Oxford University Gazette: 3 October 2002

Oxford University Gazette, Vol. 133, No. 4633: 3 October 2002

The following supplement was published with this Gazette: Institute for the Advancement of University Learning: seminars and courses 2002-3. Details may be found at the IAUL site.

University Acts

DIVISIONAL AND FACULTY BOARDS

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 18 October, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

University Agenda

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • *CONGREGATION 8 October 12 noon
    • *1 Oration by the Vice-Chancellor
    • *2 Admission of Pro-Vice-Chancellors
    • *3 Admission of Clerks of the Market
  • *CONGREGATION 15 October 2 p.m.
    • *1 Voting on Resolution approving expenditure from the Higher Studies Fund
    • *2 Voting on Resolution allocating space for the Oxford Centre for the Environment
    • *3 Voting on Statute
  • * Note on procedures in Congregation
  • * List of forthcoming Degree Days
  • * List of forthcoming Matriculation Ceremonies

 

Notices

CONFERMENT OF THE TITLE OF VISITING PROFESSOR

The Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board has conferred the title of Visiting Professor in Physical and Theoretical Chemistry upon DR JEFFREY PENFOLD, Group Leader of Large Scale Structures, ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, CLRC, for a period of three years from 1 October 2002.


STAFF COUNSELLING

Counselling is available for university staff who are experiencing distress or other difficulties either as a result of work-related problems, such as stress arising from organisational changes at work, or from non-work related problems which are affecting an individual's ability to work effectively. The service is co-ordinated by the University Occupational Health Service (UOHS) and is completely confidential.

Access to the counselling service is via the UOHS and individuals may refer themselves to the UOHS, or (with their consent) be referred to by their manager or supervisor. They will be seen initially by one of the Occupational Physicians or Occupational Health Advisers, who can then refer them to a counsellor from a panel of external, independent, qualified and experienced counsellors. The staff of the UOHS will not have access to any information given to the counsellor. Information about individuals held by the UOHS is confidential unless the individual concerned has given written consent otherwise.

This new university staff counselling service is separate from the University's student counselling service. For more information or to make an appointment telephone (2)82676 or e-mail the UOHS at enquiries@uohs.ox.ac.uk


LIBRARY OF THE HOUSE OF ST GREGORY AND ST MACRINA

This library, at 1 Canterbury Road, contains books and periodicals on the Eastern Churches, and is open on Wednesdays, 2–5 p.m., during full term, or by appointment with the librarian, The Revd Stephen Platt (telephone: Oxford 552991).


MAISON FRANÇAISE

Bibliothèque

The library at the Maison Française d'Oxford is a study and information centre for students of French and for all those interested in French culture and society.

It has a wide range of books (42,800 volumes) in history, literature, social sciences, and other fields, as well as back issues of periodicals (including Le Monde and Libération), a selection of videos (300), cassettes, and records. The social sciences section is currently being expanded.

Every is welcome to join the library and take advantage of its resources.

Opening hours: Monday–Friday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.–1 p.m.

Subscription free except for videos: £20 for the academic year (September–July). Maison Française d'Oxford, Norham Road, Oxford OX2 6SE (telephone: Oxford (2)74224).

Lectures

ROMANES LECTURE

THE RT. HON. THE LORD BINGHAM OF CORNHILL, High Steward of the University, will deliver a Romanes Lecture at 5.45 p.m. on Tuesday, 15 October, in the Sheldonian Theatre.

Subject: `Personal freedom and the dilemma of democracies.'


SPEAKER'S LECTURES IN BIBLICAL STUDIES

Who speaks for God? The Bible, discernment, and contested truth

DR WALTER MOBERLY, Reader in Theology, University of Durham, will deliver the Speaker's Lectures at 11 a.m. on the following days in the Examination Schools.

Wed. 30 0ct.: `What is speech on God's behalf, and is it a meaningful and usable concept?'

Thur. 31 Oct.: `Searching for criteria of critical discernment: the voice of Jeremiah.'

Fri. 1 Nov.: `How might you recognise a true prophet? The story of Micaiah ben Imlah.'

Wed. 6 Nov.: `How might you recognise a true apostle? The testimony of Paul.'

Thur. 7 Nov.: `How does religious dogma open eyes, and how does it shut them?'

Fri. 8 Nov.: `Living dangerously: the demands of discernment.'

 

Dr Moberly will also give a seminar on `How appropriate is "monotheism" as a category for biblical interpretation' at 5 p.m. on Friday, 30 October, in the Harris Seminar Room, Oriel College.


WILDE LECTURES IN NATURAL AND COMPARATIVE RELIGION

Indic religions until 1200 AD: a critical and anthropological approach

GEOFFREY SAMUEL, Professor of Anthropology, University of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia, will deliver the Wilde Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination Schools.

Mon. 11 Nov.: `Beginnings and foundations: introduction—tracing back Ganesha.'

Tue. 12 Nov.: `Beginnings and foundations: the limits of our knowledge.'

Mon. 18 Nov.: `Brahmanical religion and its competitors: the world of the Yakshas.'

Tue. 19 Nov.: `Brahmanical religion and its competitors: the origins of the ascetic orders.'

Mon. 25 Nov.: `The age of the Guptas: the growth of the transcendental.'

Tue. 26 Nov.: `The age of the Guptas: wild goddesses and demon devotees.'

Mon. 2 Dec.: `The high period of Tantra: ritual technologies and the state.'

Tue. 3 Dec.: `The high period of Tantra: the privatisation of Tantra.'


HERBERT SPENCER LECTURES 2002

The future of education

The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Examination Schools. The lectures are open to the public.

DR J.T. BRUER, Director, James S. McDonnell Foundation
18 Oct.: `Neuroscience, cognitive science, and the rational basis of education.'

PROFESSOR J. LEDOUX, Centre for Neural Science, New York University
25 Oct.: `How our brains learn to be who we are.'

PROFESSOR M. COLE, Department of Psychology, University of California at San Diego
1 Nov.: `Cross-cultural and historical perspectives on the consequences of education.'

PROFESSOR C. HOYLES, Professor of Mathematics Education, Institute of Education, London
8 Nov.: `Cognitive and epistemological research aspects of mathematical learning.'

PROFESSOR H. GIROUX, Waterbury Chair Professor
15 Nov.: `Reclaiming higher education as a democratic public sphere: towards a politics of educated hope.'

PROFESSOR Y. ENGESTRÖM, Director of the Centre for Activity Theory and Developmental Work Research, University of Helsinki
22 Nov.: To be announced.


WEIDENFELD VISITING PROFESSOR IN EUROPEAN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE, MICHAELMAS TERM 2002

Love and death: Vienna, Wagner, and fin de siècle culture

DR NIKE WAGNER will lecture at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination Schools. Unless otherwise indicated, the lectures will be given on Tuesdays.

15 Oct.: `Historism in Vienna.'

Thur. 17 Oct.: `The political dreams of Theodor Herzl.'

22 Oct.: `The modernity of Richard Strauss.'

5 Nov.: `Artist and countess—the "ideal" couple.'

12 Nov.: `Schnitzler's "Casanova" and Hofmannsthal's "Marschalin" .'

19 Nov.: `Lulu and Lolita.'

26 Nov.: `The divided world of Winifred Wagner.'

3 Dec.: `Richard Wagner's posterity.'

 

Dr Wagner will also give seminars in November on dates to be arranged. The seminar topics will be:

 

1. `Thomas Mann and Richard Wagner.'

 

2. `Casanova and The Feldmarschallin.'

 

3. `Theodor Herzl's dreams.'

4. `The Jewish Question in Vienna: Schnitzler and Schoenberg.'


CLARENDON LECTURES IN MANAGEMENT STUDIES

Information and organisation

PROFESSOR BRUNO LATOUR, Centre de Sociologie de l'Innovation, Ecole Normale Supérieure des Mines, Paris, will deliver the Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies at 5 p.m. on the days shown in the Saïd Business School. The lectures will be open to the public.

Tue. 22 Oct.: `Four new uncertainties in the social sciences.'

Wed. 23 Oct.: `For a critique of pure reason.'

Thur. 24 Oct.: `The trouble with organisation.'


ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

Romantic Realignments

The following seminars will be held at 5.30 p.m. on the days shown in the Goodhart Seminar Room, University College. Further information may be obtained from Luisa Cale, University College (e-mail: luisa.cale@univ.ox.ac.uk).

DR J. MEE
Thur. 24 Oct.: `Blake, nation, and circulation: politics, poetry, and physiology.'

PROFESSOR M. FAVRET, Indiana
Thur. 21 Nov.: `Reading and writing in wartime.'

PROFESSOR M. JACOBUS, Cambridge
Tue. 3 Dec.: `Wordsorth and Winnicott.'


ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE, MUSIC, THEOLOGY

The Bible in art, music, and literature

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Danson Room, Trinity College.

Conveners: C.C. Rowland, MA, D.Phil., Dean Ireland's Professor of Exegesis of Holy Scripture, and C.E. Joynes, MA, M.St., D.Phil., Bampton Fellow in Theology, Trinity College.

PROFESSOR ROWLAND
21 Oct.: `William Blake and Merkavah mysticism.'

DR D. BIRCH
4 Nov.: `Ruskin and the Bible.'

DR O. REES
18 Nov.: `The composer as exegete? Case studies from Seville.'

SR. MARY CHARLES MURRAY
2 Dec.: `The Bible and western art.'


LIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Biodiversity Research Group

BRADFORD A. HAWKINS, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Irvine, will lecture at 1 p.m. on Monday, 21 October, in the Senior Common Room, the School of Geography and the Environment.

Convener: R.J. Whittaker, MA, Reader in Biogeography.

 

Subject: `Productivity and history as predictors of the latitudinal diversity gradient of terrestrial birds.'


MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Oxford Physics Colloquia

The following colloquia will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Fridays in the Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon Laboratory.

Conveners: N.F. Johnson, MA, Professor of Physics, and J.I. Silk, MA, D.Phil., Savilian Professor of Astronomy.

PROFESSOR N. STRAUMANN, Zurich
25 Oct.: `The history and mystery of the cosmological constant.'

PROFESSOR K.W.D. LEDINGHAM, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, and William Penney Professor of Laser Induced Nuclear Physics (AWE PLC)
1 Nov.: `Laser induced nuclear physics and its applications.'

