Oxford University Gazette: 7 October 2004

Oxford University Gazette, Vol. 135, No. 4708: 7 October 2004

Note: due to the requirements of the Data Protection Act, some elements of the printed Gazette are not reproduced in the Web Gazette.

The following supplements were published with this Gazette:

  • (1) to no. 4707: Special Lecture List, Michaelmas Term (PDF file)
  • (2) to no. 4707: Oration by the retiring Vice-Chancellor, Sir Colin Lucas
  • (3) to no. 4707: Address by the incoming Vice-Chancellor, Dr John Hood

COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

Changes in regulations

Council has made the following changes in regulations, to come into effect on 22 October.

Appeals to the Appeal Court

In Council Regulations 37 of 2002, concerning appeals to the Appeal Court (Supplement (2) to Gazette No. 4630, 24 July 2002, p. 1526), renumber existing regulation 1.4 as 1.4(1) and insert new sub-sections 1.4(2) and (3) as follows:

`(2) the High Steward shall invite each member of the Appeal Court in rotation to hear and determine an application for permission to appeal and any subsequent appeal sitting alone.

(3) the application and any subsequent appeal shall be heard by the first member of the Court who is able to accept the High Steward's invitation.'


COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of Congregation:

Akande, D.O., St Peter's

Allan, W., D.Phil., University

Bishop, R.C., Faculty of Philosophy

Brandellero, S.L.A., Queen's

Broers, M.G., D.Phil., Lady Margaret Hall

Browne, D.E., Merton

Byren, I., Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Chambers, C.E., BA., Somerville

Dalrymple, M.E., Linacre

Descheemaeker, E., St Catherine's

Evangelista, S., Merton

Freckleton, R.P., Magdalen

Gerwarth, R.B., D.Phil., Corpus Christi

Halbach, V., New College

Kilford, L.J.P., Merton

Krisch, N., Merton

Linnebo, O., Merton

Marber, P., St Catherine's

Palmer, S.C., Wolfson

Palser, E.J., Exeter

Parchami, A., MA, M.Phil., Exeter

Payne, S.J., M.Eng., D.Phil., Keble

Pollard, A.M., Linacre

Poole, W.E., New College

Sexton, J.J., D.Phil., Corpus Christi

Shields, C.J.I., Lady Margaret Hall

Thapen, N.D., MA, D.Phil., St Hilda's

Wallace, T.M., Harris Manchester


BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 22 October, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • *CONGREGATION 12 October (Cancelled)
    • *1 Declaration of approval of Statute: University Discipline
    • *2 Declaration of approval of Changes in Congregation Regulations: Conduct of Business in Congregation
    • *3 Declaration of approval of Resolution concerning the Review of Governance

UNIVERSITY PREACHERS

MICHAELMAS TERM 2004

Thursday, 7 October, at 8 a.m. THE REVD DR TERESA MORGAN, Fellow of Oriel College. Holy Communion (Latin). At St Mary's.

Sunday, 10 October, at 10 a.m. THE RT REVD DR JOHN SENTAMU, Bishop of Birmingham. At St Mary's.

Tuesday, 12 October, at 10.15 a.m. THE REVD DR PETER GROVES, Chaplain and Supernumerary Fellow of Brasenose College. (Court Sermon.) At the Cathedral. Note: the congregation is asked to be seated by 10.10 a.m.

Sunday, 17 October, at 10 a.m. PROFESSOR BRIAN LEFTOW, Nolloth Professor of the Philosophy of the Christian Religion, Fellow of Oriel College. At St Mary's.

Sunday, 24 October, at 10 a.m. THE REVD CANON OSWALD SWARTZ, Regional Desk Officer, at USPG (Southern Africa, West Africa and the Indian Ocean), Chaplain of Southwark Cathedral, Canon of Kimberley Cathedral, South Africa. (Ramsden Sermon.) At St Mary's.

Sunday, 31 October, at 10 a.m. THE RT REVD DR N.T. WRIGHT, Bishop of Durham, Honorary Fellow of Merton College. At Merton College.

Sunday, 7 November, at 10 a.m. THE VERY REVD DR JOHN MOSES, Dean of St Paul's. At St Mary's.

Sunday, 14 November, at 10 a.m. THE VERY REVD DR IAIN TORRANCE, President of Princeton Theological Seminary, New Jersey, sometime Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland. (Sermon for Remembrance Sunday.) At St Mary's.

Sunday, 21 November, at 10 a.m. DR FRANCES LANNON, Principal of Lady Margaret Hall. (Sermon on the Sin of Pride.) At St Mary's.

Sunday, 28 November, at 10 a.m. THE REVD PROFESSOR BERNARD SILVERMAN, Master of St Peter's College. (Sermon for Advent Sunday.) At the Cathedral.


CONSULTATIVE NOTICE

COMMITTEE ON STATUTES BEFORE THE PRIVY COUNCIL

Notice of proposed consent to amendments to the Statutes of Queen's College

The Committee on Statutes before the Privy Council, acting under authority delegated to it by Council, is minded to give consent on behalf of the University to the amendments to Statute XXIII of Queen's College and to the Scheme made by the college under the Universities and Colleges (Trusts) Act, 1943, as approved by the Governing Body on 21 June 2003, in so far as such consent is required by Section 7 (2) of the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923. This consent will be effective eleven days after publication of this notice unless written notice of a resolution, signed by at least twenty members of Congregation, calling upon Council to withhold that consent, has been given to the Registrar by noon on Monday, 18 October.

The effects of the amendments are to provide for the adoption of a policy of Total Return on investments and to provide for the provision of certain rights to benefactors.


GENERAL NOTICES

RECOGNITION OF DISTINCTION 2003–4

The Distinctions Committee has conferred the title of Reader in Glycobiology on DR N. ZITZMAN, Wolfson College.

It is regretted that Dr Zitzman's name was omitted from the list of Recognition of Distinction titles published in Gazette, pages 49–50 (Supplement (1) to No. 4706, 23 September 2004).


ISIS INNOVATION

Opening of Science Area office

Isis Innovation Ltd., the University's technology transfer company, has opened a new office in the Science Area. The office is within the Central Chemistry Laboratory (between Inorganic Chemistry and the Dyson Perrins).

The office is open on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, 9 a.m.--1 p.m. For meetings at other times, telephone Karina Mortensen (telephone: (2)80850).

Dr David Baghurst, Dr Mairi Gibbs, Dr Roger Welch, and Dr David Churchman will be available to meet academic researchers to discuss their commercialisation ideas. All enquiries, related to patenting and licensing, consulting and service work, spin-out opportunities, or other commercialisation ideas, are welcome.

Isis Innovation hopes that the office in the Science Area will enable it to offer a convenient and accessible service.

INAUGURAL LECTURES

Professor of Divinity

PROFESSOR MARILYN ADAMS will deliver her inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 8 November, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `The immaculate conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary: a thought experiment in medieval philosophical theology.'


Professor of Environmental Science

PROFESSOR DIANA LIVERMAN will deliver her Inaugural Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 23 November, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Environment and the Americas.'


CHARLES SIMONYI LECTURE

DR RICHARD LEAKEY, palaeoanthropologist and conservationist, will deliver the Charles Simonyi Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Wednesday, 13 October, in the Oxford Playhouse. The lecture is given in association with New College.

Tickets, costing £3.50, are obtainable in advance from the Oxford Playhouse (http://www.oxfordplayhouse.com, tel.: Oxford 305305).

Subject: `Why our origins matter.'


ASTOR LECTURE

PROFESSOR RICHARD MCINTOSH, University of Colorado, will deliver an Astor Lectcure at 4.30 p.m. on Monday, 1 November, in the Lecture Theatre, MSTC, the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology.

Subject: `Electron tomography: a new look at cell structure in 3D.'


DAVID NICHOLLS MEMORIAL LECTURE

PROFESSOR J. DE GRUCHY, Cape Town, will lecture on Thursday, 14 October, at 5 p.m. at Regent's Park College.

Subject: `Christian humanism: antidote to secularism and fundamentalism?'


SIR PATRICK NAIRNE LECTURE

PROFESSOR ANDREW MOTION, Professor of Creative Writing, Royal Holloway, and Poet Laureate, will lecture on Thursday, 4 November, at 5 p.m. in the Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre at St Catherine's College. Chair: Professor D. Womersley.

Subject: ` "Public property; private property". A talk with readings.'


CLARENDON LECTURES IN ECONOMICS

Competing in capabilities—globalisation and industrial development

JOHN SUTTON, Sir John Hicks Professor of Economics, Convener of the Department of Economics, London School of Economics, will deliver the Clarendon Lectures in Economics at 5 p.m. on the following days at the Oxford University Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford.

The lectures are open to the public, and admission is free. Further information is available from Jenni Craig, Oxford University Press (telephone: Oxford 353408, e-mail: jenni.craig@oup.com).

Tue. 26 Oct.: `A view from the B-school.'

Wed. 27 Oct.: `Uncertain futures: learning to survive.'

Thur. 28 Oct.: `A divided world: can latecomers become leaders?'


CLARENDON LAW LECTURES

PROFESSOR MICHELE GRAZIADEI, Università del Piemonte orientale, will deliver the Clarendon Law Lectures as follows in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building. The lectures are open to the public. Those wishing to attend are asked to arrive early.

The first two lectures will be given on Monday, 1 November.

Mon. 1 Nov., 5 p.m.: `On playing tennis with the net up: fiduciary obligations, contractual relations, and property rights.'

Mon. 1 Nov., 6.10 p.m.: `Fiduciary obligations in civilian countries: a primer.'

Tue. 2 Nov., 5 p.m.: `Non aes sed fides: directors' duties, fiduciary obligations, and the human factor.'


CLARENDON LECTURES IN MANAGEMENT STUDIES

The logic of position, the measure of leadership

JOEL PODOLNY, Novartis Professor of Leadership and Management, Harvard Business School, will deliver the Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies at 5.30 p.m. on the following days in the Saïd Business School.

The lectures are open to the public, and admission is free. Further information is available from Liz Buckle, Saïd Business School (telephone: Oxford (2)88852, e-mail: liz.buckle@sbs.ox.ac.uk), or Sophie Austin, Oxford University Press (telephone: Oxford 353859, e-mail: sophie.austin@oup.com).

Tue. 19 Oct.: `The logic of person v. the logic of position.'

Wed. 20 Oct.: `The meaning of leadership.'

Thur. 21 Oct.: `The measure of meaning.'


WELDON MEMORIAL LECTURE

PROFESSOR SIR RICHARD PETO, winner of the Weldon Memorial Medal 2003, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 1 November, in Lecture Theatre A, the Zoology/Psychology Building. Tickets are not required for admission.

Subject: `Halving premature death.'


CLASSICS

Archive of Performances of Greek and Roman Drama

TONY HARRISON, poet and playwright, will appear in conversation with PROFESSOR OLIVER TAPLIN at 2.15 p.m. on Wednesday, 17 November, in the Auditorium, Magdalen College. All members of the University are welcome.

For further information, telephone Oxford (2)88210 or e-mail: apgrd@classics.ox.ac.uk.


ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

Fin de siècle

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Meyerstein Room, the St Cross Building. Two papers will be given at the meeting on 21 October. `Fin de siècle' is an interdisciplinary seminar series for the discussion of literature and society in England between .1870 and 1920.

Convener: Anna Vaninskaya, Hertford College (e-mail: anna.vaninskaya@hertford.ox.ac.uk).

G. CUTHBERTSON
21 Oct.: ` "Only the name": place-names and the imagination in the poetry of Edward Thomas and A.E. Housman.'

DR J. RUDY, Maryland
21 Oct.: `Wilde beats.'

J. ADAMS
4 Nov.: `Girls and the late Victorian artists.'

DR A. WITCHARD, Birkbeck College, London
18 Nov.: `The glamorous shame of Chinatown.'

PROFESSOR H.-P. SÖDER, Munich
2 Dec.: `Historical pessimism and the boundaries of a culture history of the fin de siècle.'


Early Modern Literature Graduate Seminar

The following seminars will be held on Tuesdays (1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th weeks) at 5 p.m. in the History of the Book Room, St Cross Building.

DR ANDREW LAIRD, Warwick
12 Oct.: `Thomas More's Utopia in New Spain: Europeans, Mexicans and Colonial Humanism.'

DR J. M. PEREZ FERNANDEZ, Granada
26 Oct.: `Surrey's Virgil and the Meaning of Blank Verse.'

PROFESSOR A. MCRAE, Exeter
9 Nov.: `Flufial Nation: the cultural meanings of rivers in early modern England.'

DR KATHARINE CRAIK, Worcester
23 Nov.: ` "The material point of poesy": reading, writing and sensation in early modern England.'


ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE, MUSIC, FINE ART

The Bible in Art, Music and Literature

The following seminars will be held on Mondays at 5 p.m. in the Danson Room, Trinity College.

Conveners: Professor C. Rowland and Dr C. Joynes.

DR B. GROVES
18 Oct.: ` "With old odd ends stole out of holy writ." Shakespeare and the Bible.'

REVD J. DRURY
1 Nov.: `George Herbert: on starting to read The Temple.'
(Those attending should bring a copy of Herbert's The Temple to the seminar.)

PROFESSOR R. STROHM
15 Nov.: `Baroque Oratorio and the Poetics of the Passions.' (Perspectives on the Passion series)

THE RT REVD RICHARD HARRIES, Bishop of Oxford
29 Nov.: `The Passion in art.' (Perspectives on the Passion series)


LIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Department of Zoology

The following departmental seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Mondays in Lecture Theatre B, the Department of Zoology. Details of the 11 October seminar will be announced later.

For details of the Weldon Memorial Lecture (1 November), see above.

PROFESSOR DIANA LIVERMAN and colleagues
18 Oct.: `Research in the Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford.'

DR B. LEADBETTER, Birmingham
25 Oct.: `Cells in baskets: the ancestors of animals?' (Jenkinson Seminar)

DR M. TELFORD, UCL
8 Nov.: `Testing the new animal phylogeny.' (Jenkinson Seminar)

DR S. JENNINGS, CEFAS, Lowestoft
15 Nov.: `Size-based analysis of food web structure.'

DR T. BENTON, Aberdeen
22 Nov.: `Linking life history variation to population dynamics: insights from mites.'

DR A. EYRE-WALKER, Sussex
29 Nov.: `The rates and fitness effects of mutations in the human genome.'


Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Biochemistry.

Convener: Professor L.N. Johnson.

DR P. EMSLEY, York
15 Oct.: `Model-building tools for molecular graphics.'

PROFESSOR D. BARFORD, Institute of Cancer Research, London
22 Oct.: `RAF kinases and oncogenes.'

PROFESSOR J. SPENCE, Arizona State University, Tempe
5 Nov.: `Laser-aligned protein beam diffraction: serial crystallography.'

DR D. BHELLA, Glasgow
19 Nov.: To be announced.

DR C. GORDON, Edinburgh
26 Nov.: `Transferring substrates to the 26S proteasome.'

PROFESSOR S. BALDWIN, Leeds
3 Dec.: `Molecular insights into the mechanism of nucleoside transport across biological membranes.'


Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology

Ethnicity and Identity Seminar: Anthropologists and the New Technologies

The following seminars will be held on Fridays at 11 a.m. at 61 Banbury Road.

Conveners: S. Ardener, I. Fowler, E. Hsu, and L. Sciama.

DR D. CARTER, Hull
15 Oct.: `Anthropologists: identity and virtual communities.'

DR N. BRADMAN, London
22 Oct.: `The applications of mitochondrial DNA research in the anthropology of identity.'

DR D. NEYLAND
29 Oct.: `Identity and CCTV.'

N. NISBETt, Sussex
5 Nov.: `Observing internet use in the field: young male identities and cyber space in a Bangalore internet café.'

DR S. KINGSTON, Anthropologist and publisher, Wantage
12 Nov.: `Postmodern publishing: digital transformations of text, author and publisher.'

DR S. TREMAYNE, ISCA
19 Nov.: `The use of new electronic communications by religious groups in Iran.'

P. STRONG
26 Nov.: `Imaging technology and the analysis of style in art.'

DR F. MOORE, Kingston
3 Dec: `Technology in a car factory.'


MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Department of Engineering Science

ADRIAN BEJAN, J.A. Jones Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Duke University, will lecture at 3 p.m. on Friday, 15 October, in Lecture Room 1, the Thom Building. The lecture is open to the public.

Convener: Dr Y. Ventikos.

Subject: `The constructal law: the generation of flow architecture, from engineering to nature.'


