Oxford University Gazette: 30 October 2003

Oxford University Gazette, Vol. 134, No. 4674: 30 October 2003

Note: due to the requirements of the Data Protection Act, some elements of the printed Gazette are not reproduced in the Web Gazette.

University Acts

COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

Changes in Regulations

Council has made the following changes in regulations on 30 October 2003, to come into effect on 14 November 2003. The regulations replace Council Regulations 31 of 2002, made by Council on 24 July 2002 (Gazette, Vol. 132, Supplement (2) to No. 4630, pp. 1510--14).

Council Regulations 6 of 2003

REGULATIONS FOR THE INVESTIGATION BY THE PROCTORS OF COMPLAINTS UNDER SECTION 22 OF STATUTE IX [1]

Made by Council on 6 November 2003

1. References to sections in these regulations are to sections of Statute IX unless stated otherwise, and references to colleges shall include colleges, societies, Permanent Private Halls, and other institutions designated by Council by regulation as being permitted to present candidates for matriculation.

2. The Proctors shall lay down and publish annually, and update as necessary, guidance and procedures governing the investigation of complaints by members of the University brought to their attention under the provisions of section 22. [2]

3. The procedures shall be in two parts, namely:

(1) procedures for complaints which constitute appeals from a decision relating to an academic matter which has been taken by an academic committee or other body; and

(2) procedures for other complaints, except those set out in regulation 5 below.

4. The procedures shall be drawn up in consultation with relevant university bodies and shall be approved by Council before publication.

5. The Proctors shall not undertake investigations under these regulations in relation to the following:

(1) staff grievances in respect of which procedures are provided in the staff handbook for the category of staff concerned, or any staff grievance to which Part F of Statute XII applies;

(2) complaints concerning an individual's relationship with his or her college, which shall be made under the relevant college procedures;

(3) complaints or allegations to which procedures under the University's Codes of Practice on Fraud, Public Interest Disclosure, Academic Integrity in Research, and the Freedom of Information Act apply.

(4) allegations of breaches of the Code of Discipline set out in Statute XI. Such allegations shall be addressed as follows:

(a) in the case of student members, by the Proctors in accordance with regulations made under that statute; or

(b) in the case of other members of the University, as directed by the Registrar under the provisions of that statute.

6. The Proctors shall ensure, in consultation with the University's Equal Opportunities Unit, that published procedures accord with codes of practice and policies concerning equality of opportunity or treatment published by the University or by relevant government bodies for application to the higher education sector.

7. If an individual is dissatisfied with the outcome of an investigation by the Proctors, he or she may make an appeal in writing to the High Steward setting out the reasons for the appeal.

8. (1) If an individual is dissatisfied with the progress of an investigation by the Proctors, he or she may request the Proctors to give, within twenty-eight days of the date of the request, a written report on the progress they have made.

(2) If he or she is dissatisfied with the report, he or she may appeal in writing to the High Steward.

9. Any appeal under regulation 7 or regulation 8 (2) above shall be delivered to the Registrar within twenty-eight days of the date of the Proctors' determination or report. 10.(1) The Registrar shall be entitled to reject appeals that are, on the face of it, trivial or vexatious.

(2) In all other cases, the Registrar shall refer the appeal to the High Steward under the provisions of regulations 11--13 below.

11. The High Steward shall consider any appeal referred to him or her by the Registrar under regulation 10 (2) above and may appoint another suitably qualified individual or individuals to act in his or her place.

12. The procedure to be adopted shall be determined by the person or persons considering the matter, giving due regard to the principles of natural justice.

13. The High Steward or his or her appointee or appointees shall consider the appeal expeditiously and shall deliver his or her or their decision in writing together with reasons for the decision.

14. The Proctors shall prepare an annual report to Council setting out the number and type of complaints considered by the Proctors, the time taken to investigate and adjudicate each complaint, and, in general terms, the outcome.

Procedures for Handling Complaints

(including academic appeals) submitted to the Proctors

These procedures are laid down and published under regulations made under the provisions of section 22 of Statute IX, a copy of which is annexed to these procedures. [3]

Under the provisions of the University's statutes, the Proctors 'shall be available for consultation by members of the University and may investigate complaints'. Any member of the University wishing to seek informal advice from the Proctors or the Proctors' Office may make an appointment through the Clerk to the Proctors (telephone: (2)80190). The Proctors are elected by the colleges in rotation and are seconded from their normal teaching or administrative duties for the duration of their year in office. They have a general responsibility to ensure that the University's statutes are upheld; this includes a specific responsibility to see that examinations are properly conducted and in accordance with the statutes and regulations concerning them. As part of the process of investigating complaints, the Proctors may summon any member of the University to appear before them. By custom, the Junior Proctor takes the lead role in dealing with complaints relating to taught-course examinations, while the Senior Proctor takes the lead role in dealing with complaints relating to research degree candidatures and examinations.

Formal complaints will be dealt with in accordance with the following procedures.

What the procedures cover

1. The procedures set out below relate to complaints concerning a student's relationship with the University or with clubs, societies, or other organisations which are subject to the supervision of the Proctors.

2. The procedure under Part A may be used to pursue complaints about matters concerning teaching and learning (e.g. teaching facilities, supervision arrangements, etc.), and non-academic issues (e.g. support services, library services, university accommodation, university clubs and societies, etc.). It does not cover appeals and other matters referred to below. A complaint to the Proctors under Part A should be made only if attempts at an informal resolution, or under local complaints procedures published by the department, faculty, or unit in question, are unsuccessful.

3. The procedure under Part A may also be applied in the event of complaints by members of staff.

4. The procedure under Part B may be used where a student or a member of staff wishes to challenge a decision relating to an academic matter which has been made by an academic committee or body ('an academic appeal'). It should be noted that the Proctors are empowered to consider complaints about the process that has led to a decision being made by an academic body such as a board of examiners, faculty board, or graduate studies committee (e.g. that an administrative or procedural error may have occurred, that there has been bias or inadequate assessment in the examination process, that the examiners failed to take into account special factors affecting a candidate's performance).

What the procedures do not cover

5. The procedures do not cover staff grievances in respect of which procedures are provided in the staff handbook for the category of staff concerned, or any staff grievance to which Part F of Statute XII applies.

6. The procedures do not cover complaints concerning an individual's relationship with his or her college, which shall be made under the relevant college procedures.

7. The procedures do not cover allegations of breaches of the Disciplinary Statute and Regulations, which must be investigated by the Proctors under regulations made under that statute.

8. The procedures do not cover complaints or allegations to which procedures under the University's Codes of Practice on Fraud, Public Interest Disclosure, Academic Integrity in Research and the Freedom of Information Act apply. (Copies of the University's Policies and Codes of Practice in relation to Harassment, Equal Opportunities, Race Equality, Academic Integrity in Research, Public Interest Disclosure, and Fraud may be obtained from the Clerk to the Proctors, or accessed respectively on:

www.admin.ox.ac.uk/eop/har/code.shtml; www.admin.ox.ac.uk/eop/eopolicy.shtml; www.admin.ox.ac.uk/eop/rraa/rraaeop.shtml; www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/policy/conduct.shtml; www.admin.ox.ac.uk/ps/staff/codes/pid.shtml www.admin.ox.ac.uk/finance/finregs/finregs.doc.)

9. The procedures do not cover appeals against decisions made by the Proctors under the relevant Examination Regulations in cases where they have been asked to approve special arrangements (e.g. on grounds of ill health) or to give a dispensation in respect of the academic progress or examination of an individual candidate. These should be made to the Chairman of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council. Information is available from Senior Tutors and college offices.

10. The Proctors are not empowered to challenge the academic judgment of examiners or academic bodies.

Access to personal data

11. Any complainant is entitled to request access to personal data held in relation to the investigation under the provisions of the Data Protection Act 1998. Access request forms may be obtained from the Data Protection Officer, University Offices, Wellington Square, or may be accessed in the University's Web site (www.admin.ox.ac.uk/councilsec/oxonly/dp/policy.shtml). Complainants should note that there are some exceptions to the right of access, and in particular that access may in some circumstances be restricted by virtue of the duty of confidentiality owed to third parties.

Appeals

12. Any appeal to the High Steward against a decision of the Proctors, or to express dissatisfaction with a report by the Proctors on the progress they have made, should be made in writing to the Registrar within twenty-eight days of the determination or report concerned. Copies of regulations for the consideration of such appeals may be obtained from the Clerk to the Proctors.

Part A:

Procedure applying to complaints about matters concerning teaching and learning and non- academic issues

13. Any reference in these procedures to the Proctors includes a Proctor acting alone and any person appointed under paragraph 16 below.

14. Complaints and appeals will be treated seriously and may be made without fear of recrimination.

15. No one investigating a complaint shall have had any prior involvement in the matter in hand, conflict of interest in dealing with the complaint, or vested interest in the outcome.

16. If there has been prior involvement by one or both of the Proctors another individual or individuals will be appointed by the Vice-Chancellor to act in their place, who shall have the same powers of investigation and determination as the Proctors.

17. The Proctors may call on any person in or outside the University to provide specialist assistance in their investigations.

Confidentiality

18. Complaints will be dealt with in a confidential manner. All those who are involved in procedures for investigating an allegation, including witnesses, representatives, and persons providing evidence and/or advice, have a duty to maintain confidentiality. For a complaint to be investigated fully, however, and action taken, it will be necessary to disclose the identity of the person making a complaint to the person or body who is the subject of the complaint and to others directly involved.

Malicious or vexatious allegations

19. If malicious or vexatious allegations are made, disciplinary action may be taken against the individual concerned.

Procedure

20. Complaints should be made in writing. When making a written complaint, it is helpful to give as much information as possible and set out the precise details of the complaint that is being made. This should explain the steps that have been taken to pursue the complaint, mention any discussions that have already been held about the matter, attach copies of any earlier correspondence, and state clearly what remedy, if any, the complainant is seeking. Advice may be sought from sources such as OUSU, student common room, or trade union officers, before making a written complaint.

21. Complaints shall be investigated fairly and expeditiously.

22. Complaints will be logged on receipt and complainants will be invited to provide details of their ethnic origin, to facilitate monitoring under the University's equal opportunities policies. Information about ethnic origin will be kept securely and separately unless it is pertinent to the complaint under consideration.

23. If at any time in the course of an investigation under this procedure the Proctors decide that the matter should properly be considered under the disciplinary procedure applicable to the person or persons in question, then the matter shall be referred for consideration under that procedure and the complainant shall be informed accordingly.

24. The receipt of a written complaint will normally be acknowledged within five working days. If the Proctors take the view that the complainant has not taken sufficient steps to resolve the complaint at a local level, they may advise the complainant to do so before they agree to proceed further under these procedures.