PROFESSOR T. GAISSER, Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware
15 Nov.: `Cosmic-ray physics and astrophysics.' (Leverhulme Lecture)

PROFESSOR W.D. PHILLIPS, NIST, USA; Distinguished University of Physics, University of Maryland, USA; George Eastman Visiting Professor and Nobel Laureate
22 Nov.: `Coherent atoms in optical lattices.'

PROFESSOR SIR GARETH ROBERTS
29 Nov.: `Leadership and management of scientific research.'


Inorganic Chemistry Colloquia

The following colloquia will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Lecture Theatre, the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory.

Convener: M.L.H. Green, MA, Professor of Inorganic Chemistry.

PROFESSOR L. GADE, Strasbourg
14 Oct.: `Strategies in homogeneous catalysis: going from mononuclear complexes to macromolecular dendrimer catalysts.'

PROFESSOR P. SHAPLEY, Indiana
21 Oct.: `Heterometallic complexes as selective oxidation catalysts.'

DR J. DAVIS
28 Oct.: `Molecular assemblies: metalloprotein and sensing nanotechnology.'

PROFESSOR M. DARENSBOURG, University of Texas A & M
4 Nov.: `Functioning catalysts inspired by active sites in bio- organometallic chemistry: the hydrogenases.'

PROFESSOR F.G. CLOKE, Sussex
11 Nov.: `Activation of dinitrogen by vanadium diamidoamine and uranium pentalene complexes.'

PROFESSOR N. HARRISON, Imperial College and Daresbury Laboratory
18 Nov.: `Predicting the stoichiometry, magnetic and electronic structure of transition metal oxide surfaces from first principles.'

DR P. TIMMS, Bristol
25 Nov.: `Making oxide replicas of organic nanostructures by chemical vapour deposition.'

PROFESOR S.T. BRAMWELL, University College, London
2 Dec.: `Hot spin ice: a new class of quantum magnet?'


Soft matter, biomaterials, and interfaces

This interdisciplinary seminar series will continue this term. Unless otherwise indicated, the seminars will be held at 4 p.m. on Tuesdays in the John Rowlinson Seminar Room, the Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory.

Convener: J. Klein, MA, D.Phil., Dr Lee's Professor of Chemistry.

PROFESSOR R. PASHLEY, Australian National University
15 Oct.: `Emulsion stability.'

DR W. HUCK, Cambridge
22 Oct.: `Manipulating polymers at the nanoscale.'

DR H. CHRISTENSON, Leeds
29 Oct.: `Experimental studies of capillary condensation from vapour and from liquid mixtures.'

PROFESSOR M. KLEIN, Pennsylvania
5 Nov., 11.15 a.m.: `Modelling biomolecules at soft interfaces: the continuing challenge of bridging length and time scales.'

DR J. YEOMANS
12 Nov.: `Simulating polymer hydrodynamics.'

PROFESSOR J. ISRAELACHVILI, California, Santa Barbara
19 Nov., 11.15 a.m.: `Differences in the interactions of colloids, biological molecules and surfaces.'

PROFESSOR H.-J. BUTT, Siegen
26 Nov.: `Contributions to microfluidics and chemistry.'

PROFESSOR R. EVANS, Bristol
3 Dec.: `Attraction out of repulsion: interfaces and entropic wetting in model colloid–polymer mixtures.'


MEDICAL SCIENCES

Oxford Clinical Neuroscience Lectures

The following lectures will be given at 11.30 a.m. on Fridays in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

PROFESSOR J. ROTHWELL, Sobell Department of Neurophysiology, Institute of Neurology
11 Oct.: `Transcranial magnetic stimulation.'

PROFESSOR A. COMPSTON, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge
15 Nov.: `The basis for treatment in MS.'

PROFESSOR P. DE JONGHE, Antwerp
13 Dec.: `Interited neuropathies.'


THEOLOGY

Seminars in the study of religions

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in Lecture Room 2, Christ Church.

Conveners: The Revd Professor Keith Ward, B.Litt., MA, DD, Regius Professor of Divinity, and Peggy Morgan, MA, Lecturer in the Study of Religions, Mansfield College.

PROFESSOR D. MARTIN, LSE
22 Oct.: `Protestantism and politics in the developing world.'

PROFESSOR M. DOUGLAS, University College, London
5 Nov., Examination Schools: `Microcosm as theological thinking.'

DR M. KLEIN
19 Nov.: `The spirituality of childbirth: a Jewish perspective.'

DR M. JASCHOK
3 Dec.: `Women's mosques and female ahong: innovation or aberration.'


THEOLOGY, ORIENTAL STUDIES

Eastern Christian Studies Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in St Gregory's House, 1 Canterbury Road.

Convener: S.P. Brock, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Syriac Studies.

N. NAHAS
23 Oct.: `Faith and reason according to St Ephrem.'

DR K.T. WARE
6 Nov.: `The Fifth Earl of Guilford: an eighteenth-century convert to the Orthodox Church.'

DR J. BAUN
20 Nov.: `Theological reflections on two Middle Byzantine heavens.'

L. OSINKINA
4 Dec.: `The mystery of Church Slavonic Ecclesiastes.'


INTERDISCIPLINARY SAWYER SEMINAR (IN ASSOCIATION WITH THE ANDREW W. MELLON FOUNDATION)

The theory and politics of civil society

The following seminars will be held from 1.45 p.m. to 4.15 p.m. on Mondays in the Rothermere American Institute. The series will continue in Hilary Term and Trinity Term. Papers will be precirculated to participants. Those wishing to attend the seminars should register their interest in good time. All enquiries should be directed to Paul Bou-Habib (telephone: (2)82718, e-mail: paul.bou-habib@socres.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR PHILIP PETTIT, Princeton
28 Oct.: `Deliberative democracy, the discursive dilemma, and republican theory.'

PROFESSOR HANS JOAS, Erfurt
18 Nov.: `Value pluralism and moral universalism.'

PROFESSOR ADAM SELIGMAN, Boston
25 Nov.: To be announced.


ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM

The second Ashmolean Chinese Painting Colloquy: Chinese aesthetic theory, the avant-garde, and works of art in the past half-century

This meeting will be held on Wednesday, 16 October, in the Headley Lecture Theatre, the Ashmolean Museum. To reserve a place, contact Janet Partridge (e-mail: janet.partridge@ashmus.ox.ac.uk, fax: Oxford (2)78078). The meeting will end with a period of discussion at 4.30 p.m. A reception will be held in the Khoan and Michael Sullivan Gallery of Chinese Painting, 5–6.30 p.m.

Convener: S.J. Vainker (BA London), University Lecturer in Chinese Art.

MS VAINKER
1.30 p.m.: `Introduction: collecting the contemporary—an institutional viewpoint.'

N. BUNIN, Institute for Chinese Studies
1.50 p.m.: `Themes from contemporary Chinese aesthetics.'

QU LEILEI, artist
2.20 p.m.: `Reflecting on my time: the spirit of the "Stars".'

TAO TAO LIU, Institute for Chinese Studies
2.55 p.m.: `Modern Chinese literature and the avant- garde.'

CHANG TSONG-ZUNG, curator
3.25 p.m.: `The everyday use of art.'

PROFESSOR M. SULLIVAN
4 p.m.: `Chinese modernism reaches maturity: some recent paintings from the Sullivan Collection.'


SAID BUSINESS SCHOOL

Deutsche Bank Lecture Series: European financial integration

PROFESSOR XAVIER FREIXAS will deliver the Deutsche Bank Lecture Series at 2 p.m. on Wednesdays in Michaelmas Term in the Saïd Business School.

Finance Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 12.30 p.m. on Fridays in the Saïd Business School. A sandwich lunch will be provided at 12 noon in Meeting Room 14 (except on 1 November: Seminar Room B).

18 Oct.: DAVID HOBSON, Bath.

25 Oct.: CHRISTIAN LAUX, LSE.

1 Nov.: HENRY WYNN, Warwick.

8 Nov.: MARK SALMON, City University.

15 Nov.: STEPHEN TAYLOR, Lancaster.

22 Nov.: ERNST-LUDWIG VON THADDEN, Lausanne.

29 Nov.: FRANK GERHARD, Nuffield College.

6 Dec.: LUCIO SARNO, Warwick.


CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES

International Human Rights Seminar

THE HON. HUGO CHAVEZ FRIAS, President, the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, will lecture at 3.30 p.m. on Thursday, 17 October, in the Examination Schools. The audience must be seated by 3.15 p.m.

Individual numbered tickets for members of the University only can be obtained by e-mailing to ihrs@herald.ox.ac.uk. All other requests should be directed to Dr P. Ferguson, IHRS, 17 Plantation Road, Oxford OX2 6JD, with a stamped, self-addressed envelope enclosed. All tickets will be issued on a first-come, first-served basis. Last requests for tickets must be received by midday on Tuesday, 15 October. For further details, see http://www.oxfordunivhumanrightsseminar.org.uk.

Convener: Dr William F. Pepper.

 

Subject: `Globalisation and poverty.'


ALL SOULS COLLEGE

The neo-Darwinian theory of sociocultural evolution

Seminars on this subject will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Hovenden Room, All Souls College.

Convener: W.G. Runciman, Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, and President, the British Academy.

15 Oct.: `The application of the neo-Darwinian paradigm to sociology.'

22 Oct.: `The transition from cultural to social selection in the pre- Neolithic.'

29 Oct.: `The diffusion of Christianity in the Eastern Roman Empire.'

5 Nov.: `Roman slavery and manumission in the Republic and Principate and in Hispanic America.'


Evans-Pritchard Lectures 2002–3

Histories of the hanged: testimony from the Mau Mau Rebellion, 1952–60

DR D.M. ANDERSON, School of Oriental and African Studies, London, will deliver the Evans-Pritchard Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Old Library, All Souls College.

Tue. 29 Oct.: ` "Parasites in Paradise": race, violence, and Mau Mau.'

Wed. 30 Oct.: `Death at Lari: the story of an African massacre.'

Tue. 5 Nov.: `Struggles in the city: Mau Mau in Nairobi, 1952–6.'

Wed. 6 Nov.: `General China's war: freedom fighters in the forest.'

Tue. 12 Nov.: `Rebels and informers: interrogation, torture, and the state.'

Wed. 13 Nov.: ` "War is not porridge": memorialising Mau Mau.'


HERTFORD COLLEGE

Tyndale Lecture 2002

PROFESSOR GERALD HAMMOND, Professor of English, University of Manchester, will deliver the Tyndale Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 17 October, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Tyndale's other Hebrew translations.'


