Oxford University Gazette: 29 April 2004

Oxford University Gazette, Vol. 134, No. 4694: 29 April 2004

Note: due to the requirements of the Data Protection Act, some elements of the printed Gazette are not reproduced in the Web Gazette.

The following supplement was published with this Gazette:

  • Regulations for the conduct of University Examinations

COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

Changes in Regulation

Council has made the following changes in regulations, to come into effect on 14 May 2004, and to be effective from 18 May 2004, subject to the enactment of the legislative proposal submitted by Council to Congregation on 18 May 2004.

Disciplinary Investigations by the Proctors

1 In Council Regulations 32 of 2002 (Supplement (2) to Gazette No. 4630, 24 July 2002, pp. 1514–15) delete regulation 2 and substitute: `2 Regulations 1–12 inclusive shall apply to the Proctors in the exercise of their powers and duties under sections 30, 31, 32, 42, 43, and 46.'

2 In Council Regulations 32 of 2002 (Supplement (2) to Gazette No. 4630, 24 July 2002, pp. 1514–15) insert new regulation 12 as follows and renumber subsequent regulations 12–15 as 13–16.

`Immediate fines imposed under section 32 (3)

12. (1) Where a Proctor or other person duly authorised by the Proctors under section 32 (3) proposes to impose an immediate fine he or she shall serve a notice in writing on the student member concerned stating the reason for the imposition of the fine and the amount of the fine, and notifying the student member of his or her right of appeal to the Court of Summary Jurisdiction. (2) An immediate fine shall not exceed the maximum permitted under regulation 2 of Council Regulations 33 of 2002 (referring to section 34.3 (a) of Statute XI). (3) An immediate fine shall be paid to the Clerk to the Proctors within two working days of the date of imposition, whether or not the student member intends to appeal. (4) If the student member wishes to appeal against the imposition of the fine, or the amount of the fine, he or she shall be entitled to appeal to the Court of Summary Jurisdiction in accordance with Statute XI and regulations made under that Statute and apply for suspension of payment of the fine in accordance with regulation 14 (10) below.' [These changes, made on the recommendation of the Proctors, empower the Proctors and other authorised persons to levy on the spot fines on student members, with the aim of discouraging unacceptable behaviour after examinations.]


COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of Congregation:

Bannerman, D.M., Faculty of Psychological Studies

Dowler, R.E.M., MA, St Stephen's House

Griffiths, C.L., Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Jackson, D.G., Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Jefferies, N.S., Systems and Electronic Resources Service

Lawson, E., Phonetics Laboratory

Pratap, S.E., Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine

Saunders, N.J., Faculty of Physiological Sciences,


EDUCATIONAL POLICY AND STANDARDS COMMITTEE OF COUNCIL

For changes in regulations for the conduction of university examinations, to come into effect on 13 May 2004, see Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4693 (28 April 2004).


DIVISIONAL AND FACULTY BOARDS

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 14 May 2004, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • *CONGREGATION 13 May 2004
    • *Election (Public Orator)
  • CONGREGATION 18 May 2004 2 p.m.
    • Voting on Legislative Proposal: Proctors' Disciplinary Powers
  • CONGREGATION 27 May 2004
    • Elections
  • *CONVOCATION 15 May 2004
    • *Election of Professor of Poetry
      • Details of nominations received
  • * List of forthcoming Degree Days
  • * List of forthcoming Matriculation Ceremonies

CONGREGATION 18 May 2004 2 p.m.

¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that written notice of any intention to vote against, or to propose an amendment to, the legislative proposal below, signed by at least two members of Congregation, must be given to the Registrar by noon on Monday, 10 May 2004.

Voting on Legislative Proposal: Proctors' Disciplinary Powers

The following legislative proposal, submitted by Council under Part 2 of Congregation Regulations 2 of 2002 (Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4633, 9 October 2001, p. 161), which is promoted on the recommendation of the Proctors, empowers the Proctors and other duly authorised persons to levy on the spot fines on student members, with the aim of discouraging unacceptable behaviour after examinations.

WHEREAS it is expedient to discourage unacceptable behaviour by student members, particularly after examinations, NOW THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD, in exercise of the powers in that behalf conferred upon it by the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923, and of all other powers enabling it, enacts as follows. In Statute XI (Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4633, 9 October 2002, and amended with effect from 21 January 2003 (Gazette, Vol. 133, p. 633, 23 January 2003): 1 Delete section 10 and substitute: `10. The function of the Court of Summary Jurisdiction shall be to hear and determine, in accordance with procedure set out in regulations made under section 29 of this statute, complaints made to it by the Proctors that a student member has committed a breach of the provisions of section 2, 6, or 7 of this statute, appeals against immediate fines imposed under section 32 (3) of this statute, and applications made by the Proctors under sections 42 (1) and 46 (3) of this statute.'

2 After section 32 (2) insert: `(3) If a Proctor or any member of the university staff who is authorised by the Proctors for the purposes of this sub-section has reasonable grounds for believing that a student member has committed a breach of the Regulations of the Rules Committee relating to behaviour after examinations he or she may impose a fine on that student member (called `an immediate fine') immediately on becoming aware of the breach in question. (4) The procedure to be followed in the imposition of immediate fines, the amount of the fine, and a student member's right of appeal from an immediate fine shall be prescribed in regulations.'

3 Delete section 45 (1) and substitute: `45. (1) Where a fine is imposed upon a student member, or an order is made requiring a student member to pay compensation, under the provisions of this statute, the fine or compensation shall be paid within seven days (or two days, in the case of fines imposed under section 32 (1)) whether or not an appeal is pending, unless the person or body which imposed the fine or compensation, or the Court to which any appeal is made, makes an order, in accordance with procedure set out in regulations made under section 29 of this statute, suspending or deferring payment.'

CONSULTATIVE NOTICE

REVIEW OF LAW

The Social Sciences Board is undertaking a review of the Faculty of Law as part of its programme of regular rolling reviews of units under its aegis. The Head of Division, Mr D.A. Hay, will chair the review committee, the terms of reference of which are:

(i) To review the quality of teaching and research in the Faculty of Law by reference to international standards of excellence, and having regard to the University's Mission Statement and Corporate Plan and to the divisional plan.

(ii) To review the organisational and management structures in Law including such matters as academic and non-academic planning and recruitment; accommodation and future space needs; and the relationship between the sub-units within the unit, and between the unit and cognate subject areas and colleges with which it is involved in teaching and/or research.

(iii) To review progress made in response to the last review and to identify any further action required in the light of changed circumstances during the period since that review. (iv) To make recommendations to the divisional board, bearing in mind where there are financial implications the level of resources likely to be available within the University and possible alternative ways of raising funds to implement them.

(v) To refer the recommendations to the Planning and Resources Committee and the Educational Policy and Standards Committee as appropriate. The membership of the committee is as follows:

Mr Donald Hay, Head of the Social Sciences Division

Professor Ewan McKendrick, Pembroke College

Professor David Robertson, St Hugh's College

Professor Andrew Goudie, Master of St Cross College

Professor John Phillips, King's College London

Professor David Feldman, University of Cambridge

Professor Jane Stapleton, ANU

The review committee would welcome written comments on matters falling within its terms of reference. These should be sent to the secretary of the review committee, Ms M.A. Robertson, Social Sciences Division, 34 St Giles', by 11 June.


GENERAL NOTICES

Regulations relating to the use of IT facilities

The following regulations relating to the use of the University's IT facilities are made by the ICT Committee with the approval of Council. They may also be found at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/statutes/regulations/196-052.shtml.

ICTC Regulations 1 of 2002

REGULATIONS RELATING TO THE USE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY FACILITIES Made by the ICTC on 6 June 2002 Approved by Council on 24 July 2002, and as amended with effect from 17 October 2003

1. In these regulations, unless the context requires otherwise, `college' means any college, society, or Permanent Private Hall or any other institution designated by Council by regulation as being permitted to present candidates for matriculation.

2. University IT and network facilities are provided for use in accordance with the following policy set by Council:

(1) The University provides computer facilities and access to its computer networks only for purposes directly connected with the work of the University and the colleges and with the normal academic activities of their members.

(2) Individuals have no right to use university facilities for any other purpose.

(3) The University reserves the right to exercise control over all activities employing its computer facilities, including examining the content of users' data, such as e-mail, where that is necessary:

(a) for the proper regulation of the University's facilities;

(b) in connection with properly authorised investigations in relation to breaches or alleged breaches of provisions in the University's statutes and regulations, including these regulations; or

(c) to meet legal requirements.

(4) Such action will be undertaken only in accordance with these regulations.

3. These regulations govern all use of university IT and network facilities, whether accessed by university property or otherwise.

4. Use is subject at all times to such monitoring as may be necessary for the proper management of the network, or as may be specifically authorised in accordance with these regulations.

5. (1) Persons may make use of university facilities only with proper authorisation.

(2) `Proper authorisation' in this context means prior authorisation by the appropriate officer, who shall be the Director of Oxford University Computing Services (`OUCS') or his or her nominated deputy in the case of services under the supervision of OUCS, or the nominated college or departmental officer in the case of services provided by a college or department.

(3) Any authorisation is subject to compliance with the University's statutes and regulations, including these regulations, and will be considered to be terminated by any breach or attempted breach of these regulations.

6. (1) Authorisation will be specific to an individual.

(2) Any password, authorisation code, etc. given to a user will be for his or her use only, and must be kept secure and not disclosed to or used by any other person.

7. Users are not permitted to use university IT or network facilities for any of the following:

(1) any unlawful activity;

(2) the creation, transmission, storage, downloading, or display of any offensive, obscene, indecent, or menacing images, data, or other material, or any data capable of being resolved into such images or material, except in the case of the use of the facilities for properly supervised research purposes when that use is lawful and when the user has obtained prior written authority for the particular activity from the head of his or her department or the chairman of his or her faculty board (or, if the user is the head of a department or the chairman of a faculty board, from the head of his or her division);

(3) the creation, transmission, or display of material which is designed or likely to harass another person in breach of the University's Code of Practice on Harassment;

(4) the creation or transmission of defamatory material about any individual or organisation;

(5) the sending of any e-mail that does not correctly identify the sender of that e-mail or attempts to disguise the identity of the computer from which it was sent;

(6) the sending of any message appearing to originate from another person, or otherwise attempting to impersonate another person;

(7) the transmission, without proper authorisation, of e-mail to a large number of recipients, unless those recipients have indicated an interest in receiving such e-mail, or the sending or forwarding of e-mail which is intended to encourage the propagation of copies of itself;

(8) the creation or transmission of or access to material in such a way as to infringe a copyright, moral right, trade mark, or other intellectual property right;

(9) private profit, except to the extent authorised under the user's conditions of employment or other agreement with the University or a college; or commercial purposes without specific authorisation;

(10) gaining or attempting to gain unauthorised access to any facility or service within or outside the University, or making any attempt to disrupt or impair such a service;

(11) the deliberate or reckless undertaking of activities such as may result in any of the following:

(a) the waste of staff effort or network resources, including time on any system accessible via the university network;

(b) the corruption or disruption of other users' data;

(c) the violation of the privacy of other users;

(d) the disruption of the work of other users;

(e) the introduction or transmission of a virus into the network;

(12) activities not directly connected with employment, study, or research in the University or the colleges (excluding reasonable and limited use for social and recreational purposes where not in breach of these regulations or otherwise forbidden) without proper authorisation.

8. Software and computer-readable datasets made available on the university network may be used only subject to the relevant licensing conditions, and, where applicable, to the Code of Conduct published by the Combined Higher Education Software Team (`CHEST').

9. Users shall treat as confidential any information which may become available to them through the use of such facilities and which is not clearly intended for unrestricted dissemination; such information shall not be copied, modified, disseminated, or used either in whole or in part without the permission of the person or body entitled to give it.

10. (1) No user may use IT facilities to hold or process data relating to a living individual save in accordance with the provisions of current data protection legislation (which in most cases will require the prior consent of the individual or individuals whose data are to be processed).

(2) Any person wishing to use IT facilities for such processing is required to inform the University Data Protection Officer in advance and to comply with any guidance given concerning the manner in which the processing may be carried out. 11. Any person responsible for the administration of any university or college computer or network system, or otherwise having access to data on such a system, shall comply with the provisions of the `Statement of IT Security and Privacy Policy', as published by the ICT Committee from time to time. 12. Users shall at all times endeavour to comply with guidance issued from time to time by OUCS to assist with the management and efficient use of the network. 13. Connection of computers, whether college, departmental, or privately owned, to the university network is subject to the following additional conditions:

(1) (a) Computers connected to the university network may use only network identifiers which follow the University's naming convention, and are registered with OUCS.

(b) In particular all such names must be within the domain .ox.ac.uk.

(c) Any exception to this must be authorised by the Director of OUCS, and may be subject to payment of a licence fee.

(2) (a) The administrators of computers connected to the university network are responsible for ensuring their security against unauthorised access, participation in `denial of service' attacks, etc.

(b) The University may temporarily bar access to any computer or sub-network that appears to pose a danger to the security or integrity of any system or network, either within or outside Oxford, or which, through a security breach, may bring disrepute to the University.

(3) (a) Providers of any service must take all reasonable steps to ensure that that service does not cause an excessive amount of traffic on the University's internal network or its external network links.

(b) The University may bar access at any time to computers which appear to cause unreasonable consumption of network resources.

(4) (a) Hosting Web pages on computers connected to the university network is permitted subject to the knowledge and consent of the department or college responsible for the local resources, but providers of any such Web pages must endeavour to comply with guidelines published by OUCS or other relevant authorities.

(b) It is not permitted to offer commercial services through Web pages supported through the university network, or to provide `home-page' facilities for any commercial organisation, except with the permission of the Director of OUCS; this permission may require the payment of a licence fee.

(5) Participation in distributed file-sharing networks is not permitted, except in the case of the use of the facilities for properly authorised academic purposes when that use is lawful and when the user:

(a) in the case of services under the supervision of OUCS, has demonstrated to the satisfaction of the Director of OUCS or his or her nominated deputy that the user has obtained prior written authority for the particular activity from the head of his or her department or the chairman of his or her faculty board; or

(b) in the case of services provided by a college or department, has demonstrated to the satisfaction of the nominated college or departmental officer that the user has obtained prior written authority for the particular activity from the head of that college or department.

(6) (a) No computer connected to the university network may be used to give any person who is not a member or employee of the University or its colleges access to any network services outside the department or college where that computer is situated.

(b) Certain exceptions may be made, for example, for members of other UK universities, official visitors to a department or college, or those paying a licence fee.

(c) Areas of doubt should be discussed with the Registration Manager at OUCS. 14. (1) If a user is thought to be in breach of any of the University's statutes or regulations, including these regulations, he or she shall be reported to the appropriate officer who may recommend to the appropriate university or college authority that proceedings be instituted under either or both of university and college disciplinary procedures.

(2) Access to facilities may be withdrawn under section 46 of Statute XI pending a determination, or may be made subject to such conditions as the Proctors or the Registrar (as the case may be) shall think proper in the circumstances.

Examining Users' Data

15. All staff of an IT facility who are given privileged access to information available through that facility must respect the privacy and security of any information, not clearly intended for unrestricted dissemination, that becomes known to them by any means, deliberate or accidental. 16. (1) System Administrators (i.e. those responsible for the management, operation, or maintenance of computer systems) have the right to access users' files and examine network traffic, but only if necessary in pursuit of their role as System Administrators.

(2) They must endeavour to avoid specifically examining the contents of users' files without proper authorisation. 17. (1) If it is necessary for a System Administrator to inspect the contents of a user's files, the procedure set out in paragraphs (2)--(5) below must be followed.

(2) Normally, the user's permission should be sought.

(3) Should such access be necessary without seeking the user's permission, it should, wherever possible, be approved by an appropriate authority prior to inspection.

(4) If it has not been possible to obtain prior permission, any access should be reported to the user or to an appropriate authority as soon as possible.

(5) For the purposes of these regulations `appropriate authority' is defined as follows:

(a) in the case of any university-owned system, whether central or departmental: if the files belong to a student member, the Proctors; if the files belong to any member of the University other than a student member, the Registrar or his or her nominee; or, if the files belong to an employee who is not a member of the University, the head of the department, college, or other unit to which the employee is responsible, or the head's delegated representative;

(b) in the case of a departmental system, either those named in (a) above, or, in all circumstances, the head of department or his or her delegated representative;

(c) in the case of a college system, the head of the college or his or her delegated representative.


Musical events

Queen's College

Organ Recitals

The following recitals will be given at 1.10 p.m. on Wednesdays in the chapel, Queen's College. Admission is free, with a retiring collection. Further details may be found at http://www.queens.ox.ac.uk.

5 May: CHRISTOPHER BUCKNALL, Lincoln College

12 May: ANDREW REID, Westminster Abbey

19 May: HENRY FAIRS, London 26 May: PETROS BALALAKOS, London

2 June: MARK WILLIAMS, St Paul's, London

9 June: DANIEL TURNER, Queen's College

16 June: IAIN QUINN, Yale University


Music for Ascension Day

A service with music for Ascension Day will be held at 8 a.m. on Thursday, 20 May, in the Back Quad, Queen's College.


Concert

THE CHOIR OF QUEEN'S COLLEGE will give a concert at 7.30 p.m. on Thursday, 10 June. Music by Howells and Leighton will be performed in the chapel, followed by madrigals and part-songs in the Fellows' Garden. Admission will be by programme (£6/£4), to include wine. Programmes may be reserved by e-mailing: rosemary.rey@queens.ox.ac.uk.


St John's College and the Centre for Portuguese Language/Instituto Camoes

The Portuguese guitar—two centuries of popular music

PEDRO CALDEIRA CABRAL (Portuguese guitar/cittern) and JOAQUIM ANTÓNIO SILVA (guitar) will play a selection of pieces by Portuguese composers at 8 p.m. on Saturday, 5 June, in the Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's College. Admission is free, and can be reserved by obtaining a programme from the porters' lodge, St John's. Each programme will be valid as an admission ticket until 7.50 p.m. Any remaining vacant seats will be filled from the door during the last ten minutes before the concert starts.


