The Oxford University Society invites you to Twickenham to attend our annual gathering at the Varsity Rugby Match. Join us for a picnic and drinks before the match, then watch in comfort from a well-positioned block of seats reserved by OUS for members and friends. Tickets cost £40 each. For further information, please see our website http://www.alumni.ox.ac.uk/rugby2004.shtml or phone Cathy Tennent on 01865 288087.


Cafe Zouk

Mughal Indian cuisine: 1st floor, 135 High Street, Oxford. From our kitchen to your table, we would like to bring you herbs, spices, roots, beauty, fragrances and the Mughal tradition of passion for good food. Tel.: 01865 251600. Open: daily 12 p.m. to 2.30 p.m. and 5.30 p.m. to 11.30 p.m. Web site: http://www.cafezouk.co.uk.


Study Day

The Rediscovery of Ancient Egypt: The Pioneering Years. Bristol, Sat. 20 Nov. Full day: £25, half day: £15. Speakers include Dr Aidan Dodson (University of Bristol), John Ruffle (former Keeper of The Oriental Museum, University of Durham), Dr John Taylor (British Museum), Dr Patricia Usick (British Museum). All welcome. For booking form email R.Silvester@bristol.ac.uk or send SAE to Rosemary Silvester, 69 High Kingsdown, Bristol BS2 8EP.


Antiques Bought and Sold

Antiques and decorative objects bought and sold: desks and library furniture always wanted, also garden stonework and large gilt picture frames—any condition. Please call: Greenway Antiques, 90 Corn Street, Witney, Oxon. Open Mon.–Fri., 9.30 a.m.–5 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Tel.: 01993 705026, mobile: 07831 585014.


Periodicals Bought and Sold

Back-issues of scholarly periodicals and journals bought and sold. Graham Jeffrey, Periodicals (est. 1967), 29 Cuddesdon Road, Horspath, Oxford OX33 1JD. Tel.: 01865 872528, fax: 776398. E-mail: gjeffreysatu@aol.com.


Restoration and Conservation of Antique Furniture

John Hulme undertakes all aspects of restoration: 30 years' experience; collection and delivery. For free advice, telephone or write to: The Workshop, 11A High Street, Chipping Norton, Oxon. OX7 5AD. Tel.: 01608 641692.


Services Offered

Marshall & Galpin Solicitors, Family Department. We are an established Oxfordshire private client firm with offices in Oxford, Thame and Abingdon. We have seven specialist family lawyers who advise on a wide range of issues: divorce and separation, children, financial agreements on divorce, pre-nuptial agreements, cohabitee disputes, separation agreements and pensions. Our lawyers are members of the Solicitors Family Law Association. Two members of the team are Deputy District Judges and three are trained mediators. We offer a range of competitive rates and a short free initial interview. French, Spanish and Italian spoken. Other services provided by the firm include property adviceconveyancing, wills & probate, personal injury & medical negligence, employment and businesscommercial. For further information visit our web site at: www.marshallgalpin.com or contact Mary Wakem on 01865 792300 (Oxford), Simon Bassett on 01235 555345 (Abingdon), James Stonham 01844 261966 (Thame).

Big or small, we ship it all, plus free pick up anywhere in Oxford. Also 24-hour photocopying, private mailing addresses (24-hour access, and mail forwarding world-wide), binding, fax bureau, colour photocopying, mailing services, and much more. Contact or visit Mail Boxes Etc., 266 Banbury Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 514655, fax: 514656, email: summertown@020.mbe.uk.com, also at: 94 London Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 741729, fax: 01865 742431, email: staff@mbeheadington.co.uk.

Town and Country Trees: arboricultural contractors; modern arboricultural techniques; local authority approved; safeguarded by full Public Liability insurance. Free advice and quotations. Tel.: 0845 458 2980 or 07976 261850 (mobile).

Want to go broadband and don't know how? Computer problem needing personal but understanding help? We can put you on the Internet safely or do that little upgrade to your system. We have lots of experience of the Oxford IT, supporting people as well as their computers. Happy to give advice for free and work on a no fix/no fee basis. Call MCC on 01865 880600 or 07768 732123.

Proof-reading/copy-editing offered by experienced and published English graduate (First Class). Academic, business, general. Call Julie on 01865 451960 or email oxenglish@aol.com.


Domestic Services

Local Oxford lady available for housework/ironing. Total of eleven years experience: six years in Summertown/Headington area, five years in Oxfordshire country area. Excellent references available. University/education personnel especially welcome, short or long term. All replies answered. Kindly telephone 07810513429.


Tuition Offered

Oxford Cruse Bereavement Care offers help and support to the bereaved. We offer a bereaved person of any age a place where they can talk in confidence. On Thursday, 7 Oct., we are beginning a course of eight lectures entitled þAspects of Bereavement' at the Wesley Memorial Hall, Oxford. This course is designed for all interested in working with the bereaved or dying. For more information please call 01865 202242.

Young children's art and crafts classes. Groups of 5 children (ages 4–5 and 6–7), in sunny and spacious academic family house in Southmoor Road, Jericho. Seasonal projects, healthy snacks, individual end-of-term reports by developmental psychology researcher. Autumn term starts on 28 Sept. Mornings: 10–11.45 a.m. Afternoons: 3.30–15 p.m. Some spaces still available. For further information and registration call 01865 559247.

English as a Foreign Language for Families. Separate but simultaneous classes for adults and for children (5–12 years). Wed. 5.00-6.30 p.m. at Cherwell School, Marston Ferry Road, North Oxford. Term begins 6 Oct. Cost for ten lessons: £35 for one adult or child, £45 for a family. Details from the North Oxford Association (Tel.: 01865 552295) or from the tutors, Rosemary Dorey (Tel.: 01865 553912) or Helen Foster (Tel.: 01865 763358).

Training for babysitters. Well-established 3-day training course for babysitters, certificated by the Red Cross and the North Oxford Association. Open to anyone aged over 14. Location: NOA's Cutteslowe Park offices. Tue., 26 Oct., 10.00 a.m.–3.00 p.m.; Wed., 27 Oct., 10.00 a.m.–5.00 p.m.; Thur., 28 Oct., 10.00 a.m.–3.00 p.m. Cost per person £50. Details from North Oxford Association (Tel.: 01865 552295) or the tutor, Margaret Shannon (Tel.: 01865 554018 or email: marg_shannon@hotmail.com).


Situations Vacant

Children and Youth Worker sought. Wesley Memorial Methodist Church is currently looking for a new Youth Worker. This is an exciting post developing and nurturing our lively Junior Church and would be ideal for a Christian with energy, commitment, and an interest in children and young people. Up to 12 hours p.w. Up to £4,000 p.a. plus £10 p.w. housing allowance. Involves Sunday commitments. Starting date: 1 Nov. Further information and application form can be obtained from the Church Office, Wesley Memorial Church, New Inn Hall Street, Oxford OX1 2DH. Tel.: 01865 243216; e-mail: churchoffice@wesleymem.org.uk. www.wesleymem.org.uk.

