Oxford University Gazette: 30 January 2003

Oxford University Gazette, Vol. 133, No. 4647: 30 January 2003

The following supplement was published with this Gazette:

  • Memorial Service for Lord Jenkins of Hillhead

Note: due to the requirements of the Data Protection Act, some elements of the printed Gazette are not reproduced in the Web Gazette.

University Acts

COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of Congregation:

Chalmers, J.S., Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Fazel, S., Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Gillespie, D.R.H., MA, D.Phil., St Catherine's

Jaksch, D., Keble

Locock, M.L., MA, M.Phil., Lady Margaret Hall

Murphy, M.A., Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Parker, M.J., St Cross

Perry, S.P., MA, D.Phil., Balliol

Watson, P.D.F., MA, Lady Margaret Hall


DIVISIONAL BOARDS AND BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 14 February, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

University Agenda

CONGREGATION 11 February 2 p.m.

¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that written notice of any intention to vote against any of the resolutions at item 1 below, or to vote against or to propose an amendment to the proposed change in Congregation regulations at item 2 below, signed in each case by at least two members of Congregation, must be given to the Registrar by noon on Monday, 3 February.

1 Voting on Resolutions approving the conferment of Honorary Degrees

(1) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Civil Law, honoris causa, upon THE RT. HON. BARONESS O'NEILL OF BENGARVE, CBE, MA (MA Cambridge; PH.D. Harvard), FBA, F.MED.SCI., Honorary Fellow of Somerville College, Principal of Newnham College, Cambridge, be approved.

(2) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Letters, honoris causa, upon PROFESSOR MARY DOUGLAS, CBE, B.SC., MA, D.PHIL., FBA, Honorary Fellow of St Anne's College, Emeritus Avalon Foundation Professor in the Humanities, Northwestern University, be approved.

(3) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Science, honoris causa, upon PROFESSOR DAME JULIA HIGGINS, DBE, MA, D.PHIL., FRS, F.R.ENG., Honorary Fellow of Somerville College, Professor of Polymer Science and Director of the Graduate School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, University of London, be approved.

(4) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Science, honoris causa, upon SIR PAUL NURSE (B.SC. Birmingham; PH.D. East Anglia), FRS, Honorary Fellow of Linacre College, Chief Executive, Cancer Research UK, be approved.

(5) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Science, honoris causa, upon PROFESSOR JEAN-PIERRE SERRE, Honorary Professor at the Collège de France, be approved.

(6) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Music, honoris causa, upon PLACIDO DOMINGO, KBE, FRCM, opera singer, conductor, and administrator, be approved.

¶ If the resolutions are approved, the honorary degrees will be conferred at the Encaenia on 25 June 2003.


2 Voting on Change in Congregation Regulations: Degree Ceremonies

Explanatory note

Because it is expected that an unusually large number of members of the University who have not yet been admitted to their degrees will wish to be admitted in time to become members of Convocation before the election of the new Chancellor on 14 and 15 March, Council has agreed that it would be desirable for an additional ceremony to be held this term for admission to degrees in absence. Council has accordingly agreed to promote the following change in regulations to permit this.

Change in Regulations

In regulation 3.18 of Congregation Regulations 3 of 2002 (Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4612, 13 February 2002, p. 771), delete paragraph (1) and substitute: [1]

`(1) Notwithstanding the provisions of regulations 3.1-3.17 above, a degree day shall be deemed to have been held on the Saturday of the first week of each Hilary Full Term, and on such other days as Council may in exceptional circumstances determine, for the purpose of the conferment of degrees in absence.'

[1] New wording is indicated by underlining.


CONGREGATION 25 February 2 p.m.

¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that written notice of any intention to vote against any of the following resolutions, signed in each case by at least two members of Congregation, must be given to the Registrar by noon on Monday, 17 February (see the note on the conduct of business in Congregation at the end of `University Agenda').

Voting on Resolutions approving the conferment of Honorary Degrees

(1) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Civil Law, honoris causa, upon JOHN BRADEMAS, D.PHIL. (BA Harvard), Honorary Fellow of Brasenose College, President Emeritus of New York University and former Member of the Congress of the United States, be approved.

(2) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Civil Law, honoris causa, upon THE HON. ROBERT HAWKE, AC, B.LITT. (BA (Econ.), LL.B. University of Western Australia), Honorary Fellow of University College, former Prime Minster of Australia, be approved.

(3) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Civil Law, honoris causa, upon PROFESSOR THE HON. REX NETTLEFORD, OM, M.PHIL. (BA UWI), FIJ, Honorary Fellow of Oriel College, Vice-Chancellor of the University of the West Indies, be approved.

(4) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Civil Law, honoris causa, upon DAVID RANDLE WOODS, D.PHIL. (B.SC. (Hons) Rhodes University), F.A.S.S.AF., F.R.S.S.AF., University College, Vice-Chancellor of Rhodes University, South Africa, be approved.

¶ If the resolutions are approved, the honorary degrees will be conferred at a special ceremony on 3 July to mark the centenary of the Rhodes Trust.

Notices

MASTER OF ST BENET'S HALL

The Council of Ampleforth Abbey, with the approval of the Council of the University, has appointed THE REVD G.F.L. CHAMBERLAIN, MA, University College, as Master of St Benet's Hall with effect from 1 September 2004.


BATE COLLECTION OF MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

Events

Sat. 8 Feb., 10.30 a.m. Introduction to the Viol. A one-day course for beginners, led by Catherine Miserandino-Gaherty. Contact the Bate Collection to book.

Tue. 4 Mar., 1.–1.45 p.m. From Bressan to Klemisch: a celebration of Bate recorders. Open to the public and free of charge.

Sat. and Sun. 8–9 Mar., 10.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m. Bow-rehairing weekend workshop, led by Andrew Bellis. All welcome. Numbers are limited, so booking is essential.


FACULTY OF MUSIC

The following events will be given as shown. For events at the Bate Collection of Musical Instruments this term, see above.

Sat. 8 Feb., Holywell Music Room, 8 p.m. OPERA SEICENTO: Giovanni Legrenzi Festival I—`Revival of the seventeenth-century oratorio Il Sedecia'. Tickets from the Oxford Playhouse, tel. 305305, or at the door.

Mon. 10 Feb., Holywell Music Room, 8 p.m. THE ALLEGRI STRING QUARTET performs Mozart K.387, Tippett's Quartet no. 2, and Beethoven's Quartet in F minor, op. 95. Tickets from the Oxford Playhouse, tel. 305305, or at the door.

Wed. 12 Feb., Holywell Music Room, 8 p.m. THE ALLEGRI STRING QUARTET performs Sirman's Quartet in B flat, no. 4, Saxton's Fantazia, Haydn's Quartet in D minor, op. 76, no. 2 (`The Fifths'), and Beethoven's Quartet in E flat, op. 74. Tickets from the Oxford Playhouse, tel. 305305, or at the door.

Fri. 14 Feb., Holywell Music Room, 1 p.m. THE ALLEGRI STRING QUARTET and THE REALM QUARTET perform Haydn, op. 20, no. 2, and Mendelssohn's Octet, op. 20. Tickets from the Oxford Playhouse, tel. 305305, or at the door.

Tue. 18 Feb., Sheldonian, 8 p.m. OXFORD PHILOMUSICA performs Brandenburg Concertos nos. 2–5. Tickets from the Oxford Playhouse, tel. 305305, or book online at www.oxfordphil.com.

Mon. 24 Feb., Holywell Music Room, 8 p.m. ENSEMBLE ISIS: `Rediscovering the Verein'—lecture/concert, programme to include Mahler's Symphony no. 4 (arr. Erwin Stein), and new works by Robert Saxton, Ryan Wigglesworth, and Alicia Grant. Open to the public, with a retiring collection. (Tel. for further information: (2)76125.)

Fri. 28 Feb., the chapel, Merton, 8 p.m. MEMBERS OF OPERA SEICENTO: Giovanni Legrenzi Festival II—`Sacred and secular chamber music by Giovanni Legrenzi'. Tickets from the Bate Collection, (2)76139, or at the door.

Wed. 12 Mar., the chapel, New College, 8.30 p.m. THE BAND OF INSTRUMENTS (with soloist Caroline Balding): concertos by Vivaldi, Guido, and Telemann. Tickets from the Oxford Playhouse, tel. 305305, or at the door; further information from www.newchamberopera.com.


UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD BOTANIC GARDEN AND HARCOURT ARBORETUM

Established over two sites, the University of Oxford Botanic Garden and Harcourt Arboretum are world renowned for their collections and in the advancement of learning.

The Botanic Garden, situated at the east end of the High Street opposite Magdalen College, was founded in 1621 and is the oldest botanic garden in Britain. It contains the most compact yet diverse collection of plants in the world in just 4.5 acres. Areas of interest are the Grade 1 original walled garden, the 1648 border, tropical glasshouses, rock and bog garden and a tranquil glass conservatory (which can be hired for functions). During the summer months there is also the opportunity to buy plants and seeds.

The Garden is open daily (except Christmas Day and Good Friday) at the following times:

April–September: 9 a.m.–5 p.m. (glasshouses 10 a.m.–4.30 p.m.); last admission 4.15 p.m.

October–March: 9 a.m.–4.30 p.m. (glasshouses 10 a.m.–4 p.m.); last admission 4.15 p.m.

Admission charges between October and March are by donation, and between April and September £2.50 per person (no charge for children under twelve). Season tickets cost £5, which allows unlimited access to the Garden during the charging period. Friends of the Botanic Garden and Harcourt Arboretum and holders of the University of Oxford identity card will not be charged admission.

The eighty-acre Harcourt Arboretum, six miles from Oxford in Nuneham Courtney, contains one of the finest collections of mature trees in the county and has often been described as `Oxfordshire's best kept secret'. It also houses a twelve-acre bluebell wood, thirty-five acres of beautiful wild flower meadow, an Acer glade, Pinetum, Azalea collection and Camellia and Magnolia glades.

The Arboretum is open on the following days and closed over the Christmas/New Year holiday and from Good Friday to Easter Monday inclusive:

May–October: 10 a.m.–5 p.m. daily; last admission 4.45 p.m.

November–April: 10 a.m.–4.30 p.m. weekdays only; last admission 4.15 p.m.

For further information see the Web site at http://www.botanic-garden.ox.ac.uk, e-mail to postmaster@botanic-garden.ox.ac.uk, or telephone the Garden office on Oxford (2)86690.

Lectures

INAUGURAL LECTURE

Professor of Indian History and Culture

PROFESSOR S. SUBRAHMANYAM will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 20 February, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `On the window that was India: the place of South Asia in early modern world history.'


BAMPTON LECTURES 2003

The ways of judgement: action and institution

THE REVD OLIVER O'DONOVAN, Regius Professor of Moral and Pastoral Theology, Canon of Christ Church, will deliver the Bampton Lectures at 10 a.m. on Sundays in the University Church of St Mary the Virgin.

Judgement in action

2 Feb.: `The act of judgement (Hymn 388: "Jesus shall reign where'er the sun").'

9 Feb.: `Political judgement (Hymn 490: "Judge eternal, throned in splendour").'

16 Feb.: `Messiness (Hymn 66: "Forgive our sins as we forgive").'

23 Feb.: `Political agency (Hymn 44: "Hail to the Lord's Anointed").'

Judgement in institution

4 May: `Legitimate authority (Hymn 379: "In the cross of Christ I glory").'

11 May: `Sovereign judgement (Hymn 361: "Forth in the peace of Christ we go").'

18 May: `Judgement in war (Hymn 441: "Pray that Jerusalem may have").'

25 May: `Judge not! (Hymn 362: "Glorious things of thee are spoken").'


CLARENDON LECTURES IN GEOGRAPHY AND THE ENVIRONMENT

PROFESSOR DAVID HARVEY will deliver the Clarendon Lectures in Geography and the Environment at 5 p.m. on the following days in the School of Geography and the Environment. The lectures are open to the public and are free of charge. Further information may be obtained from Martha Douglass, Oxford University Press (e-mail: douglasm@oup.co.uk).

The first lecture will be followed by a reception at which a 20 per cent discount will be offered on all Oxford University Press books on display.