25. If the complaint is trivial or repeats in substance a complaint already made and determined, the Proctors may decline to consider it.

26. The Proctors may invite the complainant to attend a meeting to discuss the matter (or the complainant may request a meeting).

27. Any individual(s) who is (are) the subject of a complaint will be given details of the complaint and will be given a reasonable period in which to respond to matters covered in the complaint. That period will normally be ten days, but may be extended at the request of the individual(s) or body concerned. The individual(s) or body or the Proctors may request a meeting to discuss the complaint.

28. Any individual attending a meeting with the Proctors under these procedures may be accompanied by a member of Congregation or, in the case of a member of staff, by a representative of his or her trade union or, in the case of a student member, by another student member of the University.

29. Notes of any interview will be available for inspection by the interviewee(s).

30. Complainants and individuals or bodies who are the principal subject of the complaint will be kept informed of the progress of the investigation.

31. The Proctors will determine the complaint as quickly as is consonant with a thorough investigation of the matter, and normally within not more than thirty working days of receipt of a written complaint. The timescale may be extended in cases of complexity or where a factor is beyond control of the Proctors (e.g. the non-availability in Oxford of key contributors to an investigation).

32. The complainant will be provided with a written determination, which will summarise the investigation that has been carried out and the reasons for the decision reached. The outcome will also be notified to any individual who is the subject of a complaint and to those bodies within the University which need to be aware of the determination.

33. Where a complaint is upheld, the Proctors will indicate what, if any, steps should be taken by the responsible body to ameliorate the matter complained of. If the responsible body is unable or unwilling to act, the Proctors may refer the matter to Council.

34. If the complainant wishes to seek clarification of the Proctors' decision or to raise further matters, the Proctors will normally provide an opportunity for him or her to do so. At their discretion, the Proctors may reopen the case in the light of new information.

35. If the complainant at any point withdraws his or her complaint, the Proctors may at their discretion continue their investigation of matters complained about.

Part B:

Procedure applying to complaints concerning academic appeals

Appeals concerning university examinations for taught courses 36. Any concern about the conduct of a taught-course examination should be discussed in the first instance between the student and his or her college authorities, subject tutor, course director, supervisor, or, where appropriate, the relevant director of graduate studies.

37. Concerns about the conduct of an examination must not be raised directly with the examiners, even in the form of enquiries about factual information. Examiners are instructed to refer all such communications to the Proctors.

38. It is open to a student, to a supervisor, or to college authorities acting on his or her behalf, or to any staff member of the University who has concerns about the conduct of an examination, to make formal representations in writing to the Proctors.

39. Any representation made by a student must be submitted through the Senior Tutor of his or her college, whether or not it has the Senior Tutor's support.

40. Complaints concerning taught-course examinations will normally be considered by the Junior Proctor.

41. Complaints about examinations must be made to the Proctors in writing, giving as much information as possible and setting out precise details. Complaints sent to local academic bodies or the Graduate Studies Office will be forwarded immediately to the Proctors.

42. If the matter raised is one that can be resolved readily (e.g. by checking that all a candidate's scripts have been accounted for and marked, or that marks have been accurately processed) the Proctors will make the necessary enquiries on the candidate's behalf and inform the candidate via his or her college without undertaking a full investigation under these procedures. If the Proctors are subsequently informed in writing that the complainant remains dissatisfied, then they will consider undertaking a full investigation.

43. When investigating a complaint about a taught-course examination, the Proctors will normally obtain information and/or comment from the chairman or other senior representative of the responsible academic body (such as board of examiners, faculty board, or graduate studies committee). Where appropriate they will also obtain information and/or comment from other individuals or officers responsible for the administration of the examination that is the subject of the complaint (e.g. the Clerk of the Schools).

44. Complaints must be submitted to the Proctors as soon as possible and not later than six months after the notification of the results of the examination concerned. (The time-limit is necessary because after six months relevant records may cease to be available.)

45. The Proctors will also send notice of the receipt of a complaint to the chairman of the responsible academic body concerned, to the responsible officer of the candidate's college, and to the candidate's supervisor(s).

46. Subject to paragraphs 36--45 above, the procedure for consideration of the appeal will be as set out in Part A.

47. The Junior Proctor will report annually to Council's Educational Policy and Standards Committee about the number and nature of complaints investigated.

Appeals concerning higher degrees involving research 48. Any concern about the examination of a research student should be discussed in the first instance between the student and his or her college authorities, supervisor, or a departmental officer such as the relevant director of graduate Studies.

49. Concerns about the conduct of an examination must not be raised directly with the examiners, even in the form of enquiries about factual information. Examiners are instructed to refer all such communications to the Proctors.

50. It is open to a student, to a supervisor, or to college authorities acting on his or her behalf, or to any staff member of the University who has concerns about the conduct of an examination, to make formal representations to the Proctors.

51. Concerns about the procedures for, or the outcome of, exercises such as transfer or confirmation of status, or other matters affecting a student's candidature (e.g. quality of supervision), may also be referred to the Proctors, but should normally be raised in the first instance with his or her college authorities or a departmental officer such as the relevant director of graduate studies. Candidates should not make direct approaches to the assessors of their work.

52. Complaints concerning higher degrees involving research will normally be considered by the Senior Proctor.

53. Complaints must be submitted to the Proctors as soon as possible and not later than twelve months after the notification of the results of the examination concerned. (The time-limit is necessary because after twelve months relevant records may cease to be available.)

54. The Proctors will also send notice of the receipt of a complaint to the chairman of the responsible academic body concerned, to the responsible officer of the candidate's college, and to the candidate's supervisor(s).

55. Subject to paragraphs 48--54 above, the procedure for consideration of the appeal will be as set out in Part A.

56. The Senior Proctor will report annually to Council's Educational Policy and Standards Committee about the number and nature of complaints investigated.

[The regulations clarify matters of detail, bring regulations into line with various other University Codes of Practice, and (51) remove the right of students to take their concerns about exercises such as transfer or confirmation of status to the head of the relevant division.]

Proctors' Regulations 1 of 2003

PROCTORS' DISCIPLINARY REGULATIONS FOR CANDIDATES IN EXAMINATIONS

Made by the Proctors on 1 October 2003 Approved by Council on 30 October 2003 These regulations replace Proctors' Regulations 1 of 2002 (Gazette, Vol. 132, Supplement (2) to No. 4630, pp. 1541–2).

1. These regulations are made by the Proctors in the exercise of their powers under section 22 of Statute IX and are designated by Council as disciplinary regulations under section 6 (2) of Statute XI.

2. In these regulations: (1) 'examination' includes where the context so permits the submission and assessment of a thesis, dissertation, essay, or other coursework which is not undertaken in formal examination conditions but counts towards or constitutes the work for a degree or other academic award; and (2) 'examination room' means any room designated by the University's Clerk of the Schools or approved by the Proctors as a place for one or more candidates to take an examination.

3. No candidate shall cheat or act dishonestly, or attempt to do so, in any way, whether before, during or after an examination, so as to obtain or seek to obtain an unfair advantage in an examination.

4. No candidate shall present for an examination as his or her own work any part or the substance of any part of another person's work.

5. In any written work (whether thesis, dissertation, essay, coursework, or written examinations) passages quoted or closely paraphrased from another person's work must be identified as quotations or paraphrases, and the source of the quoted or paraphrased material must be clearly acknowledged.

 

6. No person shall dishonestly give help to a candidate before, during or after an examination so as to give, or attempt to give, that candidate an unfair advantage in an examination.

7. No candidate shall take, or attempt to take, into an examination any unauthorised material (including revision notes) or equipment relevant to the examination nor use or attempt to use it.

8. No candidate shall copy from the script of another candidate or in any other way dishonestly receive help from another person in an examination.

9. Candidates may not communicate with any person other than an invigilator during an examination.

10. No candidate may leave or re-enter an examination room unless permitted by an invigilator.

11. No candidate shall enter an examination room more than thirty minutes after an examination has started except with the permission of the Proctors or an invigilator.

12. No candidate shall unless permitted by the Proctors or an invigilator leave an examination room:

(1) within thirty minutes of the beginning of an examination; or

(2) within thirty minutes of the time at which it is due to end.

13. No candidate may smoke in an examination room or in any building in which an examination is being held, or behave in any other way which distracts or is likely to distract other candidates.

14. Candidates may not use paper in an examination except that which is provided for them.

15. At the end of each examination candidates must hand back to an invigilator all the paper provided for writing their answers, including paper used for rough drafts and paper which has not been used. No paper must be removed from the examination room other than the question-paper for the examination that has just been completed.

16. Unless regulation 17 below applies, all articles or equipment to be used in an examination must be carried into the examination room in a transparent bag.

17. Candidates must offer non-transparent bags for inspection and, unless special permission is given by an invigilator, must deposit them at the place designated for the deposit of bags and other personal belongings.

18. No candidate shall take a mobile telephone into an examination room.

19. Candidates must present themselves for examinations in full academic dress.

20. Candidates must follow the directions of the invigilators and the Proctors during an examination, including a direction to leave the examination room and the building in which the examination is being held. [These regulations elaborate the nature of plagiarism, clarify that revision notes are not to be taken into examinations, and forbid the removal of paper, other than the examination paper, from the examination room.]

Proctors' Regulations 2 of 2003

PROCTORS' ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS FOR CANDIDATES IN EXAMINATIONS

Made by the Proctors on 1 October 2003 In exercise of their powers under Section 22 of Statute IX the Proctors have withdrawn their regulations 2 of 2002 (Gazette, Vol. 132, No. 4631, p. 1560), and replaced them with the following.

1. These regulations shall apply to all university examinations, including any examination described in any regulation as a qualifying examination.

2. In these regulations 'college' means any college, society, or Permanent Private Hall or any other institution designated by Council by regulation as being permitted to present candidates for matriculation.

3. The name of any candidate who withdraws from an examination should be notified through his or her college to the Clerk of the Schools, who will inform the Chairman of Examiners.

4. A candidate who desires to withdraw from an examination at any time after the start of the first paper must inform an invigilator and the Clerk of the Schools at once and his or her college as soon as possible.

5. (1) A candidate may not withdraw from an examination after the written part of the examination is complete.

(2) The point of completion shall be deemed to be the conclusion of the last paper for which the candidate has entered, or the time by which a dissertation or other written material is due to be submitted, whichever is the later.

(3) A candidate who fails to appear for a viva voce examination subsequent to the completion of the written examination will nevertheless be deemed to have failed the entire examination unless he or she can, through his or her college, satisfy the Proctors that his or her absence was due to illness or other urgent and reasonable cause.

