Oxford University Gazette: 30 September 2004

Oxford University Gazette, Vol. 135, No. 4707: 30 September 2004

Note: due to the requirements of the Data Protection Act, some elements of the printed Gazette are not reproduced in the Web Gazette.

The following supplements were published with this Gazette:

Since March, the University has been the target of a protest campaign which has made Oxford yet again into the focus for a debate of national social and political significance, this time concerning the use of animals in research. During the past six months, the Registrar, David Holmes, and I have sought and taken opportunities to explain Council's policy on this highly controversial and emotive subject, through channels including the University's own Web site and national media. At the same time, a number of those directly involved in research that will be relocating to our new building in South Parks Road have been presenting their own scientific arguments, although some have understandably felt unable to do this publicly, because of the experiences of individuals who have spoken on this subject in the past.

Through this and other means, we have sought to enter into a reasoned debate with those who do not share our view that regulated animal research remains a crucial element of the innovative and life-saving medical research for which Oxford is renowned internationally. However, the climate of fear and intimidation that has been generated by the unlawful activities of a small minority of protestors has made this impossible. People only indirectly linked to our new building have been attacked at home and inappropriate commercial pressure has been applied to those who had entered into legitimate contracts to work on-site.

By last month, it had become apparent that the expression of free speech within the law through weekly visible and voluble protests in South Parks Road and marches from time to time in central Oxford would never satisfy some protestors. The only way to ensure that our staff, students, other members of the collegiate University and our suppliers and contractors could be confident that they could go about their lawful business without fear of intimidation was therefore to seek the protection of an injunction. The injunction we have sought is intended to create a climate in which both sides of this argument can put their cases; it is designed to enable free speech by those who have been understandably too frightened to talk about their research into the causes of, and treatments and cures for, a number of life-threatening diseases.

As members of an academic community which has fostered some of the most innovative thinkers over many centuries, it is this freedom of speech that we must, above all, cherish and champion. We must be able to justify our actions to the committed believers in the equal rights of animals and humans, to the misinformed, and to those who have never before looked at the scientific arguments for and against this research. If we cannot talk freely about this important issue, then where will the gag of self-censorship created by fear be applied next?

We cannot simply rely on citing precedent to make our case; even though many millions owe their lives to treatments for diseases such as cancer, diabetes, polio and asthma developed using animals in the past, we must evaluate every proposal for a research programme that involves the use of animals today, however few and whatever species, in the light of our twenty-first-century medical knowledge and research techniques. That is why such proposals are considered in detail under the University's own ethical review process, even before any application is made to the Home Office for a licence, under its strict regulations.

As part of that process, those proposing research must demonstrate that they have done everything possible to reduce the number of animals to be used, to refine the processes involved to minimise any suffering caused and, wherever possible, to replace the use of animals with alternative research methods. Oxford is not only among the world's leading universities for biomedical research—from the development of antibiotics many decades ago, to today's work on vaccines against HIV and malaria—but it is also a leader in the establishment and use of techniques including cell or tissue cultures and image analysis to reduce, refine and replace the use of animals in laboratories (the so-called `3Rs').

For example, the computer-generated `artificial heart' model that Professor Noble and his colleagues have developed has enabled significant reductions in the numbers of animals needed in cardiological research in Oxford and elsewhere; the Integrative Biology Project is now building on this work to model the biological processes that take place in cancer cells. But even where methods such as this are used, there is still no reliable way to replicate the highly complex interactions of the many sophisticated systems within the body. Therefore, there remains a role for the regulated use of animals in research and will do for the foreseeable future.

It is for this reason that Oxford remains committed to the construction of a new biomedical research building in South Parks Road; it will replace a number of older facilities with an even better environment for animals that has been designed to reflect the latest understanding of husbandry and welfare. Much of the work that has shaped this approach to animal housing has itself been carried out in Oxford and is now being adopted around the world.

As we work to complete this new building, it is important that all members of the University understand the issues that are at stake in South Parks Road. If we were to be swayed by the illegal actions of a small group of protestors, much biomedical research in Oxford would cease or move to countries where regulation to protect animals is weaker than in the UK. Moreover, more importantly for us all, there would be no area of legitimate academic activity that could be guaranteed to be safe from such intimidatory tactics in the future.

So the secure future of this project is crucial not just to those who are, or will be, directly involved with one specific biomedical research building; it is crucial to everyone who believes that the strength of a university such as ours has grown over the centuries through a commitment to facing difficult choices, debating them and then reaching, and adhering to, a collegial decision based on our best academic judgment. Just as scholars in the past have not shied from adopting positions that some of their contemporaries found unacceptable, so today we will remain firm in our commitment to the regulated and necessary use of animals in research within Oxford.

COLIN LUCAS
28 September 2004

 

Oxford is one of the first universities in the UK to publish its policy on the use of animals in research, and additional information about the use of animals in scientific research, on its Web site at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/biomed/

PLANNING AND RESOURCE ALLOCATION COMMITTEE OF COUNCIL

Changes in Regulations

The Planning and Resource Allocation Committee of Council has made the following changes in regulations, to come into effect with effect on 15 October.

Amendments to composition fees: graduate degrees in Music and Fine Art

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 1102, ll. 1--2, delete `other than the Faculty of Music or the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art;'.

2 Ibid., p. 1103, ll. 7--8, delete `(f) the Humanities Board to work within the Faculty of Music or the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art;'.

[It has been agreed that the move to overseas fee category C for graduate programmes in Music and Fine Art should be deferred until 2005–6, and apply only to students commencing studies after 1 September 2005. In 2004–5, overseas fees for graduate programmes in these subject areas will therefore remain at the category A rate (£8,170). Undergraduate programmes in Music and Fine Art are correctly listed in Examination Regulations, 2004, in overseas fee category C (£10,890).]


COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of Congregation:

Green, P.J., Computing Services

Huckstep, M.R., BM, B.Ch., MA, New College

Kumar, P.P., Faculty of Theology

Landray, M.J., Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Moore, G.J., Social Sciences Division

Operario, D., Wolfson

Thomas, D.S.G., Faculty of Anthropology and Geography

Whatmore, S.J., Linacre


DIVISIONAL BOARDS AND BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 15 October, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • *CONGREGATION 5 October 12 noon [Note: Congregation will meet in the University Church]
    • *1 Retiring Vice-Chancellor's Oration
    • *2 Admission of Vice-Chancellor for 2004–9
    • *3 Admission of Pro-Vice-Chancellors
    • *4 Admission of Clerks of the Market
  • *CONGREGATION 12 October 2 p.m.
    • *1 Voting on Statute: University Discipline
    • *2 Voting on Changes in Congregation Regulations: Conduct of Business in Congregation
    • *3 Voting on Resolution concerning the Review of Governance

CONSULTATIVE NOTICE

REVIEW OF THEOLOGY

The Humanities Board is undertaking a review of the Faculty of Theology as part of its programme of regular rolling reviews of units under its aegis. The Head of the Division, Dr R. Walker, will chair the review committee, the terms of reference of which are:

(i) to review progress in response to the last review and to identify any further action required in the light of changed circumstances in the last six years;

(ii) to review by reference to international standards of excellence of the quality of academic activities in the faculty and the balance between these activities, taking into account in the context of the University's Mission Statement and Corporate Plan, all relevant factors, especially: research, organisational, and management structures within the faculty, including such matters as academic and non-academic staff planning and recruitment; accommodation and future space needs; and the relationship between units within the faculty and between the faculty and cognate subject areas and colleges (including theological colleges and permanent private halls) with which it is involved in teaching and/or research.

The membership of the review committee is:

Dr R. Walker (Chairman)

Professor G. Davies, Faculty of Divinity, Cambridge

Professor I.R. Torrance, Princeton Theological Seminary

Professor M.D. Hooker, Robinson College, Cambridge

The Dean of Christ Church

Dr R. Cross, Oriel College (Chairman of the Faculty Board)

The review committee would welcome written comments on matters falling within its terms of reference. These should be sent to the Secretary to the Review Committee, Dr Peter Gambles, Humanities Division, 34 St Giles', by 21 October.


GENERAL NOTICES

LANGUAGE CENTRE

Course registration procedures 2004–5

Full details of all courses are available on the Web site at www.lang.ox.ac.uk or by calling at the Language Centre in person. Please study them carefully before registering.

English for academic studies (EFL)

Classes start in Week 1 (week beginning 11 October). Registration will take place in Week 0 (week beginning 4 October) during normal office hours, 9.30 a.m.–4.30 p.m.

OPAL (The Oxford Programme in Languages)

Classes start in Week 2 (week beginning 18 October). Application may be made at any time during opening hours in Week 0 or Week 1, preferably by the end of Wednesday, 13 October.

Languages for study and research 2004--5

Classes start in Week 2 (week beginning 18 October). Those who are eligible for priority, primarily those needing a language course for reasons of study or research, should obtain a priority registration form, which must be returned to the Language Centre in person by 6 p.m. on Wednesday, 13 October. Non-priority places will be allocated on a random selection basis at the end of Week 1, following the initial registration period of Monday, 11 October, to Wednesday, 13 October. Registration forms may be handed in at the Language Centre (in person only; no posted, faxed, or e-mailed registration forms will be accepted) at any time between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. on these three days and must be checked by a member of the Language Centre staff before acceptance. Registrations received after 6 p.m. on Wednesday, 13 October, will automatically be allocated to the waiting list for a course if no places are available.

The Language Centre library and Independent Study Area

The Library's collection of audio/video cassettes, books and computer programs covers over 130 languages. The Self-Study Area has rooms equipped with listening and viewing facilities for individual work and computer based learning resources. New users should aim to arrive shortly before 10 a.m. or 2 p.m. to register and attend an orientation session.

The Language Centre is open 9.30 a.m.–6.30 p.m., Monday–Friday, during Noughth Week, and 9.30 a.m.--8 p.m. (6.30 p.m. on Friday) in full term; also open 10 a.m.--1 p.m. on Saturday in full term.

Further details of all courses and activities may be obtained from the Information Officer, Angela Pinkney, at the Language Centre, 12 Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6HT (telephone: Oxford (2)83360, e-mail: admin@lang.ox.ac.uk, Web pages: www.lang.ox.ac.uk).


FACULTY OF MUSIC

`Max at Oxford': Sir Peter Maxwell Davies Residency

The following events will be held as part of the Sir Peter Maxwell Davies Residency, 22–4 November. For further information see http://www.music.ox.ac.uk, or contact Tamsin Paling (telephone: Oxford (2)76141, e-mail: events@music.ox.ac.uk).

 

Monday, 22 November

Denis Arnold Hall, Faculty of Music, 10.15 a.m.: Ensemble Isis Composers' Workshop. Convener: Dr Jonathan Cross; Musical Director: Sam Hogarth.

Same venue, 1.30 p.m.: Sir Peter Maxwell lectures in the series `The Composer Speaks'. Tickets £8, concessions £4, at the door only (places limited).

Holywell Music Room, 3 p.m.: Open Rehearsals, with Sir Peter Maxwell Davies. Tickets £5, concessions £3, at the door only (places limited).

Same venue, 7.30 p.m.: Gala concert for the Seventieth Birthday of Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, with the Oxford University Sinfonietta and the Oxford Pro Musica Singers. Haydn, Symphony no. 42 in D, and the following works by Maxwell Davies: Welcome to Orkney; Strathclyde Concerto, no. 7 for double bass; The Kestral Road; and Sinfonietta Academica. Tickets £8, concessions £4, at the door or in advance from the Oxford Playhouse (tel.: Oxford 305305).

Tuesday, 23 November

Christ Church Cathedral, 6.05 p.m.: Evensong. Music by Maxwell Davies, including Jesus autem hodie, Hymn to the Word of God, and organ music. Free of charge and open to the public.

Wednesday, 24 November

Holywell Music Room, 10.30 a.m.: `Max in the theatre'—Sir Peter Maxwell Dvies in conversation. Tickets £8, concessions £4, at the door only (places limited). Same venue, 12 noon: performance of Maxwell Davies, The Medium, with Lindsay Bramley (mezzo-soprano), conducted by Michael Burden. Tickets £7, concessions £4, at the door or in advance from the Oxford Playhouse (tel: Oxford 305305).

INAUGURAL LECTURE

Professor of Environmental Science

PROFESSOR DIANA LIVERMAN will deliver her Inaugural Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 23 November, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Environment and the Americas.'


WELDON MEMORIAL LECTURE

PROFESSOR SIR RICHARD PETO, winner of the Weldon Memorial Medal 2003, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 1 November, in Lecture Theatre A, the Zoology/Psychology Building. Tickets are not required for admission.

Subject: `Halving premature death.'


CHARLES SIMONYI LECTURE

DR RICHARD LEAKEY, palaeoanthropologist and conservationist, will deliver the Charles Simonyi Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Wednesday, 13 October, in the Oxford Playhouse. The lecture is given in association with New College.

Tickets, costing £3.50, are obtainable in advance from the Oxford Playhouse (http://www.oxfordplayhouse.com, tel.: Oxford 305305).

Subject: `Why our origins matter.'


CLARENDON LECTURES IN MANAGEMENT STUDIES

The logic of position, the measure of leadership

JOEL PODOLNY, Novartis Professor of Leadership and Management, Harvard Business School, will deliver the Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies at 5.30 p.m. on the following days in the Saïd Business School.