Daylesford Organic Farmshop. Do you have knowledge or a genuine interest in the medicinal properties, history, and preparation of Chinese tea? Our tearoom is part of our lifestyle store, where our customers will be able to learn and enjoy the benefits of the remedial qualities of Chinese tea. Good customer service and communication skills are essential, also the ability to work within a team. Competitive pay and benefits. Contact Diane Pridmore on 07760 190670.

We are looking for reliable individuals to add to our Register of Invigilators. Work is on a temporary basis during the January exam period. The work involves laying out question papers, completing relevant paperwork, and invigilating during the examination session. Invigilation sessions are approximately 4 hours (in either the morning or the afternoon). The payment for each 4-hour-session is £28. Please send your CV and covering letter to the Senior Administrator, Magdalen College School, Oxford OX4 1DZ, or by email to tearnshaw@mcsoxford.org.

Part-time editors required. We provide manuscript revision to non-native English speaking authors for publishing in international journals. We are looking for people with Ph.D. degrees in several fields of biological sciences. Must have excellent written English to help proof-reading and editing of research papers (e.g. grammatical and writing style errors). Work from home in your spare time. Email: service@oxbiosci.com.

New College School, Oxford. Key Stage 2 Teacher. We are seeking a qualified and experienced teacher to teach Maths, Science, Sport, Religious Studies and ICT to Years 3 and 4 starting in Jan. 2005. The post will be initially for two terms with the possibility of a permanent position. Please contact the Principal, New College School, Saville Road, Oxford OX1 3UA. Tel.: 01865 243657. Email: jo.asquith@new.ox.ac.uk.

St Clare's, Oxford. Required as soon as possible, well-qualified teachers of Albanian, Danish, and Italian to prepare students for the International Baccalaureate. Applicants should be native speakers who are able to teach literature to young people in their mother tongue. For details please contact Mrs C. Gospel, Head of Languages, as soon as possible. Tel.: 01865 517333. Fax: 01865 517319. Email: catherine.gospel@stclares.ac.uk.

Applications are invited for membership of Oxfordshire Research Ethics Committee C, whose task is to provide independent advice regarding the ethics of proposed research projects which will involve human subjects, their tissue or data, and which will take place, generally, within the NHS. The REC's duty is to protect the interests of patients and other research subjects. In particular we are looking for pharmacists or pharmacologists (can be trainees), hospital/community consultants, public health physicians/epidemiologists, and members with statistical expertise. The REC reviews up to 10 research proposals/month from across the Thames Valley and meets for up to 4 hours dependent on the business. Members are expected to give adequate time for preparation and to attend a maximum of 2 one-day training events/year. There is no remuneration but expenses are paid. Knowledge or previous experience of working in or with the NHS, of relevant areas of research or of ethical issues will be an advantage, but is not essential. Please contact Kathryn Lucas, Administrator. Tel.: 01865 222145, Fax: 01865 222699. Email: Kathryn.Lucas@orh.nhs.uk


Houses to Let

East Oxford. Characterful Victorian terrace, 2 bedrooms, 2 reception, attic study, garden. Partly furnished, available Oct. City centre 5–10 min. bus ride away. Parking on quiet road. £750 p.c.m. for one year with possible renewal. References required. Very sorry—no children or smokers. Email: alisonbentley@jazzmenagerie.freeserve.co.uk.

An Englishman's home is his castle—so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Visit our web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or email us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: 01865 764533. Fax: 764777. Email: info@qbman.co.uk.

North Oxford . Fully-furnished 4–5 bedroom family home to let from Christmas '04 to Aug. '05. Family are going abroad for sabbatical. Large west-facing spacious garden with patio and beautiful surrounding trees. Three reception rooms and kitchen/breakfast room and 2 ½ bathrooms. House on west side of popular Woodstock road, overlooking St Edward's playing fields. Easy walking access to Summertown shops and into city centre (cycle path next to house). Port Meadow nearby. Email: douglas.wilkinson@nda.ox.ac.uk or tel.: 01865 513688.

Marston. Attractive, furnished Victorian house in quiet road. Three bedrooms, dining/living room, kitchen, upstairs bathroom, new kitchen, g.c.h., all appliances. Lovely garden backing onto meadows with pedestrian access and undercover bike storage. Suit visiting academic/medical couple or small family. 5 min. cycle ride/15 min. walk from city centre. Available from Oct. £950 p.c.m. plus bills. Non-smokers only. Pictures of the rooms available via email. Contact Rebecca.Skillman@Harcourteducation.co.uk. Tel.: 01865 726022.

Two separate self-contained beautiful, quiet, unusual, open plan, fully-furnished modern properties with stunning views to open countryside. Parking and small patio garden. Near convenient bus route and well within the ring-road in North Oxford. Suit visiting academic or professional couple. Regret no children, pets, or smokers. Available from 1 Sept. Larger property £950 p.m.; smaller £725 p.m., plus expenses. Tel.: 01865 515085 or email patricia.boyd@perinat.ox.ac.uk.

Kidlington. Three-bedroom furnished detached house available from 1 Oct. for 6-month let. Situated in a quiet close near to excellent bus route and all amenities. No smoking and no house pets, please. £875 p.c.m. Please contact Bob Green on 07780 682123.

North Oxford (Jericho). Fully-furnished, recently redecorated house, secluded garden, available from 1 Sept. for 1 year or less. Charming, cosy, quiet, c.h., easy to maintain, 2 bedrooms, 2½ bathrooms, washing machine, dryer, telephone, linen, dishes. Easy walk to University, train and coach stations, near best schools and parks. Two bedrooms £1,250 p.m.; 3 bedrooms £1,500 p.m. (inc. bedsit with separate kitchen and entrance). Tel. J. Mackrell in Oxford (evenings or 7--8 a.m.), on: 01865 775567. Email: mackrelj@btopenworld.com. Or contact A. Gaston in Canada: +613 745 1368, fax: +613 745 0299, email: gaston@cyberus.ca.