6. A candidate who fails to appear for any part of an examination other than a viva voce as specified in regulation 5 (3) above will be deemed to have withdrawn from the entire examination unless he or she can, through his or her college, satisfy the Proctors that his or her absence was due to illness or other urgent and reasonable cause.

7. (1) A candidate or his or her college may, within fourteen days of the date of the Proctors' decision under regulation 5 (3) or regulation 6 above, appeal in writing to the Chairman of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council.

(2) The appeal shall be adjudged expeditiously by the Chairman or another member of that committee, other than one of the Proctors, nominated by the Chairman.

8. Except for the drawing of diagrams, no candidate shall use pencil for the writing of an examination unless prior permission has been obtained from the Proctors.

9. (1) A candidate whose native language is not English and who wishes to take into any examination a bilingual dictionary (covering English and the candidate's native language) must at the time of entering for the examination obtain permission from the Proctors through the Senior Tutor or equivalent officer of his or her college.

(2) Where regulations or examiners' instructions forbid the use of dictionaries, permission shall not be given.

10. It is the responsibility of each candidate to ensure that he or she hands in all the material he or she wishes to be considered by the examiners and to comply with regulations relating to the submission of written work such as dissertations, essays and project reports [The main changes from Proctors' Regulation 2 of 2002 are to specify in regulation 9 (1) that permission for use of a dictionary must be requested at the time of entering for the examination, and to introduce a new regulation (10) emphasising that it is the candidate's responsibility to ensure that all examination materials are handed in and that regulations relating to the submission of written work are complied with.]


Footnotes

[1] Underlining indicates where Council Regulations 6 of 2003 differ from Council Regulations 31 of 2002 which they replace.
Return to text

[2] The current procedures laid down by the Proctors are set out below.
Return to text

[3]See above.
Return to text


COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of Congregation:

Bitsakakis, G., Brasenose

Brett, A.E.S., MA, Corpus Christi

Cavarra, A., Kellogg College

Cunningham, S., Christ Church

Davis, J.J., D.Phil., Christ Church

Ezrachi, A., D.Phil., Pembroke

Finch, J.E., MA, New College

Furger, A.M., Pembroke

Grafe, R., Nuffield

Gull, K., Lincoln

Hall, R.B., St Cross

Kara, H., Faculty of Oriental Studies

Krishnaswamy, S., BCL, Pembroke

Odling-Smee, F.J., Mansfield

Ramadorai, T., St Catherine's

Ramirez, R., Templeton

Rayner, S.F., Keble

Saprai, P., Mansfield

Taylor, R.E., BA, Christ Church

Virgincar, A.K., St Edmund Hall

Welsford, T.A.M., BA, All Souls

Wigg, M.C., University Surveyor's Office

Yueh, L.Y., D.Phil., Pembroke

University Agenda

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • *CONGREGATION 18 November 2003 2 p.m.
    • *Presentation of Vice-Chancellor's Oration
  • *CONGREGATION 21 November 2003 11.30 a.m.
    • *Honorary Degree Ceremony
  • * Note on procedures in Congregation
  • * List of forthcoming Degree Days
  • * List of forthcoming Matriculation Ceremonies
Notices

GENERAL NOTICES

ECONOMICS LIBRARY

Construction work inside the Economics Library will require the library to close on Saturday, 8 November, and Monday, 10 November. The builders will be working through Sunday to minimise library closure. However, readers are advised to ring the Politics, International Relations and Sociology Library on (2)78710 on Tuesday, 11 November to check that the Economics Library is open. The Web page at www.ssl.ox.ac.uk will also provide up-to-date information on opening times. Readers should note that there will be significant noise disruption during fifth week, 12--16 November. The Library apologises for the inconvenience.


ELECTORAL BOARD

PROFESSORSHIP OF RUSSIAN

                                          Appointed by

The Provost of 
  Worcester                               Mr Vice-Chancellor[1]
The Warden of New 
  College                                 ex officio
Professor D. Rayfield                     Council
Professor J. Elsworth                     Council
Dr R.C.S. Walker                          Humanities Board
Professor E. Fallaize                     Modern Languages Board
Dr C.M. MacRobert                         Modern Languages Board
Dr S.C. Franklin                          Modern Languages Board
Dr W. Williams                            New College

[1] Appointed by Mr Vice-Chancellor under the provisions of Sects. 10 and 11 of Statute IX (Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4633, 9 October 2002, Vol. 133, p. 108).

Lectures

INAUGURAL LECTURES

Thomas Warton Professor of English Literature

PROFESSOR D. WOMERSLEY will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 18 November, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Shakespeare and Anthony Munday.'


Chichele Professor of the History of War

PROFESSOR HEW STRACHAN will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 4 December, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `The meaning of strategy: historical reflections.'


CAMERON MACKINTOSH VISITING PROFESSOR OF CONTEMPORARY THEATRE

SIR TIM RICE will lecture at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, St Catherine's College. All members of the University are welcome to attend. Wed. 5 Nov.: `Working with Walt—how I saved Walt Disney.' Thur. 27 Nov.: `It's only words.'


CHARLES SIMONYI LECTURE

SIR MARTIN REES, FRS, Astronomer Royal and Master-Elect of Trinity College, will deliver the fifth annual Charles Simonyi Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 7 November, in the Oxford Playhouse. The lecture will be introduced by Professor Richard Dawkins, Simonyi Professor of the Public Understanding of Science. The lecture is presented in association with New College and the Department for Continuing Education. Tickets, costing £3.50, are available at from the Oxford Playhouse (telephone: Oxford 305305, Internet: www.oxfordplayhouse.com).

Subject: `Mysteries of our complex cosmos.'


MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Department of Earth Sciences

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Mondays in the Lecture Theatre, the Department of Earth Sciences. DR N. TREWIN, Aberdeen
3 Nov.: `Devonian terrestrial biodiversity trapped in a Scottish hot spring deposit—the Rhynie chert.' DR A. DICKSON, Cambridge
10 Nov.: `Echinoderm skeletal preservation: calcite/aragonite seas and the Mg/Ca ratio of Phanerozoic oceans.' DR L. LONERGAN, Imperial College, London
17 Nov.: `Quantifyng the extent of Quaternary ice sheets in the North Sea—the evidence from 3-D seismic reflection data.' PROFESSOR D. VAUGHAN, Manchester
24 Nov.: `Minerals, metals, and molecules: ore and environmental mineralogy in the twenty-first century.' DR J. ANDREWS, East Anglia
1 Dec.: `Building microbial bioherms in the Pleistocene Gulf of Corinth.'


Biophysical Chemistry Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in the John Rowlinson Seminar Room, the Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory.

Convener: Dr L.C. Snoek. PROFESSOR S. MEECH, East Anglia
13 Nov.: `Photophysics of the chromophore of GFP.' PROFESSOR C. ROBINSON, Cambridge
4 Dec.: `Probing dynamic macromolecular complexes using mass spectrometry.'


Oxford Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics

DR MARTIN LAMPE, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, will give a seminar at 4 p.m. on Monday, 3 November, in the Seminar Room, OCIAM.

Subject: `Dust molecules, strings, and crystals in dusty plasma.'


MEDICAL SCIENCES

Oxford Institute of Musculoskeletal Sciences, the Botnar Research Centre

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the Botnar Research Centre, the Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre. PROFESSOR K. VAUGHAN, Cape Town
31 Oct.: `Low dose digital X-rays: from catching diamond thieves to monitoring scoliosis.' PROFESSOR P. WORDSWORTH
7 Nov.: `The genetic epidemiology of rheumatoid arthritis.' DR A. BLUMSOHN, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield
14 Nov.: `Bone turnover and fracture risk assessment: a new emperor, or just new clothes?' PROFESSOR A. SILMAN, Manchester
21 Nov.: `Cardiovascular disease and rheumatoid arthritis—what is the connection?' DR A. BERENDT
28 Nov.: `Musculoskeletal infection: what remains to be discovered?'


Physiological Sciences

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 12 noon on Wednesdays in the Sherrington Room, the University Laboratory of Physiology.

Conveners: Dr Morten Kringelbach and Dr C. Paul Plested. PROFESSSOR T. AZIZ
Wed. 6 Nov.: `Deep brain stimulation and akinetic disorders.' (Sponsored by the Physiological Society) DR P. KOHL
12 Nov.: `Mechanical regulation of heart rhythm: from patch pipette to precordial thump.' (Sponsored by the Physiological Society) DR S. BESTMANN, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Research, Göttingen, Germany
19 Nov.: `Imaging the perturbed brain: an overview of combined TMS and fMRI.' (Sponsored by the McDonnell Foundation) DR C.S. REDWOOD
26 Nov.: `The functional effects of cardiomyopathy-causing mutations in contractile protein genes.' (Sponsored by the Physiological Society) DR P. PETROVIC, Karolinska Institute, Sweden
3 Dec.: `Placebos of the brain.' (Sponsored by the Physiological Society)


MODERN HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCES

Seminar in Economic and Social History

The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: Professor R. Allen, Professor A. Offer, Dr C.K. Harley, and Dr J. Humphries. DR D. ORMROD, Kent
4 Nov.: `The state, institutions, and commercial growth: England and the Netherlands, 1650–1800.' DR J. ELORANTA, Warwick
11 Nov.: `Responding to threats and opportunities: military spending behaviour of the great powers, 1870–1913.' PROFESSOR M. MORGAN, LSE
18 Nov.: `Ricardo and model farming.' DR J. LANDERS
25 Nov.: `Destructive labour: gunpowder, populations, and the costs of war in early modern Europe.' N. DIMSDALE
2 Dec.: `The staple industries and international competition in late Victorian Britain.'


THEOLOGY

Old Testament Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Mondays in the Seminar Room, the Theology Faculty Centre. Details of the seminar by Professor Sandre Japhet, omitted from previous announcements, are given below.

Convener: Professor J. Barton. PROFESSOR S. JAPHET, Hebrew University
3 Nov.: `History and ideology in the Biblical historiography: the case of the Restoration Period.' PROFESSOR V. HUROWITZ, Beer-sheva
10 Nov.: `Aspects of the design, symbolism, and essence of the Solomonic Temple.' (Temple and Workshop series) DR F. STAVRAKOPOULOU
17 Nov.: `The blackballing of King Manasseh.' DR S.S. BROOKS, London
1 Dec.: `The Habiru/'apiru and the connection to 'ibrim in the Old Testament, especially 1 Samuel.'


INSTITUTE FOR CHINESE STUDIES

China Research Seminar

The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in Room 207, the Institute for Chinese Studies.