The lectures are open to the public, and admission is free. Further information is available from Liz Buckle, Saïd Business School (telephone: Oxford (2)88852, e-mail: liz.buckle@sbs.ox.ac.uk), or Sophie Austin, Oxford University Press (telephone: Oxford 353859, e-mail: sophie.austin@oup.com).

Tue. 19 Oct.: `The logic of person v. the logic of position.'

Wed. 20 Oct.: `The meaning of leadership.'

Thur. 21 Oct.: `The measure of meaning.'


LIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Department of Zoology

The following departmental seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Mondays in Lecture Theatre B, the Department of Zoology. Details of the 11 October seminar will be announced later.

For details of the Weldon Memorial Lecture (1 November), see above.

PROFESSOR DIANA LIVERMAN and colleagues
18 Oct.: `Research in the Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford.'

DR B. LEADBETTER, Birmingham
25 Oct.: `Cells in baskets: the ancestors of animals?' (Jenkinson Seminar)

DR M. TELFORD, UCL
8 Nov.: `Testing the new animal phylogeny.' (Jenkinson Seminar)

DR S. JENNINGS, CEFAS, Lowestoft
15 Nov.: `Size-based analysis of food web structure.'

DR T. BENTON, Aberdeen
22 Nov.: `Linking life history variation to population dynamics: insights from mites.'

DR A. EYRE-WALKER, Sussex
29 Nov.: `The rates and fitness effects of mutations in the human genome.'


MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Department of Engineering Science

ADRIAN BEJAN, J.A. Jones Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Duke University, will lecture at 3 p.m. on Friday, 15 October, in Lecture Room 1, the Thom Building. The lecture is open to the public.

Convener: Dr Y. Ventikos.

 

Subject: `The constructal law: the generation of flow architecture, from engineering to nature.'


MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

Romance Linguistics Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in 47 Wellington Square.

Convener: Professor Martin Maiden.

PROFESSOR I. SÖHRMAN, Gothenburg
21 Oct.: `Spatial references in Sursilvan Romansh. A cognitive approach to the Sursilvan prepositional and adverb system.'

PROFESSOR H. DENMAN, UCL and OCHJS
28 Oct.: `How importance was Judeo-Romance in the genesis of the Yiddish language and from where exactly did the Romance component in Yiddish come?'

PROFESSOR C. POUNTAIN, Queen Mary College, London
11 Nov.: `Register and the history of Spanish syntax.'

J.C. SMITH
18 Nov.: `Refunctionalisation of the Latin nominative/accusative opposition in Gallo-Romance.'

N. MILIC
25 Nov.: `The debate on linguistic sexism and its effects on the language of sexism in Italian.'

A.B. MANSILLA
22 Dec.: `The function of tense and aspect in Catalan oral narratives.'


MODERN HISTORY

Early Modern Europe Seminar

The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Modern History Research Unit, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

Conveners: Professor Robert Evans, Ms J. Pollmann, and Dr L. Roper.

J.D. TRACY, Minnesota
12 Oct.: `The background war of the early modern era: European states and the Ottoman Empire in contest for dominion, trade, and cultural pre-eminence.'

H. KUGELER
19 Oct.: ` "Le parfait Ambassadeur": the theory and practice of diplomacy, 1648–1748.'

A. MARR
26 Oct.: `Mathematics and material culture in late Renaissance Italy.'

K. AUSTIN
2 Nov.: `An unsung hero? Immanuel Tremellius (1510–80) and the European Reformation.'

A. SPICER, Oxford Brookes
9 Nov.: `Sacred space and the confessional landscape of the Loire, c.1560–1660.'

Z. SHALEV, Princeton
16 Nov.: `Early modern pilgrimages to the Holy Land.'

E. FURNISS
23 Nov.: `Victims of their own success? Devotion, practice, and the Franciscans in Aragon, c.1600–58.'

R. MANNING
30 Nov.: `Confessions of a saint: Counter-Reformation, confessional culture, and the emergence of the active female apostolate.'


SAID BUSINESS SCHOOL

Finance Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursday in Lecture Theatre 5, West Wing, the Saïd Business School. For further details e-mail: professorial.secretary@sbs.ox.ac.uk.

Convener: Dimitrios P. Tsomocos.

PROFESSOR C.D. ALIPRANTIS, Purdue
14 Oct.: `Some applications of Riesz spaces to economics, finance, and econometrics.'

PROFESSOR H. SABOURIAN, Cambridge
21 Oct.: `Herd behaviour in financial models with sequential trades.'

PROFESSOR F. CORNELLI, London Business School
28 Oct.: `Investor sentiment and pre-issue markets.'

PROFESSOR M. HABIB, Montpellier II
4 Nov.: `The role of know-how acquisition in the formation and duration of joint ventures.'

PROFESSOR H. HAU, INSEAD
11 Nov.: To be announced.

R. REPULLO, CEMFI
18 Nov.: `Policies for banking crises: a theoretical framework.'

PROFESSOR M. HELLWIG, Mannheim
25 Nov.: `On the treatment of capital in cost-oriented access price regulation in network industries.'

M. PAGANO
2 Dec.: To be announced.


OXFORD CENTRE FOR HEBREW AND JEWISH STUDIES

David Patterson Seminars

The David Patterson Seminars will be given at 8 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor.

Convener: Dr Joseph Sherman.

The OCHJS minibus will leave the Playhouse, Beaumont Street, at 6.40 and 7.30 p.m., and will return from Yarnton at 9.45 p.m. A single fare costs £1.60 (students £1.20).

DR R. RASKIN, Aarhus
13 Oct.: `A child at gunpoint: a case study in the life of a photo.'

T. ARGOV
20 Oct.: `Losing the (Israeli) plot: contemporary Israel in the prose of Orly Kastel-Bloom.'

PROFESSOR R. HIEBERT, Trinity Western University, Canada
27 Oct.: `The Septuagint as a reflection of its Hellenistic Jewish context.'

PROFESSOR S. PARUSSA, Wellesley College
3 Nov.: `Hybridism of sounds: Primo Levi between Judaism and literature.'

PROFESSOR G. TRODESCHINI, Trieste
10 Nov.: `Representing medieval Jewish usurers: from a theological to an economic vocabulary.'

DR J. MIDDLEMAS
17 Nov.: `The geber's correction in Lamentations 3 as proto- Midrash.'

M. NEVADER
24 Nov.: ` "Appoint a king to govern us, like other nations"—the problem with kingship in the Hebrew Bible.'

DR S. SELA, Bar-Ilan
1 Dec.: `The twelfth-century Renaissance of the Hebrew language: strategies for the creation of a new scientific Hebrew terminology.'


Isaiah Berlin Public Lecture in Middle East Dialogue

DR M. LEDEEN, American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research, will deliver an Isaiah Berlin Lecture in Middle East Dialogue at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 28 October, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `America's mission in the Middle East.'


WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE

The history of modern medicine: national and international perspectives

The following seminars will be given at 2.15 p.m. on Mondays in the Wellcome Unit, 45 Banbury Road.

Convener: Dr Mark Harrison.

M. WORBOYS, Manchester
11 Oct.: `Mad dogs and Lancastrians: rabies, Pasteur, and the Chief Constable of Clitheroe, c.1890.'

C. LOW
18 Oct.: `Khoisan healing practices.'

M. FEDUNKIW, Toronto
25 Oct.: `British women doctors in World War I: finding a way to serve in Serbia and the case of Dr Dorothy Maude.'

S. BHATTACHARYA, UCL
1 Nov.: `WHO-led or WHO-managed? A reassessment of the nature of the Indian National Smallpox Eradication Programme, c.1960–77.'

K. MAGLEN
8 Nov.: `Quarantined: the experience of incarceration under quarantine.'

P. CHAKRABARTI
15 Nov.: `Hospital medicine in eighteenth-century India: the East India Company's establishment at Fort St George, Madras.'

M. HULVERSCHEIDT, Heidelberg
22 Nov.: `Malaria research in Germany during World War II.'

M. FUKUDA, Nagoya
29 Nov.: `The history of lock hospitals in Japan.'


OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC STUDIES

THE HON. DATO SERI ABDULLAH AHMAD BADAWI, Prime Minister of Malaysia, will lecture at 4 p.m. on Friday, 1 October, in the Auditorium, Magdalen College.

Entry is by free ticket, obtainable from the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies (telephone: Oxford (2)78730).

Subject: `Malaysia, Islam, and the wider world.'


INSTITUTO CAMOES CENTRE FOR PORTUGUESE LANGUAGE

Reopening of the Centre

ENGO. LUÍS DOS SANTOS FERRO, Director of the Luso-American Foundation, Lisbon, will give a lecture to mark the reopening of the Centre at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 28 October, in the Okinaga Room, Wadham College. The lecture will be delivered in English. The Vice-Chancellor (or his deputy) and H.E. The Portuguese Ambassador will be present at the lecture, which will be followed by a reception.

Convener: Dr Teresa Pinto Coelho (St John's), Director of the Centre.

 

Subject: `Lisbon and Eça de Queirós.'


CHRIST CHURCH

CHARLES NICHOLL, biographer of Leonardo da Vinci, will lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Monday, 11 October, in the Christ Church Picture Gallery. To accompany the talk, drawings by Leonardo will be on display in the gallery.

Subject: `Leonardo da Vinci—the flights of the mind.'


GREEN COLLEGE

McGovern Annual Lecture in the History of Medicine

PROFESSOR VIVIAN NUTTON, Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine, University College London, will deliver the McGovern Annual Lecture in the History of Medicine at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 28 October, in the E.P. Abraham Lecture Theatre, Green College.

Subject: `To dissect or not to dissect? Some ancient responses to a modern dilemma.'


Reuters Foundation Programme: Reuters Memorial Lecture

JOHN LLOYD, Editor, The Financial Times Magazine, will deliver the annual Reuters Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 22 October, in the Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, St Anne's College.

Subject: `The power and the story: media and politics in the twenty-first century.'


ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

European Studies Centre

Europe: what kind of power?

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Seminar Room, the European Studies Centre, 70 Woodstock Road. The series has been organised jointly with the Maison Française and the Department of Politics and International Relations.

PROFESSOR T. SNYDER, Yale
12 Oct.: `Power politics in Eastern Europe: past and present.'

PROFESSOR B. LAFFAN, Dublin: `Organising power in Europe: multilevel governance.' M. VAN ORANJE, Director, EU Affairs, Open Society Foundation, London
26 Oct.: `Europe as a normative power.' (To be confirmed)

G. ANDRÉANI, Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Paris
2 Nov.: `Europe as a diplomatic power.'

F. HEISBOURG, Director, Fondation pour la Recherche Stratégique, Paris
9 Nov.: `Europe as a military power.'

PROFESSOR A. SAPIR, European Commission
16 Nov.: `Europe as an economic power.'

I. KRASTEV, Director, Centre for Liberal Strategies, Sofia
23 Nov.: `What kind of power appeals to Eastern Europe? EU versus US.'


Eastern Europe under Communist rule

PROFESSOR RICHARD CRAMPTON will lecture at 2.15 p.m. on Thursdays, weeks 1–8, in St Antony's College.


Workshop

A workshop, convened by Knick Harley, will be held on Thursday, 21 October, 2–5 p.m., and on Friday, 22 October, 9 a.m.–5 p.m.


Conference: Entente Cordiale

A conference, convened by Dr Kalypso Nicolaïdis and Professor Alexis Tadié, will be held on 6 and 7 December in the Lecture Theatre, the Nissan Institute.


Other lectures

PROFESSOR NORMAN DAVIES and PROFESSOR TIMOTHY SNYDER will lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 13 October, in the European Studies Centre.

Subject: `Where on earth does Europe end?' (Centre Evening)

 


H.E. BERNARD R. BOT, Foreign Minister, the Netherlands, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 1 December, in the Lecture Theatre, the Nissan Institute.

Subject: `What should be European foreign policy?'


Russian and Eurasian Studies Centre

Twenty years of political change: the USSR and Russia, 1985–2004

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

Convener: Professor Archie Brown.

PROFESSOR BROWN
11 Oct.: `Institutions, ideas, interests, and leadership in the Soviet and Russian transition.'

DR L. SHEVTSOVA, Carnegie Moscow Center
18 Oct.: `Comparing Yeltsin and Putin as leaders.'

SIR RODRIC BRAITHWAITE, British Ambassador to Moscow, 1988–92
25 Oct.: `The view across the river, 1988–92.'

DR W. SMIRNOV, Institute of State and Law, Moscow
1 Nov.: `Civil society in post-Soviet Russia.'

DR J. HUGHES, LSE
8 Nov.: `Federalism in post-Soviet Russia: from accommodation to control?.'

DR A. GRACHEV, Paris and Moscow
15 Nov.: `The rise and fall of the new political thinking.'

MS TINA PODPLATNIK, Moscow
22 Nov.: `Big business and the state under Yeltsin and Putin.'

DR A. LEDENEVA, University College London
29 Nov.: `Informal politics in Russia in the 1990s.'


ST CROSS COLLEGE AND ALL SOULS COLLEGE

St Cross–All Souls Lectures

Who owns objects? The ethics and legality of collecting

Unless otherwise indicated, the following lectures will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Dining Hall, St Cross College.