Wed. 5 Feb.: `The new imperialism.'

Thur. 6 Feb. :`Imperialism as uneven geographical development.'

Fri. 7 Feb.: `Accumulation by dispossession.'


LUBBOCK LECTURE IN MANAGEMENT STUDIES

PROFESSOR LORD MAY OF OXFORD, President, the Royal Society, will deliver the Lubbock Lecture in Management Studies at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 13 February, in the Saïd Business School. A reception will follow the lecture.

Subject: `Innovation: from new knowledge to new products.'


COMMITTEE FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY, LINGUISTICS, AND PHONETICS

General Linguistics Graduate Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the basement seminar room, 47 Wellington Square.

Conveners: S.G. Pulman, MA, Professor of General Linguistics, and D.F. Cram, MA, University Lecturer in Linguistics.

S. DOBNIK
3 Feb.: `Clitics in Slovenian.'

J. DUSSENS, York
10 Feb.: `Applying inductive logic programming to natural language.'

O. SCHWARZWALD, Bar Ilan
17 Feb.: `Hebrew consonant clusters.'

G. CORBETT, Surrey
24 Feb.: To be announced.

A. RADFORD, Essex
10 Mar.: `On the nature of grammatical impairment in children with specific language impairment: evidence from an English case study.'


ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

Biographers at work

MICHAEL HOLROYD will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 4 February, in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building. All members of the University are welcome to attend.

Subject: `The search for nobility in literary biography.'


Shakespeare in the performing arts: cancellation

It is regretted that this lecture series, organised by St Edmund Hall, has been cancelled. The lectures were due to have been held between second week and fifth week of Hilary Term. The professional schedules of the participants made the series impossible to co-ordinate, but it is hoped that it may be possible to arrange the series later in the year.

The college extends its apologies to those who were hoping to attend.


LIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

The following research talks will be given at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in the Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Plant Sciences.

Convener: H.G. Dickinson, MA, Sherardian Professor of Botany.

DR H. FROMM, Leeds
30 Jan.: `The GABA shunt, a calcium/calmodulin regulated metabolic pathway, is required to restrict levels of reactive oxygen species and to protect plants against stress.'

PROFESSOR J. BARNETT, Reading
6 Feb.: `Designer trees: a realistic goal?'

DR M. FROHLICH, Natural History Museum
13 Feb.: `The mostly male theory of flower evolutionary origins.'

DR C. HALPIN, Dundee
20 Feb.: `Investigating lignin biosynthesis through co-ordinate manipulation of multiple genes.'

DR P. HUIJSER, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research
27 Feb.: `APS, an Arabidopsis SBP-box gene affecting sporogenesis.'

DR S. GURR
6 Mar.: `Attracted to the intractable: a tale of sensing, signalling, stress, and silencing in powdery mildew.'

DR S. HISCOCK
13 Mar.: `Sporophytic self-incompatibility—not just a matter of cabbages and sprouts.'


Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology

Departmental seminar

The following seminars will be held at 4 p.m. on Fridays in 64 Banbury Road.

S. FEUCHTWANG, LSE
31 Jan.: `Images of sub-humanity and their realisation.'

W. JAMES
7 Feb.: `Different kinds of writing: anthropology's essentials.'

J. LEACH, Cambridge
14 Feb.: To be announced.

S. HARRISON, Ulster
21 Feb.: `Cultural differences as denied resemblance: reconsidering nationalism and ethnicity.'

J. CARSTEN, Edinburgh
28 Feb.: `Constitutive knowledge: reimagining personhood and relatedness through adopted unions.'

E. HIRSCH, Brunel
7 Mar.: `Techniques of vision: photography, disco, and renderings of present perceptions in highland Papua.'

I. BELLIER, EHESS, Paris
14 Mar.: `Power issues and negotiations in multicultural organisations.'


Medical Anthropology Research Seminars: Complementary and alternative medicines: anthropological perspectives

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in 61 Banbury Road.

Conveners: E.L. Hsu, MA, University Lecturer in Medical Anthropology, and S.J. Ulijaszek, MA, University Lecturer in Human Ecology.

V. SCHEID, London
4 Feb.: `Chinese medicine in Britain.'

C. BARRY, Brunel
11 Feb.: `Homeopathy in South London.'

G. ADAMS, Brunel
18 Feb.: `Shinryou naika—psychosomatic medicine or "caring for the heart" in Japan.'

V. NAPOLITANO, Cambridge
25 Feb.: `Transculturation, cosmopolitanism, and complementary medicine in urban Mexico.'

M. BODE, Amsterdam
4 Mar.: `The kitchen, the government, and the market: the commodification of Ayurveda in India.'

C. PATERSON, Bristol
11 Mar.: `Acupuncture and Chinese medicine: the patient's perspective.'


Ethnicity and Identity Seminar: The identities of medical practitioners and medical healers

Amended notice

The following seminars will be held at 11 a.m. on Fridays in 61 Banbury Road. Details of the 21 February seminar will be announced later. This notice replaces the notice published in the Gazette of 16 January (p. 624).

Conveners: S. Ardener, I. Fowler, E. Hs'u.

DR K. MAYNARD, Denison, USA
31 Jan.: `The vicissitudes of Kedjem "traditional doctors" and an ambivalent clientele in Cameroon.'

DR G. BUIJS, Zululand
7 Feb.: `Sexual orientation and gender identity among Zulu diviners.'

DR J. DAVIES
14 Feb.: `Necessary in-betweens: auxiliary workers in the medical hierarchy.'

DR L. GASK, Manchester
28 Feb.: `The psychiatrist: cultural perceptions and self- perceptions.'

DR A. DIGBY, Oxford Brookes
7 Mar.: `Shaping changing identities: the general practitioner in Britain and South Africa.'

DR I.-B. TRANKELL, Uppsala
14 Mar.: `Pharmacists in Cambodia: identities and experiences.'


Lectures

DR MOHAMMAD TALIB will lecture as follows at 11 a.m. on Thursday in the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies.

30 Jan.: ` "Islam/Muslim" in the anthropological literature: approaches to subject matter.'

6 Feb.: `Knowledge transmission and world-making: Madrassahs in the constitution of tradition and society.'

13 Feb.: `The Sufis and Islamic authority: building tradition the other way.'

20 Feb.: `Tablighis in the making of Muslim identity.'

27 Feb.: `Islamic pilgrimage and prayer: analysing tradition and community folklore.'

6 Mar.: `What is "Islamic fundamentalism"? Conceptual clarifications for research.'

13 Mar.: `Social protest movements in Muslim societies: methodological considerations.'


LIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES, MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Mathematical Genetics and Bioinformatics Group: seminars in bioinformatics

The following talks will be given at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in the Medawar level 30 seminar room (entrance via Zoology reception).

C. PONTING
30 Jan.: `Comparison of mouse and human proteomes and transcriptomes.'

E. BIRNEY, European Bioinformatics Institute
6 Feb.: To be announced.

S. MUGGLETON, Imperial College, London
13 Feb.: To be announced.

G. LUNTER
20 Feb.: To be announced.

J. THORNE, North Carolina State
27 Feb.: `Protein evolution with dependence among codons due to tertiary structure.'

M. STERNBERG, Imperial College
6 Mar.: To be announced.

W. TAYLOR, MRC National Institute for Medical Research
13 Mar.: `Protein folds and fold-spaces.'

E. SZATHMARY, Collegium Budapest
27 Mar.: To be announced.


MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Condensed matter seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Thursdays in the Simon Room, the Clarendon Laboratory.

Conveners: Professor R.J. Nicholas and Dr A. Green.

DR C. HOOLEY, Birmingham
30 Jan.: `Nanotechnology meets Kondo physics: what's new in a quantum do at large bias.'

PROFESSOR M. CHAMBERLAIN, Leeds
6 Feb.: `Challenges and opportunities for terahertz sensing and imaging technologies.'

PROFESSOR P.G. RADAELLI, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory
20 Feb.: `Metal–insulator transistions in manganites and spinels.'

PROFESSOR S. FORREST, Princeton
27 Feb.: `Recent advances in organic optoelectronics: phosphorence, spin, and light detection.'

PROFESSOR G. AEPPLI, University College, London
6 Mar.: `Structure and magnetic properties of thin films and superlattices.'

PROFESSOR A. FISHER, University College, London
13 Mar.: `The future of molecular devices.'


MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

Italian graduate seminar

The following seminars will take at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Taylor Institution.

Conveners: M.L. McLaughlin, MA, D.Phil., Fiat–Serena Professor of Italian Studies, and M. Zaccarello, MA, University Lecturer in Italian.

DR F. CARBOGNIN, Bologna
Thur. 25 Feb., Room 10B: `Metafora e soggettività in Zanzotto, Rosselli, e Porta.'

PROFESSOR J. USHER, Edinburgh
Mon. 3 Mar., Room 3: `Dante's crowning: the poet's conception and posterity's recollection.' (Paget Toynbee Lectures 1)

Tue. 4 Mar., Room 6: `Petrarch's crowning: Boccaccio's Dantean reading of cultural renewal.' (Paget Toynbee Lectures 2)

PROFESSOR L. LEONARDI, Università per Stranieri, Siena
Thur. 13 Mar., Room 3: `Le Rime di Dante: postille a una recente edizione.' (Paget Toynbee Lectures 3)


MODERN HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCES

Seminar in economic and social history

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: R.C. Allen, MA, Professor of Economic History, K.J. Humphries, MA, Reader in Economic History, and A. Offer, MA, D.Phil., Chichele Professor of Economic History.

DR C. DAVIS
4 Feb.: `Soviet armaments in the 1920s.'

DR R. HARRIS, Tel Aviv
11 Feb.: `Government, economy, and law in Britain, c.1688–1850.'

DR L. BRUNT
18 Feb.: `Grain prices, interest rates, and banks: measuring financial market integration in the Industrial Revolution.'

DR P. SOLAR, Free University, Brussels
25 Feb.: `Rents in Ireland, 1780–1860.'

DR M. ROSE, Lancaster
4 Mar.: `Communities of knowledge: entrepreneurship, innovation, and networks in the British outdoor trades since 1960.'

PROFESSOR K. HONEYMAN, Leeds
11 Mar.: `The market for child labour in early industrial England: the case of parish apprenticeships.'


MUSIC

Graduate Students' Colloquia

The following colloquia will be held at 5.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Denis Arnold Hall, the Music Faculty. The meetings are open to the public and free of charge.

G. OLWAGE, Amsterdam and Rhodes
4 Feb.: `Homemade hegemonies: `Victorian choralism as a discipline.'

R. STROHM
11 Feb.: `Music in Utopia—music in the pastoral.'

R. COWGILL, Leeds
18 Feb.: ` "Such scientific and profound harmonies": the Italian opera orchestra and early performances of Mozart's Don Giovanni in London.'

B. PARSONS
25 Feb.: ` "Choosing oneself and committing oneself": the rift between Pierre Boulez and René Leibowitz.'

N. SIMEONE, Bangor
4 Mar.: `Messiaen and "les années noires": a composer under the German Occupation.'

G. RICO
11 Mar.: `Music, morals, and ideas in thirteenth-century sermons and exemplar literature.'


Other meetings

The following meetings will be held as shown.

Tue. 4 Feb., 1–1.45 p.m., Bate Collection, Music Faculty: `Face the Music I: Handel and his musical world.' Opening of the Handel Exhibition, with a brief talk about the current conservation programme and a tour of highlights of the collection. Booking is required (telephone: (2)76139).

Mon. 10 Feb., Denis Arnold Hall, Music Faculty: Ensemble Isis—Composers' Workshop, 4.30 p.m., and a lecture in the series `The Composer Speaks', with SIMON BAINBRIDGE, 7.30 p.m. Open to the public and free of charge. (Telephone for further information: (2)76125.)

Wed. 12 Feb., 5.30 p.m, Holywell Music Room: S. WOLLENBERG and E. ARNOLD: `An introduction to Maddalena Lombardi Sirmen (1745–1818) and her music' (pre-concert talk). Open to the public and free of charge.