Department of Earth Sciences

The following seminars will be held on Mondays at 4.30 p.m. in the Lecture Theatre, Earth Sciences Department.

DR E. CALDER, Open University
18 Oct.: `Degassing regimes and bubble-driven convection at persistently degassing volcanoes.'

DR L. BENNING, Leeds
25 Oct.: `The silicification of micro-organisms: a comparison between in situ experiments in the field and laboratory.'

DR T. WRIGHT
1 Nov.: `InSAR observations of low slip rates on the major faults of western Tibet.'

DR S. JACKMAN, FirstFaraday
8 Nov.: `Assessing and overcoming constraints to the bioremediation of contaminated sites.'

PROFESSOR T. SEWARD, ETH, Zurich
15 Nov.: `The geochemistry of aqueous fluids and gases in high temperature Earth systems.'

PROFESSOR D. SHERMAN, Bristol
22 Nov.: `Metal complexation at the mineral–water interface: molecular controls on aqueous geochemistry.'

PROFESSOR I. ROBINSON, Southampton
29 Nov.: `Making earth observation work: operational application of satellite data—the ocean example.'


Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminars

The following seminars will be held on Thursdays at 2 p.m. at the OUCL Lecture Theatre (except on 18 November and 2 December, see below). For further information, contact Shirley Day on 01865 273885.

Conveners: L. N. Trefethen and J. Scott.

PROFESSOR A. GREENBAUM, Washington
7 Oct.: `Alternatives to eigenvalues describing the behaviour of nonnormal matrices and linear operators.'

PROFESSOR K. BURRAGE, Queensland
14 Oct.: `Modelling and simulation issues in computational cell biology.'

PROFESSOR P. LAX, New York
21 Oct.: `Computational fluid dynamics.'

PROFESSOR C. REISINGER, Heidelberg
28 Oct.: `Analysis of the sparse grid combination technique and high dimensional applications in option pricing.'

PROFESSOR D. BARKLEY, Warwick
4 Nov.: `Patterns of turbulence.'

PROFESSOR A. WEIDEMAN, Stellenbosch
11 Nov.: `The trapezoidal rule in the complex plane.'

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR A.-V. DE MIGUEL, London Business School
18 Nov., Rutherford Appleton Laboratory: `An interior-point method for MPECs based on strictly feasible relaxations.'

PROFESSOR J. YEOMANS
25 Nov.: `Modelling polymer hydrodynamics.'

PROFESSOR M. HAGEMANN, Basel
2 Dec., Rutherford Appleton Laboratory: `Weighted matchings for the preconditioning of symmetric indefinite matrices.'


Biophysical Chemistry Seminar Series

The following seminars will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Thursdays in the John Rowlinson Seminar Room (20.12, opposite the Main Lecture Theatre).

Convener: Dr L. C. Snoek

PROFESSOR E. MARZLUFF, Grinnel College
14 Oct.: `Hydrogen deuterium exchange of peptides: implications for gas phase protein structural determination.'

DR J. VAN THOR
28 Oct.: `Photoreactions of the green fluorescent protein and photoreceptor proteins.'

PROFESSOR P. O'SHEA, Nottingham
11 Nov.: `Non-covalent interactions in macromolecular biological systems; kinetics and imaging.'

PROFESSOR T. WATTS
25 Nov.: `Resolving very high resolution structural constraints within biomolecules in their functional state.'


MEDICAL SCIENCES

Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics

The following research seminars will be given at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the Lecture Theatre, the Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics.

Convener: Professor K.E. Davies.

PROFESSOR J. SPARROW, York
15 Oct.: `Drosophila thin filament genetics: a model for human nemaline myopathy?'

DR A. GORLEY
22 Oct.: `FGFR2: the problem with ageing men.'

DR S. IAWATA, Imperial College, London
29 Oct.: `Structure and function of lactose permease from E.coli.'

DR P. ELLIS, Cambridge
5 Nov.: `Insights into spermiogenesis via microarray analysis of mice with Y chromosome deletions.' (Jenkinson Seminar)

PROFESSOR V. TIMMERMAN, Antwerp
12 Nov.: `Molecular genetics of distal hereditary motor neuropathies.'

DR E. SERNAGOR, Newcastle
19 Nov.: `Control of retinal maturation by changes in GABAergic function and by visual experience.' (Jenkinson Seminar)

PROFESSOR B. DEMENEIX, Paris
26 Nov.: `Non-viral gene transfer into neural stem cells in vivo.' (Jenkinson Seminar)

DR M. DERMITIZAKIS, Cambridge
3 Dec.: `Non-coding conservation and regulatory variation in the human genome.'


Pharmacology and anatomical neuropharmacology seminars

The following seminars will be given in the Lecture Theatre, the Department of Pharmacology.

PROFESSOR D. MANN, Southampton
12 Oct.: `Nf-kB as a pivotal regulator of inflammation and tissue damage.'

DR K. JONES, Newcastle
19 Oct.: `How the sperm turns on the egg: intracellular calcium spikes transduced into meiotic cell cycle resumption.'

DR D. ANTHONY
26 Oct.: `The systematic response to acute CNS injury.'

DR S. KASPAROV, Bristol
2 Nov.: `Nitric oxide-mediated signalling in the nucleus tractus solitarius: the sources and the targets.'

PROFESSOR G. COLLINGRIDGE, Bristol
9 Nov.: `Glutamate receptors and synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus.'

DR H. REUL, Bristol
16 Nov.: `Histone modifications: another level of investigating the impact of stress on the brain.'

DR S. ALLEN, Manchester
23 Nov.: `Interleukin-1 adds to excitement in the brain: but is it all too much?'

DR M. MOTA, Lisbon
30 Nov.: `New insights into molecular mechanisms of malaria.'


University Laboratory of Physiology

The following departmental seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Mondays in the Sherrington Room, University Laboratory of Physiology, Parks Road.

PROFESSOR J. STEIN
11 Oct.: `Dyslexia.'

PROFESSOR A. HALESTRAP, Bristol
18 Oct.: `Mitochondria and cell death: a pore way for the heart to die.'

DR S. KASPAROV, Bristol
25 Oct.: `Viral gene transfer in studies of central mechanisms of blood pressure control.'

PROFESSOR M. RENNIE, Nottingham
1 Nov.: `Body maintenance and repair—how exercise and food can keep your muscles and bones in good shape throughout life.' (G.L. Brown Lecture)

PROFESSOR P. STANFIELD, Warwick
8 Nov.: `Potassium ion channels: aspects of their molecular and physiological properties.' (Provisional title)

PROFESSOR R.C. MIALL, Birmingham
15 Nov.: `Cerebellum—control, co-ordination, forward modelling.'

PROFESSOR K. SILLAR, St Andrews
22 Nov.: `The development and neuromodulation of spinal motor systems.;

PROFESSOR V. BROWN, St Andrews
29 Nov.: ` "To go or not to go": subthalamic nucleus in response control.'


MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

Romance Linguistics Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in 47 Wellington Square.

Convener: Professor Martin Maiden.

PROFESSOR I. SÖHRMAN, Gothenburg
21 Oct.: `Spatial references in Sursilvan Romansh. A cognitive approach to the Sursilvan prepositional and adverb system.'

PROFESSOR H. DENMAN, UCL and OCHJS
28 Oct.: `How importance was Judeo-Romance in the genesis of the Yiddish language and from where exactly did the Romance component in Yiddish come?

PROFESSOR C. POUNTAIN, Queen Mary College, London
11 Nov.: `Register and the history of Spanish syntax.'

J.C. SMITH
18 Nov.: `Refunctionalisation of the Latin nominative/accusative opposition in Gallo- Romance.'

N. MILIC
25 Nov.: `The debate on linguistic sexism and its effects on the language of sexism in Italian.'

A.B. MANSILLA
22 Dec.: `The function of tense and aspect in Catalan oral narratives.'


Research Seminar in Spanish and Spanish American Studies

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on the days shown in Room 3, the Taylor Institution.

Conveners: Professor Edwin Williamson and Dr Jacqueline Rattray.

Graduates transferring to research status
Wed. 13 Oct.: Presentations by the graduates, followed by a reception to welcome new graduates.

DR ALFONSO SÁNCHEZ RODRÍGUEZ, critic and poet
Tue. 19 Oct.: `Poetas en la Guerra Civil 1936–9: García Lorca, Hinojosa, Alberti y otros casos españoles.' (Event sponsored by the Cultural Office, Spanish Embassy, London)


MODERN HISTORY

Early Modern Europe Seminar

The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Modern History Research Unit, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

Conveners: Professor Robert Evans, Ms J. Pollmann, and Dr L. Roper.

J.D. TRACY, Minnesota
12 Oct.: `The background war of the early modern era: European states and the Ottoman Empire in contest for dominion, trade, and cultural pre-eminence.'

H. KUGELER
19 Oct.: ` "Le parfait Ambassadeur": the theory and practice of diplomacy, 1648–1748.'

A. MARR
26 Oct.: `Mathematics and material culture in late Renaissance Italy.'

K. AUSTIN
2 Nov.: `An unsung hero? Immanuel Tremellius (1510–80) and the European Reformation.'

A. SPICER, Oxford Brookes
9 Nov.: `Sacred space and the confessional landscape of the Loire, c.1560–1660.'

Z. SHALEV, Princeton
16 Nov.: `Early modern pilgrimages to the Holy Land.'

E. FURNISS
23 Nov.: `Victims of their own success? Devotion, practice, and the Franciscans in Aragon, c.1500–58.'

R. MANNING
30 Nov.: `Confessions of a saint: Counter-Reformation, confessional culture, and the emergence of the active female apostolate.'


Seminar in medieval history

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: Dr P. Brand and Dr M. Whittow.

R. SHARPE
11 Oct.: `Address and delivery in Anglo-Norman royal charters.'

T. CRAFTER
18 Oct.: `Henry II, the St Augustine's dispute, and the loss of the abbey's mint franchise.'

R. PARTINGTON, Cambridge
25 Oct.: To be announced.

A. DUGGAN, King's College, London
1 Nov.: ` "Not quite a forgery": Laudabiliter, Adrian IV's "grant" of Ireland to Henry II.'

P. SKINNER, Southampton
8 Nov.: `Early medieval women's voices: still hidden from history.'

T. PICKLES
15 Nov.: `The Church in Anglo-Saxon Yorkshire: minsters in the Danelaw c.600–1200.'

J.-C. SCHMITT, Paris
22 Nov.: `The representation of time and space in medieval images.'

D. BATES, Director, Institute of Historical Research
29 Nov.: `1066.'


Problems in the history of science and technology

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the History of Science and Technology Seminar Room, the Modern History Faculty Building.

Convener: Dr Jim Bennett.

DR P. FARA, Cambridge
14 Oct.: `Hidden depths: Halley, hell, and other people.'

DR BENNETT
21 Oct.: `Wind-gun, air-gun, or pop-gun: the fortunes of a philosophical instrument (mostly in 1794–6).'

DR W. ASHWORTH, Liverpool
28 Oct.: `Regulation, imitation, and industrialisation in eighteenth-century England.'

E. ARAPOSTATHIS
4 Nov.: `Innovations, engineering practices, and roles in consulting, 1878–98: the case of John Hopkinson.'

DR S. VAN DAMME
11 Nov.: `Making a philosophical greatness: Descartes in France, from 1650 to the Revolution.'

DR R. HIGGITT, Imperial College, London
18 Nov.: `History by induction: men of science as historians of science.'

PROFESSOR G. RICHARDS, British Psychological Society
25 Nov.: `The place of religion in the history of modern psychology.'

PROFESSOR R. MACLEOD, Sydney
2 Dec.: To be announced.


Military History Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5.15 p.m. on Wednesdays in All Souls College.

Convener: Professor Hew Strachan.

N. BARR, Joint Services Command and Staff College
20 Oct.: `Learning to win: the British Eighth Army, July–November 1942.'

L. HÖBELT, Vienna
3 Nov.: `The turning point of the Thirty Years War.'

G. BEST
17 Nov.: `Winston Churchill in the First World War: some shapes of things to come.'

N. STARGARDT
1 Dec.: `Bombing and retaliation: German civilians in the Second World War.'


Commonwealth History Research Seminar: the Empire and British society

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Modern History Faculty Building.

Convener: Professor J.M. Brown.

PROFESSOR T. DEVINE, Aberdeen
15 Oct.: `Empire–Scottish elites, India in the eighteenth century.'

DR J. DAVIS
22 Oct.: `London's Chinese in British society, c.1960–85.'

DR W. JONES, Cardiff
29 Oct.: `Wales and the British Empire in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.'

DR A. THOMPSON, Leeds
5 Nov.: `The Empire and British elites, c.1850–1945.'

DR A. MAY, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
12 Nov.: `Imperial lives in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.'

PROFESSOR E. BOEHMER, Nottingham Trent
19 Nov.: `Centrifugal empire: Sister Nivedita and Baden-Powell, 1907.'

PROFESSOR K. JEFFERY, Ulster
26 Nov.: `Distance and proximity in service to the British Empire: Ulster and New Zealand in the twentieth century.'

DR G. EVISON
3 Dec.: `The Orientalist, his Institute, and the Empire: the rise and subsequent demise of Oxford University's Indian Institute.'


Approaches in Prosopography

PROFESSOR TIMOTHY BARNES, Toronto, will give the first of eight seminars on `Approaches in Prosopography' on Thursday, 14 October, at 2.15 p.m. in the Modern History Research Unit (Block 11.2, Radcliffe Infirmary). For directions to the MHRU see www.history.ox.ac.uk/researchunit.htm.

Subject: `Prosopography: the origin of the method and its application to Roman history.'


History of Childhood Workshop: Adult–Child Relations

This workshop is the second in a five-year series devoted to the historical investigation of major contemporary concerns about children and childhood. Its underlying premise is that public policy makers and childcare professionals would benefit from a deeper knowledge of the history of childhood. In pursuit of this aim, the conveners are advised by an external committee of childcare professionals containing lawyers, educationalists, paediatricians, a police officer, and a churchman. The workshop is a serious vehicle for the historical discussion of often difficult and contentious subjects and it is expected that participants will remember that its ultimate purpose is to contribute to the promotion of the welfare of today's children. Further information about the aims of the seminar can be found in the conveners' article in the Oxford Magazine, noughth week, Michaelmas Term, 2003, pp.4–7. The following workshops will be held on Thursdays at 5 p.m. in the Modern History Faculty.

Conveners: Professor L. Brockliss and Professor G. Rousseau.

DR H. MONTGOMERY, Open University 14 Oct.: `Child prostitution: abuse or cultural difference?' DR M. VICKERS, Ashmolean
21 Oct.: `Juvenile crime, aggression and abuse in classical antiquity: a case study.'

DR E. ARCHIBALD, Bristol 28 Oct.: `Incest between adults and children in the medieval world.' DR G. ROUSSEAU, MHRU
4 Nov.: `Two cases in eighteenth and nineteenth-century Oxford of illicit adult–child friendships.'

DR L. SMITH, Sussex
11 Nov.: `The likeness of a child: the ambiguities of Victorian photography.'

DR A. HENNEGAN, Cambridge
18 Nov.: Victorian girlhood: eroticising the maternal, maternalising the erotic.'

DR E. BOEHMER, Royal Holloway
25 Nov.: `Youth movements and the obsession with cleanliness in twentieth-century Britain.'

DR R. O'CONNELL, Central Lancashire
2 Dec.: `The iconography and representation of children: the internet and history.'


Modern European History Research Centre

/4German history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries The following seminars will be held on Wednesdays at 5 p.m. in the University College Seminar Room, Logic Lane.

Conveners: Dr Jane Caplan, Dr Robert Gerwarth, Dr Holger Nehring, and Professor Hartmut Pogge von Strandmann.

PROFESSOR M. FULBROOK, University of London
13 Oct.: `The participatory dictatorship: commitment, consent and conformity in the GDR.'

DR A. SEDLMAIR
20 Oct.: `The Wilson administration and Germany: images and policy (1913–21).'

DR J. VON DANNENBERG
27 Oct.: `The fruits of daring diplomacy: the making of the Moscow Treaty, 12 August 1970.'

DR J. CAPLAN
3 Nov.: `Why Bismarck is not the Jungfrau: property and identity in German law.'

DR K. PATEL, Humboldt Campus
10 Nov.: `Soldiers of work labour services in Nazi Germany and New Deal America, 1933–1945.'

DR C. HAASE, Nottingham
17 Nov.: `In search of a European settlement: the case of the Königswinter conferences.'