The series will conclude with an all-day workshop, to be held on 6 December in All Souls College. Registration forms for this will be available at the lectures.

Further information may be obtained from Roz Britton-Strong (e-mail: coin- room@ashmus.ox.ac.uk).

Conveners: Luke Treadwell, St Cross College; Eleanor Robson, All Souls College; and Christopher Gosden, St Cross College.

PROFESSOR LORD (COLIN) RENFREW
11 Oct.: `Collecting and looting in the past: the effects of self-indulgence.'

DR L. AL-GAILANI
18 Oct.: `Archaeological theft in Iraq.'

DR K. POLITIS
25 Oct., Pitt Rivers Museum Research Centre (64 Banbury Road): `The political and economic realities of looting ancient sites.'

DR U. KAMPMANN
1 Nov.: `Dealing in coins: problems and opportunities for a serious and responsible coin trade.'

DR D. GAIMSTER
8 Nov.: `UK government measures against the illicit trade: examining the new regulatory framework.'

G. ORTIZ
15 Nov.: `Overview and assessment after fifty years of collecting in a changing world.'

DR P. ROBERTS
22 Nov.: `Barriers or bridges? Museums and acquisitions in the light of new legal and voluntary codes.'

DR M. O'NEILL
29 Nov.: `Repatriation and its discontents: the Glasgow experience.'


WOLFSON COLLEGE

Panel discussion

The college will host a panel discussion in conjunction with the college charity, the African Medical and Research Foundation (AMREF), at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 7 October, in the Haldane Room.

The discussion will highlight the importance of three areas to the prevention and mitigation of the epidemic: scientific research, social policy, and accessto essential medicines. The event is part of Oxford Africa Week.

The panellists will be Dr Lucy Dorrell, Medical Research Council Human Immunology Unit; James Sandham and Doreen Tembo, Department of Social Policy and Social Work; Duncan Matthews, Senior Lecturer and Senior Research Fellow, Intellectual Property Research Institute, Queen Mary College, London; Matthew Ngunga, AMREF Programme Directorate, Nairobi.

Subject: `Tackling HIV/AIDS: a multidimensional approach.'


OXFORD ASIAN TEXTILE GROUP

G. IRVINE will lecture at 6.15 p.m. on Wednesday, 20 October, in the Pauling Centre, 58 Banbury Road. Non-members are welcome to attend the lecture (admission £2).

Subject: `Bu-no-mai: the military dances of Bugaku.'



Prizes, Grants, and Funding

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • RESEARCH SERVICES [external link]
  • CENTRE FOR BRAZILIAN STUDIES
    • Hardship Fund: Brazilian Studies

 


CENTRE FOR BRAZILIAN STUDIES

Hardship Fund: Brazilian Studies

Applications are invited from postgraduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Life and Environmental Sciences Divisions of the University whose research is on Brazil and who, because of unexpected difficulties, need financial assistance to complete their postgraduate studies.

Please note that financial assistance is only available to postgraduate students who are already at the University and awards are not normally made to students in their first year of study. Amounts do not normally exceed £2,000 per annum.

There is no application form. Candidates should apply in writing to Professor Leslie Bethell, Director, Centre for Brazilian Studies. The letter should include: (i) name, college, degree being studied, and terms of admission; (ii) the faculty/department under which the applicant is studying and the subject of the thesis; (iii) details of actual or estimated income and expenditure in the year for which financial assistance is requested; (iv) the amount of the grant requested.

Letters of application must be accompanied by separate and reasoned recommendations from the student's supervisor and from the head, senior tutor, or tutor for graduates from his or her college.

Applications for financial assistance for 2004–5 should be submitted by the end of noughth week in Michaelmas Term or at the end of noughth week in Hilary Term, and will be considered by the Committee in first week of each term.

Applications should be sent to Julie Smith, Administrator, Centre for Brazilian Studies, 92 Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 7ND (e-mail: julie.smith@brazil.ox.ac.uk).



 

CENTRE FOR BRAZILIAN STUDIES

Hardship Fund: Brazilian Studies

Applications are invited from postgraduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Life and Environmental Sciences Divisions of the University whose research is on Brazil and who, because of unexpected difficulties, need financial assistance to complete their postgraduate studies.

Please note that financial assistance is only available to postgraduate students who are already at the University and awards are not normally made to students in their first year of study. Amounts do not normally exceed £2,000 per annum.

There is no application form. Candidates should apply in writing to Professor Leslie Bethell, Director, Centre for Brazilian Studies. The letter should include: (i) name, college, degree being studied, and terms of admission; (ii) the faculty/department under which the applicant is studying and the subject of the thesis; (iii) details of actual or estimated income and expenditure in the year for which financial assistance is requested; (iv) the amount of the grant requested.

Letters of application must be accompanied by separate and reasoned recommendations from the student's supervisor and from the head, senior tutor, or tutor for graduates from his or her college.

Applications for financial assistance for 2004–5 should be submitted by the end of noughth week in Michaelmas Term or at the end of noughth week in Hilary Term, and will be considered by the Committee in first week of each term.

Applications should be sent to Julie Smith, Administrator, Centre for Brazilian Studies, 92 Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 7ND (e-mail: julie.smith@brazil.ox.ac.uk).

CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, and, where applicable, of divisional boards, the following changes in regulations made by divisional and faculty boards will come into effect on 15 October.

1 Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board and Board of the Faculty of Management

(a) Honour School of Materials, Economics, and Management

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first Part I examination in 2006)

In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 338, after l. 33 insert:

`Candidates embarking on the Honour School in or before October 2004 will take all papers in the sixth term after passing the First Public Examination. Candidates embarking on the Honour School in or after October 2005 will take paper Ec1 in the third term after passing the First Public Examination and the remaining papers in the sixth term after passing the First Public Examination.'


(b) Pass School of Materials, Economics and Management

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first Part I examination in 2006)

In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 340, after l. 40 insert:

`Candidates embarking on the Pass School in or before October 2004 will take all papers in the sixth term after passing the First Public Examination. Candidates embarking on the Pass School in or after October 2005 will take paper Ec1 in the third term after passing the First Public Examination and the remaining papers in the sixth term after passing the First Public Examination.'


2 Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board and Board of the Faculty of Philosophy

(a) Honour School of Mathematics and Philosophy

(i) With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in Part B in 2005 and Part C in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 29, after l. 14, as amended by Gazette, 27 June 2003, delete: `Mathematics and Philosophy (for those taking Option (i))'.

2 Ibid., after l. 16, insert:

`Master of Mathematics and Philosophy      Mathematics and Philosophy                      
                                              (four-year course)'.

3 Ibid., p. 293, delete ll. 22–31, as amended by Gazette, 27 June 2003, and substitute: `4. (a) In order to proceed to Part C, a candidate must achieve Honours standard in Part A and Part B together. A list of candidates satisfying this requirement shall be published by the Examiners.

(b) A candidate who obtains only a Pass or fails to satisfy the Examiners in Part C may enter again for Part C on at most one subsequent occasion.

(c) A candidate who is adjudged worthy of Honours on both Part A and Part B together and either does not enter Part C, or does enter Part C and is not adjudged worthy of Honours in Part C, may supplicate for the Honours degree of B.A. in Mathematics and Philosophy with the classification obtained in Part A and Part B together.

(d) A candidate who is adjudged worthy of Honours on both Parts A and B together, and on Part C may supplicate for the degree of Master of Mathematics and Philosophy if he or she has fulfilled all the conditions in the General Regulations for Admission to Degrees Awarded on Passing the Second Public Examination.'

4 Ibid., delete from p. 294, l. 27 to p. 295, l. 5 and substitute: `3. In PART C each candidate shall offer a total of three units chosen in any combination from the lists for Mathematics and for Philosophy. Units in Mathematics are taken from the schedule of units and half units at level M (see `Schedule' below). No unit or half unit in Mathematics, and no subject in Philosophy, may be offered in both Part B and Part C. A unit in Philosophy consists of one of the subjects 101, 103–18, 120 as specified in the Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy, or the Rise of Modern Logic as specified in the Regulations for the Degree of Bachelor of Philosophy, or a Thesis as specified below. Each unit in Philosophy other than a Thesis shall be examined by a three hour written paper together with an essay of at most 5,000 words. Candidates should avoid any substantial repetition of material between examination scripts and examination essays. Topics for essays shall be prescribed by the Philosophy examiners in Final Honour Schools in the previous year and shall be published in the Handbook for Mathematics and Philosophy at the beginning of Michaelmas Term in the academic year in which the examination is to be taken. Candidates may apply for approval of essay topics not on the prescribed list by writing to the Chairman of the Board, c/o the Administrator, Philosophy Centre, 10 Merton Street, giving the title he or she proposes, together with an explanation of the subject and enclosing a letter from their tutor attesting to the suitability of this topic for the candidate. Any such application must be received no later than Friday of the fourth week of the Hilary Term preceding the Part C examination for which the essay is to be submitted. Any such application shall be accepted or rejected by the Board within two weeks of its being received.

Each essay shall be the candidate's own work, though it should show knowledge of relevant literature in the subject and may include passages of quotation or paraphrase so long as these passages are clearly indicated as such and the source properly attributed. The candidate may discuss a first draft of the essay with his or her tutor for that subject. The amount of assistance the tutor may give shall be limited to what can be provided in one of the candidate's tutorials for their study of that subject. For each essay the candidate shall sign a statement to the effect that that essay is his or her own work and the tutor shall also sign a statement confirming that, to the best of his or her knowledge and belief, this is so. These statements shall be placed in a sealed envelope bearing the candidate's examination number and the name of the subject for which the essay has been written, and presented with two copies of each essay. Each copy of an essay shall be identified only by the candidate's examination number and bear the name of the Philosophy subject for which the essay is being submitted and must be submitted not later than noon on Friday of the week before the Trinity Full Term of the examination to the Examination Schools, Oxford, addressed to the Chairman of the Examiners for Part C of the Final Honour School of Mathematics and Philosophy.

PHILOSOPHY THESIS

1. Subject

The subject of every thesis should fall within the scope of philosophy. The subject may but need not overlap any subject on which the candidate offers papers. Candidates should avoid substantial repetition in examination scripts or examination essays of material from their theses. Every candidate shall submit through his or her college for approval by the Board of the Faculty of Philosophy the title he or she proposes, together with an explanation of the subject in about 100 words; and a letter of approval from his or her tutor, not earlier than the first day of Trinity Full Term of the year before that in which he or she is to be examined and not later than Friday of the third week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding his or her examination. Applications for approval of subject should be directed to the Chairman of the Board, c/o The Administrator, Philosophy Centre, 10 Merton St. The Board shall decide as soon as possible whether or not to approve the title and shall advise the candidate immediately. No decision shall be deferred beyond the end of the fourth week of Michaelmas Full Term. If a candidate wishes to change the title of his or her thesis after a title has already been approved by the Board, he or she may apply for such permission to be granted by the Board: applications should be directed to the Chairman of the Board (if the application is made before the first day of Hilary Full Term preceding the examination). If later than the first day of Hilary Full Term preceding the examination application for change of title should be made to the chairman of examiners for Part C of the Final Honour School of Mathematics and Philosophy.

2. Authorship and origin

Every thesis shall be the candidate's own work. A candidate's tutor may, however, discuss with the candidate the field of study, the sources available, and the method of presentation; the tutor may also read and comment on drafts. The amount of assistance the tutor may give is equivalent to the teaching of a normal paper. Every candidate shall sign a certificate to the effect that the thesis is his or her own work and the tutor shall countersign the certificate confirming, to the best of his or her knowledge and belief, that this is so. This certificate shall be placed in a sealed envelope bearing the candidate's examination number presented together with the thesis. No thesis shall be accepted which has already been submitted for a degree of this or any other university, and the certificate shall also state that the thesis has not been so submitted. No thesis shall, however, be ineligible because it has been or is being submitted for any prize of this university.

3. Length and format

No thesis shall exceed 20,000 words, the limit to include all notes and appendices, but not including the bibliography; no person or body shall have authority to permit any excess. The word count should be indicated on the front of the thesis. There shall be a select bibliography or a list of sources. All theses must be typed in double spacing on one side of quarto or A4 paper, with any notes and references at the foot of each page. Two copies of the thesis shall be submitted to the examiners.

4. Submission of thesis

Every candidate shall submit two copies of their thesis, identified by the candidate's examination number only, not later than noon on Friday of the week before the Trinity Full Term of the examination to the Examination Schools, Oxford, addressed to the Chairman of the Examiners for Part C of the Final Honour School of Mathematics and Philosophy.'

(b) Honour School of Physics and Philosophy

(i) With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in Part B in 2005 and Part C in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 29, before l. 18 insert:

`[For candidates embarking on the Honour School in 2002:'.

2 Ibid., after l. 20 insert:

`[For candidates embarking on the Honour School in or after October 2003:

`Master of Physics and Philosophy        Physics and Philosophy 
                                              (four-year course)].

3 Ibid., before p. 463, insert:

`SPECIAL REGULATIONS FOR THE HONOUR SCHOOL OF PHYSICS AND PHILOSOPHY

[For candidates embarking on the Honour School in or after October 2003:

A

In the following `the Physics Course Handbook' refers to the Physics Undergraduate Handbook, published annually at the start of Michaelmas Term by the Sub-faculty of Physics. The Physics and Philosophy Course Handbook is published annually at the start of Michaelmas Term by the faculty of Philosophy.