SOCIAL SCIENCES

Labour's undetected constitutional changes

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Summer Common Room, Magdalen College. Details of the 10 February seminar will be announced later.

Conveners: Sir Michael Wheeler-Booth, MA, Lecturer in Politics, Magdalen College, D.I. Marquand, MA, Honorary Fellow, Mansfield College, C.R. Brooke, Fellow and Tutor in Politics, Magdalen College, and G. Cappoccia (Ph.D. Florence), University Lecturer (CUF) in Politics.

SIMON JENKINS and SIR ALAN BAILEY
3 Feb.: `The imperial Treasury.'

LORD WAKEHAM and LORD CARTER
17 Feb.: `The handling of parliamentary business.'

PROFESSOR MARQUAND
24 Feb.: `Is populism a threat to parliamentary democracy?'


African Studies

PROFESSOR T. SHAW, Director, Institute of Commonwealth Studies, University of London, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 11 February, in the Blackhall Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House. Subject: `Dilemmas of globalisation and democracy in Uganda: from civil strife to developmental state?'


OXFORD INSTITUTE OF AGEING

The following seminars will be held at 12.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the Sociology Lecture Room.

G. LEESON
30 Jan.: `Future generations of older people in Denmark—attitudes and expectations.'

R. UNDY
6 Feb.: `Trade union responses to changing environments.'

D. MCCARTHY
13 Feb.: To be confirmed.

E. SCHRODER-BUTTERFILL
20 Feb.: To be confirmed.

I. KESSLER
27 Feb.: `Changes in the structure of public service employment.'

K. MAYHEW
6 Mar.: `Achieving the high skills vision.'

R. FITZPATRICK
13 Mar.: `Joint replacement surgery and ageing.'


CENTRE FOR BRAZILIAN STUDIES AND DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL STUDIES

Education in Brazil

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on the days shown in the Centre for Brazilian Studies.

PROFESSOR P. KRISCHKE, UFSC
Mon. 3 Feb.: `Governance, democracy, and social actors in contemporary Brazil.'

SENATOR E. MATARAZZO SUPLICY, PT-Sao Paulo
Tue. 4 Feb.: `The Fome Zero programme and minimum guaranteed income in Brazil.'

PROFESSOR M.H. GUIMARAES CASTRO, formerly Secretary-General, Ministry of Education
Fri. 7 Feb., Department of Educational Studies: `Secondary education in Brazil.'


OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC STUDIES

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies.

PROFESSOR D. BEHRENS-ABOUSEIF, SOAS
5 Feb.: `Mamluk patronage and the transmission of architectural knowledge.'

PROFESSOR E.K. ROWSON, Pennsylvania
12 Nov.: `Touch and go—patronising philosophy in the tenth-century Islamic world.'

PROFESSOR D. RICHARDS
19 Feb.: `Salah al-Din, a patron of arts and learning?'

PROFESSOR F. BAUDEN, Liège
26 Feb.: `Writing histoy in the Mamluk period: Al-Mazrizi's method in the light of his unpublished notebook.'

DR A. SHIHADEH, Abertay
5 Mar.: `Intellectuality and society: the case of Fakhr Al-Din Al-Razi.'

PROFESSOR B. KARLIGA, Marmara
12 Mar.: `Daily life in late Ottoman Madrasas.'


CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES

Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy

Englightened self-interest or just PR? Self-regulation in the media and communications sectors

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Seminar Room, the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies. Details of the 10 February seminar will be announced later.

Conveners: D. Tambini and D. Leonardi (e-mail: danilo.leonardi@csls.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR J.-C. BERTRAND, Paris
3 Feb.: `Media Accountability Systems (M*A*S).'

PROFESSOR R. PINKER, Chairman, UK Press Complaints Commission
17 Feb.: `The practice of self-regulation in the print media.'

E. RORIVE and G. FRYDMAN, Brussels
24 Feb.: `Constitutional frameworks and speech freedom in relation to self-regulation of communications.'

D, LEONARDI
3 Mar.: `Printed media and self-regulation.'

PROFESSOR A. CAMPBELL, Georgetown
10 Mar.: `Theoretical approach to self-regulation.'

D. TAMBINI
17 Mar.: Overview and conclusions.


BRASENOSE COLLEGE

Edmund Croston Lectures 2003

Knowledge in the twenty-first century

Corrigendum

The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on the days shown in the St Cross Building. All members of the University are welcome to attend.

The lectures will be given on Tuesdays, and not on Thursdays, as incorrectly stated in the Gazette of 23 January (p. 675).

PROFESOR A. FOWLER, Edinburgh
4 Feb.: `Literary criticism.'

PROFESSOR ROGER CASHMORE
11 Feb.: `The physical sciences.'

DR M. BEARD, Cambridge
18 Feb.: `Classics.'

PROFESSOR JOHN GRAY, LSE
25 Feb.: `Political thought.'

PROFESSOR SIR MICHAEL ATIYAH, Cambridge
4 Mar.: `Mathematics.'


CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE

F.W. Bateson Memorial Lecture 2003

PROFESSOR L. COLLEY, London School of Economics and Political Science, will deliver the F.W. Bateson Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 12 February, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Perceiving low literature: the captivity narrative.'


LADY MARGARET HALL

Canada Seminars

THE HONOURABLE CLAIRE L'HEUREUX-DUBÉ, former Justice, Supreme Court of Canada, will speak at 5.15 p.m. on Tuesday, 4 February, in the Talbot Hall, Lady Margaret Hall. There will be an opportunity to meet the speaker informally afterwards. Enquiries should be directed to Vanessa Windsor, Lady Margaret Hall (telephone: Oxford (2)74302, e-mail: vanessa.windsor@lmh.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `Rights on trial: equality and the Canadian Charter of Rights.'


ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

Interests, identities, and interventions

Amended notice

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

Gen. Sir Hugh Beach will now speak in place of Lord Howell at the meeting on 4 February.

Conveners: Professor Archie Brown, Alan Duncan, MP, and Gordon Marsden, MP.

GEN. SIR HUGH BEACH, FELIPE FERNANDEZ-ARMESTO, and SIR MARRACK GOULDING
4 Feb.: `When is foreign military intervention justified?' (Chair: Gordon Marsden, MP)

H.E. GRIGORY KARASIN, Ambassador of the Russian Federation, DR ANDREI GRACHEV, Paris and Moscow, JOHN LLOYD, former Moscow correspondent, The Financial Times, and DR ALEX PRAVDA
11 Feb.: `Russian national identity and national interests.' (Chair: Professor Brown)

GLYN T. DAVIES, Deputy Head of Mission, American Embassy, London, CHARLES WHEELER, former Washingon correspondent, the BBC, and PROFESSOR HENRY SHUE
18 Feb.: `Is American unilateralism out of control?' (Chair: Alan Duncan, MP)

BARONESS SCOTLAND, QC, DOMINIC GRIEVE, MP, MRS ANN CRYER, MP, and DANIEL SNOWMAN
25 Feb.: `National identity and migration: pluses and minuses.' (Chair: Professor Brown)

LORD WRIGHT OF RICHMOND, ALAN DUNCAN, MP, ERNIE ROSS, MP, and PROFESSOR AVI SHLAIM
4 Mar.: `Shifting sands: Iraq and its neighbours.' (Chair: Gordon Marsden, MP)

THE RT. HON. MICHAEL PORTILLO, PC, MP, LORD OWEN, PC, and DR ANNE DEIGHTON
11 Mar.: `EU and NATO: cousins or rivals?' (Chair: Alan Duncan, MP)


ST HUGH'S COLLEGE

Middle Common Room

Truth, knowledge, power

The following lectures will be given at 5.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Maplethorpe Building, St Hugh's College. Further information may be obtained from William Jennings (e-mail: william.jennings@st-hughs.ox.ac.uk), or Ethan Sen (e-mail: ethan.sen@st- hughs.ox.ac.uk).

P. MYLREA, Manager of Oxfam's media operations
4 Feb.: `Global village or fortress? Media power and practice in an era of globalisation.'

A. DILNOT, Principal, St Hugh's College
11 Feb.: `Does counting matter? Knowledge, truth, and power in making public policy.'

DR H. WALLACE, Director, GeneWatch UK
18 Feb.: `Genetic predictions of our future health—whose knowledge in whose hands?'

PROFESSOR G. EBERS
25 Feb.: `Lessons from the decade of treatment trials in a virgin disease.'

DR M. GRAY, Director, National Electronic Library for Health
4 Mar.: `The three most important words for a doctor in the knowledge era—"I don't know".'

DR P.D. MCDONALD
11 Mar.: `Contagious power: J.M. Coetzee's Waiting for the Barbarians and the apartheid censors.'


TRINITY COLLEGE

Richard Hillary Lecture 2003

GRAHAM SWIFT will deliver the Richard Hillary Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 5 February, in the St Cross Building.

Subject: ` "I do like to be beside the seaside": the place of place in fiction.'


WOLFSON COLLEGE

Wolfson College Lectures 2003

History and fiction: celebrating the centenary of Sir Ronald Syme (1903–89)

The Wolfson College Lectures will be held at 6 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Hall, Wolfson College. The lectures are free of charge and open to the public.

PROFESSOR K. COLEMAN, Harvard
4 Feb.: ` "Truth severe, by fairy Fiction drest": reality and the Roman imagination.'

PROFESSOR R. HOLMES, Royal Military College of Science
11 Feb.: `War of words: describing the Great War.'

PROFESSOR K. HOPKINS, Cambridge
18 Feb.: `How to be a Roman emperor—an autobiography.'

PROFESSOR N.A.M. RODGER, University of Exeter
25 Feb.: `History repeated as fiction in the novels of Patrick O'Brian.'

JULIAN MITCHELL, novelist and dramatist
4 Mar.: ` "How many times shall Caesar bleed in sport": history and drama.'

DR M. GRIFFIN
11 Mar.: ` "Lifting the mask": Syme on fictional history.'


RIPON COLLEGE, CUDDESDON

Jaspers Lecture

THE REVD ANDREW SHANKS, York Diocese, will deliver the Jaspers Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 4 February, in the Examination Schools. The lecture will be followed by a reception in the Old Library, the University Church. Those interested in attending are asked to inform S. Farrant (telephone: Oxford 877404, e-mail: SFarrant@ripon-cuddesdon.ac.uk).

Subject: `The vocation of intellectuals.'


OXFORD MEDIEVAL SOCIETY

PROFESSOR J. LAWRANCE, Manchester, will lecture at 8.30 p.m. on Thursday, 6 February, in the Quarell Room, Exeter College.

Subject: `Representations of violence in fifteenth-century Spain.'


FRIENDS OF THE BODLEIAN

PROFESSOR JESSICA RAWSON will deliver a thirty-minute lecture at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, 4 March, in the Cecil Jackson Room, the Sheldonian Theatre. Admission is free. Wine and sandwiches will be served after the lecture, at a cost of £4 per person, for which bookings should be made in advance with Mrs P.M. Sturgis, Membership Secretary, Friends of the Bodleian, Bodleian Library, Oxford OX1 3BG (telephone: Oxford (2)77234, e-mail: pms@bodley.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `Tombs and universes: the Chinese view of the afterlife.'

Grants and Research Funding

SIR JOHN HICKS FUND

The Committee for the Sir John Hicks Fund invites applications from members of the University for grants towards the costs of research in economic history. Applications will be considered from undergraduates, graduate students, and members of academic staff, and may relate to research into the economic history of any period or country.

Applicants should (a) provide sufficient information about the general nature of their research to establish that it falls within the field of economic history; and (b) specify the precise nature and cost of the expenditure for which a grant is requested. They should also give the name of one referee who might be consulted by the committee.

It is intended by the committee that grants should normally be made for sums of up to £250, though this may on occasion be exceeded. Retrospective grants will be made only in exceptional circumstances.

The committee will consider applications twice in each year. The closing date for the first round is Monday of the third week of Hilary Term, and for the second round Monday of the third week of Trinity Term. Applications should be sent to Mrs E.A. Macallister, Secretary of the Committee for the Sir John Hicks Fund, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD.

Examinations and Boards

CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, and, where applicable, of the Humanities Board the following changes in regulations made by divisional and faculty boards will come into effect on 14 February.

