Oxford University Gazette: 6 May 2004

Oxford University Gazette, Vol. 134, No. 4695: 6 May 2004

Note: due to the requirements of the Data Protection Act, some elements of the printed Gazette are not reproduced in the Web Gazette.

COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

1 Changes in Regulations

Corrigendum

It was the intention to set up the MBA prize established by regulations published in Gazette, p. 262 (6 November 2004), as the `Saïd MBA Prize'. The following correction gives effect to the original intention and to the renumbering consequent upon the name change.

In Part 2 of Council Regulations 25 of 2002, concerning trusts (Statutes, 2000, p. 655, as redesignated as regulations by Decree (5) of 11 July 2002, and renumbered by Decree (1) of 7 December 2000 and the changes published on 14 November 2002, Gazette, Vol. 131, p. 402; Vol. 132, p. 1461; Vol. 133, p. 404), § 229, which referred to the MBA prize, is renumbered § 310, and §§ 230–259 renumbered §§ 229–258. The first regulation of § 310 shall be as follows.

`§310 Saïd MBA Prize

1. The moneys establishing the Saïd MBA Prize (the fund) shall be retained by the University as a permanent endowment, and the net income of the fund shall be applied to the award of a prize, to be known as the Saïd MBA Prize.'

2 Regulations and Changes in Regulations

Council has made the following changes in regulations, to come into effect on 21 May 2004.

(a) Committee for Council Departments

In Regulation 3.31 of Council Regulations 15 of 2002 (Supplement (2) to Gazette No. 4628, pp. 1391–1405), as amended on 13 March 2003 (Gazette, Vol. 133, p. 948), delete `two persons appointed by the General Purposes Committee of Council from among the members of Council' and substitute `two persons appointed by the General Purposes Committee of Council from among the members of Congregation'.

[This change, made on the recommendation of the Committee for Council Departments, widens the pool from which committee members may be appointed, to help the committee carry out its work effectively and to promote diversity on the committee.]

(b) College Contributions Fund

Endowment grants from the College Contributions Fund

The following amounts shall be paid to the college named in each case under the provisions of section 6 of Statute XV (Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4633, 9 October 2002, p. 129) as grants for the enlargement of the permanent endowment of those colleges:

 
                                          Endowment                   Endowment
                                          grant I                     grant II
                                          £                              £

Green College                             30,000                      up to 120,000

Harris Manchester
College                                   36,000                      up to 200,000

Lady Margaret Hall                        0                           up to 250,000

Linacre College                           5,000                       up to 245,000

Mansfield College                         250,000                     up to 550,000

Pembroke College                          225,000                     up to 225,000

St Edmund                                 275,000                     up to 275,000

St Peter's                                275,000                     up to 275,000

Total                                     1,096,000                   up to 2,140,000

[This regulation authorises the endowment grants which Council has decided, on the recommendation of the College Contributions Committee, to make out of the accumulated balance of the College Contributions Fund. The sums listed under `Endowment Grant I' are to be paid to the college concerned as soon as possible. The sums listed under `Endowment Grant II' are maxima, the precise sum in each case to be determined in early 2005 by the Grants Subcommittee of the College Contributions Committee according to the success with which each college has met certain condition laid down by Council on the recommendation of the College Contributions Committee.]

College Contributions Scheme unit of statutory endowment income

The unit of statutory endowment income for 2003–4 is set at £122,000 under the provisions of regulation 2 of Council Regulations 4 of 2003 (Gazette, Vol. 133. p. 1148).

[This regulation sets the unit of statutory endowment income for 2003–4 under the College Contributions Scheme at £122,000, which represents an increase of 5.2 per cent from the unit for 2002–3 reflecting a similar increase in the overall statutory endowment income of colleges between 2001–2 and 2002–3.]


COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of Congregation:

Blackmon, K.L., MA, Merton

Gill, D.R., Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Huber, A., Systems and Electronic Resources Service

Steenberg, M.C., M.St., Greyfriars


DIVISIONAL AND FACULTY BOARDS

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 21 May 2004, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • CONGREGATION 13 May 2004
    • Election (Public Orator)
  • *CONGREGATION 18 May 2004 2 p.m.
    • *Voting on Legislative Proposal: Proctors' Disciplinary Powers
  • CONGREGATION 27 May 2004
    • Elections
  • CONVOCATION 15 May 2004
    • Election of Professor of Poetry
  • * List of forthcoming Degree Days
  • * List of forthcoming Matriculation Ceremonies

GENERAL NOTICES

LANGUAGE CENTRE

Intensive language courses

Saturday and Sunday morning 22--23 May and 5--6 June

The Language Centre will be running four short weekend courses this term. Each course will consist of eight hours' tuition and last from 9 a.m. to 1.30 p.m., with a half-hour break on both Saturday and Sunday. The emphasis will be on speaking and listening. The courses are as follows:

22–3 May: Italian (Beginners and Lower Intermediate)

22–3 May: German (Beginners and Intermediate)

5–6 June: French (Beginners, Lower Intermediate and Upper Intermediate)

5–6 June: Spanish (Beginners [waiting list only] and Lower Intermediate)

Fees: £35 for student members of the University and other full-time students; £45 members of Congregation and members of staff; £55 others.

Further details and booking information for these courses and all other Language Centre courses and activities may be obtained from the Information Officer, Angela Pinkney, at the Language Centre, 12 Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6HT (telephone: Oxford (2)83360, e-mail admin@lang.ox.ac.uk, Web pages at www.lang.ox.ac.uk). Opening hours in full term: Monday–Thursday 9.30 a.m.–8 p.m., Friday 9.30 a.m.–6.30 p.m., and Saturday 10 a.m.–1 p.m.


MUSICAL EVENTS

Balliol College: The Balliol Concerts

CARLOS ARDILA (piano): programme of traditional South American music, with students from Balliol College, the hall, Balliol, 9 p.m., Sunday, 16 May.

EDITHA KONWITSCHNY (violin) and LLYR WILLIAMS (piano) perform music by Schubert and Janácek, the hall, Balliol, 9 p.m., Sunday, 30 May.

Keble College

DAVID OWEN NORRIS performs a programme of works including Beethoven, Sonata in C minor, op. 13 (Pathétique); Brahms, Six Piano Pieces, op. 118; Tippett, Sonata no. 1; and Elgar, Concert Allegro, at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 22 May, in the O'Reilly Theatre, Keble College. Tickets, costing £5, will be available on the door, or may be obtained in advance from the Warden's PA, Keble College (telephone: Oxford (2)72700, e-mail: trish.long@keb.ox.ac.uk).


APPOINTMENTS AND ASSIGNMENTS

MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES BOARD

The Mathematical and Physical Sciences Divisional Board has conferred the title of Visiting Professor of Physics upon PROFESSOR R. ROBERTS (B.SC., PH.D.), formerly head of the Particle Physics Theory Group, the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, for a period of three years from 1 May 2004.


DEPARTMENT OF CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

On the recommendation of the Medical Sciences Board, Council has assigned the Department of Clinical Pharmacology to D.J. KERR (B.SC., M.SC., PH.D., MD, D.SC. Glasgow), Fellow of Corpus Christi College and Rhodes Professor of Cancer Therapeutics and Clinical Pharmacology, for a period of three years from 1 October 2004.

INAUGURAL LECTURES

Lady Margaret Professor of Divinity

THE REVD PROFESSOR G. PATTISON will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 11 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Thinking about God in an age of technology.'


Rhodes Professor of American History

PROFESSOR R. CARWARDINE will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 17 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Abraham Lincoln, God, and the American Civil War.'


Regius Professor of Greek

PROFESSOR CHRISTOPHER PELLING will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 20 May, in the Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's College.

Subject: `Greek lives.'


BESTERMAN LECTURE

MICHEL DELON, Paris IV, will deliver the Besterman Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 13 May, in the Taylor Institution.

Subject: `Est-ce que l'on peut inventer un nouveau plaisir?'


CYRIL FOSTER LECTURE 2004

THE HON. GARETH EVANS, President, the International Crisis Group, and formerly Foreign Minister of Australia, will deliver the Cyril Foster Lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 10 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `When is it right to fight? Rethinking the jurisprudence of military force.'


GRINFIELD LECTURES ON THE SEPTUAGINT

Critics and controversies: early modern debates about the meaning of the Septuagint

PROFESSOR SCOTT MANDELBROTE, Cambridge, will deliver the Grinfield Lectures at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Examination Schools.

6 May: `The Letter of Aristeas and its meaning for early modern scholarship.'

13 May: `Scripture and the mathematicians: chronology and proof of the authority of the Septuagint.'

20 May: `Vindicated by Christ and the Apostles: the Septuagint and the New Testament in early modern study.'


CLARENDON LECTURES IN ENGLISH

Yeats and lyric form

PROFESSOR HELEN VENDLER, Porter University Professor, Harvard, will deliver the Clarendon Lectures in English at 5 p.m. on the following days in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building.

Wed. 12 May: `Forms in "Nineteen Hundred Nineteen".'

Fri. 14 May: `Yeats at sonnets.'

Mon. 17 May: `Yeats's nationalistic measure: "Easter 1916" and other poems.'

Wed. 19 May: `The sequence again: supernatural songs.'


CAMERON MACKINTOSH LECTURE

The Cameron Mackintosh Lecture, which will take place at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 19 May, in the Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, St Catherine's College, will take the form of a conversation between SHERIDAN MORLEY, NICK ALLOTT, MICHAEL GEARIN-TOSH, and others.

Subject: `Drama at Oxford University.'


O'DONNELL LECTURES IN CELTIC STUDIES

Books from Ireland, fifth to ninth century

PROFESSOR R. SHARPE will deliver the O'Donnell Lectures at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 20 May, and Friday, 21 May, in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building.


ASTOR LECTURE

PROFESSOR I. PAPERNO, Berkeley, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 11 May, in the Taylor Institution.

Convener: Dr A.S. Kahn, University Lecturer in Russian.

Subject: `Why did we all love Stalin? Memoirs and diaries of the Soviet experience.'


RADHAKRISHNAN MEMORIAL LECTURES

Nationalism and secularism in modern India

PROFESSOR AIJAZ AHMAD will deliver the Radhakrishnan Memorial Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination Schools.

Fri. 7 May: `Antinomies of nationalism—an overiew.'

Fri. 14 May: `Secularism, anti-secularism, and the question of religion in Indian politics.'

Wed. 19 May: `The liberal tradition, the left, and the offensives of the far right.'


J.W. JENKINSON MEMORIAL LECTURES

Jenkinson Lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Mondays in Lecture Room B, the Zoology/Psychology Building. Tickets are not required for admission.

PROFESSOR CHERYLL TICKLE, Dundee
10 May: `Limb development—from start to finish.'

PROFESSOR RUDOLF TAFF, Indiana
24 May: `Evolution: a tale told by embryos.'


CLASSICS

Lewis Lecture 2004

PROFESSOR ALAIN BRESSON, Ausonius, Bordeaux 3, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 26 May, in the Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's College.

Subject: `The Harpasos valley in northern Caria: from Ptolemaic to Rhodian and Roman control.'


ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

Romantic Realignments

The following seminars will be held at 5.30 p.m. on Wednesdays in Room 11, English Faculty, St Cross Building.

Convener: Leonard Epp.

PROFESSOR K. TRUMPENER, Yale, USA
12 May: `Visits to the juvenile library: romantic bookselling and the making of child readers.'

PROFESSOR T. RAJAN, University of Western Ontario, Canada
19 May: `Reading Godwin with Kant: "political" justice in Caleb Williams, St Leon, and Mandeville.'

P. WOOLF
26 May: To be announced. (On Dorothy Wordsworth)

R. HEWITT
2 June: ` "Dreaming o'er the map of things": William Wordsworth and the Irish Ordnance Survey.'

C. THROSBY
2 June: `Flirting with flame: Byron's fan letters.'

DR L. VARGO, Saskatchewan, USA
9 June: `Mary Shelley and "The great work of life": reception and re-vision.'

D. FALLON
16 June: ` "What mov'd Milton?": Blake's Milton and eighteenth century Miltons.'

R. MARCH
16 June: `The (in)significance of Lady Caroline Lamb.'

D. O'SHAUGHNESSY
16 June: `Godwin and theatricality: radical self-censorship in the 1790s.'


HISTORY OF ART, PHILOSOPHY

Philosophy and theory of the visual arts

Seminars in this interdisciplinary series will be given at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Danson Room, Trinity College.

DR J. HYMAN
7 May: `Realism and relativism in the theory of art.'

DR K. REED-TSOCHA
14 May: `Crossing boundaries: analytical aesthetics and the history of art.'


LIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Financial markets, institutions, and behaviour

The following seminars will be held at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in the Upper Lecture Room, School of Geography and the Environment, Mansfield Road.

Convener: Professor G.L. Clark.

T. HEBB
13 May: `The economic inefficiency of secrecy: a case study of CalPERS' corporate governance campaigns.'

DR MICKIEWICZ, UCL
20 May: `Ownership characteristics and access to finance: evidence from a survey of large privatised companies in Hungary and Poland.'

K. AMBACHTSHEER, Toronto, Canada
27 May: `Pension fund governance.'

DR J. POLLARD, Newcastle
3 June: `Financing an alternative? Firm, finances and futures in Birmingham's Jewellery Quarter.'

T. L. BABCOCK-LUMISH
10 June: `Innovation and (in)decision: investors and entrepreneurs' perceptions of risk.'


Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology

The following departmental seminars will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Fridays at 64 Banbury Road and afterwards at 61 Banbury Road.

Conveners: B. Barnes and E. Hsu.

W. ARMBRUST
7 May: `Serious fun: Ramadan in modern Egypt.'

L. HOWE, Cambridge
14 May: `Late medieval Christianity and Balinese Hinduism: the doctrinal mode of religiosity.'

P. CAPLAN, Goldsmiths
21 May: `Risk and danger, trust and blame: local perceptions of modernity on Mafia Island, Tanzania.'

C. HUMPHREY, Cambridge
28 May: `Regret as a theme in anthropology and history.'

S. HEALD, Brunel
4 June: `HIV policy in Africa—why it is not working.'


Department of Plant Sciences

The following research talks will be held at 4 p.m. on Thrsdays in the Large Lecture Theatre, Department of Plant Sciences.

Convener: Professor H. Dickinson.

PROFESSOR P. RAINEY, Auckland, New Zealand and Oxford
6 May: `Evolution of biological complexity.'

PROFESSOR J. MESSING, New Jersey, USA
13 May: `Genomic features of polyploidization and hybrid vigor in plants.'

PROFESSOR M. BEVAN, John Innes Centre, Norwich
20 May: `Genetic analysis of carbon signalling in Arabidopsis.'

Y. YASUMURA
27 May: `The role of "Golden 2-like" genes in chloroplast development and evolution.' (Local Hero Seminar)

DR. M. TLALKA
27 May: `Nutrient transport in complex mycelial systems.' (Local Hero Seminar)

DR. S. TURNER, Manchester
3 June: `Secondary cell wall formation in Arabidopsis thaliana.'

PROFESSOR C. KUHLEMEIER, Berne, Switzerland
10 June: `Regulation of phyllotaxis by auxin transport.'

PROFESSOR Y. SHACHAR-HILL, Michigan, USA
17 June: `Mapping metabolic fluxes in developing Brassica napus seeds.'


MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Oxford Centre for Advanced Materials and Composites: Annual Industrial Lecture

DR J.M. GALLEGO, Chief Scientis, Thin Films, Pilkington Technology Management Ltd., will deliver the annual Industrial Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Friday, 14 May, in Lecture Room 1, the Thom Building.

Subject: `A window into the future.'


Oxford Physics Colloquia

The following seminars will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Fridays in the Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road.

Conveners: Professor Sherrington and Professor Silk.

PROFESSOR J. CARDY
7 May: `Conformal symmetry: a cornucopia of exact results in two-dimensional physics.'

DR M. ALLEN
14 May: `the physics of risk: understanding and predicting global climate change.'

PROFESSOR B. FOSTER
28 May: `The last decade in particle physics—where we are and where are we going.'

PROFESSOR C. ISHAM, Imperial College
4 June: `Is it true or is it false; or somewhere in between? The logic of quantum theory.'

PROFESSOR A. SZALAY, Johns Hopkins
11 June: `Data explosion: science with terabytes of data.'


Theoretical Physics Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in the Dennis Sciama Lecture Theatre, Denys Wilkinson Building.

Convener: S. Sarkar.

PROFESSOR B. SATHYAPRAKASH, Cardiff
14 May: `The quest for gravitational waves.'

PROFESSOR J. EGGERS, Bristol
28 May: `Hydrodynamic instability of a moving contact line.'

PROFESSOR J. POLONYI, Strasbourg, France
11 June: To be announced.


Organic Chemistry Seminar Programme (Dyson Perrins)

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in the Dyson Perrins Lecture Theatre.

DR S. BALASUBRAMANIAN, Cambridge
13 May: `Telomeres, Telomerase and DNA quadruplexes.'

DR A. YUDIN, Toronto, Canada
Tue. 18 May: `Chemo- and stereoselectivity in oxidative carbon–nitrogen bond forming processes.'

PROFESSOR M. CROSSLEY, Sydney, Australia
20 May: `Synthesis of porphyrin-appended dendrimers and their use in artifical photosynthesis and organic solar cells.'