1. All candidates shall be examined in Physics and in Philosophy.

2. No candidate shall be admitted to examination in this school unless he or she has either passed or been exempted from the First Public Examination.

3. (a) The examination in Physics and Philosophy shall consist of three parts: Part A, Part B and Part C.

(b) Parts A, B and C shall be taken at times not less than three, six, and nine terms, respectively, after passing or being exempted from the First Public Examination.

4. (a) In order to proceed to Part C a minimum standard of achievement in either Part A in physics or in Part B in philosophy may be required, as determined by the sub-faculty of Physics or the faculty of Philosophy from time to time. Any such requirement shall be published in the Physics and Philosophy Course Handbook not later than the beginning of the Michaelmas Full Term of the academic year preceding the year of the Part A examination. Names of those satisfying the requirement shall be published by the Examiners.

(b) A candidate who obtains only a Pass or fails to satisfy the Examiners in Part C may enter again for Part C on at most one subsequent occasion; Parts A and B shall be entered on one occasion only.

(c) A candidate who is adjudged worthy of Honours on both Part A and Part B together and either does not enter Part C or does enter Part C and is not adjudged worthy of Honours in Part C may supplicate for the Honours degree of B.A. in Physics and Philosophy with the classification obtained in Part A and Part B together.

(d) A candidate who is adjudged worthy of Honours on Parts A and B together, and on Part C, may supplicate for the degree of Master of Physics and Philosophy if he or she has fulfilled all the conditions in the General Regulations for Admission to Degrees Awarded on Passing the Second Public Examination.

5. The examination in this school shall be under the joint supervision of the Board of the Faculty of Philosophy and the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board, which shall appoint a standing joint committee to make regulations concerning it, subject in all cases to clauses 1–4 above.

6. (a) The examiners for Physics shall be such of the Public Examiners in Physics in the Honour School of Physics as may be required; those for Philosophy shall be nominated by a committee of which three elected members shall be appointed by the Board of the Faculty of Philosophy.

(b) It shall be the duty of the Chairman of the Public Examiners in Physics in the Honour School of Physics to designate such of their number as may be required for Physics and Philosophy, and when this has been done and the Examiners for Philosophy have been nominated, the number of the Examiners in Physics and Philosophy shall be deemed to be complete.

B

1. For the Physics papers, the Examiners will permit the use of any hand-held calculator subject to the conditions set out under the heading `Use of calculators in examinations' in the Special Regulations concerning Examinations and further elaborated in the Physics Course Handbook, save that candidates taking part in an exchange scheme shall be subject to the provisions of the host institution in this regard.

2. In Part A, candidates will take three papers in Physics and complete practical work in Physics, as specified in the Schedule below. In Part B, candidates will take three papers in Physics as specified in the Schedule below, and will be examined in three subjects in Philosophy, one of these subjects being open to choice. In Part C, candidates will be required to offer any three Units, as specified in the Schedule below.

3. The highest honours can be obtained by excellence either in Physics or Philosophy, providing that adequate knowledge is shown in the other subject areas. An honours classification will be awarded only if performance in both Physics and Philosophy is of honours standard in Parts A and B taken together, or in Part C.

4. Candidates for Part B must give to the Registrar notice of their choice of the optional Philosophy subject not later than Friday in the eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding that part of the examination. Candidates for Part C must give to the Registrar notice of their choice of written papers not later than Friday in the eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding that part of the examination, or, if taking part in an exchange scheme, shall have the proposed set of papers to be taken in the host institution approved by the standing joint committee by the beginning of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding that part of the examination.

Schedule

Part A

Physics

Candidates are required to

(i) offer three written papers on Fundamental Principles of Physics, and

(ii) submit to the Examiners such evidence as they require of the successful completion of practical work normally pursued during the three terms preceding the examination. The titles of the written papers under (i) are given below. Their syllabuses shall be approved by the Sub-faculty of Physics and shall be published in the Physics Course Handbook not later than the beginning of Michaelmas Full Term for the examination three terms thence.

Fundamental Principles of Physics:

A1: Thermal Physics
A2P: Electromagnetism
A3: Quantum Physics

Part B

Physics

Candidates are required to offer

(i) two papers in Theoretical Physics, and

(ii) one paper in Physics.

The titles of the written papers under (i) and (ii) are given below. Their syllabuses shall be approved by the Sub-faculty of Physics and shall be published in the Physics Course Handbook not later than the beginning of Michaelmas Full Term for the examination three terms thence. Theoretical Physics:

BT1: Classical Mechanics \j BT2: Covariant Electromagnetism

Physics (one of)

B1: Atomic Physics, Special Relativity, and Sub-Atomic Physics
B2: Condensed Matter Physics and Photonics
B3: Astrophysics and Atmospheric Physics

Philosophy

Candidates are required to take three subjects as specified in the provisions for Physics and Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy.

Part C

Candidates not on an exchange scheme shall offer a total of three units chosen in any combination from the lists for Physics and for Philosophy, or an approved collection of course options if taking part in an exchange scheme.

A unit in Physics consists of either a written paper on a Major Option, or a project report on either advanced practical work or other advanced work, as specified for Part C of the Honour School of Physics. A unit in Philosophy consists of one of the subjects 101–104, 107– 122, as specified in the Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy, or the Rise of Modern Logic as specified in the Regulations for the Degree of Bachelor of Philosophy, or a Thesis as specified below. No subject in Philosophy may be offered in both Part B and Part C.

Each unit in Philosophy other than a Thesis shall be examined by a three hour written paper together with an essay of at most 5,000 words. Candidates should avoid any substantial repetition of material between examination scripts and examination essays. Topics for essays shall be prescribed by the Philosophy examiners in Final Honour Schools in the previous year and shall be published in the Handbook for Physics and Philosophy at the beginning of Michaelmas Term in the academic year in which the examination is to be taken. Candidates may apply for approval of essay topics not on the prescribed list by writing to the Chairman of the Board, c/o The Administrator, Philosophy Centre, 10 Merton Street, giving the title he or she proposes, together with an explanation of the subject in about 100 words and enclosing a letter from their tutor attesting to the suitability of this topic for the candidate. Any such application must be received no later than Friday of the fourth week of the Hilary Term preceding the Part C examination for which the essay is to be submitted. Any such application shall be accepted or rejected by the Board within two weeks of its being received. Each essay shall be the candidate's own work, though it should show knowledge of relevant literature in the subject and may include passages of quotation or paraphrase so long as these passages are clearly indicated as such and the source properly attributed. The candidate may discuss a first draft of the essay with his or her tutor for that subject. The amount of assistance the tutor may give shall be limited to what can be provided in one of the candidate's tutorials for their study of that subject. For each essay the candidate shall sign a statement to the effect that that essay is his or her own work and the tutor shall also sign a statement confirming that, to the best of his or her knowledge and belief, this is so. These statements shall be placed in a sealed envelope bearing the candidate's examination number and the name of the subject for which the essay has been written, and presented with two copies of each essay. Each copy of an essay shall be identified only by the candidate's examination number and bear the name of Philosophy subject for which the essay is being submitted and must be submitted not later than noon on Friday of the week before the Trinity Full Term of the examination to the Examination Schools, Oxford, addressed to the Chairman of the Examiners for Part C of the Final Honour School of Physics and Philosophy.

PHILOSOPHY THESIS

a. Subject

The subject of every thesis should fall within the scope of philosophy. The subject may but need not overlap any subject on which the candidate offers papers. Candidates should avoid substantial repetition in examination scripts or examination essays of material from their theses. Every candidate shall submit through his or her college for approval by the Board of the Faculty of Philosophy the title he or she proposes, together with an explanation of the subject in about 100 words; and a letter of approval from his or her tutor, not earlier than the first day of Trinity Full Term of the year before that in which he or she is to be examined and not later than Friday of the third week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding his or her examination. Applications for approval of subject should be directed to the Chairman of the Board, c/o The Administrator, Philosophy Centre, 10 Merton St. The Board shall decide as soon as possible whether or not to approve the title and shall advise the candidate immediately. No decision shall be deferred beyond the end of the fourth week of Michaelmas Full Term. If a candidate wishes to change the title of his or her thesis after a title has already been approved by the Board, he or she may apply for such permission to be granted by the Board: applications should be directed to the Chairman of the Board (if the application is made before the first day of Hilary Full Term preceding the examination). If later than the first day of Hilary Full Term preceding the examination application for change of title should be made to the chairman of examiners for Part C of the Final Honour School of Physics and Philosophy.

b. Authorship and origin

Every thesis shall be the candidate's own work. A candidate's tutor may, however, discuss with the candidate the field of study, the sources available, and the method of presentation; the tutor may also read and comment on drafts. The amount of assistance the tutor may give is equivalent to the teaching of a normal paper. Every candidate shall sign a certificate to the effect that the thesis is his or her own work and the tutor shall countersign the certificate confirming, to the best of his or her knowledge and belief, that this is so. This certificate shall be placed in a sealed envelope bearing the candidate's examination number presented together with the thesis. No thesis shall be accepted which has already been submitted for a degree of this or any other university, and the certificate shall also state that the thesis has not been so submitted. No thesis shall, however, be ineligible because it has been or is being submitted for any prize of this university.

c. Length and format

No thesis shall exceed 20,000 words, the limit to include all notes and appendices, but not including the bibliography; no person or body shall have authority to permit any excess. The word count should be indicated on the front of the thesis. There shall be a select bibliography or a list of sources. All theses must be typed in double spacing on one side of quarto or A4 paper, with any notes and references at the foot of each page. Two copies of the thesis shall be submitted to the examiners.

d. Submission of thesis

Every candidate shall submit two copies of their thesis, identified by the candidate's examination number only, not later than noon on Friday of the week before the Trinity Full Term of the examination to the Examination Schools, Oxford, addressed to the Chairman of the Examiners for Part C of the Final Honour School of Physics and Philosophy.

EXCHANGE SCHEME

Each individual candidate taking part in a full year exchange at a host institution approved by the University will provide a collated set of coursework to the standing joint committee. Each individual candidate will ensure that the host institution forwards a full transcript of the courses taken certified by the host institution. Each individual candidate will ensure that the host institution retains the examination papers and scripts for the approved courses undertaken and that these are submitted under seal, together with the collated coursework and transcript of courses taken, to the Chairman of Examiners, Honour School of Physics and Philosophy, c/o Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford by noon on Friday of the sixth week of Trinity term.]'

(ii) With immediate effect

In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 463, delete ll. 4–6 and substitute: `[For candidates embarking on the Honour School in October 2002:'.

(iii) With effect from 1 October 2005

1 In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 29, delete ll. 18–20.

2 Ibid., delete from p. 463, l. 1 to p. 466, l. 16.


(c) Pass School of Physics and Philosophy

(i) With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in Part A in 2005 and Part B in 2006)

In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 466, after l. 16, insert: `[For candidates embarking on the Honour School or Pass School in or after 1 October 2003:

PASS SCHOOL OF PHYSICS AND PHILOSOPHY

The examination consists of Part A and Part B.

A candidate may be admitted to Part A of the examination no earlier than the sixth term from matriculation and to Part B of the examination no earlier than the ninth term after matriculation.

In Part A, a candidate must offer two papers on the Fundamental Principles of Physics from those specified for Part A of the Honour School of Physics and Philosophy.

In Part B, a candidate must offer two subjects in Philosophy, which are 102 (Knowledge and Reality) and 120 (Intermediate Philosophy of Physics) as specified in the provisions for Physics and Philosophy in the Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools involving Philosophy.]

[For candidates embarking on the Honour School in 2002:'.

(ii) With effect from 1 October 2005

In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 466, delete ll. 17–37.


(d) Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy

(i) With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in Part A in 2005 and Part B in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 430, delete lines 25–29 and substitute:

`In PART C each candidate shall offer a total of three units chosen in any combination from the lists for Mathematics and for Philosophy. A unit in Philosophy consists of one of the subjects 101, 103–18, 120 as specified in the Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy, or the Rise of Modern Logic as specified in the Regulations for the Degree of Bachelor of Philosophy, or a Thesis as specified in the Special Regulations for the Honour School of Mathematics and Philosophy. No subject in Philosophy may be offered in both Part B and Part C. Each unit in Philosophy other than a Thesis shall be examined by a three hour written paper together with an essay of at most 5,000 words. See Special Regulations for the Honour School of Mathematics and Philosophy for regulations concerning the examination essays.'

2 Ibid., delete ll. 40–43.

3 Ibid., p. 426, after l. 46 insert:

`[For candidates embarking on the Honour School in or after October 2003:

`121. Advanced Philosophy of Physics]

[For candidates embarking on the Honour School in 2002:'.

4 Ibid., p. 431, delete ll. 40–42 and substitute: `[For candidates embarking on the Honour School in or after October 2003:

Physics and Philosophy

Part B: candidates are required to take subject 102, subject 120, and one further subject selected from the list of subjects 101–22 above, except that neither subject 105 nor subject 106 may be taken. In this school, candidates must answer at least one question from the section on Philosophy of Science in subject 102.

Part C: those candidates offering one or more further Philosophy subjects must choose them from the subjects 101–4, 107–22 above, or Rise of Modern Logic as specified in the Regulations for the Degree of Bachelor of Philosophy, or a Thesis as specified in 199 above, save that the thesis shall not exceed 20,000 words.]