1 Social Sciences Board

(a) Postgraduate Diploma in Diplomatic Studies

With Immediate effect

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 962, after l. 44, insert:

`Postgraduate Diploma in Diplomatic Studies

Ch.X, Sect XXII]

(i) General Regulations

1. The Area and Development Studies Committee shall have the power to grant Postgraduate Diplomas in Diplomatic Studies to candidates who have satisfied the conditions prescribed in this section and any further conditions which the committee may prescribe by regulation.

2. The examination for the Postgraduate Diploma shall be under the supervision of the Area and Development Studies Committee which shall have the power, subject to the approval of the Divisional Board, to make regulations governing the examination.

3. Candidates, whether members of the University or not, may be admitted as students for the Postgraduate Diploma under such conditions as the committee shall prescribe, provided that before admission to a course of study approved by the committee, candidates shall have satisfied the criteria laid down by the admitting body.

4. Any person who has been accepted as a candidate for the Postgraduate Diploma, and who has satisfactorily pursued the course prescribed by the committee, bay be admitted to the examination by the committee.

5. Every person who has been accepted as a candidate for the diploma shall be placed by the committee under the supervision of a member of the University or other competent person selected by the committee. It shall be the duty of the supervisor to direct and superintend the work of the candidate and to submit a report to the examiners on the candidate's work.

(ii) Special Regulations

1. Students for the diploma may hold that status for no more than six terms.

2. Each student will follow a course of study comprising four core courses. The four core courses are:

International Politics. Key concepts in international relations leading to central issues in world politics, with particular emphasis on change in the international system and the evolving role of diplomacy in consequence.

Economics. Basics of international trade theory and macroeconomics, focussing on such applied and political economy topics as trade liberalisation, globalisation, and international resource transfers.

International Law. Principles of international law and the processes of legal reasoning, and their application to current world problems ranging from the nature of international law to the use of force and conflict settlement.

Diplomatic Practice. Overview of different regions of the world, major international organisations, and current world problems as they affect diplomats. Review of practical aspects of diplomacy and their application to discussion of practical action by means of which governments can address these problems.

In addition, candidates will be required to submit a dissertation of between 10,000 and 12,000 words.

3. Examination for the diploma shall be under the supervision of the Area and Development Studies Committee, with the concurrence of the Social Sciences Board. The Area and Development Studies Committee shall have power to make regulations governing the examinations, which shall be by written examination and dissertation under such conditions as the committee may by regulation prescribe.

4. Examinations. Candidates will be required to take the same examinations as for the Certificate in Diplomatic Studies. However, for International Politics, International Law, and Economics, there will be two parts to the examination. Candidates for the Postgraduate Diploma are required to answer at least two questions from Part B. A candidate whose overall average falls below 60 shall be eligible to re-sit the failed elements during the following academic year. Compensation in one paper is allowed.

5. Candidates must follow, for at least two terms, a course of instruction in Diplomatic Studies.

6. Candidates are only eligible to be admitted to the Diploma in Diplomatic Studies if they have achieved a 2.1 standard. Admission to the Diploma will take place at the end of the first term in the year of study, on the basis of a transfer proposal and the first term's assessed written work, as approved by the admissions committee for the programme. The candidate must have achieved a 2.1 standard in the first term of study.

7. All material submitted for the dissertation shall be accompanied by a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that it is the candidate's own work.

8. Syllabus

I. Four core modules: International Politics, Economics, International Law, and Diplomatic Practice.

II. Each candidate will be required to present a dissertation of not more than 12,000 words, on a subject approved by the Area and Development Studies Graduate Studies Committee, to the Director of Studies, by 12 noon on Friday of sixth week of Trinity Term in the year in which he or she completes the course.

9. The examiners may award a distinction to candidates for the Diploma.

10. A candidate whose overall average mark falls below 60 shall be eligible to resit the failed elements on one occasion during the following academic year.

11. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners in the written examinations in all four of the core elements of the Certificate course, or who fail to submit a dissertation of the necessary standard will be eligible to resit on one occasion.'

2 Ibid., p. 1020, Conduct of Examinations, after entry relating to the Foundation Certificate in Modern History, insert:

`(xvii) Postgraduate Diploma in Diplomatic Studies

This is to certify that A. B. has pursued an approved course of study, and in [such a term and year] satisfied [or was adjudged worthy of distinction by] the examiners appointed by the University to examine in the subjects prescribed for the Postgraduate Diploma in Diplomatic Studies.

Signed on behalf of the Board of Examiners of the Area and Development Studies Committee.'


(b) Certificate in Diplomatic Studies

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 2002, immediately following the entry relating to the Postgraduate Diploma in Diplomatic Studies, insert:

`Certificate in Diplomatic Studies

(i) General Regulations

Ch. X, Sect. V]

1. The Area and Development Studies Committee shall have power to grant Certificates in Diplomatic Studies to candidates who have satisfied the conditions prescribed in this section and any further conditions which the committee may prescribe by regulation.

2. The examination for the Certificate in Diplomatic Studies shall be under the supervision of the Area and Development Studies Committee.

3. Any person who has been admitted to a course of study approved for this purpose by the Area and Development Studies Committee and accepted as a candidate for the certificate and who has satisfactorily pursued the course, may be admitted to the examination.

(ii) Special Regulations

2. Students for the certificate may hold that status for no more than six terms.

3. Each student will follow a course of study comprising four core courses. The four core courses are:

International Politics.

Economics.

International Law.

Diplomatic Practice.

4. Examinations. The examination for the Certificate shall be under the supervision of the Area and Development Studies Committee, with the concurrence of the Social Sciences Board. The Area and Development Studies Committee shall have power to make regulations governing the examinations and arrange lectures and courses of instruction of candidates for the certificate.

All candidates will be required to satisfy the examiners in four separate three-hour written examinations covering each of the core areas listed in the preceding paragraph demonstrating that they have mastered the substance of the subjects listed and (where appropriate), that they are able to apply them in their continuing professional careers in the international field.

5. The examiners may award a distinction to candidates for the certificate.

6. A candidate whose overall average mark falls below 50 shall be eligible to resit the failed elements during the following academic year.

7. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners in the written examinations in all four of the core elements of the Certificate course, will not be eligible to qualify for the Certificate.'

2 Ibid., p. 981, Appointment of Examiners, after l. 31, insert:

`From 1 October 2002:

9. Examiners for the Postgraduate Diploma in Diplomatic Studies and the Certificate in Diplomatic Studies shall serve for three years.'

and renumber existing items 9–17 as 10–18 respectively.

3 Ibid., p. 1020, Conduct of Examinations, after the entry relating to the Diploma in Diplomatic Studies, insert:

`(xviii) Certificate in Diplomatic Studies

This is to certify that A. B. has pursued an approved course of study, and in [such a term and year] satisfied [or was adjudged worthy of distinction by] the examiners appointed by the University to examine in the subjects prescribed for the Certificate in Diplomatic Studies.

Signed on behalf of the Board of Examiners of the Area and Development Studies Committee.'


(c) M.Sc. in Evidence-Based Social Work

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 671, after l. 38 insert:

`Evidence-Based Social Work             Social Sciences'.

2 Ibid., p. 710, after l. 27 insert:

`Evidence-Based Social Work

1. Candidates may only be admitted to the course if they have successfully obtained an honours degree to First Class or good Upper Second Class standard.

2. Candidates must follow for at least three terms a course of instruction in Evidence-Based Social Work, and will, when entering for the examination, be required to produce a certificate from their supervisor to that effect.

3. Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in the following:

i. A compulsory core paper, Evidence-based interventions;

ii. A compulsory Research Methods paper, for which students will be examined on the basis of a methods work book and an essay of up to 2,500 words;

iii. One Option paper;

iv. A thesis of not more than 10,000 words, describing the evaluation of a project on a topic decided jointly with, and approved by, the supervisor on behalf of the Department.

4. One copy of the Research Methods work book, and two printed or word-processed copies of the Research Methods essay must be delivered to the M.Sc. Examiners (Evidence-Based Social Work), c/o the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG, no later than 12 noon on Friday of Sixth Week of the Trinity Term in which the examination has been taken.

5. Two printed or word-processed copies of the thesis must be delivered to the M.Sc. examiners (Evidence-based Social work), c/o the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG, no later than noon on Monday of the second week in September of the year in which the examination has been taken.

6. A candidate who fails the examination may enter for one subsequent examination only, provided this is within six terms of his or her initial registration. A candidate who has attained a satisfactory mark in any one of the four components of the examination in 3 above will not be required to retake the component(s) concerned.

7. Each candidate must attend an oral examination when required to do so by the examiners.

8. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.

Schedule

(i) Evidence-Based Intervention (core course): Candidates will be expected to have a knowledge of major theories underlying evidence-based interventions. The course will introduce students to a comparative perspective and use exemplary intervention research studies to illustrate important theoretical, ethical, methodological, and practice issues.

(ii) Research Methods (core course): Candidates will be expected to have a knowledge of major quantitative and qualitative techniques, and research designs for understanding social problems and evaluating interventions. There will be a particular emphasis on the appraisal and design of randomised controlled trials for evaluating social interventions.

(iii) Option course: This will enable students to link evidence-based solutions to a range of social problems in their country of origin. Not every option will be offered in any one year, and applicants for admission will be advised of this. Areas from which options may be offered include: promoting the welfare of children and families; multi-cultural mental health interventions; substance misuse and offending; interventions in relation to HIV and AIDS; community work; refugees and asylum seekers; day care for young children and their families.'

3 Ibid., p. 980, after l. 14 insert `in Evidence-Based Social Work for three examinations;'.


2 Boards of the Faculties of Classics and English Language and Literature

Honour School of Classics and English

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 135, delete l. 39.

Colleges, Halls, and Societies

OBITUARIES

St Anne's College

ANNIE BARNES, MA, D.PHIL. (DR.PHIL. Berne), 17 January 2003; Lecturer in French 1947, Fellow and Tutor 1952–71; Reader 1966–71; Honorary Fellow 1971–2003. Aged 99.

DOROTHY MARY BEDNAROWSKA, MA (née Whitehead), 4 January 2003; Home-Student 1933–7, Lecturer in English 1946–54, Fellow and Tutor 1954–82, Emeritus Fellow 1982–2003. Aged 87.


St Edmund Hall

Notice

Philip Geddes Memorial Prizes 2003

The Philip Geddes Memorial Prizes are intended to encourage undergraduates who want to pursue a career in journalism by providing them with funds to be used in furtherance of their journalistic education and training. The Prizes were founded in memory of Philip Geddes, journalist and former member of St Edmund Hall, who was killed in the IRA bombing at Harrods in 1983.

In 2003, St Edmund Hall intends to award a prize to the value of £1,000.

Entries are therefore invited from members of the University who will, at the end of Trinity Term 2003, have completed their second year, and who have involved themselves in journalism (including radio and television) in the University and elsewhere. Candidates are required to submit four copies of the following: (i) examples of journalistic work completed during their period at the University, and (ii) a description of the journalistic project on which the candidate proposes to spend the award. The Prize will be judged by two practising journalists, one fellow of St Edmund Hall and one other senior member of the University.

Student journalists who specialise in sports writing will also be able to compete for the Clive Taylor Prize for Sports Writing. Thanks to a generous benefaction, a £1,000 special award in memory of the distinguished cricket writer Clive Taylor will be available.

Candidates should ask their tutor to write separately to Professor Richard Crampton at St Edmund Hall, certifying that the candidate's journalism has not interfered with academic work. They should also note that awards are made on condition that the successful candidates later submit a report (approximately 3,000 words), detailing the use to which their prize-money has been put.

Entries should reach Professor Richard Crampton at St Edmund Hall by midday on Wednesday of fourth week of Hilary Term. Envelopes should be clearly marked `The Philip Geddes Awards'. Sports entries should also include the word `Sport'.