LADY MARGARET HALL

Save the Children Eglantyne Jebb Seminar:
Child poverty: a scar on the soul—UK and global responses

This seminar will be held at 6.15 p.m. on Thursday, 29 October, in Lady Margaret Hall. Tickets, costing £8.50 (students £5), may be obtained from Julie Haynes (telephone: 0121-558 0111, e-mail: j.haynes@scfuk.org.uk).


SOMERVILLE COLLEGE

Monika Fooks Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR KEITH HAWTON, Director, the Centre for Suicide Research, Department of Psychiatry, and Consultant Psychiatrist, the Warneford Hospital, will deliver the inaugural Monika Fooks Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 15 October, in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

Subject: `By their own hand: the problem of youth suicide.'


WOLFSON COLLEGE

Ronald Syme Lecture

PROFESSOR E. GRUEN, Berkeley, will deliver the annual Ronald Syme Lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 7 November, in the Hall, Wolfson College. The lecture will be open to the public.

Subject: `Tacitus and the Jews.'

Examinations and Boards

LIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES BOARD

The Life and Environmental Sciences Board has conferred the title of University Research Lecturer on DR R.M. CHALMERS and DR M.C. WHITBY, Department of Biochemistry; DR T.P. DAWSON, School of Geography and the Environment; and on DR S.A. HARRIS, DR G.M. PRESTON, and DR J.A. SPIERS, Department of Plant Sciences.


BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MANAGEMENT

M.Sc. in Management Research and M.Sc. in Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management

Amendment to Advanced Specialist Papers 2003

The M.Sc. Course Director has approved the following amendments to the following list of courses for the M.Sc. in Management Research and the M.Sc. in Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management Advanced Specialist Papers.

M.Sc. in Management Research Specialist Papers list: delete `Sociology of Work' and substitute `Leadership'.

M.Sc. in Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management: delete `Sociology of Work' and substitute `Leadership'.


CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, and, where applicable, of the Humanities Board, the following changes in regulations made by divisional and faculty boards will come into effect on 28 October.

1 Humanities and Social Sciences Boards

(a) Preliminary Examination for Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 104, l. 28, after `subjects.' insert:

`Candidates must also pursue a course of study in Information Technology, and are required to submit an information technology-based project by the first day of the Trinity Full Term in which the examination is taken.'

2 Ibid., l. 30, after `subjects' insert:

`, and has submitted a satisfactory project for the Information Technology course (as described above). Any candidate who fails to submit a project for the Information Technology course by the deadline, or whose project is deemed to be unsatisfactory, will be allowed to resubmit the project by the Monday of the week falling three weeks before First Week of the following Michaelmas Full Term. Submission of a satisfactory project is a requirement for entering the Second Public Examination'.


(b) Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 419, l. 16, after `under the' insert `joint'.

2 Ibid., l. 17, delete `Divisional Board of', and after `Social Sciences' insert `Board and the Humanities Board'.

3 Ibid., p. 421, l. 42, delete `British Social History since 1870' and substitute `British Society in the Twentieth Century'.

4 Ibid., p. 423, l. 24 and l. 25, delete `Community' and substitute `Union'.

5 Ibid., p. 426, l. 11, delete `Further Subject' and substitute `further subject'.

6 Ibid., p. 427, l. 23, delete `Centre' and substitute `Department'.

7 Ibid., p. 432, ll. 2, 17, 19, 49, and 52, delete `chairman' and substitute `chair'.

8 Ibid., ll. 3–5, delete `care of the Administrator É George Street, Oxford,'.

9 Ibid., l.12, delete `faculty board' and substitute `relevant chair or head of department'.


(c) Pass School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 433, l. 8, after `determined' insert `jointly'.

2 Ibid., l. 9, delete `Divisional Board of', and after `Social Sciences' insert `Board and the Humanities Board'.


2 Social Sciences Board

(a) M.Sc. in Politics Research

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 672, delete ll. 11–12, and on l. 29, after `Politics' insert `and International Relations'.

2 Ibid., p.730, l. 36, after `Politics' insert `and Inter- national Relations'.

3 Ibid., ll. 37, 38, 39, and 40, after `Politics' insert `and International Relations'.

4 Ibid., l. 47, after `classes' insert `from the Department's Research Methods Training Programme'.

5 Ibid., p. 731, l. 4, after `Latin American Studies,' insert `the M.Phil. in Chinese Studies, the M.Phil. in International Relations,'.

6 Ibid., p. 731, ll. 6, 16, 19, 24, and 25, after `Committee' insert `and the International Relations Graduate Studies Committee'.

7 Ibid., l. 23, after `Latin American Studies,' insert `the M.Phil. in Chinese Studies, the M.Phil. in International Relations,'.

8 Ibid., ll. 35, and 41, after `Politics' insert `and International Relations'.

9 Ibid., p. 981, delete l. 6.

10 Ibid., l. 7, after `Politics' insert `and International Relations'.


(b) M.Sc. in International Relations Research

With immediate effect

In Examination Regulations, 2002, delete from l.13 on p. 720 to l. 25 on p. 721.


(c) M.Phil.s in Politics (Comparative Government, Political Theory, European Politics and Society)

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 490, l. 2, delete `European Politics and Society,'.

2 Ibid., l. 7 after `Politics' insert `(Comparative Government, Political Theory, European Politics and Society)'.

3 Ibid., delete l. 33.

4 Ibid., p. 491, l. 10 after `Politics' insert `(Comparative Government, Political Theory, European Politics and Society)'.

5 Ibid., delete from p. 535, l. 24 to p. 537, l. 48.

6 Ibid., p. 573, l. 35, delete `work-book' and substitute `coursework'.

7 Ibid., p. 574, l. 16, delete `list e–ag' and substitute `following list: b, e–ag'.

8 Ibid., l. 17, after `Candidates may' insert `,'.

9 Ibid., l. 36, delete `economics' and substitute `economic'.

10 Ibid., p. 577, l. 20, delete `Heyek' and substitute `Hayek'.

11 Ibid., l. 47, delete `EMS' and substitute `European Monetary System' and delete `. External' and substitute `; external'.

12 Ibid., l. 48, delete `35'.

13 Ibid., l. 49, delete `LDCs; Economic' and substitute `Less Developed Countries; economic'.

14 Ibid., p. 578, l. 2 and l. 5, delete `cold war' and substitute `Cold War'.

15 Ibid., l. 4, delete `detente' and substitute `dÄtente'.


(d) M.Phil. in International Relations

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 546, l. 19, after `coverage' insert `are'.

2 Ibid., ll. 34–8, delete `at the discretion ... following Michaelmas Term.' and substitute:

`retake it in the eighth week of the same Trinity Term. Candidates who fail the research design essay or the course work submitted for the research modules may resubmit their work on the Friday of the week falling two weeks before Week One of the following Michaelmas Term.'

3 Ibid., ll. 45–6, delete `Two hard-bound copies of the' and substitute `The'.

4 Ibid., p. 547, l. 1, after `War' delete `,' and substitute `;'.

5 Ibid., l. 9, delete `europe' and substitute `Europe'.

6 Ibid., l. 20, before `neo-Marxist' delete `,' and substitute `;'.

7 Ibid., l. 25 and l. 28, delete `cold war' and substitute `Cold War'.

8 Ibid., p. 548, l. 40, l. 42, and l. 45, delete `cold war' and substitute `Cold War'.

9 Ibid., p. 549, l.25, delete `ancient'.

10 Ibid., p. 550, l. 9, after `annually by the' insert `International Relations'.


3 Board of the Faculty of Modern History

(a) M.Phil. in History of Science, Medicine, and Technology

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2005)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 490, l. 4, after `Roman History', insert `History of Science, Medicine, and Technology'.

2 Ibid., after l. 38 insert:

`History of Science, Medicine, and Technology—Modern History'.

3 Ibid., p. 546, after l. 2 insert:

`History of Science, Medicine, and Technology

(See also the general notice at the commencement of these regulations.)

The regulations of the Board of the Faculty of Modern History are as follows:

1. Every candidate must follow for at least six terms a course of instruction in History of Science, Medicine, and Technology, and must upon entering for the examination produce from his or her society a certificate to that effect.

2. The examination will consist of the following parts:

Qualifying test

Every candidate must pass a qualifying test. The test shall consist of the satisfactory completion of two courses on

(1) Methods and themes in economic and social history: an introduction to research.

(2) Either Methods and themes in the history of medicine (if the candidate's dissertation project lies in the field of history of medicine) or Methods and themes in the history of science and technology (if the candidate's dissertation project lies in the field of history of science and technology).

A paper from another established course within the University may be substituted for one of the standard courses where this would provide a more appropriate training for the candidate's dissertation focus. Such a choice will need formal approval from both the Course Director and the Chairman of the Graduate Studies Committee of the Board of the Faculty of Modern History.

The organisers of each course shall not later than the Friday of the sixth week of the Trinity Term preceding the examination submit to the examiners a list of candidates who have satisfactorily completed a qualifying course. No candidate who has failed the qualifying test of two courses will be permitted to supplicate for the degree. Candidates who fail a qualifying course once will be permitted to take it again, not later than one year after the initial attempt.

Final examination

The examination shall consist of four papers and a dissertation. I. Three advanced papers at least two of which must be selected from Schedule I below (`Advanced Papers for the M.Phil. and M.Sc. in History of Science, Medicine, and Technology'), and not more than one from any other M.Phil., the choice of which must be approved by the chairman of the Graduate Studies Committee of the Modern History Board not later than Monday of the fourth week of the second Michaelmas Term of the course.

Candidates must take at least two of their advanced papers as three-hour written examinations. For each of their remaining advanced papers candidates must choose to be assessed either by written examination or by two 5,000-word essays. Essays may only be submitted in lieu of written papers for subjects in Schedule I or for papers from other M.Phil.s where similar provision exists in the regulations for those examinations. The essays must be the work of the candidates alone and they must not consult any other person including their supervisors in any way concerning the method of handling the themes chosen. The themes chosen by the candidate must be submitted for approval by the chairman of examiners, c/o the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than the Monday of the fifth week of Hilary Term. Candidates will be informed within two weeks, by means of a letter directed to their colleges, whether the topics they have submitted have been approved. The finished essays must be delivered by the candidate to the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by noon on Monday of the third week of Trinity Full Term.