OXFORD UNIVERSITY COMPUTING SERVICES

Address: 13 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6NN
Telephone: Oxford (2)73200
Web: http://www.oucs.ox.ac.uk
Opening hours: opening hours: Monday--Friday, 8.30 a.m.–8.30 p.m.

Shop

The Computing Services Shop provides a counter service for the sale and distribution of computer hardware, software, consumables and stationery. All current members of the University are entitled to use the Shop; however, sales of software are restricted to full members. The Shop is just inside the main entrance to OUCS. Opening hours are from 9 a.m.–4.45 p.m., Monday–Friday (except Thursday, 9.30 a.m.–4.45 p.m.). Telephone: Oxford (2)73200, fax: (2)83401, e-mail: shop@oucs.ox.ac.uk.

Help Centre

The Computing Services Help Centre is open between 8.30 a.m. and 8.30 p.m. It provides a variety of specialist equipment (scanners, zip drives) as well as access to terminals for e- mails, web browsing and use of specialist or standard software. Advisors are on hand between 8.30 a.m. and 8.30 p.m., Monday–Friday, to answer queries, and hardware support can be sought through a booking system. See www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/help/. E-mail: help@oucs.ox.ac.uk; tel.: (2)73200.


Personal Computer Maintenance Service

We offer a very competitively priced maintenance service for PC and Macintosh personal computers, as well as their printers and other peripherals. It is available to University Institutions, Colleges and to University members on a personal basis for their privately owned equipment, including a discount for students. Full details can be found at www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/maintenance/.


NSMS: The Network Systems Management Services

NSMS provides a variety of chargeable IT support services to the University and its associated institutions. It can manage file servers, workstations, anti-virus software installations, holiday cover for support staff, web services, and web based conference registration. See /www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/nsms/.


HFS: Hierarchical File Server

The HFS is centrally funded service providing backup and archive services to senior members, postgraduates and staff. To protect your data on the HFS, you can register online, then install and configure the software on your computer. See www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/hfs/.


Printing facilities

OUCS operates a colour printing service from a wide range of PC and MAC applications onto laserprinters or a large format inkjet printer, from A4 to A0 paper sizes. The poster printing service is the most popular, with choices of heavy-coated or glossy paper for the largest print. Prices start at only 21 pounds for an A0 poster. To find out more see www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/printing/colour/.


Security

Oxford University Computer Emergency Response Team (OxCERT) responds to break-ins, system compromises and network abuse 9 a.m.--5 p.m., Monday--Friday; other times on a best efforts basis. E-mail: oxcert@ox.ac.uk; voicemail: Oxford (2)82222; Web: www.ox.ac.uk/it/compsecurity/oxcert/.

(Note: OxCERT does not handle virus-related problems unless they have a major impact on e-mail servers or the network infrastructure. Virus incidents and assistance—see www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/viruses/.)


Courses

OUCS offers an extensive programme of practical IT courses, covering introductory and specialised uses of computers, common operating systems, and popular application software. See details and bookings are available online at www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/courses/.


ECDL

OUCS is a training and testing centre for the European Computer Driving Licence. Drop-in sessions for the ECDL take place every Tuesday in Michaelmas term, and Wednesday in Hilary term, and Thursday in Trinity term between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. at OUCS. See www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/ecdl/.

IT Learning Programme

Full details on all courses can be found at http://www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/courses/, where it is also possible to book online. Any queries regarding the IT Learning Programme can be addressed to: courses@oucs.ox.ac.uk.

ONE-HOUR SESSIONS

Working with Word

Word 2000: Styles and Table of Contents. Monday, 10 May, 12.30 p.m. Word 2000: Mail Merge. Monday, 17 May, 12.30 p.m. Word 2000: Tables, Tabs and Indents. Monday, 24 May, 12.30 p.m.


Electronic Resources Awareness

A Gateway to Library Riches: Searching Online Catalogues. Tuesday, 4 May, 12.30 p.m.

Exploiting Electronic Resources in Teaching and Learning. Tuesday, 11 May, 12.30 p.m. Online Maps. Tuesday, 18 May, 12.30 p.m. British Census Data Online (CASWEB). Tuesday, 1 June, 12.30 p.m. Databases for Education. Tuesday, 8 June, 12.30 p.m.


Getting Started with Linux

Linux. An Introduction. Wednesday, 5 May, 12.30 p.m. Linux. Web and E-mail. Wednesday, 12 May, 12.30 p.m. Linux: Office Software. Wednesday, 19 May, 12.30 p.m.


Linux Further

Command Line. Wednesday, 26 May, 12.30 p.m. Text Editors. Wednesday, 2 June, 12.30 p.m. Shell Scripting. Wednesday, 9 June, 12.30 p.m.

Endnote

Searching Remote Databases Using End

Note. Wednesday, 19 May, 12.30 p.m. Importing Reference Data into End

Note. Wednesday, 26 May, 12.30 p.m. Subject Bibliographies. Wednesday, 9 June, 12.30 p.m. Using EndNote to Manage Images. Wednesday, 16 June, 12.30 p.m.


Weblearn

Weblearn: Managing Study Areas. Monday, 10 May,12.30 p.m. Weblearn: Group Communications Rooms. Monday, 17 May, 12.30 p.m. Weblearn: MCQ (Multiple-choice Question) Papers. Monday, 24 May, 12.30 p.m. Weblearn: Questionnaires. Monday, 7 June,12.30 p.m. Weblearn for Floor Managers. Tuesday, 8 June 2 p.m. Weblearn: Pigeon Holes. Monday, 14 June, 12.30 p.m. Weblearn: Short Answer Papers. Monday, 21 June. 12.30 p.m.


COURSES WITH THREE-HOUR SESSIONS

Note: the figure in round brackets shows the number of sessions of the course.

Foundation Courses

IT Skills: The Essentials (4). Tuesday, 4–25 May, 9.15 a.m.

Word Processing

Word for your Thesis, Reports and Long Documents (2). Tuesday, 4 and 11 May, 9.15 a.m.; Tuesday, 25 May and 1 June, 2 p.m.; Monday, 7 and 14 June, 5.30 p.m.

Spreadsheets

Excel 2000: Essential Spreadsheets (2). Wednesday, 19 and 26 May, 9.15 a.m. Spreadsheets for Data Management (2). Wednesday, 9 and 16 June, 9.15 a.m.


Computer Operating Systems

Apple Macintosh: An Introduction (1). Wednesday, 2 June, 2.p.m. Apple Macintosh: Further Use (1). Wednesday, 9 June, 2.p.m.


Web Publishing

HTML: An Introduction (2). Thursday, 13 and 20 May, 2 p.m.; Monday, 17 and 24 May, 5.30 p.m.; Wednesday, 2 and 9 June, 9.15 p.m. Web Publishing: Essential Skills (5). Monday, 10 May--14 June, 2.p.m. (Session will not run Bank Holiday 31 May);Tuesday, 18 May--15 June, 9.15 a.m. Web Publishing: Creating Interactive Web Pages (3). Monday, 7--21 June, 2.p.m. Dreamweaver MX 2004 Essentials (2). Monday, 10 and 17 May, 2 p.m.


Databases

Database Design (1).Wednesday, 5 May, 9.15 a.m. Access Essentials (3). Wednesdays, 12--26 May, 9.15 a.m.


Bibliographic Databases

EndNote for Creating Bibliographies (1). Tuesday, 18 May, 2.p.m.; Tuesday, 8 June, 2 p.m. End

Note: Styles and Customising Citation Formats (1). Tuesday, 25 May, 2 p.m.


Statistics and Mathematics

SPSS for Windows: An Introduction (2). Thursday, 3 and 10 June, 2 p.m. Matlab: An Introduction (6). Friday, 30 April--4 June, 5 p.m.


Programming

Java Programming (6). Tuesday, 4 May--8 June, 2 p.m.


Multimedia and Graphics

Flash: An Introduction (1). Wednesday, 12 May, 2 p.m. Photoshop: Working with Digital Images—Basic (1). Thursday, 6 May, 2 p.m.; Tuesday, 11 May, 2 p.m. Photoshop: Working with Digital Images ` Further (1). Thursday, 13 May, 2 p.m.; Tuesday, 18 May, 2 p.m. Illustrator: An Introduction (3). Monday, 7--21 June, 9.15 a.m.


Publishing and Presentation

PowerPoint: Creating Presentations (2). Thursday, 6 and 13 May, 5.30 p.m.; Mondays, 10 and 17 May, 9.15 a.m.; Tuesdays, 8 and 15 June, 9.15 a.m. PowerPoint: Advanced Topics (1). Monday, 24 May, 9.15 a.m.; Tuesday, 22 June, 9.15 a.m.


Computer8

Drop-in sessions for past students of some of our courses. You can bring along your course handbooks and problems and we will be available to guide you through the work. The sessions are not intended for specific problems that go significantly beyond the course you attended—we recommend coming along on a more advanced course, or contacting the OUCS Help Centre—but we will help you to understand the course material more thoroughly and show you where you can apply it. Thursday, 6 May--Thursday 17 June, 9.30 a.m.--1 p.m.


European Computer Driving Licence

ECDL: Drop-in Sessions. Thursday, 6 May--17 June 2004; Wednesday, 23 June; Thursday, 1 July, 9.30 a.m.--1 p.m. ECDL: Intensive (5 days). Monday--Friday, 12 July--16 July 9.15 a.m.--5 p.m.


FULL-DAY COURSES

PHP and MySQL: Developing Interactive Web Pages. Tuesday, 11--25 May, 9.15 a.m.--5 p.m. (3 days) Photoshop in Focus. Thursday, 3 June and Friday, 4 June 9.15 a.m.--5 p.m. (2 days) Dreamweaver MX 2004 Essentials. Monday, 24 May, 9.15 a.m.--5 p.m. (1 day)


FULL-DAY COURSES FOR ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF

Word for Admininistrative Staff: Advanced Features. Monday, 28 June, 9.15 a.m.--5 p.m. (1 day) Dreamweaver MX 2004 Essentials for Administrative Staff. Thursday, 1 July, 9.15 a.m.--5 p.m. (1 day)


APPOINTMENT, ASSIGNMENT, AND COMMENCEMENT OF DUTY

PROFESSORSHIP OF THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE

ANDREW WILSON, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Wolfson College and University Lecturer in Roman Archaeology, has been appointed to the professorship with effect from 1 October 2004. Dr Wilson will be a fellow of All Souls College.


UNIVERSITY LABORATORY OF PHYSIOLOGY

On the recommendation of the Medical Sciences Board, Council has assigned the University Laboratory of Physiology to J.C. ELLORY, MA, D.SC. (B.SC., PH.D. Bristol), Fellow of Corpus Christi College and Professor of Physiology, for a period of three years from 1 October 2004.


PROFESSORSHIP OF GEOGRAPHY

DAVID STEPHEN GARFIELD THOMAS, MA, D.PHIL., Professor of Geography, University of Sheffield, who has been appointed to the professorship, will now take up his duties on 1 August 2004.

APPOINTMENTS AND REAPPOINTMENTS


medical sciences division

Appointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURER

Pharmacology

daniel anthony (d.sc., ph.d. London). Fellow of Somerville College. In Systems Pharmacology. From 1 August 2004 until 31 July 2009.

Public Health

michael parker (b.ed. West of England, ph.d. Hull). Fellow of St Cross College. In Medical Ethics. From 1 May 2004 until 30 April 2009.

CLINICAL LECTURER

Paediatrics

dominic francis kelly (mb, b.chir. Cambridge). In Paediatrics. From 1 February 2005 until 31 January 2011.

Reappointments

READER AND HONORARY NHS CONSULTANT

Obstetrics and Gynaecology

stephen howard kennedy, ma (md London). In Obstetrics and Gynaecology. From 1 1 September 2004 until the retiring age.


INAUGURAL LECTURES

Lady Margaret Professor of Divinity

THE REVD PROFESSOR G. PATTISON will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 11 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Thinking about God in an age of technology.'


Rhodes Professor of American History

PROFESSOR R. CARWARDINE will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 17 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Abraham Lincoln, God, and the American Civil War.'


Regius Professor of Greek

PROFESSOR CHRISTOPHER PELLING will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 20 May, in the Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's College.

Subject: `Greek lives.'


WEIDENFELD VISITING PROFESSOR OF EUROPEAN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

The tempation of the impossible: Victor Hugo's Les Misérables

MARIO VARGAS LLOSA, Weidenfeld Visiting Professor of European Comparative Literature 2003–4, will lecture on the following days in the Nelson Mandela Lecture Theatre, the Saïd Business School. Unless otherwise indicated, the lectures will begin at 5 p.m. Thur. 6 May, 5.30 p.m.: `The dark vein of destiny.' Wed. 12 May: `Touchy monsters.' Wed. 19 May: `The great theatre of the world.' Wed. 26 May: `Rich, poor, leisured, idle, and marginal.' Wed. 2 June: `Civilised barbarians.' Fri. 4 June: `From heaven above.' Wed. 9 June: `The temptation of the impossible.'


CYRIL FOSTER LECTURE 2004

THE HON. GARETH EVANS, President, the International Crisis Group, and formerly Foreign Minister of Australia, will deliver the Cyril Foster Lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 10 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `When is it right to fight? Rethinking the jurisprudence of military force.'


GRINFIELD LECTURES ON THE SEPTUAGINT

Critics and controversies: early modern debates about the meaning of the Septuagint

PROFESSOR SCOTT MANDELBROTE, Cambridge, will deliver the Grinfield Lectures at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Examination Schools. 6 May: `The Letter of Aristeas and its meaning for early modern scholarship.' 13 May: `Scripture and the mathematicians: chronology and proof of the authority of the Septuagint.' 20 May: `Vindicated by Christ and the Apostles: the Septuagint and the New Testament in early modern study.'


WILDE LECTURES IN NATURAL AND COMPARATIVE RELIGION

From pure will to unbounded love

PROFESSOR P. FORREST, University of New England, New South Wales, Australia, will deliver the Wilde Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination Schools. Tue. 4 May: `The existence of the primordial God.' Wed. 5 May: `God changes.' Wed. 12 May: `Developmental theism and another look at the problem of evil.' Tue. 18 May: `De Trinitate.' Wed. 19 May: `The kenotic account of the Incarnation.'


CHERWELL–SIMON LECTURE

PROFESSOR ANTHONY LEGGETT, Distinguished Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Nobel Laureate 2003, will deliver the Cherwell–Simon Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Friday, 30 April, in the Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon Laboratory.

Subject: `Does the everyday world really obey quantum mechanics?'


LYELL LECTURES IN BIBLIOGRAPHY

Suppleatur per ymaginacionem: exceptional images in later medieval English manuscripts

DR K. SCOTT, Massachusetts at Amherst, will deliver the Lyell Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination Schools. Tue. 4 May: `A model book for Nicholas de Lyra's Postilla litteralis.' Thur. 6 May: `The enigma of All Souls MS 10.' Tue. 11 May: `The unique pictorial "Afterpiece" to The Abbey of the Holy Ghost in BL Stowe 39.' Thur. 13 May: `The genealogical genre: BL Royal I.B.x.' Tue. 18 May: `A Gothish episode in the Renaissance: BL Additional 21974.'


CLARENDON LECTURES IN ENGLISH

Yeats and lyric form

PROFESSOR HELEN VENDLER, Porter University Professor, Harvard, will deliver the Clarendon Lectures in English at 5 p.m. on the following days in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building. Wed. 12 May: `Forms in "Nineteen Hundred Nineteen".' Fri. 14 May: `Yeats at sonnets.' Mon. 17 May: `Yeats's nationalistic measure: "Easter 1916" and other poems.' Wed. 19 May: `The sequence again: supernatural songs.'


CAMERON MACKINTOSH LECTURE

The Cameron Mackintosh Lecture, which will take place at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 19 May, in the Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, St Catherine's College, will take the form of a conversation between SHERIDAN MORLEY, NICK ALLOTT, MICHAEL GEARIN-TOSH, and others.

Subject: `Drama at Oxford University.'


O'DONNELL LECTURES IN CELTIC STUDIES

Books from Ireland, fifth to ninth century

PROFESSOR R. SHARPE will deliver the O'Donnell Lectures at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 20 May, and Friday, 21 May, in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building.


ASTOR LECTURE

PROFESSOR I. PAPERNO, Berkeley, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 11 May, in the Taylor Institution.

Subject: `Why did we all love Stalin? Memoirs and diaries of the Soviet experience.'


RADHAKRISHNAN MEMORIAL LECTURES

Nationalism and secularism in modern India

PROFESSOR AIJAZ AHMAD will deliver the Radhakrishnan Memorial Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination Schools. Fri. 7 May: `Antinomies of nationalism—an overiew.' Fri. 14 May: `Secularism, anti-secularism, and the question of religion in Indian politics.' Wed. 19 May: `The liberal tradition, the left, and the offensives of the far right.'


J.W. JENKINSON MEMORIAL LECTURES

Jenkinson Lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Mondays in Lecture Room B, the Zoology/Psychology Building. Tickets are not required for admission. PROFESSOR CHERYLL TICKLE, Dundee
10 May: `Limb development—from start to finish.' PROFESSOR RUDOLF TAFF, Indiana
24 May: `Evolution: a tale told by embryos.'


EDUCATIONAL POLICY AND STANDARDS COMMITTEE AND MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES

The Bologna Process—Principles, Policy, and Strategy

PROFESSOR GARETH JONES, Imperial College, London, will lead a seminar and discussion group at 2.30 p.m. on Wednesday, 5 May, in the Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, Department of Physics, on the Bologna Process. The Bologna Process, promulgated in 1999, is an initiative of EU Education Ministers to establish a `European Area of Higher Education'. One of the aims is to harmonise degree programmes and qualifications, which would help academic mobility. The UK Government is a signatory to the Process, and the way in which the ideas it entails are adopted could have far-reaching consequences for many UK and Oxford degree programmes. For further information see http://www.bologna-berlin2003.de.