[For candidates embarking on the Honour School in 2002:'.

5 Ibid., p. 432, before l. 5 insert:

[For candidates embarking on the Honour School in or after October 2003:

Each subject in Philosophy other than a Thesis shall be examined by a three-hour written paper together with an essay of at most 5,000 words. See Special Regulations for the Honour School of Physics and Philosophy for regulations concerning the examination essays.]

(ii) With effect from 1 October 2005

1 In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 426, delete l. 47.

2 Ibid., p. 427, delete ll. 12–15.

3 Ibid., p. 431, delete ll. 43–52.


3 Medical Sciences Board

(a) M.Sc. in Science and Medicine of Athletic Performance

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2003, delete from l. 26 on p. 759 to l. 49 on p. 760 and substitute:

`Science and Medicine of Athletic Performance

1.The Medical Sciences Board shall elect for the supervision of the course an organizing committee which shall have the power to arrange lectures and other instruction. 2.Every candidate must follow for at least six terms a course of instruction in the Science and Medicine of Athletic Performance. The course of instruction shall consist of the modules set out in the schedule and the examiners shall require confirmation from the Course Director of satisfactory attendance by each candidate.

3. In the first year of the course, candidates must take the five Level I modules listed in the schedule. Candidates shall be examined in all of the following ways:

(i) One examination paper shall be set for each of the modules which candidates elect to take.

(ii) In addition, in the case of four of the five first year modules, each candidate shall be required to submit to the examiners two copies of a typewritten or printed essay of not more than 3,000 words on a topic selected from a list published by the organizing committee by the beginning of the term in which the essay must be submitted. Deadlines for submission and resubmission shall be notified to candidates at the same time.

(iii) In the case of one module, specified by the organizing committee, candidates must undertake a research project in Performance Science. This will involve identifying an athlete or a team, to observe, and then reporting to what extent science, training, performance and recovery have been made cohesive and have been applied toward the integration of physical, mental and emotional components of elite athletic activity. Candidates must submit a project report of not more than 3,000 words, and each candidate shall be expected to give a public oral presentation on his or her project, on a date to be determined by the organizing committee.

(iv) Candidates must satisfy the examiners in each of the forms of assessment for each of the modules that they take.

4. In the second year of the course, candidates must take the four Level II modules set out in the Schedule Candidates shall be examined in all of the following ways:

(i) One examination paper shall be set for each of the modules, other than the Project Module, which candidates elect to take.

(ii) In addition, in the modules other than the Project module, each candidate shall be required to submit to the examiners two copies of a typewritten or printed essay of not more than 3,000 words on a topic selected from a list published by the organizing committee by the beginning of the term in which the essay must be submitted. Deadlines for submission shall be notified to candidates at the same time.

(iii) Candidates must offer and satisfy the examiners in each of the forms of assessment for each of the modules that they take.

(iv) Candidates must submit and satisfy the examiners in a dissertation based on the Project Module. The Project can be laboratory-based, library-based or survey-based. The length of the dissertation shall be not more than 10,000 words (excluding tables, appendices, footnotes and bibliography) and each candidate shall select the subject of his or her dissertation in consultation with the Course Director. The subject of each dissertation shall also be subject to the approval of the organizing committee. No dissertation subject shall be approved without the appointment of a suitable supervisor. The dissertation shall be submitted by such date as the examiners shall determine and of which they shall notify candidates by the beginning of Michaelmas Term in the second year of study. The dissertation shall be accompanied by a statement certifying that it is the candidateþs own work.

5. The required written submissions must be sent to the Chairman of Examiners, M.Sc. in Science and Medicine of Athletic Performance, c/o Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford.

6. Each submission must be accompanied by a certificate indicating that it is the candidateþs own work.

7. The examiners shall make a recommendation, based on the performance of candidates in the first year examinations, as to whether each candidate is likely to attain the level of performance required for the successful completion of the second year of the course. Admission to the second year shall be determined by the organizing committee in the light of the examiners' recommendations, evidence of adequate arrangements made by each candidate to undertake the Project Module and an interview of each candidate by the Course Director. A candidate may appeal to the Medical Sciences Board against the decision of the organizing committee. 8.Candidates who fail to reach the required standard in any of the required submissions, including the project module and oral presentation in the first year of the course, but excluding the final dissertation, may revise and resubmit on one further occasion up to two pieces of submitted work in the first year, and one piece of submitted work in the second year, the dates for resubmission to be determined and published by the organizing committee.

9. Candidates who fail to reach the required standard in any examination paper for any module, will be permitted to enter for the examination of the relevant module(s) on no more than one further occasion, normally at the end of the long vacation following the first examination.

10. Candidates may be required by the examiners to attend a viva voce examination.

11. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.

12. The organizing committee shall have the discretion to permit any modules examined for the Postgraduate Diploma in Science and Medicine of Athletic Performance to count towards the examination requirements for the M.Sc. A period of study for the Postgraduate Diploma may be counted towards the minimum period of study required for the M.Sc.

13. Candidates who transfer from the Diploma to the MSc. at the end of the first year, having previously been examined in only four of the Level I modules, in addition to meeting the requirements of paragraph 4 above, must also take, and be examined in, the Level I module that they did not take in the first year.

14. If any candidate who is successful in the examination for the M.Sc. in Science and Medicine of Athletic Performance has previously successfully completed the Postgraduate Diploma, and the standing committee has agreed that, for that examination, modules examined for the Postgraduate Diploma should count towards the examination requirements for the M.Sc., then the award of the M.Sc. will subsume the award of the Postgraduate Diploma.

SCHEDULE

Level I Modules

Structural and biomechanical basis of physical performance

Biochemical basis of physical performance

Motor control, muscle energetics and training

Cardio-respiratory, renal and endocrine adaptations to physical performance

Genes, drugs and performance

Level II Modules

Nutrition, endurance exercise and the unexplained underperformance syndrome

Psychology, sociology and gender issues in sport

Advanced biomechanics, injury and sport for the disabled

Project Module'


(b) Postgraduate Diploma in Science and Medicine of Athletic Performance

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2003, delete from l. 33 on p. 950 to l. 17 on p. 951 and substitute: `1. The Medical Sciences Board shall elect for the supervision of the course an organizing committee which shall have the power to arrange lectures and other instruction.

2. Every candidate must follow for at least three terms a course of instruction in the Science and Medicine of Athletic Performance. The course of instruction will consist of the modules set out in the schedule of Level I modules for the MSc in Science and Medicine of Athletic Performance. The examiners shall require confirmation from the Course Director of satisfactory attendance by each candidate, including at least four of the modules set out in the schedule.

3. Candidates shall be examined in each of the ways set out in the regulations for the MSc in Science and Medicine of Athletic Performance for the first year of the course, except that they need only elect to take four of the five modules set out in the schedule. Candidates must satisfy the examiners in each of the forms of assessment for each of the modules that they take.

4. The required written submissions must be sent to the Chairman of Examiners, Postgraduate Diploma in Science and Medicine of Athletic Performance, c/o Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford.

5. Each submission must be accompanied by a certificate indicating that it is the candidate's own work.

6. Candidates who fail to reach the required standard in any of the required submissions, including the project module and oral presentation, may revise and resubmit on one further occasion up to two pieces of submitted work, the dates for resubmission to be determined and published by the organizing committee.

7. Candidates who fail to reach the required standard in any examination paper for any module, will be permitted to enter for the examination of the relevant module(s) on no more than one further occasion, normally at the end of the long vacation following the first examination.

8. Candidates may be required by the examiners to attend a viva voce examination.

9. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.þ

OBITUARY

Christ Church

LESLIE LAWSON YOUNGBLOOD, 22 August 2004; commoner 1947; formerly Senior Vice-President, Mobil Oil Corporation; President, USS Constitution 2000. Aged 84.


MEMORIAL SERVICES

All Souls College

A Memorial Service for PETER BRIAN HERENDEN BIRKS, QC, MA, DCL, FBA, will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Saturday, 20 November, in the University Church of St Mary the Virgin.


Keble College

A Memorial Service for JAMES WILLIAM HARRIS, MA, PH.D., DCL, FBA,formerly Fellow and Tutor in Jurisprudence and Professor of Law, will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 9 October, in the University Church of St Mary the Virgin.

Refreshments will be served afterwards in Keble College.


Somerville College

A Memorial Service for AGATHA RAMM, MA, D.LITT. (MA London), F.R.HIST.S., formerly Tutor, Fellow, and Emeritus Fellow, will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 30 October, in the chapel, Somerville College.

Oxford University Newcomers' Club

The Club welcomes the wives, husbands and partners of visiting scholars, graduates and members of the University who are new to Oxford. It aims to offer help, advice and information, and the opportunity to meet others socially. Informal coffee mornings are held at 13 Norham Gardens every Wednesday 10.30 a.m.–12 noon except for two weeks at Christmas and Easter. Newcomers with children (0–4 years) meet every Friday in term 10.15 a.m.–12 noon. Other term-time activities include a Book Group, informal Conversation Group and tours to colleges, museums, and other places of interest, also country walks, garden trips and a visit to an antique centre. Second-hand items can be bought on Wednesday mornings 10.30 a.m.–12 noon from the equipment room. Visit our website: www.ox.ac.uk/staff.


Exhibition

Nineteenth and Twentieth Century British Printmakers. Sanders of Oxford, in association with Hilary Gerrish and Neil Jennings Ltd, presents an exhibition of graphic works by important British printmakers including Bevan, Brangwyn, Nash, Nevinson, William Nicholson, Ravilious, Sickert and J.M.W. Turner. Free admission. Friday 1 Oct.–23 Oct. Mon–Sat., 10 a.m.–6p.m. 104 High Street, Oxford OX1 4BW. Tel.: 01865 242590. Email: SOXINFO@btclick.com. www.sandersofoxford.com.


St Giles' Thursday Lunchtime Talks

Please note new order of lectures: The Art of Writing: 14 Oct., Sneaking past the guard dogs: avoiding the enemies of writing, Salley Vickers; 21 Oct., Kiosks and obelisks: poems as structures, Jamie McKendrick; 28 Oct., The splinter of ice, Veronica Stallwood; 4 Nov., Writing the past: an Oxford childhood, Charlotte Mendelson; 11 Nov., Writing a crime novel, P.D. James; 18 Nov., Working with three prime ministers and the rest of the world, Douglas Hurd; 25 Nov., Writing the story of a life, Shirley du Boulay; 2 Dec., Speedy's dog: poetry and place, Henry Shukman; 9 Dec., Writing, reading: escape or engagement?, Tim Pears. The talks will be held at St Giles' Church at 12.30 p.m. Everyone is welcome. In order to help us with our costs, a small donation would be appreciated. www.st-giles-church.org.


Antiques Bought and Sold

Antiques and decorative objects bought and sold: desks and library furniture always wanted, also garden stonework and large gilt picture frames—any condition. Please call: Greenway Antiques, 90 Corn Street, Witney, Oxon. Open Mon.–Fri., 9.30 a.m.–5 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Tel.: 01993 705026, mobile: 07831 585014.


Periodicals Bought and Sold

Back-issues of scholarly periodicals and journals bought and sold. Graham Jeffrey, Periodicals (est. 1967), 29 Cuddesdon Road, Horspath, Oxford OX33 1JD. Tel.: 01865 872528, fax: 776398. E-mail: gjeffreysatu@aol.com.


Restoration and Conservation of Antique Furniture

John Hulme undertakes all aspects of restoration: 30 years' experience; collection and delivery. For free advice, telephone or write to: The Workshop, 11A High Street, Chipping Norton, Oxon. OX7 5AD. Tel.: 01608 641692.


Car for Sale

Golf 1.6S 2002 '52' Reg. Metallic Black 5 door, A/C CD Player, power steering, ABS Central Locking. 1 owner from new, dealer maintained. Full history, immaculate, recently serviced. 59 K. miles approx. Price £7,295. Tel.: 01993 773191. Mobile: 07919 092857.


Services Offered

Marshall & Galpin Solicitors, Family Department. We are an established Oxfordshire private client firm with offices in Oxford, Thame and Abingdon. We have seven specialist family lawyers who advise on a wide range of issues: divorce and separation, children, financial agreements on divorce, pre-nuptial agreements, cohabitee disputes, separation agreements and pensions. Our lawyers are members of the Solicitors Family Law Association. Two members of the team are Deputy District Judges and three are trained mediators. We offer a range of competitive rates and a short free initial interview. French, Spanish and Italian spoken. Other services provided by the firm include property adviceconveyancing, wills & probate, personal injury & medical negligence, employment and businesscommercial. For further information visit our web site at: www.marshallgalpin.com or contact Mary Wakem on 01865 792300 (Oxford), Simon Bassett on 01235 555345 (Abingdon), James Stonham 01844 261966 (Thame).

Big or small, we ship it all, plus free pick up anywhere in Oxford. Also 24-hour photocopying, private mailing addresses (24-hour access, and mail forwarding world-wide), binding, fax bureau, colour photocopying, mailing services, and much more. Contact or visit Mail Boxes Etc., 266 Banbury Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 514655, fax: 514656, email: summertown@020.mbe.uk.com, also at: 94 London Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 741729, fax: 01865 742431, email: staff@mbeheadington.co.uk.