DR B. VON SEHERR-THO<BETA>
24 Nov.: `Occupation and occupation: the British occupation of Germany in comparison/compared.'

DR E. WINTER, Cambridge
1 Dec.: `Italia and Germania: nationalism and cosmopolitanism in the European art world 1797–1848.'

 


MODERN HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCES

Seminar in economic and social history

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: Professor Robert Allen, Dr Knick Harley, Professor Jane Humphries, and Professor Avner Offer.

 

PROFESSOR K. SOKOLOFF, UCLA
12 Oct.: `Taxation and inequality: evidence from the economic history of the Americas.'

DR F. CARNEVALI, Birmingham
19 Oct.: `Crooks, thieves, and receivers. A transaction costs approach to the problem of trust in nineteenth-century industrial Birmingham.'

DR H.-J. CHANG, Cambridge
26 Oct.: `Kicking away the ladder: "good policies" and "good institutions" in historical perspective.'

PROFESSOR R. STECKEL, Ohio State
2 Nov.: `A dreadful childhood: a chronological portrait of antebellum slave child health.'

DR G. HUFF, Glasgow
9 Nov.: `The Lewis hypothesis, globalisation, and immigration to south-east Asia before the Second World War.'

PROFESSOR A. BOWMAN
16 Nov.: `Quantifying the economy of imperial Rome.'

PROFESSOR E. KARAKACILI, Western Ontario
23 Nov.: `Pre-industrial possibilities: English medieval agrarian labour productivity rates.'

PROFESSOR P. SEABRIGHT, Toulouse
30 Nov.: `Agriculture, warfare, and the division of labour.'


SOCIAL SCIENCES

Are Labour's constitutional changes working?

The following seminars will be held on Mondays at 5 p.m. in the Summer Common Room, Magdalen College, unless otherwise stated.

Conveners: Sir Michael Wheeler-Booth, Professor D. Marquand, Dr C. Brooke, and Dr R. Coggins.

RT. HON. LORD BUTLER
Tuesday, 12 Oct.: `The Butler report.'

TOM DALYELL, MP
18 Oct.: `What needs to be done to the House of Commons?'

THE RT. HON. WILLIAM HAGUE, MP
25 Oct.: `The future of House of Lords reform.'

THE RT. HON. ERIC FORTH, MP
1 Nov.: `The role of the opposition—a conservative view.'

THE RT. HON. LORD RICHARD
8 Nov.: `Why executive devolution to Wales is unsatisfactory.'

PROFESSOR SIR W. MCKAY
15 Nov.: `Why parliamentary procedure matters.'

LORD KERR, Secretary-General, the European Convention
22 Nov.: `Was the convention experiment to draw up the European constitution a success?'


Looking For Law In China

PROFESSOR STANLEY LUBMAN, University of California/Berkeley School of Law, will lecture as follows.

Tue. 19 Oct., 5 p.m., Dahrendorf Room, St Antony's: `Themes and issues in Western Scholarship'.

Wed. 20 Oct., 5.30 p.m., Mure Room, Merton: `Law reform after Mao—accomplishments and problems.'

Fri. 22 Oct., 5 p.m., Schools: `Foreigners and legal uncertainty.' (With discussion by Professor Anthony Dicks, QC)

 


Promoting the well-being of children at risk of social exclusion

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Violet Butler Seminar Room, the Department of Social Policy and Social Work.

Convener: Dr A. Buchanan.

 

DR A. BUCHANAN and F. BENNETT
12 Oct.: `The impact of government policy on children aged 0–13 at risk of social exclusion: overview.'

T. SMITH
19 Oct.: `Early years research and policy for children at risk of social exclusion.'

G. SMITH and DR C. RITCHIE
26 Oct.: `Education research and policy for children at risk of social exclusion.'

DR BUCHANAN
2 Nov.: `Family support child protection research and policy.'

M. MACLEAN
9 Nov.: `Research that has informed the "contact" debate.'

PROFESSOR K. SYLVA
16 Nov.: `The EPPE research on the effects of pre-school education on children's development.'

DR F. GARDNER
23 Nov.: `US/UK research on children with anti- social behaviour disorders.'

DR BUCHANAN
30 Nov.: `Are there some key messages? Bringing the research together.'


THEOLOGY

Ian Ramsey Centre

The following seminars will be held at 8.15 for 8.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the Hood Room, St Cross College.

Conveners: Professor J. Hedley Brooke and Dr Margaret Yee.

PROFESSOR BROOKE
14 Oct.: `The search for extra-terrestrial life: some historical and theological perspectives.'

DR T. KEMP
28 Oct.: `Explanatory theories in palaeobiology: or how science copes with history.'

PROFESSOR R. TRIGG, Warwick
11 Nov.: `Must we privatise religion?—religion and science in the public sphere.'

PROFESSOR N. CARTWRIGHT, LSE
25 Nov.: `No God, no laws.'


INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING

The following research seminars will be held at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in the IAUL Seminar Room, Level 2, Littlegate House, St Ebbe's. Those wishing to attend are asked to contact Harriet Dunbar-Goddet (telephone: Oxford (2)86824, e-mail: harriet.dunbar-goddet@learning.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR D. BOUD, Sydney
14 Oct.: `Aligning assessment with long-term learning needs.'

DR P. DENICOLO, Reading
4 Nov.: `Teaching and learning research: challenging pervasive metaphors.'

DR J. VERMUNT, Utrecht
11 Nov.: `How students, teachers, and student teachers learn: similarities and differences.'

DR M. MCLEAN
18 Nov.: `The professionalisation of university teaching: what can Habermas offer?'

DR A. BREW, Sydney
25 Nov.: `Is research higher degree supervision teaching, or is it research? Does it matter?'

DR B. JOHNSTON
2 Dec.: `The ESRC criticality project: theory and outcomes.'


ROTHERMERE AMERICAN INSTITUTE

Power in American politics

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Rothermere American Institute.

Conveners: Professor Desmond King and Dr Nigel Bowles.

DR BOWLES
12 Oct.: `Presidential power reconsidered.'

DR W. MACMILLAN
19 Oct.: `Redistricting Michigan; maps, computers, and the public interest.'

DR F. ROSS, Bristol
26 Oct.: `Party competition and the Welfare State reform agenda in the US and Britain.'

DR I. PARMA
2 Nov.: `Think-tanks and power in US foreign policy: the cases of the CFR and Project for a New American Century.'

DR D. JAENICKE, Manchester, and DR A. WADDAN, Sunderland
9 Nov.: `President Bush and social policy: the strange case of prescription drugs.'

PROFESSOR R. PIOUS, Barnard College, Columbia
Fri. 19 Nov.: `The war on terror and presidential prerogative.'

PROFESSOR J. ZIMMERMAN, SUNY
23 Nov.: `The United States federal system: a kaleidoscopic view.'

DR J. HERBERT, Keele
30 Nov.: `Strategy, public policy, and the US presidency.'


Other lectures

The following lectures will be given as shown in the Rothermere American Institute.

DONALD PEASE, Dartmouth College, will lecture at 5.15 p.m. on Wednesday, 20 Oct.

Subject: `Walt Whitman.'


LESTER FRIEDMAN, Northwestern University, will lecture on Thursday, 25 November (time to be announced).

Subject: `Steven Spielberg.'

 


PHILIP MANGANO, The United States Interagency Council on Homelessness, and TERRIE ALAFAT, Office of the Deputy Prime Minister, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 21 October.

Subject: `Housing the homeless.' (Transatlantic Dialogue in Public Policy)

 


SUZI LEATHER, Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, and KIRSTEN MOORE, The Reproductive Health Technologies Project, Washington DC, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 16 November.

Subject: `Regulating reproductive health.'


Conference: The United States and Global Human Rights

This three-day international conference will be held from Thursday, 11 November until Saturday, 13 November. Speakers include MICHAEL IGNATIEFF, Harvard, GAY MCDOUGALL, Global Rights, MICHAEL FREEMAN, Essex, DAVID CHANDLER, Westminster. Advance registration is required. Registration forms are available at www.rai.ox.ac.uk or from cheryl.hudson@rai.ox.ac.uk.


Film Screenings: `Reel Subversion': Movies, Censorship, and Mexican American Radicalism in Film

The following series of film screenings with introductory talks will be shown on Thursdays at 5 p.m.

28 Oct.: Alambrista (with an introduction by NICK J. CULL, Leicester)

4 Nov.: Salt of the Earth (with an introduction by ELIZABETH JACOBS, London)

11 Nov.: Zoot Suit (with an introduction by ELIZABETH JACOBS, London)


US Election Night Panel and Party: Bush v. Kerry

The panel, which is jointly presented by the Oxford Union and Democrats Abroad (Oxford Chapter), will take place at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 2 November, at the Oxford Union. Speakers include JOEL SILBEY, Harmsworth Visiting Professor 2004þ5, and MICHAEL GOVE, Saturday Editor of The Times. Chaired by GILLIAN PEELE, Fellow and Tutor in Politics, LMH. This will be followed by an Election Returns Party until late.


CENTRE FOR BRAZILIAN STUDIES

Seminars

The following seminars will be held on Tuesdays at 5 p.m. at the Centre for Brazilian Studies, 92 Woodstock Road.

PROFESSOR M. LAPLANE, Universidade Estadual de Campinas
12 Oct.: `The evolution of Brazilian industry since 1990.'

PROFESSOR L. A. DOS SANTOS SENNA, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul
19 Oct.: `Private sector participation in the provision of Brazilian roads.'

MR A. CARVALHO
26 Oct.: `State government, education reform and democracy in Brazil.'

DR K. VON METTENHEIM, DR M. A. DEL TEDESCO LINS, Sao Paulo, MR A. R. BONO OLENSCKI, Sao Paulo
2 Nov.: Seminar Round Table: `The 2004 municipal elections in Brazil: results and implications.'

DR M. DOCTOR, Reading
9 Nov.: `EU–Mercosul economic relations: implications for Brazilian trade flows and investments.'

MS C. BARRETO, Sao Paulo
16 Nov.: `New challenges in Amazonian archaeology: research and exhibitions.'

PROFESSOR P. EVANS, University of California, Berkeley
23 Nov.: To be announced.

DR M. CONDE
30 Nov.: `Locating the belle époque of Brazilian cimena.'


One-Day Workshops

Friday, 5 Nov.: `The politics of federal government banking in Brazil.'

Convener: Dr K. von Mettenheim.

Venue and Program to be announced. Pre-registration required at enquiries@brazil.ox.ac.uk or on 01865 284460.


Monday, 15 Nov.: `Assessing the impact of industrial development policies: the case of the Mercosul auto industry.'

Conveners: Professor M. Laplane and Dr M. Doctor.

Program to be announced. This workshop will be held in the Dahrendorf Room, St Antony's. Pre-registration required at enquiries@brazil.ox.ac.uk or on 01865 284460.


SAID BUSINESS SCHOOL

Finance Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursday in Lecture Theatre 5, West Wing, the Saïd Business School. For further details e-mail: professorial.secretary@sbs.ox.ac.uk.

Convener: Dimitrios P. Tsomocos.

PROFESSOR C.D. ALIPRANTIS, Purdue
14 Oct.: `Some applications of Riesz spaces to economics, finance, and econometrics.'

PROFESSOR H. SABOURIAN, Cambridge
21 Oct.: `Herd behaviour in financial models with sequential trades.'

PROFESSOR F. CORNELLI, London Business School
28 Oct.: `Investor sentiment and pre-issue markets.'

PROFESSOR M. HABIB, Montpellier II
4 Nov.: `The role of know-how acquisition in the formation and duration of joint ventures.'

PROFESSOR H. HAU, INSEAD
11 Nov.: To be announced.

R. REPULLO, CEMFI
18 Nov.: `Policies for banking crises: a theoretical framework.'

PROFESSOR M. HELLWIG, Mannheim
25 Nov.: `On the treatment of capital in cost- oriented access price regulation in network industries.'

M. PAGANO
2 Dec.: To be announced.


`Building a Business' Course

A series of eight lectures in basic business skills will be held on Tuesdays at 5.30 p.m. at the Saïd Business School, Park End Street, beginning on 9 November. The lectures will be open to all members of the University and local science and technology businesses. For more information and to reserve a place, see www.science-enterprise.ox.ac.uk.


BYZANTINE STUDIES

Byzantine Studies Seminar

The following seminars are held on Tuesdays at 5 p.m. in the New Seminar Room, St John's.

Conveners: Professor E. Jeffreys, Dr J. Howard- Johnston, and Dr M. Mango.

DR P. FRANKOPAN
12 Oct.: `Kinship and the distribution of power in Komnenian Byzantium.'

DR J. JOHNS, DR Y. RAPOPORT, and DR E. SAVAGE-SMITH
19 Oct.: `The Aegean or the Black Sea? Unidentified harbours in the Book of Curiosities compiled 1020-þ1050 AD.'

PROFESSOR J. FRANCE, Swansea
26 Oct.: `Our continent this side the sea: Europe and Byzantium.'

L. SCHACHNER
2 Nov.: `Wine-production in the early monasteries of Egypt and the Levant: a multidisciplinary approach.'

C. ENTWISTLE, British Museum
9 Nov.: `Byzantine weights of late antiquity.'

E. KHAMIS
16 Nov.: `The transition between Byzantine and early Islamic weighing systems, from evidence at Bet Shean/Scythopolis.'

DR D. KOROBEINIKOV
23 Nov.: `How Asia Minor was lost. The Byzantines and the Turks in 1040–1081.'

PROFESSOR D. PHILLIPSON
30 Nov.: `The significance of Aksumite ivory and ivory-carving.'


CENTRE FOR CRIMINOLOGY

The following seminars will be held on Wednesdays at 5 p.m. in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

Convener: Professor A. Ashworth.

K. DALY, Griffith University, Australia
20 Oct.: `Restorative justice and sexual assault.'

P. O'MALLEY, Carleton University, Canada
3 Nov.: `The uncertain promise of risk.'

R. MCGLASSON, Capital Habeas Unit, Federal Defender Program of Atlanta, Georgia
17 Nov.: `Defeating the politics of the US death penalty with international law and beyond.'

J. L. NOLAN, Williams-Exeter Programme and Williams College
1 Dec.: `Problem-solving courts: a comparative study of a legal transplant.'


OXFORD CENTRE FOR HEBREW AND JEWISH STUDIES

David Patterson Seminars

The David Patterson Seminars will be given at 8 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor.

Convener: Dr Joseph Sherman.

The OCHJS minibus will leave the Playhouse, Beaumont Street, at 6.40 and 7.30 p.m., and will return from Yarnton at 9.45 p.m. A single fare costs £1.60 (students £1.20).

DR R. RASKIN, Aarhus
13 Oct.: `A child at gunpoint: a case study in the life of a photo.'

T. ARGOV
20 Oct.: `Losing the (Israeli) plot: contemporary Israel in the prose of Orly Kastel-Bloom.'

PROFESSOR R. HIEBERT, Trinity Western University, Canada
27 Oct.: `The Septuagint as a reflection of its Hellenistic Jewish context.'

PROFESSOR S. PARUSSA, Wellesley College
3 Nov.: `Hybridism of sounds: Primo Levi between Judaism and literature.'

PROFESSOR G. TRODESCHINI, Trieste
10 Nov.: `Representing medieval Jewish usurers: from a theological to an economic vocabulary.'

DR J. MIDDLEMAS
17 Nov.: `The geber's correction in Lamentations 3 as proto-Midrash.'

M. NEVADER
24 Nov.: ` "Appoint a king to govern us, like other nations"—the problem with kingship in the Hebrew Bible.'

DR S. SELA, Bar-Ilan
1 Dec.: `The twelfth-century Renaissance of the Hebrew language: strategies for the creation of a new scientific Hebrew terminology.'


Isaiah Berlin Public Lecture in Middle East Dialogue

DR M. LEDEEN, American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research, will deliver an Isaiah Berlin Lecture in Middle East Dialogue at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 28 October, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `America's mission in the Middle East.'


WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE

The history of modern medicine: national and international perspectives

The following seminars will be given at 2.15 p.m. on Mondays in the Wellcome Unit, 45 Banbury Road.

Convener: Dr Mark Harrison.

M. WORBOYS, Manchester
11 Oct.: `Mad dogs and Lancastrians: rabies, Pasteur, and the Chief Constable of Clitheroe, c.1890.'