CLASSICS

Nelly Wallace Lectures

PROFESSOR ERIC CSAPO, Toronto, will deliver the Nelly Wallace Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following Fridays in the Macgregor-Matthews Room, New College. 14 May: `Dramatic performance in classical Greek vase painting.' 28 May: `The privatisation of theatre in ancient Greece and Rome.' 11 June: `Show biz: economic conditions contributing to the rise of the acting profession in the fifth and fourth centuries bc.' 18 June: `The men who built the theatres: theatropolai and architektones.'


Dionysus Recast: Ancient Drama in the Modern World

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Fraenkel Room, Corpus Christi College. Some papers will be accompanied by readings or performances. Two papers will be given at some of the meetings. D. WILES, Royal Holloway, London
5 May: `Sophoclean Diptychs.' E. IOANNIDOU
5 May: `Postmodern inscriptions on the classical text.' K. RILEY
12 May: ` "That way madness lies": Seneca and the Hercules Furens tradition in Elizabethan drama.' M. LEIGH
19 May: To be announced. F. MACINTOSH, APGRD and Oxford
26 May: `Dance, Decadence and Modernity.' Y. ZARIFI, Royal Holloway, London
2 June: `Aristophanes in performance.' H. EASTMAN, Floodtide Productions
9 June: `Greek tragedy in contemporary political theatre.' A. WILLIS
9 June: `Trojan Women in performance: adapting Euripides' play for the modern stage, 2004.' D. HULTON, Exeter and Foursight Theatre
16 June: `Foursight Theatre's 2004 production of Agamemnon.' A. BURKE, Queen Margaret, Edinburgh
16 June: `The Oresteia and the British press.'


HISTORY OF ART

Interdisciplinary Research Seminar in the Philosophy and Theory of the Visual Arts

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Danson Room, Trinity College.

Conveners: Dr J. Hyman (Queen's) and Dr K. Reed- Tsocha (Trinity). PROFESSOR C. HARRISON, Open University
30 Apr.: `Painting a coming storm.' DR J. HYMAN
7 May: `Realism and relativism in the theory of art.' DR K. REED-TSOCHA
14 May: `Crossing boundaries: analytical aesthetics and the history of art.' PROFESSOR M. PODRO, Essex
21 May: `Wollheim, trompe l'oeil, and Andrea Mantegna.' DR P. GOLDIE, King's College, London
28 May: `The experience of conceptual art.' PROFESSOR G. POLLOCK, Leeds
4 June: `The aesthetics of difference.' DR J. FRIDAY, Kent
11 June: `The ontology of the photographic image.'


LIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES, MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Mathematical Biology and Ecology Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Fridays in Lecture Room 3 (unless otherwise stated) at the Mathematical Institute.

Conveners: Professor P. Maini and Dr S. Schnell. DR R. DIEZ, Dundee
7 May: `Neurogenesis in the developing spinal cord: making the right number of neurons at the right time.' PROFESSOR T. NAKAGAKI, Hokkaido University
21 May: `How does an amoeba tackle some geometrical puzzles? Smartness based on pattern formation of cellular rhythms.' DR M. MEYER-HERMANN
4 June: `Implications on germinal centre affinity maturation from individual-based models.' DR C. MOLINA-PARIS, Leeds
18 June: `Mathematical model of T-cell activation.'


MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Theoretical Chemistry Group Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the John Rowlinson Seminar Room (20.12) (opposite the main lecture theatre).

Convener: Professor M. S. Child PROFESSOR M.S. CHILD
17 May: `Semi-classical dynamics of the water molecule.' PROFESSOR J. WHEELER, University of California, San Diego
24 May: `Phase transitions and critical phenomena in molecularly complex systems.'


Department of Atomic and Laser Physics

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 1.45 p.m. on Mondays in the Audrey Wood Seminar Room, Clarendon Laboratory. PROFESSOR J. EISERT, Potsdam and Imperial College
10 May: `Generation, manipulation, distillation and estimation of continuous-variable entanglement.' S. ROSENWAKS, Ben-Gurion University
Thur. 20 May: `The chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL): principles of operation and recent achievements.' DR M. DUNNE, AWE Aldermaston
24 May: `Inertial confinement fusion research at AWE Aldermaston.'


Theoretical Physics Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in the Dennis Sciama Lecture Theatre, Department of Physics.

Convener: S. Sarkar. PROFESSOR B. SATHYAPRAKASH, Cardiff
14 May: `The search for gravitational waves.' PROFESSOR J. EGGERS, Bristol
28 May: `Hydrodynamic instability of a moving contact line.' PROFESSOR J POLONYI, Strasbourg
11 June: To be announced.


Theoretical Particle Physics

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in the Dennis Sciama Lecture Theatre, Department of Physics. Details of the 18 June seminar will be announced later.

Convener: S. Sarkar. H. WITTIG, DESY Hamburg
7 May: `Random matrix theory and the low- energy regime of QCD.' H. DREINER, Bonn
21 May: `Light neutralinos and Supernova 1987a.' A. PILAFTSIS, Manchester
4 June: `Probing minimal 5-dim extensions of the Standard Model.'


MEDICAL SCIENCES

Department of Experimental Psychology

The following departmental seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Weiskrantz Room (C113), the Department of Experimental Psychology. PROFESSOR G. HITCH, York
4 May: `Some challenges for a simple account of how we process information about serial order.' DR M. RUSHWORTH
11 May: `Decisions and actions sets in the medial frontal cortex.' PROFESSOR F. GROSJEAN, Universite de Neuchatel, Switzerland
18 May: `Bilingualism, biculturalism and deafness.' PROFESSOR S. ANSTIS, University of California
25 May: `I thought I saw it move: illusions of motion perception.' DR F. PULVERMÜLLER, Cambridge
1 June: `Brain reflections of language and actions.' PROFESSOR J. MORTON, UCL
8 June: `Dissociative identity disorder and the architecture of memory.' PROFESSOR J. ELMAN, University of California
15 June: `Generalisation beyond our experience: the poverty of the stimulus problem.'


MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

Graduate seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5.15 p.m. on Mondays in the Margaret Thatcher Centre, Somerville College.

Conveners: Professor C. Robinson and Dr A Tooke. A. WATT
17 May: `Lessons in reading in Proust's A la recherche du temps perdu.' DR P COOKE, Manchester
31 May: `Baudelaire, Delacroix, and the problematics of literary painting.' S. KAPOOR
14 June: `Beyond marginality: a new reading of prostitutes in Flaubert.'


Italian Graduate Seminar

Unless otherwised indicated the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in Lecture Room 2, Christ Church.

Conveners: Professor M.L. McLaughlin and E. Tandello. M. FORTUNATO, Istituto Italiano di Cultura, London
4 May: `L'arte di perdere senso - 4 anni di cultura italiana in UK.' J. CANNON, Berkeley
19 May, Room 2, Taylor Institution: `The imaginary universe of Italo Calvino: from the Trilogy to Sotto il sole giaguaro.' A. D'AQUINO
1 June: `Umberto Eco on the edge of complexity: Il nome della rosa and the paradigm shift.' E. ARCARI, Venice
15 June: `Castelvetro e la Ragione contro il Caro: studio per un'edizione critica.'


MODERN HISTORY

Seminar in medieval history

Conveners: R. Davies, P. Brand, and M. Whittow. The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College. DR H. SUMMERSON, Dictionary of National Biography
3 May: `Laurence of Ludlow.' PROFESSOR L. PATERSON, Warwick
10 May: `The Troubadours and the Holy Land.' J. CORNER, Graduate student, Worcester College
17 May: `Troubadour literature and evidence for lay literacy in the Senechausée of Carcassonne c.1270-c.1330.' PROFESSOR A. SCHARER, Vienna and All Souls
24 May: `The King's voice. Interpreting some early medieval charters.' DR A. MUSSON, Exeter
31 May: ` "Ruling Virtually": law, authority, and the power of image in late medieval England.' PROFESSOR M. RUBIN, Queen Mary, London
7 June: `The Passion of the Virgin and the Jew.' DR S. MACLEAN, St Andrews
14 June: `Performance or madness? The strange case of Charles the Fat's outburst at the royal assembly of 873, and the ruler portrait in the Ludwigpsalter.'


Language and history seminar

DR WENDY BENNETT, Cambridge, will give a seminarat 2.15 p.m. on Tuesday, 11 May, in the MacGregor Room, Oriel College.

Conveners: David Cram, Robert Evans, and Suzanne Romaine.

Subject: `Women and language in seventeenth-century France.'


East and East–Central Europe Seminar

PROFESSOR MANFRED HILDERMEIER will give a seminar at 2.15 p.m. on Friday, 30 April, in the MacGregor Room, Oriel College.

Conveners: Richard Crampton, Robert Evans, and David Rechter.

Subject: `An alternative to revolution? Liberal milieu in Russian province, 1900–17.'


MODERN HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCES

Social and economic history of the British Isles, 1000–1600

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Hovenden Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: R. Davies, Dr S. Baxter, R. Evans, N, Mayhew, P. Nightingale, and R. Peberdy. DR S. OOSTHUIZEN, Cambridge
5 May: `Sokemen and Freemen: tenure, status and landscape conservation in eleventh-century Cambridgeshire.' DR C. M. WOOLGAR, Southampton
12 May: `Speech and the senses in late medieval England.' DR S. BAXTER
19 May: `Rethinking royal patronage in late Anglo-Saxon England: the case of Bampton Hundred in Oxfordshire.' S. MILESON
26 May: `The pre-history of enclosure in England: eleventh to fifteenth centuries.' E. MCGIBBON, Cambridge
2 June: `Changes in the Manor Court of Sutton- in-the-Isle (Cambs.) before the Black Death.' DR R. GODDARD, Nottingham
9 June: `A medieval glass ceiling: women and trade, 1350-1500.' M. MULLER, Birmingham
16 June: `Peasant communities and socio- economic change in later medieval England.'


ORIENTAL STUDIES

Armenian studies seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays at the Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane. (Lecture titles are provisional.)

Convener: Professor T. van Lint. T. DE WAAL
20 May: `Contemporary Armenia and Nagorno Karabagh.' V. GULBENKIAN
3 June: `Armenian epic storytelling and the Ashugh tradition.' DR T. GREENWOOD
17 June: `A topic in Armenian history up to 1100.'


PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICS

DR PIERO PINZAUTI, Florence, will lecture at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, 19 May, in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: Professor G.A. Cohen and Dr P.M.S. Hacker.

Subject: `Marx's commodity fetishism and Wittgenstein's grammatical confusion.'


THEOLOGY

Old Testament Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Mondays in the Seminar Room, Theology Faculty Centre, 41 St Giles'.

Convener: Professor John Barton. D. LAMB
3 May: `Jehu and David: the Deuteronomist's most favoured Israelite kings.' DR J. MIDDLEMAS
17 May: `Did Deutero-Isaiah write Lamentations 3?' MS M. NEVADER
31 May: `Legislating the sacred: spatial orientation in Ezekiel 40-8 and Deuteronomy.' PROFESSOR J. BARTON
14 June: `Imitation of God in the Old Testament.'


INTERDISCIPLINARY SEMINAR SERIES

Restoration to Reform: 1660-1832—British literary, social, cultural, intellectual, and political history in the long eighteenth century

The following seminars will be held at 5.15 p.m. on Mondays in the Goodhart Seminar Room, University College.

Conveners: Dr R. Ballaster, Professor M. Butler, Dr F. Dabhoiwala, Dr C. Gerrard, Dr K. Gleadle, Dr T. Keymer, Professor I Rivers, Professor K. Sutherland, and Dr A. Williams. R. REES
3 May: `Secret murder: the death of secret history in Roxana.' C. LIVINGSTONE
3 May: `The "Universal Historian": Daniel Defoe's creative historiography.' P. BURDITT
17 May: `Richardson's hangover? Generic experimentation and the "network novel" in the 1750s.' G. SOUTHCOMBE
31 May: `Fighting Calvin in verse: the poetry of the General Baptist, Thomas Grantham.' W. VAN REYK
31 May: `Forging "unnatural" connections: Evangelicalism and domesticity in the works of Wordsworth and Cowper.' M. BIGOLD
14 June: `Elizabeth Rowe's fictional and familiar letters: exemplarity, enthusiasm, and the production of posthumous meaning.'


SAID BUSINESS SCHOOL

Complex Adaptive Systems

The following seminars will be held at 12.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in Seminar Room A.

Convener: F. Reed-Tsochas. DR J. EFSTATHIOU
4 May: `Complexity in manufacturing systems.' PROFESSOR M. NEWMAN
18 May: To be announced. PROFESSOR T. HALPIN-HEALY
1 June: To be announced.


INSTITUTE FOR CHINESE STUDIES

China research seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in Room 207, Institute for Chinese Studies, Walton Street (except on 7 May, which will be held on Friday at 5 p.m.).

Convener: R. Mitter. J. LAM, Michigan
7 May (Friday): `Imperial agency in Ming music culture.' D. PALMER, LSE
13 May: `Body cultivation and modern religiosity in post-Mao China.' S. ABE, Duke University
20 May: `Moving Buddha: collecting Chinese Buddhist sculpture and art history.' R. EGAN, University of California, Santa Barbara
27 May: `A reconsideration of Li Qingzhao and her Afterword to Records on metal and stone.' Z. CHAO, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences
3 June: `Art and archaeology of the Ming dynasty.' (Title to be confirmed) M. HILLENBRAND, SOAS
10 June: `Trauma and the politics of identity: form and function in narratives of the 28 February incident.' T. RAN, Institute for Chinese Studies
17 June: `Sloped land conversion program, grain reform and local government in China.' C. STARR, Durham
24 June: ` "Monkey! Magic: from the sixteenth-century Chinese novel to twentieth-century Japanese television series: cross-cultural and cross-media narrative transformations.'


COMPUTING LABORATORY

Numerical Analysis Group

Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminars

Unless otherwise stated, the following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the OUCL Lecture Theatre.

Conveners: E. Süli and J. Scott (RAL). DR D. JENKINSON, Huddersfield
29 Apr., RAL: `Parameterised approximation estimators for mixed noise distributions.' DR P. DELLAR
6 May: `Non-hydrodynamic modes and lattice Boltzmann equations with general equations of state.' DR P. MATTHEWS, Nottingham
13 May: `Pattern formation with a conservation law.' DR B. BAXTER, Birkbeck
20 May: `Exponential Brownian motion and divided differences.' DR M. ANJOS, Southampton
27 May: `Towards an SDP-based algorithm for the satisfiability problem.' PROFESSOR P. HOUSTON, Leicester
3 June: ` Discontinuous Galerkin methods for time-harmonic Maxwell's equations.' DR S. GRATTON, CERFAX, Toulouse
10 June, RAL: `Practical implementation of an inexact GMRES method.' DR Y. HU, Wolfram Research
Tue. 15 June, RAL: `Fast and high-quality display of large relational information with an introduction to recent advances in mathematica.' PROFESSOR G. STRANG, MIT and Oxford
17 June: `Generating good meshes and inverting good matrices.'


DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL STUDIES

Research seminars

Unless otherwise indicated the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in Teaching Room 1, 15 Norham Gardens.

Convener: Professor K. Sylva. J. GARCIA, London Institute for Education
10 May: `Evidence-based Policy and Practice Initiative (EPPI): current work.' J. MASON, Open University
17 May: `Practitioner research: the discipline of noticing.' L. HAGGARTY AND K. POSTLETHWAITE, Open University; Exeter
24 May: `Reflecting on action research as a strategy for supporting teacher change.' R. PRING AND T. BRIGHOUSE, Oxford; London Institute of Education
Wed. 26 May, Teaching Room 3, 30 Norham Gardens: `Have the ideals of comprehensive schooling still got a future?' D. MCINTYRE, Cambridge
7 June: `Reconsidering classroom observation as a research method.'


OXFORD CENTRE FOR HEBREW AND JEWISH STUDIES

Isaiah Berlin Public Lectures in Middle East Dialogue

YOSSI KLEIN HALEVI will deliver an Isaiah Berlin Public Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 13 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Can religion heal the wounds of the Middle East?'


WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE

Disease and History

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Mondays at the Wellcome Unit, 45–7 Banbury Road.

Convener: Dr M. Harrison. I SMITH AND E. VAN HEYNINGEN, Warwick
10 May: `Morbidity and mortality in the concentration camps of the South African War (1899-1902): research in progress.' P. DRINOT
17 May: `Venereal disease, prostitution and sexuality in Peru, 1850-1950.' K. KALLING, University of Tartu
24 May: `The history of leprosy in Estonia.' M. HARRISON
7 June: `Medicine, malaria, and morale: the Burma campaign of the Second World War.'


OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC STUDIES

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held as shown at the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies. DR LOUAY SAFI, Islamic Society of North America
Wed. 5 May, 5 p.m.: `Religious solidarity and political loyalty in Islamic sources and experience.' H.E. DR JUWONO SUDARSONO, Ambassador of the Republic of Indonesia
Thur. 6 May, 2 p.m.: `Political Islam and the 2004 election in Indonesia.' DR G. BUNT, Lampeter
Thur. 6 May, 5 p.m.: `E-jihad: towards an Islamic information revolution.' MR GARET EVANS, formerly Foreign Minister of Australia, and President, International Crisis Group
Mon. 10 May, 11 a.m.: `Peace and change in the Middle East.' THE RT. HON. CHRISTOPHER PATTEN, CH, European Commissioner for External Affairs and Chancellor of the University
Mon. 24 May, 5 p.m., Sheldonian Theatre: `Islam and the West—at the crossroads.'


NISSAN INSTITUTE OF JAPANESE STUDIES

Seminar in Japanese Studies

Unless otherwise indicated the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Dahrendorf Room, Founders' Building, St Antony's College.

Convener: A. Waswo. PROFESSOR R. CHRISTENSEN, Brigham Young University
3 May: `Why does the LDP always win?' DR I. P. HALL, historian and author
10 May: `Japan's intellectual spin machine East and West, and how to unspin it.' PROFESSOR K. SAKAMOTO, Gakushuin University
17 May: `The politics of Golden Week in Japan.' PROFESSOR E. FOWLER, University of California, Irvine
24 May: `Living on the brink in post-bubble Japan: San'ya and Kamagasaki as sites of homelessness.' PROFESSOR H GU LYNN, University of British Colombia
31 May: `Formaldehyde for the future: popular culture in South Korea–Japan relations, 1965-2005.' DR B. POWELL AND UNDERGRADUATES READING JAPANESE
Wed. 2 June, O'Reilly Theatre, Keble (entrance from Blackhall Road): Mayama Seika's Death of Yoritomo (Yoritomo no shi) in video and live performance.