Town and Country Trees: arboricultural contractors; modern arboricultural techniques; local authority approved; safeguarded by full Public Liability insurance. Free advice and quotations. Tel.: 0845 458 2980 or 07976 261850 (mobile).

Want to go broadband and don't know how? Computer problem needing personal but understanding help? We can put you on the Internet safely or do that little upgrade to your system. We have lots of experience of the Oxford IT, supporting people as well as their computers. Happy to give advice for free and work on a no fix/no fee basis. Call MCC on 01865 880600 or 07768 732123.

Proof-reading/copy-editing offered by experienced and published English graduate (First Class). Academic, business, general. Call Julie on 01865 451960 or email oxenglish@aol.com.

Blenheim House Creche. Quality childcare in a safe, happy and caring environment, for children aged 6 months to 4 years. Open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., Mon.–Fri. Places available from 2 sessions up to full time. Conveniently situated for Woodstock Road, Banbury Road, Lynams and Esporta. Open morning on Sat. 9 Oct., 9.30 a.m.–11.30 a.m. Call Mrs Susan Palmer on 01865 554526 or email susanpalmer.1@btopenworld.com.


Tuition Offered

Piano lessons. Experienced teacher; adults and children; all grades. Beginners welcome. Contact Miss P. Read, BA (Hons) L.R.A.M. (Near Kidlington, Oxford). Tel.: 01865 331147.

Oxford Cruse Bereavement Care offers help and support to the bereaved. We offer a bereaved person of any age a place where they can talk in confidence. On Thursday, 7 Oct., we are beginning a course of eight lectures entitled þAspects of Bereavement' at the Wesley Memorial Hall, Oxford. This course is designed for all interested in working with the bereaved or dying. For more information please call 01865 202242.

English as a Foreign Language for Families. Separate but simultaneous classes for adults and for children (5–12 years). Wed. 5.00-6.30 p.m. at Cherwell School, Marston Ferry Road, North Oxford. Term begins 6 Oct. Cost for ten lessons: £35 for one adult or child, £45 for a family. Details from the North Oxford Association (Tel.: 01865 552295) or from the tutors, Rosemary Dorey (Tel.: 01865 553912) or Helen Foster (Tel.: 01865 763358).


Situations Vacant

We are looking for reliable individuals to add to our Register of Invigilators. Work is on a temporary basis during the January exam period. The work involves laying out question papers, completing relevant paperwork, and invigilating during the examination session. Invigilation sessions are approximately 4 hours (in either the morning or the afternoon). The payment for each 4-hour-session is £28. Please send your CV and covering letter to the Senior Administrator, Magdalen College School, Oxford OX4 1DZ, or by email to tearnshaw@mcsoxford.org.

Part-time assistant sought for interesting showroom selling beautiful natural stone tiles and work-surfaces. 10.30 a.m–5.30 p.m., 3 days p.w., with a mixture of duties including clerical work and selling. The atmosphere varies from very busy to very calm. Sometimes you will be working on your own and at other times with two happy, easy-going people. £7 p.h. Tel.: 01865 402102.

Hebrew Cataloguer/Library Assistant. Applications are invited for this post (20–30 h.p.w., £8.50 p.h.), which is available from 1 Oct. or as soon as possible thereafter. The appointee will be part of the computer cataloguing project team. Requirements are a good knowledge of Hebrew and familiarity with one or more fields of Jewish Studies. As far as Library assistance is concerned, duties will include issuing books and answering readers' enquiries. Letters of application, together with a CV and the contact details of two referees, should be sent to Dr Piet van Boxel, Librarian, Leopold Muller Memorial Library, Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor, Yarnton, Oxford OX5 1PY. Tel.: 01865 377946 ext. 119. Email: vanboxel@ochjs.ac.uk.


Houses to Let

An Englishman's home is his castle—so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Visit our web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or email us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: 01865 764533. Fax: 764777. Email: info@qbman.co.uk.

North Oxford . Fully-furnished 4–5 bedroom family home to let from Christmas '04 to Aug. '05. Family are going abroad for sabbatical. Large west-facing spacious garden with patio and beautiful surrounding trees. Three reception rooms and kitchen/breakfast room and 2 ½ bathrooms. House on west side of popular Woodstock road, overlooking St Edward's playing fields. Easy walking access to Summertown shops and into city centre (cycle path next to house). Port Meadow nearby. Email: douglas.wilkinson@nda.ox.ac.uk or tel.: 01865 513688.

Central North Oxford: 10 minutes' walk from city centre, all main university buildings and parks, also very close to the river: available now for short/long let in extremely quiet, civilised, large Victorian house in this exclusive, leafy, residential Victorian suburb with large, light airy rooms: lovely ground floor flat, large double bedroom, large single bedroom, large drawing room, kitchen, bathroom. Available now. Off-street parking, large secluded garden. Tel./fax: 01865 552400. Mobile: 07789092274.

North Oxford (Jericho). Fully-furnished, recently redecorated house, secluded garden, available from 1 Sept. for 1 year or less. Charming, cosy, quiet, c.h., easy to maintain, 2 bedrooms, 2½ bathrooms, washing machine, dryer, telephone, linen, dishes. Easy walk to University, train and coach stations, near best schools and parks. Two bedrooms £1,250 p.m.; 3 bedrooms £1,500 p.m. (inc. bedsit with separate kitchen and entrance). Tel. J. Mackrell in Oxford (evenings or 7--8 a.m.), on: 01865 775567. Email: mackrelj@btopenworld.com. Or contact A. Gaston in Canada: +613 745 1368, fax: +613 745 0299, email: gaston@cyberus.ca.

Two separate self-contained beautiful, quiet, unusual, open plan, fully-furnished modern properties with stunning views to open countryside. Parking and small patio garden. Near convenient bus route and well within the ring-road in North Oxford. Suit visiting academic or professional couple. Regret no children, pets, or smokers. Available from 1 Sept. Larger property £950 p.m.; smaller £725 p.m., plus expenses. Tel.: 01865 515085 or email patricia.boyd@perinat.ox.ac.uk.

Kidlington. Three-bedroom furnished detached house available from 1 Oct. for 6-month let. Situated in a quiet close near to excellent bus route and all amenities. No smoking and no house pets, please. £875 p.c.m. Please contact Bob Green on 07780 682123.

Architect's Spelsbury bungalow, bought for its beautiful views and quiet end of lane position, converted from 3-bedroom to 1 to create very large living and dining areas; en suite WC, basin and walk-in wardrobe for bedroom; 5 French windows open onto terrace and rolling farmland towards Wychwood forest; kitchen with new cooker, fridge, washing machine; 2nd WC and basin in bathroom off hall; large storage cupboards; warm air c.h.; natural wood and white walls throughout; fully furnished; new large 24ft pyramidal conservatory with surrounding banquette seating—seats 12! Garden, parking, 1½ miles to BR station. £145 p.w. Tel.: 0207 7369744 or 07890289697.

Ferry Road, Marston. An attractive, fully-furnished Victorian house in quiet road with superb outlook to meadows. Three bedrooms, dining/living room, kitchen, upstairs bathroom, lovely garden with pedestrian access and undercover bike storage. New kitchen, g.c.h., all appliances. Suit visiting academic/medical couple or small family. Conveniently located for the cycle track into town. Available from Jan. 2005. £900 p.c.m. plus bills. Non-smokers only. Pictures of the rooms available by email. Contact Rebecca.Skillman@Harcourteducation.co.uk Oxfordshire. Wing of beautiful country house. Six bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 WCs, kitchen with aga, scullery, larder, laundry room. Three reception rooms. Fully-furnished. South-facing orangerie. Set in parkland with lake. Tennis court. Domestic and garden staff provided. Ideal professional family home. £2,800 p.m. Tel.: 01865 343202.

Normandy: Village au Brun, Notre Dame de Cenilly. Beautiful, fully-furnished three-storey farmhouse with all mod. cons. to let for 1–3 years. Set in 13 acres of farmland. Peaceful yet within 4 kms from Cerisy la Salle (local village); Saint-Lô, Coutance approx. 20 kms; Cherbourg, Bayeux, Mont St Michel and Caen within 100 kms. Ground floor: kitchen/dining room; gas cooker; separate electric oven; microwave; large fridge with separate freezer; g. c.h.; bathroom with w.c.; sitting room. First floor: music room (with grand piano), 2 bedrooms (1 with small office). Second floor: large bedroom; shower room with w.c.; gallery (suitable for office) that overlooks music room below. Open fire in sitting room. Ideal for writer or musician seeking peace and quiet to work. Non-smoker preferred; pets welcome. 800–900 euro p.c.m. For further details please contact Alexander Kok on 00 33 2 33 45 52 16. Fax: 00 33 2 33 17 22 96.

Florence Park. Recently refurbished 1930s house with attractively designed garden. Close to local amenities, park and river. Light and cosy. Furnished and fully equipped, with two large bedrooms and dressing room. Kitchen/diner. Easy access to central Oxford. Available from Sept. for one year or less. Ideal for professional or family. £850 p.c.m. plus bills. Call Jo Dixon on 01865 760907 or 07932 724232. Email: 53netherwoodsroad@tiscali.co.uk.

Shortlet for 5 months. A beautiful Oxford city house in quiet cul-de-sac near city centre, hospitals and Brookes while owner is abroad. One large double bedroom, 1 single with large balcony and both with own shower, toilet, rooms, study, very large kitchen, living/dining room and second separate sitting room with fireplace. Large garden open to the park at back. £1,200 p.c.m. (incl. council tax). Available 1 Dec. to 10 Apr. (negotiable). See pictures on http://tanyag.t35.com. Tel.: 01865 247150.

Attractive, large ó bedroom detached house close to all Headington hospitals and good schools. Fully furnished, all appliances, c.h., off-street parking and rear garden. Suit professional family or responsible graduates. Long lease preferred. £1,400 p.c.m. (incl. council tax). Tel.: 01865 766032. Email: jwoodman@doctors.org.uk.

Wootton, near Woodstock. Delightful period cottage to let in sought after, pretty village. Living room with open fire overlooking rear garden. Stable door to garden. Kitchen with all mod. cons. Double bedroom and large bathroom with panelled bath and electric shower. Loft for storage. Oil-fired c.h. Attractive mature garden. Two garden sheds and brick-built log stove. Good bus and train connections to Oxford. Suit academic/professional couple. Available Oct. for 6 months/1 year. £695 p.m. incl. gardener. (excl. council tax and utility bills). References essential. Contact: Sally Stradling on 01993 812278 or email sally.stradling@ukgateway.net.

St Clement's. Great location! Two-bed Victorian house within walking distance to town centre, Brookes, Headington hospitals. Good local shops/supermarket. Furnished, dishwasher, etc. Two reception rooms (could make one into third bedroom), large kitchen, patio garden. £900 p.m. plus bills and council tax. No students or smokers. Tel.: 0207 350 2692. Email: dvh@ic.ac.uk.

North Oxford . Fully-furnished three bedroom house with garage and sheltered garden available for tenancy. On bus route to city centre. One year or more from end Sept. £1,050 p.c.m. Please call 01865 243216 or 01865 515547.

Convenient, comfortable and quiet furnished 2-bedroom house in Wadham Park, Marston, 10 min. from University science area, city centre, John Radcliffe Hospital and Brookes University. Newly fitted kitchen, gardens front and rear, parking space. Ideal for young family or professional couple. £825 p.c.m. Available end of October. Tel.: 01865 552855.

House available now in popular West Oxford street within easy reach of station. Four bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, attractive garden. To let either furnished or unfurnished. £1,400 p.c.m. Contact Alison Measham on 01865 558802 or 07919 336452.

East Oxford. Characterful Victorian terrace, 2 bedrooms, 2 reception, attic study, garden. Partly furnished, available Oct. City centre 5–10 min. bus ride away. Parking on quiet road. £750 p.c.m. for one year with possible renewal. References required. Very sorry—no children or smokers. Email: alisonbentley@jazzmenagerie.freeserve.co.uk.


Flats to Let

Comfortable 2-bedroom furnished flat on excellent bus route to central Oxford. Situated in the attractive village of Eynsham, quiet yet close to schools and shops. Recently refurbished to a high standard. G.c.h., double-glazing, 4 phone points. Bedding provided on request. Available from Sept. References required. £750 p.c.m. (negotiable). Email: Virginia.Bainbridge@st_hildas.ox.ac.uk or info@NaturalHorse.co.uk or ring 0845 4569840.

North Oxford . Two-bedroom apartment available Oct. to May. Spacious, with views over parkland and convenient access to Summertown. £700 p.c.m. Contact Finders Keepers on 01865 311011 or visit our website for our full property listing. www.finders.co.uk.


Accommodation Offered

Attractive and quiet B&B. One minute to bus stop, close to river walks. £40 per night/£60 double; 15% discount for full week. Tel.: 01865 770501.

OxfordShortlets offers a portfolio of high quality self-catering short let properties as an excellent alternative to hotel/guesthouse and bed and breakfast accommodation in Oxford and the surrounding villages. We have a wide selection of quality homes available for short stay lets from 1 week up to several months. OxfordShortlets provides property rental on a short-term basis for professional individuals, groups or families requiring housing while visiting Oxford for holiday/vacation, business/academic, relocation purposes or temporary accommodation in between homes. For more information, please contact us on tel: 0870 1602325, fax: 0870 1602327, email: admin@oxfordshortlets.co.uk or visit our website at www.oxfordshortlets.co.uk.