Normandy: Village au Brun, Notre Dame de Cenilly. Beautiful, fully-furnished three-storey farmhouse with all mod. cons. to let for 1–3 years. Set in 13 acres of farmland. Peaceful yet within 4 kms from Cerisy la Salle (local village); Saint-Lô, Coutance approx. 20 kms; Cherbourg, Bayeux, Mont St Michel and Caen within 100 kms. Ground floor: kitchen/dining room; gas cooker; separate electric oven; microwave; large fridge with separate freezer; g. c.h.; bathroom with w.c.; sitting room. First floor: music room (with grand piano), 2 bedrooms (1 with small office). Second floor: large bedroom; shower room with w.c.; gallery (suitable for office) that overlooks music room below. Open fire in sitting room. Ideal for writer or musician seeking peace and quiet to work. Non-smoker preferred; pets welcome. 800–900 euro p.c.m. For further details please contact Alexander Kok on 00 33 2 33 45 52 16. Fax: 00 33 2 33 17 22 96.

Oxfordshire. Wing of beautiful country house. Six bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 WCs, kitchen with aga, scullery, larder, laundry room. Three reception rooms. Fully-furnished. South-facing orangerie. Set in parkland with lake. Tennis court. Domestic and garden staff provided. Ideal professional family home. £2,800 p.m. Tel.: 01865 343202.

Florence Park. Recently refurbished 1930s house with attractively designed garden. Close to local amenities, park and river. Light and cosy. Furnished and fully equipped, with two large bedrooms and dressing room. Kitchen/diner. Easy access to central Oxford. Available from Sept. for one year or less. Ideal for professional or family. £850 p.c.m. plus bills. Call Jo Dixon on 01865 760907 or 07932 724232. Email: 53netherwoodsroad@tiscali.co.uk.

Shortlet for 5 months. A beautiful Oxford city house in quiet cul-de-sac near city centre, hospitals and Brookes while owner is abroad. One large double bedroom, 1 single with large balcony and both with own shower, toilet, rooms, study, very large kitchen, living/dining room and second separate sitting room with fireplace. Large garden open to the park at back. £1,200 p.c.m. (incl. council tax). Available 1 Dec. to 10 Apr. (negotiable). See pictures on http://tanyag.t35.com. Tel.: 01865 247150.

Attractive, large 3/4 bedroom detached house close to all Headington hospitals and good schools. Fully furnished, all appliances, c.h., off-street parking and rear garden. Suit professional family or responsible graduates. Long lease preferred. £1,400 p.c.m. (incl. council tax). Tel.: 01865 766032; email: jwoodman@doctors.org.uk.

Wootton, near Woodstock. Delightful period cottage to let in sought after, pretty village. Living room with open fire overlooking rear garden. Stable door to garden. Kitchen with all mod. cons. Double bedroom and large bathroom with panelled bath and electric shower. Loft for storage. Oil-fired c.h. Attractive mature garden. Two garden sheds and brick-built log stove. Good bus and train connections to Oxford. Suit academic/professional couple. Available Oct. for 6 months/1 year. £695 p.m. incl. gardener. (excl. council tax and utility bills). References essential. Contact: Sally Stradling on 01993 812278 or email sally.stradling@ukgateway.net.

St Clement's. Great location! Two-bed Victorian house within walking distance to town centre, Brookes, Headington hospitals. Good local shops/supermarket. Furnished, dishwasher, etc. Two reception rooms (could make one into third bedroom), large kitchen, patio garden. £900 p.m. plus bills and council tax. No students or smokers. Tel.: 0207 350 2692. Email: dvh@ic.ac.uk.

Well-decorated, furnished house to let in central Eynsham. Excellent bus service to Oxford, shopping facilities and good schools. This pretty and unusual stone-built converted coach-house is secure and quiet. Set in own private drive, well away from the street. Large living room/kitchen with fridge, freezer, dishwasher. One double and 1 single bedroom, bathroom, large office/third bedroom. Utility room, shower room, walk-in-wardrobe. Integral garage and additional off-road parking spaces. Patio garden. Available 1 Oct. for a minimum let of 6 months. £975 (incl. council tax) p.c.m. Tel.: 01865 880018 or 07771873838. Email: Stephen.lord2@ntlworld.com.

Marlborough Road. Attractive furnished 2-bedroom house, with large sitting room and kitchen, backing on to the meadow. £850 p.c.m. Contact Dr. Peter Collett on 01865 744073 or collett.research@virgin.net.

Abingdon town centre. A newly refurbished (by Berkeley Homes) 3-bedroom grade II listed period cottage with charming character. Two double bedrooms (one en suite), one large single bedroom, family bathroom and cloakroom. Front and rear garden. Large kitchen diner and separate through lounge. Two parking spaces. Unfurnished or furnished, available mid-September. £1,100 p.c.m. plus bills. Tel.: 01865 273495 or 01235 530168. Email: w.lau1@physics.ox.ac.uk.

North Oxford . Fully-furnished three bedroom house with garage and sheltered garden available for tenancy. On bus route to city centre. One year or more from end Sept. £1,050 p.c.m. Please call 01865 243216 or 01865 515547.

North Oxford . Stylishly furnished house in quiet road, 5 min. from Summertown shops. Suit 1 or 2 academics/professionals sharing. Two spacious bedrooms available. £1,100 p.c.m. (incl. council tax and water). Tel.: 01865 557408 or 0789 1078810.

Fully-furnished house available 15 Oct. to Feb. 2005. One double and 2 single bedrooms, living room, kitchen, utility room, bath, shower, toilet. Linen provided. G.c.h., telephone, microwave, fridge, freezer, w/machine, dish washer. Parking space. Easy access to Oxford and every 12 min. bus to London. £700 p.c.m. plus bills (plus £700 deposit). Reference required. Please contact Mr or Mrs Kevin Annely. Tel.: 01865 716426. Ref.: Anne Brau. Email: kevin.annely@btinternet.com.

Exquisite house in North Oxford to let long or short term. A very well situated Georgian grade II listed house, in a quiet backwater. Four large beds, living room, dining room, conservatory, garden, recently upgraded. Available now. £1,800–2,000 p.c.m., depending on short or long term. Phone on 01865 201444 or 07866672722. Email: oxhomes@aol.com.

Stanton St. John. Self-contained cottage annexe. Daytime bus service, shop, two pubs. Two miles from Green Road roundabout and Oxford A40. £750 p.c.m. to include all bills except telephone. No DHSS. Suit non-smoking professional/couple. Tel.: 07817122214 or 01865 351236.


Flats to Let

North and central North Oxford. One- and 2-bedroom apartments available for the coming academic year, best suited to mature professionals and visiting academics. Situated at a short distance from most university and hospital departments. Variety of rents. 1-bedroom apartments: £695 to £775; 2-bedroom apartments: £795 to £850 (all p.c.m. and exclusive of utility and council tax). Tel.: 01865 516144. Fax 01865 437996. Email: a.fiorentino@ntlworld.com.