C. LOW
18 Oct.: `Khoisan healing practices.'

M. FEDUNKIW, Toronto
25 Oct.: `British women doctors in World War I: finding a way to serve in Serbia and the case of Dr Dorothy Maude.'

S. BHATTACHARYA, UCL
1 Nov.: `WHO-led or WHO-managed? A reassessment of the nature of the Indian National Smallpox Eradication Programme, c.1960–77.'

K. MAGLEN
8 Nov.: `Quarantined: the experience of incarceration under quarantine.'

P. CHAKRABARTI
15 Nov.: `Hospital medicine in eighteenth- century India: the East India Company's establishment at Fort St George, Madras.'

M. HULVERSCHEIDT, Heidelberg
22 Nov.: `Malaria research in Germany during World War II.'

M. FUKUDA, Nagoya
29 Nov.: `The history of lock hospitals in Japan.'


OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC STUDIES

The Ulama in society and history

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, George Street.

PROFESSOR R. BULLIET, Columbia
13 Oct.: `Kindred souls: the parallel evolution of the Ulama and the Latin clergy.'

DR A. CHRISTMANN, Manchester
20 Oct.: `Sufism and politics in modern Syria: the case of Muhammad Sa'id Ramadan al-Buti.'

DR M. ZEGHAL, CNRS, Paris, and Chicago
3 Nov.: `Do religious institutions matter? The Ulama of al-Azhar in contemporary Egypt.'

PROFESSOR A. RAHNEMA, American University of Paris
10 Nov.: `Ayatollah versus ayatollah: the battle between Boroujerdi and Kashani in the Iranian oil nationalisation crisis of the 1950s.'

PROFESSOR F. ROBINSON, Royal Holloway College, University of London
Thur. 18 Nov.: `The creativity of South Asian Ulama since 1800 and its significance.'

DR R. LOIMEIER, Bayreuth
24 Nov.: `Old Ulama, new Ulama, and the translation of the Qur'an in sub-Saharan Africa.'

PROFESSOR U. FREITAG, Free University, Berlin
1 Dec.: `The mufti and the orientalist: cultural contact in Mecca in the late nineteenth century.'


NISSAN INSTITUTE OF JAPANESE STUDIES

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Dahrendorf Room, Founder's Building, St Antony's College. The Dahrendorf Room will be open from 4.45 p.m. Those travelling to Oxford are advised to telephone the Nissan Secretary earlier in the day on 01865 274570, in case there has been a cancellation.

Convener: A. Waswo.

DR P. HILL
11 Oct.: `The Matsuoka-kai of Kabuki- chô: profile of a contemporary yakuza group.'

PROFESSOR F. NAGAI, Osaka
18 Oct.: `Japanese foreign policy towards southeast Asia since the end of the Cold War.'

DR L. MARTINEZ, SOAS
25 Oct.: `Hollywood genealogies: or, the curious case of Kurosawa and the "Rashomon technique".'

MR T. KUNIYOSHI, LSE
1 Nov.: `Britain and the question of Japan's security, 1947–51.'

DR M. TREVOR (formerly EU–Japan Centre for Industrial Co- operation, Tokyo)
8 Nov.: `Is Japanese business changing? A historical and political view.'

PROFESSOR A. YAMANAKA, United Nations University, Tokyo
15 Nov.: `Japan's role in international peace- building efforts.'

DR J. CORBETT, Nissan Institute
22 Nov.: `Where has all my money gone? Policy towards cross-border electronic finance in the APEC region.'

PROFESSOR A. WAKISAKA, Gakushuin University
29 Nov.: `Family-friendly companies in Japan.'


INSTITUTO CAMOES CENTRE FOR PORTUGUESE LANGUAGE

Reopening of the Centre

ENGO. LUÍS DOS SANTOS FERRO, Director of the Luso-American Foundation, Lisbon, will give a lecture to mark the reopening of the Centre at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 28 October, in the Okinaga Room, Wadham College. The lecture will be delivered in English. The Vice-Chancellor (or his deputy) and H.E. The Portuguese Ambassador will be present at the lecture, which will be followed by a reception.

Convener: Dr Teresa Pinto Coelho (St John's), Director of the Centre.

 

Subject: `Lisbon and Eça de Queirós.'


QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

Development Economics Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

As details may be subject to change, those wishing to attend are asked to check on www2.qeh.ox.ac.uk/teaching/seminars.html near to the advertised time of the seminar.

Conveners: Rosemary Thorp, Sanjaya Lall, Peter Evans, and Eva-Lotta Hedman.

PROFESSOR P. EVANS, Berkeley; George Eastman Visiting Professor
14 Oct.: `Neo-liberalism as a political opportunity: constraint and innovation in contemporary development strategy.'

MRS THORP
21 Oct.: `The role of the state and development: insights from the Latin American case.'

PROFESSOR LALL
28 Oct.: `Revisiting the fole of government in industrialisation in an era of globalisation.'

DR HEDMAN
4 Nov.: `Contesting state and civil society in south-east Asia.'

PROFESSOR J.T. SIDEL, LSE
11 Nov.: ` "Local strongmen" and local state capture in an era of globalisation and democratisation.'

DR J. ALEXANDER
18 Nov.: `Crime and the settler state: space, race, and labour in interwar Rhodesia.'

DR H.-J. CHANG, Cambridge
25 Nov.: `The demise of the developmental state in South Korea.'

DR V. FITZGERALD
2 Dec.: `Taxation, capital accumulation, and development.'


International Gender Studies Centre

The search for common ground: the role of women in conflict resolution

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

Conveners: Dr Paula Heinonen, Dr Janette Davies, and Rachel S. Harris.

J. CHAMPENOIS, Geneva
14 Oct.: `Can film provide a common ground or an alternative medium for transnational feminist(s') dialogue?'

A. ADRIAN-PAUL, International Alert
21 Oct.: `Women, peace, and security: challenges faced by refugee and internally displaced women.'

J. BURDA, Geneva
28 Oct.: `Women NGOs' role in improving the impact of international trade liberalisation on women's lives.'

PROFESSOR J. OKELY, Oxford Brookes
4 Nov.: `Gendered aspect of conflict resolution among traveller gypsies in the UK.'

B. NUMAN, Cyprus International University
11 Nov.: `The transition from peace activism to the uncivil grounds of party politics: journey of Turkish Cypriot peace activist women.'

DR M. HULME, Liverpool
18 Nov.: `When does violence become acceptable? The gendered dynamics of tolerance in San Salvador.'

H. SUMMERFIELD, development and human rights consultant
25 Nov.: `The flux of women's status and identity during war and its aftermath.'

DR J. WALDREN
2 Dec.: `The politics of being a woman in Bosnia.'


Refugee Studies Centre

Public seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

Further information may be obtained from Dominique Attala, Refugee Studies Centre, Queen Elizabeth House, 21 St Giles', Oxford OX1 3LA (e-mail: rscmst@qeh.ox.ac.uk). Updates and amendments will be found at www.rsc.ox.ac.uk.

DR D. JAMES, LSE
20 Oct.: `Gaining lost ground? Property, patronage, and citizenship in South Africa's land reform programme.'

DR T. MANN, Australian Refugee Association
27 Oct.: `Asylum seekers at Woomera and the Australian response.'

DR A. MONSUTTI, Geneva
3 Nov.: `Beyond the figures of refugee and migrant: the case of Hazara networks between Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Iran.'

DR C. PHUONG, Newcastle
10 Nov.: `The removal of failed asylum seekers.'

DR D. ROMANO, McGill
17 Nov.: `Whose house is this anyhow? IDP and refugee return in post-Saddam Iraq.'

DR C. HORST, Amsterdam
24 Nov.: `Forced transnationalism? The links between Somalis in East Africa and the wider diaspora.'

DR J. CHATTERJEE, LSE
1 Dec.: `Refugee agency and government policy: the case of Bengali refugees in India, 1947–50.'


Harrell-Bond Lecture

PROFESSOR B. ANDERSON, Cornell, will deliver the Harrell-Bond Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 13 October, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `National citizenship, private property, and domestic migration: witches' brew?'


Weekend workshop: Cross-cultural psychology, forced migration, and peace-building

A weekend workshop on this subject will be held during Michaelmas Term. The instructors will be Dr Michael Wessells, Randolph-Macon College, and Dr Maryanne Loughry, RSC Research Associate. Further information may be obtained from Dominique Attala (see contact details above).


CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES

Socio-legal approaches to law and development

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Mondays in Seminar Room D, the Manor Road Building.

Convener: Dr Tobias Kelly.

PROFESSOR P. MCAUSLAN, Birkbeck College, London
11 Oct.: `In the beginning was the law ... an intellectual Odyssey.'

PROFESSOR B. HARRISS-WHITE
18 Oct.: `De- and re-regulating business in rural West Bengal: capitalism under the left front.'

PROFESSOR J. FAUNDEZ, Warwick
25 Oct.: `Why has the law and development movement failed to revive?'

DR A. MANJI, Warwick
1 Nov.: `The rebirth of law and development: a feminist critique.'

L.-H. PIRON, Overseas Development Institute
8 Nov.: `Donors' approaches to justice sector reform.'


ALL SOULS COLLEGE

Evans-Pritchard Lectures 2004

DR KEITH BROWN, Watson Institute for International Studies, Brown University, will deliver the Evans-Pritchard Lectures at 5 p.m. on the days shown in the Old Library, All Souls College.

Tue. 19 Oct.: `History, anthropology, and the archival imagination.'

Wed. 20 Oct.: `The horizons of the peasant: rethinking fatalism.'

Tue. 26 Oct.: `Circuits, symbols, and solidarity.'

Wed. 27 Oct.: `The architecture of loyalty.'

Tue. 2 Nov.: `From past to future: the translation of tradition.'

Wed. 3 Nov.: `The grammar of feud, the logic of terror.'


BALLIOL COLLEGE

Oliver Smithies Lectures

Reform of the International Monetary Fund

DR TIMOTHY LANE, International Monetary Fund, will deliver the first series of Oliver Smithies Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination Schools.

Tue. 9 Nov.: `Tensions in the role of the IMF.'

Thur. 11 Nov.: `Directions for reform of the IMF.'


Modelling and simulation issues in computational cell biology

PROFESSOR KEVIN BURRAGE, University of Queensland, will deliver the second series of Oliver Smithies Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following Wednesdays in the Lecture Theatre, the Computing Laboratory.

24 Nov.: `Overview.'

1 Dec.: `Stochastic modelling and simulation.'


CHRIST CHURCH

CHARLES NICHOLL, biographer of Leonardo da Vinci, will lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Monday, 11 October, in the Christ Church Picture Gallery. To accompany the talk, drawings by Leonardo will be on display in the gallery.

Subject: `Leonardo da Vinci—the flights of the mind.'


GREEN COLLEGE

McGovern Annual Lecture in the History of Medicine

PROFESSOR VIVIAN NUTTON, Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine, University College London, will deliver the McGovern Annual Lecture in the History of Medicine at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 28 October, in the E.P. Abraham Lecture Theatre, Green College.

Subject: `To dissect or not to dissect? Some ancient responses to a modern dilemma.'


LADY MARGARET HALL AND SOMERVILLE COLLEGE

Education Conference: what are universities for?

On Saturday, 16 October, to conclude their 125th anniversary celebrations, Somerville College and Lady Margaret Hall are jointly holding a one-day conference. At this conference the wider issues surrounding universities will be addressed. Speakers, including PROFESSOR D. EYRE, National Academy for Gifted and Talented Youth, PROFESSOR S. IVERSEN, Planning and Resource Allocation, and PROFESSOR A. WOLF, London, will offer their different views on the role of universities in contemporary society; on the place of universities in the education system, and on strategies that they should be pursuing in the 21st century. To reserve a place, please contact the Development Office, Somerville College, Oxford OX2 6HD. Tel.: 01865 280626.


MANSFIELD COLLEGE AND BALLIOL COLLEGE

Adam von Trott Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR T. GARTON ASH will deliver the Adam von Trott Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 30 November, in the chapel, Mansfield College.

Subject: `Are there moral foundations of European power?'


ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

Asian Studies Centre

Special Seminar

GEERT VAN DER LINDEN, Asian Development Bank, SHAMSHAD AKHTAR, Asian Development Bank, and DR JENNY CORBETT will hold a special seminar on Friday, 29 October, at 5 p.m., in the Dahrendorf Room, Founder's Building, St Antony's College. For more information, please e-mail asian@sant.ox.ac.uk or telephone 01865 274559.

Conveners: Dr M. Rebick and T. Cullen.

 

Subject: `Integration, governance and the economic and social transformation of Asian economics.'

 


South Asian History Seminars

The following seminars will be held on Tuesdays at 2 p.m. in the Deakin Room, Founder's Building, St Antony's College. For more information, please e-mail asian@sant.ox.ac.uk or telephone 01865 274559.

Convener: Dr D. A. Washbrook.

 

DR J. CHATTERJI, LSE
12 Oct.: `Graveyards and ghettos: Muslims in West Bengal, 1947–67.'

DR S. MUKHERJEE, Sydney
19 Oct.: `Images and realities: nineteenth-century Calcutta in Bengali literature, 1818–1910.'

PROFESSOR T. MIZUSHIMA, Tokyo
26 Oct.: `From Mirasi to Patta: changes of social grammar in South India between the 1770s and 1870s.'

D. PRICE
2 Nov.: `The illusion of omnipotence: revenue administration and the `Punjab tradition' in the nineteenth century.'

Y. KHAN
9 Nov.: `Out of control? Understanding partition violence.'

H. BELLENOIT
16 Nov.: `Missionary education, knowledge and North Indian society, c.1880–1915.'

PROFESSOR C. FULLER AND H. NARASIMHAN, LSE
23 Nov.: `Globalisation, information technology and the middle class in Chennai (Madras).'

PROFESSOR P. ROBB, SOAS
30 Nov.: `Children, emotion and identity: views from the Blechyndens' Calcutta diaries (1790–1822).


European Studies Centre

Europe: what kind of power?

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Seminar Room, the European Studies Centre, 70 Woodstock Road. The series has been organised jointly with the Maison Française and the Department of Politics and International Relations.

Convener: Dr J. Zielonka.

PROFESSOR T. SNYDER, Yale
12 Oct.: `Power politics in Eastern Europe: past and present.'

PROFESSOR B. LAFFAN, Dublin: `Organising power in Europe: multilevel governance.' M. VAN ORANJE, Director, EU Affairs, Open Society Foundation, London
26 Oct.: `Europe as a normative power.' (To be confirmed)

G. ANDRÉANI, Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Paris
2 Nov.: `Europe as a diplomatic power.'

F. HEISBOURG, Director, Fondation pour la Recherche Stratégique, Paris
9 Nov.: `Europe as a military power.'

PROFESSOR A. SAPIR, European Commission
16 Nov.: `Europe as an economic power.'

I. KRASTEV, Director, Centre for Liberal Strategies, Sofia
23 Nov.: `What kind of power appeals to Eastern Europe? EU versus US.'


Eastern Europe under Communist rule

PROFESSOR RICHARD CRAMPTON will lecture at 2.15 p.m. on Thursdays, weeks 1–8, in St Antony's College.


Workshop

A workshop, convened by Knick Harley, will be held on Thursday, 21 October, 2–5 p.m., and on Friday, 22 October, 9 a.m.–5 p.m.


Conference: Entente Cordiale

A conference, convened by Dr Kalypso Nicolaïdis and Professor Alexis Tadié, will be held on 6 and 7 December in the Lecture Theatre, the Nissan Institute.


Other lectures

PROFESSOR NORMAN DAVIES and PROFESSOR TIMOTHY SNYDER will lecture at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, 13 October, in the European Studies Centre.

Subject: `Where on earth does Europe end?' (Centre Evening)


H.E. BERNARD R. BOT, Foreign Minister, the Netherlands, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 1 December, in the Lecture Theatre, the Nissan Institute.

Subject: `What should be European foreign policy?'


TOD LINDBERG, Stanford University, KALYPSO NICOLAÏDIS, and TIMOTHY GARTON ASH will hold a discussion at 2.15 p.m. on Thursday, 28 October, in the Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

Subject: `When Mars met Venus: the crisis in transatlantic relations and the US elections'.


Russian and Eurasian Studies Centre

Twenty years of political change: the USSR and Russia, 1985–2004

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

Convener: Professor Archie Brown.

PROFESSOR BROWN
11 Oct.: `Institutions, ideas, interests, and leadership in the Soviet and Russian transition.'

DR L. SHEVTSOVA, Carnegie Moscow Center
18 Oct.: `Comparing Yeltsin and Putin as leaders.'