PROFESSOR S. KOBAYASHI, Tokyo, Japan
27 May: `Towards truly efficient and powerful organic synthesis.'


Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Planetary Physics Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Thursdays in the Dobson Lecture Room, Atmospheric Physics Laboratory. They are preceded by tea at 3.45 p.m. in the same room.

DR. J. HAYWARD, Meteorological Office
6 May: `Measurement and modelling the radiative effects of biomass burning and Saharan dust aerosols.'

DR F. ECCLES
13 May: `Synchronisation and chaos control in periodically forced baroclinic systems.'

HELEN WILLETTS, BBC Weather Centre
20 May: `Science to air.'

DR J. REBURN, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory
27 May: `Millimetre-wave tomographic limb-sounding of the UTLS.'

PROFESSOR M. BARNSLEY, University of Wales, Swansea
3 June: `The role of Earth observation in land–surface climate feedback studies.'

DR. J. EYRE, Met Office
10 June: `GPS radio occultation measurements in numerical weather prediction.'


Theoretical Chemistry Group Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the John Rowlinson Seminar Room (20.12) opposite the Main Lecture Theatre.

Convener: Professor Child.

PROFESSOR CHILD
17 May: `Semi-classical dynamics of the water molecule.'

PROFESSOR J. WHEELER, University of California, San Diego
24 May: `Phase transitions and critical phenomena in molecularly complex systems.'


Oxford Logic Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 3.15 p.m. on Fridays in the Mathematical Institute, 24–9 St Giles'.

Convener: Professor Wilkie.

M. PREST, Manchester
7 May: `Irreducible representations and the Ziegler spectrum over generalised Weyl algebras and related rings.'

J. KRAJICEK, Prague
14 May: `Boolean valued models of bounded arithmetic based on random variables.'

B. ZILBER
28 May: `Zariski structures and noncommutative geometry.'

S. BARBINA, Leeds
4 June: `Reconstruction of classical geometries from the automorphism group.'

V. GRANDJEAN, Bath
11 June: `Geometry and singularities at infinity of real (plane) polynomial functions.'

M. KOROVINA, Aarhus, Denmark
18 June: To be announced.


Department of Materials

The following colloquia will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Thursdays in the Hume-Rothery Lecture Theatre.

Convener: J.L. Hutchison.

PROFESSOR B. DERBY, Manchester
6 May: `Ink-jet printing of functional and biological materials'.

PROFESSOR R. WEBB, Surrey
13 May: `Ion beams in the 21st centuryþmaterials and nanotechnology.'

PROFESSOR S. LYON, Princeton, USA
20 May: To be announced.

PROFESSOR J. TITCHMARSH
27 May: `Stress corrosion cracking mechanisms in light water nuclear reactors.'

PROFESSOR B. LEE, Sheffield
3 June: `Immobilising radioactive waste in glasses, ceramics and cements.'

DR T. HAYASHI, NTT Basic Research Laboratory
10 June: `Coherent charge oscillations and decoherence in semiconductor double quantum dots.'

PROFESSOR R. PALMER, Birmingham
17 June: `Organising atoms, clusters and proteins on surfaces.'


MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES, LIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Soft Matter, Biomaterials, and Interfaces

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 4 p.m. on Tuesdays in the John Rowlinson Seminar Room.

Convener: Professor J. Klein.

PROFESSOR R. ZARE, Stanford, USA
11 May: `Recent studies of interfacial binding and release.'

PROFESSOR J. H. P. BAYLEY
25 May: `Non-covalent and covalent chemistry with protein nanopores.'

DR J. MACPHERSON, Warwick
1 June: To be announced.

PROFESSOR F. DE SCHRYVER, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Holland
8 June: `Visualisation and study of single molecules.'

PROFESSOR B. EISENBERG, Rush Medical College, Chicago, USA
Fri. 11 June, 2.15 p.m.: `Ion channels as devices: crowded charge model of selectivity.'


MEDICAL SCIENCES

Institute of Musculoskeletal Sciences, the Botnar Research Centre

Unless otherwise indicated the following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the Botnar Research Centre, the Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre.

UDR R. GILL
14 May: To be announced.

PROFESSOR J. MARTIN, Melbourne
Thur. 20 May: `Coupling of bone formation to bone resorption.'

GEORGINA FERRY, science writer and editor of Oxford Today
21 May: `From lab to living-room: making sense of science.'

PROFESSOR S. GORDON
11 June: `Macrophage heterogeneity and tissue homeostasis.'

PROFESSOR A. HOLLANDER, Bristol
18 June: To be announced. (Postponed from 27 February)

PROFESSOR C. BOSHOFF
25 June: `Incorporating pharmacogenetics and genomics into clinical cancer care.'

DR S. OPPENHEIMER
2 July: To be announced.

DR M. SUNDSTROM, Chief Scientist, Structural Genomics Consortium
3 Sept.: `From structure to function: the Structural Genomics Consortium.'

PROFESSOR T. CHAMBERS, St George's Hospital Medical School, London
24 Sept: To be announced.

MR M. SNEAD, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge
15 Oct.: `Genetics and clinical features of Stickler's syndrome.'

DR P. BOWNESS
5 Nov.: `Why does HLA-B27 predispose to inflammatory arthritis?'

PROFESSOR L. CARDON
12 Nov.: To be announced.

DR J. URBAN
19 Nov.: To be announced.

PROFESSOR D. KERR
3 Dec., 2 p.m.: To be announced.


MODERN HISTORY

Early Modern German History Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5.15 p.m. on Thursdays in the modern History Research Unit, Radcliffe Infirmary. Details of the 17 June meeting will be published later.

Conveners: R.J.W. Evans, H. Kugeler, D. Phelps, M. Wasa.

PROFESSOR WATANABE-O'KELLY
6 May: (Seminar paper I) `European court festivals and festival books and their relevance for historians.'

C. GLOSSNER, D. PHELPS, M. WASA, Postgraduate Students
13 May: `Palaeography session II: working through the documents.'

C. GLOSSNER, D. PHELPS, M. WASA, Postgraduate Students
20 May: `Palaeography session III: working through the documents.'

DR B. KÜMIN
27 May: (Seminar paper II) `Drink and debauchery? An economic profile of the early modern public house.'

DR A. LINTON
3 June: (Seminar paper III): `German Lutheran funeral verse for bereaved parents in the seventeenth century.'

S. JUTERCZENKA, International Max Planck Research School, Göttingen, Germany, and D. PHELPS, KCL (provisional)
10 June: Postgraduate workshop.


East and East–Central Europe Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in the MacGregor Room, Oriel College.

Conveners: R. Crampton, R. Evans, and D. Rechter.

J. EVANS
7 May: `British attitudes to questions of Yugoslav "race" in the early twentieth century.'

D. DELETANT, UCL
14 May: `The Romanian solution to the "Jewish Problem": deportation to Transnistria, 1941–4.'

C. KUZNITZ, Bard College
21 May: `YIVO and the economy of Yiddish culture in interwar Eastern Europe.'

L. TOPP, Oxford Brookes
28 May: `The modernist mental hospital in Vienna and the Habsburg empire, 1900–10.'

L. COLE, East Anglia
4 June: `The dynastic cult and popular patriotism in the Habsburg monarchy, 1870–1914.'

R. BARTCZAK, University of Tübingen, Germany
11 June: `Reconciling empire and liberty in seventeenth-century Central Europe: Leibniz and the Polish royal election of 1669.'

N. ALAICA
18 June: To be announced.


Modern European History Research Centre

PROFESSOR R.J. EVANS, Cambridge, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 12 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Coercion and consent in Nazi Germany.'


MODERN HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCES

Seminars in Economic and Social History

Unless otherwise indicated the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Chester Room, Nuffield College.

PROFESSOR N. LAMOREAUX
12 May, Examination Schools: `Rethinking the property rights paradigm.'

A. SELTZER, Royal Holloway
19 May: `White-collar labour markets, 1890–1914: evidence from the banking industry.'

C. FEINSTEIN
26 May: `Economic history of South Africa.'

M. HUBERMAN, Montreal, Quebec
2 June: `Globalisation and the standard of living in Belgium, 1870–1913.'


PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICS

DR P. PINZAUTI, Florence, will lecture at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, 19 May, in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: Professor G.A. Cohen and Dr P.M.S. Hacker.

Subject: `Marx's commodity fetishism and Wittgenstein's grammatical confusion.'


SOCIAL SCIENCES

The new politics of protest in South Africa

This workshop will be held on Thursday, 13 May, from 4 p.m., in the Buttery, St Antony's College.

P. ALEXANDER, Rand Afrikaans University: `Leadership in social movements: Trevor Ngwane and the Soweto Electricity Crisis Committee.'

B. SIWISA: `Renting the crowd or struggles from below?: water services struggles in the Mpumlanaga Township, Durban, 1998–2002.' (Discussant: Leslie Bank, Fort Hare)

African Studies Seminars

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Fellows' Dining Room, St Antony's College.

W. GUMEDE, SOAS 20 May: `Thabo Mbeki and the reconfiguration of South African politics.'

JOHN LONSDALE, Cambridge
27 May, Nissan Institute Lecture Theatre: `Jomo Kenyatta and African historiography.'

L. BANK, Fort Hare
3 June: To be announced.

T. CULLEN and P. COULTER
10 June, Green College: The Bank, the President, and the Pearl of Africa—showing and discussion of a film made by the IBT in the 1990s about the World Bank, over two evenings (10 and 11 June). The second meeting will be held in the Nissan Institute Lecture Theatre, St Antony's.

M. BAKARI, Fatih University, Istanbul
17 June: `African Wahhabism and the quest for social climbing: the Kenyan experience.'


RESEARCH LABORATORY FOR ARCHAEOLOGY

The following seminars will be held at 10.30 a.m. on Thursdays in the Seminar Room, Research Laboratory for Archaeology and History of Art, 6 Keble Road.

Convener: Professor Tite.

A. CHAMBERLAIN, Sheffield
6 May: `The deceptive dead: age estimation and the detection of mortality patterns in the archaeological record.'

J. SCOTT-JACKSON
20 May: `The challenge of decalcified deposits: understanding palaeolithic-high-level sites in southern England.'

J. DIX, Southampton
3 June: `High resolution acoustics for the visualisation and characterisation of submerged archaeology.'

A. IRVING AND J. AMBERS, British Museum
17 June: `X-ray vision: radiography reveals new insights into artefacts from the royal cemetery at Ur.'


SAID BUSINESS SCHOOL

Quantification and the supply chain

This research workshop will be held on Wednesday, 19 May, 2–6 p.m., in Lecture Theatre 5, the Saïd Business School. The meeting will be chaired by Professor Michael Shields, Eli Broad Professor of Accounting, Michigan State University.

For further details, contact: steve.new@sbs.ox.ac.uk.

D. ROMERO-MORALES: `Centralised versus decentralised supply chain planning.'

S. NEW: `Recurrent themes in supply chain quantification: justifying co-operation and control.'

J. EFSTATHIOU: `Agent-based networks: the future for supply chain modelling and measurement.'

A. CALINESCU: `Information-theoretic measures of supply chain complexity.'


Complex Adaptive Systems

The following seminars will be held at 12.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in Seminar Room A, the Saïd Business School.

Convener: F. Reed-Tsochas.

DR. J. EFSTATHIOU
4 May: `The complexity of supply chains and manufacturing systems.'

PROFESSOR M. NEWMAN, Michigan, USA
11 May: `Form and function in complex networks.'

PROFESSOR T. HALPIN-HEALY, Columbia, USA
1 June: `The dynamics of conformity and dissent.'

DR P. ANDRIANI, Durham Business School
8 June: To be announced.

DR F. CONTI, University of Catania, Italy
8 June: To be announced.

DR A. BYDE, HP Labs UK
15 June: `Market-based control for utility data centres.'


Finance Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in Lecture Theatre 5, West Wing, the Saïd Business School.

Convener: D.P. Tsomocos.

A. KOLEN, Maastricht, Holland
6 May: `Robust portfolio selection.'

H. SABOURIAN, Cambridge
13 May: `herding in efficient markets with monotonic signals.'

A. KESWANI, Cass Business School
20 May: To be announced.

PROFESSOR A. RÖELL, Princeton, USA
27 May: `Executive pay, earnings manipulation and shareholder litigation.'

R.G. TOMPKINS
3 June: `Estimating default probabilities.'


OXFORD INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RESEARCH CENTRE

Intellectual property in the new millennium

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Latner Room, St Peter's College.

Conveners: Professor D. Vaver and Dr C. Greenhalgh.

S. STOKES, Partner, Tarlo Lyons, and Visiting Research Fellow, Bournemouth
11 May: `Some reflections on art and copyright.'

DR C. GREENHALGH and DR M. ROGERS
18 May: `The value of innovation: the interaction of competition, research and development, and intellectual property.'


OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC STUDIES

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on the days shown in the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies.

PROFESSOR E. KARIC, Sarajevo
Wed. 12 May: `The concept of the citizen ( al-Muwattan) in the thought of contemporary Muslim thinkers.'

DR S. HUNTER, Center for Strategic and International Studies, Washington, DC
Thur. 13 May: `Politics of Muslim representation post-11 September 2001.'


CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES

Interdisciplinary conversations

DR P. LUNT, University College London, will deliver the second seminar in this series at 4 p.m. on Monday, 10 May, in the Seminar Room, the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Wolfson College.

Subject: `Regulations.'


ALL SOULS COLLEGE

Attention: Phenomenology Hemispheric Specialisation and Psychiatric Disorders

This conference will be held on Friday, 28 May, and Saturday, 29 May, in All Souls College. Those interested in attending should contact the Fellows' Secretary, Humaira Erfan Ahmed (telephone: Oxford (2)89109, e-mail: humaira.erfan-ahmed@all-souls.ox.ac.uk).

Convener: Dr I. McGilchrist.

Friday, 28 May

PROFESSOR L. SASS, Rutgers
9.30 a.m.: `Attention, engagement and emotion in schizophrenia: a phenomenological account.'

PROFESSOR E. MATTHEWS, Aberdeen
11 a.m.: `Being in a world on one's own: Merleau-Ponty and schizophrenia.'

DR M. WYLLIE, Aberdeen
12 noon: `Lived time and psychopathology: depression and eternal suffering.'

M. BRENNER, author of Faces and Vanishing Points
2 p.m.: To be announced.

PROFESSOR N. NIKOLAENKO, St Petersburg, Russia
3 p.m.: To be announced.


Saturday, 29 May

DR MCGILCHRIST
9.30 a.m.: To be announced.

DR J. CUTTING, Bethlem Royal and Maudsley Hospital, Institute of Psychiatry
11 a.m.: `Apollo and Dionysus: respective phenomenological reductions in schizophrenia and depressive illness.'

PROFESSOR G. STANGHELLINI, Florence, Italy
12 noon: `Ceci n'est pas un délire: Husserl, Scheler, and the phenomenological reduction.'

DR A. RICHARDSON
2 p.m.: `Attention, laterality, and lipids in developmental and psychiatric disorders: a new approach to some old questions.'

DR G. GLAS, Consultant Psychiatrist and Professor, Utrecht
3 p.m.: `Concepts of attention in phenomenology and cognitive neuroscience: are what we experience and what we measure the same thing?'


HARRIS MANCHESTER COLLEGE

MR TAE SHIK LEE, Korean Ambassador, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 12 May, in the Charles Wellbeloved Room, Harris Manchester College. Enquiries should be addressed to: miriam.chung@hmc.ox.ac.uk.

Subject: `The North Korean nuclear development and the inter-Korean relationship.'


JESUS COLLEGE

Don Fowler Lecture

DR ANDREW LAIRD, Reader in Classical Literature, Department of Classics and Ancient History, University of Warwick, will deliver the Don Fowler Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 13 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Recognising Virgil.'


KEBLE COLLEGE

Eric Symes Abbott Memorial Lecture

FR. TIMOTHY RADCLIFFE, OP, will deliver the Eric Symes Abbott Memorial Lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Friday, 28 May, in the chapel, Keble College.

Subject: `The crisis of truth-telling in our society.'


LADY MARGARET HALL

Canada Seminars

DR LAURA PEERS, Lecturer Curator, the Pitt Rivers Museum, will speak at 5.30 p.m. on Thursday, 13 May, in the Talbot Hall, Lady Margaret Hall. There will be an opportunity to meet the speaker informally afterwards. Further information may be obtained from Vanessa Windsor, Lady Margaret Hall (telephone: Oxford (2)74302, e-mail: vanessa.windsor@lmh.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `New relationships, new knowledge: First Nations photographs and the Pitt Rivers Museum.'


MANSFIELD COLLEGE

Hands Lecture

SIR NIGEL WICKS, Chairman of the Committee on Standards in Public Life 2001–4, will deliver the fourth annual Hands Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 25 May, in the chapel, Mansfield College.

Subject: `Muddle, muddle, toil, and trouble: some challenges for our democratic process.'


ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

European Studies Centre

Sub-state entities and co-sovereignty within the EU

This workshop will be held on Thursday, 20 May, in the European Studies Centre, St Antony's College. The conference will start with an introduction by Professor Ezeizabarrena at 9.15 a.m. and will end with an open debate at 7 p.m.

Convener: Professor Xabier Ezeizabarrena, St Antony's College.