CENTRE FOR LINGUISTICS AND PHILOLOGY

Computational Linguistics Graduate Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Fridays at the Centre for Linguistics and Philology, Walton Street.

Convener: Professor S. G. Pulman. DR J. CUSSENS, York
30 April: `Applying inductive logic programming to natural language processing.' DR A COPESTAKE, Cambridge
7 May: `Extreme underspecification: using semantics to integrate deep and shallow processing.' PROFESSOR Y. WILKS, Sheffield
14 May: `Ontotherapy: or how to stop worrying about what there is.' DR S. CLARK, Edinburgh
21 May: `Wide-coverage statistical parsing with combinatory categorical grammar.' K. SPÄRCK-JONES, Cambridge
28 May: To be announced. DR J. CARROLL, Sussex
4 June: `Wide-coverage parsing of unrestricted text using the RASP system.'


QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

International Gender Studies Centre

Research methodologies: theories—realities

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

Conveners: Dr Z. Morrison and Dr J. Reynell. DR R. SETH, Punjab University
29 Apr.: `Towards feminist empowerment: idealising tradition.' DR E FERRARO, Quito, Peru
6 May: `Gendered economics theory and methodology. Androcentric bias in economic policy and discourse in urban Quito. The case of women street sellers in the time of dollarisation.' C. CANTONE, SOAS
13 May: `Women peep out: gender, visibility and space in Senegalese mosques.' DR R. CHAN, Warwick
27 May: `Lust or liberty—is there feminism for Chinese women writers?' DR D. JOSHI, Southampton
3 June: `Feminist research: breaking shackles - whose and why? DR A. COLES
10 June: `Families flourishing or floundering overseas: issues of methodology and authorship from a feminist perspective.' DR S. LEDWITH
17 June: `Praxis in the gendering of trade union democracy.'


Barbara Ward Commemorative Lecture

PROFESSOR E. SINN, University of Hong Kong, will deliver the Barbara Ward Commemorative Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 19 May, in the Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

Subject: `Women at work: brothel keepers in nineteenth-century Hong Kong.'


Refugee Studies Centre

Public Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House. Further information may be obtained from Dominique Attala (e-mail: rscmst@qeh.ox.ac.uk). DR C PANTER-BRICK, Durham
5 May: `Cross disciplinary issues of mental health and social resilience: Afghan youth in Kabul and Peshawar.' DR N. VAN HEAR, COMPAS
19 May: `I went as far as my money would take me: conflict, forced migration, and class.' DR E. HEDMAN
26 May: ` The making and unmaking of "IDPs": Indonesia revisited.'


Elizabeth Colson Lecture

DR D. TURTON will deliver the Elizabeth Colson Lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 12 May, in Rhodes House.

Subject: `The meaning of place in a world of movement: lessons from long-term field research in southern Ethiopia.'


Weekend workshops

Workshops will be held as follows. For further details, e-mail: rscmst@qeh.ox.ac.uk. PROFESSOR J.C. HATHWAY, Michigan University Law School (presenter)
15–16 May: `The law of refugee status.' DR R. FARAH, Western Ontario, and FIONA MCKAY, Lawyers Committee for Human Rights (presenters)
22–3 May: `Palestinian refugees and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.'


BRASENOSE COLLEGE

Tanner Lectures in Human Values

PROFESSOR JOSEPH STIGLITZ, Professor of Economics, Columbia Business School, Nobel Laureate in Economics, will deliver the Tanner Lectures in Human Values at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 4 May, and Wednesday, 5 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Ethical dimensions of globalisation.'


LADY MARGARET HALL

Canada Seminars

DR LAURA PEERS, Lecturer Curator, the Pitt Rivers Museum, will speak at 5.30 p.m. on Thursday, 13 May, in the Talbot Hall, Lady Margaret Hall. There will be an opportunity to meet the speaker informally afterwards. Further information may be obtained from Vanessa Windsor, Lady Margaret Hall (telephone: Oxford (2)74302, e-mail: vanessa.windsor@lmh.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `New relationships, new knowledge: First Nations photographs and the Pitt Rivers Museum.'


NUFFIELD COLLEGE

Nuffield social science postdoctoral seminar series

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Seminar Room (D Staircase), Nuffield College. DR B. RITTBERGER, Postdoctoral Prize Research Fellow in Politics
11 May: `The egg of Colombus: explaining the making of parliamentary democracy in the European Union (1951-2003).' DR N. LETKI, Postdoctoral Prize Research Fellow in Politics
25 May: `Does ethnic heterogeneity erode social capital? Evidence from Britain.' DR. H. HAMILL, British Academy Postdoctoral Research Fellow
8 June: ` "Stealin' cars and gettin' shot": crime and punishment in West Belfast.' DR. C. VERMEERSCH, Postdoctoral Prize Research Fellow in Economics
15 June: `Parental involvement and school quality in Kenya: some preliminary results.'


Political Economy in Practice and Theory

The following seminars will be held at 3.30 p.m. on Fridays in the Large Lecture Room, Nuffield College. Details of the 4 June seminar will be announced later.

Conveners: C. Jennings and I. McLean. SIR ALAN BUDD
30 Apr.: `Fiscal policy making in the UK.' DR MCLEAN
7 May: `New labour and new social democracy.' (Discussant: Stewart Wood) C. ALLSOPP
14 May: `The Monetary Policy Committee of the Bank of England.' T. ATKINSON, Member of a high level group of the European Commission
21 May: `Social scientists and social policy in Europe.' P. KLEMPERER, Member of the UK Competition Commission
28 May: `Auction design and competition policy.' M. ROBSON
11 June: `The UK as a fiscal and monetary union.' L. STOKER, Berkeley
18 June: `Are citizens' policy opinions self- interested?' (Joint session with Nuffield Political Science Seminar)


ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

Asian Studies Centre

South Asian History Seminars

The following seminars will be given at 2 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Deakin Room, St Antony's College.

Convener: Dr D.A. Washbrook. DR S. GOOPTU, Calcutta
25 May: To be announced. P. FEINSTEIN
1 June: `Commerce in the Chola Empire, eleventh to thirteenth centuries.' (PRS presentation)


Other seminars

PROFESSOR HIDEAKI MIYAJIMA, Waseda University, will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 1 June, in the Dahrendorf Room, the Founder's Building, St Antony's College.

Convener: Dr Mark Rebick.

Subject: `The state of the Japanese economy.'


PROFESSOR JUNE TEUFEL DREYER, Miami, will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Friday, 4 June, in the Dahrendorf Room, the Founder's Building, St Antony's College.

Convener: Dr Steve Tsang.

Subject: `Taiwan's presidential election and its implications for the consolidation of Taiwan's democracy.' (Taiwan Studies Programme)


Middle class in Asia: Taiwan and other perspectives

This conference will be held on Sunday, 27 June, in the Deakin Room, Founders' Building, St Antony's College.

Conveners: R. H. Barnes, D. Faure, and H.-H. M. Hsiao

Session 1: The middle class, a myth? (9.30 a.m.–10.15 a.m.)

M. REBICK: `The myth of the middle-mass society: inequality and emerging divisions in Japanese society.'


Session 2: `The middle class in East Asian history (10.30 a.m.–11.45 a.m.)

D.FAURE: `The ever-emerging middle class in Chinese history.'

A. WASWO: `The "old" and "new" middle classes of early twentieth-century Japan.'


Session 3: The middle class in Taiwan (11.45 a.m.–1 p.m.)

FONG-MAO LEE, Academia Sinica: `Religious practice of the middle class in Taiwan.' MAU-KUEI CHANG, Academia Sinica: `Ethnicity and class in Taiwan's politics.'


Session 4: The middle class in south-east Asia (2.15–3 p.m.)

R.H. BARNES: `On the margins of the middle class: becoming middle class in rural eastern Indonesia.' BIEN CHIANG, Academia Sinica ` "Kongsi" around the South China Sea: peasants, traders, miners, and corporations.'


Session 5: Making and breaking the middle class (3.45–5 p.m.)

HONG-ZEN WANG, National Chung-Hsin University and Academia Sinica: `Social mobility of the business middle class in Taiwan.' R. GOODMAN: `Education and the development (and collapse?) of the middle class in Japan.'


Session 6: Closing remarks and research agenda (5–6 p.m.)

H.H.M. HSIAO, Academia Sinica: `Prioritising the middle class research in east and southeast Asia.'


Indian texts in historical context: problems and possibilities

This conference, organised jointly with the Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies, will be held on Friday, 7 May, in the Dahrendorf Room, Founders Building, St Antony's College.

Convener: Professor S. Subrahmanyam. P. OLIVELLE, University of Texas–Austin
10.30 a.m.: `Textual history and social reality in the Manavadharmasastra.' F. CLOONEY, Boston College and OCHS
11.30 a.m.: `Exegesis, normativity and structures of authority in the Srimadrahasyatrayasara of Vedanta Desika (fourteenth century).' J. BENSON
2 p.m.: `Pandits and grammarians in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century northern India.' S. SUBRAHMANYAM
3 p.m.: `Rethinking Niti texts in medieval and early modern south India.' N. GREEN
4 p.m.: `A'zam al-karamat: making "Muslim" Saints in the early twentieth-century Hyderabad state.'


European Studies Centre

Debate

PROFESSOR H. HUBEL, Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, and PROFESSOR A. MENON, Birmingham, will debate at 5 p.m. on Friday, 14 May, in the Seminar Room, European Studies Centre, St Antony's College.

Subject: `Is enlargement good for Europe?'


European Studies Centre Lecture

MR RECEP TAYYIP ERDOGAN, Prime Minister of Turkey, will deliver the European Studies Centre Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 28 May, in the Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's College. Admission will be by ticket only (limited places available). Applications should be sent to: dev.office@sant.ox.ac.uk. Further details may be obtained from Ulli Parkinson, St Antony's College (telephone: Oxford (2)74470, e-mail: european.studies@sant.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `Why the European Union needs Turkey.'


Lectures

Unless othewise indicated, the following lectures will take place at 5 p.m. on the days shown in the European Studies Centre. MS VAIRA VIKE-FREIBERGA, President of Latvia
Tue., 11 May: To be announced. PROFESSOR HANS MOMMSEN, Emeritus Professor of Modern History, Bochum
Mon. 17 May: `The dissolution of the Third Reich 1943 to 1945.' JOHN MONKS, General Secretary, European TUC
Fri. 4 June, Lecture Theatre: `Is Europe still the workers' best friend?'


Other meetings

Workshop on sub-national units

This workshop will be held on Thursday, 20 May, in the European Studies Centre.

Convener: Dr Xabier Ezeizabarrena.


Greek–Turkish Conference: The continued rapprochement between Greece and Turkey: (still) genuine or strategic?

This conference will be held on Friday, 28 May, 9 a.m.–4 p.m., in the Maplethorpe Conference Room, St Hugh's College. Registration is necessary: e-mail SEESP@sant.ox.ac.uk.


M.Phil. classes

The following classes will be held in St Antony's College. DR JAN ZIELONKA
Weeks 1–6, Tue., 11 a.m.–1 p.m.: `European integration.' PROFESSOR RICHARD CRAMPTON
Weeks 2–5, Tue., 2.15–4.30 p.m.: `Truth and record.' DR KALYPSO NICOLAÏDIS
Weeks 1, 2, 3, 5, Thur., 2–4 p.m.: `Game theory and negotiation analysis.'


Latin American Centre

Seminars

PROFESSOR CARLOS HUNEEUS, Univ. de Chile and Univ. Catolica de Chile, will give two seminars 11.30 a.m. on Wednesdays in the Latin American Centre, 1 Church Walk. 5 May: `Is democracy now consolidated in Chile?' 12 May: `The Chilean party system: the case of the Christian Democrats.'


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR DAVID WIGGINS will deliver the H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 11 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Objectivity in ethics: two difficulties, two responses.'


OXFORD LYCEUM

The following lectures will be held at 5 p.m. on the days shown in the Examination Schools. PROFESSOR JOSEPH STIGLITZ, Professor of Economics, Columbia Business School, Nobel Laureate in Economics,
Mon. 3 May): `Globalisation and its discontents.' SIR JEREMY GREENSTOCK, UK Special Representative for Iraq
Tue. 11 May: `Iraq and the polarisation of world politics.'

ELIZABETH HANNAH JENKINSON FUND

The Elizabeth Hannah Jenkinson Fund provides small grants (up to £2,500) towards research on developmental biology of invertebrates or vertebrates. Eligibility is restricted to graduates of the University of Oxford with an honours degree in Biological Sciences, Zoology, or Pure and Applied Biology. Applicants should send a curriculum vitae and two-page research proposal to Professor Peter Holland, Linacre Professor of Zoology, Department of Zoology, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS. Closing date: 31 May.

CHAIRMEN OF EXAMINERS

TRINITY TERM 20O4

Preliminary Examination

Fine Art: B.D. CATLING, Ruskin School


Honour Schools

English Language and Literature (Course H): PROFESSOR V.D. CUNNINGHAM, Corpus Christi Geography: DR L.S. WILD, St Hilda's Natural Science—Earth Sciences/Geology (Year 2): DR S.P. HESSELBO, St Peter's


Bachelor of Civil Law

PROFESSOR P.B.H. BIRKS, All Souls


Bachelor of Medicine

cYear 3\: PROFESSOR R.V. THAKKER, Orthopaedic Surgery


Master of Philosophy

Development Studies (Year 1): DR N. GOOPTU, St Antony's

International Relations: DR Y.F. KHONG, Politics and International Relations

Music (Year 1): DR S.M. DARLINGTON, Christ Church


Master of Science

Educational Research Methodology: PROFESSOR D.G. PHILLIPS, Educational Studies

Educational Studies (Syllabus B): PROFESSOR D.G. PHILLIPS, Educational Studies

Mathematical Modelling and Scientific Computing: PROFESSOR M.B. GILES, St Hugh's

Political Theory Research: PROFESSOR M.S. FREEDEN, Politics and International Relations


Magister Juris

PROFESSOR P.B.H. BIRKS, All Souls


CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

For changes in regulations for examinations to come into effect on 7 May 2004, see Supplement (3) to Gazette No. 4692.

CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

 

With the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, and, where applicable, of divisional boards, the following changes in regulations made by divisional boards, faculty boards, and the Continuing Education Board will come into effect on 14 May 2004.

1 Humanities Board

M.St. in History of Art and Visual Culture

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

  1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 648, ll. 42--3, delete ‘comprise one extended essay of between 4,000 and 5,000 words and’ and substitute ‘be assessed by’.

     

  2. Ibid., p. 649, ll. 9--11, delete ‘Two typewritten or printed copies of the extended essay for the compulsory paper must be sent to the Chairman of the Examiners at the address above by noon on Friday of Week One of Hilary Term.’

2 Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board

(a) Honour School of Mathematics

  1. With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in Part B in 2005)

     

    1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 278, after l. 14 insert:

       

      ‘(c) Candidates may offer one unit which is designated as an Extended Essay or Dissertation.’

       

    2. Ibid., after l. 20, insert:

       

      ‘(c) Candidates may offer either one whole unit or one half unit which is designated as an Extended Essay or Dissertation.’

       

    3. Ibid., ll. 40--2, delete ‘Provisional lists …. will be published in the Examination Regulations.’

       

    4. Ibid., p. 279, after l. 13 insert:

       

      Units and half units for Part B [from October 2004] Indicative list

      1. Approved units and half units B1 Foundations: Logic and Set Theory B2 Algebra

        B3 Geometry B4 Analysis

        B5 Applied Analysis

        B6 Theoretical Mechanics B7 Mathematical Physics

        B8 Topics in Applied Mathematics B9 Number Theory

        B10 Martingales and Financial Mathematics B11 Communication Theory (half unit)

        BE Extended Essay

         

      2. Other Mathematics units and half units

        O1 History of Mathematics OS1 Applied Statistics OS2 Statistical Inference OS3 Stochastic Modelling OS4 Actuarial Science

        OCS1 Functional Programming and Algorithm Design OCS2 Numerical Solution to Partial Differential Equations OE Extended Essay

         

      3. Other Non-Mathematical units and half units NP101 History of Philosophy from Descartes to Kant NP102 Knowledge and Reality

    NP122 Philosophy of Mathematics

     

    Units and half units for Part C [from October 2005]

    Provisional lists of units and half-units will be published in the Examination Regulations.’

     

  2. Honour School of Mathematics and Statistics

    With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in Part B in 2005)

    1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 304, delete lines 11--15 and substitute: ‘(a) Each candidate shall offer the unit BS1.

      1. Each candidate shall also offer at least one of the units BS2 and BS3.

      2. Any candidate not offering both BS2 and BS3 shall offer at least one unit from the schedule of ‘Approved units and half units’ for Part B of the Honour School of Mathematics (i.e. those units and half units which have been approved by the Teaching Committee of the Department of Mathematics).

      3. Each candidate may offer up to one unit from those designated as M level.’

  3. Ibid., delete ll. 37--48 and substitute:

     

    ‘Not all listed units and half units will be available each year and some extra units and half units may be added. The final list of units and half units will be published in the Course Handbook by the beginning of Michaelmas Full Term in the academic year of the examination concerned, together with the following details.’

  4. Ibid., p. 305, after l. 14 insert:

    Units and half units for Part B [from October 2004] Indicative list

    1. Statistics units and half units

      BS1 Applied Statistics BS2 Statistical Inference BS3 Stochastic Modelling BS4 Actuarial Science

    2. Other units and half units

From the schedule of units and half units for Part B of the Honour School of Mathematics: all of the units and half units from the lists of ‘Approved units and half units’, ‘Other Mathematics units and half units’, and ‘Other Non-Mathematical units and half units’, except for those listed under ‘Statistics units and half units’ above.

Units and half units for Part C [from October 2005]

Provisional lists of ‘Mathematics’ and of ‘Statistics’ units and half units will be published in the Examination Regulations.’