Yarnton. Spacious 2-storey flat, six miles north of city centre. One double bedroom, sitting room, bathroom with bath and shower, fully-fitted kitchen, conservatory. Countryside views, private parking, on bus route. No smokers. Suit single person or couple. £595 p.c.m. incl. heating/water rates. Available Oct. Tel.: 01865 376824.

St Margaret's Road. Modern furnished two-bedroom apartment over two floors of a purpose-built block in central North Oxford: double bedroom with wall of wardrobes; single bedroom with built- in closet; bathroom with shower; kitchen with washer/dryer, fridge/freezer and dishwasher; living room; lock-up garage; use of large communal garden. Available to non-smokers from mid-Oct. £850 p.c.m. for one-year lease with possibility of renewal. Email: binney@thphys.ox.ac.uk.

North Oxford . Modern furnished flat on second (top) floor of purpose-built block in Osberton Road, Summertown. Fully furnished and equipped with kitchen utensils, crockery, etc. Washer/dryer, fridge/freezer, g.c.h., shower, garage, and garden use. Living room and two double bedrooms. Available to non- smokers early Oct. £800 p.c.m. for a one-year lease with possibility of renewal. Email: binney@thphys.ox.ac.uk.

St Clement's. Architect designed, 2 bedrooms, living/dining area, good size kitchen. Bathroom with shower. Dedicated parking. £770 p.c.m. Available end of Oct. Phone to view on 01865 201444 or 07866672722. Email: oxhomes@aol.com.

Comfortable 2-bedroom furnished flat on excellent bus route to central Oxford. Situated in the attractive village of Eynsham, quiet yet close to schools and shops. Recently refurbished to a high standard. G.c.h., double-glazing, 4 phone points. Bedding provided on request. Available from Sept. References required. £750 p.c.m. (negotiable). Email: Virginia.Bainbridge@st_hildas.ox.ac.uk or info@NaturalHorse.co.uk or ring 0845 4569840.

Summertown. Spacious, furnished two bedroom, two bathroom ground floor apartment with small private terrace and allocated parking space. £1,050 p.c.m. Available now. Contact Sarah Richardson, Scott Fraser Lifestyle. Tel.: 01865 554577. Email: sarah@scottfraser.co.uk.

Summertown. Furnished duplex apartment offering three bedrooms, two reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room, two bathrooms and allocated parking space. £1,200 p.c.m. Available now. Contact Sarah Richardson, Scott Fraser Lifestyle. Tel.: 01865 554577. Email: sarah@scottfraser.co.uk.

Newly decorated self-contained flat in 17th century rectory near Oxford. Good public transport. Parking space. Tel.: 01865 373794. Email: janeskinner@freeuk.com.


Accommodation Offered

Attractive and quiet B&B. One minute to bus stop, close to river walks. £40 per night/£60 double; 15% discount for full week. Tel.: 01865 770501.

OxfordShortlets offers a portfolio of high quality self-catering short let properties as an excellent alternative to hotel/guesthouse and bed and breakfast accommodation in Oxford and the surrounding villages. We have a wide selection of quality homes available for short stay lets from 1 week up to several months. OxfordShortlets provides property rental on a short-term basis for professional individuals, groups or families requiring housing while visiting Oxford for holiday/vacation, business/academic, relocation purposes or temporary accommodation in between homes. For more information, please contact us on tel: 0870 1602325, fax: 0870 1602327, email: admin@oxfordshortlets.co.uk or visit our website at www.oxfordshortlets.co.uk.

Paying guests, visiting academics, welcomed for short or long stays in the comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple, in exclusive, quiet, leafy central north Oxford, within walking distance of all main university buildings, town centre, parks, river, good shops, and restaurants. All rooms have colour TV, tea-/coffee-making facilities, microwave, and refrigerator and/or deep-freeze availability, c.h., and independent heating. Breakfast included in the very moderate terms. Tel./fax: 01865 557879.

Comfortable rooms available now in pleasant North Oxford house. Short stay (up to 3 months). £55 p.w. (a bargain price!) Book by telephone: 01865 511657 or email: coulsonm@btconnect.com.

Academic host family in leafy Jericho welcomes academics and visitors to Oxford for short and long stays. Walking distance to town centre, colleges, museums, University Parks, and Port Meadow. Fashionable shops, restaurants, and an art cinema around the corner. Sunny single room with tea/coffee-making facilities, TV and video recorder, c.h. Bike with basket for moderate lease. Fine continental breakfast. Tel.: (+44) (0)1865 559247. Email: oxfordvisit@hotmail.com.

Rooms to rent in well-located North Oxford House. Two single rooms in family home available to rent with large shared kitchen, bathroom, and good sized garden. Quiet, residential location off Banbury Road, within minutes of bus stops into city centre. Available immediately. Tel.: 01865 559544 (after office hours).

Large double bedroom off Woodstock road in spacious 3-bedroom house with all mod. cons. and private garden with Italian academic professional. £425 p.c.m. Available from Nov. 2004. Suitable for professional or post-doctoral researcher. Please call Marina on 01865 554148 or 07939594379. Email: marina.cacioppo@oucs.ox.ac.uk.

Room to let in private house in Iffley Fields. Own entrance, good-sized room, shared bathroom and kitchen. £80 p.w. incl. bills. Female n/s. Tel.: 07780697691.


Office Accommodation

North Oxford , 800 yards from St Giles. A complex of four rooms (garden bungalow) incl. an annexe in detached premises off the Woodstock Road. Separate entrance, with all facilities. Computer and fax input, BT telephone, car parking, c.h. and hot/cold water. Total alarmed security. Five star interior and exterior appearance. Available immediately. Tel.: 01865 51 11 11.

North Oxford . Wolfson College, Linton Road. 7,300 sqft (660 sqm) of offices adjacent to its main buildings with separate entrance and car parking. The flexible accommodation currently comprises 25 office units, a conference room and common room. Access to the use of the College's superb riverside facilities, including restaurant for staff and visitors, by arrangement. Available immediately. For further details contact the Bursar on 01865 274104 or email stephen.palmer@wolfson.ox.ac.uk.


Self-catering Apartments

Fully-furnished and serviced 3 and 4-star self-catering apartments available in North Oxford; 15 min. from Oxford city centre. Suitbale for short lets for visiting academics or business people. From £330 p.w. all inclusive. Sleeps 2–5 people. Tel.: 07870 234725. Web site: http://www.weeklyhome.com. E-mail: info@weeklyhome.com.


Accommodation Sought

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us: 01865 764533, fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk. Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.

House-sit sought by professional non-smoking woman for a few months. I have sold my flat in London and am moving to the north of England, but must first finish a project in Oxfordshire. I am equally happy with town or country, and I should be delighted to look after any animals. I am presently house-sitting in Abingdon. References available. Contact Pamela Lanigan on 01235 868031.