Morning session (chaired by Kalypso Nikolaidis)

M. KEATING, European Institute, Florence
9.30 a.m.: `General overview towards the EU constitution.'

PROFESSOR EZEIZABARRENA
10.15 a.m.: `Basque historical titles at the EU, and a comparative approach with Germany, Austria, and Belgium.'

E. JURADO
11.30 a.m.: `A comparative approach with the eastern EU enlargement.'

J.C. KARL
12.15 p.m.: `A historical and constitutional analysis of Bavaria.'

Afternoon session

M. QUINN, Welsh Government
3.30 p.m.: `Contribution from the UK–Welsh case.'

L. BAS, Flemish Government
4.15 p.m.: `The Flemish perspective and activity at the UN and EU.'

J. BENGOETXEA, University of the Basque Country/CJEC
5.30 p.m.: `The Basque case in the current situation.'

M. HERRERO DE MIÑON, Royal Academy of Political Sciences, Spain
6.15 p.m.: Sub-state entities and co-sovereignty at the Council of Europe.'

Informal talk and discussion

JAVIER SÁENZ DE PIPAÓN, lawyer of the Bar of Madrid, will give an informal talk, to be followed by discussion, at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 6 May, in the Seminar Room, the European Studies Centre. The talk will be introduced by Professor Xabier Ezeizabarrena, Basque Visiting Fellow, St Antony's.

Subject: `EU co-operation in criminal matters: a vision from Spain after the 11-M.'


ST HUGH'S COLLEGE

Henry Rowlatt Bickley Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR G. VATTIMO, Professor of Philosophy, University of Turin, will deliver the Henry Rowlatt Bickley Memorial Lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 18 May, in the Maplethorpe Building, St Hugh's College.

Subject: `A farewell to truth: veritas from modernity to postmodernity.'


ST JOHN'S COLLEGE

Oxford Buildings—Architects and Architecture in Context

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the New Seminar Room, St John's College.

Conveners: L. Durning and W. Whyte.

J. MUNBY
10 May: `Defending Oxford: a new look at the castle and the walls.'

L. DURNING, Oxford Brookes
17 May: `Representing Elizabethan Oxford: a reassessment of the Bereblock drawings.'

A. GERAGHTY, York
24 May: `Wren, restoration Oxford, and the Sheldonian Theatre.'

M. HALL, Editor, Apollo magazine
7 June: `The Oxford buildings of Bodley and Garner.'

P. HOWELL, Past President, the Victorian Society
14 June: `The fight for North Oxford: conserving Victorian townscape.'


TRINITY COLLEGE

Margaret Howard Lecture

SIR CHARLES GRAY, Judge of the High Court, will deliver the Margaret Howard Lecture at 5.45 p.m. on Thursday, 27 May, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `Freedom of expression—checking the balances.'


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR DAVID WIGGINS will deliver the H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 11 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Objectivity in ethics: two difficulties, two responses.'


REGENT'S PARK COLLEGE

Centre for Christianity and Culture

Visions and Visionaries: Wise Women

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays at Regent's Park College.

DR F. KENNETT
11 May: `Joanna Southcott: prophecy and leadership in the eighteenth to nineteenth centuries.'

DR J. SHAW
18 May: `Octavia, 1914–34: vision versus holy text in the life and work of a modern British prophet.'

H. BLACKMORE
25 May: `Isabella Gilmore (1842–1923) and the Deaconess movement.'

REVD. K. GALLOWAY, Leader, Iona community
1 June: `Of witnesses, wives and wise women: women in the life of the Iona community.'

DR A. BRADSHAW, Oxford Brookes
8 June: `No Angels? Vision and values in nursing, past and present.'

REVD. M. BLYTH AND OTHERS
15 June: `Women visionaries in the Baptist tradition.'


RIPON COLLEGE, CUDDESDON

150 Anniversary Festival

The past, present, and future of theological education

This conference will be held on Tuesday, 25 May, 9.30 a.m.–6 p.m., in Ripon College, Cuddesdon. Speakers will include Mark Chapman, Andrew Atherstone, Alastair Redfern, Michael Brierley, and Robert Jeffrey.

THE RT. REVD STEPHEN PLATTEN, Bishop of Wakefield, will deliver the keynote lecture at 4.15 p.m.

Subject: `Cuddesdon, theological education, and the changing Church.'

Other events

The following events will also be held as part of the Anniversary Festival. Further details of all events may be obtained from Mrs Sophie Farrant, Ripon College, Cuddesdon, Oxford OX44 9EX (telephone: Oxford 874404, e-mail: sfarrant@ripon-cuddesdon@ac.uk).

Note: places are very limited for the Friday events.

Wed. 26 May, 7.30 p.m.: Concert of sacred music in All Saints Church, Cuddesdon, with the choir of St Mary Magdalen.

Thur. 27 May, 5.30–7 p.m.: Tour of the old Ripon Hall buildings in Boar's Hill, and unveiling of blue plaque.

Fri. 28 May, 11.30 a.m.: Festival Eucharist. Celebrant: The Rt. Revd Dr Rowan Williams, Archbishop of Canterbury; preacher: The Rt. Revd Richard Harries, Bishop of Oxford and Visitor to the college.

Fri. 28 May, 2.30 p.m. THE RT. REVD DR ROWAN WILLIAMS, Archbishop of Canterbury: `The Christian priest today.' (Festival Lecture)


OXFORD ITALIAN ASSOCIATION

Rowe Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR PIERO BOITANI, FBA, Professor of English, University of Rome, `La Sapienza', will deliver the Dorothy Rowe Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 28 May, in the Grove Auditorium, Magdalen College (entrance through Longwall).

Subject: `Dante, Milton, and the poetry of Christian Europe.'

ESRC AIM DOCTORAL STUDENTSHIPS

Applications are invited for two doctoral studentships for EU and UK nationals, to be awarded by the University's Saïd Business School, as part of the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)'s Advanced Institute of Management Research (AIM) initiative. Scholarships will be tenable from October 2004 for a period of three years.

AIM is a major new initiative to improve management practice and research in the United Kingdom. AIM has appointed seventeen fellows from leading UK institutions to work together for three years in this effort. Its mission is to initiate and conduct research on significant issues related to productivity, innovation, and practice (see www.aimresearch.org for details). Successful candidates will conduct research under the supervision of Professor Mari Sako, an AIM Fellow (see www.sbs.ox.ac.uk Faculty and Research page for her research interests).

Applicants should indicate how the proposed area of study contributes to the research literature in management practice, innovation, corporate performance, or productivity. Candidates will have a good first degree and a master's qualifications in the social sciences, and will register for a D.Phil. degree.

The studentships are to the value of full time home/EU fees plus a stipend towards living costs. The studentship includes opportunities for some teaching and research assistance.

The deadline for applications is 10 May. For application forms, contact Audrey Leishman, Research Degrees Coordinator quoting AIM-2004 at Audrey.leishman@sbs.ox.ac.uk or visit www.sbs.ox.ac.uk. Informal enquiries may be addressed to Professor Mari Sako at mari.sako@sbs.ox.ac.uk.

OXFORD UNIVERSITY GAZETTE 6 May 2004

EXAMINATIONS AND BOARDS

CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

The following changes in regulations made by the Personnel and Resource Allocation Committee of Council will come into effect on 21 May 2004.

With the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, and, where applicable, of divisional boards, the following changes in regulations made by divisional and faculty boards will come into effect on 21 May 2004.

1 Planning and Resource Allocation Committee of Council

Explanatory note

During Hilary Term, PRAC considered a number of papers proposing revisions to fee structures and rates for the 2004-5 academic year. The amendments to Examination Regulations required to implement the approved changes are set out below. These are as follows:

  1. Visiting Students regulations are amended to remove the liability to bench fees and thus the contradiction in current legislation. It has been decided to defer implementation until 2005-6.

  2. The level of fees payable at Matriculation, on registration, entry for examination etc, is increased by 4.5 per cent.

  3. Home/EU tuition fee levels are amended to 2004-5 levels.

  4. Overseas and bespoke tuition fees are amended to 2004-5 levels.

  5. The following amendments to categorisation of courses for overseas fee purposes have been advised: Mathematical and Physical Sciences Division proposes to move the M.Sc. in Computer Science and the Diploma and M.Sc. in Applied Statistics to Category C from 2005-6; Medical Sciences Division advises that graduate programmes in the Department of Experimental Psychology will remain in Category C, and the M.Sc. and Diploma in Science and Medicine of Athletic Performance will attract the Category C fee for all students.

  1. Fees for Visiting Students

    With effect from 1 September 2004

    1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 995, ll. 16-19, delete '˜and (b) to the Curators of the University Chest '¦ in accordance with cl. 6 below.

    2. Ibid., p. 996, ll. 2-3, delete '˜to the payment of such fee or fees as may be prescribed, and.

  2. Regulations on financial matters

    With effect from 1 September 2004

    1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 1062, l.16, delete '˜£161 and substitute '˜£168.

    2. Ibid., l.26, delete '˜80.00 and substitute '˜84.00.

    3. Ibid., l.27, delete '˜250.00 and substitute '˜261.00.

    4. Ibid., l.32, delete '˜41.00 and substitute '˜43.00.

    5. Ibid., l.33, delete '˜46.00 and substitute '˜48.00.

    6. Ibid., l.34, delete '˜80.00 and substitute '˜84.00.

    7. Ibid., l.35, delete '˜58.00 and substitute '˜61.00.

    8. Ibid., l.36, delete '˜168.00 and substitute '˜176.00

    9. Ibid., l.38, delete '˜278.00 and substitute '˜291.00. 10 Ibid., l.40, delete '˜148.00 and substitute '˜155.00. 11 Ibid., l.41, delete '˜88.00 and substitute '˜92.00.

    12 Ibid., p. 1063, l.1, delete '˜152.00 and substitute '˜159.00.

    1. Ibid., l.2, delete '˜334.00 and substitute '˜349.00.

    2. Ibid., l.3, delete '˜350.00 and substitute '˜366.00.

    3. Ibid., l.4, delete '˜537.00 and substitute '˜561.00.

    4. Ibid., l.7, delete '˜100.00 and substitute '˜105.00.

    5. Ibid., l.10, delete '˜350.00 and substitute '˜366.00.

    18 Ibid., l.12, delete '˜1,000.00 and substitute '˜1,045.00.

    1. Ibid., l.22, delete '˜15.00 and substitute '˜16.00.

    2. Ibid., l.24, delete '˜17.00 and substitute '˜18.00.

    3. Ibid., l.39, delete '˜17.00 and substitute '˜18.00.

    4. Ibid., p. 1064, l.27, delete '˜(x) for the Diploma in European Studies; and renumber (xi) to (xii). 23 Ibid., p. 1065, l.21, insert '˜(viii) the Degree of M.F.A.; and renumber (viii) to (ix).

    24 Ibid., l.25, delete '˜(c) the Diploma in European Studies; and reletter (d) to (h). 25 Ibid., p. 1066, l.17, after M.Th., insert '˜M.F.A,

    26 Ibid., after l.25, insert '˜(c) the number of composition fees payable by candidates for the D.Phil. in the Doctoral Training Centre at the Life Sciences Interface shall not exceed twelve.

    27 Ibid., p.1069, l.19 , delete '˜2003-4 and substitute '˜2004-5. 28 Ibid., l.24, delete '˜£1,125 and substitute '˜£1,150.

    1. Ibid., l.29, delete '˜£550 and substitute '˜£560.

    2. Ibid., l.36, delete '˜3,910 and substitute '˜£4,085. Insert footnote: '˜A banded fee structure for Recognised and Visiting Students will be introduced from 2005-6;

    3. Ibid., l.37, delete '˜£10,424 and substitute '˜£12,400 (including College and other fees, but excluding accommodation and other living costs);

    4. Ibid., ll.38-39, delete '˜(f) for members of the University working for the Diploma in European Studies, £19,108; and replace with '˜(f) for members of the University resident in the Isle of Man or the Channel Islands, fees in one of four bands, details of which may be obtained from the University Offices (Planning and Resource Allocation Section), or from College offices;

    5. Ibid., l.43, delete '˜2003-4 and substitute '˜2004-5.

    6. Ibid., ll.43-44, delete '˜, save in the case of the Postgraduate Diploma in Management Studies where the specific fee shall be paid in the first year of the course only

    7. Ibid., p.1069, l.46 to p.1070, l.4, delete '˜£2,940, or half'¦ Westminster College). and replace with '˜£3,010, or half that rate if part-time students for Degrees, Diplomas or Certificates not specified in items (b) to (l) below;

    36 Ibid., p.1070, l.6, delete '˜£21,000 and substitute '˜£23,000.

    1. Ibid., l.7, delete '˜£32,000; and substitute '˜£37,000 (including College fees and accommodation);

    2. Ibid., l.8, delete '˜£1,000 and substitute '˜15%.

    3. Ibid., l.12, insert footnote: '˜The non-refundable deposit shall also apply to the M.Sc. in Financial

      Economics commencing in 2005-6.

    4. Ibid., l.17, after £750, add '˜in the first year of the course only;

    5. Ibid., after l.17, insert '˜(e) for members of the University working for the Degrees of M.Sc. in Forced Migration, M.Sc. in Economics for Development, M.Phil. in Development Studies, or M.Phil. in Economics, and entitled, in accordance with the Appendix to this subsection, to be charged fees at the appropriate '˜home rate, £3,010;

    6. Insert footnote: '˜The '˜home fee for the first years of programmes listed under item (e) above will be set at a higher bespoke rate from 2005-6.

    7. Ibid., ll.18-19, reletter (e) as (f), and delete '˜£5,444 and substitute '˜£5,720.

    8. Ibid., ll. 20-22, delete '˜(f) for members'¦ in the third year. and substitute '˜(g) for members of the University working for the Degree of M.Sc. in Bioinformatics: £5,250 for those entitled, in accordance with the Appendix to this subsection, to be charged fees at the appropriate '˜home rate;

      £7,500 for overseas students;

    9. Ibid., after l.22, insert '˜(h) for members of the University working for the Degree of M.Sc. in Mathematical Finance: £6,300 for those entitled, in accordance with the Appendix to this subsection, to be charged fees at the appropriate '˜home rate; £8,300 for overseas students;

      '˜(i) for members of the University working for the Degree of M.Sc. in Advanced Cognitive Therapy Studies, £6,100;

      '˜(j) for members of the University working for the Degree of M.Sc. in Evidence-Based Health Care:

      £4,000 for those entitled, in accordance with the Appendix to this subsection, to be charged fees at the appropriate '˜home rate; £7,600 for overseas students;

      '˜(k) for members of the University working for the Degree of M.Sc. in Software Engineering, fees of

      £1,300 per module, plus an annual registration fee of £1,250 for home students or £2,500 for overseas students. These fees include College fees and course materials;

      Insert footnote: '˜For non-matriculated students studying subjects listed under items (g) to (j), fees as published by the Department for Continuing Education.

    10. Ibid., l.23, reletter (g) as (l).

    11. Ibid., l.26, delete '˜Category B and substitute '˜Category C. 48 Ibid., l.27, reletter (h) as (m).

    1. Ibid., p.1070, delete existing footnote and substitute '˜Note on overseas fee rates for 2005-6: Council has approved the reassignment of a number of courses to different categories w.e.f. 1 September 2005 (i.e. for the academic year 2005-6). The changes of category will apply onto to those students on such courses who begin their studies on or after 1 September 2005, and not to those already on course at that date. Council has also approved an increase of 4.5% in fee rates for overseas students for 2005-6, as compared with 2004-5.

    2. Ibid, p. 1070, l.30 to p. 1072, l.14, delete all text and substitute:

    Category A. Composition fees of £8,170 (or at that annual rate) shall be paid by:

    1. those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl.1 above, who are studying for a Degree in:

      Ancient and Modern History; Archaeology and Anthropology;

      Classical Archaeology and Ancient History; Classics and English;

      Classics and Modern Languages; Classics and Oriental Studies; Economics and Management; English Language and Literature; English and Modern Languages;

      European and Middle Eastern Languages; Geography;

      History of Art;

      Human Sciences;

      Jurisprudence;

      Literae Humaniores;

      Mathematics;

      Mathematics and Philosophy; Mathematics and Statistics; Modern History;

      Modern History and Economics; Modern History and English;

      Modern History and Modern Languages; Modern History and Politics;

      Modern Languages;

      Oriental Studies;

      Philosophy and Modern Languages; Philosophy, Politics and Economics; Philosophy and Theology;

      Physics and Philosophy; Theology (B.A.);

      Theology (B.Th. and Certificate);

    2. those liable to pay a composition fee under the provision of §6 cl.1 above, who are studying for the:

      Degree of BCL or Magister Juris; Diploma in Theology;

      Diploma in Legal Studies;

      Postgraduate Diploma in Educational Studies; Postgraduate Certificate in Education;

    3. those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl.3 above, who are admitted as students by:

      1. the Humanities Board to work within any Faculty other than the Faculty of Music or the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art;

      2. the Life and Environmental Sciences Board to work within the Schools of Anthropology, Archaeology or Geography and the Environment;

      3. the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board to work within the Computing Laboratory, Mathematical Institute or Department of Statistics, and who commenced the programme of study prior to 1 September 2004*;

      4. the Social Sciences Board;

      5. the Continuing Education Board;

    4. those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl.6 above, and who are studying a subject listed in (i) or (ii) above or which falls within the scope of the board of any division as specified in (iii) above.