Paying guests, visiting academics, welcomed for short or long stays in the comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple, in exclusive, quiet, leafy central north Oxford, within walking distance of all main university buildings, town centre, parks, river, good shops, and restaurants. All rooms have colour TV, tea-/coffee-making facilities, microwave, and refrigerator and/or deep-freeze availability, c.h., and independent heating. Breakfast included in the very moderate terms. Tel./fax: 01865 557879.

Room to let in private house in Iffley Fields. Own entrance, good-sized room, shared bathroom and kitchen. £80 p.w. incl. bills. Female n/s. Tel.: 07780697691.

Free accommodation offered. One-bed studio flat near University Parks in North Oxford rent free plus own bills in exchange for 2–3 nights babysitting and some afternoon/weekend tutoring help with 2 children aged 5 and 11. Would suit female mature student or postgraduate. Please send a short CV and two references. Tel.: 01865 516689 or email georgie.rowse@ntlworld.com.


Office Accommodation

North Oxford , 800 yards from St Giles. A complex of four rooms (garden bungalow) incl. an annexe in detached premises off the Woodstock Road. Separate entrance, with all facilities. Computer and fax input, BT telephone, car parking, c.h. and hot/cold water. Total alarmed security. Five star interior and exterior appearance. Available immediately. Tel.: 01865 51 11 11.

North Oxford . Wolfson College, Linton Road. 7,300 sqft (660 sqm) of offices adjacent to its main buildings with separate entrance and car parking. The flexible accommodation currently comprises 25 office units, a conference room and common room. Access to the use of the College's superb riverside facilities, including restaurant for staff and visitors, by arrangement. Available immediately. For further details contact the Bursar on 01865 274104 or email stephen.palmer@wolfson.ox.ac.uk.


Self-catering Apartments

Fully-furnished and serviced 3 and 4-star self-catering apartments available in North Oxford; 15 min. from Oxford city centre. Suitable for short lets for visiting academics or business people. From £330 p.w. all inclusive. Sleeps 2–5 people. Tel.: 07870 234725. Web site: http://www.weeklyhome.com. E-mail: info@weeklyhome.com.


Accommodation Sought

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us: 01865 764533, fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk. Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.


Holiday Lets

Naples, Florida: rent our beautiful 4-bedroom, 3-bathroom house, on the Gulf Coast, in southwest Florida. This spacious home is located on one of the best private golf courses in the area. The house sleeps up to 8 people, has a huge south-facing heated swimming pool, and comes fully furnished and equipped. The house is available all year round from £800 p.w. (minimum 2-week let, discount for longer lets), Tel. Mark on: 07802 754154. E-mail: mark@bayrock.co.uk. Web site: website: www.golf-in-naples.com.


House for Sale

Jericho. Spacious modern house in the heart of this sought-after area. Two double bedrooms, study/nursery, two reception rooms, courtyard garden, garage and further off-street parking. Close to city centre, train/bus stations and colleges. £317,000. Tel: 07779 225767 or email salmondavid@hotmail.com for more details.

HEADSHIP OF THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION

Applications are invited for the Headship of the Social Sciences Division. The University is seeking to appoint an eminent social scientist or academic lawyer to provide leadership for this internationally renowned academic division. The division comprises ten world-class departments and faculties, most located in the new Centre for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences building: the Departments of Economics, Politics and International Relations, Sociology, Social Policy and Social Work, International Development (Queen Elizabeth House), and Educational Studies, the Law Faculty, the Saïd Business School, the Oxford Internet Institute, and a newly-formed School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies.

The range and distinction of the Social Sciences Division are considerable and the priority for the next head will be to provide leadership and vision to support and advance the constituent units' ambitious research agendas and to help them consolidate their strong teaching base. The division currently enjoys a highly collegial style of self-government with co-ordination, oversight and support for units' activities provided by the divisional officers, secretariat and board.

This is a full-time senior management position, tenable from 1 October 2005 at a competitive salary, which provides an exciting opportunity to continue to shape the development of social sciences at Oxford. Candidates should have academic standing, and the administrative and managerial skills to implement Oxford's vision of the national and international role of its social science departments.

Further details, including details of how to apply are available from http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/, or from the Registrar, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: Oxford (2)70200. The closing date for applications is Friday, 15 October.


HUMANITIES DIVISION (FACULTY OF MODERN HISTORY)

University Lecturership in the History of Medicine

In association with St Cross College

Applications are invited for the above post, tenable from 1 October 2005. The successful candidate will be offered a non-stipendiary official fellowship with St Cross College. The salary will be according to age, on a university scale, to a maximum of £45,707 per annum.

The successful candidate will have a high standard of research ability and a record of successful teaching with a wide range of teaching interests.

Candidates should have a research specialism in an area of the history of medicine in a non-Western context. This specialism links to the research strategy and international reputation of the Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, Oxford, recently endorsed by the grant of a major Strategic Award by the Wellcome Trust. The new lecturer will be based at the Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine.

The appointee will participate in the delivery of the highly successful and expanding M.Sc./M.Phil. in the History of Science, Medicine, and Technology (which has a specific `stream' in the history of medicine), and undertake some teaching for the new M.Sc. in Medical Humanities, as well as supervising doctoral students. The appointee will also, along with the Director of the Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, co-manage and develop research initiatives, seminars, and conferences.

Further particulars may be obtained from the Administrator, Modern History Faculty, Broad Street, Oxford OX1 3BD (telephone: Oxford (2)77253, e-mail: administrator@history.ox.ac.uk), or can be downloaded from http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/. Applicants should send ten copies of their application (or one only from candidates overseas) to the Chairman of the Modern History Faculty Board at the above address by 4 p.m. on 5 November. Note that applications cannot be accepted by e-mail. Candidates are asked to arrange for three references to be sent to the above address by the closing date.


BALLIOL COLLEGE, OXFORD

Appointment of Database Manager

We are looking for a bright, enthusiastic and professional colleague to join Balliol's well-established Development Office. You will be responsible for all aspects of managing and enhancing our alumni database, as well as helping to develop our Web pages and providing IT support for the Development Office's five staff.

This is a key role, and will include the following activities: maintaining standards for data quality and security; data entry and retrieval, including inputting donations; enhancing the data using published resources; and generating data selections and reports for both fundraising and alumni relations. You will help to produce around twenty personalised mailings each year.

You should have at least two years' practical experience of managing Windows-based systems in a networked environment---including setting up equipment, installing software and trouble-shooting---and you should have a thorough knowledge of MS Office applications. Experience of managing a Raiser's Edge database or similar would be an advantage but is not essential.

You should be a team player, be very organised and accurate, and used to working effectively to deadlines. You should also be flexible, have problem-solving skills, and be imaginative. A high standard of written and spoken English is required, and you should ideally have a good degree (in any subject). As well as having excellent IT skills, you should enjoy dealing with people at all levels and have good interpersonal skills. You will be expected to take a lively interest in the various activities of the college.

The job will be for a period of five years in the first instance. Starting salary will be in the range of £22,743 to £24,524, depending on experience, and the successful candidate will be able to join the OSPS pension scheme. For an application pack, please contact Sue Harrop, Personnel Assistant, Balliol College, Oxford OX1 3BJ (telephone: Oxford (2)77447, e-mail: sue.harrop@balliol.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for applications is Friday, 8 October.


CHRIST CHURCH

Appointment of Administrative Assistant, Picture Gallery

Christ Church is unique among the Oxford and Cambridge colleges in having a designated art gallery which houses one of the most important private collections of Old Masters in the country---consisting mainly of Italian drawings and paintings from the fourteenth to the eighteenth centuries. To provide secretarial assistance in the gallery office and administrative support for the assistance curator the college is looking for an enthusiastic, bright, and proactive Administrative Assistant for the Picture Gallery. The post is part- time (17.5 hours weekly; daily hours 9.30 a.m.--1 p.m.).

This is a challenging role helping the Assistant Curator in the day-to-day running of the gallery. The ideal candidate will have excellent verbal and written communication skills, very good IT skills (with advanced knowledge of Microsoft Office 2000), and will have the potential to provide more than the usual forms of secretarial support. The ideal candidate should preferably have a degree and experience of working in a museum environment or similar sector might be useful. An interest in and enthusiasm for the gallery's collection is essential, as is the flexibility to deal with a wide range of tasks. Some knowledge of European history is desirable, and familiarity with one foreign language would be an advantage.

The position will be for six months in the first instance, but extendable subject to performance and budgeting constraints. Salary c.£14,500, pro rata.

Further information and a detailed job description are available from the Dean's secretary, Mrs Jan Bolongaro (telephone: Oxford (2)76161, e-mail: jan.bolongaro@chch.ox.ac.uk).

Aapplications, consisting of a covering letter, a curriculum vitae, and the names of two referees, should be sent to Mrs Jan Bolongaro, Christ Church, Oxford OX1 1DP, to arrive by the closing date of Monday, 11 October (9 a.m.). It is expected that interviews will be held on Tuesday, 19 October.

The college regrets that it cannot reply to every application. Short-listed candidates will be contacted before the interview date.


KEBLE COLLEGE

Official Fellowship and Tutorship and University Lecturership (CUF) in Philosophy

Keble College proposes to elect a Tutorial Fellow in the Faculty of Philosophy. Preference will be given to applicants whose research interests lie in the fields of moral philosophy and/or philosophy of religion and/or aesthetics. The starting date will be 1 October 2005, or as soon as possible thereafter. The post will be tenable in conjunction with a university lecturership (CUF) and the combined university and college salary will be according to age on a scale up to £45,707 per annum.

Further particulars are available from Mrs Trish Long, the Warden's Personal Assistant, Keble College, Oxford OX1 3PG (telephone: Oxford (2)72700, e- mail: trish.long@keb.ox.ac.uk). Applications (ten copies, or one only from candidates overseas), including the names of three referees, should be sent to Mrs Long by Friday, 12 November. Applicants are requested to ask referees to send references directly to Mrs Long by the same date.

The college and University are equal opportunities employers and exist to promote excellence in education and research.


LADY MARGARET HALL

Appointment of Personal Assistant to the Principal

Applications are invited for the post of PA to the Principal of Lady Margaret Hall. This is a responsible position, which requires high-level communication and interpersonal skills. Excellent IT, typing, and secretarial skills are essential, and shorthand is desirable. Starting salary between £18,537 and £20,791. An attractive package of generous holiday allowance, pension scheme, and free lunches is offered. The working environment in the college is excellent.

Further particulars may be obtained from the Treasurer's Secretary, Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford OX2 6QA (e-mail: treasurers.secretary@lmh.ox.ac.uk, telephone: Oxford (2)84260), or from the college's Web site, http://www.lmh.ox.ac.uk. The deadline for applications is Friday, 8 October.


NEW COLLEGE

Junior Research Fellowships 2005

Applications are invited for the following Junior Research Fellowships tenable for a fixed period of three years from 1 October 2005.

Astor Junior Research Fellowship in Experimental Psychology. The person appointed will be expected to undertake advanced research in the field of Experimental Psychology (defined to include Social and Cognitive Neuroscience).

Juliana Cuyler Matthews Junior Research Fellowship in Law. The person appointed will be expected to undertake advanced research in the field of Law.

Esmée Fairbairn Junior Research Fellowship in Mathematics. The person appointed will be expected to undertake advanced research in any field of Mathematics.

Applicants for any of these three posts must have completed their first degree before 1 October 2002, and may not have previously held a Junior Research Fellowship or comparable appointment. The fellowships carry a stipend of £13,975 per annum (subject to review). In addition, a fellow is entitled to a housing allowance (currently £1,400 per annum) or to live in college accommodation if suitable rooms are available, meals in college, and to entertainment, research and book allowances. The appointment will be pensionable under the USS scheme.

Harold Salvesen Junior Fellowship. The person appointed will be expected to undertake advanced research in his or her chosen field and perform liaison and welfare duties. The Harold Salvesen Fellowship is open to men and women who normally have not exceeded four years from completion of their first degree at 1 October 2005. This Junior Fellowship carries a stipend of £13,975 per annum (subject to review). The appointment will be pensionable under the USS scheme. The fellow will be expected to live in college and suitable accommodation is provided free of charge. In addition, fellows are entitled to meals in college and to entertainment, research, and book allowances.

Application forms and further particulars are available from the College Secretary, New College, Oxford OX1 3BN (telephone: Oxford (2)79548, e- mail: barbara.vardag@new.ox.ac.uk), and the particulars are also available at http://www.new.ox.ac.uk/appointments. The closing date for receipt of applications is 29 October.

New College is an equal opportunities employer.


ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE (EUROPEAN STUDIES CENTRE)

Appointment of Programme Secretary, South-east European Studies Programme

The European Studies Centre at St Antony's College seeks a Programme Secretary for its expanding and lively South-east European Studies Programme. The Programme promotes the interdisciplinary study of the South-east European region and deals with contemporary developments in the Balkans, Greece, Turkey, and Cyprus. The Programme Secretary will work closely with the Programme Director and liaise with fellows, academic visitors, and students.