SIR RODRIC BRAITHWAITE, British Ambassador to Moscow, 1988–92
25 Oct.: `The view across the river, 1988–92.'

DR W. SMIRNOV, Institute of State and Law, Moscow
1 Nov.: `Civil society in post-Soviet Russia.'

DR J. HUGHES, LSE
8 Nov.: `Federalism in post-Soviet Russia: from accommodation to control?.'

DR A. GRACHEV, Paris and Moscow
15 Nov.: `The rise and fall of the new political thinking.'

MS TINA PODPLATNIK, Moscow
22 Nov.: `Big business and the state under Yeltsin and Putin.'

DR A. LEDENEVA, University College London
29 Nov.: `Informal politics in Russia in the 1990s.'


Economics of transition

The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the New Room, the Hilda Besse Building, St Antony's College. Further information may be obtained from Dr Carol Leonard (e-mail: carol.leonard@sant.ox.ac.uk).

Conveners: Dr Carol Leonard, Dr A. Chawluk, and Dr Linda Yueh.

PROFESSOR D. DYKER, Sussex
12 Oct.: `Foreign direct investment and productivity enhancement in Central–East Europe.'

DR S. COMMANDER, EBRD and London Business School
19 Oct.: `Explaining unemployment and its persistence in the transition countries: some conjectures.' (With Janos Kollo and Andre Tolstopiatenko)

DR K. SCHOORS, Ghent
26 Oct.: `Bank supervision Russian-style: rules versus enforcement.'

DR WING THYE WOO, California (Davis) and Columbia
2 Nov.: `The poverty challenge for China in the new millennium.'

DR T. MICKIEWICZ and DR C. GERRY, University College, London
9 Nov.: `Privatisation and employment growth. Panel data results for Polish large companies, 1996–2002.'

PROFESSOR S. ESTRIN, London Business School
16 Nov.: `Privatisation methods and economic growth in transition economics.'

C.M. WATSON, adviser, European Commission
23 Nov.: `Eastern Europe after enlargement: is convergence a safe bet?'

PROFESSOR M. SHAFFER, Heriot-Watt
30 Nov.: `The evolution of the structure of markets and industries in transition Russia.'


ST CROSS COLLEGE AND ALL SOULS COLLEGE

St Cross–All Souls Lectures

Who owns objects? The ethics and legality of collecting

Unless otherwise indicated, the following lectures will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Dining Hall, St Cross College.

The series will conclude with an all-day workshop, to be held on 6 December in All Souls College. Registration forms for this will be available at the lectures.

Further information may be obtained from Roz Britton-Strong (e-mail: coin- room@ashmus.ox.ac.uk).

Conveners: Luke Treadwell, St Cross College; Eleanor Robson, All Souls College; and Christopher Gosden, St Cross College.

PROFESSOR LORD (COLIN) RENFREW
11 Oct.: `Collecting and looting in the past: the effects of self-indulgence.'

DR L. AL-GAILANI
18 Oct.: `Archaeological theft in Iraq.'

DR K. POLITIS
25 Oct., Pitt Rivers Museum Research Centre (64 Banbury Road): `The political and economic realities of looting ancient sites.'

DR U. KAMPMANN
1 Nov.: `Dealing in coins: problems and opportunities for a serious and responsible coin trade.'

DR D. GAIMSTER
8 Nov.: `UK government measures against the illicit trade: examining the new regulatory framework.'

G. ORTIZ
15 Nov.: `Overview and assessment after fifty years of collecting in a changing world.'

DR P. ROBERTS
22 Nov.: `Barriers or bridges? Museums and acquisitions in the light of new legal and voluntary codes.'

DR M. O'NEILL 29 Nov.: `Repatriation and its discontents: the Glasgow experience.'


ST PETER'S COLLEGE

Intellectual Property Research Centre

Intellectual Property in the New Millenium

The following seminars are held on Tuesdays at 5 p.m. in the Latner Room at St Peter's College.

L. KIM TREIGER-BAR-AM
19 Oct.: `The moral right of integrity: a freedom of expression.'

D. GHANGJEE
26 Oct.: `The name blame game (or "why are geographical indications so controversial")?'

A. PANAGOPOULOS, Bristol
2 Nov.: `The effects of firm size in reaching an out-of-court settlement.'

DR A. WYATT, Melbourne and Intellectual Property Research Institute of Australia
9 Nov.: `Evaluating IPO Incentives and Prospects using prospectus and IP data.'

DR C. MACLEOD, Bristol
16 Nov.: `No patent system, no industrial revolution.'

DR J. PILA
23 Nov.: `Software patenting in Europe: the battle over article 52(2) of the EPC.'

DR M. T. SUNDARA RAJAN
30 Nov.: `Copyright and creative freedom: are moral rights the future of copyright law?'


WOLFSON COLLEGE

Ronald Syme Lecture

PROFESSOR WERNER ECK, Institut für Altertumskunde, University of Cologne, will deliver the annual Ronald Syme Lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 28 October, in the Hall, Wolfson College. The lecture is open to the public.

Subject: `Augustus' Germany: a new province is born.'


REGENT'S PARK COLLEGE

Measure for Measure: The idea of Justice in Literature, Religion and Law

The following public lectures will be held on Tuesdays at 5 p.m. at Regent's Park College.

PROFESSOR P. FIDDES
19 Oct.: `Law and divine mercy in Shakespeare: a study of The Merchant of Venice and Measure for Measure.'

PROFESSOR P. WELLER, Derby
26 Oct.: `Whose justice from which perspective? Sex, blasphemy, religion and law: The Satanic Verses controversy in retrospect.'

DR W. WAGNER, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC
2 Nov.: `The law as `measure of misfit': law and grace in the fiction of Flannery O'Connor.

PROFESSOR G. PATTISON
9 Nov.: `Psychology, mercy and punishment: aspects of criminal justice in Dostoevsky's writing.'

DR A. GEAREY, Birkbeck College, London
16 Nov.: `James Joyce's epiphanies of justice.'

V. HOBSON, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris
23 Nov.: `Transgression and redemption in Hugo's Les Misérables.'

M. ARISTODEMOU, Birkbeck College, London
30 Nov.: `Kafka: Women on the verge of law and religion.'


ROYAL STATISTICAL SOCIETY, OXFORD BRANCH

The following seminars are held on Wednesdays at 4.30 p.m. in the Royal Statistical Society, Oxford Branch, Abraham Lecture Theatre, Green College. Tea will be served in the bar at 4 p.m.

PROFESSOR S. LAURITZEN
27 Oct.: `Bayesian networks for DNA identification.'

DR C. HOLMES
24 Nov.: `Statistical issues in the analysis of gene expression profiles obtained from microarrays.'


OXFORD ASIAN TEXTILE GROUP

G. IRVINE will lecture at 6.15 p.m. on Wednesday, 20 October, in the Pauling Centre, 58 Banbury Road. Non-members are welcome to attend the lecture (admission £2).

Subject: `Bu-no-mai: the military dances of Bugaku.'


OXFORD ITALIAN ASSOCIATION

Lectures

Unless otherwise indicated, the following lectures will be given at 7.45 for 8 p.m. on the days shown in the Mary Ogilvie Theatre, St Anne's College. Admission costs £1 for members, £3 for non-members (students under thirty admitted free).

The meetings are open to the public. For further information contact the Hon. Secretary (telephone: Oxford 377479, e-mail: pmilner@clara.net), or the Membership Secretary (telephone: Oxford 865476).

DR O.V. SAMUELS
Wed. 13 Oct.: `Ideal cities and Italian Renaissance city planning.'

PROFESSOR A. CAESAR
Tue. 16 Nov., Pauling Human Sciences Centre, 58 Banbury Road: `The rise of the modern Italian novel and its readers.'

M. WHITE
Wed. 1 Dec.: `Vivaldi: true or false?'

 

Informal meeting

Tue. 26 Oct.: conversazione and pizza at the Mamma Mia Pizzeria, South Parade, Summertown, from 7 p.m. Contact the Hon. Secretary for further information (see contact details above).


OXFORD BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY

DR I. CHRISTIE-MILLER will lecture at 5.15 p.m. on Thursday, 14 October, in the Taylor Institution. All members of the University are welcome to attend.

Subject: `Paper imaging as a bibliographical research tool.'


FRIENDS OF THE BODLEIAN

Thirty-minute lectures

The following thirty-minute lectures will be held at 1 p.m. on the days shown in the Cecil Jackson Room, the Sheldonian Theatre.

Wine and sandwiches will be served after the lectures at a cost of £4 per person, for which bookings should be made in advance with Geoffrey Groom, Secretary, Friends of the Bodleian, Bodleian Library, Oxford OX1 3BG (telephone: Oxford (2)77022, e-mail: fob@bodley.ox.ac.uk).

MISS L. FORBES and DR J. JOHNS
Wed. 20 Oct.: `The Bodleian Book of Curiosities: some answers and many new questions.'

DR G. WALKER
Wed. 10 Nov.: `Seven million volumes described: editing the new subject guide to the Bodleian's collections.'

MR J. ROBERTS
Tue 30 Nov.: `Does the Bodleian Library deserve John Selden (16 December 1584–30 November 1654)?'

 

Literary Evening

MICHAEL HOLROYD and JENNY UGLOW will read from and discuss their work, from 8 p.m. on Friday, 29 October, in the Holywell Music Room. The meeting will be followed by wine and an opportunity to talk to the speakers, in the ante-chapel, Wadham College.

Tickets, costing £20 (a limited number of tickets are available to students at £10), may be obtained on application to Geoffrey Groom, Secretary, Friends of the Bodleian, Bodleian Library, Oxford OX1 3BG (telephone: Oxford (2)77022, e-mail: fob@bodley.ox.ac.uk). Proceeds will go to the funds of the Friends of the Bodleian.

OXFORD INSTITUTE OF AGEING

Leslie Kirkley Fellowship

The Leslie Kirkley Fellowship, sponsored by HelpAge International, is awarded annually to individuals, from the less developed world, who have demonstrated great potential or even proven excellence, and who would not normally have the opportunity of working from within the University of Oxford. The fellowship is intended to provide financial support to enable the holder to undertake a period of study and work of intellectual, scientific, social or environmental value, and to share knowledge and experience within the field of ageing research, policy, or practice, at the Oxford Institute of Ageing, University of Oxford.

The funding allows for flights, accommodation, and subsistence, and the Institute provides host accommodation, Internet access, and supervision from the Director, Dr Sarah Harper, supporting the preparation of the fellow's paper. There is also opportunity to work with colleagues in similar fields.

The Leslie Kirkley Fellow should interact with, and benefit from, the network of centres and institutes at the University working in areas related to the research interests of the fellow. Visits may also be arranged to centres outside Oxford, including HelpAge International in London.

As the fellowship is limited to one term (April to June), it is essential that the fellow has a clearly defined research aim, within a realistic timeframe. It should be a clear aim that the fellowship concludes with publication of work in the Institute's series of Working Papers. Where possible, links between the Institute and the fellow will be maintained after termination of the fellowship.

Further details and an application form are available from the Institute Web site, http://www.ageing.ox.ac.uk. Completed applications should be forwarded to the Administrator, Oxford Institute of Ageing, Manor Road Buildings, Manor Road, Oxford OX1 3UQ as soon as possible, and no later than 30 November.


MICHAEL AND LOUISA VON CLEMM FOUNDATION INC., CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE, AND HARVARD UNIVERSITY

Michael von Clemm Fellowship 2005–6

Applications are invited for a Michael von Clemm Fellowship for study at Harvard University during the academic year 2005--6. The fellowship is in memory of Michael von Clemm (1935--97), who was a graduate of Harvard and a graduate student (and subsequently Honorary Fellow) of Corpus Christi College. It is open to undergraduates at the University of Oxford who will be entering their final year in October 2004 and also to those who will complete their degree in June 2004. It is intended to attract applicants of very high academic calibre and who have the personal qualities likely to conduce to success in a non-academic career. The holder will also be perceived (however informally) as an `ambassadorial' representative of Oxford at Harvard, and should be content with and capable of that role.

The successful applicant will spend a year at the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences as a Special Student following a course of study or research of his or her choice (subject to the availability of tuition or supervision at Harvard); he/she must apply to and be registered at that School and no other. The fellowship is not intended for those wishing to study vocational subjects, such as Business Administration or Law. Potential applicants are advised to look at the School Web site (www.gsas.harvard.edu), and should if possible list in their application the specific courses there which they hope to take.

The fellowship will meet the costs of all tuition at Harvard as well as travel between Boston and the UK and will provide an allowance sufficient to cover the costs of living at Harvard.

Those wishing to be considered should write to the College Secretary, Corpus Christi College, Oxford OX1 4JF (e-mail: college.office@ccc.ox.ac.uk), asking for further particulars and an application form, together with a copy of the information for referees. It is the responsibility of applicants to ask three referees to write directly to the same address. Completed application forms and references must reach the College Secretary not later than 22 October. Late or incomplete applications will not be considered.

It is expected that interviews will be held towards the end of November.

BY-ELECTIONS TO DIVISIONAL AND FACULTY BOARDS 4 November

Notice is given of the following impending vacancies:

Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board

(from among the members of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences working in the Mathematical Institute)

Resigning member: Professor M.B. Giles

Period of office: two years from Michaelmas Term 2004


Social Sciences Board

(from among the members of the Faculty of Social Sciences)

Resigning member: Professor A.F. Heath

Period of office: one year from Michaelmas Term 2004


Board of the Faculty of Modern History

(two from among the members of the Faculty of Modern History) Resigning members: Dr L.J. Abrams and Dr K.J. Humphries

Period of office: one year from Michaelmas Term 2004

Where it is specified in the above list that the candidates must be from among certain persons `working in' a department or other institution, both the candidates and the electors must be persons so working at the time of the election.

Nominations in writing, by two members (other than the candidate) of the electorate for each vacancy, which is the same as the persons from among whom the vacancy will be filled (as specified above), will be received by the Head of Student Administration at the University Offices, Wellington Square, up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 11 October, and similar nominations by six members of the electorate (other than the candidate) up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 18 October.

Council has decided that nominations should show for each signature the name and faculty, sub-faculty, or department (indicative of the relevant electorate) in block capitals. Any names which are not so shown may not be published. At least one nomination in respect of each candidate must be made on an official nomination form. Copies of the form are obtainable from the Web site.

In the event of a contested election, a brief biographical notice of each candidate will be published in the Gazette dated 28 October, and voters may wish to wait until they have read these notes before returning their ballot papers (which will be sent to members of the electorate as soon as possible after the closing date for nominations, and which, after completion, must be received by the Head of Student Administration not later than 4 p.m. on 4 November.


M.SC. IN BIOLOGY (INTEGRATIVE BIO-SCIENCE)

Examination deadlines 2004–5

The following deadlines will apply in 2004–5:

First Extended Essay: noon, 14 January 2005

Second Extended Essay: noon, 4 March 2005

Third Extended Essay: noon, 1 July 2005

First Research Project: noon, 8 April 2005

Second Research Project: noon, 26 August 2005

Practical Notebooks: noon, 2 September 2005

OBITUARY

Christ Church

SIR WILLIAM GRENVILLE PEEK, 14 September 2004; commoner 1938. Aged 84.


MEMORIAL MEETING

St Hugh's College

A Memorial Meeting for EDITH MCMORRAN, B.LITT., MA (L.-ÈS-L. Paris), Lecturer at St Hugh's College 1977--2001, will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Saturday, 23 October, in the Maplethorpe Bulding, St Hugh's College. Tea will be served after the meeting. To assist the college with seating arrangements, those wishing to attend the meeting are asked to inform Trish Carter in advance (telephone: Oxford (2)74958, e-mail: trish.carter@st-hughs.ox.ac.uk).


MEMORIAL SERVICE

Somerville College

A Memorial Service for AGATHA RAMM, MA, D.LITT. (MA London), F.R.HIST.S., formerly Tutor, Fellow, and Emeritus Fellow, will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 30 October, in the chapel, Somerville College.

Oxford University Newcomers' Club

The Club welcomes the wives, husbands and partners of visiting scholars, graduates and members of the University who are new to Oxford. It aims to offer help, advice and information, and the opportunity to meet others socially. Informal coffee mornings are held at 13 Norham Gardens every Wednesday 10.30 a.m.–12 noon except for two weeks at Christmas and Easter. Newcomers with children (0–4 years) meet every Friday in term 10.15 a.m.–12 noon. Other term-time activities include a Book Group, informal Conversation Group and tours to colleges, museums, and other places of interest, also country walks, garden trips and a visit to an antique centre. Second-hand items can be bought on Wednesday mornings 10.30 a.m.–12 noon from the equipment room. Visit our website: www.ox.ac.uk/staff.