    Category B. Composition fees of £9,530 (or at that annual rate) shall be paid by:

    1. those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl.3 above, who are admitted as students by the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board to work within the Computing Laboratory, Mathematical Institute or Department of Statistics, and who commenced the programme study on or after 1 September 2004*;

    2. those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl.6 above, and who are studying a subject which falls within the scope of the board of any division as specified in (i) above. New footnote *: A student shall be deemed to have commenced a programme of study on commencing study towards any new qualification aim, except when progressing to D.Phil. study in the term following completion of a programme which qualifies the student for a reduced number of

    D.Phil. composition fee payments under the provisions of §6 cl.4, in which case the student shall be deemed to have commenced on admission to their previous programme of study.

    Category C. Composition fees of £10,890 (or at that annual rate) shall be paid by:

    1. those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl.1 above, who are studying for a Degree in:

      Biological Sciences;

      Chemistry;

      Computer Science;

      Earth Sciences;

      Geology;

      Engineering Science;

      Engineering and Computer Science; Engineering, Economics and Management; Engineering and Materials;

      Experimental Psychology; Fine Art;

      Materials, Economics and Management; Materials Science;

      Mathematics and Computer Science; Metallurgy and the Science of Materials; Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry; Music;

      Physics;

      Physiological Sciences;

      Psychology, Philosophy and Physiology;

    2. those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl.1 above, who are studying for the:

      Bachelor of Medicine (First Examination, Parts I and II); Preliminary Examination in Medicine (Part I);

    3. those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl.3 above, who are admitted as students by:

      1. the Humanities Board to work within the Faculty of Music or the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art;

      2. the Life and Environmental Sciences Board to work within the Departments of Biochemistry, Plant Sciences or Zoology;

      3. the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board to work within the Departments of Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Engineering Science, Materials or Physics, or the Life Sciences Interface Doctoral Training Centre;

      4. the Medical Sciences Board to work within the Departments of Human Anatomy and Genetics, Pathology, Pharmacology, Physiology, or Experimental Psychology;

  1. those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl.6 above, and who are studying a subject listed in (i) or (ii) above or which falls within the scope of the board of any division as specified in (iii) above.

Category D. Composition fees of £19,970 (or at that annual rate) shall be paid by:

  1. those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl.2 above, who are studying for the:

    Bachelor of Medicine (Second Examination) Preliminary Examination in Medicine (Part II)

  2. those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl.3 above, who are admitted by the Medical Sciences Board to work within departments in the Faculty of Clinical

    Medicine.

  3. those liable to pay a composition fee under the provisions of §6 cl.6 above, who are working within departments in the Faculty of Clinical Medicine.

2 Humanities Board and Social Sciences Board

  1. Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

    1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.441, delete ll.37-45 and substitute:

      '˜This paper focuses on the comparative study of the national party and institutional systems of the main Western European countries, and on comparative issues in West European constitutional and party politics. A part of the paper concentrates on the study of the process of European integration and the European Union. Candidates will be required to show knowledge of at least two of the three major Western European countries (Germany, France and Italy), and of one further country (which may or may not be the third major country) or the European Union. Knowledge of the United Kingdom will not count towards the satisfaction of this requirement, and no question may be answered solely with reference to the United Kingdom, though comparisons of the United Kingdom with other Western European countries may be appropriate..

    2. Ibid., p.442, delete ll.42-49 and substitute:

      '˜The relations among the major powers, 1945-91, including domestic and external factors shaping foreign policy; the origins and course of the cold war, including detente and the end of the cold war; East-West relations in Europe with particular reference to the foreign policies of France and the Federal Republic of Germany; European integration; the external relations of China and Japan, particularly with the Soviet Union and the United States; the Soviet Unions relations with Eastern Europe; decolonisation and conflict in the developing world..

    3. Ibid., delete from p. 442, l.51 to p.443, l.4 and substitute:

    '˜The primary topics will be: the competing approaches to the study of international relations; the principal institutions of international politics; contemporary patterns of war and peace; globalisation. Other topics will include: foreign-policy analysis; international law; regional organizations; international political economy; ethnic, national, and cultural sources of insecurity; power, interdependence, and dependency. Candidates will be required to illustrate their answers with contemporary or historical material. They will be expected to know the major developments in international affairs from 1990 onwards, and to cite these wherever appropriate. They may also be given the opportunity to show knowledge of earlier developments; but questions referring specifically to events before 1990 will not be set.

  2. Preliminary Examination for Philosophy, Politics, and Economics With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.103, l.24, after '˜constraints insert '˜, integration.

  3. Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    1. In Examination Regulations, 2004, p.449, delete l.29 and substitute:

      '˜The paper will be set in two parts. Candidates will be required to show knowledge of both parts..

    2. Ibid., delete l.37.

  4. Preliminary Examination in Politics, Philosophy, and Economics With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.102, l. 42, delete '˜Information Technology and substitute '˜Data Analysis and Information Technology.

    2. Ibid., p.103, ll. 5 and 7, de

  5. Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, on p. 440, after l.26 insert: '˜317 Economic Decisions Within the Firm.

    2. Ibid., p.447, l.37, delete '˜investment and finance,.

    3. Ibid., l.39 delete '˜public enterprises and substitute with '˜regulation.

    4. Ibid., p. 450, after l.29 insert:

    '˜317. Economic Decisions within the Firm.

    As specified in Paper E3, Economic Decisions within the Firm, in the Honour School of Engineering, Economics, and Management..

  6. Honour School of Economics and Management

    As for the Honour School of PPE (see (e), clauses 2 and 3, above).

  7. Preliminary Examination for Philosophy, Politics, and Economics With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.103, l.12 after '˜all three subjects insert: '˜and submitted a satisfactory IT and Data Analysis project.

  8. Honour School of Modern History and Politics

    With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 336, ll. 28-29 delete '˜British Politics and Government in the Twentieth Century and substitute '˜British Politics and Government since 1900.

  9. Pass School of Modern History and Politics

    With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.338, ll.41-42 delete '˜British Politics and Government in the

    Twentieth Century and substitute '˜British Politics and Government since 1900.

  10. Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.439, l.23 and p.440, l.40 delete '˜British Politics and Government in the Twentieth Century and substitute '˜British Politics and Government since 1900.

  11. Preliminary Examination in Modern History and Economics With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 83, after l.27 insert:

'˜Candidates must also pursue a course in Data Analysis and Information Technology, and are required to submit an information technology-based project by the first day of Trinity Full Term in which the examination is taken. Candidates will only be deemed to have passed the examination if they have submitted a satisfactory project for the Data Analysis and Information Technology course. Any candidate who fails to submit a project for the Data Analysis and Information Technology course by the deadline, or whose project is deemed to be unsatisfactory, will be allowed to resubmit the project by the Monday of the week falling three weeks before First Week of the following Michaelmas Full Term. Details of the course are to be found in the Student Handbook for Modern History and Economics.

3 Social Sciences Board

  1. M.Sc. in Political Theory Research

    With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    In Examination Regulations, 2003, delete from p.751, l.41 to p.752, l.2 inclusive, and substitute: '˜ 2. Candidates must:

    Attend such classes, seminars and lectures the Politics Graduate Studies Committee shall determine;

    Satisfy, where necessitated by the students choice of subject, the language requirement as set out in the relevant M.Phil. course;

    Satisfactorily complete the courses in Ethics and Philosophy of the Social Sciences;

    Satisfactorily complete one of either Formal Analysis or Text and Interpretation (formerly entitled Research Methods for Political Theorists);

    Satisfactorily complete two optional assessed courses from the research methods training programme.

  2. M.Phil. in Politics (Comparative Government, Political Theory, European Politics and Society)

    With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.592, l.32 after '˜e-u, insert '˜m as specified for the M.Phil. in International Relations,.

    2. Ibid., p.594, l.3 delete '˜the History and Politics of Central and Eastern Europe since 1945 and substitute '˜Eastern Europe under Communist Rule, 1944-1990.

    3. Ibid., p.594, l,10 delete '˜Sociology of politics and substitute '˜Political Sociology.

    4 Ibid., p. 596, delete ll.19-21.

    5 Ibid., p.596, delete l.40.

  3. M.Sc. in Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 736, delete ll.38-44, and substitute: '˜Research Methodology, as prescribed in the schedule. The Research Methodology

      Teachers will set either a written test to be taken in Week 9 of Hilary Term, or an assignment to be submitted by 12 noon on Monday of Week 10 of Hilary Term. Students will be informed at the beginning of each element of the course whether the method of assessment will be a written test or an assignment..

    2. Ibid., p.737, delete ll.34-36, and substitute:

    '˜This course examines economic approaches to organization and their relationship to other approaches, in particular those grounded in sociology and psychology.

  4. M.Sc. in Management Research

    With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.739, delete ll.22-28, and substitute: '˜Research Methodology, as prescribed in the schedule. The Research Methodology

      Teachers will set either a written test to be taken in Week 9 of Hilary Term, or an assignment to be submitted by 12 noon on Monday of Week 10 of Hilary Term. Students will be informed at the beginning of each element of the course whether the method of assessment will be a written test or an assignment..

    2. Ibid., p.740, delete ll.14-16, and substitute:

    '˜This course examines economic approaches to organization and their relationship to other approaches, in particular those grounded in sociology and psychology.

  5. M.Sc. in Russian and East European Studies

    With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    1 In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.758, delete ll.16-36 and substitute:

    '˜1. Each candidate will be required to follow a course of instruction for three terms and to present himself or herself for examination in the two compulsory papers in week eight of Trinity Term. Two copies of a thesis should be delivered to the Chair of Examiners for the M.Sc. in Russian and East European Studies, c/o Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by noon on the Friday of the sixth week of Trinity Term in the calendar year in which

    the examination is taken. Also two typewritten copies of an extended essay on methodology should be delivered to the same address by noon on the Friday of the ninth week of Hilary Term in the calendar year in which the examination is taken.

    1. The marking conventions will be those of other M.Sc. degrees.

    2. Candidates may be required to attend an oral examination. Candidates who fail the examination will be allowed to retake it in the following year. If the thesis or extended essay submitted by such candidates are of a satisfactory standard, they will not be required to resubmit them.

      2 Ibid., p.759, delete ll.13-25 and substitute:

      '˜3. A formally assessed essay of 3,000-4,000 words on methodology.

    3. A thesis of between 10,000 and 15,000 words.

  6. M.Phil. in Latin American Studies

    With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.567, l.24, after '˜course. insert:

      '˜Candidates who fail one of the three papers taken at the end of the first year without compensating strengths on the other papers will be required to retake it and pass it by the start of the Michaelmas term of their second year in order to proceed with the degree. Candidates who fail more than one paper will be deemed to have failed, and will be permitted to retake the entire examination on one further occasion only, not later than one year after the attempt..

    2. Ibid., l. 40 delete '˜in one additional paper from an and substitute '˜paper from any.

    3. Ibid., p.568, l.4 delete '˜ Area and Development Studies Committee and substitute '˜Latin American Centre Management Committee.

    4. Ibid., delete ll.8-12 and substitute:

    '˜Candidates who fail the second year examination paper (without compensating strengths on the thesis) or who fail the thesis will be permitted to resubmit the thesis or retake the examination paper on one further occasion only, not later than one year after the attempt. Candidates who fail both the thesis and the examination paper will be deemed to have failed, and will be permitted to retake the entire examination on one further occasion only, not later than one year after the attempt.

  7. M.Sc. in Latin American Studies

    With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.738. l.4 delete '˜in the chosen discipline.

    2. Ibid., delete ll. 11-12, and substitute:

      '˜submitted for approval by the Latin American Centre Management Committee by noon on the Friday of week 0 of the Hilary Full term preceding the written.

    3. Ibid., delete ll.18-22 and substitute:

      '˜2. Candidates who fail one of the examination papers or the extended essay (without compensating strengths on the other components) will be permitted to resubmit the extended essay or retake the examination paper on one further occasion only, not later than one year after the attempt.

      Candidates who fail more than one component will be deemed to have failed, and will be permitted

      to retake the entire examination on one further occasion only, not later that one year after the attempt..

    4. Ibid., delete from p.738 l.31 to p. 739, l. 6 inclusive, and substitute:

      '˜(b) two further examination papers from the list below. Candidates will usually choose a general and an optional paper but are permitted to take two general papers if they choose to. Candidates who choose an optional paper in Economics must also be taking the general paper in Economics. History

      • Latin America from Independence to the First World War (general)

      • Social Revolutions in Latin America (optional)

      • The Military in Latin America since 1930 (jointly with Politics) (optional)

      • The History of a Country or Group of Countries (optional). Candidates must choose from the following list:

        1. Brazil

        2. Mexico

        3. Chile and Argentina

        4. Peru and Bolivia

        5. Colombia, Venezuela and Ecuador

        Politics

      • The Politics of Democracy in Latin America (general)

      • Social Policies in Latin America (optional)

      • The Military in Latin America since 1930 (jointly with History) (optional)

      • The International Relations of Latin America (optional)

      • The Politics of a Country or Group of Countries (optional) (for choices see the History list above)

        Economics

      • Introduction to the Latin American Economies (general)

      • Further issues in Latin American Development (optional)

      • Human Development in Latin America (optional)

      • The Economic Development of a single country (optional) Candidates must choose from the following list

    1. Argentina

    2. Brazil

    3. Colombia

    4. Chile

    5. Peru

    6. Mexico.

  8. M.Sc. in Public Policy in Latin America

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

  1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.755, ll.35-36, delete '˜and will, when entering for the examination, be required to produce a certificate from their supervisors to this effect..

  2. Ibid., delete ll.42-45 and substitute:

    '˜3. Not later than noon on the Friday of the sixth week of the Michaelmas Full term in which they are admitted, candidates shall submit for approval by the Latin American Centre Management Committee the subject area in which they propose to work and the proposed title of their dissertations..

  3. Ibid., after l. 50 insert:

'˜6. Candidates who fail the examination paper (without compensating strengths on the dissertation) or who fail the dissertation will be permitted to resubmit the dissertation or retake the examination paper on one further occasion only, not later than one year after the attempt. Candidates who fail both the dissertation and the examination paper will be deemed to have failed, and will be permitted to retake the entire examination on one further occasion only, not later than one year after the attempt.

  1. M.Phil. in Development Studies

    With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.522, l.32 and l.38, and p.523, l.10 delete '˜Techniques and substitute '˜Methods.

    2. Ibid., p.523, delete ll.27-34 and substitute:

      '˜(i) Development and the Environment:

      This course will examine both theoretically and through particular applications the contested field of sustainable development, as it applies to the developing world. It will provide students with an interdisciplinary introduction to diverse understandings of the relationship between the environment and development. Themes covered in this option include: the link between inequality, poverty and environmental degradation; natural resource use, degradation and depletion; common property resources; pollution control; the science of biodiversity loss and biodiversity policy; evaluation of trade-offs between development and conservation; non- monetary valuations of environmental resources..

    3. Ibid., p.525, delete ll.16-25 and substitute:

    '˜ The paper analyses the international relations of developing countries from 1945 to the present day with emphasis on the contemporary international relations of developing countries. The focus is on the characteristics of developing states and their interaction with the extant political and economic arrangements in the international system. The paper will address topics including the legacy of colonialism, and of state and nation building in developing countries; the political and economic forces which have shaped contemporary international economic relations between the developed and the developing worlds; the international financial institutions and their political impact; and the problems of the international financial architecture as manifested in frequent financial crises in the developing world.

  2. Research degrees in Educational Studies

    With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.868, delete ll.14-16.

    2. Ibid., l.21, delete '˜Committee for Educational Studies and substitute '˜Departments Academic Board.

    3. Ibid., delete ll.23-32.

    4. Ibid., after l.48 insert:

      '˜The assessors will make a recommendation in an agreed written report. Candidates seeking transfer to M.Sc. status will be expected during the interview to show evidence of research training through successful completion of the requirements of the departments educational research methods course, unless specifically exempted from all or part of it. Candidates whose first application for transfer to M.Sc. status is not approved shall be permitted to make one further application..

    5. Ibid., p.869, ll.17-18, delete '˜Students failing'¦..in their fourth term. and substitute: '˜Candidates whose first application for transfer to M.Litt. status is not approved shall be permitted to make one further application in their fourth term..

    6. Ibid., after l.34 insert:

      '˜The assessors will make a recommendation in an agreed written report. Candidates seeking to transfer to D.Phil. status will be expected during the interview to show evidence of research training through successful completion of the requirements of the departments educational research methods course, unless specifically exempted from all or part of it. Candidates whose first application for transfer to D.Phil.. status is not approved shall be permitted to make one further application..

    7. Ibid., delete ll. 50-51 and substitute :

      '˜Candidates whose first application for confirmation is not approved shall be permitted to make one further application within a term..

    8. Ibid., delete from p.869, l.52 to p.870, l.2 inclusive.

    9. Ibid., p.870, after l.2 insert '˜6. Thesis and delete l.6.

    10. Ibid., l.10, delete '˜committee and substitute '˜Departments Academic Board.

  3. Postgraduate Diploma in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    1 In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.956, delete ll.13-14.

    2 Ibid., p. 958, after l.14 insert:10. Candidates for the Diploma in Educational Studies may be awarded a distinction., and renumber the existing paragraph 10 as 11 accordingly.