Flat, small house or room in a private house in Oxford is sought for a newly appointed Commonwealth Research Fellow in the Department of Zoology, Oxford, from Oct. Please contact Dr Christine Carrington at Ccarrington@fms.uwi.tt Self-contained modest accommodation in central Oxford sought by responsible academic couple; must be close to public transport. Mid-Oct to end-Nov. Oxford references supplied. Tel./Fax: (0033) (0)450594103. Email: ddrucker@tiscali.fr.


Holiday Lets

Venice: S. Marco, S. Samuele. Charming apartment available in the heart of town for short stays, rented on a weekly basis. Well appointed; large living room, fully-equipped kitchen, 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms. Sleeps 5 comfortably. £650 p.w. Email: tagariello@libero.it.

Sardinia, Costa Smeralda, Italy. Tasteful villa in rural village of San Pantaleo on the North East coast of Sardinia, suitable for 2–6 people. Beautiful mountain views over the Roche Sarde from house and garden. 3 double bedrooms (2 double beds, 1 twin); balcony and large terrazzo for al fresco dining; deckchairs on terrace and garden; self-catering kitchen and spacious living room with TV. Only 10 min. by car from Porto Cervo, world-renowned Pevero golf course and all major beaches. Close to wide range of activities (e.g. village market, restaurants, mountain trails, tennis, diving, riding, sailing and windsurfing schools). Email: margareta@sanpanteleo.co.uk. See http://www.sanpantaleo.co.uk.

Naples, Florida: rent our beautiful 4-bedroom, 3-bathroom house, on the Gulf Coast, in southwest Florida. This spacious home is located on one of the best private golf courses in the area. The house sleeps up to 8 people, has a huge south-facing heated swimming pool, and comes fully furnished and equipped. The house is available all year round from £800 p.w. (minimum 2-week let, discount for longer lets), Tel. Mark on: 07802 754154. E-mail: mark@bayrock.co.uk. Web site: website: www.golf-in-naples.com.


Houses for Sale

Jericho. Spacious modern house in the heart of this sought-after area. Two double bedrooms, study/nursery, two reception rooms, courtyard garden, garage and further off-street parking. Close to city centre, train/bus stations and colleges. £317,000. Tel: 07779 225767 or email salmondavid@hotmail.com for more details.

Wood End, 45 Upper Road Kennington, Oxford, OX1 5LJ. Individual 4-bedroom house in the sought-after village of Kennington, with easy access to Oxford. Spacious rooms, 135ft mature rear garden, master bed with en suite shower, large family bathroom. Study, sunroom, 18ft sitting room, well-fitted kitchen and utility. Offers in the region of £560,000. Freehold. Tel.: 01865 739180.

Headington Hill, Oxford. Three-bedroom modern detached bungalow. Exceptional location: green, secluded and quiet, with easy access to both universities, JR hospital and city centre. Large living space with high ceiling, kitchen/breakfast room, 2 bedrooms, third bedroom/study, bathroom, garage and off-street parking. Mature gardens with view over central Oxford. £310,000. Tel.: 01865 243704.

HEADSHIP OF THE HUMANITIES DIVISION

Applications are invited for the Headship of the Humanities Division. The University is seeking to appoint an eminent academic from any field of the Humanities to provide leadership for this large, highly diverse, and internationally renowned academic division. The division comprises eight world-class faculties and three other academic units (the Faculties of Classics, English, Modern History, Modern Languages, Music, Oriental Studies, Philosophy, and Theology; the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art; Linguistics, Philology, and Phonetics; and the Rothermere American Institute).

The range and distinction of the Humanities Division are considerable and the priority for the next head will be to provide leadership and vision and to strengthen further the division's policy agenda and the means of fulfilling it within a highly consensual framework. The division enjoys a collegial style of self-government with co-ordination, oversight, and support for units' activities provided by the divisional officers, secretariat and board. This is a full-time senior management position, tenable from 1 October 2005 at a competitive salary, which provides an exciting opportunity to shape the development of the Humanities at Oxford, building on and extending its international reputation for research and teaching. Candidates should have the administrative and managerial skills to implement Oxford's vision of the role of its Humanities faculties.

Further details, including details of how to apply are available from http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/ or from the Registrar, University of Oxford, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: Oxford (2)70200). The closing date for applications is Monday, 1 November.


CHICHELE PROFESSORSHIP OF MEDIEVAL HISTORY

Applications are invited for the above post, tenable from 1 October 2005. The professor will be an outstanding scholar of international distinction who will play a leading role in stimulating and developing the study of medieval history at all levels in the History Faculty. The successful candidate will take a full and active part in the development and delivery of the History Faculty's strategies in relation to teaching and research, and will have a particular responsibility for graduate studies in the medieval period.

A non-stipendiary fellowship at All Souls College is attached to the professorship.

Further particulars, including details of how to apply, are available from http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/ or from the Registrar, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: Oxford (2)70200). The closing date is Monday, 1 November.


JAMES MARTIN PROFESSORSHIP OF TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIAL CHANGE

Applications are invited for the above post in the James Martin Institute at the Saïd Business School, with effect from as early a date as may be arranged.

The person appointed will have an exceptional research record in the area of science and technology studies and policy with an emphasis on technology and society. The role of the James Martin Institute is to identify science and technology issues likely to play especially critical roles in shaping the future world of civilisation, and to initiate and conduct research directed at finding opportunities for humanity to shape a brighter future for itself and the natural environment on which it depends. The Saïd Business School, the University's business school, is rapidly establishing itself as one of Europe's leading centres for management education. The school offers undergraduate and postgraduate courses, with the MBA as its flagship programme.

A non-stipendiary fellowship at Brasenose College is attached to the professorship.

Further particulars, including details of how to apply, are available from http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/ or from the Registrar, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: Oxford (2)70200). The closing date is Monday, 1 November.


MEDICAL SCIENCES DIVISION

Professorship of Pharmacology

Waynflete Professorship of Physiology

Watts Professorship of Psychology

Candidates with distinguished records of research and teaching are invited to apply for these prestigious professorships. Candidates will be expected to be leaders of research in their particular fields and to have major portfolios of peer-reviewed grant income. Those with expertise in any appropriate discipline are invited to apply for the respective chairs. While the absolute distinction of candidates will be the primary criterion determining the appointments, the University will be seeking to advance a key strategic priority, namely neuroscience. The University will wish to appoint candidates capable of leadership of the relevant academic departments and with the potential for leadership, in consultation with others, of neuroscience research endeavour across a variety of different departments.

The Watts Professorship and the Waynflete Professorship are tenable from as early a date as can be arranged, and the Professorship of Pharmacology is tenable from 1 October 2005.