The essays must be presented in proper scholarly form, and two typed copies of each must be submitted. Candidates may be examined viva voce on the subjects on which they submit essays. Candidates who have not delivered essays as prescribed by the due date on any of their subjects must sit the written examination in those subjects.

II. Either (i) one paper in a discipline or skill or sources or methods selected from Schedule II below.

or (ii) A fourth advanced paper selected from Schedule I or from any additional list of papers for the M.Phil. and M.Sc. in History of Science, Medicine, and Technology approved by the Graduate Studies Committee of the Board of the Faculty of Modern History and published in the definitive list of Advanced Papers as set out in Schedule I.

III. A dissertation of not more than 30,000 words, including appendices but excluding bibliography on a topic approved by the candidate's supervisor. The dissertation must be delivered not later than noon on the Monday of the first week of the Trinity Full Term in which the examination is to be taken to the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford. Dissertations submitted must not exceed the permitted length. If they do the examiners will reduce the marks awarded.

The presentation and footnotes should comply with the requirements specified in the Regulations of the General Board for the degree of M.Litt. and D.Phil. and follow the Conventions for the presentation of dissertations and theses of the Board of the Faculty of Modern History.

Each dissertation must include a short abstract which concisely summarises its scope and principal arguments, in about 300 words.

Candidates must submit by the specified date two copies of their dissertations. These must be securely and firmly bound in either hard or soft covers. One copy of an M.Phil. dissertation which is approved by the examiners must be deposited in the Bodleian Library.

This finalised copy should incorporate any corrections or amendments which the examiners may have requested. It must be in a permanently fixed binding, drilled and sewn, in a stiff board case in library buckram, in a dark colour, and lettered on the spine with the candidate's name and initials, the degree, and the year of submission.

3. Candidates may, if they so wish, be examined in up to two of their four papers (or submit essays in lieu of these papers as provided for above) at the end of their first year.

4. The examiners will permit the use of any hand-held pocket calculator subject to the conditions set out below under the heading `Use of calculators in examinations' in the Special Regulations concerning Examinations.

5. Each candidate must attend an oral examination when required to do so by the examiners.

6. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.

7. If it is the opinion of the examiners that the work done by a candidate, while not of sufficient merit to qualify for the degree of M.Phil., is nevertheless of sufficient merit to qualify for the degree of Master of Science in History of Science, Medicine, and Technology, the candidate shall be given the option of resitting the M.Phil. (as provided by Ch. VI, Sect. vi, § 2, para. 4) or of being granted leave to supplicate for the degree of Master of Science.

8. A candidate who fails the examination will be permitted to retake it on one further occasion only, not later than one year after the initial attempt.

Such a candidate whose dissertation has been of a satisfactory standard may resubmit the same piece of work, while a candidate who has reached a satisfactory standard on the written papers will not be required to retake that part of the examination.

Schedule I

Advanced Papers for the M.Phil. and M.Sc. in History of Science, Medicine, and Technology

A broad range of the course resources are shared with the corresponding courses in Economic and Social History, and Advanced Papers are therefore available in the subject areas listed here.

1. Economic and business history

2. History of science and technology

3. Social history

4. Historical demography

5. History of medicine

A descriptive list of Advanced Papers will be published by the Board of the Faculty of Modern History in September for the academic year ahead (not all options may be available in every year). The definitive list of the titles of Advanced Papers for any one year will be circulated to candidates and their supervisors and posted on the Faculty notice board not later than Friday of Third Week of Michaelmas Term.

Schedule II

The paper in a relevant discipline or skill may be:

1. One of the papers from the M.Phil. in Economics.

2. One of the papers from the M.Phil. in Sociology or in Comparative Social Policy.

3. One of the papers from the M.Phil. in Russian and East European Studies.

4. One suitable paper from another Master's degree under the auspices of the Faculty of Modern History approved from time to time by the Graduate Studies Committee of the Board of Modern History.

5. One suitable paper from another Master's degree on the recommendation of the candidate's supervisor and endorsed by the Course Director.

Choices under Schedule II have to be approved by the Chairman of the Graduate Studies Committee of the Board of the Faculty of Modern History not later than Monday of the fourth week of the second Michaelmas Term of the course. Candidates wishing to take a paper under 1, 2, 3, or 5 will also need the approval of the appropriate course convener and the Graduate Studies Committee of the relevant faculty board or inter-faculty committee who need to be satisfied that each candidate has an adequate background in the subject. Not all options may be available in any one year.'


(b) M.Sc. in History of Science, Medicine, and Technology

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 672, after 1. 5 insert:

`History of Science, Medicine,       Modern History'.  
   and Technology 

2 Ibid., p. 714, after 1. 45 insert:

`History of Science, Medicine, and Technology

(See also the general notice at the commencement of these regulations.)

The regulations of the Board of the Faculty of Modern History are as follows:

1. Every candidate must follow for at least three terms a course of instruction in History of Science, Medicine, and Technology, and must upon entering for the examination produce from his or her society a certificate to that effect.

2. The examination will consist of the following parts:

Qualifying test

Every candidate must pass a qualifying test. The test shall consist of the satisfactory completion of two courses on

(1) Methods and themes in economic and social history: an introduction to research.

(2) Either Methods and themes in the history of medicine (if the candidate's dissertation project lies in the field of history of medicine) or Methods and themes in the history of science and technology (if the candidate's dissertation project lies in the field of history of science and technology).

A paper from another established course within the University may be substituted for one of the standard courses where this would provide a more appropriate training for the candidate's dissertation focus. Such a choice will need formal approval from both the Course Director and the Chairman of the Graduate Studies Committee of the Board of the Faculty of Modern History.

The organisers of each course shall not later than the Friday of the sixth week of the Trinity Term preceding the examination submit to the examiners a list of candidates who have satisfactorily completed a qualifying course. No candidate who has failed the qualifying test of two courses will be permitted to supplicate for the degree. Candidates who fail a qualifying course once will be permitted to take it again, not later than one year after the initial attempt.

Final examinations

The examination shall consist of two papers and a dissertation.

Candidates must take at least one of their papers as a three-hour written examination. For the remaining paper candidates must choose to be assessed either by written examination or by two 5,000-word essays. Essays may only be submitted in lieu of written papers for subjects in Schedule I below (`Advanced Papers for M.Phil. and M.Sc. in History of Science, Medicine, and Technology') or for other papers permitted in Schedule II below where similar provision exists in the regulations for those examinations. The essays must be the work of the candidates alone and they must not consult any other person including their supervisors in any way concerning the method of handling the themes chosen. The themes chosen by the candidate must be submitted for approval by the chairman of examiners, c/o the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than the Monday of the fifth week of Hilary Term. Candidates will be informed within two weeks, by means of a letter directed to their colleges, whether the topics they have submitted have been approved. The finished essays must be delivered by the candidate to the Clerk of the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by noon on Monday of the third week of Trinity Full Term. The essays must be presented in proper scholarly form, and two typed copies of each must be submitted. Candidates may be examined viva voce on the subjects on which they submit essays. Candidates who have not delivered essays as prescribed by the due date on any of their subjects must sit the written examination in those subjects. I. One advanced paper selected from Schedule I below.

II. Either (i) one paper in a relevant discipline or skill or sources or methods selected from Schedule II below;

or (ii) a second advanced paper selected from Schedule I or from any additional list of papers for the M.Phil. and M.Sc. in History of Science, Medicine, and Technology approved by the Graduate Studies Committee of the Board of the Faculty of Modern History and published in the definitive list of Advanced Papers as set out in Schedule I.

III. A dissertation of not more than 15,000 words, including appendices but excluding bibliography, on a topic approved by the candidate's supervisor. The dissertation must be delivered not later than noon on the last Monday in September of the year in which the examination is taken to the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford. Dissertations submitted must not exceed the permitted length. If they do the examiners will reduce the marks awarded. The presentation and footnotes should comply with the requirements specified in the Regulations of the General Board for the degrees of M.Litt. and D.Phil. and follow the Conventions for the presentation of dissertations and theses of the Board of the Faculty of Modern History Each dissertation must include a short abstract which concisely summarises its scope and principal arguments, in about 300 words.

Candidates must submit by the specified date two copies of their dissertations. These must be securely and firmly bound in either hard or soft covers.

3. The examiners will permit the use of any hand-held pocket calculator subject to the conditions set out below under the heading `Use of calculators in examinations' in the Special Regulations concerning Examinations.

4. Each candidate must attend an oral examination when required to do so by the examiners.

5. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.

6. A candidate who fails the examination will be permitted to retake it on one further occasion only, not later than one year after the initial attempt.

Such a candidate whose dissertation has been of satisfactory standard may resubmit the same piece of work, while a candidate who has reached a satisfactory standard on the written papers will not be required to retake that part of the examination.

Schedule I

Advanced Papers for the M.Phil. and M.Sc. in History of Science, Medicine, and Technology

A broad range of the course resources are shared with the corresponding courses in Economic and Social History, and Advanced Papers are therefore available in the subject areas listed here.

1. Economic and business history

2. History of science and technology

3. Social history

4. Historical demography

5. History of medicine

A descriptive list of Advanced Papers will be published by the Board of the Faculty of Modern History in September for the academic year ahead (not all options may be available in every year). The definitive list of the titles of Advanced Papers for any one year will be circulated to candidates and their supervisors and posted on the Faculty notice board not later than Friday of Third Week of Michaelmas Term.

Schedule II

The paper in a relevant discipline or skill may be:

1. One of the papers from the M.Phil. in Sociology or in Comparative Social Policy.

2. One suitable paper from another Master's degree under the auspices of the Faculty of Modern History approved from time to time by the Graduate Studies Committee of the Board of the Faculty of Modern History.

3. One suitable paper in a related skill or discipline other than those specified in paragraphs 1 to 2 above on the recommendation of the candidate's supervisor and endorsed by the Course Director.

Choices under Schedule II have to be approved by the Chairman of the Graduate Studies Committee of the Board of the Faculty of Modern History not later than Monday of the fourth week of Michaelmas Term. Candidates wishing to take a paper under 1 or 3 will also need the approval of the appropriate course convener and the Graduate Studies Committee of the relevant faculty board or inter-faculty committee who need to be satisfied that each candidate has an adequate background in the subject. Not all options may be available in any one year.'