Advertisements

Institute for the Advancement of University Learning

The Institute for the Advancement of University Learning (IAUL) conducts research into higher education and offers staff development and training opportunities to staff working in any capacity in the University. We are looking for 2 women members of the University's staff to take on roles as trainers on the Springboard programme. Springboard is a personal and professional development programme for women; 2 programmes are taking place during 2002/3. The role as trainer will require between 6 and 12 days per annum, which trainers could undertake as consultancy work or within their substantive University posts, subject ot departmental approval. You will have some experience as a trainer, and a commitment to women's–including your own–development. For further details including information on how to apply, please contact Hannah Boschen at the IAUL by e-mail: Hannah.Boschen@learning.ox.ac.uk or telephone 01865 (2)86818. The closing date for applications is 5 p.m. on Mon., 17 Mar., and interviews will be held on Thurs., 27 Mar.


Concerts

The Oxford Millennium Orchestra plays Music for Spring: Elgar's Serenade for Strings; Vaughan Williams' Five Mystical Songs; Rachmaninov's 2nd Symphony. Principal conductor, Nick Mumby; baritone, David Somerville Wright. Fri., 31 Jan., 8 p.m. Sheldonian Theatre. Tickets £12/£10, £5 available from the Oxford Playhouse, 01865 305305 or www.ticketsoxford.com.

Oxford Chamber Music Society concert at Holywell, Sun., 2 Feb., 2.45 p.m. Thomas Carroll (cello) and Carole Presley (piano) play Beethoven's Magic FluteVariations, Kodaly's sol sonata, Schumann's 5 Folk Pieces op. 102 and the Bridge Sonata (1913-17). Tickets from Oxford Playhouse, 01865 305305 or www.ticketsoxford.com: £13, seniors £11; at the door £14, £12; students/juniors £5, but some free Cavatina Trust tickets for 8–22 year-olds.


Pemberley International Study Centre

Situated 4,000 ft above sea-level in the magnificent hills of Haputale in Sri Lanka, in a tea plantation with panoramic views, the Centre provides an atmosphere of tranquillity and peace, a congenial milieu for scholars of all disciplines, writers and artists, in which research projects can be initiated or completed, and books or monographs planned and written. For 3 months in each year (June–Aug.) it is open to Residential Scholars who have been chosen on the basis of the merit of their applications by a Selection Committee of international experts in the field. For details and application forms, see the 8 pp. in colour on Pemberley's Web site: http://www.pemberleyhouse.com.


Art Exhibition

Elaine Brown paintings Mon., 20 Jan.,–Fri., 7 Feb. Wolfson College, Linton Road, Oxford OX2 6UD. Open daily 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Subject to college commitments. Visitors are advised to ring the lodge (01865) 274100 beforehand.


David Goldblatt in Conversation with Okwui Enwezor

The South African photographer talks to the Director of the recent Documenta 11and co-curator of the exhibition David Goldblatt: Fifty-One years at Modern Art Oxford, Tues. 4 Feb., 7.30 p.m. Admission is free but advance booking is recommended as places are limited. David Goldblatt: 51 Years, 1 Feb.,–30 March. Modern Art Oxford, 30 Pembroke Street, Oxford OX1 1BP. Tel.: 01865 722733. Web site: www.modernartoxford.org.uk.


Society for Graduates

Meetings are held on Fri., at 8 p.m. in Wadham College, Parks Road. Visitors are welcome. Graduates of any university and of all ages are eligible for membership (undergraduates welcome). 31 Jan.,: The badgers of Wytham Woods, Drs Chris Newman and Christina Buesching; 7 Feb.,: Homeopathy–Past, Present and Future, Dr Karima Brooke; 14 Feb.,: Print and Pomegranates–A history of Oxford University Press, Dr Martin Maw; 21 Feb..: 75 years of the Oxford Preservation Trust, Debbie Dance; 28 Feb.,: Manned Missions to Mars–closer than you think?!, Emily C. MacDonald; 7 Mar.,: Mind your language–international English for the 21st Century, Alison Haills; 14 Mar.,: RAF Falcons Parachute Display team, RAF Weston on the Green. Subscriptions: £5 per term, members; £1.50 per meeting, visitors.


Oxford Brookes University

Centre for Family and Household Research Spring seminar series: 27 Feb., Rosalind Edwards (South Bank University), Families and social capital (Research Centre, room SG05); 26 March, Floya Anthias (Oxford Brookes), Where do I belong? Narrating identity among young British Cypriots (Research Centre, room SG05). All seminars will begin at 5.30. Open seminars–all welcome.


Oxford University Newcomers' Club

The Club welcomes the wives and partners of visiting scholars, graduate students, and members of the University who are new to Oxford. It aims to offer help, advice, information, andthe opportunity to meet each other socially. Informal coffee mornings are held at 13, Norham Gardens every Wed., 10.30–12 noon. Other activities in the club room include the Craft Group, Book Group, and informal Conversation Group. Newcomers with children (0--4 years) meet every Fri. in term, 10.15 a.m.--12 noon. We organise tours of colleges and museums, visits to places of interest, country walks, and outings to gardens and antique shops. Secondhand items can be bought on Wed. mornings from the basement. Visit our Web site on www.ox.ac.uk/staff.

 


Oxford University Research Staff Society

The Research Staff Society (RSS) membership consists of Post- doctoral/Junior Research Fellows and Research Assistants who work for the University of Oxford. As most Research Staff are not attached to a college and may be new to Oxford our social events provide a unique opportunity to meet researchers outside your group or department. We aim to provide an interesting and varying social setting in which to mix and to become a voice for research staff within the University. We run social events each month to suit all tastes. Please visit our Web site http://users.ox.ac.uk/~rss/, which provides information on how to join the society as well as details on events which we will be running in the near future. We hope you will decide to join us and very much look forward to meeting you at one of our events this year.


Periodicals Bought and Sold

Back-issues of scholarly periodicals and journals bought and sold. Graham Jeffrey, Periodicals (est. 1967), 29 Cuddesdon Road, Horspath, Oxford, OX33 1JD. Tel.: 01865 872528, fax: 776398. E-mail: gjeffreysatu@aol.com.


Antiques Bought and Sold

Antiques and decorative objects bought and sold: desks and library furniture always wanted, also garden stonework. Please call: Greenway Antiques, 90 Corn Street, Witney, Oxon. Open Mon.,–Fri., 9.30 a.m.–5 p.m., Sat., 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Tel.: 01993 705026, mobile: 07831 585014.


Restoration and Conservation of Antique Furniture

John Hulme undertakes all aspects of restoration: 30 years experience; collection and delivery. For free advice, telephone or write to: The Workshop, 11A High Street, Chipping Norton, Oxon. OX7 5AD. Tel.: 01608 641692.

 


Services Offered

Oxford Academic Services: indexing, project management, history research projects. Details of all services: judith@history.u-net.com, or Judith Loades, P.O.Box 323, Burford, Oxon. OX18 4XN.

Painting, carpentry, building and design: small and medium sized projects undertaken, from shelving through kitchens to home extensions; decorating, internal and external; planning applications. Free advcie, quotations and references. Tel.: Ian on 01865 308188 or 07773 712829.

Big or small, we ship it all, plus free pick up anywhere in Oxford. Also 24-hour photocopying, private mailing addresses (24-hour access, and mail forwarding world-wide), binding, fax bureau, colour photocopying, mailing services, and much more. Contact or visit Mail Boxes Etc., 266 Banbury Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 514655, fax: 514656, e-mail: summertown@020.mbe.uk.com, also at: 94 London Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 741729, fax: 01865 742431, e-mail: staff@mbeheadington.co.uk.

Town and Country Trees: arboricultural contractors; modern arboricultural techniques; local authority approved; safeguarded by full Public Liability insurance. Free advice and quotations. Tel.: 0845 458 2980 or 07976 261850 (mobile).


Domestic Services

Blue House, a small, intimate nursery for children 2–5 years, established 10 years. Open Mon.–Fri., 8.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m., full or half-days. NNEB staff. All pre-school activities inc. numeracy and literacy skills to prepare children for school entry. Short-term vacancies for visiting academics. Call Kimberley for further information, or come to visit. Tel.: 01865 247877.

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: 01865 726983 or 01235 555533.


Tuition Offered

Piano lessons: experienced teacher; adults and children; all grades. Beginners welcome. contact Miss P. Read BA (Hons) L.R.A.M., near Kidlington. Tel.: 01865 331147.


Help Wanted

Can you scan? Author seeks occasional help to scan or type text from typescript into digital form (Word or similar) for Web site. Meagre rewards, rich job satisfaction. Please reply through www.richardwebster.net.


Situations Vacant

Translators and interpreters in all languages are required. Please send CV with clear reference to language skills and contact details to "P.O.Box 1140, East Oxford DO, Oxford OX4 4WP". For further information contact 07904 555739.

Felicity Bryan Limited Literary Agency: full-time Administrative assistant/Receptionist required for North Oxford company. We are looking for someone with good organisational abilities, computer skills, numeracy and a flexible approach to work, who would fit well into a small team and be willing to learn new skills. For full details of the vacancy please e-mail: agency@felicitybryan.com, tel. 01865 513816, or write to 2a North Parade, Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6LX.


Exchange Wanted

German boy, 16, seeks exchange with English counterpart of either sex, to improve English. Would like to come to Oxford for 2 weeks, second half of July/early Aug. Reverse visit to Nuremberg by arrangement. Contact: kevin.hilliard@spc.ox.ac.uk or tel.: 01865 278859.


House Sit

Responsible person, non-smoker, sought for North Oxford house from mid-March to late Apr. No rental but some charges for tel., and utilities. Tel.: 01865 553617 (after 8 p.m. or weekends).


Houses to Let

Beautiful Grade I listed 1-bedroom stone stable conversion in Wytham, with views over Wytham Woods and Wytham Abbey. Ideal for academic wanting quiet location but swift access to Oxford. Available fully furnished and ready for immediate occupation for long term. For more information please contact Julia at Finders Keepers on 00 44 (0) 1865 302344 or visit our Web site at www.finders.co.uk.

1908 family house (furnished) for let Apr.,–Aug.: 2 reception rooms (piano), large kitchen/dining room, utility room (washing machine, dishwasher), 3 bedrooms plus study/bedroom. Garden and parking; 15 minutes cycle/bus to city centre. £1,000 p.m. Contact: 01865 739070.

North Oxford , Banbury Road, OX2 7RG: fully-furnished, spacious 4-bedroom semi-detached house; newly modernised and decorated; very good condition; large luxury fitted kitchen and dining room; living room; children's playroom; bathroom; 2 toilets; front and good-size back garden; d.g., gas c.h.; washing machine and drier; dishwasher; piano. Off-road parking. Within excellent schools catchment area, frequent bus services, 10 minutes' walk to Summertown, local banks and shops. Available from end March for 1 year. £1,250 plus bills and council tax. Non-smoking professional families by reference. No pets. Tel.: 01865 559490 (eves.), 01865 274576 (day) or e-mail: roger.goodman@sant.ox.ac.uk.

Superb, modern, architect-designed house in residential North Oxford. Easy access to city centre (several bus routes, or walk along road or canal). Easily looked- after garden, has feeling of being out in the country. Very large kitchen/dining room; large living room upstairs, to take advantage of view over large green open space. Modern furniture, fully equipped. Central heating. Available Apr.–Aug. Non-smokers and no children preferred. E-mail: l.lyons1@physics.ox.ac.uk, or message to: Dr L. L. Lyons at Jesus College, Oxford OX1 3DW.

An Englishman's home is his castle---so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or e-mail us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: 01865 764533, fax: 764777, e-mail: info@qbman.co.uk.


Easter Let

North Oxford , to let Easter break: large house with large west-facing garden. Easy access to city centre and Summertown shops. On an excellent bus route. Fully equipped kichen breakfast room; utility with washing machine and tumble drier; 2 bathrooms including a shower; 2 large reception rooms, study and 4 bedrooms. £700 p.w. Available from 30 Mar.,–22 Apr. Contact 01865 513688 or e-mail: dianecw25@hotmail.com.


Summer Let

Spacious 6-bedroom (sleeps 10), 2-bathroom fully-equipped house on 4 floors with garden backing onto canal and overlooking fields, available July–Sept. Near city centre and colleges. Off-road parking. £590 p.w. Tel.: 01865 288123 or e- mail: david.harper@regents.ox.ac.uk.