Convener: Dr Rana Mitter. ZHENH DANYI and D. MAHONEY
6 Nov.: `Wings of Summer': Zheng Danyi reads his poetry (in Mandarin, with an English translation). M. BLECHER, Oberlin College
13 Nov.: `What are the Chinese workers thinking?' ZHONGPING LAI
20 Nov.: `Environmental change in the Loess Plateau and its possible reference to Chinese history.' F. WAKEMAN, Berkeley
27 Nov.: `Victims of history: the case of Pan Hannian.' D. BUCK
4 Dec.: `Constructing China's capitalism: connecting Shanghai's urban and rural industries.'


SCHOOL OF GEOGRAPHY AND THE ENVIRONMENT AND ROTHERMERE AMERICAN INSTITUTE

Conference: Global Standards

This conference, co-sponsored by the Economic and Social Research Council Future, Governance Programme, Bristol University, and the University of Oxford, will bring together an international group of invited speakers on the topic of global standards, emphasising issues related to corporate strategy and responsibility in the developed and developing worlds. The conference will be held at the Rothermere American Institute on 20-22 November. Registration will be at 1.30 p.m. Enquires may be directed to Jan Burke, Personal Assistant to Professor Gordon L. Clark (telephone: Oxford (2)71922, e-mail: jan.burke@geog.ox.ac.uk).

Conveners: Professor Gordon L. Clark (Oxford) and Professor Adam Tickell (Bristol).

20 November

STEVE HUGHES, University of Newcastle: `The international labour standards regime. A case study in global regulation.' SUSAN CHRISTOPHERSON, Cornell University: `Ideal and real in labor standards.' ALLAN FELS, University of Melbourne: `Global competition policy.'


21 November

DAVID ANGEL, Clark University: `Global standards and the environmental performance of industry.' TAD MUTERSBAUGH, University of Kentucky: `Below standard: decertification and disqualification in certified organic coffee producing communities.' JAYNE GODFREY, Monash University: `International harmonisation of accounting standards: Going global?' PROFESSOR CLARK, TESSA HEBB, and DARIUSZ WOJCIK: `The institutional investment value chain: CalPERS' emerging markets strategy.' LISE KINGO, Executive Vice-President, Novo Nordisk: `Global health standards.'


22 November

JAMES HAWLEY and ANDREW WILLIAMS, Saint Mary's College of California: `Global corporate governance standards: the limits and potential of the fiduciary capitalism perspective.' GRAHAME THOMPSON, the Open University: `Limits to global standard setting.'


QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

International Gender Studies Centre

Fieldwork and fieldnotes revisited: the local in a globalised world

Amended notice

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the Blackhall Room, Queen Elizabeth House. This notice replaces previous announcements.

Conveners: Dr Janette Davies and Dr Zoe Morrison. DR J. HART
30 Oct.: `Growing up mukhayyamji: boyhood in a Palestinian refugee camp in Jordan.' DR H. MONTGOMERY, Open University
6 Nov.: `Rethinking child prostitution.' DR L. SCIAMA
13 Nov.: `Can you call this fieldwork? September in Italy.' DR D. BROCKINGTON
20 Nov.: `Community conserved areas and governance in East Africa.' DR J. OKELY, Hull
27 Nov.: `Revisiting sequestered Gypsy narratives.' DR J. DAVIES
4 Dec.: `From shanty town clinic to peri-urban teaching hospital in Bolivia.'


ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

Latin American Centre

JULIO FAUNDEZ, Professor of Law, University of Warwick, will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Friday, 7 November, in the Latin American Centre.

Subject: `Law and politics in the breakdown of democracy in Chile in 1973.'


SOMERVILLE COLLEGE

Eleanor Rathbone Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR SUSAN PEDERSEN, Columbia University, New York, will deliver the Eleanor Rathbone Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 20 November, in Flora Anderson Hall, Somerville College. The lecture will be followed by a wine reception. Open to the public.

Subject: `Eleanor Rathbone and the democratic faith.'


WOLFSON COLLEGE

Ronald Syme Lecture

PROFESSOR F.G.B. MILLAR, Emeritus Professor of Ancient History, will deliver the annual Ronald Syme Lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 6 November, in the Hall, Wolfson College. The lecture will be open to the public.

Subject: `Two Roman revolutions.'

Grants and Research Funding

VIOLETTE AND SAMUEL GLASSTONE RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS IN SCIENCE

Applications are invited for the above research fellowships, tenable at the University of Oxford, in the fields of Plant Sciences, Chemistry (Inorganic, Organic, or Physical), Engineering, Mathematics, Materials Science, and Physics. The fellowships will be tenable for one year with a possibility of renewal for up to two further years. The awards will be available from 1 October 2004, and can be taken up from that date or as soon as possible thereafter. There is one fellowship for men and one fellowship for women. These are supported from the Glasstone Fund for Men and the Glasstone Fund for Women respectively. The salary will be on the RSIA scale (currently £18,265–£27,339). Additional travel and research support grants are available. Applicants should have submitted for their doctorate by the time of taking up a fellowship (normally 1 October of the year in which the offer is made). There is no age limit but applicants should not normally have had more than five years of postdoctoral research experience. Application forms and further particulars can be obtained from Mrs J. Brown, Life and Environmental Sciences Divisional Office, 2 South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3UB (telephone: Oxford (2)82464, e-mail: judith.brown@admin.ox.ac.uk). They are also available at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/.


OPPENHEIMER FUND

The Oppenheimer Fund provides grants to assist the academic exchange of senior members between the University of Oxford on the one hand and universities and similar institutions of higher education in the Republic of South Africa on the other. Applications are invited from senior members of the University who wish either to visit one or more universities in South Africa or to invite a staff member from a South African university to Oxford. Grants may be awarded to assist with living expenses for a maximum of six months, and travel costs. Visits for the sole purpose of attending a conference will not normally be eligible for support from the Fund. The maximum level of grants is likely to be up to £1,000 per month for subsistence and up to £700 for the cost of travel between Oxford and South Africa. Applications for grants from the Fund should include a statement of the purpose of the proposed visit (including an outline of any research to be carried out during the visit), duration and estimated costs, details of any other available sources of funding, and, in the case of visits to Oxford, a curriculum vitae of the staff member it is proposed to invite and a letter of support from a senior member at Oxford. The closing date for applications is 15 November. Applications and any enquiries about the Fund should be sent to James Tibbert, International Office, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford (telephone: Oxford (2)70134).

 

Examinations and Boards

DIVISIONAL BOARD BY-ELECTIONS 23 October 2003

Humanities Board

On Thursday, 23 October, the following was duly elected as a member of the Humanities Divisional Board (from among the members of the Faculty of Philosophy, vice Broome), to hold office for two terms from the first day of Hilary Term 2004: J. HYMAN, MA, B.PHIL., D.PHIL., Fellow of Queen's

Life and Environmental Sciences Board

On Thursday, 23 October, the following was duly elected as a member of the Life and Environmental Sciences Board (from among the members of a faculty or sub-faculty working in the Department of Zoology, vice Holland), to hold office for two years from Michaelmas Term 2003: S.J. SIMPSON, MA, Fellow of Jesus

Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board

On Thursday, 23 October, the following was duly elected as a member of the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board (from among the members of the Sub-faculty of Chemistry, vice Green), to hold office for two years from Michaelmas Term 2003: P.P. EDWARDS, Fellow of St Catherine's


APPOINTMENTS and REAPPOINTMENTS

With the approval of the relevant Divisional board, the following appointments and reappointments have been made and titles conferred for the periods stated.

Life and Environmental Sciences Division

Appointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

andreas p. russ (dr.med. Frankfurt), Fellow of Magdalen. In Genetics. From 1 October 2003 to 30 September 2008. miltos tsiantis, d.phil. (b.sc. Athens), Fellow of Wadham. In Plant Sciences (Developmental Biology). From 1 October 2004 to 30 September 2008.

Reappointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURER

penny a. handford, ma (b.sc., ph.d. Southampton), Fellow of St Catherine's. In Biochemistry. From 1 April 2004 to the retiring age.

Mathematical and Physical Sciences Division

Appointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

fabian h.l. essler (ma, ph.d. New York), Fellow of Worcester. In Theoretical Physics. From 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2008. simon m. hooker, ma, d.phil., Fellow-elect of Merton. In High-Intensity Light–Matter Interactions. From 1 October 2005 to 30 September 2010. frank p. payne (ma, ph.d. Cambridge), Fellow of Lincoln. In Electronic Materials Engineering. From 1 October 2003 to 30 September 2008. nik petrinic, ma (m.sc. Zagreb, ph.d. Swansea), Fellow of Exeter. In Impact Engineering. From 1 October 2003 to 30 September 2008. yiannis ventikos (ph.d. Athens), Fellow of Wadham. In Mechanical Engineering (Fluids). From 1 December 2003 to 30 November 2008.

UNIVERSITY LECTURER (FIXED-TERM)

marko bacic, m.eng., Fellow of Lincoln. In Control Engineering. From 1 October 2003 to 30 September 2007.

FACULTY LECTURER

alan g.b. lauder (b.sc. Glasgow, ph.d. London), Fellow of Hertford. In Mathematics. From 1 October 2003 to 30 September 2013.

UNIVERSITY LECTURER (CUF)

jan kristensen (m.sc., ph.d. Technical University of Denmark), Fellow of Magdalen. In Pure Mathematics. From 1 October 2004 to 30 September 2008. (Dr Kristensen will hold the title of University Lecturer (CUF) in Pure Mathematics at Magdalen from 1 October 2003 to 30 September 2004.)

Reappointment

UNIVERSITY LECTURER

stephen j. heyes, ma, d.phil., Fellow of Keble. In Inorganic Chemistry. From 1 October 2003 to 30 September 2006.

Mathematical and Physical Sciences/Continuing Education

Appointment

UNIVERSITY LECTURER (FIXED-TERM)

alessandra cavarra (m.sc., ph.d. Catania), Fellow of Kellogg. In Software Engineering and Continuing Education. From 1 October 2003 to 30 September 2008.

Medical Sciences Division

Appointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURER/HONORARY NHS CONSULTANT

peter m. rothwell (md Edinburgh) mrcp, frcp, Fellow-elect of Green College. In Clinical Neurology. From 1 October 2005 to 30 September 2010.

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

catherine harmer (b.sc., d.phil. York), Fellow of Magdalen. In Cognitive Psychology. From 1 August 2004 to 31 July 2009. robert j. wilkins, ba, d.phil., Fellow of St Edmund Hall. In Epithelial Physiology. From 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2008.

JOINT UNIVERSITY/HOSPITAL APPOINTMENTS

harald becher (md Heidelberg). In Cardiovascular Medicine. From 1 October 2003 to 30 September 2008. john d. young (dm Southampton). In Anaesthetics and Intensive Care. From 1 October 2003 to 30 September 2008.

CLINICAL LECTURER

stuart m. carney (mb, ch.b. Edinburgh), m.r.c.psych. In General Adult Psychiatry. From 1 December 2003 to 30 November 2007.