Colleges, Halls, and Societies

OBITUARIES

Corpus Christi College

HERBERT HARRY HOBBS, MA, CB, CVO, 8 August 2002; Haigh Scholar 1931–5. Aged 89.


Magdalen College

LORD ARTHUR DE VILLIERS, March 2001; Rhodes Scholar 1933–6. Aged 89.

DAVID REGINALD ELLOWAY, 18 June 2000; commoner 1942–6 and 1948–51. Aged 75.

JOHN LAWSON FIELD, CBE, 22 July 2002; Home Bursar 1981–92. Aged 76.

PROFESSOR PETER LAUCHLAN HEATH, 4 August 2002; Doncaster Scholar 1940–2 and 1945–6. Aged 80.

WILLIAM HYNDMAN `PAT' STOOPS, 26 August 2002; Rhodes Scholar 1937–9. Aged 85.

DR DIRK TER HAAR, 3 September 2002; Fellow 1959–86, Emeritus Fellow 1986. Aged 83.

DR NOEL ARTHUR FRANCIS WILLIAMS, July 2002; Rhodes Scholar 1938–9. Aged 86.


St Anne's College

BARONESS YOUNG OF FARNWORTH (née Janet Mary Baker); Member of the St Anne's Society 1944–7, Honorary Fellow 1978–2002.

Advertisements

Popham Hairdressing

Our proposition is simple, to provide a design, cutting, and colouring service, which combines classic standards with modernist thinking. One North Parade, Oxford. For appointments call: 01865 517040, or e-mail us through our Web site: www.davidpopham.com.


Volunteers Wanted

Research study into the effects of dietary fibre intake: our study will investigate the role of dietary fibre in the development of insulin sensitivity and diabetes. The study will involve taking 2 dietary supplements, each for a period of 4 weeks, and completing 4 full day visits to the Radcliffe Infirmary. Volunteers will be reimbursed for their time. For more details please contact Dr Denise Robertson or Louise Dennis (Research Nurse) on 01865 224872 or e-mail: denise.robertson@oxlip.ox.ac.uk. This study is being run jointly by the Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism (OCDEM) and the Department of Gastroenterology (OxRec no. 02.1320).

You and your body: How do you feel about your body? Are you satisfied or not? Either way, if you are female and over 18, you may be eligible to participate in body- image research at the department of Psychiatry, Oxford University. Contacting us does not oblige you to participate and all information is confidential. For more information, please contact Michelle Lee (Research Psychologist) on 01865 223903 or e-mail: michell.lee@psych.ox.ac.uk. (Ethics committee no.O02.029).


Oxford University Newcomers' Club

The Club welcomes the wives and partners of visiting scholars, graduate students and members of the University who are new to Oxford. It aims to offer help, advice, information and the opportunity to meet each other socially. Informal coffee mornings are held at 13, Norham Gardens every Wed., 10.30–12 noon. Other activities in the club room include the Craft Group, Book Group and informal Conversation Group. Newcomers with Children (0–4 years) meet every Fri. in term, 10.15 a.m.–12 noon. We organise tours of colleges and museums, visits to places of interest, country walks and outings to gardens and antique shops. Secondhand items can be bought on Wed., mornings from the basement. Visit our Web site on www.ox.ac.uk/staff.


Oxford University Research Staff Society

The Research Staff Society (RSS) membership consists of Post- doctoral/Junior Research Fellows and Research Assistants who work for the University of Oxford. As most Research Staff are not attached to a college and may be new to Oxford our social events provide a unique opportunity to meet researchers outside your group or department. We aim to provide an interesting and varying social setting in which to mix and to become a voice for research staff within the University. We run social events each month to suit all tastes. Please visit our Web site http://users.ox.ac.uk/~rss/, which provides information on how to join the society as well as details on events which we will be running in the near future. We hope you will decide to join us and very much look forward to meeting you at one of our events this year.


Restoration and Conservation of Antique Furniture

John Hulme undertakes all aspects of restoration: 30 years experience; collection and delivery. For free advice, telephone or write to: The Workshop, 11A High Street, Chipping Norton, Oxon. OX7 5AD. Tel.: 01608 641692.

 


Three Must Read Books

Genetic Catastrophe! Sneaking Doomsday?; Human Behavior: The New Synthesis; A Dictionary of Human Instincts. Buy now: Amazon.co.uk.


Services Offered

Horological services for your ailing apparatus. Thirty years of expertise in all types of clocks and barometers, of which many of these have been restored for the University over the years. Quotations are free. All work is fully guaranteed. Please phone Paul Carroll, Oxford Longcase Clocks on 01865 779660.

Big or small, we ship it all, plus free pick up anywhere in Oxford. Also 24-hour photocopying, private mailing addresses (24-hour access, and mail forwarding world-wide), binding, fax bureau, colour photocopying, mailing services, and much more. Contact or visit Mail Boxes Etc., 266 Banbury Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 514655, fax: 514656, e-mail: summertown@020.mbe.uk.com, also at: 94 London Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 741729, fax: 01865 742431, e-mail: staff@mbeheadington.co.uk.

Town and Country Trees: arboricultural contractors; modern arboricultural techniques; local authority approved; safeguarded by full Public Liability insurance. Free advice and quotations. Tel.: 0845 458 2980 or 07976 261850 (mobile).

 


Domestic Services

Blue House, a small, intimate nursery for children 2–5 years, established 10 years. Open Mon.–Fri., 8.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m., full or half-days. NNEB staff. All pre-school activities inc. numeracy and literacy skills to prepare children for school entry. Short-term vacancies for visiting academics. Call Kimberley for further information, or come to visit. Tel.: 01865 247877.

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: 01865 726983 or 01235 555533.

 


Part-time employment sought

Cheerful, motivated lady retiring from full-time administrative assistant role at end of Sept., seeks fullfilling part-time post that involves dealing with people. Tel.: Jeannette Hudson-Pudwell on 01865 762187 or e-mail: jeannette@jwhp.fsnet.co.uk.


Situations Vacant

Secretarial help sought: retired blind lady in north Oxford needs help to open, read and reply to correspondence, and undertake other secretarial tasks; 2 hours, twice a week (£10–£12 depending on experience). Tel.: 01865 558131.


Houses to Let

Beautiful, quiet, unusual, open plan, fully furnished house with stunning views to open countryside. Well within the ring road in north Oxford, off-street parking, small patio garden and near convenient bus route. Suit visiting academic or professional couple. Regret no children, pets or smokers. Available from 1 Nov. £950 p.m. plus expenses. Tel.: 01865 515085 or e-mail: trishaboyd@hotmail.com.

A bay fronted Victorian terrace house in St Clements, walking/cycling distance from the city centre; large sitting room (24 x 12 ft), 2 double bedrooms, kitchen/breakfast room, bathroom, separate toilet, 50 ft east-facing garden; furnished, dishwsher and washing machine. Available to rent from early Nov., for 12–14 months. Rent £750 p.c.m. excl. tax and utilities. No smoking, no pets. Tel.: 01865 724444.

Wheatley: attractive cottage to let; 3 bedrooms, garage, near shops and bus stop. £750 p.c.m. Tel.: 01932 563335.

A bay fronted Victorian terrace house in St Clements, walking/cycling distance from the city centre; large sitting room (24 x 12 ft), 2 double bedrooms, kitchen/breakfast room, bathroom, separate toilet, 50 ft east-facing garden; furnished, dishwsher and washing machine. Available to rent from early Nov., for 12–14 months. Rent £750 p.c.m. excl. tax and utilities. No smoking, no pets. Tel.: 01865 724444.

Two-bedroom modern terrace house with small garden: fully furnished and fitted, gas c.h., washer/drier. Situated in a quiet cul-de-sac next to Said Business School between Oxford city centre and the railway station, with own parking space. Available mid- Oct., for 6 months minimum. £880 p.c.m., 2 months deposit required. Ian and Josephine Macdonald, tel.: 01865 516615, fax: 01865 516616, or e-mail: macdonaldreynell@aol.com.

Charming Victorian 2-bedroom terrace cottage in East Oxford, 10 minutes walk from city centre (or 5 minutes by regular bus), wooden floors, open fire, gas c.h., cellar and garden. Fully furnished. Ideal for non-smoking professional couple. Available immediately for 1 year. Rent £800 p.m. Tel.: 01865 512928, mobile: 079 470 794 35.

North Oxford , Wentworth Road, OX2 7TH: furnished spacious 3- bedroom semi-detached house; newly decorated, very good condition; 2 reception rooms, front and back gardens, luxury fitted kitchen, double glazing, gas c.h., washing machine and drier; separate bath and toilet. Off-road parking. Sky and cable TVs connected. Within excellent schools catchment area, frequent bus services, 10 minutes walk to Summertown local banks and shops. Available now for 1 year, renewable. £1,150 p.c.m. plus bills. Non-smoking professional families by reference. No pets. Tel.: 01865 454729 (eve.), 01276 66549 (eve.), 01865 850104 (day). E-mail: zhangsuqing@yahoo.com.

Three-bedroom period cottage with mature garden in small hamlet just north of Banbury (7 miles); 5 minutes M40 (J12), 30 minutes drive to Oxford, or regular train service from Banbury. Available now for 2002/3 academic year. £695 p.m. plus utility bills. Call David Barnes, 01295 670693 or 020 785 1192. E-mail: davidbarnes65@hotmail.com.

An Englishman's home is his castle---so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or e-mail us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: 01865 764533, fax: 764777, e-mail: info@qbman.co.uk.

Make finding accommodation easy. Finders Keepers have a dedicated approach to helping you find the right property. Browse through our Web site for up-to-date detailed information on properties available and make use of our interactive database, priority reservation service (credit cards accepted), personal service and professional advice. For further information please contact Finders Keepers at 226, Banbury Rd., Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: 01865 311011. Fax: Oxford 556993. E-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk. Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.


Flats to Let

Paris studio: small but charming studio in the historic and very central Marais (4th arrondissement) available for short lets. Attractively furnished and fully equipped with television, phone, CD, kitchenette. Linens and weekly maid provided. £38 per night or £250 p.w. to members of the University; non-university £45 per night and £290 weekly. Contact joe-chamberlain@ukgateway.net or ring 07957 588448.

Modern, fully furnished, centrally heated, self-contained flat in large country house. Quiet position with ample parking. Double bedroom with en suitebathroom and shower. Fully fitted kitchen, incl. freezer and microwave. Large lounge and dining area. Available from early Nov., for long or short lets. Rent £695 p.m. inc. bills and linen. Non smoking. Tel.: 01865 883991 or e-mail: suehemingway@aol.com.