Non-stipendiary college fellowships are associated with the chairs as follows:

Pharmacology:Lady Margaret Hall

Physiology: Magdalen College

Psychology: Wolfson College

Further particulars, including details of how to apply, are available from http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/ or from the Registrar, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: Oxford (2)70200). The closing date for applications is Monday, 4 October.


SAID BUSINESS SCHOOL

University Lecturerships

The Saïd Business School is launching a major recruitment drive to attract world-class specialists to the University. The School seeks to appoint five new lecturers. It is seeking outstanding scholars, many of whom will have a training in the wider social sciences, including business history, economics, international relations, political science, sociology, quantitative methods, to teach and research in a business school environment.

University Lecturership in Accounting
(in association with Templeton College)

The School is particularly keen to develop its strength in research, bearing on organisational and social dimensions of account. (Informal enquiries may be made to Dr Chris Chapman, e-mail: chris.chapman@sbs.ox.ac.uk.) Closing date: 10 January 2005.


Peter Moores University Lecturership in Chinese Business Studies
(in association with Brasenose College)

The School is looking for an economist, political scientist, or sociologist interested in important aspects of the development, management, and analysis of business in China. (Informal enquiries may be made to Professor Mari Sako, e-mail: mari.sako@sbs.ox.ac.uk.) Closing date: 1 November.


University Lecturership in Finance
(in association with Oriel College)

The person appointed will teach on the School's new M.Sc. in Financial Economics and there is a strong preference for someone who can teach continuous time finance at graduate level. (Informal enquiries may be made to Dr Gren Sussman, e-mail: gren.sussman@sbs.ox.ac.uk.) Closing date: 18 October.


University Lecturership in International Business
(in association with Lady Margaret Hall)

Applications are encouraged from international economists, international relations and international political economy specialists, and scholars interested in the politics of international business. (Informal enquiries may be made to Professor Mari Sako, e-mail: mari.sako@sbs.ox.ac.uk.) Closing date: 1 November.


University Lecturership in Operations Management
(in association with Green College)

The School has a strong preference for appointing a specialist in the operations management of science- and technology-based firms. (Informal enquiries may be made to either Dr Steve New, e-mail: steve.new@sbs.ox.ac.uk, or Professor Roy Westbrook, e-mail: roy.westbrook@sbs.ox.ac.uk). Closing date: 4 January 2005.

Salaries for the above posts will be according to age on a scale up to a joint maximum of £47,707 per annum. These posts are in areas currently designated as shortage subjects under the national `Golden Hello' scheme. The appointee may therefore be eligible for a three-year salary supplement if he or she can fulfil certain conditions and if funds are available in the limited budget for the scheme.

Further particulars for each post can be found on http://www.sbs.ox.ac.uk, or obtained from the Academic Recruitment Secretary at the Saïd Business School, Park End Street, Oxford OX1 1HP (telephone: Oxford (2)88800, e- mail: acvacs@sbs.ox.ac.uk). Completed applications can be sent either electronically or in hard copy, and references should be forwarded directly to the School by the applicant's referees, by the closing date shown.


MEDICAL SCIENCES DIVISION

Appointment of Assistant Registrar

The Division of Medical Sciences is one of five divisions within the University of Oxford. A new position of Assistant Registrar has been created to be the senior representative of the Medical Sciences Divisional Secretariat in the Medical Sciences Teaching Centre. He or she will have key administrative responsibilities and a co-ordinating role in relation to all matters concerning three major undergraduate courses. This will require excellent managerial, administrative and interpersonal skills. A good knowledge of medical education, including an overview of the sciences basic to medicine, would be of benefit. The post will be on the ALC4 scale (salary £32,666-- £39,114, with a discretionary range to £44,616).

Further particulars for this post may be found at Web site at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/. Prospective applicants are welcome to contact Dr David Bryan, Secretary to the Medical Sciences division (telephone: Oxford 221688).

Applications (seven copies), including a curriculum vitae, a covering letter, and the names, addresses, telephone numbers, and e-mail addresses of two referees, should be sent to Miss Carol Green, Medical Sciences Office, Level 3, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford OX3 9DU, by 15 October. Applicants will be expected to address the selection criteria outlined in the further particulars.


CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE

Corpus Christi Visiting Fellowship(s) 2005--6

Corpus Christi College proposes to elect to a Visiting Fellowship for the academic year 2005--6. The fellowship is intended for persons of high academic distinction, either from abroad or from the UK, who wish to pursue academic study and research as a member of the college. It is tenable for one, two or three terms during the year. Preference will be given to candidates whose work is close to the academic interests of one or more Fellows of the college.

A visiting fellow is entitled to free luncheon and dinner and to full membership of the senior common room. The college will provide the fellow with shared study accommodation and will provide assistance with finding accommodation in Oxford.

Applicants should write to the President's Secretary, Corpus Christi College, Oxford OX1 4JF, by Friday, 12 November, enclosing a curriculum vitae, a list of publications, a programme of work, and the names of three referees. It is the applicant's responsibility to ask their referees to send their references direct by the same date.

The college exists to promote excellence in education and research and is actively committed to the principle of equality of opportunity for all suitably qualified candidates.


GREEN COLLEGE

Appointment of Development Officer

The college is looking for a highly motivated individual with strong communication and organisational skills, who wishes to start or develop a career in the development sector, for the post of Development Officer (twenty- five hours per week). The Development Officer's main responsibilities will be to create development publications, manage e-mail communications; maintain the development pages on the Web site; manage the event programme; maintain the alumni section of the database, and support the Development Director in fund-raising activities.

The successful candidate will be self-motivated with outstanding interpersonal skills and strong organisational abilities. Some experience of successful marketing, events management and developing publications is desirable but not essential. Applicants should be IT literate and experienced in using Microsoft Office products, databases, e-mail, and the Internet. This post would suit someone with an empathy for Green College's ethos and who is looking to start, pursue, or further a career in development and alumni relations.

The starting salary scale will be on the University's clerical grade 4 scale, stage 05---£17,970 (pro rata). College lunch and participation in a contributory pension scheme will be provided.

Further details may be obtained from the Development Director, Green College, Oxford OX2 6HG (e-mail: jane.rogers@green.ox.ac.uk, telephone: Oxford (2)74777). Applicants should send a letter of application, a curriculum vitae, and full contact details of two referees, by Thursday, 30 September, at the latest. References will not be taken up without first seeking the applicant's permission. Interviews will be held during the week beginning Monday, 4 October.


ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

Appointment of Domestic Bursar

St Antony's College invites applications for this senior position. The post-holder will report to the Bursar and will be a member of the college's senior administrative team. He or she will be responsible for ensuring that the domestic services of the college are professionally managed.