Reappointments

CLINICAL TUTOR

jonathan r. price, ba, bm (ma Cambridge). In Psychiatry. From 1 June 2004 to 31 May 2007.

Conferment of title

HONORARY SENIOR CLINICAL LECTURERS

(with effect from 1 August 2003)

ian d. bottrill (mb Southampton), frcs. In Otolaryngology. thomas a.d. cadoux-hudson, d.phil. (mb, bs London), frcs. In Neurosurgery. jeremy p. crew (b.chir., ma, md Cambridge), frcs. robert b. galland (mb, ch.b., md Manchester), frcs. In Surgery. bruce d. george (b.sc., mb, bs London), frcs. In Colorectal Surgery. john m. reynard, ma, dm, frcs. In Urology. peter g. richards (mb, bs London), frcs, frcpch. In Neurosurgery. richard j. stacey (mb, bs London), frcs. In Neurosurgery.


(with effect from 1 October 2003)

richard s.c. kerr, ma status (b.sc., mb, bs, ms London), frcs. In Neurosurgery. jeremy m.t. perkins (md Bristol), frcs. In Vascular Surgery. hugh g. series, ma, dm, m.r.c.psych. In Psychiatry of Old Age.

continuing education

Appointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURER (half-time)

anna r. beer, ba (ph.d. Reading), Fellow of Kellogg. In Literature (Continuing Education). From 1 September 2003 to 31 August 2008.

STAFF TUTOR

barbara j. gabrys, m.sc. (m.sc. Wroclaw, ph.d. Leuven), Supernumerary Fellow of Kellogg. In Computing. From 29 September 2003 to 28 September 2006.

Colleges, Halls, and Societies

OBITUARIES

Corpus Christi College

MARTIN HENRY GRUNDY, MA, 10 October 2003; commoner 1934–7. Aged 87.


Exeter College

DAVID M. BRIDGMAN, 27 August 2003; Commoner 1993. Aged 28. EDGAR FRANK CODD, 18 April 2003; Stapeldon Scholar 1941. Aged 79. DAVID KENYON HALL, 23 August 2003; Commoner 1963. Aged 58. ROBERT EVELYN HYDE, 23 July 2003; Commoner 1939. Aged 82. NORMAN NATHANIEL JACOBS, 1 March 2003; Commoner 1951. Aged 72. BRIAN LAURIE MURGATROYD, 24 April 2003; Open Scholar 1943. Aged 76. DONALD PATRICK NESTOR, 10 January 2003; Commoner 1959. Aged 64. LAWRENCE WARREN PEARSON, 7 February 2003; Commoner 1932. Aged 92. JONATHAN MICHAEL REYNOLDS, 31 August 2003; Commoner 1987. Aged 34. ANTHONY DAVID ROBERTS, 10 March 2003; Commoner 1956. Aged 67. COLIN SKINNER, 22 May 2003; Commoner 1955. Aged 67. DAVID RIGBY SPRIGGS, 27 August 2003; Commoner 1945. Aged 76. MICHAEL PETER STAMBACH, 7 March 2003; Ashworth-Parkinson Scholar 1956. Aged 67. ERNEST ARTHUR TALBOT, 1 February 2003; Scholar 1935. Aged 86. JOHN FRANCIS RENEL TOLKEIN, 22 January 2003; Commoner 1936. Aged 85. EWART GEOFFREY WALSH, 26 March 2003; Stapeldon Scholar 1940. Aged 80. HAROLD FREDERICK WALTON, 2003; Open Scholar 1931.


Keble College

JOHN MICHAEL BREARE, January 2003; 1959. JOHN FRANCIS FITZMAURICE, 27 August 2003; 1969. Aged 55. SEAN HESKETH, 30 April 2002; 1961. Aged 59. CHARLES FRANCIS AKUDO ONOCHIE, 4 July 1997; 1961. JOSEPH L. SILK, 14 October 2003; 2000. JAMES DOUGLAS MAXWELL STUART, 15 October 2003; Fellow and Tutor, 1934–49, Chaplain 1939–49, Junior Dean 1940–4, Dean 1947–9; Member of the Cambridge Brotherhood of the Ascension Delhi (`the Delhi Brotherhood') from 1949. JOHN ELIOT BRADE WHITMORE, 24 August 1992; 1928.


St Cross College

STUART SWINFORD WILSON, MA, 6 October 2003; Founding Fellow 1965–84, Emeritus Fellow 1984–2003; University Lecturer in Engineering Science 1954–84. Aged 80.

Advertisements

Art Exhibition

Observations, new paintings by Rebecca Hind, Wolfson College, Linton Road, 3rd to 21st Nov. Open daily 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., subject to college commitments. Visitors are advised to ring the College Lodge on 01865 274100 beforehand.


Talk

His Beatitude Mar Nasrallah Sfeir, the Patriarch of Antioch and of all the Levant, will give a talk at the Oxford Union, on Fri., 31 Nov., at 8.30 p.m. on The Muslim-Christian co-existence in the Lebanon. The talk is open for members and non- members of the university.


National Blood Service

Do something amazing today–Give Blood.There will be a university staff blood donor session on Wed., 5 Nov., Assembly Rooks Rown Hall, St Aldates: 10 a.m. to 12.25 p.m., and 2 p.m. to 4.25 p.m. Please call 08457 711711. You can visit us at: www.blood.co.uk or on BBC2, Ceefax page 465.


d'Overbroeck's College Open Morning

Join us for our Open Morning on Saturday 8 November from 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. for information on Years 9–11 and Sixth Form entry. This is an informal event which gives students and parents an opportunity to have a look around the College, meet our teaching staff and some of our current students. Based in North Oxford, d'Overbroeck's is one of the largest and most successful co-educational independent colleges in the UK. For further information about us, please contact the College Office on 01865 310000 or visit our Web site at www.doverbroecks.com


Concerts

Merton College Chapel, Sat., 8 Nov., 8 p.m., Berlioz concert: Harold en Italieand Symphonie Fantastique. The Thorington Players, conductor David Cairns. Admission by programme at the door, £10 (students, OAPs £5). In aid of the Anthony Storr Memorial Bursary, Green College.

Thursday 13 November, 8 p.m., Sheldonian Theatre: Rossini, William Tell Overture, Ravel, Piano Concerto in G, Dvorak, Symphony No. 9 in E minor (from the 'New World'). The Oxford Philomusica Orchestra, Angela Hewitt, piano, Marios Papadopoulos, conductor. Tickets: £30, £24, £17, £10. Box Office: 01865 305305. Book online at: www.oxfordphil.com.

The Oxford Millennium Orchestra plays Tchaikovsky 1812 Overture; Bruch Violin Concerto No 1 (soloist Stuart Baran), and Brahms Symphony No.3. Conductor Nicholas Mumby. Wed., 3 Dec., 8 p.m., Sheldonian Theatre. Tickets £12/£10, £5 available from the Oxford Playhouse on 01865 305305 or www.ticketsoxford.com.


St Giles' Thursday Lunchtime Talks

Oxford Authors: 6 Nov., The Highs, Lows, Terrors and Rewards of Writing, Angela Huth; 13 Nov., Truth is no stranger to fiction, Linda Proud; 20 Nov., Fascinating Sinners, Patricia Hall; 27 Nov., Cruelty in crime fiction, Jane Jakeman; 4 Dec., An Alternative Oxford, Philip Pullman. The talks will be held in St Giles' Church at 12.3 0 p.m. Everyone is welcome. In order to help us with our costs, a small donation would be appreciated. Web site: http://www.st-giles-church.org.


Emmaus Oxford

Helping the homeless to help themselves: second user home and office furniture at very reasonable prices. Free delivery. Tel.: 01865 402073. E-mail: emmausoxon@netscape.net. Registered charity no: 1066618.


Oxford University Newcomers' Club

The Club welcomes the wives, husbands, and partners of visiting scholars, graduates and members of the University who are new to Oxford. It aims to offer help, advice and information, and the opportunity to meet others socially. Informal coffee mornings are held at 13 Norham Gardens every Wed. 10.30 a.m. to 12 midday, except for 2 weeks at Christmas and Easter. Newcomers with children (0-4 years) meet every Friday in term from 10-15 a.m. to 12 midday. Other term time activities include a Book Group, informal Conversation Group, and tours to clleges, museums, and other places of interest, also country walks and garden trips. Secondhand items can be bought on Wed. mornings 10.30 a.m. to 12 midday from the equipment room. The Welcome Party will be held in the club rooms on Sun., 2 Nov., from 5–6.30 p.m. Please book with the booking secretaries. Visit our Web site: www.ox.ac.uk/staff.


Summer Fields School

The Maclaren Trust Scholarship: a scholarship, up to full fees, is awarded to a boy of outstanding ability between the age of 8 and 11 who, without this financial support, would not be able to come to Summer Fields. For an application form please write to or telephone: The Headmaster, Summer Fields, Oxford OX2 7EN. Tel.: 01865 454433. E-mail: hmsec@summerfields.org.uk


Vital-Health Marketing

"Creamy dairy free chocolate flavoured Shake. The Shake with muscle!! E.G. aid diet–support sport? www.vital-health.co.uk. Even join our dynamic team and start your own p/t business (18+)! www.ultra-business.com/leggo. Shaun A. Leggott (3rd Dan Karate). Tel.: 01737 773393. E-mail: nutrition@tiscali.co.uk.


Books Bought and Sold

Books Bought: 01865 727928–we buy any quantity of books, from single items of importance to entire libraries on history and the humanities. Unsworth's Booksellers (ABA). Shops at 15 Turl Street, Oxford OX1 3DQ and 12 Bloomsbury Street, London WC1B 3QA. Open every day. E-mail: books@unsworths.com. Web site: www.unsworths.com.


Periodicals Bought and Sold

Back-issues of scholarly periodicals and journals bought and sold. Graham Jeffrey, Periodicals (est. 1967), 29 Cuddesdon Road, Horspath, Oxford, OX33 1JD. Tel.: 01865 872528, fax: 776398. E-mail: gjeffreysatu@aol.com.


Restoration and Conservation of Antique Furniture

John Hulme undertakes all aspects of restoration: 30 years experience; collection and delivery. For free advice, telephone or write to: The Workshop, 11A High Street, Chipping Norton, Oxon. OX7 5AD. Tel.: 01608 641692.


Tuition Offered

Ashtanga yoga: Tuesdays 6–7 p.m. at East Oxford Community Centre, Princes Street, off Cowley Road. Starting 28 Oct. Drip-in basis. £5/£4 students. contact: katie.christoffers@bioch.ox.ac.uk. Web site: www.ashtangayoga.org.uk.