Central north Oxford: 10 minutes' walk from city centre, all main university buildings and parks, and very close to the river. Available now for short/long let. Completely newly refurbished ground-floor flat to very high standard, new bathroom, new John Lewis kitchen with washer, dishwasher, dryer, etc., in extremely quiet, civilised, large Victorian house in this exclusive, leafy residential suburb, with large, light airy rooms. Double bedroom, single bedroom, drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom. Available Dec., a second-floor flat for short/long let with large double bedroom, large drawing room, kitchen , bathroom. Off-street parking, large secluded garden. Tel./fax: 01865 552400.

Large flat in the heart of Venice, near Palazzo Grassi, in the heart of Venice, with large traditional sitting-room, and separate dining room, well-appointed kitchen, 1 double bedroom with en suitebathroom, second bedroom with twin beds, third bedroom with 1 bed (= 1), and a second bathroom. The flat is ideal for a family, in pristine condition, and available for short periods on a weekly basis at £600 per week. Tel.: + 39 0423 723582, e-mail: tagariello@libero.it.


Accommodation Offered

Paying guests, visiting academics, welcomed for short or long stays in the comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple, in exclusive, quiet, leafy central north Oxford, within walking distance of all main university buildings, town centre, parks, river, good shops, and restaurants. All rooms have colour TV, tea-/coffee-making facilities, microwave, and refrigerator and/or deep-freeze availability, c.h., and independent heating. Breakfast included in the very moderate terms. Tel./fax: 01865 557879.

Available by the week for visitors to Oxford: self-contained, fully- furnished studio flat, centrally located in Kingston Road. En suiteshower, toilet and washbasin, and fully-equipped kitchen area. Sleeps 2. £300 p.w. all inc. British Tourist Board approved 3 Stars. For further information tel.: 01865 516913 or visit: http://www.oxfordcity.co.uk/accom/studioflat.

Delightful rooms in North Oxford available now. £55 p.w. Book by telephone or fax: 01865 511657 or e-mail: mcadex@gofornet.co.uk.

Finders Keepers is celebrating its 30th year as Oxfordshire's leading letting agent, providing a specialist service to both landlords and tenants throughout the Oxfordshire and the surrounding counties. With experienced letting and management teams Finders Keepers provide a high standard of service to all our clients. If you would like more information about Finders Keepers' services please contact us at our Head Office at 226 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford, OX2 7BY, tel.: (00 44) 1865 311011, or visit the Finders Keepers Web site at www.finders.co.uk.


Accommodation Sought

Post-doc (Mathematics) with wife and 2 sons (ages 2 and 4) seeks accommodation (furnished or non-furnished) in (or near) Oxford, from Jan., for a period of 2 years. Non-smoking. Preferred 3-bedroom flat, quiet. Please contact: K. Erdmann, 24–29 St Giles, or e-mail: erdmann@maths.ox.ac.uk.

Visiting Mathematician with wife and 2 daughters (ages 3 and 5) seems furnished accommodation from mid-Dec., to end June 2003. Non-smoking. Preferred 2- bedroom flat, quiet. Please contact K. Erdmann, 24–29 St Giles, or e-mail: erdmann@maths.ox.ac.uk.

Canadian academics on sabbatical, family of 4 (10 year old twin daughters), seek quite furnished accommodation in north central Oxford, Summertown, or in easy reach of Headington School. Responsible. Jan.,–July 2003. Contact Dr Anne Gorsuch, History, University of British Columbia, tel.: 001 604 739 1921. E-mail: gorsuch@interchange.ubc.ca.

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us: 01865 764533, fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk. Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.


Accommodation Sought to Rent or Exchange

House exchange sought: we are looking to exchange a modern 4- bedroom, colonial house on 1.75 acres of wooded land in Boonton Township, New Jersey, for a house in or near Oxford for 6-8 months between Jan., and Aug., 2003. Start and end dates are flexible. Our house is on a secluded cul-de-sac in a rural section of North Central NJ, has all modern conveniences and 2 cars. It is a 10 minute drive to Routes 80 and 287 giving easy access to the entire tri-state area. For details please contact Jim and Elizabeth Tepper. E-mail: tepper@axon.rutgers.edu; tel.: 001 973 299 0967; fax.: 001 973 299 0912.


Holiday Lets

Tuscany: enjoy a luxurious stay in a beautifully restored stone villa with spacious rooms and inspiring views of lake, and mountains; 5 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, heated pool. Web site: www.casasinerna.com, or e-mail: info@casasingerna.com. Tel.: +39 0575 791166. Now booking for Christmas and summer 2003.

France–Charente-Maritime: villa in open countryside on outskirts of village, overlooking vineyards, between Saintes and Royan, 30 minutes from beaches; fully-equipped with washing machine, dishwasher, microwave, TV, hi-fi, etc.; sleeps 6 in 3 bedrooms. Ample parking. Long-term out-of-season lets available for those needing peace and quiet for study or writing. Telephone and internet access by arrangement. Phone Chirs and Siân Wallworth on 01993 812187 for full details or visit www.simply-charente.com.


Houses for Sale

Lovely large North Oxford family home in quiet cul-de-sac; 2½ miles city centre; 10 minutes schools, hospitals; close to bus route; sitting room with fireplace, study, large dining/music room, 21x16 ft living room, 24ft kitchen/breakfast room, utility room, garage; 5 bedrooms (1 with en suitebathroom), dressing room/sixth bedroom, and family bathroom. Large boarded loft. Cavity wall insulation, gas c.h. with efficiency condensing boiler. Well-maintained secluded south-facing half-acre garden to rear, having patios, raised beds, pond, flowerbeds, mature trees, lawns accommodation tennis court, vegetable and soft fruit gardens, greenhouse and shed. £675,000 freehold. Tel.: 01865 557466.

Modern 3-bedroom semi-detached house in quiet neighbourhood c. 100 metres from Florence Park, Cowley; ground floor: large living room, dining room, kitchen, entrance and toilet; first floor: 3 bedrooms, bathroom. Gas c.h., double glazing throughout, optional fireplace, garage with loads of storage space, 30 ft garden. Proximity to pub, shops and local park. Built 1997. £210,000. Ready to move in to. E-mail: paul.ganter@physiol.ox.ac.uk.


Car for Sale

Bright yellow Fiat Cinquecento Sporting (3-door, 1108cc, with red seat belts) in very good condition for sale; great fun to drive, perfect size for Oxford, only 32,500 miles on the clock, N Registration, driven by 2 members of a family since purchased new. Fully maintained and professionally serviced each year (most recent service and MOT in Sept., 2002), with 6 months road tax licence. £2,500 or offer. Please tel.: Alastair James on 01865 750914 (weekday eves., until 9.30 p.m., or weekends).

Appointments

REGIUS PROFESSORSHIP OF DIVINITY

A Regius Professor of Divinity is due to be appointed by Her Majesty the Queen with effect from 1 October 2003 or such later date as may be arranged, in succession to The Reverend Professor J.S.K. Ward.

The Regius Professor of Divinity is usually appointed in the area of Christian doctrine, either historical or contemporary, or in the study of religions more generally, though with a central focus on the Christian faith. The appointee will be a scholar
of distinction who will exercise leadership in research and develop graduate studies in his or her area of specialisation. He or she will also be expected to take a leading part in developing the work of the faculty generally.

The Regius Professor must be in Priest's Orders in the Church of England or in an Episcopal Church in communion with the Church of England. A canonry at Christ Church is annexed to the professorship. The canon professor will be required to live in one
of the canonical houses at Christ Church.

Suitably qualified persons wishing to submit their names for consideration are invited to do so not later than 25 November, sending their applications (eleven copies, or one only if from overseas), together with the names and contact details (postal and
e-mail addresses and telephone/ fax numbers) of three referees who have agreed to act on this occasion, to the Registrar of the University (Mr D.R. Holmes), University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD, from whom further particulars of the
professorship may be obtained. The further particulars may also be accessed on the Web at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/.



OXFORD UNIVERSITY LIBRARY SERVICES, BODLEIAN LIBRARY (DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL COLLECTIONS)

Appointment of temporary part-time Research Assistant

In association with the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies

A temporary part-time Research Assistant (18.25 hours per week) is sought for two years to work as part of a small team on the study of a medieval Arabic cosmographical and cartographical manuscript which has recently been acquired by the Bodleian Library.
The work is funded by a grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund. The primary responsibility of the research assistant will be to transcribe and translate the text of the manuscript and to assist the Project Research Manager and the Senior Project Researcher
with research on the sources on which the text is based, place names, bibliographical work, and other tasks as required.

For this post, applicants should have a good degree in Arabic, a research degree drawing upon medieval Arabic sources, and extensive experience of working with medieval Arabic manuscripts. The person appointed will have excellent communication skills
in written and spoken English, in particular a demonstrable ability to write academic English clearly and to the highest standard. IT skills, in particular familiarity with Arabic word-processing (Microsoft Word 2000 Professional or a comparable package),
accurate keyboarding skills, the ability to work under pressure to tight targets, team-working skills, and enthusiasm are all essential requirements. The post-holder will be expected to work in Oxford.

The post will be on the academic-related research staff grade 1B scale (salary £17,626–£20,470 per annum, pro rata), and is offered on a fixed-term contract for two years from date of appointment.

Short-listed candidates will be asked to do a prepared transcription and translation from an Arabic manuscript in advance of the interview, and an unprepared translation on the day of the interview.

Application packs may be obtained from the OULS Personnel Section, Bodleian Library, Broad Street, Oxford OX1 3BG. The closing date for applications will be Friday, 11 October. Interviews are likely to be held in late October/ early November, with a view
to the candidate starting as soon as possible thereafter. Reference BL2069 should be quoted in correspondence.



NEW COLLEGE

Fellowships

Applications are invited for the following fellowships for three years from 1 October 2003:

Astor Junior Research Fellowship in Modern Languages

The person appointed will be expected to undertake advanced research in the field of Modern Languages.

J. Arthur Rank/C.A.W. Manning Junior Research Fellowship in Social Studies (excluding Law)

The person appointed will be expected to undertake advanced research in the field of Social Studies.

Todd-Bird Junior Research Fellowship in Medicine (including Psychology) or Biochemistry

The person appointed will be expected to undertake advanced research in the fields of Medicine (including Psychology) or Biochemistry.