  1. Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board and Board of the Faculty of Philosophy Honour School of Physics and Philosophy

    With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in Part B in 2005)

    In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 465, l. 16, delete ‘Electomagnetic Theory’ and substitute ‘Covariant Electromagnetism’.

     

  2. Continuing Education Board

Undergraduate Advanced Diploma in Local History

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

  1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 974, l. 51, delete ‘A.’ and substitute ‘Module 1’.

  2. Ibid., p. 975, l. 1, delete ‘B.’ and substitute ‘Module 2’.

  3. Ibid., delete ll. 10-11, and substitute:

    ‘(c) One assignment of between 1,500 and 2,000 words, one assignment of between 2,000 and 2,500, one assignment of 2,000 words plus supporting tables and one assignment of 3,000 words based on the work covered in the Concepts and Methods module (Module 1)’.

  4. Ibid., l. 13, delete ‘(B, above)’ and substitute ‘(Module 2)’.

  5. Board of the Faculty of Classics

 

  1. M.Phil. in Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

    1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.554, l.41, delete ‘Sophocles, Ajax 1-1184’, and substitute ‘Euripides, Orestes 1--347 and 1246--1693’.

    2. Ibid., l.44, delete ‘to answer questions on passages from the prescribed play (3 hours)’ and substitute:

      ‘to take a paper of transcription and of comment on passages in the set text (Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.9; 3 hours)’.

    3. Ibid., l.46, after ‘handling of the text’ insert ‘, and to show, as appropriate, knowledge of the whole play’.

    4. Ibid., l.48, delete ‘Ovid, Heriodes 3, 5, 8, 9, 16, 17’ and substitute ‘either (a) Seneca, Agamemnon or (b) Ovid, Heroides 3, 5, 9, 16.*’.

    5. Ibid., l.51, delete ‘to answer questions on passages from the prescribed poems (3 hours)’ and substitute:

      ‘to take a paper of transcription and of comment on passages in either (a) or (b) (Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.10; 3 hours)’.

    6. Ibid., p.555, l.2, delete ‘to the proper’, and substitute ‘for a proper’.

    7. Ibid., after l. 2 insert:

    ‘*University classes will be given for only one of these options each year.’

     

  2. M.St. in Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

    In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.639, delete ll.20-22 and substitute:

     

    ‘(ii) Euripides, Orestes: papyri, manuscripts, text. (Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.9).

    (iii) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.10]

    Either (a) Seneca, Agamemnon: manuscripts, text, interpretation*

    or (b) Ovid, Heroides 3, 5, 9, 16: manuscripts, text, interpretation.*

    *University classes will be given for only one of these options each year.’

     

  3. M.St. in Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.639, delete ll.33--4 and renumber sub-sections

      (x) and (xi) as (ix) and (x) respectively.

    2. Ibid., p.640, l.2, delete ‘V, I--XIII, 92’, and substitute ‘V.1--XIII.92’.

    3. Ibid., ll.6--7, delete ‘(in H.G. Evelyn-White, Hesiod, The Homeric Hymns and Homerica (Loeb), pp. 480--533)’, and substitute ‘(in M.L. West, Greek Epic Fragments (Loeb, 2003), pp. 38---71)’.

    4. Ibid., p.641, l.33, delete ‘VIII--XV’, and substitute ‘XIII--XV’.

    5. Ibid, p.643, after l.8 insert:

    'In theses and presubmitted essays all quotations from primary or secondary sources, and all reporting or appropriation of material from those sources, must be explicitly acknowledged. Each candidate must sign a certificate to the effect that the thesis or presubmitted essay is the candidate's own work, and that the candidate has read the Faculty's guidelines on plagiarism. This declaration must be placed in a sealed envelope bearing the candidate's examination number and presented together with the thesis or presubmitted essay.'.

     

  4. M.Phil. in Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

    In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 553, after l.30 insert:

     

    '8. In theses and presubmitted essays all quotations from primary or secondary sources, and all reporting or appropriation of material from those sources, must be explicitly acknowledged. Each candidate must sign a certificate to the effect that the thesis or presubmitted essay is the candidate's own work, and that the candidate has read the Faculty's guidelines on plagiarism. This declaration must be placed in a sealed envelope bearing the candidate's examination number and presented together with the thesis or presubmitted essay.'

    and renumber sections 8--10 as 9--11 respectively.

     

  5. Special Regulations of the Divisional and Faculty Boards With immediate effect

    In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 839, after l. 7 insert:

     

    ‘In Languages and Literature candidates will also be required to have attended such classes as the Graduate Studies Committee shall from time to time determine, and to provide evidence of reading competence in German and a second modern language.’

     

  6. Honour School of Literae Humaniores

     

    1. With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

       

      In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 256, ll. 46--50, delete ‘Candidates shall make … together with the thesis.’ and substitute:

       

      ‘All quotations from primary or secondary sources, and all reporting or appropriation of material from those sources, must be explicitly acknowledged. Each candidate must sign a certificate to the effect that the thesis is the candidate's own work, and that the candidate has read the Faculty’s guidelines on plagiarism. This declaration must be placed in a sealed envelope bearing the candidate's examination number and presented together with the thesis.’

       

    2. With effect from 1 October 2006 (for first examination in 2007)

       

      1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 238, l. 23, delete ‘Cicero and Seneca’ and substitute ‘Latin Philosophy’.

         

      2. Ibid., p. 247, delete ll. 6 - 49 and substitute:

       

      ‘Candidates may offer up to five subjects in Philosophy, from the list below. Candidates offering one Philosophy subject only may offer any of the subjects listed below except 199. Those offering at least two Philosophy subjects must select at least one subject in ancient philosophy, i.e. one of 115, 116, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134 and 135. Those offering three or more subjects must also select one subject from 101, 102, 103 and 108. Candidates offering subject 199 (Thesis in Philosophy) must offer at least three other subjects in Philosophy. The syllabus for each subject, including thesis regulations, is specified in Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy. In the list below, numbers in parenthesis after a subject’s title indicate other subjects with which it may not be combined.

       

      101 History of Philosophy from Descartes to Kant 102 Knowledge and Reality

      1. Ethics

      2. Philosophy of Mind

      3. Philosophy of Science and Philosophy of Psychology and Neuroscience (106)

      4. Philosophy of Science and Social Science (105)

      5. Philosophy of Religion

      6. The Philosophy of Logic and Language 109 Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Criticism 110 Medieval Philosophy

      111 Continental Philosophy from Descartes to Leibniz 112 The Philosophy of Kant

      113 Post-Kantian Philosophy 114 Theory of Politics

      1. Plato: Republic (in translation) (130)

      2. Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics (in translation) (132)

      3. Frege, Russell, and Wittgenstein (118)

      4. The Later Philosophy of Wittgenstein (117)

      5. Formal Logic

      6. Intermediate Philosophy of Physics 122 Philosophy of Mathematics

      1. Plato: Republic (in Greek) (115)

      2. Plato: Theaetetus and Sophist (in Greek)

      3. Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics (in Greek) (116)

      4. Aristotle: Physics (in Greek)

      5. Sextus Empiricus: Outlines of Pyrrhonism (in Greek) 135 Latin Philosophy (in Latin)’.

       

  7. Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy

    With effect from 1 October 2006 (for first examination in 2007)

     

    1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 425, ll. 36-7, delete ‘This subject … subject 130.’.

       

    2. Ibid., ll. 39-40, delete ‘This subject … subject 131.’.

       

    3. Ibid., p. 427, l. 16, delete ‘Either (a)’.

       

    4. Ibid., , l. 22 , delete ‘Or (b)’ and substitute ‘131.’

       

    5. Ibid., l. 26, delete ‘131. Either (a)’ and substitute ‘132.’.

       

    6. Ibid., l. 32, delete ‘Or (b)’ and substitute ‘133.’.

       

    7. Ibid., l. 43, delete ‘132’ and substitute ‘134.’.

       

    8. Ibid., p. 427, after l. 45 insert ‘135. Latin Philosophy’.

     

    9 Ibid., l. 46, delete ‘133’.

     

    1. Ibid., p. 429, after l. 18 insert:

       

      ‘(ii) A candidate may not take both of subjects 115 and 130.

      1. A candidate may not take both of subjects 116 and 132.’ and renumber existing sections (ii)-(vi) as (iv)-(viii) respectively.

    2. Ibid., delete ll. 46-49, and substitute:

       

      ‘(i) candidates offering one Philosophy subject only may offer any of the subjects listed above except 121, 123 and 199.

      (ii) candidates offering at least two Philosophy subjects must select at least one subject in ancient philosophy, i.e., one of 115, 116, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134 and 135. Those offering three or more subjects must also select one subject from 101, 102, 103, and 108.’.

       

    3. Ibid., ll. 31-3, delete ‘and 132 …(not 133)’ and substitute:

       

      ‘132, 133, 134, and 135 may be offered only by candidates in Classics and English, Classics and Modern Languages, Literae Humaniores, and Oriental Studies’.

       

    4. Ibid., p. 430, delete l. 6 and substitute ‘133 (Greek), 134 (Greek), 135 (Latin).’.

       

    5. Ibid., delete ll. 7-14.

     

  8. Honour School of Classics and English

     

    With effect from 1 October 2006 (for first examination in 2007)

    In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 131, ll. 52-3, delete ‘Either … 131 (a))’ and substitute ‘Any one of subjects 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135’.

     

  9. Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages With effect from 1 October 2006 (for first examination in 2007)

    In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 141, ll. 43-4, delete ‘Either … 131 (a))’ and substitute ‘Any one of subjects 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135’.

     

  10. Honour School of Oriental Studies

 

With effect from 1 October 2006 (for first examination in 2007)

 

  1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 401, l. 38, delete ‘Either … 132’ and substitute ‘Any one of subjects 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135’.

     

  2. Ibid., p. 417, l. 7, delete ‘Either … 132’ and substitute ‘Any one of subjects 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135’.

 

6 Boards of the Faculties of Classics and English Language and Literature Honour School of Classics and English

 

  1. With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

     

    1. In Examination Decrees, 2003, p. 134, l. 33, after ‘work,’, insert ‘and that the candidate has read the Joint School guidelines on plagiarism.’

       

    2. Ibid., l1. 32-33 delete ‘and their’ and substitute ‘Their’.

     

  2. With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

 

In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.131, delete ll. 37-40, and substitute:

 

‘(viii) Euripides, Orestes: papyri, manuscripts, text [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.9].

(ix) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.10]

Either (a) Seneca, Agamemnon: manuscripts, text, interpretation*

or (b) Ovid, Heroides 3, 5, 9, 16: manuscripts, text, interpretation.*

 

*University classes will be given for only one of these options each year.’

 

7 Board of the Faculty of English Language and Literature

 

  1. D.Phil. in English

     

    With effect from 1 October 2004

     

    In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 841, after l. 13 insert:

     

    ‘5. Confirmation of D.Phil. status

     

    1. Application for confirmation of D.Phil. status shall normally be presented to the Graduate Studies Office not later than two weeks before any meeting of the Graduate Studies Committee before the end of the ninth term after the candidate's admission as a Probationer Research Student, or the tenth term after the candidate's admission to M.Phil. student status.

    2. Application for confirmation of D.Phil. status shall be accompanied by (a) a statement giving the title of the thesis, and summarizing each component chapter in approximately 100 words per chapter, and (b) an overview of the intended thesis, of approximately 1,000 words, stating how much of the thesis is complete and how much remains to be done (with an estimate of the probable date of completion).

    3. The candidate's supervisor shall provide a confidential report on the candidate's application upon the form provided for this purpose. The report shall comment upon the accuracy of the account and feasibility of the timetable, and upon the candidate's progress, together with an estimate of the probable date of completion.

    4. The documents under (ii) and (iii) above shall be considered by the Graduate Studies Committee, or by at least two members of that committee to whom power may be delegated. The committee shall have power either (a) to authorize confirmation of D.Phil. status, or (b) to call for further examination by two assessors.

    5. If the committee adopts (b) under (iv) above, two assessors shall be appointed, one of whom shall, wherever practicable, be one of those who acted at the time of the candidate's transfer to D.Phil. status. The assessors shall have power to call for the submission of written work (which shall normally be of 20,000-30,000 words in length and intended to form part of the thesis) by a date which they shall determine, and shall in any event interview the candidate. The assessors shall jointly report to the Graduate Studies Committee in writing whether they think the status of the candidate should be confirmed. If they do not consider that confirmation should be made, they may recommend either (a) that the candidate should reapply at a later date, or (b) that the candidate should be transferred to M.Litt. status. If they cannot agree, the committee shall appoint a third assessor to read the written work.

    6. Any candidate whose first application for confirmation is refused may reapply on one (only) further occasion. This second application should normally be within two terms of the first. The material required will be the same as under (ii) above, and the same procedure as under (iii)-(v) will be followed.’

       

      and renumber sections 5. and 6. as 6. and 7. respectively.

       

  2. M.St. in English

 

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

  1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 632, delete ll. 46--51 and substitute:

     

    ‘Candidates offering the course in the palaeography of manuscripts up to 1550 under B will be required to take a test in manuscript transcription and to submit for assessment a description of a manuscript, of about 2,500 words, instead of an essay.

    The test, which shall contribute towards the final mark, shall be taken at the end of Hilary Term, and the manuscript description shall be submitted under the same conditions as prescribed above for option B essays.

    Candidates offering the course in bibliography in the period 1550 to the present day under B will be required also to attend a course in manuscript reading and transcription and to pass a test in transcription at the end of Michaelmas Term. Those who do not achieve a satisfactory mark in this test will be required to retake it at the start of Hilary Term. Any candidate not achieving a satisfactory mark at that stage will be deemed to have failed the whole examination. The test will not contribute to the final marks awarded by the examiners.’

     

  2. Ibid., p. 633, l. 8, after ‘examination’ insert:

 

‘other than the test in bibliography in the period 1550 to the present day described above’.

 

8 Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern European Languages M.Phil. in European Literature

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

 

  1. In Examination Decrees, 2003, p. 548, l. 9, delete ‘Or’.

  2. Ibid, after l. 32 insert: ‘Or

    (iv) A methodological essay of approximately 5,000 words on a topic or issue related to the candidate’s Special Subject or dissertation. It might consist, for example, of a theoretical discussion of the candidate’s approach to the material being studied, or a detailed analysis of existing approaches. If candidates choose this option, they will be expected to also attend a set of seminars in (i) or (ii) above, or a set of tutorials in (iii), and to make a presentation. The essay should be typed, and include a bibliography. Candidates should submit two copies, which should be handed in to the Modern Languages Office, 41 Wellington Square, by Friday of 9th Week of Hilary Term. Each should have a cover sheet giving the candidate’s name, college, the title of the essay, the name of the candidate’s supervisor, and the words ‘Essay on Method, submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the M.Phil. in European Literature’.

     

  3. Ibid, p. 635, l. 22, after ‘Trinity Term’ insert ‘[2(A)(iv) for the M.Phil. in European Literature]’.

 

9 Board of the Faculty of Modern History

  1. Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages With effect from 1 October 2004

    In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 331, l. 17, before ‘the Monday of eighth week’ insert ‘by noon on’.

     

  2. Honour School of Modern History and Economics

     

    With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

     

    1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.322, l. 1, delete: ‘(c) British Social History since 1870.’ and substitute ‘(c) British Society in the Twentieth Century.’.

       

    2. Ibid., l. 4, after ‘(b) two Further Subjects in Modern History’ insert ‘, provided that neither option (a) English Society in the Seventeenth Century nor option (b) British Economic History 1700-1870 has been taken under Item 5 above’.

     

  3. Preliminary Examination in Modern History With immediate effect

    In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.82, l. 36, delete ‘Industrial Work and Working-Class Life in Britain 1870-1914and substitute’Working-Class Life and Industrial Work in Britain 1870- 1914’.

     

  4. Preliminary Examination in Modern History and Economics With immediate effect

    In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.83, l. 13, delete ‘Industrial Work and Working-Class Life in Britain 1870-1914’ and substitute ‘Working-Class Life and Industrial Work in Britain 1870- 1914’.

     

  5. Honour School of Modern History and Economics With immediate effect

    In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.321, l. 39, delete ‘British Economic History 1700-1870’ and substitute ‘British Economic and Social History 1700-1870’.

     

  6. Pass School of Modern History and Economics With immediate effect

    In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.323, l. 38, delete ‘British Economic History 1700-1870’ and substitute ‘British Economic and Social History 1700-1870’.

     

  7. Honour School of Modern History and English With immediate effect

In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.326, l. 39, delete ‘by its first meeting of the preceding Hilary Term’.

 

  1. Board of the Faculty of Music Honour School of Music

    With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

     

    In Examination Regulations, 2003, p.365, delete ll.17-18 and substitute ‘one is from List B, one is from List C, one is from either List B or C, and one is from List B, C or D.’

     

  2. Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies

 

  1. M.Phil. in Modern Middle Eastern Studies

     

    With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

     

    1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 581, l. 10, after ‘in Arabic’ insert ‘, Persian’.

    2. Ibid., l. 11, after ‘Advanced Arabic’ insert ‘, Advanced Persian’.

    3. Ibid., l. 16, after ‘Persian’ insert ‘or Advanced Persian’.

    4. Ibid., l. 36, after ‘Arabic’ insert ‘, Advanced Persian’.

    5. Ibid., l. 42, delete ‘10’ and substitute ‘12’.

    6. Ibid., p. 582, after l. 3 insert:

     

    ‘(12) Qajar History, 1797-1921.’

     

  2. M.Phil. in Oriental Studies

     

    With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

     

    1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 583, ll. 14-15, delete ‘The Jewish experience in Europe, from c. 1700 to the present day, or The Jewish experience in the United Kingdom or the United States’ and substitute ‘Modern Jewish History’.

       

    2. Ibid., delete l. 27 and renumber existing items (10)-(12) as (9)-(11).

       

    3. Ibid., p. 587, after l. 1, insert ‘(13) History and culture during the Mongol Period’.

     

  3. M.St. in Modern Jewish Studies

     

    With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

     

    1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 659, l. 6, delete ‘The Jewish experience in Europe 1789-1945’ and substitute ‘Modern Jewish History’.