Concert

Gala Concert. Oxford Welsh Male Voice Choir and special guests Risca Male Choir and soloist perform on Sat., 20 Nov., 7 p.m in Keble College Chapel. Tickets (£10/£9) available from Modern Music, High Street, Abingdon; Oxford Music Shop, St Aldates, Oxford; and Music Stand, High Street, Witney.


Exhibition

Nineteenth and Twentieth Century British Printmakers. Sanders of Oxford, in association with Hilary Gerrish and Neil Jennings Ltd, presents an exhibition of graphic works by important British printmakers including Bevan, Brangwyn, Nash, Nevinson, William Nicholson, Ravilious, Sickert and J.M.W. Turner. Free admission. Friday 1 Oct.–23 Oct. Mon–Sat., 10 a.m.–6p.m. 104 High Street, Oxford OX1 4BW. Tel.: 01865 242590. Email: SOXINFO@btclick.com. www.sandersofoxford.com.


Volunteers Sought

Would you be willing to take part in our studies on diet and blood fats? We are studying links between diet and heart disease. If you are healthy and aged 18–65 years, we would like to hear from you. Please contact Alex or Mary at OCDEM, Churchill Hospital. Tel.: 01865 857262. Email: enquiries@oxlip.ox.ac.uk.


Cafe Zouk

Mughal Indian cuisine: 1st floor, 135 High Street, Oxford. From our kitchen to your table, we would like to bring you herbs, spices, roots, beauty, fragrances and the Mughal tradition of passion for good food. Tel.: 01865 251600. Open: daily 12 p.m. to 2.30 p.m. and 5.30 p.m. to 11.30 p.m. Web site: http://www.cafezouk.co.uk.


Study Day

The Rediscovery of Ancient Egypt: The Pioneering Years. Bristol, Sat. 20 Nov. Full day: £25, half day: £15. Speakers include Dr Aidan Dodson (University of Bristol), John Ruffle (former Keeper of The Oriental Museum, University of Durham), Dr John Taylor (British Museum), Dr Patricia Usick (British Museum). All welcome. For booking form email R.Silvester@bristol.ac.uk or send SAE to Rosemary Silvester, 69 High Kingsdown, Bristol BS2 8EP.


St Giles' Thursday Lunchtime Talks

Please note new order of lectures: The Art of Writing: 14 Oct., Sneaking past the guard dogs: avoiding the enemies of writing, Salley Vickers; 21 Oct., Kiosks and obelisks: poems as structures, Jamie McKendrick; 28 Oct., The splinter of ice, Veronica Stallwood; 4 Nov., Writing the past: an Oxford childhood, Charlotte Mendelson; 11 Nov., Writing a crime novel, P.D. James; 18 Nov., Working with three prime ministers and the rest of the world, Douglas Hurd; 25 Nov., Writing the story of a life, Shirley du Boulay; 2 Dec., Speedy's dog: poetry and place, Henry Shukman; 9 Dec., Writing, reading: escape or engagement?, Tim Pears. The talks will be held at St Giles' Church at 12.30 p.m. Everyone is welcome. In order to help us with our costs, a small donation would be appreciated. www.st-giles-church.org.


Antiques Bought and Sold

Antiques and decorative objects bought and sold: desks and library furniture always wanted, also garden stonework and large gilt picture frames—any condition. Please call: Greenway Antiques, 90 Corn Street, Witney, Oxon. Open Mon.–Fri., 9.30 a.m.–5 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Tel.: 01993 705026, mobile: 07831 585014.


Periodicals Bought and Sold

Back-issues of scholarly periodicals and journals bought and sold. Graham Jeffrey, Periodicals (est. 1967), 29 Cuddesdon Road, Horspath, Oxford OX33 1JD. Tel.: 01865 872528, fax: 776398. E-mail: gjeffreysatu@aol.com.


Restoration and Conservation of Antique Furniture

John Hulme undertakes all aspects of restoration: 30 years' experience; collection and delivery. For free advice, telephone or write to: The Workshop, 11A High Street, Chipping Norton, Oxon. OX7 5AD. Tel.: 01608 641692.


D'Overbroeck's College Open Morning

Join us for our Open Morning on Sat., 16 Oct., from 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. for information on direct entry into Sixth Form, entry at age 13 (Year 9), and—starting in Sept. 2005—entry at age 11 (Year 7). This is an informal event which gives students and parents an opportunity to have a look at the College, meet our teaching staff and some of our current students. Based in North Oxford, d'Overbroeck's is one of the largest and most successful co-educational independent colleges in the UK. For further information about us, please contact the College Office on 01865 310000 or visit our website at www.doverbroecks.com.


Services Offered

Marshall & Galpin Solicitors, Family Department. We are an established Oxfordshire private client firm with offices in Oxford, Thame and Abingdon. We have seven specialist family lawyers who advise on a wide range of issues: divorce and separation, children, financial agreements on divorce, pre-nuptial agreements, cohabitee disputes, separation agreements and pensions. Our lawyers are members of the Solicitors Family Law Association. Two members of the team are Deputy District Judges and three are trained mediators. We offer a range of competitive rates and a short free initial interview. French, Spanish and Italian spoken. Other services provided by the firm include property adviceconveyancing, wills & probate, personal injury & medical negligence, employment and businesscommercial. For further information visit our web site at: www.marshallgalpin.com or contact Mary Wakem on 01865 792300 (Oxford), Simon Bassett on 01235 555345 (Abingdon), James Stonham 01844 261966 (Thame).

Big or small, we ship it all, plus free pick up anywhere in Oxford. Also 24-hour photocopying, private mailing addresses (24-hour access, and mail forwarding world-wide), binding, fax bureau, colour photocopying, mailing services, and much more. Contact or visit Mail Boxes Etc., 266 Banbury Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 514655, fax: 514656, email: summertown@020.mbe.uk.com, also at: 94 London Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 741729, fax: 01865 742431, email: staff@mbeheadington.co.uk.

Town and Country Trees: arboricultural contractors; modern arboricultural techniques; local authority approved; safeguarded by full Public Liability insurance. Free advice and quotations. Tel.: 0845 458 2980 or 07976 261850 (mobile).

Proof-reading/copy-editing offered by experienced and published English graduate (First Class). Academic, business, general. Call Julie on 01865 451960 or email oxenglish@aol.com.

Specialist advisers to academics. Colin Coates & Partners offer tax and accounting services including professorial salary review and retirement covering The Universities Superannuation Scheme. Tel.: 01934 844133. Email: info@ccptax.com. See www.ccptax.com.

Blenheim House Creche. Quality childcare in a safe, happy and caring environment, for children aged 6 months to 4 years. Open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., Mon.–Fri. Places available from 2 sessions up to full time. Conveniently situated for Woodstock Road, Banbury Road, Lynams and Esporta. Open morning on Sat. 9 Oct., 9.30 a.m.–11.30 a.m. Call Mrs Susan Palmer on 01865 554526 or email susanpalmer.1@btopenworld.com.

Visit St Philip's Books at 82 St Aldates, Oxford (next to Reservoir Books). We specialise in rare and second-hand books in the humanities, especially theology and history, also literature and philosophy. Open Mon.–Sat., 10 a.m.–5p.m. Free catalogues on request. Good prices paid for large or small collections. Please call Christopher Zealley on 01865 202182. www.stphilipsbooks.co.uk.

Hypnotherapy is a natural and gentle way to improve both your emotional and physical health. Symptoms treated include stress, insomnia, smoking, social phobias, fear of public speaking, overweight, IBS, migraines, psoriasis, and much more. To find out how hypnotherapy can help you, contact The Oxford Natural Health Centre's hypnotherapist Mark Witter MA PhD DHP on 07837 121539 or visit his website at www.markwitter.com.


Tuition Offered

Piano lessons. Experienced teacher; adults and children; all grades. Beginners welcome. Contact Miss P. Read, BA (Hons) L.R.A.M. (Near Kidlington, Oxford). Tel.: 01865 331147.


Situations Vacant

Part-time Associate Cataloguer. The Oxford Union Library is seeking an enthusiastic and motivated individual to join its cataloguing team. Your primary task will be to publicise the Library to its readers through high quality cataloguing and user-friendly subject arrangement of its collections. You should have at least 2 years' experience in an academic library and preferably knowledge of cataloguing or a library qualification. Good time management and team skills will be important. £17,000 pro rata. Closing date: 22 Oct. For further details please contact Mrs Su Lockley on 01865 246782. Applications incl. CV, covering letter and names of two referees should be sent to: The Bursar, Oxford Union Society, Frewin Court, Oxford OX1 3JB, or emailed to: bursar@oxford- union.org.

Director for Music Society Choir, Green College. We are seeking to appoint a Director for the choir as soon as possible. There are three concerts each year, which are held during term time, and rehearsals will take place on a weekly basis during term time and in the early evenings. A small remuneration is available. This post would suit a choral scholar or someone with some experience in directing a choir. Keyboard ability would be an advantage. Please contact Jane Rogers, Development Director, Green College, Oxford OX2 6HG to register your interest by Mon., 18 Oct. Tel.: 01865 274777. Email: jane.rogers@green.ox.ac.uk.


Houses to Let

An Englishman's home is his castle—so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Visit our web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or email us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: 01865 764533. Fax: 764777. Email: info@qbman.co.uk.

North Oxford . Fully-furnished 4–5 bedroom family home to let from Christmas '04 to Aug. '05. Family are going abroad for sabbatical. Large west-facing spacious garden with patio and beautiful surrounding trees. Three reception rooms and kitchen/breakfast room and 2 ½ bathrooms. House on west side of popular Woodstock road, overlooking St Edward's playing fields. Easy walking access to Summertown shops and into city centre (cycle path next to house). Port Meadow nearby. Email: douglas.wilkinson@nda.ox.ac.uk or tel.: 01865 513688.

North Oxford (Jericho). Fully-furnished, recently redecorated house, secluded garden, available from 1 Sept. for 1 year or less. Charming, cosy, quiet, c.h., easy to maintain, 2 bedrooms, 2½ bathrooms, washing machine, dryer, telephone, linen, dishes. Easy walk to University, train and coach stations, near best schools and parks. Two bedrooms £1,250 p.m.; 3 bedrooms £1,500 p.m. (inc. bedsit with separate kitchen and entrance). Tel. J. Mackrell in Oxford (evenings or 7--8 a.m.), on: 01865 775567. Email: mackrelj@btopenworld.com. Or contact A. Gaston in Canada: +613 745 1368, fax: +613 745 0299, email: gaston@cyberus.ca.

Oxfordshire. Wing of beautiful country house. Six bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 WCs, kitchen with aga, scullery, larder, laundry room. Three reception rooms. Fully-furnished. South-facing orangerie. Set in parkland with lake. Tennis court. Domestic and garden staff provided. Ideal professional family home. £2,800 p.m. Tel.: 01865 343202.

Normandy: Village au Brun, Notre Dame de Cenilly. Beautiful, fully-furnished three-storey farmhouse with all mod. cons. to let for 1–3 years. Set in 13 acres of farmland. Peaceful yet within 4 kms from Cerisy la Salle (local village); Saint-Lô, Coutance approx. 20 kms; Cherbourg, Bayeux, Mont St Michel and Caen within 100 kms. Ground floor: kitchen/dining room; gas cooker; separate electric oven; microwave; large fridge with separate freezer; g. c.h.; bathroom with w.c.; sitting room. First floor: music room (with grand piano), 2 bedrooms (1 with small office). Second floor: large bedroom; shower room with w.c.; gallery (suitable for office) that overlooks music room below. Open fire in sitting room. Ideal for writer or musician seeking peace and quiet to work. Non-smoker preferred; pets welcome. 800–900 euro p.c.m. For further details please contact Alexander Kok on 00 33 2 33 45 52 16. Fax: 00 33 2 33 17 22 96.

Florence Park. Recently refurbished 1930s house with attractively designed garden. Close to local amenities, park and river. Light and cosy. Furnished and fully equipped, with two large bedrooms and dressing room. Kitchen/diner. Easy access to central Oxford. Available from Sept. for one year or less. Ideal for professional or family. £850 p.c.m. plus bills. Call Jo Dixon on 01865 760907 or 07932 724232. Email: 53netherwoodsroad@tiscali.co.uk.

Wootton, near Woodstock. Delightful period cottage to let in sought after, pretty village. Living room with open fire overlooking rear garden. Stable door to garden. Kitchen with all mod. cons. Double bedroom and large bathroom with panelled bath and electric shower. Loft for storage. Oil-fired c.h. Attractive mature garden. Two garden sheds and brick-built log stove. Good bus and train connections to Oxford. Suit academic/professional couple. Available Oct. for 6 months/1 year. £695 p.m. incl. gardener. (excl. council tax and utility bills). References essential. Contact: Sally Stradling on 01993 812278 or email sally.stradling@ukgateway.net.

Jericho, Oxford. Charming terraced cottage in quiet residential street. Nicely modernised, two bedrooms, bath, shower, open-plan downstairs, patio doors to tiny garden, TV, all appliances, g.c.h. To let completely furnished, with china, linen, etc. Close to canal walks, good primary school, shops, and walking distance to station and city centre. Ideal for sabbatical. All inclusive (incl. council tax), £1,300 p.m. Available from 1 Nov. to June, flexible. Owner teaches in London in wintertime. Details: janet.bell@ucl.ac.uk.

Headington, Kiln Lane. Furnished and newly renovated 2–3 bedroom semi-detached house with c.h., kitchen, bathroom, lounge, dining room, garden, etc. Easy access for bus/car routes to city centre, university departments and the M40 to London. Close to shops, JR, Churchill and Nuffield Orthopaedic hospitals. Would suit professional university or medical couple. Available for rent initially for 1 year, with renewal possible. No smokers or pets. References required. Available now. £800 p.c.m. plus bills. Contact: 01865 735540.

House available now in popular West Oxford street within easy reach of station. Four bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, attractive garden. To let either furnished or unfurnished. £1,400 p.c.m. Contact Alison Measham on 01865 558802 or 07919 336452.

Central North Oxford. Exceptional, spacious 3-bedroom house, available Oct. £1,050 p.m. Suit senior members of University or advanced postgraduates. Tel.: 01865 515520.


Flats to Let

Central North Oxford: 10 minutes' walk from city centre, all main university buildings and parks, also very close to the river: available now for short/long let in extremely quiet, civilised, large Victorian house in this exclusive, leafy, residential Victorian suburb with large, light airy rooms: lovely ground floor flat, large double bedroom, large single bedroom, large drawing room, kitchen, bathroom. Available now. Off-street parking, large secluded garden. Tel./fax: 01865 552400. Mobile: 07789092274.

Self-contained annex on village green in charming Steventon. One double bedroom and one sitting room or study. Kitchen/bathroom. All mod. cons. Twenty min. by car to Oxford, frequent buses. Must be willing to help for three hours a week, e.g. light gardening/occasional house sitting, in return for moderate rent. Tel.: 01235 831453 or email Irene@ireneandpeter.freeserve.co.uk.

St Margaret's Road. Modern furnished two-bedroom apartment over two floors of a purpose-built block in central North Oxford: double bedroom with wall of wardrobes; single bedroom with built- in closet; bathroom with shower; kitchen with washer/dryer, fridge/freezer and dishwasher; living room; lock-up garage; use of large communal garden. Available to non-smokers from mid-Oct. £850 p.c.m. for one-year lease with possibility of renewal. Email: binney@thphys.ox.ac.uk.

North Oxford . Modern furnished flat on second (top) floor of purpose-built block in Osberton Road, Summertown. Fully furnished and equipped with kitchen utensils, crockery, etc. Washer/dryer, fridge/freezer, g.c.h., shower, garage, and garden use. Living room and two double bedrooms. Available to non- smokers early Oct. £800 p.c.m. for a one-year lease with possibility of renewal. Email: binney@thphys.ox.ac.uk.


Accommodation Offered

Attractive and quiet B&B. One minute to bus stop, close to river walks. £40 per night/£60 double; 15% discount for full week. Tel.: 01865 770501.