  4. M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 696, after l. 40 insert:

      '˜These eight modules (or six in the case of students with the Diploma in Educational Studies, Modern Foreign Languages) constitute Part 1 of the examination. The dissertation (described in cll. 5 and 6 below) constitutes Part 2. Candidates shall be deemed to have passed the examination if they have satisfied the examiners in both Part 1 and Part 2. Candidates must pass Part 1 before submitting a dissertation for Part 2. At the close of the examination in Part 1, a list of candidates shall be published who have satisfied the examiners in that part of the examination..

    2. Ibid., delete l. 43 and substitute:

      '˜(ii) Satisfactory performance in both Part 1 and Part 2..

    3. Ibid., l. 44, before '˜Two insert '˜4. and renumber subsequent paragraphs accordingly.

    4. Ibid., l. 46 and l.49 delete '˜5 p.m. and substitute '˜noon.

    5. Ibid., p. 697, delete ll. 26-34, and substitute:

    '˜9. If Part 1 is failed, the candidate may retake the whole examination one further time on the next occasion when the modules are examined.

  5. M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

  1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 696, after l. 40 insert:

    '˜These eight modules (or six in the case of students with the Diploma in Educational Studies, Modern Foreign Languages) constitute Part 1 of the examination. The dissertation (described in cll. 5 and 6 below) constitutes Part 2. Candidates shall be deemed to have passed the examination if they have satisfied the examiners in both Part 1 and Part 2. Candidates must pass Part 1 before submitting a dissertation for Part 2. At the close of the examination in Part 1, a list of candidates shall be published who have satisfied the examiners in that part of the examination..

  2. Ibid., delete l. 43 and substitute:

    '˜(ii) Satisfactory performance in both Part 1 and Part 2..

  3. Ibid., l. 44, before '˜Two insert '˜4. and renumber subsequent paragraphs accordingly.

  4. Ibid., l. 46 and l.49 delete '˜5 p.m. and substitute '˜noon.

  5. Ibid., p. 697, delete ll. 26-34, and substitute:

'˜9. If Part 1 is failed, the candidate may retake the whole examination one further time on the next occasion when the modules are examined.

4 Board of the Faculty of Law

  1. Special regulations concerning research degrees in Law With effect from 1 September 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.874, delete ll.19-22 and substitute:

      '˜(ii) It is not possible to transfer to M Litt status, having successfully completed the M.Phil. or M.St. in Legal Research, unless the candidate proposes to write an entirely new thesis.

      A candidate transferring to D. Phil. status is entitled to incorporate the thesis presented for the M. Phil. or M. St. in Legal Research within the D.Phil. thesis..

    2. Ibid., delete ll. 23-30, and substitute:

      '˜(iii) Candidate who at the time of the transfer will have successfully completed the M Phil in Law or the M St in Legal Research shall submit for Part B of the Qualifying Test their successful M Phil or M St thesis. In such a case the word limits for Part B in sub-paragraph

      (ii) of paragraph 3 below do not apply..

    3. Ibid., l. 44, after '˜(ii) insert Subject to sub-paragraph (iii) of paragraph 2 above,.

    4. Ibid., p. 875, delete ll. 25-30, and substitute:

      '˜(iv) On the original submission for the Qualifying Test, the assessors may recommend (a) that the candidate be granted the transfer which has been applied for, or (b) that the candidate be permitted to resubmit Part A or, in the case in which the candidate is a probationary research student, Part B or both Part A and Part B; in the case in which the candidate offers a successful M Phil or M St thesis for Part B within sub-paragraph (iii) of paragraph 2 above, there can be no reference back except in relation to Part A. Hence in a case in which, despite having earned the degree for which it was submitted, the thesis fails to satisfy the assessors of Part B of the Qualifying Test, the permission to transfer must be refused..

    5. Ibid, delete ll. 39-49, and substitute:

      '˜(vii) Where the assessors have recommended resubmission, the candidate may resubmit at any time before the end of the sixth term from admission to the status of probationary research student or, as the case may be, M Phil or M St , or M.Litt. student. On resubmission the assessors may recommend (a) that the candidate be granted the transfer requested or (b) that the candidate be refused permission to transfer. In the case of a probationary research student the effect of the latter recommendation is to entitle the candidate to register for the M St in Legal Research under Ch VI, sect. xxxi, s. 3, 10 of the Examination Regulations, with effect retrospective to the original registration as a probationary research student..

    6. Ibid., p. 876, delete ll.1-2.

  2. Bachelor of Civil Law and Magister Juris

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

  1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.893, after l.3 insert: '˜European Private Law: Contract;.

  2. Ibid., delete l.15.

5 Board of the Faculty of Modern History

  1. Special Regulations for the Preliminary Examination in History of Art With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    1. In Examination Regulations 2003, p. 17, after l. 27, before 'œHuman Sciences', insert 'œHistory of Art'.

    2. Ibid., p. 77, after l.6 insert:

      Special Regulations for the Preliminary Examination in History of Art

      A

      The Preliminary Examination in History of Art shall be under the supervision of the Board of the Faculty of Modern History. The subjects of the examination, the syllabus, and the number of papers shall be as prescribed by regulation from time to time by the Board of the Faculty of Modern History.

      B

      The Modern History Faculty Board shall issue annually the Handbook for the Preliminary Examination in History of Art by Monday of Noughth Week of Michaelmas Term for the academic year ahead.

      Each candidate shall offer four papers as follows:

      1. Approaches to Visual Culture in World Art.

        Candidates will be examined by three-hour unseen examination.

      2. Interrogating the Classical Tradition from the Renaissance to Post-Modernism. Candidates will be examined by three-hour unseen examination.

      3. Classical Art Option.

        One course to be chosen from the following options:

        1. Greek Vases (Special Subject as specified for Honour Moderations in Classics).

        2. Greek Sculpture (Special Subject as specified for Honour Moderations in Classics).

        3. Roman Architecture (Special Subject as specified for Honour Moderations in Classics). Candidates will be examined by three-hour unseen examination.

      4. Objects, Images and Buildings in Oxford.

        Candidates will be examined by a 5,000 word extended essay, including footnotes but excluding bibliography. A list of suitable objects for this essay will be presented to candidates at the beginning of the academic year. The objects will have been proposed in advance by potential extended essay advisers and the full list of approved by the Co-ordinator of the Undergraduate Degree. The Preliminary Extended Essay Co-ordinator will assign appropriate extended essay advisers to candidates by the end of Michaelmas Term in the First Year. A candidate may propose to study an object which is not on the list, but this object must be approved by the extended essay adviser after the first tutorial with the candidate. Approval will depend on the objects accessibility and the availability of source material and curatorial expertise. Candidates will have no more than four one-hour meetings with their assigned extended essay adviser. A first draft of the extended essay may be commented on by the extended essay adviser during one of these four meetings.

        Candidates must submit the title of the extended essay to the Chairman of Examiners, Preliminary Examination in History of Art, Modern History Faculty, Broad Street, Oxford, by midday on Monday of the Second Week of the Hilary Term preceding the examination. Essays should be typed or word-processed in double spacing and should conform to the standards of academic presentation prescribed in the course handbook. Essays must be delivered by hand to the Examination Schools (addressed to the Chairman of Examiners, Preliminary Examination in History of Art, Examination Schools, Oxford) not later than noon on Friday of Third Week of the Trinity Term in the academic year in which the candidate is presenting himself or herself for examination.

        Candidates delivering essays will be required to complete a receipt form, which will only be accepted as proof of receipt if it counter-signed by a member of the Examination Schools staff. Each essay must be accompanied by a sealed envelope (bearing only the candidate's examination number) containing a formal declaration signed by the candidate that the essay is his or her own work. The University's regulations on Late Entries will apply.

        Candidates who fail one or more of papers I, II, III or IV above may resit that subject or subjects at a subsequent examination. In the case of failure to reach the required standard in the Preliminary Extended Essay, candidates must resubmit the essay by Monday of Noughth Week of Michaelmas Term of the second year. Candidates are entitled to one further meeting with their extended essay adviser.

         

    3. Ibid, p. 1006, after l. 28, insert new line:

      '˜in the Preliminary Examination in History of Art for two years;.

  2. Honour School of History of Art

With effect from 1 October 2006 (for first examination in 2007)

  1. In Examination Regulations 2003, p. 23, l. 1, before '˜Human Sciences insert: '˜History of Art.

  2. Ibid., after p. 223 insert:

    '˜SPECIAL REGULATIONS FOR THE HONOUR SCHOOL OF HISTORY OF ART A

    1. The examination in the School of History of Art shall be under the supervision of the Board of the Faculty of Modern History.

    2. No candidate shall be admitted to the examination in this school unless he or she has passed or been exempted from the First Public Examination.

    3. The Board of the Faculty of Modern History shall, by notice from time to time, make regulations respecting the examination.

    4. The Board of the Faculty of Modern History may include in the examination, either as necessary or optional, other subjects which they may deem suitable to be studied in connection with History of Art.

      B

      The Modern History Board shall issue annually the Handbook for the Honour School of History of Art by Monday of First Week of the first Michaelmas Full Term of candidates work for the Honour School.

      All candidates are required to offer Subjects I, II, III, IV, V and VI below.

      1. The Historiography and Methodologies of Art History.

      2. A Further Subject in Western Art.

        Any one of the Further Subjects listed below, as specified for the Honour School of Modern History (numbering is as for the Honour School of Modern History):

        1. Anglo-Saxon Archaeology of the Early Christian Period

        3. The Carolingian Renaissance

        1. Culture and Society in Early Renaissance Italy 1290-1348

        2. Flanders and Italy in the Quattrocento 1420-1480

        10. Court Culture and Art in Early Modern Europe

        14. Intellect and Culture in Victorian Britain

      3. Classical, Pre-Modern or Non-Western Art Option

        Any one of the options below, as specified for the relevant Honour School:

        1. Greek Art and Archaeology c.500-300 BC (as specified for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores, Greek and Roman Archaeology).

        2. Greek and Roman Wallpainting (as specified for the Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History).

        3. Art under the Roman Empire AD 14-337 (as specified for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores, Greek and Roman Archaeology).

        4. From Late Antiquity to Islam. The archaeology of the Near East during the transition from Late Antiquity and the formation of Islam, 550-900 (as specified for the Honour School of Oriental Studies, Arabic with Islamic Art and Archaeology).

        5. Byzantium: the transition from Antiquity to the Middle Ages, AD500-1100 (as specified for the Honour School of Archaeology and Anthropology).

        6. Material culture and the anthropology of things (as specified for the Honour School of Archaeology and Anthropology), if not taken under IV below.

      4. Modern Art Option

        Any one of the options below, as specified for the Honour School or Final Examination:

        1. Literature and the Visual Arts from Diderot to Zola, as specified for the Honour School of Modern Languages, Special Subjects.

        2. German Expressionism in literature and the visual arts (as specified for the Honour School of Modern Languages, Special Subjects).

        3. European Cinema (as specified for the Honour School of Modern Languages, Special Subjects).

        4. Modernism and After (as specified for the Final Examination in Fine Art).

        5. Material culture and the anthropology of things (as specified for the Honour School of Archaeology and Anthropology), if not taken under III above.

      5. Special Subject in Western Art, consisting of

        (a) a paper including compulsory passages and/or images for comment; (b) an extended essay. Any one of the Special Subjects listed below, as specified for the Honour School of Modern History (numbering is as for the Honour School of Modern History):

        8. The High Renaissance in Rome and Florence.

        12. English Architecture 1660-1720.

        Depending on the availability of teaching resources in the different Faculties, not all of the options listed under II, III, IV and V will be available to all History of Art candidates. Candidates should

        refer to the handbooks of the relevant Honour Schools for details about availability and registration for individual options. A list of options available the following year and how to register will be circulated to students by Week 4 in Hilary Term of each year.

      6. A thesis from original research

      7. Candidates must submit a thesis as part of the fulfilment of their Final Examination.

      8. Theses shall normally be written during the Hilary Term of the Final Year. All theses must be submitted not later than noon on Friday of Eighth Week of the Hilary Term of the academic year in which the candidate is presenting himself or herself for examination.

      9. A candidate may submit

        1. any essay or part of any essay which he or she has submitted or intends to submit for any university essay prize; or

        2. any other work

          provided in either case that (i) no thesis will be accepted if it has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for a final honour school other than one involving Modern History or History of Art, or another degree of this University, or a degree of any other university, and (ii) the candidate submits a statement to that effect, and (iii) the subject is approved by the Chairman of the Examiners for the Honour School of History of Art.

      10. The provisos in cl. 3 above shall not debar any candidate from submitting work based on a previous submission towards the requirements for a degree of any other university provided that

        1. the work is substantially new;

        2. the candidate also submits both the original work itself and a statement specifying the extent of what is new. The examiners shall have sole authority to decide in every case whether proviso (i) has been met.

      11. Every candidate except when offering a thesis as defined in cl. 3 (a) must submit a proposed preliminary title to the Chairman of the Examiners for the Honour School of History of Art, the History Faculty, Broad Street, Oxford, by midday on the Friday of Eighth Week of Trinity Full Term in the academic year prior to the examination. The final title proposed must be submitted to the Chairman of Examiners (as above), together with the written approval of their College History of Art Co-ordinator, not later than Friday of Eighth Week of Michaelmas Term in the year of the examination. The Chairman of Examiners shall give notification whether or not the title is approved by the first Monday of Hilary Full Term of the same year. Any subsequent changes to title require formal application to and approval by the Chairman of Examiners.

      12. Theses should normally include an investigation of visual and material culture (broadly defined), with references made to relevant images and printed and/or unprinted primary written sources, and must include proper footnotes and a bibliography. They must be the work of the author alone. In all cases, the candidate's Undergraduate Thesis Adviser shall discuss with the candidate the field of study, the sources available, and the methods of presentation. Candidates shall be expected to have attended a class on choosing a thesis topic, led by the Undergraduate Thesis Co-ordinator, and to have discussed their choice of topic with their College History of Art Co-ordinator during the Trinity Term of the year prior to examination and Michaelmas Term of the year of examination. Details of arrangements are given in the course handbook. The Undergraduate Thesis Co-ordinator will appoint an appropriate expert thesis adviser for each candidate. Candidates shall have no more than five one-hour meetings with their Undergraduate Thesis Adviser, normally distributed as follows: one in Trinity Term of the year prior to examination, one in Michaelmas Term and three in

        Hilary Term of the year of examination. A first draft may be commented on by the Undergraduate Thesis Adviser during one of these five meetings.

      13. No thesis shall exceed 12,000 words in length (including footnotes, but excluding bibliography, and, in cases for which specific permission has been obtained from the Chairman of Examiners, appendices). All theses must be typed or word-processed in double spacing on one side of A4 paper with the notes and references at the foot of each page, with a left-hand margin of one-and-a- half inches and all other margins of at least one inch. The thesis should conform to the standards of academic presentation prescribed in the course handbook. Failure to conform to such standards may incur penalties as outlined in the course handbook.

      14. All candidates must submit two copies of their thesis, addressed to the Chairman of Examiners, Honour School of History of Art, Examination Schools, Oxford, not later than noon on Friday of Eighth Week of the Hilary Term of the year in which they are presenting themselves for examination. The University's regulations on Late Entries will apply. Every candidate shall present a certificate, signed by him or herself and by his or her College History of Art Co-ordinator in a separate envelope bearing the candidate's examination number, addressed to the Chairman of Examiners. The certificate (forms are available from the Modern History Faculty Office) should declare that (a) the thesis is the candidate's own work, (b) that no substantial portion of it has been presented for any other degree course or examination, (c) that it does not exceed 12,000 words in length, (d) that no more than five advisory meetings have taken place between the candidate and his or her Undergraduate Thesis Adviser, and (e) that only the first draft of the thesis has been seen by the Undergraduate Thesis Adviser. Candidates delivering theses will be required to complete a receipt form, which will only be accepted as proof of receipt if it is countersigned by a member of the Examination Schools staff.

      15. Candidates shall not answer in any other paper questions which fall very largely within the scope of their thesis nor choose a Special Subject extended essay topic related to their thesis. Candidates should not choose a thesis that only substantially reworks material studied in the Further Subject in Western Art, in the Classical, Pre-Modern or non-Western art option, in the Modern art option, or in the Special Subject, and should demonstrate familiarity with and use of substantially different and additional primary sources and visual material.

  3. Ibid., p. 1008, l. 23, after '˜Honour School of Modern History insert '˜and in the Honour School of History of Art.

  1. Pass School of History of Art

    With effect from 1 October 2006 (for first examination in 2007)

    In Examination Regulations 2003 insert after new regulations for Honour School of History of Art, the following new regulations:

    '˜PASS SCHOOL OF HISTORY OF ART

    Candidates must satisfy the examiners in the following four papers:

    1. The Historiography and Methodologies of Art History, as specified for the Honour School of History of Art.

    2. A Further Subject in Western Art, as specified for the Honour School of History of Art, or A thesis from original research, as specified under Regulation VI for the Honour School of History of Art.

    3. A Classical, Pre-Modern or non-Western Art Option, as specified for the Honour School of History of Art.

    4. A Modern Art Option, as specified for the Honour School of History of Art.

OBITUARIES

Lincoln College

ROBERT BALTAXE, 30 December 2003; commoner 1950–4. Aged 76.

HENRY BENSON BIRRELL, 18 September 2003; commoner 1952–4. Aged 76.