The role involves the day-to-day management of the college's domestic services. Seven staff report directly to the Domestic Bursar; the total staff of the Domestic Bursary is fifty-five. The domestic services for which the Domestic Bursar is responsible comprise catering, housekeeping, accommodation, the Porter's Lodge, and the maintenance of the college's buildings and grounds. The Domestic Bursar is responsible for developing the college's conference business and is the college's Health and Safety Officer.

It is expected that the successful applicant will have a relevant recognised qualification and have had at least five years' relevant senior experience.

The salary will be on the University's grade 3 scale for academic and academic-related staff (£30,363--£42,573), plus a conference gratuity. There are also generous holiday entitlements and other benefits including senior common room membership.

Further details and application forms may be obtained from Jennifer Cable, Bursar's Secretary, St Antony's College, Oxford OX2 6JF (telephone: Oxford (2)84722, e-mail: jennifer.cable@sant.ox.ac.uk).

The closing date for applications is 6 October. Interviews are likely to be held on 22 October.


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

Junior Research Fellowship in the Arts

University College invites applications for a Junior Research Fellowship in the fields of history, economics, or politics, tenable for a period of three years from 1 October 2005. A stipend of £16,242 (under review) will normally be paid, though at a reduced rate if the successful candidate is in receipt of other emoluments. The statutes permit the election of persons up to the age of thirty-five, but it is normally expected that the successful candidate will be under thirty years of age.

The fellow will be entitled to accommodation in college or a housing allowance (£4,250 per annum), and to the common table: lunch and dinner at the college's expense. S/he will receive an academic allowance of £1,438 per annum. The fellow may be asked to do a limited amount of teaching for the college, for which payment will be made at capitation rates.

Application forms, further particulars, and information for referees may be obtained from the College Secretary, University College, Oxford OX1 4BH (e-mail: jrf@univ.ox.ac.uk), or downloaded from http://www.univ.ox.ac.uk.

The closing date for receipt of applications is Friday, 22 October.


Science Junior Research Fellowship in Mathematics and the Physical Sciences

University College invites applications for a Science Junior Research Fellowship in the fields of mathematics and the physical sciences (computing, mathematics, statistics, chemistry, earth sciences, engineering science, materials science, and physics) tenable for a period of three years from 1 October 2005. A stipend of £16,242 (under review) will normally be paid, though at a reduced rate if the successful candidate is in receipt of other emoluments. The statutes permit the election of persons up to the age of thirty-five, but it is normally expected that the successful candidate will be under thirty years of age.

The fellow will be entitled to accommodation in college or a housing allowance (£4,250 per annum), and to the common table: lunch and dinner at the college's expense. S/he will receive an academic allowance of £1,438 per annum. The fellow may be asked to do a limited amount of teaching for the college, for which payment will be made at capitation rates.

Application forms, further particulars, and information for referees may be obtained from the College Secretary, University College, Oxford OX1 4BH (e-mail: jrf@univ.ox.ac.uk), or downloaded from http://www.univ.ox.ac.uk.

The closing date for applications is Friday, 22 October.


CLARE HALL, CAMBRIDGE

Research Fellowships in the Arts and Social Sciences

The governing body of Clare Hall proposes to elect one stipendiary and two or more non-stipendiary Research Fellows in the Arts and Social Sciences for a period of three years starting from October 2005. These are normally for applicants who have recently finished their Ph.D. (or equivalent). Applicants who have previously held college research fellowships in Oxford or Cambridge are not eligible. Non-stipendiary research fellows will be expected to demonstrate that they have adequate financial support throughout the period of the fellowship.

The closing date for the receipt of applications and references is Friday, 29 October 2004. Candidates are responsible for seeing that their curriculum vitae and references reach the college by this date.

Application forms may be obtained from the Tutorial Secretary, Clare Hall, Herschel Road, Cambridge CB3 9AL (e-mail: tutorial.secretary@clarehall.cam.ac.uk ).


Research Fellowships in the Sciences

The governing body of Clare Hall proposes to elect two or more non-stipendiary Research Fellows in the Sciences for a period of three years starting from October 2005. These are normally for applicants who have recently finished their Ph.D. (or equivalent). Applicants who have previously held college research fellowships in Oxford or Cambridge are not eligible. Non-stipendiary research fellows will be expected to demonstrate that they have adequate financial support throughout the period of the fellowship.

The closing date for the receipt of applications is Friday, 29 October 2004. Candidates are responsible for seeing that their curriculum vitae and references reach the college by this date.

Application forms may be obtained from the Tutorial Secretary, Clare Hall, Herschel Road, Cambridge CB3 9AL (e-mail: tutorial.secretary@clarehall.cam.ac.uk ).


KING'S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE

Appointment of Domus Bursar

King's College, Cambridge, intends to appoint a Domus Bursar, preferably to take office from 1 November 2004, or as soon as possible thereafter.

The Domus Bursar has overall responsibility, under the First Bursar, for the maintenance of the college's estate and for the domestic aspect of the college's life. The Domus Bursar plays an important role in the life and successful administration of the college.

The salary will be in the range £32,000--£42,000, the starting point depending upon age and experience.

There is no application form. Candidates should write, enclosing a curriculum vitae and the names of two referees, by Monday, 4 October, to Tte Provost, King's College, Cambridge CB2 1ST.

Further details may be obtained from the Provost's Personal Assistant, King's College, Cambridge CB2 1ST (e-mail: provost.pa@kings.cam.ac.uk), or from the King's College Web site
(http://www.kings.cam.ac.uk/vacancies). King's College follows an equal opportunities policy.


PETERHOUSE, CAMBRIDGE

Research Fellowships

The governing body of Peterhouse, applying the benefactions of the late William Stone, former scholar of the college, and of Sir Michael Sobell, intends to elect a number of Research Fellows, who will enter upon their tenure on 1 October 2005.

Candidates must by 1 October 2005 have passed all examinations required for a first degree at a university and must at the same date be not more than four years from the start of their Ph.D. (or equivalent). Candidature will be restricted to graduates of, or those studying at, universities in the UK and Republic of Ireland.

Candidates should obtain an application form from the Secretary to the Research Fellowships Committee or from the college Web site
(http://www.pet.cam.ac. uk/vacancies/research-fellowship.html). They will be asked to name two or three referees who know their work, and to request them to write to the Master a letter supporting their candidature. The completed application form and the letters from referees must reach the Master by 3 January 2005.

The electors will make a short-list of candidates who will be invited to submit dissertations or other written work. Some of these candidates will subsequently be invited for interview.