OxfordShortlets offers a portfolio of high quality self-catering short let properties as an excellent alternative to hotel/guesthouse and bed and breakfast accommodation in Oxford and the surrounding villages. We have a wide selection of quality homes available for short stay lets from 1 week up to several months. OxfordShortlets provides property rental on a short-term basis for professional individuals, groups or families requiring housing while visiting Oxford for holiday/vacation, business/academic, relocation purposes or temporary accommodation in between homes. For more information, please contact us on tel: 0870 1602325, fax: 0870 1602327, email: admin@oxfordshortlets.co.uk or visit our website at www.oxfordshortlets.co.uk.

Paying guests, visiting academics, welcomed for short or long stays in the comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple, in exclusive, quiet, leafy central north Oxford, within walking distance of all main university buildings, town centre, parks, river, good shops, and restaurants. All rooms have colour TV, tea-/coffee-making facilities, microwave, and refrigerator and/or deep-freeze availability, c.h., and independent heating. Breakfast included in the very moderate terms. Tel./fax: 01865 557879.

Double bedroom and small study available in house off Iffley Road, close to The Plain. Bathroom, WC, kitchen, two reception rooms and patio garden, shared with one other during week. Suit single professional academic. £450 plus bills. Tel.: 07865954365.

Lodger required. Mon.–Fri. preferred in very comfortable, peaceful family farmhouse in pretty village just north of Kidlington, near A34, 7 min. from North Oxford. Off road parking, use of kitchen, washing machine, TV and shower. £70 p.w. for single occupancy of double room. Would suit post-grad or weekly commuter. Enquiries after 12 Oct. Tel.: 01869 350034 or 07990512006.

Shortlet for four months from the beginning of Oct. Bright, friendly room with own phone/internet connection in Victorian house with garden, off Abingdon Road. Sharing house with female academic. £300 p.c.m. Ideal for visiting academics. Please call 01865 240 782.

Room offered in attractive large detached four-bedroom house for single professional female. Shared house is located close to all Headington hospitals and Brookes University. Ten minute cycle ride into city. Fully furnished, all appliances, wireless broadband, off-street parking and secluded garden. Long lease preferred. £360 p.c.m. incl. council tax. Available immediately. Tel: 01865 766032. Email: jwoodman@doctors.org.uk


Office Accommodation

North Oxford , 800 yards from St Giles. A complex of four rooms (garden bungalow) incl. an annexe in detached premises off the Woodstock Road. Separate entrance, with all facilities. Computer and fax input, BT telephone, car parking, c.h. and hot/cold water. Total alarmed security. Five star interior and exterior appearance. Available immediately. Tel.: 01865 51 11 11.

North Oxford . Wolfson College, Linton Road. 7,300 sqft (660 sqm) of offices adjacent to its main buildings with separate entrance and car parking. The flexible accommodation currently comprises 25 office units, a conference room and common room. Access to the use of the College's superb riverside facilities, including restaurant for staff and visitors, by arrangement. Available immediately. For further details contact the Bursar on 01865 274104 or email stephen.palmer@wolfson.ox.ac.uk.


Self-catering Apartments

Fully-furnished and serviced 3 and 4-star self-catering apartments available in North Oxford; 15 min. from Oxford city centre. Suitable for short lets for visiting academics or business people. From £330 p.w. all inclusive. Sleeps 2–5 people. Tel.: 07870 234725. Web site: http://www.weeklyhome.com. E-mail: info@weeklyhome.com.


Accommodation Sought

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us: 01865 764533, fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk. Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.

The Chief Executive of Oxford Inspires—the cultural development agency for Oxfordshire—seeks quiet comfortable room in Oxford in which to stay three nights each week. Usually Mon., Tues., and Wed. Tel. 01962 870082 or email robert.hutchison@sbs.ox.ac.uk.

Self-contained modest accommodation in central Oxford sought by responsible academic couple; must be close to public transport. Mid-Oct to end-Nov. Oxford references supplied. Tel./Fax: (0033) (0)450594103. Email: ddrucker@tiscali.fr.


Holiday Lets

Venice: S. Marco, S. Samuele. Charming apartment available in the heart of town for short stays, rented on a weekly basis. Well appointed; large living room, fully-equipped kitchen, 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms. Sleeps 5 comfortably. £650 p.w. Email: tagariello@libero.it.

Naples, Florida: rent our beautiful 4-bedroom, 3-bathroom house, on the Gulf Coast, in southwest Florida. This spacious home is located on one of the best private golf courses in the area. The house sleeps up to 8 people, has a huge south-facing heated swimming pool, and comes fully furnished and equipped. The house is available all year round from £800 p.w. (minimum 2-week let, discount for longer lets), Tel. Mark on: 07802 754154. E-mail: mark@bayrock.co.uk. Web site: website: www.golf-in-naples.com.


Houses for Sale

Jericho. Spacious modern house in the heart of this sought-after area. Two double bedrooms, study/nursery, two reception rooms, courtyard garden, garage and further off-street parking. Close to city centre, train/bus stations and colleges. £317,000. Tel: 07779 225767 or email salmondavid@hotmail.com for more details.

Temple Cowley, Oxford. Three-bedroom end terrace town house in popular development. Excellent bus and road access to central Oxford. Kitchen/diner, living room, cloakroom, bathroom (en suite), garage, well-stocked 40 ft rear garden. Five year NHBC warranty. No onward chain. Carpets/curtains incl. OIRO £269,950. Email: sarahd_hutch@yahoo.co.uk.

POSTDOCTORAL PRIZE RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES

Nuffield College intends to appoint, with effect from 1 September 2005, a number of Postdoctoral Prize Research Fellows (PPRFs).

Applications are invited from graduates of any country wishing to undertake research in any area of the social sciences except Economics, for which there is a separate competition (see below). (Those wishing to undertake interdisciplinary research which includes Economics may apply for either or both competitions.) The main interests of the college are in economics, politics and sociology, but these are broadly construed to include, for example, social science approaches to history, social and medical statistics, international relations, social psychology, and social policy.

The main responsibility of PPRFs is to engage in independent scholarly research. They have no teaching or administrative obligations but are expected to participate in the intellectual life of the college.

The postdoctoral salary starts at £18,059 per annum (pre-doctoral grant of £9,921 per annum), with a research budget of £2,107 per annum, and free single college accommodation or a £4,417 per annum housing allowance. Child support funds are available.

The fellowships are intended for scholars from any country, who at the time of taking up the fellowships will have completed, or be very close to the completion of, a doctoral thesis, or be at a comparable point in a research career. To be eligible, candidates should not, by that date, have spent more than a total of eight years in postgraduate study, teaching, or research in the social sciences, and should not have previously held a research fellowship similar to that advertised.

The fellowships are normally to be taken up on the 1 September 2005. The appointment will be for up to three years.

Further particulars and application forms can be obtained from the college Web site, http://www.nuff.ox.ac.uk, or from the Administrative Officer, Nuffield College, Oxford OX1 1NF (e-mail: justine.crump@nuf.ox.ac.uk). Applications must be received by 5 November.


NUFFIELD COLLEGE

Postdoctoral Prize Research Fellowships in Social Sciences

Nuffield College intends to appoint, with effect from 1 September 2005, a number of Postdoctoral Prize Research Fellows (PPRFs).

Applications are invited from graduates of any country wishing to undertake research in any area of the social sciences except Economics, for which there is a separate competition (see below). (Those wishing to undertake interdisciplinary research which includes Economics may apply for either or both competitions.) The main interests of the college are in economics, politics and sociology, but these are broadly construed to include, for example, social science approaches to history, social and medical statistics, international relations, social psychology, and social policy.

The main responsibility of PPRFs is to engage in independent scholarly research. They have no teaching or administrative obligations but are expected to participate in the intellectual life of the college.

The postdoctoral salary starts at £18,059 per annum (pre-doctoral grant of £9,921 per annum), with a research budget of £2,107 per annum, and free single college accommodation or a £4,417 per annum housing allowance. Child support funds are available.

The fellowships are intended for scholars from any country, who at the time of taking up the fellowships will have completed, or be very close to the completion of, a doctoral thesis, or be at a comparable point in a research career. To be eligible, candidates should not, by that date, have spent more than a total of eight years in postgraduate study, teaching, or research in the social sciences, and should not have previously held a research fellowship similar to that advertised.

The fellowships are normally to be taken up on the 1 September 2005. The appointment will be for up to three years.

Further particulars and application forms can be obtained from the college Web site, http://www.nuff.ox.ac.uk, or from the Administrative Officer, Nuffield College, Oxford OX1 1NF (e-mail: justine.crump@nuf.ox.ac.uk). Applications must be received by 5 November.


Postdoctoral Prize Research Fellowships in Economics

Nuffield College seeks Prize Research Fellows (PPRFs) in Economics, whose responsibility is to engage in independent research in any area of economics. PPRFs have no teaching or administrative obligations, though they may elect to run a seminar series, give a short lecture course, or organise a conference.

Graduates of any country are eligible. Candidates should, by 1 September 2005, be close to completing a doctorate. Candidates must not have spent more then eight years in postgraduate study, teaching, or research in economics.

The postdoctoral salary starts at £18,059 per annum (predoctoral grant of £9,921 per annum), with a research budget of £2,107 per annum, and free single college accommodation or a £4,417 per annum housing allowance. Child support funds are available. The appointment will be for three years, with the third year contingent on a doctorate having been completed within an appropriate time. The start date is 1 September 2005.

Further details and application forms may be obtained from http://www.nuff.ox.ac.uk or from Economics Secretary, Nuffield College, Oxford OX1 1NF (e-mail: economics.secretary@nuf.ox.ac.uk). Deadline: 15 November.


Appointment of part-time Finance Assistant

Nuffield College is seeking an experienced Finance Assistant to work part-time in its Accounts Office for fifteen hours per week, preferably five afternoons, Monday--riday inclusive.

The college is looking to appoint someone with considerable experience of working in a finance office. The postholder will have specific responsibility for the sales ledger, but will also be expected to assist in other areas. An AAT or part-qualified accountancy qualification would be highly desirable.

The salary is on the scale £15,805--£17,659 per annum, pro rata (dependent upon qualifications and experience). The college also offers free meals while on duty, generous holidays, car parking adjacent to the college, a bus pass scheme, and a contributory pension scheme.

For an informal discussion of the post, contact the Finance Officer, Linda Arch (telephone: Oxford (2)78696).

Further information and application packs may be obtained from Jane MacAlister, Personnel Assistant, Nuffield College, New Road, Oxford OX1 1NF (telephone: Oxford (2)78699). Details can also be obtained from the college Web site: http://www.nuff.ox.ac.uk/General/jobs/. The closing date for completed applications is 22 October.

Nuffield College is an equal opportunities employer.


ST ANNE'S COLLEGE

Official Fellowship and University Lecturership (CUF) in Modern History

In association with the Faculty of Modern History

St Anne's College proposes to appoint a fellow and Tutor in Modern History with effect from 1 October 2005. The fellowship will be held in conjunction with a University Lecturership (CUF) in the Faculty of Modern History.

Applications are invited from candidates with interests in early modern British and European history, and with a particular research interest in the intellectual history of the early modern period.

The fellow will be required to undertake at least eight hours' teaching a week for the college in relevant courses in Modern History and its Joint Schools, and to give lectures and undertake graduate teaching and supervision for the faculty.

Further particulars, covering both the college and the university posts, are available on the St Anne's College Web site
(http://www.st-annes.ox.ac.uk) and may also be obtained from the Senior Tutor's Secretary, St Anne's College, Oxford OX2 6HS (e-mail: heather.law@st-annes.ox.ac.uk). Applications (eight copies), and three references, should be sent to the same address. The closing date for receipt of applications and references is 8 November. Interviews are likely to be held on Tuesday, 30 November.

St Anne's College and the University are equal opportunities employers.


TRINITY COLLEGE

Retaining Fee Lecturerships in Organisation of the Body and in Pathology

Trinity College invites applications from suitably qualified candidates for College Retaining Fee Lecturerships in the First BM subjects `Organisation of the Body' and `General Pathology and Microbiology' for the academic year 2004--5. The lecturership is a teaching post and the holder will be expected to provide between two and three hours of undergraduate teaching per week over two (Pathology) or three (Organisation) terms of the academic year. In addition, the lecturer may be required to assist in the admissions process.

Candidates should have an excellent educational background, with a good first degree and either a research degree in a relevant area of biomedical science or be clinically qualified. Candidates must also be able to demonstrate a sufficiently good understanding of the relevant areas of the first- and second- year BM syllabus to teach these subjects to the First BM level. Previous experience in teaching high-achieving undergraduates via tutorials is also desirable. The termly fee associated with the appointment is £111. In addition teaching and admissions interviewing is paid at the Senior Tutors' scale using weighted hours (currently £20.19 per hour, under review). The lecturer will be a member of the senior common room entitled to one lunch and one dinner per week.

Copies of the First BM syllabus for first- and second-year undergraduates can be found by following the relevant links from http://www.psb.ox.ac.uk/medics/cou rselinks.htm. Informal enquiries may be addressed to the Tutor in Medicine, Dr Keith Buckler, by e-mail (e-mail: keith.buckler@ trinity.ox.ac.uk). Applications including a curriculum vitae, with details of career and research and teaching experience, should be sent, preferably by regular mail, to the Academic Administrator, Trinity College, Oxford OX1 3BH (e-mail: annabel.ownsworth@tri.ox.ac.uk), by 15 October. Candidates are also requested to ask two referees to write in support of their application directly to the Academic Administrator by the closing date. Interviews are likely to be held on 22 October or as soon as possible thereafter.

Trinity College is an equal opportunities employer.


WOLFSON COLLEGE

Non-stipendiary Junior Research Fellowships 2005 in Clinical and Non-clinical Sciences

Wolfson College proposes to elect up to six non-stipendiary Junior Research Fellows in Clinical and Non-Clinical Sciences, if candidates of sufficient merit present themselves, without limitation of subject, for two years in the first instance from 1 January 2005. These fellowships carry common table rights (up to £30 a week for meals in Hall) and are open to both men and women. Preference will be given to candidates who have not already held a Junior Research Fellowship at another college. Junior Research Fellows are not ipso facto members of the governing body of the college; but they are eligible to sit on nearly all college committees, and may be elected as representative members of the governing body.

Non-clinical science candidates. In the non-clinical sciences, candidates must hold a doctorate by the commencement of the fellowship (1 January 2005) and no more than three years should have elapsed since receipt of a doctorate.

Exceptions will be made only for candidates whose postdoctoral academic career has been interrupted by, for example, childbirth, family commitments, illness or compulsory military service. A statement giving reasons why an exception should be considered in their case must be included with the application.

Clinically qualified science candidates. Clinically qualified science candidates should have completed no more than four years fulltime research by 1 January 2005. Clinically qualified candidates with outstanding research records are encouraged to apply. Both laboratory and clinical research will be considered.

Renewal. Junior Research Fellows may apply for renewal of their Fellowship for a further final two years. Renewal, which is not automatic and is subject to approval by the governing body, is considered on the basis of satisfactory progress in your research, normally submission of a doctoral (or equivalent) thesis by those not holding a doctorate at the time of election, evidence of adequate funding for the further term, and, of course, your good standing in the college. Those clinically qualified candidates who do not hold a doctorate will be expected to have completed one within the first two years of the fellowship in order to apply for renewal.

Funding. This is a non-stipendiary position and candidates are asked to demonstrate their financial independence by reference to evidence of their funding. Where funds are applied for but not confirmed, any offer will be conditional on provision of proof of funding before taking up the post.

References. Candidates should themselves write directly to their referees asking them without further request to send a confidential reference to the President's Secretary by the closing date (Monday, 1 November). References may be faxed or e-mailed direct to the President's Secretary (fax: Oxford (2)74136, e-mail: sue.hales@wolfson.ox.ac.uk).

Applications. Applications, typed or clearly printed, including a completed application form, a curriculum vitae, and the names of three referees, should be sent to the President's Secretary, Wolfson College, Oxford OX2 6UD, by 5 p.m. on Monday, 1 November. Candidates should also include details of the research they will be doing in Oxford.

For an application form, send a self-addressed envelope to the President's Secretary, Wolfson College, Oxford OX3 6UD (including messenger area).

 

Note: non-stipendiary Arts/Humanities Junior Research Fellowships will be advertised in January 2005 for commencement in October 2005.


UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE

Herchel Smith Professorship of Pure Mathematics

The Board of Electors to the Herchel Smith Professorship of Pure Mathematics invites applications for this professorship, to take up appointment on 1 August 2005 or as soon as possible thereafter.

Applications are welcome from individuals active in any area of pure mathematics. Preference will be given to persons whose work falls within the field of mathematical analysis.