    2. Ibid., delete l. 7 and renumber existing items (7)-(11) as (6)-(10).

     

  4. M.St. in Jewish Studies

     

    With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

     

    1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 653, l. 14, delete ‘six’ and substitute ‘Five’.

    2. Ibid., l. 15, delete ‘three’ and substitute ‘two’.

    3. Ibid., delete ll. 16-22 and substitute:

      ‘The method of examination will be either by three-hour written examination held at the end of Trinity Term or by essay examination. The method of examination of each option will be determined in advance and will be published in the course handbook. Candidates will be informed in advance of the mode of assessment for each option. The essay examination will consist of the submission of two essays of not more than 2,500 words each, which must be submitted to the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford by 12 noon on the Friday of Noughth Week of the term following that in which the option was taught. Candidates will be notified of the essay topics on the Friday of 8th Week of the term in which the option is taught.’.

    4. Ibid., l. 42, delete ’10,000’ and substitute ’15,000’.

     

  5. Honour School of Oriental Studies

 

  1. With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005) In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 403, after l. 19 insert:

    ’12. Egyptian art and architecture. This paper is optional and may be taken in substitution for 7. or 11. above. Selection of this paper is subject to approval by the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies.’

     

    and renumber existing items 12. – 14. as 13. – 15.

     

  2. With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

 

  1. In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 406, delete l. 26 and reletter items (m)--(w) as (l)-- (v).

  2. Ibid., l. 28, delete ‘Jewish History 1750-1948’ and substitute ‘Modern Jewish History’.

  3. Ibid., l. 33, delete ‘Modern Jewish Thought1’ and substitute ‘Modern Judaism1’.

12 Board of the Faculty of Philosophy

 

  1. Preliminary Examination for Philosophy, Politics, and Economics With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    In Examination Regulations, 2003, delete from ‘These topics’ on p.103, l. 46 to ‘in that book’ on p.104, l. 1 and substitute:

     

    ‘These topics may be studied in Wilfrid Hodges, Logic, 2nd edition (Penguin Books) sections 1-11 and 16-41, omitting Theorem XII of section 24. The logical symbols to be used are those to be found in that book, and the tableaux rules to be used are those listed on pp. 281-2 together with the rules I-VI listed on pp. 191-2.’

     

  2. Honour Moderations and Preliminary Examination in Classics With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    As for the Preliminary Examination for Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (see (a) above).

     

  3. Preliminary Examination in Philosophy and Modern Languages With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    As for the Preliminary Examination for Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (see (a) above).

     

  4. Preliminary Examination for Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    As for the Preliminary Examination for Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (see (a) above).

     

  5. Preliminary Examination for Theology

 

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

 

As for the Preliminary Examination for Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (see (a) above).

OBITUARIES

St Hilda's College

MARGARET LOVELL CLARKE, MA, 24 March 2004; commoner 1960–3. Aged 85.

JANE LOUISE DECAMP, BA, 6 April 2004; exhibitioner 1978–81. Aged 44.

MARGARET ELAINE MAXWELL (née Le Blanc-Smith), MA, 19 December 2003; commoner 1943–6. aGed 78.

JOAN KIMBER (née Gibson), BA, 31 March 2004; commoner 1938–41. Aged 84.

Concerts

Oxford University Orchestra. Conductor: Toby Purser. Rossini—Overture to William Tell. Vaughan Williams—Fantasia on a theme by Thomas Tallis. Tchaikovsky—Symphony No. 4. Friday 7 May 2004. Sheldonian Theatre. Tickets (£10/£5) from the Oxford Playhouse (01865 305305) or on the door.
The Oxford Millennium Orchestra plays Beethoven, Symphony No. 5 in C minor, and Mozart, Piano Concerto No. 24 in C minor. Conductor: Nicholas Mumby. Piano: Alistair Curd. Tuesday, 11 May, 8 p.m., Sheldonian Theatre. Tickets £12/£10/£5 available from the Oxford Playhouse. Telephone: 01865 305305 or www.ticketsoxford.com.


Lectures

Oxford Greek Festival 2004. Oswyn Murray: `Tragic pity', Wed., 5 May, 6 p.m.; Jasper Griffin: `Trojan Womenand the realities of war', Thur., 6 May, 4.15 p.m.; James Morwood: `The Trojan Women: nowhere a glimmer of hope?', Fri., 7 May, 6 p.m.; Chuck Mike and Avery T. Willis: `Directorial approaches to Trojan Women', Sat., 8 May, 4.15 p.m. All lectures in the Auditorium, Oxford Playhouse, before the evening performance or after the matinée performance of Trojan Women(5–8 May, Oxford Playhouse). Admission to the lectures is free. Tickets are required and may be obtained from 01865 305305.
Society for Graduates: Trinity Term 2004. Meetings are held on Fridays at 8 p.m. in the Okinaga Room in WADHAM COLLEGE, Parks Road, Oxford. Visitors are welcome. Graduates of any university and of all ages are eligible for membership. President: Anita Segar, 21 Woodcroft, Kennington; Programme Coordinators: Cynthia Styles, 1 Carey Close, Oxford, OX2 8HX (Tel: 01865 554137); Serena Marner, 19 Meadow Way, Yarnton, Oxon, OX5 1TA (Tel: 01865 378817); Committee: Elsie Callander, Alan Oxley (Treasurer), Derek Phillips; Dining Steward: Anita Segar (tel: 01865 730574). 7 May—Whither the Weather: past, present and future climate (Dr Howard R. Oliver, Meteorologist); 14 May—Wings over Oz—and some (cardiac) arrests (Martyn Segar, M.Eng (aero) A young pilot with Air Traffic Control); 21 May—The death of an elephant (Dr Malcolm Coe, Tropical Ecologist); 28 May—50 years of the computer. What has it given us? (Professor John Burren, Oxford Brookes University); 4 June—Imitating Creation and the World: the Architecture and Form of the Temple in Ancient Egypt (Andrew Ganley, Egyptologist); 11 June—An Oxford Divine of Merton College, Oxford, during 1780–1830 (Allan Ledger, A Guide at Blenheim Palace); 18 June—AGM & Social. Subscriptions: Members £5 per term, visitors £1.50 per meeting.
St Giles' Thursday Lunchtime Talks, Trinity Term 2004—Children of Abraham 29/04/04: Illuminating Islam—Basil Mustafa; 06/05/04: A Christian Perspective—Keith Ward; 13/05/04: A Jewish Perspective—Yossi Klein Halevi; 18/05/04 (Tuesday): A Jewish reaction to The Passion of the Christ—Jonathan Gorsky; 20/05/04: The Wall in Israel/Palestine—Husam Zomlot; 27/05/04: Keeping the Peace: the essential soldier—Roy Giles; 03/06/04: Iraq: the aftermath—Andrew White; 10/06/04: Debt and Poverty from an Islamic Perspective—Muhammad Imran; 17/06/04: Why Fair Trade?—Carol Wills. (The titles of some of the talks are to be confirmed.) The talks will be held at St Giles' Church at 12.30pm. Everyone is welcome. In order to help us with our costs, a small donation would be appreciated. For more information visit: www.st-giles-church.org.


Volunteers sought

Would you be willing to take part in our studies on diet and blood fats? We are studying the links between diet and heart disease. If you are healthy and aged 18–65 years, we would like to hear from you. Contact Alex or Mary at OCDEM, the Churchill Hospital. Tel.: 01865 857262, e-mail: enquiries@oxlip.ox.ac.uk.


Antiques Bought and Sold

Antiques and decorative objects bought and sold: desks and library furniture always wanted, also garden stonework and large gilt picture frames—any condition. Please call: Greenway Antiques, 90 Corn Street, Witney, Oxon. Open Mon.–Fri., 9.30 a.m.–5 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Tel.: 01993 705026, mobile: 07831 585014.


Periodicals Bought and Sold

Back-issues of scholarly periodicals and journals bought and sold. Graham Jeffrey, Periodicals (est. 1967), 29 Cuddesdon Road, Horspath, Oxford OX33 1JD. Tel.: 01865 872528, fax: 776398. E-mail: gjeffreysatu@aol.com.


Restoration and Conservation of Antique Furniture

John Hulme undertakes all aspects of restoration: 30 years' experience; collection and delivery. For free advice, telephone or write to: The Workshop, 11A High Street, Chipping Norton, Oxon. OX7 5AD. Tel.: 01608 641692.


Services Offered

Hypnotherapy Sessions. This is a busy time of year for students, what with exams and all the studying that you need to do. Hypnotherapy can hep you to deal with the stress that may be an issue for you this time of year. Stress can have a detrimental effect on our memory and also our overall performance. So if you need a guiding hand, then call today to book your hypnotherapy session with Richard MacKenzie. Richard has been trained in hypnosis to a high standard and he has been fortunate to learn and share his profession with some of the top people in hypnosis today. He specialises and has great enthusiasm in helping clients with such issues as smoking, slimming and stress. He has an extremely successful practice in Witney, Oxfordshire (UK) in which he has sessions with clients from all over the community in the south-east of England. Telephone: 0845 2265503 or visit the website at: www.richardmackenzie.co.uk.

Town and Country Trees: arboricultural contractors; modern arboricultural techniques; local authority approved; safeguarded by full Public Liability insurance. Free advice and quotations. Tel.: 0845 458 2980 or 07976 261850 (mobile).

Marshall & Galpin Solicitors, Family Department. We are an established Oxfordshire private client firm with offices in Oxford, Thame and Abingdon. We have seven specialist family lawyers who advise on a wide range of issues: divorce and separation, children, financial agreements on divorce, pre-nuptial agreements, cohabitee disputes, separation agreements and pensions. Our lawyers are members of the Solicitors Family Law Association. Two members of the team are Deputy District Judges and three are trained mediators. We offer a range of competitive rates and a short free initial interview. French, Spanish and Italian spoken. Other services provided by the firm include property adviceconveyancing, wills & probate, personal injury & medical negligence, employment and businesscommercial. For further information visit our website at: www.marshallgalpin.com or contact Mary Wakem on 01865 792300 (Oxford), Simon Bassett on 01235 555345 (Abingdon), James Stonham 01844 261966 (Thame).


Secretarial Services

Transcription Service—interviews, seminars, focus groups. Specialised service by experienced secretary/linguist. Latest transcription equipment—poor sound quality no problem! Tapes or digital files. Contact: Alanna Ivin, Rapid Transcriptions on 07801 569045 or e-mail: rapid.transcriptions@pobox.com.


Domestic Services

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: 01865 726983 or 01235 555533.


Situations Vacant

Tutors required. Texas State University is moving its British Summer School to St Hilda's in 2005. Tutors wanted in Fine Arts, Astronomy, Natural Sciences, Western Civilization (1715 to date). Write with CV to Trevor Rowley, AST, 3 Whites Forge, Appleton, Oxon, OX13 5LG or email: trevor@academic-study.com.


Houses to Let

Attractive, fully-furnished, quiet, well-maintained 2-bedroom, 2-study house (could sleep 3) with long garden and garden work-room, gas c.h, near park, shops, bus route, 10 minutes from city centre, available from 1 Sept 2004 to July 2005, £900 per month. Tel.: 01865 725577.

Boar's Hill. 15 minutes to city centre, near Abingdon. Ideal for St Edward's, University, European and Abingdon schools. Lovely 4 bedroom house in best area for 1 year. Roomy, yet modern and economical. £1,495 pcm with offers invited. Contact: Premier 01865 792299.
Academic year 2004–5. Looking for shared house or family home? Premier is pleased to invite you to view our excellent selection. Mostly furnished. All comply to safety regulations, etc. www.premier-letting.co.uk. Contact: Premier 01865 792299.
North Oxford . Charming recently built properties, fully furnished and equipped to a high standard with a choice of 2 bedrooms + study, and 4 bedrooms all with master bedroom en suite, family bathroom, cloakroom, lounge, kitchendiner, landscape garden and private parking. Located in one of the best residential areas and close to Summertown shops and sporting amenity and with easy access to most hospital and most University departments. Best suited to professional or visiting academics with no pets and non smokers. The 2 bedroom + study are available from various dates (early August and mid-September) at £975 pcm. The 4 bedroom is available from late September at £1,195 pcm. Telephone: 01865 516144 or fax: 01865 437996 or email: a.fiorentino@ntlworld.com.
Large, attractive 3–4 bedroom detached house, just minutes' walk from John Radcliffe, Churchill, and Nuffield hospitals. Close to good schools. Fully furnished, c.h., all appliances, off-street parking and rear garden. Suit professional family or responsible graduates. Long lease available. £1,500 p.c.m. (inc. council tax). Contact: fidewan@yahoo.co.uk or telephone 07711 377921.
Superb, modern, architect-designed house in residential north Oxford. Quiet location, very large kitchen/dining room, large living room upstairs (to take advantage of view over large green open space), modern furniture, fully equipped. Easy access to city centre (several bus routes, or walk along road or canal). Easily looked-after garden. Very much has the feeling of being out in the country. Available July and August 2004. Non-smokers and no children preferred. Telephone: 01865 511825 (evenings or Sundays) or email: l.lyons@physics.ox.ac.uk.
Comfortable, 2 bedroom terrace house with c.h. and pleasant garden in central North Oxford to let for next academic year. Large living room, small study, cloakroom, and well-equipped kitchen. Would suit visiting academics. No more than 2 people sharing. Available from beginning of September 2004 to mid-July 2005. Telephone: Mrs Ockenden 01865 512747 or email rosaleen@community.co.uk.
Temple Cowley, modern 3 bed 2 bathroom townhouse in quiet private road. Fully furnished, all mod cons, garage and enclosed garden. Available August 2004 for 12 months. Bike/bus 10 mins to city centre. Adjacent to swimming pool, library and shopping. No smokers/pets. Rent £900 p.c.m. + bills. Contact drdog@bigfoot.com.
Central North Oxford Edwardian family home overlooking picturesque college playing fields; pretty garden going down to Oxford canal. Easy walking distance to city centre. 4 bedrooms (sleeps 8), 2 reception rooms, music room/study. Rowing boat and bicycles available for use. Non-smokers only, no pets. Available mid-July to end August. £500 p.w. Telephone: Oxford 559440 or e-mail tlamb@dial.pipex.com.
Live in comfort near the Thames, a short walk to the city centre. Beautiful Victorian house, 4 bedrooms, (two doubles), c/h, large split level living room, dining room, modern and fully equipped kitchen. Bathroom 1, large bath, bidet and WC; Bathroom 2, shower and WC. South facing garden. Possible use of bicycle(s). Available 7+ weeks, Tuesday 13 July ` Thursday 2 September 2004. Price negotiable. Telephone: +44(0) Oxford 725193.
Eighteenth century Cotswold house, perfect for visiting academic family, recently renovated to high standard, band in the historic centre of pretty village (Eynsham) 6 miles from Oxford. Excellent 24 hour bus service, literally from our door. 2 sitting rooms, (large open fireplace, wood-burning stove), music/playroom with piano, dining-room, kitchen, utility room, 4/5 bedrooms, large study (internet access), c.h., all mod. cons., garage. Charming south-facing walled garden. Available for 4-week period from mid-July to late August. £450 p.w. E-mail: jmacclancy@brookes.ac.uk or Tel.: (home) 01865 880142; (work) 01865 483951.
Temple Cowley, newly renovated and furnished Victorian house with garden, close to local amenities; 1–2 reception rooms; 3 bedrooms (1 with en suite shower and w.c.); fitted kitchen with dishwasher and w/machine. Available mid-Aug. to end Dec. £825 p.m. plus bills. Ideal for professionals and family. Tel.: Yasmin Sidhwa on 01865 711341 or e-mail : sidaley@hilldale.fsnet.co.uk.
North Oxford : new, bright, fully and tastefully furnished and equipped house with 2 bedrooms plus a study, master bedroom en suite, family bathroom, kitchen-diner, lounge, cloakroom, landscaped garden, private parking. Best suited to professionals or visiting academics seeking excellent accommodation in the best residential area just north of the Summertown shopping and sporting amenity, and with easy access to most hospitals and university departments. Available from Apr. Rent £975 p.c.m. (short term and service option). For further details tel.: 01865 516144 or fax: 01865 437996.
An Englishman's home is his castle---so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or e-mail us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: 01865 764533, fax: 764777, e-mail: info@qbman.co.uk.


Flats to Let

North Oxford , Summertown. Excellent selection of studios, luxury apartments, houses for sharers. www.premier-residential- letting.co.uk for further details of these and many other realistically priced and well presented homes. Contact: Premier 01865 792299.
Central North Oxford (Rawlinson Road). Attractive 1 bedroom self-contained flat with patio and parking. Lets of 3 months or more considered. £1,100 pcm. Telephone: 01865 55637207771 802582 or email: pjy@btinternet.com.

Headington. 1.5 miles from Oxford city centre, close to Headington hospitals. A wonderful architect designed, self-contatined, split- level studio apartment. Light and airy with a French window to a tiny private garden. Cooking facilities, cast iron wood burning stove, separate bathroom. Would suit a single person, post graduate, research student or visiting professor. Available for long or short lets. £650 pcm (inc. heating, lighting and cleaning). Telephone: 01865 762991 or email: paulinehodson@supanet.com.
North Oxford . 1 & 2 bedroom apartments adjacent to Summertown shops and sporting amenity. Easy access to University and hospital departments. The 1 bedroom flat is available from August at £675 pcm. The 2 bedroom flat (1 double, 1 singlestudy) is available from various dates (early June, early July, early to late August) at £775 pcm and £795 pcm. Best suited to professionals or visiting academics with no pets and non smokers. Telephone: 01865 516144 or fax: 01865 437996 or email: a.fiorentino@ntlworld.com.
Central North Oxford, charming and spacious south- facing garden flat in quiet residential street, 1 double bedroom, sitting room, kitchen with washing machine, bathroom with bath and shower, plentiful storage space, g.c.h., fully furnished. 4 minutes' walk from University Parks and easy walking to University Science Area, libraries, and city centre. Suit single person or couple. No smokers. Available from July. £860 p.c.m.. Telephone: 01865 512138 or email: mdy@bioch.ox.ac.uk.
Central North Oxford: 10 minutes' walk from city centre, all main university buildings and parks, also very close to the river: available now for short/long lets in extremely quiet, civilised, large Victorian house in this exclusive, leafy, residential Victorian suburb with large, light airy rooms: 2 luxury fully furnished flats, furnished to a very high standard; each has large double bedroom, dining-room, kitchen, bathroom; on first and second floors. Off-street parking, large secluded garden. Both available end June. Tel./fax: 01865 552400.