BERNERS ARCHDALE WALLACE JACKSON, October 2003; commoner 1952–6. Aged 87.

ALAN MORRISON LITTLEJOHN, 17 December 2003; graduate commoner 1947–50. Aged 78.


MEMORIAL SERVICE

All Souls College

A Memorial Service for SIMON KEITH WALKER, MA, D.PHIL., F.R.HIST.S., will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Saturday, 15 May, in the chapel, All Souls College.

Concerts

The Oxford Millennium Orchestra plays Beethoven, Symphony No. 5 in C minor, and Mozart, Piano Concerto No. 24 in C minor. Conductor: Nicholas Mumby. Piano: Alistair Curd. Tuesday 11th May 2004 at 8pm, Sheldonian Theatre. Tickets £12/£10/£5 available from the Oxford Playhouse. Telephone: 01865 305305 or www.ticketsoxford.com.

Saturday, 15 May, 8 p.m. Sheldonian Theatre: Richard Strauss, Four Last Songs; Mahler, Symphony No 1 in D Major (\Titan\). The Oxford Philomusica Orchestra, Susan Bullock, soprano, Marios Papadopoulos, conductor. Tickets £30, £24, £17, £10. Book online at www.oxfordphil.com, Box Office 01865 305305.

The Oxford Pops Orchestra and conductor Philip Mann proudly present an unabashedly fun program of American classics. Accomplished pianist Tatiana Roitman joins Oxford's finest musicians in Gershwin's ever-popular Rhapsody in Blue, Ives's profoundly beautiful Unanswered Question and Copland's timeless Appalachian Spring. A pre-concert talk with composer Christopher Dietz at 7 p.m. precedes the European première of his prize-winning composition, Allidatha. Friday, 14 May at 8 p.m., Sheldonian Theatre. Tickets available on the door or from Tickets Oxford 01865 305305 or http://www.ticketsoxford.com, £15/10/5 (concessions). More information available at http://users.ox.ac.uk/~scat2498/.


Lectures

St Giles' Thursday Lunchtime Talks, Trinity Term 2004—06/05/04: A Christian Perspective—Keith Ward; 13/05/04: A Jewish Perspective—Yossi Klein Halevi; 18/05/04 (Tuesday): A Jewish reaction to The Passion of the Christ—Jonathan Gorsky; 20/05/04: The Wall in Israel/Palestine—Husam Zomlot; 27/05/04: Keeping the Peace: the essential soldier—Roy Giles; 03/06/04: Iraq: the aftermath—Andrew White; 10/06/04: Debt and Poverty from an Islamic Perspective—Muhammad Imran; 17/06/04: Why Fair Trade?—Carol Wills. (The titles of some of the talks are to be confirmed.) The talks will be held at St Giles' Church at 12.30pm. Everyone is welcome. In order to help us with our costs, a small donation would be appreciated. For more information visit: www.st-giles-church.org.

Would you be willing to take part in our studies on diet and blood fats? We are studying the links between diet and heart disease. If you are healthy and aged 18–65 years, we would like to hear from you. Contact Alex or Mary at OCDEM, the Churchill Hospital. Tel.: 01865 857262, e-mail: enquiries@oxlip.ox.ac.uk.


Antiques Bought and Sold

Antiques and decorative objects bought and sold: desks and library furniture always wanted, also garden stonework and large gilt picture frames—any condition. Please call: Greenway Antiques, 90 Corn Street, Witney, Oxon. Open Mon.–Fri., 9.30 a.m.–5 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Tel.: 01993 705026, mobile: 07831 585014.


Periodicals Bought and Sold

Back-issues of scholarly periodicals and journals bought and sold. Graham Jeffrey, Periodicals (est. 1967), 29 Cuddesdon Road, Horspath, Oxford OX33 1JD. Tel.: 01865 872528, fax: 776398. E-mail: gjeffreysatu@aol.com.


Restoration and Conservation of Antique Furniture

John Hulme undertakes all aspects of restoration: 30 years' experience; collection and delivery. For free advice, telephone or write to: The Workshop, 11A High Street, Chipping Norton, Oxon. OX7 5AD. Tel.: 01608 641692.

Mughal Indian cuisine: 1st floor, 135 High Street, Oxford. From our kitchen to your table, we would like to bring you herbs, spices, roots, beauty, fragrances and Mughal tradition of passion for good food. Tel.: 01865 251600. Open: daily 12 p.m. to 2.30 p.m. and 5.30 p.m. to 11.30 p.m. Web site: http://www.cafezouk.co.uk.


Services Offered

Specialist advisers to academics: Colin Coates and Partners offer tax and accounting services, including professional salary review, and retirement covering the University's Superannuation Scheme. Telephone 01934 844133 or e-mail info@ccptax.com. For more information visit www.ccptax.com.

Marshall & Galpin Solicitors, Family Department. We are an established Oxfordshire private client firm with offices in Oxford, Thame and Abingdon. We have seven specialist family lawyers who advise on a wide range of issues: divorce and separation, children, financial agreements on divorce, pre-nuptial agreements, cohabitee disputes, separation agreements and pensions. Our lawyers are members of the Solicitors Family Law Association. Two members of the team are Deputy District Judges and three are trained mediators. We offer a range of competitive rates and a short free initial interview. French, Spanish and Italian spoken. Other services provided by the firm include property adviceconveyancing, wills & probate, personal injury & medical negligence, employment and businesscommercial. For further information visit our website at: www.marshallgalpin.com or contact Mary Wakem on 01865 792300 (Oxford), Simon Bassett on 01235 555345 (Abingdon), James Stonham 01844 261966 (Thame).

Wendy Darnell: Catering for any occasion! Menus individually designed for you. Many years' experience. Telephone: Wendy Darnell 01865 767105.

Town and Country Trees: arboricultural contractors; modern arboricultural techniques; local authority approved; safeguarded by full Public Liability insurance. Free advice and quotations. Tel.: 0845 458 2980 or 07976 261850 (mobile).

Typing service. Manuscript typing (not thesis typing): £10 per hour/4 sides A4. Fast and accurate. Contact Louise Pim on Oxford 721582.

One of the highest qualified exercise and nutritional consultant/personal trainers in the UK. 35 years' experience. MSc Biomechanics and Applied Human Movement; BSc (Hons 1st) Sports Nutrition; Adv. Dip in Clinical Stress Management; Adv. Dip in Clinical Sports Therapy. Member of the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences. Member of the International Society of Biomechanics. Expert attention for tone, weight loss, injury and rehabilitation and performance, from total novice levels to advanced, regardless of sex, age or physical limitations. Web site: www.alangordon-health.co.uk.


Domestic Services

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: 01865 726983 or 01235 555533.

Language tuition. Chinese Mandarin teacher (native speaker) offers Chinese language tuition for different levels and requirements (conversation and writing). Tuition at your home or office possible. Contact: Oxford 514206 or e-mail: W100009@hotmail.com.


Situations Vacant

Christ Church Cathedral School. Required for Sept.: Playground Supervisor and part-time Matron, to work c.15 hours p.w., mostly with 4--7 year olds, also assisting with part-time matron duties. Details from: Christ Church Cathedral School, 3 Brewer Street, Oxford OX1 1QW. Application with CV and telephone/address details of two referees as soon as possible. Telephone: 01865 242561, fax: 202945, e-mail: schooloffice@cccs.org.uk.

Oxford-based academic publisher requires publicity assistant. Please send CV, application and salary expectations to: salesuk@berghahnbooks.com.


Houses to Let

Central North Oxford. 4/5 bedroom house on 3 floors in a stunning location between the canal and Port Meadow. Walking distance to city centre, near playgrounds and schools. Excellent condition, less than 2 years' old, 3 bathrooms, 2 showers, fully fitted kitchen. Would suit family. No smokers or pets please. Available from 16 July 2004 for 1 year. £1,940 pcm. Contact: Oxford 513569 / 07900 988150 or e-mail irini.skaliora@physiol.ox.uk.

Cumnor. Beautiful house situated in a side street of Cumnor Hill. 5 bedrooms. 3½ bathrooms, 3 large reception rooms, exceptional and secluded garden. Unfurnished, but furnishing may be possible. Rent will depend on length of tenancy and requirements. For further information, contact: Oxford 438422 or e-mail yellowsocks@ntlworld.com.

Central North Oxford. Very large family house with spectacular glazed open-plan living space. 3/4 reception rooms, 5/6 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, shower room, well furnished, fully equipped, nice garden, off street parking for 3 cars, use of small boat on the Thames. Available from August for the 04/05 academic year. £3,750 pcm, cleaner and gardener/handyman included. Contact: Oxford 316202 or e-mail jj@jjteam.demon.co.uk for photos and further details.

Marston, William Street. 2 bedroom Victorian semi-detached house with garage. Quiet neighbourhood within easy walking/cycle distance of University and John Radcliffe hospital. Ground floor is open-plan with snooker table and dining table. Recently refurbished kitchen and new bathroom with power shower and bath. Fully furnished and equipped, g.c.h., small front garden and large back garden. Available now. £750 pcm. Contact: Oxford 407827.

East Oxford. Spacious new 3/4 bedroom townhouse with garage. 2 en-suite bedrooms, bathroom, lounge, kitchen/diner. Unfurnished, all appliances included. Frequent bus service, near public park and sports facilities. £1,250 pcm (negotiable). Deposit required. Contact: V. Salmon on e-mail: salmonvyr@aol.com.

Eynsham. Newly refurbished Victorian terrace cottage to let in central old Eynsham, 2 minutes walk from shops, pub, church. Excellent bus service to Oxford; riverside walks. 1 bedroom, bathroom, kitchen, dining room, sitting room and walled garden. Suit professional person and non-smoker, as 2 other rooms are used for part time counselling. £550 pcm (inc. gas and electricity). References required. Contact: Dr Forrest on 01993 812651 or Dr Kirk on 772004.

Attractive, fully-furnished, quiet, well-maintained 2-bedroom, 2-study house (could sleep 3) with long garden and garden work-room, gas c.h, near park, shops, bus route, 10 minutes from city centre, available from 1 Sept 2004 to July 2005, £900 per month. Tel.: 01865 725577.

North Oxford . Charming recently built properties, fully furnished and equipped to a high standard with a choice of 2 bedrooms + study, and 4 bedrooms all with master bedroom en suite, family bathroom, cloakroom, lounge, kitchendiner, landscape garden and private parking. Located in one of the best residential areas and close to Summertown shops and sporting amenity and with easy access to most hospital and most University departments. Best suited to professional or visiting academics with no pets and non smokers. The 2 bedroom + study are available from various dates (early August and mid-September) at £975 pcm. The 4 bedroom is available from late September at £1,195 pcm. Telephone: 01865 516144 or fax: 01865 437996 or email: a.fiorentino@ntlworld.com.

Large, attractive 3–4 bedroom detached house, just minutes' walk from John Radcliffe, Churchill, and Nuffield hospitals. Close to good schools. Fully furnished, c.h., all appliances, off-street parking and rear garden. Suit professional family or responsible graduates. Long lease available. £1,500 p.c.m. (inc. council tax). Contact: fidewan@yahoo.co.uk or telephone 07711 377921.

Comfortable, 2 bedroom terrace house with c.h. and pleasant garden in central North Oxford to let for next academic year. Large living room, small study, cloakroom, and well-equipped kitchen. Would suit visiting academics. No more than 2 people sharing. Available from beginning of September 2004 to mid-July 2005. Telephone: Mrs Ockenden 01865 512747 or email rosaleen@community.co.uk.

Eighteenth century Cotswold house, perfect for visiting academic family, recently renovated to high standard, band in the historic centre of pretty village (Eynsham) 6 miles from Oxford. Excellent 24 hour bus service, literally from our door. 2 sitting rooms, (large open fireplace, wood-burning stove), music/playroom with piano, dining-room, kitchen, utility room, 4/5 bedrooms, large study (internet access), c.h., all mod. cons., garage. Charming south-facing walled garden. Available for 4-week period from mid-July to late August. £450 p.w. E-mail: jmacclancy@brookes.ac.uk or Tel.: (home) 01865 880142; (work) 01865 483951.

Temple Cowley, modern 3 bed 2 bathroom townhouse in quiet private road. Fully furnished, all mod cons, garage and enclosed garden. Available August 2004 for 12 months. Bike/bus 10 mins to city centre. Adjacent to swimming pool, library and shopping. No smokers/pets. Rent £900 p.c.m. + bills. Contact drdog@bigfoot.com.

Central North Oxford Edwardian family home overlooking picturesque college playing fields; pretty garden going down to Oxford canal. Easy walking distance to city centre. 4 bedrooms (sleeps 8), 2 reception rooms, music room/study. Rowing boat and bicycles available for use. Non-smokers only, no pets. Available mid-July to end August. £500 p.w. Telephone: Oxford 559440 or e-mail tlamb@dial.pipex.com.

Live in comfort near the Thames, a short walk to the city centre. Beautiful Victorian house, 4 bedrooms, (two doubles), c/h, large split level living room, dining room, modern and fully equipped kitchen. Bathroom 1, large bath, bidet and WC; Bathroom 2, shower and WC. South facing garden. Possible use of bicycle(s). Available 7+ weeks, Tuesday 13 July ` Thursday 2 September 2004. Price negotiable. Telephone: +44(0) Oxford 725193.

Temple Cowley, newly renovated and furnished Victorian house with garden, close to local amenities; 1–2 reception rooms; 3 bedrooms (1 with en suite shower and w.c.); fitted kitchen with dishwasher and w/machine. Available mid-Aug. to end Dec. £825 p.m. plus bills. Ideal for professionals and family. Tel.: Yasmin Sidhwa on 01865 711341 or e-mail : sidaley@hilldale.fsnet.co.uk.

An Englishman's home is his castle---so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or e-mail us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: 01865 764533, fax: 764777, e-mail: info@qbman.co.uk.


Flats to Let

The Wharf House: a range of elegantly furnished 1, 2, and 3 bedroom canal side apartments within a secure gated development. A convenient city base for a short stay with serviced options available. Let Finders Keepers make your time in Oxford a pleasant one. Finders Keepers, 226 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 7BY. Telephone: Oxford 311011. Web site: www.finders.co.uk.

Central Oxford. Spacious, well-furnished, 1 bedroom apartment in Gloucester Green, OX1. Available from September 1 2004 for 1 year. Suit quiet academic couple who enjoy the theatre, concerts and easy trips to London. Non smokers only. £795 pcm. Contact: Oxford 241224 or e-mail sally.thomas@earliestyears.freeserve.co.uk.

North Oxford . Stylish 2 bedroom flat in peaceful location off the Woodstock Road. 5 minutes bus journey to city centre. Fully furnished with open-plan lounge/diner, recently fitted kitchen and bathroom. Beautiful communal gardens, 2 parking spaces. Would suit non- smoking professional couple. Available early June. £795 pcm (excl. bills). Contact Kathryn Fulton at kathryn.fulton@admin.ox.ac.uk or telephone Oxford 315080 (home) or Oxford 286289 (work).

Headington. 2 bedroom, fully furnished flat with garage overlooking the golf course. 1 mile from city centre and close to hospitals. Available from early July to non-smoking tenants. Would suit visiting academics. £700 pcm. Contact: Oxford 279182 / 279180 or e-mail christine.peters@queens.ox.ac.uk.

Central North Oxford (Rawlinson Road). Attractive 1 bedroom self-contained flat with patio and parking. Lets of 3 months or more considered. £1,100 pcm. Telephone: 01865 55637207771 802582 or email: pjy@btinternet.com.

Headington. 1.5 miles from Oxford city centre, close to Headington hospitals. A wonderful architect designed, self-contatined, split- level studio apartment. Light and airy with a French window to a tiny private garden. Cooking facilities, cast iron wood burning stove, separate bathroom. Would suit a single person, post graduate, research student or visiting professor. Available for long or short lets. £650 pcm (inc. heating, lighting and cleaning). Telephone: 01865 762991 or email: paulinehodson@supanet.com.

North Oxford . 1 & 2 bedroom apartments adjacent to Summertown shops and sporting amenity. Easy access to University and hospital departments. The 1 bedroom flat is available from August at £675 pcm. The 2 bedroom flat (1 double, 1 singlestudy) is available from various dates (early June, early July, early to late August) at £775 pcm and £795 pcm. Best suited to professionals or visiting academics with no pets and non smokers. Telephone: 01865 516144 or fax: 01865 437996 or email: a.fiorentino@ntlworld.com.

Central North Oxford: 10 minutes' walk from city centre, all main university buildings and parks, also very close to the river: available now for short/long lets in extremely quiet, civilised, large Victorian house in this exclusive, leafy, residential Victorian suburb with large, light airy rooms: 2 luxury fully furnished flats, furnished to a very high standard; each has large double bedroom, dining-room, kitchen, bathroom; on first and second floors. Off-street parking, large secluded garden. Both available end June. Tel./fax: 01865 552400.

Available by the week for visitors to Oxford: self-contained, fully-furnished studios, centrally located in Kingston Road. En suite shower, w.c. and washbasin, and fully-equipped kitchen area. Sleep 2. From £320 to £350 p.w. all inc. British Tourist Board approved 3 Stars. For further information tel.: 01865 516913 or visit: http://www.oxfordcity.co.uk/accom/studioflat.