Flats to Let

Rural retreat for one: a well-presented self-contained 1-bedroom flat above a farmhouse, situated between Stanton St John and Worminghall. Accommodation comprises of living room, equipped kitchen, double bedroom and bathroom. Fully furnished. Available now at only £495 p.m. For more information please contact Anna Turner at Finders Keepers, 27 St Clements, Oxford OX1 4AB. Tel.: 01865 200012 or e-mail: annat@finders.co.uk or visit our Web site: www.finders.co.uk.


Serviced Accommodation

Finally! the luxurious and economical alternative to 5-star luxury hotels, in central Oxford. Ambassador's Oxford offers clients short-stay 2-bedroom, 2 bathroom–1 en suite–5-star apartments in the centre of Oxford with allocated parking. Only 3 minutes' walk from the railway station and the Saïd Business School. Furnished to a very high standard to include well-equipped kitchen and lounge, computer, printer, internet access, and weekly Maid Service. From less than £100 per apartment per night, to accommodate up to 4/5 guests. Contact: www.ambassadorsoxford.co.uk, or tel.: 07876 203378.

Serviced and short let luxury apartments are now available in central Jericho with waterfront location, private balconies, designer furnishings, fully equipped with the option of ISDN lines, televisions, stereos, cable connections and full services. Ideal if visiting Oxford for a short break or visiting family, as well as business trips and corporate stop-overs. The apartments are well located with private secure parking, within easy walking distance to Oxford City Centre's leisure and social facilities, as well as Jericho's restaurants and boutiques. For more information about availability and individual rates please contact Finders Keepers at 226 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BP. Tel.: 00 44 (0) 1865 311011 or view our full list of available properties on our Web site at: www.finders.co.uk.


Accommodation Offered

Paying guests, visiting academics, welcomed for short or long stays in the comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple, in exclusive, quiet, leafy central north Oxford, within walking distance of all main university buildings, town centre, parks, river, good shops, and restaurants. All rooms have colour TV, tea-/coffee-making facilities, microwave, and refrigerator and/or deep-freeze availability, c.h., and independent heating. Breakfast included in the very moderate terms. Tel./fax: 01865 557879.


Accommodation Sought

American male academic (non-smoker), taking up a visiting fellowship at Oxford Brookes, seeks self-contained accommodation for the period 1 Apr.–20 May, within cycling distance of the Bodleian Library. E-mail: ottenhoff@alma.edu or ring 01865 425982.

Academic family (visiting fellows from Germany with 2 children) seek 2- or 3-bedroom flat/house to rent short term from 25 Apr.,–20 July. Central location or South Oxfordshire, up to £1,000 p.c.m. Contact Prof. M. Havenith-Newen, e-mail: martina.havenith@ruhr-uni-bochum.de, or Dr Albert Newen on 0049 4221 9160 222.

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us: 01865 764533, fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk. Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.

College & County, a new letting agency, require high quality properties for clients within the academic world in Oxford. Please contact Mark on 01865 722277 or call in at the office at 116b Cowley Road.


Holiday Lets

Tuscany: "Corzano & Paterno", a top award winning family run wine and cheese producing farm, half-hour south of Florence (Chianti), offers faithfully restored farmhouses and apartments for ren. Swimming pool. Contact Sibilla Gelpke (Wadham '01) at: corzpaterno@libero.it.

Sicily: house right on the sea. Photos at: http://David.Gourio.bei.t- online.de/VS_Sicily/Main_GB.htm. Price £450 incl. Bookings tel.: 01865 552876.

Las Alpujarras–Las Canadas: rustic cottage in olive terraces, mountain views, pool, 2 doubles and 1 twin, kitchen, dining , bath and living rooms; edge of village, 10 minutes drive to Ugijar market town. Car hire preferable. Tel.: 0034 958 851773 or e-mail: L.bond@wanadoo.es.

Winter/early spring breaks in cosy north Pembrokeshire coast cottage. Books to read and paths to walk. Find a glowing fire and freshly made bara brith on arrival! £120 p.w., shorter periods negotiable. Accessible by public transport. Tel.: 01348 872080.

Dordogne–France: charming restored stone cottage hidden on a hillside close to the famous Chateau of Beynac. Large living room, newly equipped kitchen/dining room both 5x5 m., 2 bedrooms, 1 new bathroom, utility room. Large independent studio giving onto private swimming pool, 12x5 m. Access to 3½ hectares of private land. Available June, £500 p.w., mid-July–end Aug. £800 p.w. Contact Barbara Emerson on 01235 553944 or e-mail: barbaracemerson@yahoo.co.uk.

Crete. A traditional Cretan house in old town Rethimno, superbly renovated to provide space and comfort in beautifully furnished surroundings. Elevated, vine- covered, sitting area with brick barbecue—perfect for alfresco dining. It is in a quiet area, and close to long, sandy beach, taverns, shops, and the many interesting sights in and around this historic area. Sleeps 4 (1 double, 1 twin). Available all year round. All linen, electricity and cleaning inc. 2002 rates on request. Tel./fax: Nikolaos Glinias, 0030 831 56525, e-mail: nglynias@ret.forthnet.gr.

Flat to let on the Estoril coast in Portugal: lovely, large, fully furnished Duplex; 3 bedrooms, 2 living rooms, with garden and barbecue. All mod. cons. TV with Cable. Close to delightful beaches similar to the Cote d'Azur. Twenty minutes by car to Lisbon, 30 minutes to the Sintra-Cascais Natural Park. £250 p.w. until Easter. Tel.: 01865 769328, e-mail: julian@jdgross.fsworld.co.uk.

Umbria–near Perugia, easy reach of Assisi, Lake Trasimene, Orvieto. Restored farmhouse, own private valley, large swimming pool: 2 spacious flats sleeping 4 and 2, or can be combineds. £220–£710 p.w. depending on number of beds and season. For further details phone or fax 01865 390581.

Tuscany: family-owned wine estate, producing highly recognised wines, olive oil and cheese; offers ancient farmhouse and apartments accommodation 2 up to 12+. Secluded rural setting, half-hour central Flroence. Contact: tel/fax: (0039) 055 824 9120, e-mail: sulpoggio@bcc.tin.it.

Two farmhouse with pools to let in SW France; both stunningly situated, these sunny and luxurious properties reside in private and spacious grounds and offer good views; sleep 10 (4 in independent `granny' house) and 6 respectively. Suitable for superb holidays or longer stays. Further details on: www.hidden-sw-france.com, or contact Marion on 00 33 5 63 24 08 78/00 33 5 63 02 11 98, or e-mail: emailenquirie@hidden-sw- france.com.

Greek Island rentals: Skopelos, Alonissos and Skiathos: local villa specialist offers lovely villas, island houses and apartments available for rent. Town, country and seaside locations. Accommodation for 2–16 persons. Prices from GBP 100 p.p.p.w. For information see: www.holidayislands.com. E-mail: thalpos@otenet.gr, fax: 0030 4240 23057.


For Sale

Solid teak coffee table, hand crafted in Okinawa, modern in design, having 4 drawers with brass pendant handles. Dimensions: 152 cm long, 51 cm wide, 39.5 cm high. Excellent condition. £75. Tel.: 01865 247787, e-mail: emilie.savage- smith@orinst.ox.ac.uk.

Appointments

AREA AND DEVELOPMENT STUDIES COMMITTEE, QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

University Lecturership in Forced Migration

In association with St Cross College

Applications are invited for the above post at the Refugee Studies Centre, Queen Elizabeth House, Oxford University's International Development Centre, tenable from 1 October 2003. Applicants should have a doctorate, or equivalent, in anthropology and have conducted research on forced migration. The person appointed is expected to have teaching experience; an interest in the Middle Eastern region would be desirable. The post-holder will be expected to teach on the M.Sc. in Forced Migration, including an introductory course on research methods. Stipend according to age, on the lecturers' scale of £22,191–£42,900 per annum (current scales). It is expected that the successful candidate will be offered a fellowship by St Cross College.

Further particulars are available from http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/ or the QEH Web site, http://www2.qeh.ox.ac.uk/people/va cancies.html, and from the Administrator, Queen Elizabeth House, 21 St Giles', Oxford OX1 3LA (telephone: Oxford (2)73599, e-mail: sarah.abbott@qeh.ox.ac.uk), to whom completed applications with a curriculum vitae and the names and addresses of three referees (eight copies or one if airmailing) should be sent by Friday, 28 February.


FACULTY OF THEOLOGY

Postdoctoral Research Assistantships in New Testament Studies

Applications are sought for one or two three-year postdoctoral research assistant positions working on a project funded by the AHRB under its Resource Enhancement scheme. The aim of the project is to provide critical editions of and introductions to a number of early Christian non-canonical gospel texts. The candidates will be working with Professor Christopher Tuckett and will be based in the Theology Faculty Centre.

The successful candidates should have a proven track record of independent research, preferably with a doctorate in the area of New Testament studies or a related field, with a good knowledge of Greek. Knowledge of Coptic would be an advantage but is not essential. The posts will be on the RS1A scale, in the range £18,265–£27,339, depending on age and experience.

Further particulars can be found on the Theology Web site, http://www.theology.ox.ac.uk. Informal enquiries may be directed to Professor Christopher Tuckett, Faculty of Theology (e-mail: christopher.tuckett@theology.ox.ac.uk ).

Applications should be submitted in triplicate to Dr Karen Bell, 34 St Giles', Oxford OX1 3LH, before 28 February. Interviews will be held in March with a start date of 1 April. Applicants should give the names of two referees who may be approached for references.


GRADUATE STUDIES OFFICE

Appointment of Assistant Graduate Admissions and Studies Officer (two-year fixed-term post)

A vacancy exists for an enthusiastic and well-organised graduate (or equivalent) with significant administrative experience in higher education to work as an Assistant Graduate Admissions Officer in the Student Administration section of the University Offices.

The Graduate Admissions Office is part of the Graduate Studies Office and deals with all applications to the University for admissions for graduate study. Some 50,000 enquiries and almost 9,000 applications were processed for 2002–3. The main responsibility of the Assistant Officer will be the day-to-day management of the six clerical staff in the office (including the updating of literature and liaison on a regular basis with colleges, departments, and sponsoring agencies). Liaison on matters of policy will be with the Graduate Admissions Officer, who is to be seconded to the Isidore (student information system) project for the period of this appointment. The post-holder will report to the Graduate Studies Officer, for whom he/she will also deputise as necessary. Duties may also include assisting with a variety of matters in the Graduate Studies Office, such as the administration of the annual AHRB graduate studentships competition.

The successful candidate will have experience of staff management, preferably in the context of organisational change; be able to acquire, within the minimum amount of time, a detailed knowledge of the graduate admissions process; be articulate in writing and speech; have a proven ability to deal professionally with a wide range of people, and have experience of working in a diverse team. The post will be on the academic related grade 2 scale (salary in the range £21,125–£27,339).

Further information may be obtained by telephoning the Graduate Studies Office (Oxford (2)70047). Applications should be made in writing with a full curriculum vitae, the names and addresses of two referees, and a day-time telephone number, to Ms J.M. Williams, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD, by noon on 21 February. Candidates should explain in their letters of application their interest in and relevant experience for this job.


CHRIST CHURCH

Appointment of Assistant Computing Officer (part-time)

Christ Church wishes to appoint an Assistant Computing Officer to support all aspects of IT within the college. This is a part-time post (twenty-one hours per week).

Candidates should have some technical knowledge of Microsoft Office products and their support as well as Windows-based desktop operating systems. They should also have the ability to deal with a wide variety of people with varied skill levels and the ability to learn and adapt quickly to new technologies. The post is offered on a six-month contract on the university research staff 1 (b) scale (salary £18,265, pro rata at 60 per cent). Further details, including application procedure, may be obtained from the Censors' Administrator, Christ Church, Oxford OX1 1DP, and will be available at http://www.chch.ox.ac.uk/jobs. The closing date for applications is 10 February.

Christ Church is an equal opportunities employer.