Vacation Lets

Available for holiday rental—summer 2004. 5 bedroom house in central Headington, convenient for buses to Oxford, coaches for London. Recently updated, newly fitted kitchen, large living room, bathroom and shower room, small garden, two parking spaces. Telephone: 01865 307219 or email fvmorris@hotmail.com.
Family house for rent in central north Oxford. 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2 living rooms, kitchen, garden. Available 24 July–September. £550 p.w. Telephone: 01865 553569 or email miranda.carnegie@dial.appleinter.net.
Very convenient, well-appointed, fully furnished 1 bedroom flat from mid-July for up to 3 months; easy walking distance to town centre, parks, colleges, etc. Suitable for non-smoking visiting academic single personcouple or other professionals. Contact: dorothymyers@gn.apc.org.


Self-catering Apartments

Fully furnished and serviced 3 and 4-star self-catering apartments available in North Oxford; 15 minutes' from Oxford city centre. Suitbale for short lets for visiting academics or business people. From £330 p.w. all inclusive. Sleeps 2–5 people. Tel.: 07870 234725. Web site: http://www.weeklyhome.com. E-mail: info@weeklyhome.com.


Accommodation Offered

Room to let in beautiful 16th century thatched cottage in Old Marston. All mod cons, cleaner, share bathroom and secluded garden, parking available. Close to city centre and John Radcliffe Hospital. Short/long-term lodger sought. Tall applicants beware of some low beams! £460 p.c.m. (inc. bills). Telephone: 01865 250722.
OxfordShortlets offers a portfolio of high quality self- catering short let properties as an excellent alternative to hotel/guesthouse and bed and breakfast accommodation in Oxford and the surrounding villages. We have a wide selection of quality homes available for short stay lets from 1 week up to several months. OxfordShortlets provides property rental on a short-term basis for professional individuals, groups or families requiring housing while visiting Oxford for holiday/vacation, business/academic, relocation purposes or temporary accommodation in between homes. For more information, please contact us on tel: 0870 1602325, fax: 0870 1602327, email: admin@oxfordshortlets.co.uk or visit our website at www.oxfordshortlets.co.uk.
Little Garden B&B: `A home from home'. Single £38, double £50. Reduced monthly rates. Telephone: 01865 358578.
Paying guests, visiting academics, welcomed for short or long stays in the comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple, in exclusive, quiet, leafy central north Oxford, within walking distance of all main university buildings, town centre, parks, river, good shops, and restaurants. All rooms have colour TV, tea-/coffee-making facilities, microwave, and refrigerator and/or deep-freeze availability, c.h., and independent heating. Breakfast included in the very moderate terms. Tel./fax: 01865 557879.


Acommodation Sought

Academic couple, non-smokers, with small well- behaved dog, seek house with garden to rent in Oxford or nearby, ideally from 1 July 2004 for 1 year: length and start date of rental negotiable. Oxford references available. Please contact Fiona Robertson at: fiona.robertson@durham.ac.uk.
Oxford academic couple looking for a house to rent in Oxford or surrounding area for a short period while in the process of moving house. Likely duration of rental from mid-May until end of June. Please contact Chris Davies at: chris.davies@edstud.ox.ac.uk.
Wanted: short let—furnished three- or four-bed property, whilst own undergoes renovation; mid-May–end July; north and east Oxford/west Bucks border. Tel.: 0208 947 8236 or 07778 398349.
House rental sought in central/north Oxford, for July (all or part—ideally the whole month), for professional mum and 2 daughters. Former Oxford resident (still owns Summertown house, and friends), now NYC resident, seeks summer base for visiting UK friends/family. Will consider NYC exchange. Excellent Oxford references. E-mail: Lbarder@nyc.rr.com.
Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us: 01865 764533, fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk. Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.


Accommodation Exchange

Australia. Home Exchange. Orthopaedic surgeon and family looking for accommodation in Oxford from July 2004 for 12 months. Seeking 3 bedroom house close to University for family of four (2 boys, aged 2 and 3 years). Will exchange for charming 3-bedroom `Queenslander', fully air conditioned, large front and back decks, huge garden and located minutes from downtown Brisbane. BMW 318i vehicle also included in exchange. For more information, please email: gallaghers_abroad@hotmail.com.


Holiday Lets

France, Languedoc-Roussillon. Charming cottage on the fringes of Limoux in the heart of Cathar country. Very large shady, secluded, terraced south-facing garden with orchard. 20 minutes from Carcassonne airport, 80 minutes from Toulouse and Perpignan airports; local train station; 20 minutes from A61 autoroute. 1 hour from the Mediterranean and 1 hour from the Pyrenees. Outdoor pool, canoeing, tennis, restaurants, shops, bike hire, etc. all within walking distance. Wonderful walking, cycling, wine and food. Unsuitable for toddlers or wheel-chair users. Sleeps 24. July and August: £300 p.w.; June and September £250 p.w. Contact: dorothymyers@gn.apc.org.
Tuscany. Traditional stonebuilt house in friendly hill village. Sleeps 45. Lovely unspoilt area adjoining incredible nature reservenational park. Walk, paint or relax. Discover Lucca, Florence (1.5 hours), Pisa (1 hour). Beautiful swimming pool complex, shops and restaurants nearby. Brochure available. Tel: 01865 204412.
Sardinia—Costa Smeralda. Tasteful villa in the rural village of San Pantaleo on the north-eastern coast of Sardinia, suitable for 2–6 people. Beautiful mountain views over the Roche Sarde from the house and garden. 3 double bedrooms (2 with double beds and 1 twin). Balcony and large terrazzo for al fresco dining. Deckchairs both on terrace and in the garden. Kitchen and spacious living room with television. Only 10 mins by car from Porto Cervo, the world renowned Pevero golf course and all the major beaches. Close also to a wide range of activities, from the village market, restaurants and mountain trails to tennis, diving, riding, sailing and wind surfing schools. For more information, email: maggan_krim@yahoo.com.
South of France. holiday cottage with private shady garden, 500 yards from sheltered sandy beach in La Ciotat. Sleeps 4 (+ 1 child). Well-equipped kitchen. Linen provided. Available June to October, £420 pw. Telephone: 01869 343037.
Southern France—Montagnes Ardèchoises. Take the best of wild Britain and shift it a long day's journey south to a corner of France high in the Cevennes Mountains. Eat French, drink French in a spectacular landscape. Vive la France profonde! The views from our beautifully converted barn stretch out for 100 miles. Walk or ride in the mountains. Canoe and swim in the lakes and rivers. Fish for fun or for the table. Shop in the great valley markets. Relax and sleep well. Sleeps 6. £475 pw. Telephone: 0207 722 6740 or email: ro.ver@which.net. Dordogne. Timeless and beautiful 17th century stone house in the Vézère valley. Former Pavillon de Chassenow lovingly restored, with traditional lauzesroof and many original features. Stands in its own peaceful and partly wooded grounds of some 3 acres. 5 minutes from village with local shops, 15 minutes from the historic market town of Montignac. Spacious lounge with wood burner, large fully fitted kitchendining area. Sleeps 6 in comfort in 2 double bedrooms (1 en-suite) and 1 twin. Can accommodate 2 more on convertible settee if required. Dining terrace with barbecueþand boules. Own 10m x 4m pool with glorious views; garage. A few weeks remaining both in high season and autumn. From £350 pw. Telephone: 07778 633848 or email: PJWNet@aol.com.
Cyprus—Pegeia. 10 minutes to Coral Bay, 20 minutes to Paphos harbour. Detached luxury villa with own 8m x 4m pool in spectacular location, with views over the Mediterranean. Sleeps 6 in comfort, 2 double (1 en-suite), 1 twin and further occasional beds if required. Each bedroom has own access to pool terrace. Peaceful area but close to local amenities and beach. Fully equipped and air conditioned throughout, TV/DVD. From £425 pw. Also, an apartment available in Paphos, 5 minutes from the picturesque old harbour, terraced house with uninterrupted sea views, sleeps 4. Bedroom balcony for breakfast overlooking the sea; patio and small garden. Fully equipped with air conditioning, TV/DVD, own shaded parking. Use of large communal pool. From £295 pw. Telephone: 07778 633848 or email: PJWNet@aol.com.
Tuscany. Traditional stonebuilt house in friendly hill village. Sleeps 4/5. Lovely unspoilt area adjoining incredible nature reserve/national park. Walk, paint or relax. Discover Lucca, Florence (1.5 hours), Pisa (1 hour). Beautiful swimming pool complex, shops, restaurants nearby. Brochure available. Tel.: 01865 204412.

Paris: small studio, sleeps 2, Paris 12ème between Nation and Bastille, very near Marché Beauvau, Marché Aligre, `Coulée Verte' and the Gare de Lyon. Well equipped with bathroom, kitchen area, digicode and interphone, lift. No smokers. £140 pw, £260 for 2 weeks, £500 for 4 weeks (inc. bills). Available from 1 May to 30 September 2004. Also available: cottage in small village in Lot, near Figeac/Cahors, sleeps 6 in 2 independent units (2, 1+1; 2). £300 for June 2004. For further information and pictures, please email johnellis46@yahoo.co.uk.
Les Bournizeaux. Dordogne/Lot et Garonne. Traditional farmhouse in small rural hamlet sensitively converted with country furniture, set in 2 acres of meadow. Swimming pool (11m x 5m), lawns overlooking fields, vineyards, and woods. 2 large hayloft bedrooms (1 divided) sleeping 6–7, large open-plan dining room/lounge/kitchen (with fridge-freezer, washing machine, electric cooker), library/study, shower, huge cool veranda for dining, barbecues, and games. Local village a short drive away with shop, church, and post office. Nearby world-class golf club of Chateau Vigier, tennis, riding, lake with water sports, restaurants, bastide towns and markets: Bergerac, St Emilion, Sarlat, and Monbazillac near by. Ryan Air flies to Bergerac and BA flies to Bordeaux where a car can be hired. June £700; July–August £800; October–May £550. Telephone: 01993 881408.
Italy: luxury villas, country houses, apartments for convenient rental in Tuscany, Umbria, Sardinia (Emerald Coast), Rome, Florence, Pompeii, Naples. Available at any time of the year and for any length of time. Cars also available for hire at competitive rates. Range of optional services available on demand. Contact: tuscany.countries@libero.it or telephone 00 39 328 713 3951.
Andalucia (Gaucin): a uniquely designed villa, newly built as a series of cottages and apartments around a private courtyard and pool. It can be booked exclusively for large groups (up to 13) during the summer months or as individual units (2+) during the remainder of the year. Telephone: 01865 791999 or visit the website at www.thespanishvilla.com.
Andalucia: Gaucin. Delightful private house in white mountain village to let, 2 June–27 July and 21 Aug.–end Sept., while owner author is away. Two double bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, large living area (with open fireplace, fully fitted kitchen) leading onto terrace with magical view over valleys to coast and mountains of Africa; local swimming pool 5 minutes, Mediterranean 35 minutes; also rivers and fabulous beaches; Atlantic coast 2 hours. Very comfortably furnished, TV, video, washing machine, deep freeze. Excellent maid, by arrangement. £500 p.w., reduction for longer lets. Tel.: 00 34 95 215 11 11 or e-mail: venetia@ari.es.
Barcelona. Fabulous flat in city centre available for week-ends and short breaks. Sleeps 6. Fully equipped kitchen, large sitting room, dining room, 2 bathrooms, 2 balconies. Original tiled floors and 16ft ceilings. Bi-lingual babysitter available. TV/DVD/CD and internet. See http://www.barcelona-breaks.com/ or e-mail clarefontes@hotmail.com.
Naples, Florida: rent our beautiful 4-bedroom, 3-bathroom house, on the Gulf Coast, in southwest Florida. This spacious home is located on one of the best private golf courses in the area. The house sleeps up to 8 people, has a huge south-facing heated swimming pool, and comes fully furnished and equipped. The house is available all year round from £800 p.w. (minimum 2-week let, discount for longer lets), Tel. Mark on: 07802 754154. E-mail: mark@bayrock.co.uk.
Experience the Greek islands of Sporades with Thalpos Holidays. Local villa specialist offers lovely houses and villas in the beautiful islands of Skopelos and Alonissos in the Aegean Sea. Whether you are 2 or 20 persons in the party, and whether you wish to stay in the picturesque town, by the clear blue sea or in the breathtaking countryside, we have just what you are looking for. With more than 10 years of experience we are proud to offer high quality holidays and the very best service. See our programme for 2004 on: www.holidayislands.com, or contact us on e-mail: thalpos@otenet.gr. Tel.: 0030 24240 29036. Fax: 0030 24240 23057.


Houses for Sale

Central North Oxford. 6 bedroom semi-detached home in Bainton Road, adjacent to canal and St John's Sports Ground. For details contact David or Clare on 01865 863712 or email: david.wenham@wycliffe.ox.ac.uk.
Old Headington: early 1920s three-bedroom detached cottage, carefully restored. Small, pretty walled garden. No chain. £325,000 o.n.o. Tel.: 01865 751861.
Oxford. Lovely house for sale. Writer's bijou but roomy house, just over 1 mile from Bodleian Library and city centre, in quiet street with good parking, off the Abingdon Road. Many exceptionally nice features—spacious study leading to deck and overlooking well-stocked garden. Loads of bookshelves, large boarded loft, beautiful, dark stained floors, original art-deco type fireplaces. Potential to expand. harmonious décor, ready to move in. Perfect for 1 or 2 people. 3 bedrooms (smallest converted to dressing roomwardrobe), 2 receptions, kitchen, bathroom (no shower), light and airy. Excellent local facilities (nearby Sainsbury, good buses, outdoor pool, gym, dedicated cycle routes, river walks, allotments, nice neighbours, quiet area, etc.). Chain free sale desired. £298,000—no agents. Telephone 01865 247180 or email: pratima_mitchell@hotmail.com.
Wheatley Village, Oxford. 3 bedroom semi-detached in sought-after area. Excellent road and bus access to central Oxford. Approx. 115-ft rear garden and 50-ft front garden. Off-street parking for 4 cars. New rewiring and new c.h. throughout. Garage, car port, and rear patio. Viewing recommended. £249,995. Contact: savera@onetel.net.uk.

FACULTY OF LAW

University Lecturership in Property Law and Trusts

In association with Trinity College

Applications are invited for this new post, to start on 1 October 2004 or as soon as possible after that date. The University Lecturership is associated with a tutorial fellowship at Trinity College. The combined university and college salary will be according to age on a scale up to £42,900 per annum (pay award pending), plus housing allowance and other college allowances.

Further particulars, containing details of the duties and full range of benefits and allowances associated with both the university and the college posts, may be obtained on the Web at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/ or from Mrs S.E. Samuelson, Faculty Administrator, Faculty of Law, St Cross Building, St Cross Road, Oxford OX1 3UL (e-mail: lawfac@law.ox.ac.uk, telephone: Oxford (2)71491). The closing date for applications is Tuesday, 4 May.

This post is in an area currently designated by the Higher Education Funding Council as a shortage subject under its `Golden Hello' Scheme. The appointee may therefore be eligible for a three-year salary supplement if he or she fulfils certain conditions and if funds are available in the limited budget for the scheme.


Appointment of Faculty Administrator

This permanent, full-time post will be vacant from 1 July 2004. The successful candidate will be an articulate graduate with excellent management and administrative skills. Responsibilities will range from providing advice on academic policy to committee servicing and organising recruitment of academic staff. They will also include managing the busy faculty office.

The Law Faculty is a stimulating environment where the pursuit of excellence is highly valued. The faculty was rated 5* in the 1996 and 2001 Research Assessment Exercises and has an international reputation in many fields of legal scholarship. It has about 850 undergraduate and 345 postgraduate students from around the world, studying for BA, Masters' and doctoral degrees.

The post is on the academic-related grade 3 scale (salary £28,498--£33,679 per annum, with discretionary points up to £39,958---pay award pending).

Further details of the post and the selection process are available on the Web at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/ or from Ms Elisabeth Burroughs, Faculty of Law, St Cross Building, St Cross Road, Oxford OX1 3UL (e-mail: elisabeth.burroughs@law.ox.ac.uk, telephone: Oxford (2)71491). Letters of application, together with a full curriculum vitae and the names and addresses of two referees, should be sent to the same address by 18 May.


DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS

Lecturership in Statistics

In association with St Peter's College

The University seeks to appoint a statistician with interests close to the modern mainstream of the subject to take up this established post from 1 September 2004 or as soon as possible thereafter. The lecturership will be held in conjunction with a tutorial fellowship at St Peter's College.

The combined university and college salary is on a scale up to £42,900 per annum (pay award pending). Additional college allowances are available as set out in the further particulars, including, if living out of college, a £3,800 per annum housing allowance. This post is in an area currently designated as a shortage subject under the HEFCE `Golden Hello' scheme. The appointee may therefore be eligible for a three-year salary supplement. Entitlement to sabbatical leave accrues at the rate of one term's leave for every six terms with normal duties.

The lecturership will be held in the Department of Statistics, which is experiencing an exciting period of growth and development, and is one of the leading UK departments. The successful candidate will be expected to take a full part in the research, teaching, and other activities of the department, and in the teaching and other activities of the college.

Further particulars, including details of how to apply, are available from http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk or from the Personnel Administrator, Department of Statistics, 1 South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3TG (telephone: Oxford (2)72860). The closing date for applications is Tuesday, 4 May.


Appointment of Senior Administrator

One of the University's fastest growing and dynamic departments wishes to appoint an experienced Senior Administrator to provide day-to-day management and strategic vision across the range of its activities. The Senior Administrator is responsible for the effective organisation of all administrative activities, including strategy, finance, personnel, buildings, and academic-related matters. The successful candidate is likely to possess a good record in long-term planning and leadership, and must have proven organisational and interpersonal skills.