Piano lessons: experienced teacher; adults and children; all grades. Beginners welcome. contact Miss P. Read BA (Hons) L.R.A.M., near Kidlington, Oxford. Tel.: 01865 331147


Services Offered

Big or small, we ship it all, plus free pick up anywhere in Oxford. Also 24-hour photocopying, private mailing addresses (24-hour access, and mail forwarding world-wide), binding, fax bureau, colour photocopying, mailing services, and much more. Contact or visit Mail Boxes Etc., 266 Banbury Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 514655, fax: 514656, e-mail: summertown@020.mbe.uk.com, also at: 94 London Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 741729, fax: 01865 742431, e-mail: staff@mbeheadington.co.uk.

Town and Country Trees: arboricultural contractors; modern arboricultural techniques; local authority approved; safeguarded by full Public Liability insurance. Free advice and quotations. Tel.: 0845 458 2980 or 07976 261850 (mobile).


Domestic Services

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: 01865 726983 or 01235 555533.


Situations Vacant

Practice Nurse in central Oxford. Small friendly holistic practice seeks enthusiastic and experienced Practice Nurse for 21 hours per week. Contact: Practice Manager, 01865 311811.

Magdalen College School: we are looking for reliable individuals to add to our Register of Invigilators. Work is on a temporary basis during the January exam period. The work involves laying out of question papers, completing relevant paperwork, and invigilating during the examination session. Invigilation sessions are approx. 4 hours (in either the mroning or the afternoon). The payment for each 4 hour session is £28. If you are interested please send a CV, and covering letter to the Senior Administrator, Magdalen College School, Oxford OX4 1DZ, or by e-mail to: tearnshaw@mcsoxford.org.

Magdalen College School: require a Registrar to commence 1 April 2004. To be directly responsible to the Master for admissions at this successful and prestigious independent day school. Letter of application, including full CV and details of 2 referees, to be sent to the Master, Magdalen College School, Oxford OX4 1DZ. Full details of the position may be obtained from the Master's PA. Tel.: 01865 242191. Closing date 5 Nov.


Short term lets

House to rent over Christmas and New Year: 4-bedroom, detached family house to rent in Oxford from 10 Dec., to 6 Jan., (inclusive). Quiet side road, 5 minutes' walk from Summertown shops and main city bus routes. £1,500 for whole period (or £1,250 if willing to 'house sit' resident cat and rabbit). May be possible to negotiate shorter period. Tel.: 01865 554059 eves./weekend.

Jericho: furnished 2/3-bedroom house in central Jericho area with additional study, large open plan living room, modern kitchen, bath/shower room and small garden. Available as a furnished rental from 1 Jan., for up to 4 months. Would suit visiting family. Washing machine; dishwasher; cable TV; broadband; phone. Four minute walk to rail station, similar to Port Meadow and the river. Even less to great selection of local shops, and restaurants. Ten minutes to most University Departments. £1,100 p.c.m. Tel.: 01865 282123 or e-mail: gideonh@earth.ox.ac.uk.


Houses to Let

House for rent in south Oxford: 20 minutes' walk from city centre; furnished, 3-4 bedroom house in quiet area near Hinksey Park, Jan. to Aug. 2004. Easy access to university, hospitals and ring road. Fireplace; gas c.h.; 2 WCs;south-facing rear garden. £1,000 p.m. Tel.: 01865 454092 or e-mail: michael.kooy@warwick.ac.uk.

North Oxford : un-/part-furnished 2-bedroom modern house in quiet location. Garden, garage, off-street parking. Updated kitchen and bathroom; 5 minutes' walk from bus route direct to city centre. No smokers or pets. Available beginning Nov. £775 p.c.m. Contact: peterjonathanclarke@hotmail.com or ring 01865 559518.

Headington (part furnished), near Shotover, shops, hospitals and London buses: 4-bedroom house (2 double, 2 single). Ideal for family; large garden with fruit trees; re-carpeted and painted throughout. Dual aspect living room; washing machine and dishwasher. £1,100 p.c.m. excl. bills. contact Guy Turton. Tel.: 07769 704082.

Waterways, central north Oxford: selection of brand new luxury 4-/5- bedroom, and 3-bathroom houses in prestigious location. Master bedroom with spacious en suite; family bathroom with separate shower. Landscaped garden, some with conservatory. Elegantly furnished. Secure parking, some with own garage. High quality applicances and fittings. All properties owned, let and managed by Chase. No tenant administration fess charged. Immediately available. Tel.: Chase-the property people-01865 516060 or 07808 477850.

An Englishman's home is his castle---so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or e-mail us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: 01865 764533, fax: 764777, e-mail: info@qbman.co.uk.


Flats to Let

Quiet accommodation in Headington: a wonderful architect designed split-level studio. Light and airy with French window to the garden. Cooking facilities and separate bathroom. Cast iron wood burning stove. For a single person, post graduate or visiting professor. Non-smoker. £650 p.c.m., incl. heat, light and cleaning. Please contact: 01865 762991. E-mail: paulinehodson@supanet.com.

Flat, 1–2 persons, in centre of large and peaceful country garden, next to main house in Cumnor village; near bus routes; parking space provided; storage space. £450 p.m. Ideal for PhD students/young couple, seeking log fire and home comforts. Long history of happy tenants. Call Catherine on 01865 864102 for info., and appointment.

Central North Oxford: 10 minutes' walk from city centre, all main university buildings and parks, also very close to the river: available now for short/long lets in extremely quiet, civilised, large Victorian house in this exclusive, leafy, residential Victorian suburb with large light airy rooms: 2 furnished ground-floor flats, each with double and single bedrooms, drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom. Off-street parking, large secluded garden. Tel.:/fax: 01865 552400.


Serviced Accommodation

Have you seen the Wharf House? Short stay and serviced apartments: luxury canal side apartments in a secure gated development. These 1, 2 and 3 bedroom suites can be taken for a short or extended stay with the option of a regular maid service. High specification interiors and private balconies make The Wharf House a home from home ideal for a short sabbatical or base to relocate from. For further information on availability please contact Finders Keepers on 01865 311011, 226 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 7BP or visit our Web site: www.finders.co.uk.


Accommodation Offered

Large double room to let in Iffley village. House share of 3 ; non- smoking cat lover required. All mod cons, parking, 7 minutes' bus stop. Cleaner. £370 p.c.m. inc. Beginning Dec.–mid-Apr. Dates negotiable. e-mail: sarahoxblue@hotmail.com.

Keep Your Independence with Support: very sheltered accommodation for elderly people near central Oxford. All rooms en suite, lovely garden, good transport links, friendly and supportive staff and volunteers, 24-hour alarm system. For more details contact: The Administrator, The Abbeyfield Oxford Society, Brian Lewis House, 80 St Clements, Oxford OX4 1AW. Tel.: 01865 790439. E-mail: brianlewis@ukonline.co.uk.

Paying guests, visiting academics, welcomed for short or long stays in the comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple, in exclusive, quiet, leafy central north Oxford, within walking distance of all main university buildings, town centre, parks, river, good shops, and restaurants. All rooms have colour TV, tea-/coffee-making facilities, microwave, and refrigerator and/or deep-freeze availability, c.h., and independent heating. Breakfast included in the very moderate terms. Tel./fax: 01865 557879.

Oxford B & B: attractive, quiet and convenient home from home. Per night, single £38, double £50. Weekly rate less 20%. Monthly rates negotiable. Tel.: 01865 770501, e-mail: charmaine.cole@cliffordchance.com

Let Finders Keepers award winning North Oxford office make you at home in Oxfordshire. Over thirty years experience, a dedicated 24-hour management service and a comprehensive marketing profile ensure Finders Keepers ' reputation for making renting a pleasure is endorsed by both landlords and tenants. Whether you are looking for a short term sabbatical base in the city or a more permanent home we have a range of quality properties to match your requirements. With a dedicated team of property managers, letting negotiators, and an interior design and buildings division we offer landlords sound advice on all aspects of the residential market, providing security in the knowledge that your home is in skilled and capable hands. For further information on availability and landlord services please contact Finders Keepers, 226 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: 01865 311011 or visit our Web site: www.finders.co.uk.


Accommodation Sought

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us: 01865 764533, fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk. Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.

 


Accommodation Sought to Exchange

Two older women have a house in Juneau, Alaska, to exchange for house or flat near university for 2 months, June to Aug., 2004. Alaska house on tidelands with 3+ bedrooms, 2 baths, hot tub on desk with view of glacier, 2 pianos, 2 bikes, kayak. Three miles from UAS campus. Use of cars negotiable. E-mail: bhaywood@gci.net.


Holiday Lets

Newport: between Fishguard and Cardigan, Pemborkeshire. Lovely bungalow, sleeps 6-8; ten minutes' from the sea; all mod cons; c.h. Available first week in Jan. Reasonable price. Ideal for families, or for writer or artist seeking peace and inspiration. Tel.: Mrs Bayley on 01865 557851.

Experience the Greek islands of Sporades with Thalpos Holidays. Local villa specialist offers lovely houses and villas in the beautiful islands of Skopelos and Alonissos in the Aeagean Sea. Whether you are 2 or 20 persons in the party , and whether you wish to stay in the picturesque town, by the clear blue sea or in the breathtaking countryside, we have just what you are looking for. With more than 10 years of experience we are proud to offer high quality holidays and the very best service. See our programme for 2004 on: www.holidayislands.com, or contact us on e-mail: thalpos@otenet.gr. Tel.: 0030 24240 29036. Fax: 0030 24240 23057.

Paris apartment available for short or longer stays: delightful 1- bedroom, first-floor flat overlooking the Place du Marche St Catherine (Marais). Period building with large windows and high ceilings. Attractively furnished and well-equipped with television, CD, hairdryer, etc. Linens and cleaning provided. Available from late July, 3 nights minimum. £55 per night, £325 per week or £950 per month for members of the university. (Non-member rates are £65 per night, £395 p.w., and £1,050 p.c.m.). Contact Dr J.J. Chamberlain on 07957 588 448 or e-mail: joe.chamberlain@ukgateway.net.

Traditional Tarn farmhouse in 7 hectares, sleeps 6/8; 2 bathrooms; recently modernised to high standard; private location a mile from thriving village with shops, restaurants etc; open fireplaces; oil c.h.; fully furnished; satellite TV; hard tennis court and heated pool, games room with table tennis, snooker; 45 minutes' Toulouse airport, in Gaillac, Cordes, Albi triangle. Available to let until Easter 2004. £650 p.c.m. Contact: mike.simler@wanadoo.fr, or tel. Judith on 01993 878793 or 01865 281577.


For Sale

Late eighteenth-century mahogany dining table (1.2 x 1.5 metres when fully opened), and 5 Hepplewhite chairs with upholstered seats. £750 o.n.o. If interested please telephone 01865 516638.