Weston Junior Research Fellowship in English

The person appointed will be expected to undertake advanced research in the field of English Language and Literature.

Applicants for the above fellowships must, at the time of taking up the post, have completed at least two years of study for an advanced degree. Each fellowship carries a stipend of £13,510 per annum (subject to review). In addition, the fellows will
be entitled to free rooms in college if available, meals in college, and to entertainment, research, and book allowances.

Christopher Cox Junior Fellowship

The person appointed will be expected to undertake advanced research in his or her chosen field, and perform certain liaison and welfare duties. The Cox Fellowship is open to men and women who normally have not exceeded four years from completion of their
first degree at 1 October 2003.

Application forms and further particulars are available from the College Secretary, New College, Oxford OX1 3BN (telephone: Oxford (2)79548, e-mail: barbara.vardag@new.ox.ac.uk), and particulars are available on the Web site http://www.new.ox.ac.uk/appointments.
The closing date for receipt of applications is 8 November.

New College is an equal opportunities employer.

NUFFIELD COLLEGE

Postdoctoral Prize Research Fellowships in Economics

Nuffield College seeks Postdoctoral Prize Research Fellows (PPRFs) in Economics, whose responsibility is to engage in independent research in any area of Economics. PPRFs have no teaching or administrative obligations, though they may elect to run a
seminar series, give a short lecture course, or organise a conference. Graduates of any country are eligible.

Candidates should, by 1 October 2003, be close to completing a doctorate. Candidates must not have spent more than eight years in postgraduate study, teaching, or research in economics.

The appointment will be for two years from 1 October 2003, extendable for a third provided a doctorate is completed within an appropriate time. Postdoctoral salary starts at £16,424 (Predoctoral grant of £9,023), with a research budget £2,046, and free
single college accommodation or £4,017 housing allowance. Child support funds are available.

Further details and application forms may be obtained from http://www.nuff.ox.ac.uk, or from the Economics Secretary, Nuffield College, Oxford OX1 1NF (e-mail: economics.secretary@nuf.ox.ac.uk). Deadline: 8 November.


 

Postdoctoral Prize Research Fellowships in Social Sciences

Nuffield College intends to appoint, with effect from 1 October 2003, a number of Postdoctoral Prize Research Fellows, whose responsibility is to engage in independent scholarly research. The main interests of the college are in economics, politics,
and sociology, but these are broadly construed to include, for example, social science approaches to history, social and medical statistics, international relations, social psychology, and social policy. Applications are invited from graduates of any
country wishing to undertake research in any area of the social sciences except economics, for which there is a separate competition. (Those wishing to undertake interdisciplinary research which includes economics may apply for either or both competitions.)

Candidates should normally, by 1 October 2003, have completed, or be close to completing, a doctoral thesis. To be eligible, candidates should not, by that date, have spent more than a total of eight years in postgraduate study in the social sciences,
and/or in employment in a teaching or research post in the social sciences, nor should they have previously held a research fellowship similar to that advertised.

The fellowships are to be taken up on 1 October 2003 and cannot in general be postponed. The appointment will be for two years, extendable for a third year provided a doctorate is completed within an appropriate time.

The salary scale for fellows with a doctorate is from £16,424. Fellows who have not yet completed their doctorate receive a grant of £9,023. Fellows receive free single accommodation in college or a housing allowance of £4,017 per year. Child support
funds are available. Each fellowship includes a £2,046 research budget under the control of the fellow.

Further particulars and the application form can be obtained from the college Web page, http://www.nuff.ox.ac.uk, or from the College Secretary, Nuffield College, Oxford OX1 1NF (e-mail: college.secretary@nuf.ox.ac.uk). Applications must be received by
Friday, 8 November.

Nuffield College exists to promote excellence in education and research, and is an equal opportunities employer.

QUEEN'S COLLEGE

Junior Research Fellowship in Mathematics

The governing body proposes to elect to a Junior Research Fellowship in Mathematics. The successful candidate will enter upon the fellowship on 1 October 2003.

The basic stipend of the fellowship, which is pensionable under the Universities Superannuation Scheme, is £13,653 (under review) subject to adjustment in the light of any other emoluments enjoyed by the fellow or in the light of any general alteration
to university stipends. The fellowship will be tenable for three years only. The fellow will be entitled to free rooms in college (or in approved cases to an allowance of £2,624 (under review), in lieu), and to free meals in college. The fellow may,
with the leave of the governing body, engage in teaching up to a maximum of six hours weekly and, if teaching, would normally be expected to give priority to the college's own teaching needs.

Candidates must by 1 October 2003 have passed all the examinations required for a first degree at Oxford or another university, and must not have accumulated more than six years in full-time postgraduate study or research (not necessarily continuous).

Further particulars and application forms may be obtained from the Academic Administrator, Queen's College, Oxford OX1 4AW (telephone: Oxford (2)79166, e-mail: particulars@queens.ox.ac.uk), to whom applications (four copies) should be submitted not later
than 1 November. E-mailed applications will not be acceptable.

ST ANNE'S COLLEGE

Stipendiary Junior Research Fellowships

St Anne's College invites applications for the following Junior Research Fellowships, open to women and men and tenable for one or two years from 1 October 2003. The posts are open to graduates in their second or subsequent year of research.

The Drapers' Company Junior Research Fellowship: this year offered in biological sciences, physiology, biochemistry, molecular biophysics.

The Kathleen Bourne Junior Research Fellowship in French language, literature, or humanities.

Further particulars can be found at http://www.stannes.ox.ac.uk. Those unable to access the WWW can obtain further particulars from the Tutor for Junior Research Fellowships' Secretary (telephone: Oxford (2)74825, e-mail: heather.law@st-annes.ox.ac.uk).
The closing date for applications is 18 October.

St Anne's College is an equal opportunities employer.

ST CROSS COLLEGE

Knoop Junior Research Fellowship 2003

St Cross College proposes to make an election to this Junior Research Fellowship, tenable from 1 January 2003 (or another date by agreement), for one year in the first instance. The fellowship is to be held in conjunction with a position in the Department
of Ophthalmology, involving research work in the general area of the composition and properties of tears and their interaction with the ocular surface. The aim is to study the contributions of these properties in normal functions of the external eye,
and in relation to dry-eye disorders. The fellowship will be particularly suitable for graduates in physiology, biochemistry, or optometry, and candidates with an interest in biophysics or surface chemistry are especially encouraged to apply. The fellowship
is open to men and women and carries a stipend of £17,451 per annum together with common table rights (five lunches a week).

Applicants should have submitted their doctoral dissertations by the date of taking up the appointment or have obtained the D.Phil./Ph.D. or equivalent within the last five years, but the college will exercise flexibility in the case of applicants whose
academic careers have been interrupted.

Applications (marked Knoop JRF) should include a full curriculum vitae and the names of two referees and should be addressed to the Master, St Cross College, Oxford OX1 3LZ. The closing date for applications is 25 October. Applicants should
ask their referees to send references direct to the Master by that date. It is expected that interviews will be held on 21 November. Further details about scientific aspects can be obtained from Dr J.M. Tiffany, Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology,
Walton Street, Oxford OX2 6AW (telephone: Oxford 248996, e-mail: john.tiffany@eye.ox.ac.uk).

St Cross College exists to promote excellence in education and research, and is an equal opportunities employer.

WADHAM COLLEGE

Appointment of Administrator (Tutorial Office)

Wadham College seeks to appoint an administrator to work in its Tutorial Office. The post-holder would be expected to undertake a broad range of administrative and secretarial tasks in the Tutorial Office, including admissions work. He/she will work
closely with the Tutor for Graduates, Senior Tutor, and the Tutor for Admissions, and will work with one other administrator under the direction of the Registrar. It is essential that the successful applicant be flexible, accurate, and eager to work in
a busy environment.

The salary will be within the range £16,000–£18,000 (UCL grade 4), depending on experience. Other elements of the package are detailed in the further particulars. The college would be happy to consider applications from well-qualified candidates interested
in a job share.

Further details may be obtained from the Registrar, Wadham College, Oxford OX1 3PN (telephone: Oxford (2)77946, fax: (2)77949, e-mail: registrar@wadham.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for applications is Monday, 7 October.

Wadham College is an equal opportunities employer.

WOLFSON COLLEGE

Non-stipendiary Junior Research Fellowships 2003 in Clinical and Non-Clinical Sciences

Wolfson College proposes to elect up to six non-stipendiary Junior Research Fellows in Clinical and Non-Clinical Sciences, if candidates of sufficient merit present themselves, without limitation of subject, for two years in the first instance from 1
January 2003. These fellowships carry common table rights (up to £30 a week for meals in Hall) and are open to both men and women.

Preference will be given to candidates who have not already held a junior research fellowship at another college.

Non-clinical science candidates. In the non-clinical sciences, candidates must hold a doctorate by the commencement of the fellowship (1 January 2003) and no more than three years should have elapsed since receipt of a doctorate.

Exceptions will be made only for candidates whose postdoctoral academic career has been interrupted by, for example, childbirth, family commitments, illness, or compulsory military service. A statement giving reasons why an exception should be considered
in their case must be included with the application.

Clinically qualified science candidates. Clinically qualified science candidates should have completed no more than four years' full-time research by 1 January 2003.

Renewal. Junior Research Fellows may apply for renewal of their fellowship for a further final two years. Renewal, which is not automatic and is subject to approval by the governing body, is considered on the basis of satisfactory progress
in your research, normally submission of a doctoral (or equivalent) thesis by those not holding a doctorate at the time of election, evidence of adequate funding for the further term, and, of course, the fellow's good standing in the college.

Funding. The positions are non-stipendiary, and candidates are asked to demonstrate their financial independence by reference to evidence of their funding. Where funds are applied for but not confirmed, any offer will be conditional on provision
of proof of funding before taking up the post.

Applications. Applications, typed or clearly printed, including a completed application form (see below), a curriculum vitae, and the names of three referees, should be sent to the President's Secretary, Wolfson College, Oxford
OX2 6UD, by the closing date of Monday, 4 November (5 p.m.). Candidates should also include details of the research they will be doing in Oxford. The college reserves the right not to accept applications received after the closing date.

References. Candidates should themselves write directly to their referees asking them without further request to send a confidential reference to the President's Secretary by the closing date (Monday, 4 November). References may be faxed
direct to the President's Secretary on Oxford (2)74136.