Further information may be obtained from the Academic Secretary, University Offices, The Old Schools, Cambridge CB2 1TT (e-mail: ibise@admin.cam.ac.uk), to whom a letter of application, marked `Confidential', including details of current and future research plans, a curriculum vitae and a publications list should be sent, together with form PD18 indicating the names of two referees, so as to reach him not later than 10 December.

Informal enquiries may be made to Professor Geoffrey Grimmett, Head of the Department of Pure Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics (telephone: 01223 337995, e-mail: g.r.grimmett@statslab.cam.ac.uk).


N.M. Rothschild Professorship of Mathematical Sciences and Directorship of the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences

Applications are invited for the N.M. Rothschild Professorship of Mathematical Sciences from senior academics working in some branch of the mathematical sciences to take up appointment on 1 October 2006.

The successful candidate will also be the Director of the Isaac Newton Institute, a national institute which aims to promote research of the highest international quality in the mathematical sciences for the benefit of the UK community, through the running of major visitor programmes in selected, often interdisciplinary, fields. Candidates should therefore have appropriate managerial and leadership experience. The appointment will be for a fixed term of five years.

Further information may be obtained from the Academic Secretary, Academic Division, University Offices, The Old Schools, Cambridge CB2 1TT (e-mail: ibise@admin.cam.ac.uk). Applications, marked `Confidential', should consist of a covering letter, a curriculum vitae, a publications list, and a completed form PD18 with details of two referees, and should reach the Academic Secretary no later than 30 November.

Informal enquiries may be made to Professor Peter Landshoff, Chair of the Management Committee of the Institute (telephone: 01223 337880, e-mail: p.v.landshoff@damtp.cam.ac.uk).

The appointment will be subject to the statutes and ordinances of the University of Cambridge.


Directorship of the Institute of Criminology

Applications are invited for the Directorship of the Institute of Criminology. This is a fixed term appointment for a period of five years and the successful candidate will take up appointment on 1 January 2005 or as soon as possible thereafter. The current pensionable stipend for this office is £52,936 per year.

Candidates will have the appropriate managerial and administrative skills for this senior appointment, be able to provide strong academic leadership, and have the ability to maintain and develop effective links between the institute and other relevant organisations.

Further information may be obtained from the Academic Secretary, Academic Division, University Offices, The Old Schools, Cambridge CB2 1TT (e-mail: ibise@admin.cam.ac.uk). Applications, marked `Confidential', should consist of a covering letter, a curriculum vitae, a publications list, and a completed form PD18 with the names of two referees, and should reach the Academic Secretary no later than Friday, 15 October.

Informal enquiries may be made to Professor J.R. Crawford, Chair of the Faculty of Law (telephone: 01223 330041, e-mail: jrc1000@cam.ac.uk).

The University of Cambridge is committed to equality of opportunity.


CLARE COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE

Junior Research Fellowships 2005--8

Clare College offers two Junior Research Fellowships, normally one in Sciences and one in Humanities, tenable for three years from 1 October 2005. Stipends are payable on the university's assistant in research scale (currently under review), starting at £17,798 (non-resident in college) or £15,103 (resident). Applications are invited from graduates of, or postgraduate students at, any university in the UK, who must, by 1 January 2005, be within four years of starting on full-time research in the Humanities, or five years in Sciences.

The closing date for receipt of completed applications is Tuesday, 4 January 2005 (10 a.m.). Candidates should request two referees to write, by that date, directly to the Fellowship Administrator in support of their candidature. Application forms and further particulars may be obtained from the Fellowship Administrator, Clare College, Cambridge CB2 1TL (telephone: 01223 333241, e-mail: master@clare.cam.ac.uk), or from the college's Web site, http://www.clare.cam.ac.uk/.


CLARE HALL, CAMBRIDGE

Research Fellowships in the Arts and Social Sciences

The governing body of Clare Hall proposes to elect one stipendiary and two or more non-stipendiary Research Fellows in the Arts and Social Sciences for a period of three years starting from October 2005. These are normally for applicants who have recently finished their Ph.D. (or equivalent). Applicants who have previously held college research fellowships in Oxford or Cambridge are not eligible. Non-stipendiary research fellows will be expected to demonstrate that they have adequate financial support throughout the period of the fellowship.

The closing date for the receipt of applications and references is Friday, 29 October 2004. Candidates are responsible for seeing that their curriculum vitae and references reach the college by this date.

Application forms may be obtained from the Tutorial Secretary, Clare Hall, Herschel Road, Cambridge CB3 9AL (e-mail: tutorial.secretary@clarehall.cam.ac.uk ).


Research Fellowships in the Sciences

The governing body of Clare Hall proposes to elect two or more non-stipendiary Research Fellows in the Sciences for a period of three years starting from October 2005. These are normally for applicants who have recently finished their Ph.D. (or equivalent). Applicants who have previously held college research fellowships in Oxford or Cambridge are not eligible. Non-stipendiary research fellows will be expected to demonstrate that they have adequate financial support throughout the period of the fellowship.

The closing date for the receipt of applications is Friday, 29 October 2004. Candidates are responsible for seeing that their curriculum vitae and references reach the college by this date.

Application forms may be obtained from the Tutorial Secretary, Clare Hall, Herschel Road, Cambridge CB3 9AL (e-mail: tutorial.secretary@clarehall.cam.ac.uk ).


DARWIN COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE

Moses and Mary Finley Research Fellowship

Darwin College proposes to elect a stipendiary Moses and Mary Finley Research Fellow from l October 2005. The fellowship is available for research into economic, social or political history of any period and (unlike the Finley Ancient History Fellowship) is not confined to those specialists in Greek or Roman history, although they are eligible to apply. Preference will be given to those who interests coincide with those of the late Sir Moses Finley.

The fellowship is tenable for three years with the possibility of renewal for a fourth. Candidates should be normally aged not more than 35 on l October 2005 and have been awarded the Ph.D. or an equivalent degree, or be able to present to the electors substantial amounts of work, published or unpublished, but consideration will be given to persons over this age if they began their research at a significantly later age than usual and to those who have interrupted their careers for family or other reasons.

The successful candidate will be subject to the statutes and ordinances of the college, including the obligation to reside in Cambridge for at least two-thirds of each University term, unless excused by the governing body. The Finley Research Fellow will become a member of the governing body and will have fellows' dining rights as well as the entitlement to a college room or flat, subject to availability, for which a charge will be made. An annual allowance will be available for travel and research expenses.

Further details are available from the Classics Faculty Office or the Master's Secretary, Darwin College, Cambridge CB3 9EU, or the college Web site, http://www.dar.cam.ac.uk. The closing date for applications is 25 October.

Darwin College follows an equal opportunities policy.

Friday 8 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `A harvest tour', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Sunday 10 October

MICHAELMAS FULL TERM begins.

THE RT REVD DR JOHN SENTAMU preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.


Monday 11 October

M. WORBOYS: `Mad dogs and Lancastrians: rabies, Pasteur, and the Chief Constable of Clitheroe, c.1890' (seminar series: `The history of modern medicine: national and international perspectives'), Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 2.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. MCAUSLAN: `In the beginning was the law ... an intellectual Odyssey' (seminar series: `Socio-legal approaches to law and development'), Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building, 4.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR ARCHIE BROWN: `Institutions, ideas, interests, and leadership in the Soviet and Russian transition' (Russian and Eurasian Studies Centre Seminar: `Twenty years of political change: the USSR and Russia, 1985–2004'), the Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR LORD (COLIN) RENFREW: `Collecting and looting in the past: the effects of self-indulgence' (St Cross–All Souls Lectures: `Who owns objects? The ethics and legality of collecting'), Dining Hall, St Cross College, 5 p.m.

CHARLES NICHOLL: `Leonardo da Vinci—the flights of the mind' (lecture), Christ Church Picture Gallery, 5.30 p.m.


Tuesday 12 October

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Contracts', 9.30 a.m., and `Lecturing' (first of three seminars), 12.15 p.m. (see information above).

THE REVD DR PETER GROVES preaches the Court Sermon, Cathedral, 10.15 a.m. (Note: congregation to be seated by 10.10 a.m.)

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Paintings of everyday life', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

THE RT. HON. LORD BUTLER: `The Butler report' (seminar series: `Are Labour's constitutional changes working?'), Summer Common Room, Magdalen, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR T. SNYDER: `Power politics in Eastern Europe: past and present' (seminar series: `Europe: what kind of power?'), Seminar Room, European Studies Centre, St Antony's (70 Woodstock Road), 5 p.m.

DR N. BOWLES: `Presidential power reconsidered' (seminar series: `Power in American politics'), Rothermere American Institute, 5 p.m.

DR A. BUCHANAN and F. BENNETT: `The impact of government policy on children aged 0–13 at risk of social exclusion: overview' (seminar series: `Promoting the well-being of children at risk of social exclusion'), Violet Butler Seminar Room, Department of Social Policy and Social Work, 5 p.m.

S. MUTHU: `Enlightenment against empire' (Political Theory and International Relations Seminar), Department of Politics, 5 p.m.

J.D. TRACY: `The background war of the early modern era: European states and the Ottoman Empire in contest for dominion, trade, and cultural pre-eminence' (Early Modern Europe Seminar), Modern History Research Unit, Radcliffe Infirmary, 5 p.m.

EDOUARD GLISSANT, writer, presents his work (Littérature Française Actuelle à Oxford), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m. (chaired by Toby Garfitt, Magdalen College).

J. CROSS: `Myth, memory, modernism: reinventing Orpheus' (Graduate Colloquia), Denis Arnold Hall, Music Faculty, 5.15 p.m.


Wednesday 13 October

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Budget preparation', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

ORGAN RECITAL (David Maw), Queen's, 1.10 p.m. (admission free; retiring collection).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Introduction to oriental lacquer', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

DR RICHARD LEAKEY: `Why our origins matter' (Charles Simonyi Lecture, introduced by Professor Richard Dawkins), Oxford Playhouse, 4.30 p.m. (tickets £3.50, from the Oxford Playhouse: tel. 305305).

PROFESSOR B. ANDERSON: `National citizenship, private property, and domestic migration: witches' brew?' (Refugee Studies Centre: Harrell-Bond Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

NORMAN DAVIES and TIMOTHY SNYDER: `Where on earth does Europe end?' (lecture), European Studies Centre, St Antony's, 8 p.m.

DR R. RASKIN: `A child at gunpoint: a case study in the life of a photo' (David Patterson Seminars), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, 8 p.m.


Thursday 14 October

CONFERENCE: `Cent ans de relations culturelles franco-britanniques' (Maison Française, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.).

J. CHAMPENOIS: `Can film provide a common ground or an alternative medium for transnational feminist(s') dialogue?' (International Gender Studies Centre seminars: `The search for common ground: the role of women in conflict resolution'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Induction seminar for new contract researchers', 3.30 p.m. (see information above).

PROFESSOR D. BOUD: `Aligning assessment with long-term learning needs' (Institute for the Advancement of University Learning: research seminars), IAUL Seminar Room, Littlegate House, St Ebbe's, 4 p.m. (to attend, tel.: (2)86824).

PROFESSOR J. DE GRUCHY: `Christian humanism: antidote to secularism and fundamentalism?' (David Nicholls Memorial Lecture), Regent's Park College, 5 p.m.

ALAIN VIALA: `Rousseau face à la modernité: le livre, l'imprimerie, la lecture' (Early Modern French Seminar), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

DR I. CHRISTIE-MILLER: `Paper imaging as a bibliographical research tool' (Oxford Bibliographical Society lecture), Taylor Institution, 5.15 p.m.


Friday 15 October

DR D. CARTER: `Anthropologists: identity and virtual communities' (Ethnicity and Identity Seminars: `Anthropologists and the new technologies'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology (61 Banbury Road), 11 a.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Crete BC', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

P. JACOB: `The scope and limits of Chomsky's naturalism' (lecture), Philosophy Faculty Centre, 4.30 p.m.


Saturday 16 October

EDUCATION CONFERENCE: `What are universities for?' (jointly held at Lady Margaret Hall and Somerville College, as part of 125th anniversary celebrations; further details from Development Office, Somerville: tel. 01865 (2)80626).


Sunday 17 October

PROFESSOR BRIAN LEFTOW preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.


Monday 18 October

C. LOW: `Khoisan healing practices' (seminar series: `The history of modern medicine: national and international perspectives'), Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 2.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR B. HARRISS-WHITE: `De- and re-regulating business in rural West Bengal: capitalism under the left front' (seminar series: `Socio-legal approaches to law and development'), Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building, 4.30 p.m.

TAM DALYELL, MP: `What needs to be done to the House of Commons?' (seminar series: `Are Labour's constitutional changes working?'), Summer Common Room, Magdalen, 5 p.m.

DR L. SHEVTSOVA: `Comparing Yeltsin and Putin as leaders' (Russian and Eurasian Studies Centre Seminar: `Twenty years of political change: the USSR and Russia, 1985–2004'), the Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

DR L. AL-GAILANI: `Archaeological theft in Iraq' (St Cross–All Souls Lectures: `Who owns objects? The ethics and legality of collecting'), Dining Hall, St Cross College, 5 p.m.


Tuesday 19 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Glass', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

PROFESSOR B. LAFFAN: `Organising power in Europe: multilevel governance' (seminar series: `Europe: what kind of power?'), Seminar Room, European Studies Centre, St Antony's (70 Woodstock Road), 5 p.m.

DR W. MACMILLAN: `Redistricting Michigan; maps, computers, and the public interest' (seminar series: `Power in American politics'), Rothermere American Institute, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR STANLEY LUBMAN: `Themes and issues in Western scholarship' (lecture series: `Looking for law in China'), Dahrendorf Room, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. FIDDES: `Law and divine mercy in Shakespeare: a study of The Merchant of Venice and Measure for Measure' (public lecture series: `Measure for measure: the idea of justice in literature, religion, and law'), Regent's Park College, 5 p.m.

T. SMITH: `Early years research and policy for children at risk of social exclusion' (seminar series: `Promoting the well-being of children at risk of social exclusion'), Violet Butler Seminar Room, Department of Social Policy and Social Work, 5 p.m.

R.E. LEBOW: `Interests and ethics' (Political Theory and International Relations Seminar), Department of Politics, 5 p.m.

H. KUGELER: ` "Le parfait Ambassadeur": the theory and practice of diplomacy, 1648–1748' (Early Modern Europe Seminar), Modern History Research Unit, Radcliffe Infirmary, 5 p.m.

DR K. BROWN: `History, anthropology, and the archival imagination' (Evans-Pritchard Lectures: `The structure of loyalty in revolutionary Macedonia'), Old Library, All Souls, 5 p.m.

B. HEBBERT: `The Tudor violin 1540–1600' (Graduate Colloquia), Denis Arnold Hall, Music Faculty, 5.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. PODOLNY: `The logic of person v. the logic of position' (Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies: `The logic of position, the measure of leadership'), Saïd Business School, 5.30 p.m. (open to the public; admission free).


Wednesday 20 October

MISS L. FORBES and DR J. JOHNS: `The Bodleian Book of Curiosities: some answers and many new questions' (Friends of the Bodleian thirty-minute lecture), Cecil Jackson Room, Sheldonian, 1 p.m.

ORGAN RECITAL (Elizabeth Burgess), Queen's, 1.10 p.m. (admission free; retiring collection).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Introduction to twentieth-century art', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Welcome to the University', 2 p.m. (see information above).

PROFESSOR STANLEY LUBMAN: `Law reform after Mao—accomplishments and problems' (lecture series: `Looking for law in China'), Mure Room, Merton, 5.30 p.m.

DR K. BROWN: `The horizons of the peasant: rethinking fatalism' (Evans-Pritchard Lectures: `The structure of loyalty in revolutionary Macedonia'), Old Library, All Souls, 5 p.m.

DR D. JAMES: `Gaining lost ground? Property, patronage, and citizenship in South Africa's land reform programme' (Refugee Studies Centre: public seminars), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. PODOLNY: `The meaning of leadership' (Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies: `The logic of position, the measure of leadership'), Saïd Business School, 5.30 p.m. (open to the public; admission free).

G. IRVINE: `Bu-no-mai: the military dances of Bugaku' (Oxford Asian Textile Group lecture), Pauling Centre, 58 Banbury Road, 6.15 p.m. (admission for visitors £2).

T. ARGOV: `Losing the (Israeli) plot: contemporary Israel in the prose of Orly Kastel-Bloom' (David Patterson Seminars), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, 8 p.m.