The annual remuneration of a research fellow is at present £16,734 (non-resident in college) or £14,875 (resident), with an annual book allowance of £372 and a travel allowance of up to £558. Stipends will be subject to deductions in consideration of emoluments from other sources. In the case of a research fellow who has not yet taken a doctorate, the college may pay certain approved university fees. Research fellows are expected to engage in full time research, but may be permitted to teach for up to six hours a week and will be paid for this. Free rooms in college with service may be provided for a fellow who is single. All research fellows are allowed seven free meals a week at the common table. There is an entertainment allowance in kind. The tenure is three years and in certain circumstances may be renewed for a further year. Up to one year's absence may be granted.

All correspondence (clearly marked `RFC') should be directed to the Secretary to the Research Fellowships Committee, Peterhouse, Cambridge CB2 1RD (telephone: 01223 330834, e-mail: mh324@cam.ac.uk).


SELWYN COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE

Keasbey Research Fellowship in American Studies

Selwyn College invites applications for a Keasbey Research Fellowship in American Studies, tenable for three years from 1 October 2005. The fellowship is open to candidates in any area of American Studies.

Further particulars, an application form, and forms for use by referees are available on the college Web site
(http://www.sel.cam.ac.uk) or from the Master's Assistant, Selwyn College, Cambridge CB3 9DQ (telephone: 01223 335890, fax: 01223 335888, e-mail: hrk22@sel.cam.ac.uk). The closing date for applications (five copies) is 11 October.

Friday 24 September

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Costume in art', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Saturday 25 September

DAY-SCHOOL: `Maritime discovery and exploration', Christ Church, 9 a.m.–4.30 p.m. (with Professor Andrew Lambert, Jeremy Coote, and Professor Glyn Williams). (Tickets £39. Further details from Alex Webb—e-mail: dayschool@chch.ox.ac.uk.)


Tuesday 28 September

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Classical Greek sculpture', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Wednesday 29 September

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Introduction to Impressionism', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Friday 1 October

SOCIAL SCIENCE LIBRARY (Manor Road Building) opens, 9 a.m. (See http://www.ssl.ox.ac.uk.)

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Landscapes in art', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Saturday 2 October

CONFERENCE: `Du papier à l'archive, du privé au public: France et Iles Britanniques, deux mémoires' (Maison Française, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.).


Tuesday 5 October

CONGREGATION meeting, 12 noon (retiring Vice-Chancellor's Oration, and admission of Vice-Chancellor for 2004–9). Note: as the Sheldonian Theatre is temporarily closed, Congregation will meet in the University Church.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Tibetan Buddhist art', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Wednesday 6 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk in series `The Curator and the Collection': `An introduction to Jingdezhen porcelain' (Shelagh Vainker, Curator of Chinese Art), 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Booking essential—tel: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Friday 8 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `A harvest tour', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Sunday 10 October

MICHAELMAS FULL TERM begins.


Monday 11 October

PROFESSOR P. MCAUSLAN: `In the beginning was the law ... an intellectual Odyssey' (seminar series: `Socio-legal approaches to law and development'), Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building, 4.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR ARCHIE BROWN: `Institutions, ideas, interests, and leadership in the Soviet and Russian transition' (Russian and Eurasian Studies Centre Seminar: `Twenty years of political change: the USSR and Russia, 1985–2004'), the Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR LORD (COLIN) RENFREW: `Collecting and looting in the past: the effects of self-indulgence' (St Cross–All Souls Lectures: `Who owns objects? The ethics and legality of collecting'), Dining Hall, St Cross College, 5 p.m.


Tuesday 12 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Paintings of everyday life', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

PROFESSOR T. SNYDER: `Power politics in Eastern Europe: past and present' (seminar series: `Europe: what kind of power?'), Seminar Room, European Studies Centre, St Antony's (70 Woodstock Road), 5 p.m.

DR A. BUCHANAN and F. BENNETT: `The impact of government policy on children aged 0–13 at risk of social exclusion: overview' (seminar series: `Promoting the well-being of children at risk of social exclusion'), Violet Butler Seminar Room, Department of Social Policy and Social Work, 5 p.m.

S. MUTHU: `Enlightenment against empire' (Political Theory and International Relations Seminar), Department of Politics, 5 p.m.

EDOUARD GLISSANT, writer, presents his work (Littérature Française Actuelle à Oxford), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

J. CROSS: `Myth, memory, modernism: reinventing Orpheus' (Graduate Colloquia), Denis Arnold Hall, Music Faculty, 5.15 p.m.


Wednesday 13 October

ORGAN RECITAL (David Maw), Queen's, 1.10 p.m. (admission free; retiring collection).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Introduction to oriental lacquer', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

NORMAN DAVIES and TIMOTHY SNYDER: `Where on earth does Europe end?' (lecture), European Studies Centre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

DR R. RASKIN: `A child at gunpoint: a case study in the life of a photo' (David Patterson Seminars), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, 8 p.m.


Thursday 14 October

CONFERENCE: `Cent ans de relations culturelles franco-britanniques' (Maison Française, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.).

ALAIN VIALA: `Rousseau face à la modernité: le livre, l'imprimerie, la lecture' (Early Modern French Seminar), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.


Friday 15 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Crete BC', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

P. JACOB: `The scope and limits of Chomsky's naturalism' (lecture), Philosophy Faculty Centre, 4.30 p.m.


Monday 18 October

PROFESSOR B. HARRISS-WHITE: `De- and re-regulating business in rural West Bengal: capitalism under the left front' (seminar series: `Socio-legal approaches to law and development'), Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building, 4.30 p.m.

DR L. SHEVTSOVA: `Comparing Yeltsin and Putin as leaders' (Russian and Eurasian Studies Centre Seminar: `Twenty years of political change: the USSR and Russia, 1985–2004'), the Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

DR L. AL-GAILANI: `Archaeological theft in Iraq' (St Cross–All Souls Lectures: `Who owns objects? The ethics and legality of collecting'), Dining Hall, St Cross College, 5 p.m.


Tuesday 19 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Glass', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

PROFESSOR B. LAFFAN: `Organising power in Europe: multilevel governance' (seminar series: `Europe: what kind of power?'), Seminar Room, European Studies Centre, St Antony's (70 Woodstock Road), 5 p.m.

T. SMITH: `Early years research and policy for children at risk of social exclusion' (seminar series: `Promoting the well-being of children at risk of social exclusion'), Violet Butler Seminar Room, Department of Social Policy and Social Work, 5 p.m.

R.E. LEBOW: `Interests and ethics' (Political Theory and International Relations Seminar), Department of Politics, 5 p.m.

B. HEBBERT: `The Tudor violin 1540–1600' (Graduate Colloquia), Denis Arnold Hall, Music Faculty, 5.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. PODOLNY: `The logic of person v. the logic of position' (Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies: `The logic of position, the measure of leadership'), Saïd Business School, 5.30 p.m. (open to the public; admission free).