Good audiotyping and IT skills are essential. The normal working week is 17½ hours, but it may be possible to work some additional hours for other fellows of the Centre. The salary will be pro rata to the university grade M42, clerical grade 3 (£13,953--£18,537), with generous benefits.

The closing date for applications is 11 October. Applications, including a curriculum vitae and the names and contact details of two referees, should be sent to the College Secretary, St Antony's College, Oxford OX2 6JF (telephone: Oxford (2)74479), from whom further particulars can be obtained.


WOLFSON COLLEGE

Non-stipendiary Junior Research Fellowships 2005 in Clinical and Non-clinical Sciences

Wolfson College proposes to elect up to six non-stipendiary Junior Research Fellows in Clinical and Non-Clinical Sciences, if candidates of sufficient merit present themselves, without limitation of subject, for two years in the first instance from 1 January 2005. These fellowships carry common table rights (up to £30 a week for meals in Hall) and are open to both men and women. Preference will be given to candidates who have not already held a Junior Research Fellowship at another college. Junior Research Fellows are not ipso facto members of the governing body of the college; but they are eligible to sit on nearly all college committees, and may be elected as representative members of the governing body.

Non-clinical science candidates. In the non-clinical sciences, candidates must hold a doctorate by the commencement of the fellowship (1 January 2005) and no more than three years should have elapsed since receipt of a doctorate.

Exceptions will be made only for candidates whose postdoctoral academic career has been interrupted by, for example, childbirth, family commitments, illness or compulsory military service. A statement giving reasons why an exception should be considered in their case must be included with the application.

Clinically qualified science candidates. Clinically qualified science candidates should have completed no more than four years fulltime research by 1 January 2005. Clinically qualified candidates with outstanding research records are encouraged to apply. Both laboratory and clinical research will be considered.

Renewal. Junior Research Fellows may apply for renewal of their Fellowship for a further final two years. Renewal, which is not automatic and is subject to approval by the governing body, is considered on the basis of satisfactory progress in your research, normally submission of a doctoral (or equivalent) thesis by those not holding a doctorate at the time of election, evidence of adequate funding for the further term, and, of course, your good standing in the college. Those clinically qualified candidates who do not hold a doctorate will be expected to have completed one within the first two years of the fellowship in order to apply for renewal.

Funding. This is a non-stipendiary position and candidates are asked to demonstrate their financial independence by reference to evidence of their funding. Where funds are applied for but not confirmed, any offer will be conditional on provision of proof of funding before taking up the post.

References. Candidates should themselves write directly to their referees asking them without further request to send a confidential reference to the President's Secretary by the closing date (Monday, 1 November). References may be faxed or e-mailed direct to the President's Secretary (fax: Oxford (2)74136, e-mail: sue.hales@wolfson.ox.ac.uk).

Applications. Applications, typed or clearly printed, including a completed application form, a curriculum vitae, and the names of three referees, should be sent to the President's Secretary, Wolfson College, Oxford OX2 6UD, by 5 p.m. on Monday, 1 November. Candidates should also include details of the research they will be doing in Oxford.

For an application form, send a self-addressed envelope to the President's Secretary, Wolfson College, Oxford OX3 6UD (including messenger area).

 

Note: non-stipendiary Arts/Humanities Junior Research Fellowships will be advertised in January 2005 for commencement in October 2005.


EMMANUEL COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE

Research Fellowships

The governing body of Emmanuel College invites applications from men and women for two Research Fellowships in any subject and tenable for three years from 1 October 2005. Applicants must not have completed more than a total of eight years of postgraduate research by 1 October 2005.

The stipend for Research Fellows is related to the national academic scale. The current stipend for pre-doctoral (resp. postdoctoral) Research Fellows is £17,207 (resp. £18,332) and £18,947 (resp. £20,072), according as the fellow is resident or non-resident in college. Pre-doctoral Research Fellows will be responsible for any university fee they incur up to the level of a UK postgraduate student (the college will contribute the difference if a higher fee is applicable). A limited amount of teaching in college is permitted, for which payment will be made at the usual rate.

Additional benefits provided for Research Fellows will include grants for research expenses and academic travel, a book allowance, and assistance with computing facilities. Research Fellows will be given the option to live in college (although no married accommodation can be provided), and will be provided with lunch and dinner in Hall free of charge.

Requests for application forms should be directed, in writing, to the Research Fellowships' Secretary, Emmanuel College, Cambridge CB2 3AP, by 5 p.m. on Friday, 15 October, enclosing a large self-addressed envelope, or can be received via the Emmanuel College Web site at http://www.emma.cam.ac.uk/resfell.

Candidates should send to the Research Fellowships' Secretary not later than 5 p.m. on Thursday, 21 October, (i) three copies of their application form, and (ii) three copies of a statement of not more than 1,000 words outlining their completed and proposed research, in a form which is intelligible to a non-specialist.

Candidates should also arrange for two people familiar with their work to send references to the Research Fellowships' Secretary so as to reach her by Thursday, 21 October. The appropriate forms for referees' use will be supplied to applicants, and will be included with the application forms.

Selected candidates will be invited, by letter dated 24 November, to submit by Tuesday, 7 December, copies of any published or unpublished work with which they wish to support their application. Candidates will not be interviewed by the college. It is hoped to make elections to the Research Fellowships on 7 February 2005.


ST CATHARINE'S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE

Research Fellowships

The governing body of St Catharine's College invites applications from women and men for election to two stipendiary Research Fellowships, tenable from 1 October 2005 for three years. The fellowships are open to graduates of any university who (i) are members of the college, or (ii) not being members of the college, are engaged in research in the Sciences.

Fellowships are intended to support those at an early stage in their academic careers, and will normally be awarded to those who have recently completed a research doctorate, or are close to completion. Candidates should not have been engaged in full-time postgraduate research for longer than four years, nor have already held a research fellowship elsewhere.

The closing date for applications is Saturday, 27 November. Further particulars are available on the college Web site or on written application to the Master's Secretary, St Catharine's College, Cambridge CB2 1RL (e-mail: masters.secretary@caths.cam.ac.uk).

Friday 1 October

SOCIAL SCIENCE LIBRARY (Manor Road Building) opens, 9 a.m. (See http://www.ssl.ox.ac.uk.)

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Landscapes in art', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

THE HON. DATO SERI ABDULLAH AHMAD BADAWI (Prime Minister of Malaysia): `Malaysia, Islam, and the wider world' (lecture), the Auditorium, Magdalen, 4 p.m. (entry by free ticket, available from the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies: tel. Oxford (2)78730).


Saturday 2 October

CONFERENCE: `Du papier à l'archive, du privé au public: France et Iles Britanniques, deux mémoires' (Maison Française, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.).


Tuesday 5 October

CONGREGATION meeting, 12 noon (retiring Vice-Chancellor's Oration, and admission of Vice-Chancellor for 2004–9). Note: as the Sheldonian Theatre is temporarily closed, Congregation will meet in the University Church.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Tibetan Buddhist art', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Wednesday 6 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk in series `The Curator and the Collection': `An introduction to Jingdezhen porcelain' (Shelagh Vainker, Curator of Chinese Art), 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Booking essential—tel: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Friday 8 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `A harvest tour', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Sunday 10 October

MICHAELMAS FULL TERM begins.


Monday 11 October

M. WORBOYS: `Mad dogs and Lancastrians: rabies, Pasteur, and the Chief Constable of Clitheroe, c.1890' (seminar series: `The history of modern medicine: national and international perspectives'), Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 2.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. MCAUSLAN: `In the beginning was the law ... an intellectual Odyssey' (seminar series: `Socio-legal approaches to law and development'), Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building, 4.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR ARCHIE BROWN: `Institutions, ideas, interests, and leadership in the Soviet and Russian transition' (Russian and Eurasian Studies Centre Seminar: `Twenty years of political change: the USSR and Russia, 1985–2004'), the Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR LORD (COLIN) RENFREW: `Collecting and looting in the past: the effects of self-indulgence' (St Cross–All Souls Lectures: `Who owns objects? The ethics and legality of collecting'), Dining Hall, St Cross College, 5 p.m.

CHARLES NICHOLL: `Leonardo da Vinci—the flights of the mind' (lecture), Christ Church Picture Gallery, 5.30 p.m.


Tuesday 12 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Paintings of everyday life', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

PROFESSOR T. SNYDER: `Power politics in Eastern Europe: past and present' (seminar series: `Europe: what kind of power?'), Seminar Room, European Studies Centre, St Antony's (70 Woodstock Road), 5 p.m.

DR A. BUCHANAN and F. BENNETT: `The impact of government policy on children aged 0–13 at risk of social exclusion: overview' (seminar series: `Promoting the well-being of children at risk of social exclusion'), Violet Butler Seminar Room, Department of Social Policy and Social Work, 5 p.m.

S. MUTHU: `Enlightenment against empire' (Political Theory and International Relations Seminar), Department of Politics, 5 p.m.

J.D. TRACY: `The background war of the early modern era: European states and the Ottoman Empire in contest for dominion, trade, and cultural pre-eminence' (Early Modern Europe Seminar), Modern History Research Unit, Radcliffe Infirmary, 5 p.m.

EDOUARD GLISSANT, writer, presents his work (Littérature Française Actuelle à Oxford), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

J. CROSS: `Myth, memory, modernism: reinventing Orpheus' (Graduate Colloquia), Denis Arnold Hall, Music Faculty, 5.15 p.m.


Wednesday 13 October

ORGAN RECITAL (David Maw), Queen's, 1.10 p.m. (admission free; retiring collection).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Introduction to oriental lacquer', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

DR RICHARD LEAKEY: `Why our origins matter' (Charles Simonyi Lecture, introduced by Professor Richard Dawkins), Oxford Playhouse, 4.30 p.m. (tickets £3.50, from the Oxford Playhouse: tel. 305305).

NORMAN DAVIES and TIMOTHY SNYDER: `Where on earth does Europe end?' (lecture), European Studies Centre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

DR R. RASKIN: `A child at gunpoint: a case study in the life of a photo' (David Patterson Seminars), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, 8 p.m.


Thursday 14 October

CONFERENCE: `Cent ans de relations culturelles franco-britanniques' (Maison Française, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.).

ALAIN VIALA: `Rousseau face à la modernité: le livre, l'imprimerie, la lecture' (Early Modern French Seminar), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.


Friday 15 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Crete BC', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

P. JACOB: `The scope and limits of Chomsky's naturalism' (lecture), Philosophy Faculty Centre, 4.30 p.m.


Monday 18 October

C. LOW: `Khoisan eating practices' (seminar series: `The history of modern medicine: national and international perspectives'), Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 2.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR B. HARRISS-WHITE: `De- and re-regulating business in rural West Bengal: capitalism under the left front' (seminar series: `Socio-legal approaches to law and development'), Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building, 4.30 p.m.

DR L. SHEVTSOVA: `Comparing Yeltsin and Putin as leaders' (Russian and Eurasian Studies Centre Seminar: `Twenty years of political change: the USSR and Russia, 1985–2004'), the Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

DR L. AL-GAILANI: `Archaeological theft in Iraq' (St Cross–All Souls Lectures: `Who owns objects? The ethics and legality of collecting'), Dining Hall, St Cross College, 5 p.m.


Tuesday 19 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Glass', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

PROFESSOR B. LAFFAN: `Organising power in Europe: multilevel governance' (seminar series: `Europe: what kind of power?'), Seminar Room, European Studies Centre, St Antony's (70 Woodstock Road), 5 p.m.

T. SMITH: `Early years research and policy for children at risk of social exclusion' (seminar series: `Promoting the well-being of children at risk of social exclusion'), Violet Butler Seminar Room, Department of Social Policy and Social Work, 5 p.m.

R.E. LEBOW: `Interests and ethics' (Political Theory and International Relations Seminar), Department of Politics, 5 p.m.

H. KUGELER: ` "Le parfait Ambassadeur": the theory and practice of diplomacy, 1648–1748' (Early Modern Europe Seminar), Modern History Research Unit, Radcliffe Infirmary, 5 p.m.

B. HEBBERT: `The Tudor violin 1540–1600' (Graduate Colloquia), Denis Arnold Hall, Music Faculty, 5.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. PODOLNY: `The logic of person v. the logic of position' (Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies: `The logic of position, the measure of leadership'), Saïd Business School, 5.30 p.m. (open to the public; admission free).


Wednesday 20 October

MISS L. FORBES and DR J. JOHNS: `The Bodleian Book of Curiosities: some answers and many new questions' (Friends of the Bodleian thirty-minute lecture), Cecil Jackson Room, Sheldonian, 1 p.m.

ORGAN RECITAL (Elizabeth Burgess), Queen's, 1.10 p.m. (admission free; retiring collection).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Introduction to twentieth-century art', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

PROFESSOR J. PODOLNY: `The meaning of leadership' (Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies: `The logic of position, the measure of leadership'), Saïd Business School, 5.30 p.m. (open to the public; admission free).

G. IRVINE: `Bu-no-mai: the military dances of Bugaku' (Oxford Asian Textile Group lecture), Pauling Centre, 58 Banbury Road, 6.15 p.m. (admission for visitors £2).

T. ARGOV: `Losing the (Israeli) plot: contemporary Israel in the prose of Orly Kastel-Bloom' (David Patterson Seminars), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, 8 p.m.