Central North Oxford. Attractive Victorian house for rent. Light and airy, newly decorated, and just 10 minutes walk to the city centre. 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1 living room, 1 reception room, kitchen, garden, all mod cons. Available from 24 July to 4 September. £550 pw. Telephone: Oxford 553569 or e-mail miranda.carnegie@dial.appleinter.net.

Available for holiday rental—summer 2004. 5 bedroom house in central Headington, convenient for buses to Oxford, coaches for London. Recently updated, newly fitted kitchen, large living room, bathroom and shower room, small garden, two parking spaces. Telephone: 01865 307219 or email fvmorris@hotmail.com.

Very convenient, well-appointed, fully furnished 1 bedroom flat from mid-July for up to 3 months; easy walking distance to town centre, parks, colleges, etc. Suitable for non-smoking visiting academic single personcouple or other professionals. Contact: dorothymyers@gn.apc.org.


Self-catering Apartments

Fully furnished and serviced 3 and 4-star self-catering apartments available in North Oxford; 15 minutes' from Oxford city centre. Suitbale for short lets for visiting academics or business people. From £330 p.w. all inclusive. Sleeps 2–5 people. Tel.: 07870 234725. Web site: http://www.weeklyhome.com. E-mail: info@weeklyhome.com.


Accommodation Offered

OxfordShortlets offers a portfolio of high quality self- catering short let properties as an excellent alternative to hotel/guesthouse and bed and breakfast accommodation in Oxford and the surrounding villages. We have a wide selection of quality homes available for short stay lets from 1 week up to several months. OxfordShortlets provides property rental on a short-term basis for professional individuals, groups or families requiring housing while visiting Oxford for holiday/vacation, business/academic, relocation purposes or temporary accommodation in between homes. For more information, please contact us on tel: 0870 1602325, fax: 0870 1602327, email: admin@oxfordshortlets.co.uk or visit our website at www.oxfordshortlets.co.uk.

Paying guests, visiting academics, welcomed for short or long stays in the comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple, in exclusive, quiet, leafy central north Oxford, within walking distance of all main university buildings, town centre, parks, river, good shops, and restaurants. All rooms have colour TV, tea-/coffee-making facilities, microwave, and refrigerator and/or deep-freeze availability, c.h., and independent heating. Breakfast included in the very moderate terms. Tel./fax: 01865 557879.

Delightful rooms in North Oxford available now. Short stay (up to 6 weeks). £55 p.w. Book by telephone or fax: 01865 511657 or e-mail: coulsonm@btconnect.com.

Visiting academic couple from Germany with 5 year old daughter seek furnished house/flat in Oxford from 1 August 2004 to 31 January 2005. Non-smokers, no pets. Could offer furnished flat near Basel, Switzerland. Contact Thomas Mueller at e-mail: thomas.mueller@uni-bonn.de or telephone: 00 49 7623 965654.

Wanted: short let—furnished three- or four-bed property, whilst own undergoes renovation; mid-May–end July; north and east Oxford/west Bucks border. Tel.: 0208 947 8236 or 07778 398349.

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us: 01865 764533, fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk. Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.

Australia. Home Exchange. Orthopaedic surgeon and family looking for accommodation in Oxford from July 2004 for 12 months. Seeking 3 bedroom house close to University for family of four (2 boys, aged 2 and 3 years). Will exchange for charming 3 bedroom "Queenslander", fully air conditioned, large front and back decks, huge garden and located minutes from downtown Brisbane. BMW 318i vehicle also included in exchange. For more information, please email: gallaghers_abroad@hotmail.com.


Holiday Lets

Ireland, Kerry. Tastefully restored farmhouse in peaceful rural area. 4 double bedrooms, fully equipped kitchen and living room with open fire. Wonderful local walks and short easy drives to a selection of beaches, Killarney National Park, Ring of Kerry and Tralee. Euros 250 pw. For more details and photos, see www.vulkan.worc.ox.ac.uk/kerry or telephone Oxford 557961.

Athens. Accommodation for the 2004 Olympic Games. Newly decorated apartment, situated in Pagrati, a cosmopolitan area close to the metro and all public transport. Pagrati is near the Panathinaiko Stadium (15 mins. walk), Goudi Olympic Complex (15 mins. bus ride), central Athens (25 mins. walk), and Plaka old Athens (20 mins. walk). 1 bedroom (with king size bed), sitting room, dining room/study, fully fitted kitchen with all mod cons, bathroom, and balconies all around, air-conditioning, TV and VCR, washing machine, and linen and bedding provided. Cleaning service available once a week. Available in August. For further information, please contact Vicky at: vicky_smara@hotmail.com.

Florence. Rent our recently restored, fully furnished, 2 bedroom air-conditioned apartment in the historic San Frediano district, steps from Santa Maria del Carmine in the `Oltrarno', Florence's `Left Bank'. The apartment is on the 5th (top) floor (with lift) with stunning views over the rooftops of the city to the hills surrounding Florence. Within easy walking distance of all major tourist attractions and main train station, and on minibus route between station and Pitti Palace. Off the beaten tourist track, with undiscovered trattorias, neighbourhood bars, artisans' workshops, unique galleries, and authentic food shops, our apartment is the place to begin your discovery of the real Florence. Available all year round from Euros 600 per week. Longer periods negotiable. Contact: jnbairstow@verizon.net.

Old Tuscany: two charming apartments with shaded terraces and orchard, on edge of small hill town near Siena. Short walk to restaurant and shops. Glorious countryside. Flat A (sleeps 4) £350 p.w. Flat B (sleeps 2), £260 p.w. Flats A and B together, £525 p.w. For more information and a brochure, telephone: 01428 714363 or: +39 333 123 6091. E-mail: uliviera@hotmail.com.

France, Languedoc-Roussillon. Charming cottage on the fringes of Limoux in the heart of Cathar country. Very large shady, secluded, terraced south-facing garden with orchard. 20 minutes from Carcassonne airport, 80 minutes from Toulouse and Perpignan airports; local train station; 20 minutes from A61 autoroute. 1 hour from the Mediterranean and 1 hour from the Pyrenees. Outdoor pool, canoeing, tennis, restaurants, shops, bike hire, etc. all within walking distance. Wonderful walking, cycling, wine and food. Unsuitable for toddlers or wheel-chair users. Sleeps 24. July and August: £300 p.w.; June and September £250 p.w. Contact: dorothymyers@gn.apc.org.

Sardinia—Costa Smeralda. Tasteful villa in the rural village of San Pantaleo on the north-eastern coast of Sardinia, suitable for 2–6 people. Beautiful mountain views over the "Roche Sarde" from the house and garden. 3 double bedrooms (2 with double beds and 1 twin). Balcony and large terrazzo for al fresco dining. Deckchairs both on terrace and in the garden. Kitchen and spacious living room with television. Only 10 mins by car from Porto Cervo, the world renowned Pevero golf course and all the major beaches. Close also to a wide range of activities, from the village market, restaurants and mountain trails to tennis, diving, riding, sailing and wind surfing schools. For more information, email: maggan_krim@yahoo.com.

Dordogne. Timeless and beautiful 17th century stone house in the Vézère valley. Former Pavillon de Chassenow lovingly restored, with traditional lauzesroof and many original features. Stands in its own peaceful and partly wooded grounds of some 3 acres. 5 minutes from village with local shops, 15 minutes from the historic market town of Montignac. Spacious lounge with wood burner, large fully fitted kitchendining area. Sleeps 6 in comfort in 2 double bedrooms (1 en-suite) and 1 twin. Can accommodate 2 more on convertible settee if required. Dining terrace with barbecueþand boules. Own 10m x 4m pool with glorious views; garage. A few weeks remaining both in high season and autumn. From £350 pw. Telephone: 07778 633848 or email: PJWNet@aol.com.

Cyprus—Pegeia. 10 minutes to Coral Bay, 20 minutes to Paphos harbour. Detached luxury villa with own 8m x 4m pool in spectacular location, with views over the Mediterranean. Sleeps 6 in comfort, 2 double (1 en-suite), 1 twin and further occasional beds if required. Each bedroom has own access to pool terrace. Peaceful area but close to local amenities and beach. Fully equipped and air conditioned throughout, TVDVD. From £425 pw. Also, an apartment available in Paphos, 5 minutes. from the picturesque old harbour, terraced house with uninterrupted sea views, sleeps 4. Bedroom balcony for breakfast overlooking the sea; patio and small garden. Fully equipped with air conditioning, TV/DVD, own shaded parking. Use of large communal pool. From £295 pw. Telephone: 07778 633848 or email: PJWNet@aol.com.

Paris: small studio, sleeps 2, Paris 12ème between Nation and Bastille, very near Marché Beauvau, Marché Aligre, `Coulée Verte' and the Gare de Lyon. Well equipped with bathroom, kitchen area, digicode and interphone, lift. No smokers. £140 pw, £260 for 2 weeks, £500 for 4 weeks (inc. bills). Available from 1 May to 30 September 2004. Also available: cottage in small village in Lot, near Figeac/Cahors, sleeps 6 in 2 independent units (2, 1+1; 2). £300 for June 2004. For further information and pictures, please email johnellis46@yahoo.co.uk.

Italy: luxury villas, country houses, apartments for convenient rental in Tuscany, Umbria, Sardinia (Emerald Coast), Rome, Florence, Pompeii, Naples. Available at any time of the year and for any length of time. Cars also available for hire at competitive rates. Range of optional services available on demand. Contact: tuscany.countries@libero.it or telephone 00 39 328 713 3951.

Andalucia (Gaucin): a uniquely designed villa, newly built as a series of cottages and apartments around a private courtyard and pool. It can be booked exclusively for large groups (up to 13) during the summer months or as individual units (2+) during the remainder of the year. Telephone: 01865 791999 or visit the website at www.thespanishvilla.com.

Andalucia: Gaucin. Delightful private house in white mountain village to let, 2 June–27 July and 21 Aug.–end Sept., while owner author is away. Two double bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, large living area (with open fireplace, fully fitted kitchen) leading onto terrace with magical view over valleys to coast and mountains of Africa; local swimming pool 5 minutes, Mediterranean 35 minutes; also rivers and fabulous beaches; Atlantic coast 2 hours. Very comfortably furnished, TV, video, washing machine, deep freeze. Excellent maid, by arrangement. £500 p.w., reduction for longer lets. Tel.: 00 34 95 215 11 11 or e-mail: venetia@ari.es.

Barcelona. Fabulous flat in city centre available for week-ends and short breaks. Sleeps 6. Fully equipped kitchen, large sitting room, dining room, 2 bathrooms, 2 balconies. Original tiled floors and 16ft ceilings. Bi-lingual babysitter available. TV/DVD/CD and internet. See http://www.barcelona-breaks.com/ or e-mail clarefontes@hotmail.com.

Naples, Florida: rent our beautiful 4-bedroom, 3-bathroom house, on the Gulf Coast, in southwest Florida. This spacious home is located on one of the best private golf courses in the area. The house sleeps up to 8 people, has a huge south-facing heated swimming pool, and comes fully furnished and equipped. The house is available all year round from £800 p.w. (minimum 2-week let, discount for longer lets), Tel. Mark on: 07802 754154. E-mail: mark@bayrock.co.uk.

Dordogne holiday rentals: stone house in an acre of garden in the Dordogne, France. Fabulous 270 degree panorama. Sleeps 8/10. Very peaceful, many day trips possible. Prices £210–£635 p.w. Private owner. Also gites sleeping 4/6 in nearby farm. Contact 01223 353603 or e-mail: whitehead.jo@bcg.com.

Southern France: 27 miles from Perpignan Airport. Tastefully restored traditional village house with character in the heart of `Cathar Country'; 5 double bedrooms (3 en suite) plus family bathroom; 2 living rooms; large fully equipped kitchen. Large roof terrace. Other airports: Carcassone, Montpelier, Barcelona. Local swimming, rivers and lakes, beaches within 30 miles, and hiking. Available from now. Call Tony Venables on 01491 825035, or 01865 557767 evening. E-mail: janevenab@aol.com.

Tuscany: Fattoria Corzano e Paterno, family owned and run award winning wine and cheese producing farm, half an hour from Florence, offers faithfully restored houses and apartments for short and longer term rentals. Web site: corzanoepaterno.it. Please contact Sibilla Gelpke (Wadham, 2000), e-mail: corzpaterno@libero.it.

Experience the Greek islands of Sporades with Thalpos Holidays. Local villa specialist offers lovely houses and villas in the beautiful islands of Skopelos and Alonissos in the Aegean Sea. Whether you are 2 or 20 persons in the party, and whether you wish to stay in the picturesque town, by the clear blue sea or in the breathtaking countryside, we have just what you are looking for. With more than 10 years of experience we are proud to offer high quality holidays and the very best service. See our programme for 2004 on: www.holidayislands.com, or contact us on e-mail: thalpos@otenet.gr. Tel.: 0030 24240 29036. Fax: 0030 24240 23057.

Paris apartment available for short or longer stays: delightful 1-bedroom, first-floor flat overlooking the Place du Marche St Catherine (Marais). Period building with large windows and high ceilings. Attractively furnished and well-equipped with television, CD, hairdryer, etc. Linens and cleaning provided. Three nights minimum. £55 per night, £325 p.w. or £950 p.m. for members of the University. (Non- member rates are £65 per night, £395 p.w., and £1,050 p.c.m.). Contact Dr J.J. Chamberlain on 07957 588 448 or e-mail: joe.chamberlain@ukgateway.net.

Deepest SW France. Relax in a luxuriously renovated farmhouse with large seculded grounds in a stunning rural area. Generous facilities include en suite accommodation, heated pool, satellite TV. Suitable for great holidays or sabbatical breaks. Tel.: Marion on 01865 554122 or e- mail via Web site: www.hidden-sw-france.com.


House to Let/For Sale in France

Normandy: Village au Brun, Notre Dame de Cenilly: old farm house, newly tiled roof, all mod. cons., and set in approx. 13½ acres of farmland. Peaceful yet within 4 kms from Cerisy la Salle (local village; Saint-Lo, Coutance approx. 20 kms; Cherbourg, Bayeux, Mont St Michel and Caen within 100 kms. Ground floor: kitchen/dining room; gas cooker; separate electric oven; microwave; large fridge with separate freezer; gas c.h.; bathroom with w.c.; sitting room. First floor: music room (with Grand piano), 2 bedrooms (1 with small office). Second floor: large bedroom; shower room with w.c.; gallery (suitable for office) which overlooks music room below. Open fire in sitting room. Ideal retreat for writer or musician seeking peace and quiet to work. £40 per night; £250 p.w. £900 p.m., longer lets negotiable. Price includes heating, linen and crockery but excludes telephone and electricity. For further details please contact Alexander Kok on tel.: 00 33 2 33 45 52 16, fax: 00 33 2 33 17 22 96.


Houses for Sale

Central North Oxford. 6 bedroom semi-detached home in Bainton Road, adjacent to canal and St John's Sports Ground. For details contact David or Clare on 01865 863712 or email: david.wenham@wycliffe.ox.ac.uk.

Kidlington. Beautifully presented 2 bedroom, end of terrace house in quiet close. New bathroom, kitchen and carpets throughout. Lovely little garden. £185,000. Details and photos can be found on www.house.ladder.co.uk (using the above information with their search facility) or contact Sarah Proctor on e-mail at sarah.proctor@sjc.ox.ac.uk.

Old Headington: early 1920s three-bedroom detached cottage, carefully restored. Small, pretty walled garden. No chain. £325,000 o.n.o. Tel.: 01865 751861.

BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

Fixed-term Departmental Lecturership in Brazilian Literature and Culture

The post is available from 1 October 2004 or as soon as possible thereafter for a period of two years, with the possibility of renewal for a further year. The appointee will give lectures on Brazilian Literature and Culture and take part in language teaching. The language of instruction may be either English or Portuguese. Applicants are expected to have a doctorate in Portuguese or to be close to concluding such a doctorate. Preference will be given to applicants with relevant prior teaching experience and/or training. Salary £18,265--£24,121 per annum (pay award pending).

The closing date for applications is 2 June. Further particulars are available from Ms L. Barham, 41 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JF (telephone: Oxford (2)80740, e-mail: louise.barham@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk).


BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF ORIENTAL STUDIES

Instructorship in Arabic

Applications are invited for an Instructorship in Arabic, tenable from 1 October 2004. The post is for three years in the first instance, with the possibility of renewal thereafter, subject to a satisfactory review at the end of the third year. Applicants should have a native command or equivalent of Arabic and expertise in the teaching of Arabic as a foreign language. Applicants will hold a professional teaching qualification and/or a doctorate (or be working towards one). Experience of the teaching of Arabic literature would be an advantage, but is not essential.

Salary in the grade A12, £18,265--£21,125 per annum.

Further particulars, including details of how to apply, should be obtained from http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/ or from the office of Ms C. Vinnicombe, Secretary to the Board of Oriental Studies, Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE (telephone: Oxford (2)78200, fax: (2)78190, e-mail: orient@orinst.ox.ac.uk), to whom applications should be sent no later than Thursday, 3 June.