Junior Research Fellows are not ipso facto members of the governing body of the college, but they are eligible to sit on nearly all college committees, and may be elected as representative members of the governing body. For an application
form, send a self-addressed envelope to the President's Secretary, Wolfson College, Oxford OX2 6UD.

Non-stipendiary Arts/Humanities Junior Research Fellowships will be advertised in January 2003 for commencement in October 2003.

DARWIN COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE

Moses and Mary Finley Research Fellowship

Darwin College proposes to elect a stipendiary Moses and Mary Finley Research Fellow from 1 October 2003. The fellowship is available for research into the ancient history of the Mediterranean world and/or the Near East, down to the end of the sixth
century ad. Preference will be given to those whose interests coincide with those of the late Sir Moses Finley.

The fellowship is tenable for four years from 1 October 2003. Candidates should be aged not more than thirty-five on 1 October 2003, but consideration will be given to persons over this age if they began their research at a significantly later age than
usual, and to those who have interrupted their careers for family or other reasons.

Further details are available from the Master's Secretary, Darwin College, Cambridge CB3 9EU, or the college Web site, http://www.dar.cam.ac.uk. Applications close on 27 October.


 

Schlumberger Interdisciplinary Research Fellowship

Applications are invited for a non-stipendiary Research Fellowship sponsored by Schlumberger Cambridge Research Limited and tenable at Darwin College, Cambridge. Candidates' research interests may be in the physical or biological sciences, mathematics,
information sciences, or the social and economic aspects of technology and technology management, and candidates will be expected to pursue interdisciplinary research across one or more lines of inquiry during the tenure of the fellowship. The fellowship
will begin on 1 October 2003 or on a date to be agreed, and is for two years.

Men and women graduates of any university are eligible, irrespective of age, provided that they have been awarded the Ph.D. or an equivalent degree.

Further details and information on how to apply are available from the college Web page, http://www.dar.cam.ac.uk, or the Master's Secretary, Darwin College, Cambridge CB3 9EU. The closing date for applications is 27 October.

Darwin College follows an equal opportunities policy.

EMMANUEL COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE

Research Fellowships

The governing body of Emmanuel College invites applications from men and women for three Research Fellowships in any subject and tenable for three years from 1 October 2003. Applicants must not have completed more than a total of eight years of postgraduate
research by 1 October 2003.

The stipend for Research Fellows is related to the national academic scale, and a salary award is pending on 1 October 2002. The current stipend for pre-doctoral (resp. postdoctoral) Research Fellows is £15,604 (resp. £16,624) and £17,179 (resp. £18,199),
according as the fellow is resident or non-resident in college. Pre-doctoral Research Fellows will be responsible for any university fee they incur up to the level of a UK postgraduate student (the college will contribute the difference if a higher
fee is applicable). A limited amount of teaching in college is permitted, for which payment will be made at the usual rate.

Additional benefits provided for Research Fellows will include grants for research expenses and academic travel, a book allowance, and assistance with computing facilities. Research Fellows will be given the option to live in college (although no married
accommodation can be provided), and will be provided with lunch and dinner in Hall free of charge.

Requests for application forms should be directed, in writing, to the Research Fellowships' Secretary, Emmanuel College, Cambridge CB2 3AP, by 5 p.m. on Friday, 18 October, enclosing a large self-addressed envelope, or can be received via the Emmanuel
College Web site at http://www.emma.cam.ac.uk/resfell.

Candidates should send to the Research Fellowships' Secretary not later than 5 p.m. on Thursday, 24 October: (i) three copies of their application form; (ii) three copies of a statement of not more than 1,000 words outlining their completed and proposed
research, in a form which is intelligible to a non-specialist.

Candidates should also arrange for two people familiar with their work to send references to the Research Fellowships' Secretary so as to reach her by Thursday, 24 October. The appropriate forms for referees' use will be supplied to applicants, and will
be included with the application forms.

Selected candidates will be invited, by letter dated 28 November, to submit by Tuesday, 10 December, copies of any published or unpublished work with which they wish to support their application. Candidates will not be interviewed by the college. It is
hoped to make elections to the Research Fellowships on 3 February 2003.

ST CATHARINE'S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE

Research Fellowships

The governing body of St Catharine's College invites applications from women and men for election to two stipendiary Research Fellowships, tenable from 1 October 2003 for three years. The fellowships are open to graduates of any university who (i) are
members of the college, or (ii) not being members of the college, are engaged in research in the sciences.

Fellowships are intended to support those at an early stage in their academic careers, and will normally be awarded to those who have recently completed their doctoral research, or are close to completion. Candidates should not have been engaged in full-time
postgraduate research for longer than four years, nor have already held a Research Fellowship elsewhere.

The closing date for applications is Saturday, 30 November. Further particulars are available on written application to the Master's Secretary, St Catharine's College, Cambridge CB2 1RL (e-mail: masters.secretary@caths.cam.ac.uk).

Diary

Institute for the Advancement of University Learning Seminars: places should be booked in advance through the IAUL (telephone: (2)86808, e-mail: services@learning.ox.ac.uk, Internet: http://www.learning.ox.ac.uk).

 


Friday 4 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Stones and gems for sealing', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Tuesday 8 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Early watches: jewel or machine?', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Thursday 10 October

CHRIST CHURCH PICTURE GALLERY guided tour: `Landscapes', 2.15 p.m. (booking not required).


Friday 11 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Venetian painting', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Saturday 12 October

THE OXFORD PRO MUSICA SINGERS (conductor Michael Smedley): choral concert, including works by Schutz and Schnittke, University Church, 8 p.m. (tickets £8/£5).


Sunday 13 October

MICHAELMAS FULL TERM begins.


Monday 14 October

CODRINGTON LIBRARY, All Souls College, reopens (term opening hours: 9.30 a.m.–6.30 p.m., Monday–Friday).

S. LANG: `Drop the demaon dai: maternal mortality and the state in Victorian India' (seminar series: `Metropolis, periphery, and nation: medicine and colonialism'), Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 2.15 p.m.


Tuesday 15 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Modern Chinese paintings from the Sullivan Collection, Part 2', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

DR NIKE WAGNER (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor in European Comparative Literature): `Historism in Vienna' (lecture series: `Love and death: Vienna, Wagner, and fin de siècle culture'), Schools, 5 p.m.

LORD BINGHAM OF CORNHILL (High Steward of the University): `Personal freedom and the dilemma of democracies' (Romanes Lecture), Sheldonian, 5.45 p.m.


Wednesday 16 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM introductory gallery talk: `Greek pots', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Thursday 17 October

LORD ROBERT MAY: `Sentiment and science in conservation planning' (seminar series: `What is the future of science-based conservation?'), School of Geography and the Environment, 1 p.m.

CHRIST CHURCH PICTURE GALLERY guided tour: `Baroque paintings', 2.15 p.m. (booking not required).

THE HON. HUGO CHAVEZ FRIAS (President of Venezuela): `Globalisation and poverty' (International Human Rights Seminar), Schools, 3.30 p.m. (audience to be seated by 3.15 p.m.) (admission by tickets, available to members of the University from ihrs@herald.ox.ac.uk).

DR NIKE WAGNER (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor in European Comparative Literature): `The political dreams of Theodor Herzl' (lecture series: `Love and death: Vienna, Wagner, and fin de siècle culture'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR GERALD HAMMOND: `Tyndale's Jonah' (Tyndale Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

SIR JOHN KREBS: `Food safety: science and policy' (Radcliffe Lecture), Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 6 p.m.


Friday 18 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Costume in art', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

DR J.T. BRUER: `Neuroscience, cognitive science, and the rational basis of education' (Herbert Spencer Lectures: `The future of education'), Schools, 5 p.m. (open to the public).


Saturday 19 October

COLIN CARR (cello) and THOMAS SAUER (piano) perform chamber works by Beethoven, Britten, and Brahms, Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's, 8.30 p.m. (admission by free programme, available from the Porters' Lodge; reserved for college members until about ten days before the event).


Monday 21 October

N.S. MANTE: `Robert Boyle and the early modern racial body' (seminar series: `Metropolis, periphery, and nation: medicine and colonialism'), Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 2.15 p.m.

CHRISTOPHER MITCHELL: `Overseas interests' (Joseph Beuys Lectures), Auditorium, Magdalen, 3 p.m.

PROFESSOR ELIZABETH THOMPSON: `Chromosome ancestry and genetic mapping in the era of genome data' (lecture), Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building, 5 p.m.


Tuesday 22 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Hals and Manet: travelling companions' (special exhibition), 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

DR NIKE WAGNER (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor in European Comparative Literature): `The modernity of Richard Strauss' (lecture series: `Love and death: Vienna, Wagner, and fin de siècle culture'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. MARTIN: `Protestantism and politics in the developing world' (Seminars in the study of religions), Lecture Room 2, Christ Church, 5 p.m.


Wednesday 23 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM introductory gallery talk: `Impressionism', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

W.K. ZEWADSKI: `Greek theatre in the cinema and television' (Archive of Performances of Greek and Roman Drama lecture), the Auditorium, Magdalen College, 2.15 p.m. (further details from: apgrd@classics.ox.ac.uk).


Thursday 24 October

DR S. KNAPP: `Collecting to conserve: not as paradoxical as it may seem' (seminar series: `What is the future of science-based conservation?'), School of Geography and the Environment, 1 p.m.

CHRIST CHURCH PICTURE GALLERY guided tour: `The Harding Glass Collection', 2.15 p.m. (booking not required).

J. MARTINDALE: `Eleanor of Aquitaine: why another biography?' (DNB Seminars on Biography'), Rainolds Room, Corpus Christi, 5 p.m.

DR D. MCCARTHY: `Eusebius' Canones Chronicorum and the voice of St Jerome' (lecture), Modern History Faculty Building, 5 p.m.


Friday 25 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Buddhism: art and symbol', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

PROFESSOR J. LEDOUX: `How our brains learn to be who we are' (Herbert Spencer Lectures: `The future of education'), Schools, 5 p.m. (open to the public).


Monday 28 October

PROFESSOR P. PETTIT: `Deliberative democracy, the discursive dilemma, and republican theory' (International Sawyer Seminar: `The theory and politics of civil society'), Rothermere American Institute, 1.45 p.m. (enquiries to: paul.bou-habib@socres.ox.ac.uk, tel. (2)82718).