Car for sale: N Reg. Fiat Punto; Red; 80,000 miles; MOT until Aug. '04; tax until Jan. '04; alarm and immobiliser; radio cassette; very good condition and well looked after. £1,800. Tel.: Patricia, 01865 723000.


House for Sale

Marston: pretty 2-bedroom period house within walking distance of city centre; living room; dining room; kitchen; 2 bedrooms; first-floor bathroom; small secluded west-facing garden; gas c.h. Period features, open fireplace, sash windows. On a good bus route/cycle route throuh parks to city centre. Close to Oxford Brookes, local hospitals and the university science are. Price £224,950 (offers considered for quick sale). For details tel. Julia Cross on 07932 006744.

Appointments

DIVISION OF MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES (DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCES)

University Lecturerships in Earth Sciences

(1) In association with Exeter College

Applications are invited for a University Lecturership in the field of igneous processes, available from 1 April 2004. Areas of interest include, but are not limited to, physical and chemical volcanology, magma migration, igneous petrogenesis, and mid-ocean ridge processes. The successful candidate will have a strong research record, and will be expected to develop a vigorous research programme at an international level, as well as being an effective teacher and being able to provide lectures in igneous petrology and petrogenesis. Applications are also strongly encouraged from candidates able to lecture in these fields while having research interests in other areas of the Earth and Environmental Sciences.

This is a joint appointment to be held in association with a Tutorial Fellowship at Exeter College. The combined university and college salary will be according to age on a scale up to £42,900 (pay award pending).

Further particulars, including details of the application procedure and of the duties attached to both the university and college appointments, are available at http://www.earth.ox.ac.uk/departm ent/igneous.pdf, or from Mrs Sue Ling, Department of Earth Sciences, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PR (e-mail: sue.ling@earth.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for applications is 5 January 2004.


(2) In association with Wolfson College

Applications are invited for a University Lecturership in the field of palaeobiology and palaeoenvironments, available from 1 April 2004. The successful candidate will have a strong research record, and will be expected to develop a vigorous research programme at an international level, as well as being an effective teacher and being able to provide lectures in the area of palaeobiology, palaeoevironments and evolution. It is expected that the successful candidate will also be appointed to a Curatorship in the Oxford University Museum of Natural History. The appointment will be held in association with a fellowship at Wolfson College. Salary will be according to age on a scale up to £42,900 (pay award pending). A curatorial allowance, currently £2,000, is payable in addition.

Further particulars, including details of the application procedure and of the duties attached to the university, college, and curatorial posts, are available at http://www.earth.ox.ac.uk/departm ent/palaeob.pdf, or from Mrs Sue Ling, Department of Earth Sciences, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PR (e-mail: sue.ling@earth.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for applications is 5 January 2004.


FACULTY OF LAW

Appointment of Administrative Secretary, Law Faculty Office

The Law Faculty Office has an immediate vacancy for a permanent, full-time administrative secretary. The faculty is looking for someone with excellent secretarial and organisational skills, who would enjoy a responsible role in this small, busy team. As well as the usual benefits of working for the University, the position offers the opportunity to be involved in a wide variety of work in an interesting environment where excellence is highly valued. The main duties will be to provide secretarial and administrative support to the Faculty Administrator and the Deputy Administrator, and to assist with the various functions of the faculty's `front office'.

The post will be on the C4 grade (salary: £15,053--£17,416 per annum, pending pay review).

Further particulars, including details of the application process, are available on the Web at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/ or from the Faculty Office, Faculty of Law, St Cross Building, St Cross Road, Oxford OX1 3UL (telephone: Oxford (2)71491, e-mail: lawfac@law.ox.ac.uk).

Closing date for applications: Monday, 24 November (5 p.m.).


ALL SOULS COLLEGE

Evans-Pritchard Lecturership 2004--5

Applications are invited for the Evans-Pritchard Lecturership during the academic year 2004- -5.

The lecturer will deliver a series of four to six lectures in the course of at most one term, based on fieldwork or other indigenous primary materials concerning Africa, the Middle East, or the Mediterranean, and offering an empirical analysis of social relations. Scholars in the field of social anthropology, classical studies, modern history, and oriental studies are eligible and, other things being equal, the electors will prefer a person at the beginning or middle of his or her career. It is hoped that the lectures will be published in book form.

The lecturer will be accommodated in All Souls, and will receive a stipend.

Candidates for election should send an outline of the proposed lectures, and a list of publications, to the Warden, All Souls College, Oxford OX1 4AL, by 31 January 2004. They should also ask two referees to write directly to the Warden, from whom further particulars may be obtained.


LADY MARGARET HALL

Tutorial Fellowship and University Lecturership (CUF) in French Language and Literature

Lady Margaret Hall and the University invite applications from suitably qualified candidates for the above post, starting 1 October 2004. (The University Lecturership is associated with an Official Fellowship and Tutorship at Lady Margaret Hall.) No specialism is excluded but there is a preference for someone with teaching competence and research interests in Literary Theory and post-1900 Literature. Candidates will be considered for the post on the basis of the selection criteria outlined in the further particulars. An application form and the further particulars are available from the Senior Tutor's Secretary, Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford OX2 6QA (telephone: Oxford (2)74321, e-mail: senior.tutor.secretary@lmh.ox.ac.uk), and may also be downloaded from the college Web site, http://www.lmh.ox.ac.uk.

The closing date for applications is Friday, 28 November. Short-listed candidates may expect to be interviewed in January 2004.

Lady Margaret Hall and the University are equal opportunities employers.


LINCOLN COLLEGE

Appointment of Admissions and Graduates Secretary

Lincoln College is seeking to appoint a full-time, responsible, efficient, and enthusiastic secretary to handle both undergraduate and graduate admissions and the administration of graduate students in residence. Applicants should have sound typing skills and an excellent telephone manner. A working knowledge of database work, Excel, and word-processing (preferably Microsoft Word) are essential. Previous university experience would be an advantage. It is essential that the post-holder should be able to use initiative, to work under pressure, and to meet deadlines.

According to experience, the salary will be within the range of the university clerical and library staff grade 5 scale (currently £17,416--£20,755). The hours will be for a 36.25 hour week, plus generous holidays and free lunches while on duty. The post-holder will be eligible to join the OSPS pension scheme.

The further particulars may be obtained from the College Secretary, Lincoln College, Oxford OX1 3DR (telephone: Oxford (2)79801, fax: (2)79802, e-mail:juliet.montgomery@lincoln.ox.ac.uk).

Applicants should send a curriculum vitae and the names of two referees to the College Secretary, either by post or e-mail, by Thursday, 6 November. It is hoped that the short- listed candidates will be interviewed on Monday, 17 November.

Lincoln College is an equal opportunities employer.


NEW COLLEGE

Fellowship and Tutorship in Philosophy, with a University (CUF) Lecturership

New College proposes to elect, if a suitable candidate applies, a Fellow and Tutor in Philosophy with effect from 1 October 2004. The fellowship is associated with a University (CUF) Lecturership. The area of specialist research is open, but there is a particular need for teaching in at least some of the areas covered by the following undergraduate option papers: Introduction to Logic, Introduction to Epistemology and Metaphysics, History of (Early Modern) Philosophy, Knowledge and Reality, Philosophy of Mind, Philosophy of Language. The salary will be according to age, on the CUF scale, currently up to £42,900 per annum. Additional college allowances are payable.

Application forms and further particulars are available from the College Secretary, New College, Oxford OX1 3BN (telephone: Oxford (2)79548, fax: (2)79512, e-mail: barbara.vardag@new.ox.ac.uk). and from the college Web site, http://www.new.ox.ac.uk, under `Job Vacancies'. The closing date for receipt of applications is Wednesday, 10 December.

New College and the University are equal opportunities employers.


WOLFSON COLLEGE

Research Fellowships 2004

Wolfson College proposes to elect up to three non-stipendiary Research Fellows, if candidates of sufficient merit present themselves, without limitation of subject, for four years in the first instance (renewable up to a total of seven years), from 1 October 2004 (or from 1 April 2004 by arrangement). Research Fellowships are intended for those whose careers are progressing to a point where they are becoming established scholars in their field. No more than ten years should have elapsed since receipt of a doctorate. Exceptions will only be made for candidates whose postdoctoral academic career has been interrupted by, for example, childbirth, family commitments, illness, or compulsory military service. A statement giving reasons why an exception should be considered must be included with the application.

Applications from candidates under the age of thirty are discouraged, since it is very unlikely that they will have acquired sufficient experience and seniority. (It may be more appropriate for these candidates to apply for a Junior Research Fellowship in the competitions to be advertised in January for Humanities and Social Studies, or September/October for Clinical and Non-clinical Sciences.) It is a condition that the fellow should be engaged in research in Oxford.

Applications, typed or clearly printed, should include: a completed application form (see below); a curriculum vitae; a list of publications; full details of the candidate's current status or position in Oxford, and its expected duration; a research programme; and the names of three referees Candidates should themselves write directly to their referees asking them without further request to send a confidential reference to the President's Secretary by the closing date.

Application forms are available from the President's Secretary, Wolfson College, Oxford OX2 6UD (applicants should apply in person or send a self-addressed envelope).

References may be faxed direct to the President's Secretary on Oxford (2)74136, or sent by e-mail to: sue.hales@wolfson.ox.ac.uk.

Timetable: the closing date is Monday, 5 January 2004 (12 noon). Proposals and all supporting documentation should reach the President's Secretary by the closing date. Short- listed candidates will be notified during the week of 19--23 January, and will be invited to attend for interview on Friday, 13 February (morning). (An alternative date is unlikely to be possible.)

It should be noted that the college is able to offer financial assistance towards travelling expenses only when the endowment associated with the fellowship allows it to do so and, unfortunately, in the current financial climate this is not possible.

Recommendations for election to research fellowships are subject to governing body approval. Successful candidates will not, therefore, be notified until after the governing body meeting in mid-March 2004.

The college reserves the right not to accept late applications.


UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE

Regius Professorship of Physic

Applications are invited for the Regius Professorship of Physic, an appointment made by the Crown, which will become vacant on 1 October 2005 upon the retirement of Professor Sir Keith Peters. It is hoped the successful candidate will take up appointment on 1 October 2005. The Regius Professor is expected to provide strategic leadership within the School of Clinical Medicine in all aspects of its activities. Applicants should have an established international reputation in a field related to Clinical Medicine.

Candidates should send a copy of their application, marked `Confidential', together with the names of two referees, to the Academic Secretary, from whom further information regarding the Professorship is available, at the Academic Division, the University Offices, The Old Schools, Cambridge CB2 1TT, so as to reach him not later than Monday, 1 December. Informal enquiries may be made to Professor Patrick Sissons, Department of Medicine, School of Clinical Medicine, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 2QQ (telephone: 01223 336848, e-mail: jgps10@medschl.cam.ac.uk).