BALLIOL COLLEGE

Appointment of Archivist

Balliol College, founded 1263, wishes to appoint a professionally qualified archivist from September or October 2004 on a fixed term contract of four years. The post could be full-time or part-time with a minimum of three days a week on average, flexibly distributed. The person appointed will work half the time on the Archives under the supervision of the Ffellow-Archivist, and half the time on Library manuscript collections under the supervision of the Fellow-Librarian. The salary will be within senior librarian grades 1--2 (currently £18,265--£27,339), pro rata, according to experience, pensionable, and with senior common room membership, including free lunches on working days.

Further particulars are available from the Secretary to the Vice-Master and Archivist, Balliol College, Oxford OX1 3BJ (e-mail: catherine.willbery@balliol.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for applications is 1 July.

Balliol's archival holdings and manuscript collections are rich and diverse, dating from the twelfth century to the present day. The college Web site provides additional information and includes a detailed Guide to the Archives at http://www.balliol.ox.ac.uk/his tory/archives/index.asp.


BRASENOSE COLLEGE

Stipendiary Lecturership in English

Brasenose College wishes to appoint a twelve-hour Stipendiary Lecturer for 1 year from 1 October 2004. The person appointed will be required to teach both the Shakespeare and Renaissance papers in the Oxford English syllabus plus at least one of the following papers: Medieval Literature, Seventeenth-century literature, Eighteenth-century literature, History of the Language.

The lecturer will also be required to participate in the entrance procedures and to assist generally in the running of English in collaboration with the Tutor in English.

The salary, which is pensionable in USS, will be according to qualifications and experience within the range £17,839--£21,852 per annum.

Further particulars, including details of allowances, lunching and dining rights, may be obtained from the College Secretary, Brasenose College, Oxford OX1 4AJ (telephone: Oxford (2)77823, e-mail: college.office@brasenose.oxford.ac.uk ), to whom applications should be sent by Friday, 21 May. Applicants should arrange for three referees to write direct to the Senior Tutor by the same date.

Brasenose College is an equal opportunities employer.


HARRIS MANCHESTER COLLEGE

Appointment of a Junior Dean

Harris Manchester College proposes to appoint a Junior Dean for a period of one year from 1 October 2004, with the possibility of renewal for a second year. The Junior Dean will be required to live in college, free of charge, and will also be entitled to receive free meals at high table. There will be a stipend of £1,500 per annum, additional to any other income the appointee may receive. The Junior Dean will assist the Dean and other college officers in the smooth running of the college. Applicants must be graduate members of the University, and it is expected that they will be pursuing advanced study or research. As the college is a society of mature students, it is preferred that applicants be over twenty-five years of age.

Applications, including a full curriculum vitae and the names, addresses, and telephone numbers of three referees, should be sent to the Academic Administrator, Mrs Judith Nisbet, by Friday, 21 May. It is expected that one of the referees will be the applicant's research supervisor. Interviews are expected to take place on Friday, 28 May.

Harris Manchester College is an equal opportunities employer.


ST HILDA'S COLLEGE

Appointment of Domestic Bursar

St Hilda's College invites applications for the post of Domestic Bursar, with responsibility for daily operational matters in support of the Bursar. This senior management/administrative position will suit those with experience of accommodation and facilities management, health and safety, the supervision of annual budgets, and an interest in the higher education sector and conference business.

St Hilda's College is a progressive college situated on the river Cherwell in Oxford. It has a community of 490 students and 100 fellows, lecturers, and administrative staff, and a growing residential conference trade. The post offers an attractive salary, thirty-eight days' annual leave including bank holidays, meals provided, contributory pension and a choice of self-contributory healthcare scheme, and membership of the senior common room.

Further particulars are available on the college Web site
(http://www.st-hildas.ox.ac.uk) or from Mrs Anne Allan, St Hilda's College, Oxford OX4 1DY (e-mail: anne.allan@st-hildas.ox.ac.uk, telephone: Oxford (2)76809), to whom applications should be sent by Monday, 24 May.

St Hilda's College is an equal opportunities employer and welcomes applications from minority groups.


ST HUGH'S COLLEGE

Appointment of Bursar

St Hugh's College intends to elect a Bursar to take office in September 2004. The Bursar is the college's chief administrative officer, responsible to the governing body for the college's finances, non-academic staff, site and buildings, and domestic operation. The Bursar plays a central strategic and managerial role in college affairs. This is an exciting and challenging role at the heart of one of the University's largest colleges.

The Bursar will be a fellow of the college. Salary will be on the scale £45,000--£55,000 per annum.

Further information is available on the college Web site
(http://www.st-hughs.ox.ac.uk), or from the Principal's Secretary, St Hugh's College, St Margaret's Road, Oxford OX2 6LE (e-mail: libby.pasciak@st-hughs.ox.ac.uk, telephone: Oxford (2)74910). The closing date for applications is 14 May.


TEMPLETON COLLEGE

Appointment of Assistant to the Dean and Chairman

Templeton College is a graduate college specialising in management studies, with an executive centre that provides programmes for international groups of senior executives. It employs twenty faculty and approximately a hundred domestic and administrative staff.

The college is now seeking an experienced and capable Executive Assistant to provide comprehensive and confidential support to the Dean and Chairman. The role will suit an experienced PA with first-class secretarial, organisational, and IT skills who enjoys working at a senior level within a modern, lively environment. Professionalism, discretion, and a mature outlook are essential as is the ability to take an active role in organising committees and associated documentation. Previous work at board or governing body level and experience of academic or professional service organisations will be an advantage. Salary within the range £25,000--£30,000.

For further details telephone on Oxford 422769, e-mail: HR@templeton.ox.ac.uk, or see http://www.templeton.ox.ac.uk/jobs.

Templeton College is committed to equal opportunities.


WADHAM COLLEGE

Appointment of Raiser's Edge Database Assistant (part-time)

Wadham College has a vacancy for an expert on Raiser's Edge Database to start as soon as possible.

The post-holder will work closely with the Finance and Database Officer, the Director of Development, and the staff members responsible for alumni relations in the Development Office. Hours of work will be twenty-five per week, spread over five days (morning or afternoon to be negotiated).

The post-holder will manage and regularly review the Raiser's Edge database, including maintaining the integrity of data, security of the system, and software management, by carrying out routine functions and checks.

Salary will be on the university grade 3 scale (£13,547 per annum, pro rata), plus generous holidays and an excellent pension scheme.

Applications, including a curriculum vitae and details of two referees, should be sent to the Director of Development, Wadham College, Oxford OX1 3PN (telephone: Oxford (2)77997), from whom a job description may be obtained. Applications should be received no later than 14 May.

Wadham College is an equal opportunities employer.


ST HILDA'S COLLEGE

Appointment of Domestic Bursar

St Hilda's College invites applications for the post of Domestic Bursar, with responsibility for daily operational matters in support of the Bursar. This senior management/administrative position will suit those with experience of accommodation and facilities management, health and safety, the supervision of annual budgets, and an interest in the higher education sector and conference business.

St Hilda's College is a progressive college situated on the river Cherwell in Oxford. It has a community of 490 students and 100 fellows, lecturers, and administrative staff, and a growing residential conference trade. The post offers an attractive salary, thirty-eight days' annual leave including bank holidays, meals provided, contributory pension and a choice of self-contributory healthcare scheme, and membership of the senior common room.

Further particulars are available on the college Web site
(http://www.st-hildas.ox.ac.uk) or from Mrs Anne Allan, St Hilda's College, Oxford OX4 1DY (e-mail: anne.allan@st-hildas.ox.ac.uk, telephone: Oxford (2)76809), to whom applications should be sent by Monday, 24 May.

St Hilda's College is an equal opportunities employer and welcomes applications from minority groups.

Friday 7 May

STUDY-DAY: `Nature et contre-nature au seuil de la modmodernite', Maison Française, 11 a.m.–4.30 p.m.

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Briefing for research supervisors, group leaders, and administrators', 12.30 p.m. (see information above).

PROFESSOR SIR ADAM ROBERTS: `The "War on Terror" in historical perspective' (A.B. Emden Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR A. AHMAD: `Antinomies of nationalism—an overiew' (Radhakrishnan Memorial Lectures: `Nationalism and secularism in modern India'), Schools, 5 p.m.

N. JONES lectures in the Reuters Foundation Programme lecture series: `Media and Politics', Nuffield, 5 p.m.


Saturday 8 May

ORGAN RECITAL: Daniel Collins, the chapel, Magdalen, 5.25 p.m. (admission free).


Sunday 9 May

THE REVD DR SIMON JONES preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.


Monday 10 May

THE HON. GARETH EVANS (formerly Foreign Minister of Australia): `Peace and change in the Middle East' (lecture), Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, 11 a.m.

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Induction seminar for new contract researchers', 12.30 p.m.; `Heads of department and chairmen of boards: "Directions" seminar', 1 p.m.; and `Inducting staff', 12.45 p.m. (see information above).

SIDNEY BLUMENTHAL and MATTHEW TAYLOR: `Politics, policy, and the press' (Transatlantic Dialogues in Public Policy), Rothermere American Institute, 4.30 p.m.

THE HON. GARETH EVANS (formerly Foreign Minister of Australia): `When is it right to fight? Rethinking the jurisprudence of military force' (Cyril Foster Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

J.-L. LEUTRAT: `Chris Marker' (lecture series: `Les cinéastes de la "modernité" en France'), Maison Française, 5 p.m.

DR G. ZUCKERMANN: `Lexical genetics in the third millennium: how one word can have two parents' (OED Forum), Rewley House, 5 p.m.


Tuesday 11 May

THE REVD PROFESSOR G. PATTISON (Lady Margaret Professor of Divinity): `Thinking about God in an age of technology' (Inaugural Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. WIGGINS: `Objectivity in ethics: two difficulties, two responses' (H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

MS VAIRA VIKE-FREIBERGA (President of Latvia) lectures in the Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

DR K. SCOTT: `The unique pictorial "Afterpiece" to The Abbey of the Holy Ghost in BL Stowe 39' (Lyell Lectures in Bibliography: `Suppleatur per ymaginacionem: exceptional images in later medieval English manuscripts'), Schools, 5 p.m.

C. DOGGETT AND S. BURNETT:: `Sharing knowledge globally—Australian social work's Cochrane connection' (seminar series: `Evidence-based practice'), Violet Butler Seminar Room, Department of Social Policy and Social Work, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. SENNETT: `Talent' (lecture series: `The new culture of capitalism'), Rothermere American Institute, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR I. PAPERNO: `Why did we all love Stalin? Memoirs and diaries of the Soviet experience' (Astor Lecture), Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

J. ROUBAUD (writer) presents his work (Littérature Française Actuelle à Oxford series), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

M. BENT: `What is isorhythm?' (Graduate Students' Colloquia), Denis Arnold Hall, Music Faculty, 5.15 p.m.


Wednesday 12 May

ANDREW REID: organ recital, the chapel, Queen's, 1.10 p.m. (admission free, with retiring collection).

MARIO VARGAS LLOSA (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor of European Comparative Literature): `Touchy monsters' (lecture series: `The tempation of the impossible: Victor Hugo's Les Misérables'), Nelson Mandela Lecture Theatre, Saïd Business School, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R.J. EVANS: `Coercion and consent in Nazi Germany' (lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR HELEN VENDLER: `Forms in "Nineteen Hundred Nineteen" ' (Clarendon Lectures in English: `Yeats and Lyric Form'), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. FORREST: `Developmental theism and another look at the problem of evil' (Wilde Lectures in Natural and Comparative Religion: `From pure will to unbounded love'), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR D. TURTON: `The meaning of place in a world of movement: lessons from long-term field research in southern Ethiopia' (Elizabeth Colson Lecture), Rhodes House, 5 p.m.

MR TAE SHIK LEE (Korean Ambassador): `The North Korean nuclear development and the inter-Korean relationship' (lecture), Charles Wellbeloved Room, Harris Manchester College, 5 p.m.

DR S. SCHAFFER: `History of science' (Oxford Dictionary of National Biography seminars: `Problems and methods in biography'), Modern History Faculty Building, 5 p.m.

S. AVAYOU: `The Dönme literature in Ladino prose and poetry, form and language' (David Patterson Seminars), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor, 7 p.m.


Thursday 13 May

C. CANTONE: `Women peep out: gender, visibility and space in Senegalese mosques' (International Gender Studies Centre seminars: `Research methodologies: theories—realities'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

A. ZIMDARS: `Pilot study: the demographic profile of UK graduate students admitted to the University of Oxford' (Institute for the Advancement of University Learning: research seminars), History of Art Lecture Room, Level 2, Littlegate House, 4 p.m. (to attend, e- mail: harriet.dunbar-goddet@learning.ox.ac.uk).

YOSSI KLEIN HALEVI: `Can religion heal the wounds of the Middle East?' (Isaiah Berlin Public Lectures in Middle East Dialogue), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR ANDREW LAIRD: `Recognising Virgil' (Don Fowler Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR PETER SLUGLETT: `Whose sacred trust? Some reflections on the implementation and legacy of the British and French Mandates in the Middle East' (first of two Leonard Stein Lectures), Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m. (second lecture on 20 May).

DR K. SCOTT: `The genealogical genre: BL Royal I.B.x' (Lyell Lectures in Bibliography: `Suppleatur per ymaginacionem: exceptional images in later medieval English manuscripts'), Schools, 5 p.m.

M. DELON: `Est-ce que l'on peut inventer un nouveau plaisir?' (Besterman Lecture), Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

M. LEISERACH: `The artist and the Emperor: Turner puts Napoleon into his new perspectives—Part I' (lecture series: `Turner and Napoleon'), Headley Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean Museum, 5 p.m.

SCOTT MANDELBROTE: `Scripture and the mathematicians: chronology and proof of the authority of the Septuagint' (Grinfield Lectures on the Septuagint: `Critics and controversies: early modern debates about the meaning of the Septuagint'), Schools, 5 p.m.


Friday 14 May

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Induction seminar for new contract researchers', 12.30 p.m. (see information above).

PROFESSOR A. AHMAD: `Secularism, anti-secularism, and the question of religion in Indian politics' (Radhakrishnan Memorial Lectures: `Nationalism and secularism in modern India'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR HELEN VENDLER: `Yeats at sonnets' (Clarendon Lectures in English: `Yeats and Lyric Form'), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR H. HUBEL and PROFESSOR A. MENON: `Is enlargement good for Europe?' (debate), Seminar Room, European Studies Centre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

A. MCELVOY lectures in the Reuters Foundation Programme lecture series `Media and Politics', Nuffield, 5 p.m.


Saturday 15 May

LORD RODGER OF EARLSFERRY: `A time to every thing under the law: some reflections on retrospectivity' (Blackstone Lecture), Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 11.30 a.m.

ORGAN RECITAL: Philip Scriven, the chapel, Magdalen, 5.25 p.m. (admission free).


Sunday 16 May

THE VEN. SHEILA WATSON preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

CARLOS ARDILA (piano): programme of traditional South American music, with students from Balliol College, the hall, Balliol, 9 p.m.


Monday 17 May

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Managing employee absence', 9.30 a.m., and `Performance management', 12.45 p.m. (see information above).

PROFESSOR J. CARWARDINE (Rhodes Professor of American History): `Abraham Lincoln, God, and the American Civil War' (inaugural lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. FORREST: `De Trinitate' (Wilde Lectures in Natural and Comparative Religion: `From pure will to unbounded love'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR HELEN VENDLER: `Yeats's nationalistic measure: "Easter 1916" and other poems' (Clarendon Lectures in English: `Yeats and Lyric Form'), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR HANS MOMMSEN: `The dissolution of the Third Reich 1943 to 1945' (lecture), European Studies Centre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. CRAWFORD: `The poetry of England' (Oliver Smithies Lectures: `Sound systems: poetry, nations, and listening'), Lecture Room 23, Balliol, 5 p.m.

DR J. ROBERTS: `Wordsworth: the apocalypse of language' (seminar series: `The Bible in art, music, and literature'), Danson Room, Trinity, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. CAMERON: `Vergal hygiene: another look at "political correctness" ' (OED Forum), Rewley House, 5 p.m.


Tuesday 18 May

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Job search and interview skills for contract research staff', 9.30 a.m., and `Assertiveness'—day 2, 2 p.m. (see information above).

M. PURCELL: `The library at Tyntesfield' (Friends of the Bodleian thirty-minute lecture), Cecil Jackson Room, Sheldonian, 1 p.m. (admission free).

DR K. SCOTT: `A Gothish episode in the Renaissance: BL Additional 21974' (Lyell Lectures in Bibliography: `Suppleatur per ymaginacionem: exceptional images in later medieval English manuscripts'), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR P. GLASZOU: `Evidence-based practice—seven steps from research to practice' (seminar series: `Evidence-based practice'), Violet Butler Seminar Room, Department of Social Policy and Social Work, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. SENNETT: `Consumer' (lecture series: `The new culture of capitalism'), Rothermere American Institute, 5 p.m.

B. HARVEY, F. HEAL, AND B. HARRISON: `Thoughts on the new dictionary content: medieval, early modern, and modern' (Pre-publication seminars: `The Dictionary of National Biography past, present, and future'), Rainolds Room, Corpus Christi, 5 p.m.

N. O'REGAN: `Palestrina and papal politics: the secular motet Laetus hyperboream' (Graduate Students' Colloquia), Denis Arnold Hall, Music Faculty, 5.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR G. VATTIMO: `A farewell to truth: veritas from modernity to postmodernity' (Henry Rowlatt Bickley Memorial Lecture), Maplethorpe Building, St Hugh's, 5.30 p.m.