JESUS COLLEGE

Lecturership and Senior Research Fellowship in Inorganic Chemistry

Jesus College proposes to appoint a Lecturer and Senior Research Fellow in Inorganic Chemistry with effect from 1 October 2003 for a period of three years in the first instance (with the possibility of an extension for a further two years). The lecturership would carry a teaching commitment for the college of up to six hours per week during full term. The successful applicant would have responsibility for Inorganic Chemistry teaching in the college, and would be a member of the governing body. The salary package is in the region of £10,000 per annum.

Further particulars may be obtained from the Senior Tutor, Jesus College (telephone: Oxford (2)79720, e-mail: dprice@jesus.ox.ac.uk), or may be accessed via the college's Web page, http://www.jesus.ox.ac.uk. Applications, with a curriculum vitae and the names of three referees, should reach the Senior Tutor, Jesus College, Oxford OX1 3DW, not later than 17 February. Referees should be asked to write directly to the Senior Tutor by the same date. Applicants are also requested to inform their referees that, under the 1998 Data Protection Act, the references they provide will be regarded as disclosable to the subject of the reference unless marked `strictly confidential'. This instruction must appear on the letter of reference itself and not just on the envelope in which the letter is contained. Applications should not be made by e-mail. Short-listed candidates will receive one week's notice of interview which will be held on 28 February.


KEBLE COLLEGE AND TRINITY COLLEGE

Joint Stipendiary Lecturership in German

Keble College and Trinity College jointly invite applications from men and women for a Lecturership in German for the academic year 2003–4. The starting date will be 1 October 2003. The successful candidate will be expected to teach an average of ten hours per week (roughly two-thirds of the time being devoted to Keble undergraduates and one-third to Trinity undergraduates).

The lecturer will be responsible for the teaching of undergraduates reading German either as a single subject, or with another Modern Language, or with Classics, English, History, or Philosophy. The lecturer will be required to teach language classes and to supervise the oral tuition offered by the German Lektor. The lecturer will also be required to offer teaching for a substantial number of literary topics from the period 1730 to the present. In addition to teaching duties, the lecturer will be expected to set and mark college examinations, to participate in admissions and in the routine administration of German in collaboration with colleagues in other languages in the two colleges, and to assist in the pastoral care of undergraduates reading German.

The post might suit someone who is about to complete or has recently completed a doctoral thesis. There is no age limit for applicants. The salary is on a scale £14,371–£17,684. The lecturer will be offered certain dining rights in both colleges and a teaching room in Keble College.

Further details are available from the Senior Tutor, Keble College, Oxford OX1 3PG. Letters of application should include a statement of the candidate's research interests and teaching experience, and an indication of those parts of the syllabus the candidate would be willing and able to teach, as well as a curriculum vitae and the names of two referees. Candidates should ask their referees to write directly to the Senior Tutor. Letters of application and references should reach the Senior Tutor of Keble College by Thursday, 20 February.


LINCOLN COLLEGE

Appointment of Archivist

Lincoln College is seeking to appoint an Archivist. The records of the archive reflect the history of the college, spanning five centuries, and include the original founding charter of 1427, manorial records, accounts, and deeds. More modern papers include college societies' memorabilia, photographs, and the papers of Sir Osbert Lancaster. The Archivist will be responsible for managing all aspects of the archive, including acquisitions, access, cataloguing, and storage. This includes facilitating access to the collections, answering enquiries, and promoting the archive through exhibitions, articles, and presentations as required.

The successful applicant will have an honours degree and a postgraduate qualification in archive administration and records management, together with at least two years' experience in archive work. The appointment will be for one day per week, on the senior librarian, administrative, and computer staff grade 2 scale, starting at £21,125 (pro rata).

A job description may be obtained from Mrs F.M. Piddock, Lincoln College, Oxford OX1 3DR (telephone: Oxford (2)79831, e-mail: library@lincoln.ox.ac.uk). Applicants should send a curriculum vitae and letter of application together with the names of two referees to Mrs Piddock at the above address. The closing date for the receipt of applications is 7 February.


MAGDALEN COLLEGE

Tutorial Fellowship in Pure Mathematics

Magdalen College proposes to elect with effect from 1 October 2003 a Fellow and Tutor in Pure Mathematics. The salary will be according to age on a scale up to £42,900 per annum. Additional college allowances are available. The fellowship is tenable with a titular University Lecturership (CUF) held in the Mathematical Institute which will be converted into a Stipendiary University post in October 2004.

Application forms and further information can be obtained from the President's Secretary, Magdalen College, Oxford OX1 4AU (telephone: Oxford (2)76101, e-mail: carolyn.tucker@magd.ox.ac.uk). The further particulars are also located on the college Web site, http://www.magd.ox.ac.uk. Candidates should send eight copies of completed applications, including full curricula vitae, and must ask three referees to send references to the President by the closing date of Friday, 4 April.

Magdalen College and the University are equal opportunities employers.


NEW COLLEGE

Reynolds Bequest—one-year non-renewable Graduate Scholarship

In accordance with the wishes of the donors and trustees of this bequest, New College proposes to offer a one-year graduate scholarship in Modern History or Ancient History from October 2003. It is envisaged that the applicant will be undertaking the Master of Studies degree in Modern History or Historical Research; in exceptional cases students who are within one year of completing their doctoral research will be considered for this scholarship.

The successful candidate will receive the financial equivalent of an AHRB studentship (£7,700 over the year) and the costs of Home/EU university and college fees will be met in full. The candidate will become a member of New College MCR, but there is no necessary assumption that s/he will be supervised by an historian within the college. The successful candidate will be offered the opportunity of renting a graduate room. It is assumed that candidates, who will be at the beginning of their graduate research, will also be applying to the AHRB or the ESRC for a one-year studentship.

After the closing date for applications a ranking order of candidates will be drawn up, and the highest ranking candidate on the list who proves unsuccessful in applying for these other graduate awards will be awarded the Reynolds Graduate Scholarship. A final decision may only be made after the announcement of the AHRB/ESRC awards in the late summer.

Applications, providing a curriculum vitae and a brief outline of proposed research, should be submitted to the College Secretary, New College, Oxford OX1 3BN, by Friday, 11 April. Candidates should arrange for two academic referees to send references on their behalf by the same date.


QUEEN'S COLLEGE

Lecturership in Philosophy

The governing body proposes to elect a suitably qualified candidate to a fixed-term Stipendiary Lecturership in Philosophy (with a competence in Ancient Philosophy) for five years only from 1 October 2003.

The lecturer will be required to teach six hours per week for the college, and be able in particular to teach (for the Final Honour Schools) Ethics, Plato's Republic and Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, and (for Mods and Prelims) Moral Philosophy and/or Logic.

He or she will be expected to share in the general arrangements of tuition for undergraduates studying philosophy and will be called on to take part in entrance and other examinations for the college. He or she will also be expected to pursue research in philosophy.

The basic stipend will be on a scale starting at £8,623 per annum, and the lecturer will have access to a shared teaching room and to other allowances. Further particulars may be obtained from the Academic Administrator, Queen's College, Oxford OX1 4AW (e-mail: particulars@queens.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for applications is 21 February.


ST HUGH'S COLLEGE

Graduate Scholarships

St Hugh's College is offering up to ten scholarships for research to graduates of any nationality from October 2003, each of £2,000 per annum and for a period not extending beyond their fee-paying status. Scholarships are offered in all subjects, including named scholarships in classics, modern languages, and theology.

Each graduate scholar will be entitled to a room in St Hugh's graduate accommodation for up to two years (i.e. the duration of their fee-paying or two years, whichever is shortest) at the standard charge, and to dine periodically at the high table.

Awards to applicants not already reading for a higher degree at Oxford will be conditional on their being accepted to do so by the relevant faculty board of the University.

Awards to applicants currently reading for a higher degree at Oxford will be conditional on permission being granted by their present college for migration to St Hugh's.

Further particulars of the scholarships and of the application procedure may be obtained from the Academic Administrator, St Hugh's College, Oxford OX2 6LE (e-mail: marie.mcallister@st-hughs.ox.ac.uk), who should receive applications by Friday, 14 February.


ST PETER'S COLLEGE

Tutorial Fellowship in Law

Applications are invited for the above post, which is tenable from 1 October 2003 in conjunction with a University Lecturership (CUF) in the Faculty of Law. The combined college and university salary will be according to age on a scale up to £42,900 at age forty-five. The successful applicant will be expected to offer teaching for the college in several core subjects drawn from the undergraduate syllabus.

Further particulars may be obtained from the College Secretary, St Peter's College, Oxford OX1 2DL (telephone: Oxford (2)78864, e-mail: olivia.henley@spc.ox.ac.uk), to whom applications should be sent by Wednesday, 26 February. Candidates should submit a concise curriculum vitae with details of teaching experience, research interests, and publications, and also the names of three referees, whom they should ask to write to the College Secretary by the same date.

Potential applicants are welcome to make informal contact with Catherine Redgwell, College Fellow and Tutor in Law, by telephone (Oxford (2)78906) or e-mail (catherine. redgwell@spc.ox.ac.uk).


Democracy 2500 Fellowship in Aegean Studies

Applications are invited from graduates under the age of thirty-five for a Junior Research Fellowship in Aegean Studies, tenable for two years from 1 October 2003. The duties of the fellow will be to carry out advanced study or research in Aegean Studies (ancient, medieval, modern), no particular field being specified.

Applications (six copies, except for overseas applicants who need send only one), including a full curriculum vitae and a summary not exceeding three hundred words of the proposed research, should be sent not later than Friday, 14 March, to the College Secretary, St Peter's College, Oxford OX1 2DL (telephone: Oxford (2)78864, e-mail: olivia.henley@spc.ox.ac.uk). Applicants should ask three referees to write direct to the college before the closing date.


Appointment of Assistant Registrar and Tutorial Secretary

St Peter's College wishes to appoint an efficient, enthusiastic person to undertake a broad range of administrative and secretarial tasks in its Academic Office, working as part of a small, friendly team. Responsibilities will include: the management of current student records and tuition payments, co-ordination of examination arrangements, and administration of degree ceremonies. The post involve frequent contact with academic staff, students, and visitors.

Essential qualities for the successful candidate are: good organisational and interpersonal skills, a high standard of accuracy, IT competence (including use of databases and spreadsheets), a willingness to learn new applications and to use personal initiative, and a flexible, good-humoured approach. Familiarity with the higher education sector would be an advantage.

The starting salary is in the range £15,053–£16,381 per annum, according to qualifications and experience, linked to the university clerical and library grade C4. The package includes six weeks' leave, free lunches, and optional membership of the Oxford Staff Pension Scheme and of the colleges' Healthcare Plan.

Further details are available from the College Secretary, St Peter's College, Oxford OX1 2DL (telephone: Oxford (2)78864, e-mail: olivia.henley@spc.ox.ac.uk), to whom a letter of application, together with a curriculum vitae and contact details for two work-related referees, should be sent by post by Monday, 17 February.


TRINITY COLLEGE

Fixed-Term Teaching Fellowship in English

Trinity College wishes to appoint a fixed-term Fellow in English with effect from 1 October 2003. He or she will be required to teach twelve hours per week for the college during full term and to play an active part in the organisation and development of English in the college. The appointment will be for a fixed period of three years with the possibility of renewal for a further two. The candidate must be willing to teach English Literature from 1740 to the present.

Applications should be sent to the Academic Administrator, Trinity College, Oxford OX1 3BH, by Friday, 28 February. Applicants should ask three referees to send confidential references direct to the Academic Administrator by the same date.

Further particulars, including details of stipend and other benefits and an equal opportunities monitoring form, may be obtained from the Trinity College Web site, http://www.trinity.ox.ac.uk, or from the Academic Administrator, Mrs Annabel Ownsworth (telephone: Oxford (2)79910, e-mail: annabel.ownsworth@tri.ox.ac.uk). Interviews will take place on 22 April.

Trinity College is an equal opportunities employer.


WADHAM COLLEGE

Stinton Scholarship 2003–4

The Stinton Scholarship is funded by the income from the Stinton bequest, a trust created in memory of Tom and Sylvia Stinton in 2002. The value of the scholarship is £1,750, which is tenable for one year only. It is open to applicants who have been accepted for graduate studies within the Division of Social Sciences, beginning October 2003, and by Wadham College. It is restricted to students who do not have fees paid by any other body.