The University of Cambridge is committed to equality of opportunity.


CLARE COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE

Junior Research Fellowships 2004--7

Clare College offers two Junior Research Fellowships, normally one in Sciences and one in Humanities, tenable for three years from 1 October 2004. Stipends are payable on the University of Cambridge's Assistant in Research scale (currently under review), starting at £17,206 (non-resident in college) or £14,601 (resident). Applications are invited from graduates of, or postgraduate students at, any university in the UK, who must, by 1 January 2004, be within four years of starting on full-time research in the Humanities, or five years in Sciences.

The closing date for receipt of completed applications is Monday, 5 January 2004 (10 a.m.). Candidates should request two referees to write, by that date, directly to the Fellowship Administrator in support of their candidature. Application forms and further particulars may be obtained from the Fellowship Administrator, Clare College, Cambridge CB2 1TL (telephone: 01223 333241, e-mail: master@clare.cam.ac.uk), or from the college's Web site, http://www.clare.cam.ac.uk/.


FITZWILLIAM COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE

Fellowship and College Lectureship in Law

Fitzwilliam College invites applications for a College Lecturer to undertake college teaching and to serve as Director of Studies in Law, with effect from 1 October 2004. Applications are welcome from candidates working in any field of law, but preference may be given to candidates in Land Law or Equity. The lectureship is for a fixed period of five years and is not renewable. The person appointed will be elected to an official fellowship at Fitzwilliam College. The appointment is subject to the statutes and ordinances of the college.

The college lecturer will be appointed at point 7 of the University scale (currently £19,279), with annual increments up to point 11 (currently £23,296); the stipend can be pensionable under USS. Cost of living increases in college stipends are made at the same time as comparable increases in university stipends. The additional stipend associated with the Direction of Studies is currently £1,430. The successful candidate will be elected to a fellowship of the college, with which further obligations and privileges are associated.

Candidates must have, or expect to obtain by the time they take up the post, a postgraduate (LL.M., BCL, Ph.D., or equivalent) and/or professional (barrister or solicitor or equivalent) qualification in Law. However, they should not by then have completed five years of academic employment following the qualification. The reason for this restriction is that the post is intended to give someone near the beginning of an academic career an opportunity to acquire training and experience that will lead to a permanent appointment in Cambridge or another leading university.

The college follows an equal opportunities policy. Applications for part-time (or job share) appointments will be welcomed.

Before applying, applicants should obtain the further particulars from the Web site http://www.fitz.cam.ac.uk/vacancies, or send a stamped-addressed envelope to the Master's Secretary, Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge CB3 ODG. Applications should be sent to the Master no later than Thursday, 20 November.


NEWNHAM COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE

Phyllis and Eileen Gibbs Travelling Research Fellowship 2004--5

This Travelling Fellowship has been endowed with the object of assisting women graduates who have considerable experience of research (normally beyond the doctoral level) and who intend to undertake fieldwork projects outside the British Isles (and normally not within their own countries of residence) in biology, archaeology, social anthropology, or sociology, with preference for archaeology or biology.

The Travelling Fellowship is open to women who are or have been members of any college or approved foundation or approved society in, or University Officers in, the University of Cambridge, but preference will be given to present or former members of Newnham College. The Travelling Fellowship will be available for all or part of the year 2004--5, and the fund will pay research, travel, and subsistence expenses normally up to £12,500 for the year; these conditions may be modified according to the nature of the project.

Further information can be obtained from the college Web site, http://www.newn.cam.ac.uk, or from the Principal's Secretary, Newnham College, Cambridge CB3 9DF, and applications should be sent to her by 5 January 2004.

Diary

Friday 31 October

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Leading teams'—day 1, 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

DR B. MORRIS: `Insects, humans, and identity' (Ethnicity and Identity Seminar: `The identity of animals'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Aspects of childhood', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

PROFESSOR F. STEWART: `Global economic influences on conflict in the developing world' (seminar series: `Making globalisation work for developing countries'), Goodhart Seminar Room, University College, 2 p.m.

CONFERENCE: `Caught in the crossfire: the media and the war in Iraq', Maison Française, 2–5.30 p.m. (continues tomorrow, 9.30 a.m.–1 p.m.).

B. HARRISS-WHITE: `India's religious plurality and its implications for the economy' (Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology seminars), ISCA, 4 p.m.

PROFESSOR G.A. HOSKING: `Structures of trust in Russian society: a historian's view' (Modern History Faculty: Special Faculty Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.


Saturday 1 November

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Treasures of the Ashmolean', 11 a.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

ORGAN RECITAL: Jessica Cottis, the chapel, Magdalen, 5.25 p.m. (admission free).


Sunday 2 November

PROFESSOR TIM GORRINGE preaches, Lady Margaret Hall, 10 a.m.


Monday 3 November

J. SPEIRS: `To test contested definition of kinship in donor insemination: legal structures versus social process' (Fertility and Reproduction seminars: `Reproduction, religion, and law'), Seminar Room, Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Assertiveness'—day 1, 2 p.m. (see information above).

G. JONES: ` "Stupid, stubborn patients": the Irish and the TB institution in the twentieth century' (Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine seminars: `Segregation and exclusion in public health and disease control'), Wellcome Unit, 2.15 p.m.

FACULTY OF MUSIC: Extended Composers' Workshop. There will be a reception during this extended workshop to welcome new composers and discuss future plans. Denis Arnold Hall, Music Faculty, 4.30 p.m. (free of charge and open to the public).

Note: the seminar by MR JOHN SCARLETT in the series `Are Labour's constitutional changes working?', due to be held at 5 p.m. today, has been postponed to Hilary Term. No seminar in this series will be held this week.


Tuesday 4 November

ANDREW LAMB: `Music and Instruments for the Crimean War, 1854--6': Producing authentic background music for television documentaries (illustrated talk), Bate Collection of Musical Instruments, Music Faculty, 1 p.m. (No booking necessary. Free of charge and open to the public.)

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Dealing with harassment', 2 p.m. (see information above).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Camille Pissarro', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

DR D. ZEITLYN: `Religion and change' (Evans-Pritchard Lectures: `Sample of one: Diko Madeleine, a senior Mambila woman's life in the twentieth century'), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR A. NEWMAN: `Well-being and resilience. Drowning or waving? Children's views on the balance between risk and protection factors' (seminar series: `Child well-being against the odds'), Violet Butler Seminar Room, Department of Social Policy and Social Work, 5 p.m.

M. BRENTON: `Intentional communities and informal networks' (public lecture series: `Fruits of winter: well-being in an ageing society'), Centre for the Study of Christianity and Culture, Regent's Park College, 5 p.m.

J.S. SMITH: `Bad language crosses the border: accent change in Glaswegian' (Oxford English Dictionary Forum), Rewley House, 5 p.m.

D. FANNING: `Shostakovitch's eighth string quartet: off with the corset?' (Graduate Students' Colloquia), Music Faculty, 5.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR T. CHARLES-EDWARDS: `Early Christian literature in the British Isles' (public lectures: `Early Christianity in Britain and Ireland'), Blackfriars, 8 p.m.


Wednesday 5 November

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk, in series `The Curator and the Collection' (Dr Timothy Wilson): `The Art Fund and the Ashmolean: recent acquisitions of European art', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

ORGAN RECITAL: Joshua Getzler and Francis Knights, the chapel, Queen's, 1.10 p.m. (admission free; retiring collection).

PIANO MASTERCLASS with Marios Papadopoulos, Denis Arnold Hall, Music Faculty, 2 p.m. (free of charge and open to the public).

SIR TIM RICE (Cameron Mackintosh Visiting Professor of Contemporary Theatre): `Working with Walt—how I saved Walt Disney' (lecture), Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, St Catherine's, 5 p.m.

DR D.A. PALMA: `Adolescence and armed conflict in Colombia' (Refugee Studies Centre public seminars: `Adolescents, armed conflict, and forced migration'), Thatcher Conference Centre, Somerville, 5 p.m.

DR D. ZEITLYN: `Summing up a life? Last words. Several farewells' (Evans-Pritchard Lectures: `Sample of one: Diko Madeleine, a senior Mambila woman's life in the twentieth century'), Schools, 5 p.m.

P. PARKER: `The truth about letters and diaries' (DNB seminars: `Lives in action, word, and image'), Rainolds Room, Corpus Christi, 5 p.m.

P. WEINDLING: `A post-Holocaust encounter of philosophy, psychiatry, and literature: Eau Vive, 1945–55' (lecture), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.


Thursday 6 November

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Introduction to strategic planning and management', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

DR H. MONTGOMERY: `Rethinking child prostitution' (International Gender Studies Centre seminars: `Fieldwork and fieldnotes revisited: the local in a globalised world'), Blackhall Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR F.G.B. MILLAR: `Two Roman revolutions' (Ronald Syme Lecture), the Hall, Wolfson, 6 p.m. (open to the public).


Friday 7 November

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `The history of the University', 9.30 a.m., and `Springboard'—Programme 1, 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

DR M. PELICAN: `Cattle as social personae among the Mbororo (agro-pastoral Fulbe) in north-west Cameroon' (Ethnicity and Identity Seminar: `The identity of animals'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Animals: east and west', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

DR B. MORGAN: `Global companies and local actors: the case of water politics in South Africa' (seminar series: `Making globalisation work for developing countries'), Goodhart Seminar Room, University College, 2 p.m.

T. INGOLD: `Transformations of the line: threads, traces, and surfaces' (Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology seminars), ISCA, 4 p.m.

SIR MARTIN REES: `Mysteries of our complex cosmos' (Charles Simonyi Lecture), Oxford Playhouse, 5 p.m. (tickets £3.50, from the Oxford Playhouse—tel. 305305, Internet: www.oxfordplayhouse.com).

S. MILTON and R. BUXTON: `Local government—squeezed to death' (lecture series: `Contemporary UK government and policy-making: the death, rebirth, or re-invention of democratic politics?'), Old Library, All Souls, 5 p.m.

DR H. GODDARD: `The crisis of representation in Islamic studies' (Interdisciplinary seminars in the study of religions), Council Room, Mansfield, 5 p.m.


Saturday 8 November

BETTS FOUNDATION ORGAN MASTERCLASS with David Goode: `The organ works of Reger, and other nineteenth-century German organ symphonists', 10.30 a.m.--12 noon and 2--4 p.m., the chapel, Harris Manchester.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Treasures of the Ashmolean', 11 a.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

ORGAN RECITAL: Dana Marsh, the chapel, Magdalen, 5.25 p.m. (admission free).