The closing date is 20 August 2003. There is no application form. Applicants should send to the Registrar, Wadham College, OX1 3PN (or by e-mail: registrar@ wadh.ox.ac.uk):
(a) a letter of application;
(b) a curriculum vitae; and
(c) a research proposal for those proposing to do a research degree, or a statement of their interests for those proposing to do a taught course (neither should be more than 500 words).


Philip Wright Scholarship

The Philip Wright Scholarship is funded by income from the Philip Wright Fund, a trust fund established in 1874 for the award of scholarships and grants to students of Wadham College, subject to the stipulation that any recipient of any award must be an ex-student of the Manchester Grammar School. The college is offering a scholarship tenable for one year in the first instance and renewable for two further years, at Wadham College, to an applicant, who is a former pupil of Manchester Grammar School, and who intends to engage in graduate studies in any subject from October 2003, or has already been engaged in graduate studies at the University of Oxford. The scholarship is awarded on condition that the candidate is accepted by a faculty of the University of Oxford to take up graduate studies towards an advanced degree.

A successful applicant who is at present a student at another college will be required to migrate to Wadham College to take up the award.

The scholarship will pay university and college fees, and a maintenance grant of £7,500 a year. If the successful applicant is already in receipt of another studentship, such as from one of the UK funding councils, a scholarship of £1,750 will be offered. Single accommodation is available if required, either on the main college site or in the Merifield complex in north Oxford. Application forms are available from the Registrar, Wadham College, Oxford OX1 3PN (e-mail: registrar@ wadh.ox.ac.uk). All applications should be received by Friday, 24 May.


TRINITY COLLEGE

Fixed-Term Teaching Fellowship in English

Trinity College wishes to appoint a fixed-term Fellow in English with effect from 1 October 2003. He or she will be required to teach twelve hours per week for the college during full term and to play an active part in the organisation and development of English in the college. The appointment will be for a fixed period of three years with the possibility of renewal for a further two. The candidate must be willing to teach English Literature from 1740 to the present.

Applications should be sent to the Academic Administrator, Trinity College, Oxford OX1 3BH, by Friday, 28 February. Applicants should ask three referees to send confidential references direct to the Academic Administrator by the same date.

Further particulars, including details of stipend and other benefits and an equal opportunities monitoring form, may be obtained from the Trinity College Web site, http://www.trinity.ox.ac.uk, or from the Academic Administrator, Mrs Annabel Ownsworth (telephone: Oxford (2)79910, e-mail: annabel.ownsworth@tri.ox.ac.uk). Interviews will take place on 22 April.

Trinity College is an equal opportunities employer.

Diary

Institute for the Advancement of University Learning Seminars: places should be booked in advance through the IAUL (telephone: (2)86808, e-mail: services@learning.ox.ac.uk, Internet: http://www.learning.ox.ac.uk).


Friday 31 January

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Minutes and agendas—an advanced programme', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

DR K. MAYNARD: `The vicissitudes of Kedjem "traditional doctors" and an ambivalent clientele in Cameroon' (Ethnicity and Identity Seminar: `The identities of medical practitioners and traditional healers'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

COMPUTING SERVICES courses: `Computing for the terrified', OUCS, 9.15 a.m.–12.15 p.m., and `Teaching and/with the Web', OUCS, 12.30–1.30 p.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk (Gertrud Seidmann, FSA): `A new acquisition: the Seal of Sir Joshua Reynolds', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

S. FEUCHTWANG: `Images of sub-humanity and their realisation' (Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology Departmental Seminar), ISCA, 4 p.m.

PROFESSOR QUENTIN SKINNER: `The rights and liberties of subjects' (Ford's Lectures in British History: `Freedom, representation, and revolution, 1603–51'), Schools, 5 p.m.

SAM YOUNGER: `The role of the Electoral Commission' (seminar series: `British government and politics'), Lecture Room XI, Brasenose, 5 p.m.

M. WIEVIORKA: `La République et la violence' (lecture), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.


Sunday 2 February

THE REVD OLIVER O'DONOVAN: `Judgement in action: the act of judgement (Hymn 388: "Jesus shall reign where'er the sun")' (Bampton Lectures: `The ways of judgement: action and institution'), St Mary's, 10 a.m.


Monday 3 February

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Recruitment and selection for administrators' (day 1), 9.30 a.m., and `Pre-retirement programme', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

DR M. BONACCORSO: `Programmes of gamete donation: strategies (in private clinics) of assisted conception' (Fertility and Reproduction Seminars: `Reproductive technologies'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

COMPUTING SERVICES courses: `E-mail and Web browsing on Linux', and `Full text to your desktop: introduction to e-journals', OUCS, 12.30–1.30 p.m.

J. MANTON: `Missionary leprosy control: ideologies and practices in Ogoja Province, Nigeria, 1944–8' (seminar series: `Ridding the Empire of leprosy: a grand undertaking and its legacy'), Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 2.15 p.m.

SIMON JENKINS and SIR ALAN BAILEY: `The imperial Treasury' (seminar series: `Labour's undetected constitutional changes'), Summer Common Room, Magdalen, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR I. HARGREAVES: `Lost in media-space: how science failed the communications test' (Green College Lectures: `Science and the media: the challenge of adapting science to the mass media'), Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 6 p.m.


Tuesday 4 February

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Recruitment and selection for administrators' (day 2), 9.30 a.m., and `Small group teaching' (second meeting), 12.15 p.m. (see information above).

BATE COLLECTION OF MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS event: `Face the Music I—Handel and his musical world', 1–1.45 p.m. (Opening of Handel Exhibition, with brief talk about the current conservation programme and tour of highlights of the collection. Booking necessary: tel. (2)76139.)

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Dutch still life painting', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

GEN. SIR HUGH BEACH, FELIPE FERNANDEZ-ARMESTO, and SIR MARRACK GOULDING: `When is foreign military intervention justified?' (seminar series: `Interests, identities, and interventions'), Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

MICHAEL HOLROYD: `The search for nobility in literary biography' (lecture series: `Biographers at work'), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

DR M. EVANS: `Lessons from the New Deal for Lone Parents—where should policy go next?' (seminar series: `Current issues in social policy'), Violet Butler Seminar Room, Department of Social Policy and Social Work, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR A. FOWLER: `Knowledge in the twenty-first century: literary criticism' (Edmund Croston Lectures), St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

V. SCHEID: `Chinese medicine in Britain' (Medical Anthropology Research Seminars: `Complementary and alternative medicines: anthropological perspectives'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 5 p.m.

G. OLWAGE: `Homemade hegemonies: Victorian choralism as a discipline' (Graduate Colloquia), Denis Arnold Hall, Music Faculty, 5.15 p.m. (open to the public).

BARRY COX (News International Visiting Professor of Broadcast Media): `The reformation of the BBC' (News International Broadcast Media Lectures: ` "It's TV, Jim, but not as we know it"—British television in the digital era'), Exeter, 5.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR K. COLEMAN: ` "Truth severe, by fairy Fiction drest": reality and the Roman imagination' (Wolfson College Lectures: `History and fiction: celebrating the centenary of Sir Ronald Syme (1903–89)'), the Hall, Wolfson, 6 p.m. (open to the public).


Wednesday 5 February

COMPUTING SERVICES course: `Creating information architectures for the development of Forced Migration online' (Marilyn Deegan), OUCS, 1–1.45 p.m.

ORGAN RECITAL: Clive Driskill-Smith, the chapel, Queen's, 1.10 p.m. (admission free; retiring collection).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM introductory gallery talk: `Furniture', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Descriptive statistics for research—statistical inference', 3 p.m. (see information above).

PROFESSOR ERNST VAN DE WETERING: `How to be a connoisseur in the seventeenth century' (Slade Lectures: `Reconstructing Rembrandt—questions and answers in recent research'), Lecture Hall, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m. (open to the public).

GRAHAM SWIFT: ` "I do like to be beside the seaside": the place of place in fiction' (Richard Hillary Lecture), St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

O. BAKEWELL: `Finding durable but non-permanent solutions to a protracted refugee situation: the case of Angolan refugees in Zambia' (Seminars in Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. HARVEY: `The new imperialism' (Clarendon Lectures in Geography: `Geopolitics and the new imperialism'), School of Geography and the Environment, 5 p.m. (open to the public).

A. BÉCHERAND: `L'Alsace, une région française pas comme les autres' (lecture), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

K. LASS: `Truth and the media' (discussion series: `In search of God'), University Church (Radcliffe Square entrance), 7 p.m.

DR C. ANGIER: `Primo Levi and the problems of biography' (David Patterson Seminars), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor, 8 p.m.


Thursday 6 February

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Handling conflict', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

COMPUTING SERVICES courses: `Services provided by OTA and AHDS', OUCS, 12.30–1.30 p.m., and Unix Systems Administration Seminar, OUCS, 12.45–1.45 p.m.

DR L. NIXON: `Mothers and daughters inside and outside the ancient Greek city: the cults of Demeter and Kore' (International Gender Studies Centre seminars: `Gender and religions: sacralising time and space'), Blackhall Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

M. LIESERACH: `An Englishman's reactions to the Napoleonic wars: J.M.W. Turner' (seminar series: `Britain and the war with Napoleon'), Maison Française, 2.15 p.m.

CHRIST CHURCH PICTURE GALLERY guided tour: `Landscape drawings', 2.15 p.m. (booking not required).

PROFESSOR A. MENTKOWSKI: `Learning that lasts: what is it? How does it happen? How do we know?' (Institute for the Advancement of University Learning: Research Seminars), Littlegate House, 4 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. GRAY: `Liberalism' (seminar series: `British political history in the twentieth century'), Lecture Room XI, Brasenose, 5 p.m.

G. GRUNBERG: `The Left/Right cleavage structuring French politics: can it resist the extreme right populist challenge?' (West European Seminar: `Populism, the extreme right, and the crisis of representation in Western Europe'), Maison Française, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. HARVEY: `Imperialism as uneven geographical development' (Clarendon Lectures in Geography: `Geopolitics and the new imperialism'), School of Geography and the Environment, 5 p.m. (open to the public).

PROFESSOR K.R. JAMISON: `Moods and the imagination' (Litchfield Lecture), Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 5.15 p.m.

DR B. BOARDMAN: `Lessons from transforming the cold market' (Linacre Lectures: `Designing successful environmental policies'), Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building, 5.30 p.m.


Friday 7 February

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Reitlinger, the collector', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

PROFESSOR G. BUIJS: `Sexual orientation and gender identity among Zulu diviners' (Ethnicity and Identity Seminar: `The identities of medical practitioners and traditional healers'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

COMPUTING SERVICES course: `Website building blocks I: HTML', OUCS, 12.30–1.30 p.m.

W. JAMES: `Different kinds of writing: anthropology's essentials' (Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology Departmental Seminar), ISCA, 4 p.m.

PROFESSOR QUENTIN SKINNER: `Parliament and the representation of the people' (Ford's Lectures in British History: `Freedom, representation, and revolution, 1603–51'), Schools, 5 p.m.

ANDREW ADONIS: `Advising the Prime Minister' (seminar series: `British government and politics'), Lecture Room XI, Brasenose, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. HARVEY: `Accumulation by dispossession' (Clarendon Lectures in Geography: `Geopolitics and the new imperialism'), School of Geography and the Environment, 5 p.m. (open to the public).

H. LE BRAS: `L'adieu aux masses ou les nouvelles tendances de la démographie européenne' (lecture), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.


Saturday 8 February

OPERA SEICENTO: Giovanni Legrenzi Festival I—`Revival of the seventeenth- century oratorio Il Sedecia', Holywell Music Room, 8 p.m. (tickets from the Oxford Playhouse, tel. 305305, or at the door).


Sunday 9 February

THE REVD OLIVER O'DONOVAN: `Judgement in action: political judgement (Hymn 490: "Judge eternal, throned in splendour")' (Bampton Lectures: `The ways of judgement: action and institution'), St Mary's, 10 a.m.