The post will be on the academic-related grade ALC 3 (salary £28,498--£33,679---under review).

Further particulars, including details of how to apply, are available from http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk or from Mrs Jane Hornsby, Department of Statistics, 1 South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3TG (telephone: Oxford (2)72860). The closing date for applications is 4 May.


Appointment of Secretary/Personal Assistant to the Head of Department

The Department of Statistics is a growing department, and now needs an experienced senior secretary/PA to support the Head of Department and two professors. In return for excellent secretarial and IT skills, the ability to handle a complex workload, and exercise initiative and discretion, the department offers benefits including thirty-eight days' holiday per annum (including public holidays), pension scheme, and a happy and supportive working environment.

The further particulars, which should be consulted before applications are submitted, are available from office@stats.ox.ac.uk, Oxford (2)72860, or from the address below.

The post is on the clerical and library grade c4 scale (salary £15,603--£18,015 per annum).

Applications should comprise a covering letter and a curriculum vitae, together with the names, addresses, telephone, fax and e-mail details of two referees, one of whom should be a recent line-manager. The department will assume that it is free to approach referees at any stage unless the candidate's application stipulates otherwise.

Applications should be submitted to the Administrator, Department of Statistics, 1 South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3TG. Applications faxed to Oxford (2)72595 or e-mailed (e-mail: office@stats.ox.ac.uk) are acceptable. Reference number AM-04-03 should be quoted in all correspondence. The closing date for applications is noon on 4 May.


UNIVERSITY LECTURERSHIP IN ZOOLOGY (ORNITHOLOGY)

In association with St Catherine's College

Applications are invited for the above post, tenable from 1 October 2004 or as soon as possible thereafter. The successful candidate will be offered a Tutorial Fellowship at St Catherine's College. The combined college and university salary will be according to age on a scale up to £42,900 per annum (pay award pending).

The University and the college are seeking candidates with a proven record of scholarship and research in ecology or evolutionary biology, particularly with an ornithological component; and a track record of attracting research funding. The lecturership will be established in the broad field of ornithology, as studied from an ecological or evolutionary perspective. Individuals with expertise in molecular ecology, or biostatistics and modelling, are particularly encouraged to apply, as are individuals with research skills that are transferable to the study of ornithology. The appointee will be required to engage in research which will contribute to the department's research reputation; to teach, supervise, and examine undergraduate and graduate students; and to contribute to administration in college and department.

Further particulars are available from http://www.zoo.ox.ac.uk or from Professor P. Harvey, FRS, Department of Zoology, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3BS (e-mail: paul.harvey@zoo.ox.ac.uk). Applications (electronic copies are acceptable), including a curriculum vitae, a list of principal publications, and the names and contact details of three referees, should be sent to Professor Harvey for receipt not later than 21 May. There is no application form, and separate application is not required for the college post. Interviews will be held on a date to be determined. Those interviewed will be requested to give a brief overview of their research interests and teaching expertise.


CENTRE FOR CRIMINOLOGY

Visiting Fellowships

The Centre for Criminology invites applications for visiting fellowships from active research scholars with an established record of publications.

Applications are welcome from scholars in any field of criminology, although preference may be given to applicants whose research is related to the research programmes of the Centre
(http://www.crim.ox.ac.uk). Visiting Fellows are given a workspace and related facilities in the Centre, but there is no financial support associated with this position. Visiting Fellows are required to present two seminars on their research.

Application is by letter, curriculum vitae, and statement of proposed research, sent to Jo Armitage, Administrator, Centre for Criminology, 12 Bevington Road, Oxford OX2 6LH (e-mail: jo.armitage@crim.ox.ac.uk). The deadline for applications is 15 November 2004 for the period 1 October 2005--30 June 2006. Applicants must specify whether they propose to visit during one or more of Michaelmas, Hilary, and Trinity terms.

Applicants should be aware that some Oxford colleges advertise fellowships which could be held in conjunction with the Centre's visiting fellowship and offer additional benefits.


ALL SOULS COLLEGE

Election to Fellowships by Examination

1. There will be an election at All Souls on Saturday, 6 November 2004 to not more than two Fellowships by Examination, if candidates of sufficient merit present themselves.

2. The examination is open to any candidate (male or female) who either
(a) has passed all the examinations required by the University for the degree of BA or
(b) has been duly registered for, or been awarded, a higher degree in the University (including BCL). The college will not normally admit to the Examination, however, candidates who will have passed their twenty-sixth birthday at the time of election, or who will then have completed ten or more terms since they qualified for the degree of BA, or first registered for a higher degree in the University. Candidates who are short-listed may be required to verify their date of birth.

3. The fellowships are for seven years and cannot be extended. They are open to those who intend to pursue an academic career, and the college pays the university fees of fellows registered for a higher degree. They are also open to those who, while intending to take up non-academic work (such as the practice of the law, politics, diplomacy, etc.), nevertheless wish to maintain and strengthen their links with academic life. In the case of the latter category it is possible for those pursuing a non-academic career to comply with the college's residential convention in the first year of fellowship by, for example, spending the weekends during term in college and the weekdays working in London.

4. During the first two years fellows receive a stipend, which they may supplement, of £11,962* per annum, and may be eligible for a housing allowance of £4,179. At the end of that period the fellowship will (with the approval of the college) be extended for a further five years, during which
(a) a fellow who decides to take up or continue non-academic work will receive a stipend of £2,307* per annum;
(b) a fellow who decides to take up or continue academic work will receive a stipend of £16,558* per annum, rising to £21,098* per annum if a certain amount of lecturing is undertaken; otherwise the stipend will be £15,068* per annum rising to £19,199* per annum, plus in each case a housing allowance of £4,785 per annum, if eligible.

5. A Fellow by Examination will be a member of the governing body and will be entitled to rooms, dinners, and lunches without charge. A fellow is conventionally required to reside (or dine) in college for at least twenty-eight days in each academical term of the first year of tenure; but the college is prepared to consider deferment of this residence in exceptional cases.

6. Prospective candidates should apply to the Warden's Secretary for an application form and further particulars, including a statement of the college's policy on equality of treatment of candidates. See also the college's Web site: http://www.all-souls.ox.ac.uk. Completed forms together with a curriculum vitae should be sent to the Warden not later than 6 September 2004. Candidates must enclose with their application form a letter from the candidate's college---from the Head of House or Senior Tutor---certifying that the applicant is a suitable candidate to sit the Examination. Candidates who wish to be admitted to the Examination notwithstanding the rules as to age and standing should communicate with the Warden. All correspondence should be marked `Fellowship Examination'.

7. The Warden and the Chairman of Assistant Examiners will meet candidates whose applications have been accepted on Wednesday, 29 September, at 4 p.m. and will answer any queries raised by them.

8. The examination will be held in the college Hall, starting on 30 September at 9.30 a.m. and ending on 2 October 2004 at 12.30 p.m. (except for candidates who take the Classical Studies papers---see para.10 below).

9. The examination will consist of five papers of three hours each:

Two papers in Law, History,*8 Philosophy, Economics, Politics, English Literature, or Classical Studies;**

Two General Papers;

An Essay.

10. Candidates who take the Classical Studies papers will be required to take a Translation paper at 2 p.m. on Saturday, 2 October.

Specimen papers from previous years may be seen in college on application to the Warden's Secretary or the Fellows' Secretary.

11. A viva of short-listed candidates will be held in the presence of Fellows of the college on Saturday, 30 October, commencing at 10 a.m. All short-listed candidates will be expected to dine in college that evening.

*Reviewed each August.

**The History papers will cover: Paper I: political, constitutional and ecclesiastical history; Paper II: social, economic and cultural history. Each paper will contain a section of questions on History of the Ancient World. The two papers on Classical Studies will contain questions on Ancient History and Classical Literature.


BRASENOSE COLLEGE

Lecturership(s) in Philosophy

Brasenose College intends to appoint one or more lecturers in philosophy to cover twelve hours per week of teaching in Michaelmas Term 2004. Lecturers will be paid at the standard per caput rate plus 40 per cent.

Applicants should write to the College Secretary, Brasenose College, Oxford OX1 4AJ, by 21 May, enclosing a curriculum vitae, giving the names of two referees, specifying the areas of philosophy in which they are competent to teach, and indicating how many hours per week of teaching they are prepared to offer. Importance will be attached to teaching experience.


CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE

Garside Senior Scholarship

Corpus Christi College proposes to elect a Garside Senior Scholar in Mathematics, to start in Michaelmas Term 2004. The successful candidate will normally be reading for a D.Phil. in Mathematics. It is hoped to make an appointment for two years (for candidates who will be in their second year of study when they take up the scholarship). The value of the scholarship will be £1,750 per annum, together with limited dining rights with senior members: essentially one free lunch per week in term and vacation, and one free dinner per week in term. The scholar may be asked to do some undergraduate teaching for the college.

Candidates should send their application to the College Secretary, Corpus Christi College, Oxford OX1 4JF, enclosing a curriculum vitae and examples of work to date, and should arrange for two named referees to write directly to the College Secretary. Applications and references should arrive at the college no later than Friday, 21 May. It is expected that interviews will take place in sixth week of Trinity Term.


JESUS COLLEGE

Appointment of Schools Liaison Officer (maternity leave cover)

This post offers an interesting opportunity to someone enthusiastic about promoting undergraduate education at Jesus College and the University The Schools Liasion Officer is the primary point of contact in college for information about undergraduate admissions, dealing with schools, colleges, prospective applicants and their families, and undertaking a range of activities to support the college's schools outreach work.

The post requires recent knowledge and/or experience of higher education (ideally an understanding of undergraduate education at Oxford), fluent written and oral communication skills, excellent interpersonal skills with a wide range of people, good organisational and IT proficiency, and the ability to work both independently and in a small team.

The post is to cover a period of maternity leave, for a maximum of fifty-two weeks, and it is hoped to fill the post from Monday, 28 June, or as soon as possible thereafter. The post will be 60 per cent of full-time, i.e. twenty-one hours per week. The salary is on the academic-related grade 1 scale (£18,265--£20,311 per annum, pro rata---under review from 1 August 2003). Other benefits include a contributory staff pension scheme (OSPS); holiday entitlement of thirty-eight days, pro rata; and a free lunch when on duty.

Further particulars are available from the Assistant Bursar, Jesus College, Oxford OX1 3DW (e-mail: rosemary.frame@jesus.ox.ac.uk, telephone: Oxford (2)79716), or on http://www.jesus.ox.ac.uk. Applicants should submit an application form (available from the Assistant Bursar), a curriculum vitae, and covering letter to the Assistant Bursar by the closing date of Tuesday, 11 May. Applicants should also ask two referees to write to the Assistant Bursar by the closing date.


KEBLE COLLEGE

Research Fellowship and Tutorship in Engineering Science

Keble College proposes to elect a Research Fellow and Tutor in Engineering Science for a period of five years (fixed term, non-renewable) from 1 October 2004. The person elected will have research interests in any area of engineering and will be required to teach Engineering Science at undergraduate level. The teaching stint will be three hours per week averaged over the academic year. The fellow will be asked to help in a limited way with the academic and pastoral organisation of the subject. Informal enquiries may be made to Professor Martin Oldfield (e-mail: martin.oldfield@eng.ox.ac.uk).

The fellow will not be a member of the governing body, but will be a full member of the senior common room and be entitled to lunch and dinner at the common table as well as to an academic allowance of £400 per annum (adjustable annually). A shared teaching room will be available. The stipend for up to three hours of teaching per week averaged over the year will be £2,725.92 per annum (adjustable annually). In addition, a fellow not in receipt of other financial support will receive a housing allowance of £3,417 per annum (adjustable annually). The fellow will be eligible to join USS. Selection will be made on the basis of research potential and teaching ability.

Candidates should submit a curriculum vitae (including the names, addresses, and telephone numbers of two referees) and a statement of research activity to the Warden's Personal Assistant, Keble College, Oxford OX1 3PG, by 27 May, and should ask their referees to write directly to the Warden's personal Assistant by the same date.

Keble College is an equal opportunities employer committed to excellence in research and teaching.


LADY MARGARET HALL

Stipendiary Lecturership in Pure Mathematics

Lady Margaret Hall proposes to appoint a Stipendiary Lecturer in Pure Mathematics, for four years from 1 October 2004, to teach nine hours a week in Pure Mathematics and to assist in directing undergraduates reading Mathematics. The lecturer will be paid on the stipendiary lecturers' scale, at present £13,379, with entitlement to join USS, research/book and entertainment allowances, and with entitlement to some meals without charge during university term.

It is college policy to assist and promote academic staff at an early stage in their careers by awarding fixed-term lecturerships in appropriate subjects. It is an integral feature of these developmental lecturerships that they are time-limited, and cannot be renewed beyond a maximum of four academic years, so that the policy can be implemented for the benefit of a succession of academic staff early in their careers. This post will give the person appointed an opportunity to develop skills in teaching, provide an element of career development, and support for research.

Further particulars can be obtained from the Senior Tutor's Secretary, Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford OX2 6QA (telephone: Oxford (2)74321), or by downloading from the Web site at http://www.lmh.ox.ac.uk. The closing date for applications is Tuesday, 4 May. Applicants should also ask two referees to write directly to the Senior Tutor by the same date. Interviews will be held on Friday, 14 May.


MAGDALEN COLLEGE

Appointment of Assistant Librarian

Magdalen College is seeking to appoint an Assistant Librarian to work as part of the Libraries and Archives team in its busy and well-used libraries. Duties are varied and include acquisitions, reference work, circulation and cataloguing. All applicants must have a first degree, professional librarian qualifications, and at least three years' professional experience, preferably in an academic library. Knowledge of the Dewey Decimal Classification System, and print and electronic resources together with good interpersonal and IT skills are essential. Working experience of cataloguing to MARC standards and of Dewey classifying are very desirable.

Benefits include a salary in the range £18,893--£22,000 per annum, generous holidays, contributory pension scheme, free lunch, and use of sports facilities.

Further particulars are avaible from Mrs H. Simms, Personnel Administrator, Magdalen College, Oxford OX1 4AU (telephone: Oxford (2)76031). Closing date: 17 May.


Appointment of Librarian and Archivist Graduate Trainee

Magdalen College is seeking to appoint a graduate for a full time one-year internship (1 October 2004--30 September 2005) in its Libraries and Archives. This is an unusual opportunity for someone who wishes to gain experience of both library and archives work before pursuing further qualifications. All applicants should have a first degree and serious intentions of pursuing a career in professional librarianship or archives work. It is expected that the successful candidate will apply to a library or archives course during their year at Magdalen.

The trainee's time will be divided between the college Archives and Libraries, where there will be a variety of training and duties, such as answering queries, cataloguing, setting up exhibitions, learning conservation methods, and assisting with general administration. Training will include formal short courses, e.g. in IT skills, depending on the trainee's particular interest. Salary £11,612 (pay increase after three-month probation). Closing date: 17 May.

Further particulars are available from Mrs H. Simms, Personnel Administrator, Magdalen College, Oxford OX1 4AU (telephone: Oxford (2)76031).

Magdalen College is an equal opportunities employer.


ORIEL COLLEGE

Fixed-term Fellowship in Political Theory

Oriel College invites applications for a four year fixed-term Fellowship in Political Theory, with effect from 1 October 2004. The successful candidate will be a member of the governing body of the college. The stipend offered will be on an age-related scale up to a maximum of £25,809. In addition the post-holder will receive other college allowances including, if living out of college, a £5,248 per annum housing allowance and a £1,200 per annum research and book allowance.

The fellow appointed will be required to undertake up to twelve hours' teaching per week, averaged over the academic year, that is the three eight-week terms which comprise the academic year. Of these twelve hours, eight hours will be for the college and four for the Department of Politics and International Relations. The person appointed will be required to teach at least the theory component of Prelims and the core political theory paper and, if possible, another core paper, together with some option papers.

The fellow and tutor in the subject (Dr Mark Philp) is currently Head of the Department of Politics and International Relations and will then have a period of leave. The appointee will work with the college's other PPE tutors.

Further particulars, including information about how to apply, may be obtained from the Academic Registrar, Oriel College, Oxford OX1 4EW. (telephone: Oxford (2)76543, e-mail: academic.appointments@oriel.ox.ac.uk ), or they may be viewed on the college's Web site, http://www.oriel.ox.ac.uk.

The closing date for applications including references is Thursday, 20 May.


Appointment of Chaplain

Oriel College is seeking to appoint a Chaplain for a five-year period with effect from 1 October 2004. The post is not renewable. Applications are invited from men and women in Anglican Holy Orders. The person appointed will be required to carry out pastoral work amongst all members of the college and will be responsible for the conduct and oversight of services in the college chapel. The stipend is that of an incumbent of the Church of England in the Oxford Diocese, on the scale £16,800--£18,708 per annum ( subject to any stipend review from 1 April 2004).

Further particulars, including information about how to apply, may be obtained from the Academic Registrar, Oriel College, Oxford OX1 4EW (telephone: Oxford (2)76543, e-mail: academic.registrar@oriel.ox.ac.uk), or they may be viewed on the college's Web site, http://www.oriel.ox.ac.uk. The closing date for applications is Friday, 21 May. Referees should be asked to write directly to the Academic Registrar by the same date. Applications are required in hard copy. References may be e-mailed or faxed but a hard copy is also required.

Oriel College is an equal opportunities employer.


ST CATHERINE'S COLLEGE

Stipendiary Lecturership in Philosophy

St Catherine's College proposes to appoint a Stipendiary Lecturer in Philosophy from 1 October 2004. The lecturership will be for one year in the first instance with the possibility of renewal for a further one year.

The lecturer will be expected to teach (in tutorials and classes) up to twelve hours a week averaged over the three terms (twenty-four weeks) of the academic year. He or she will be required to teach two of the following Preliminary Examinations subjects (first-year courses): Logic, Mill, and General Philosophy; two of the following Final Honour School papers (second- and third-year courses): History of Philosophy from Descartes to Kant, Knowledge and Reality, and Ethics; plus at least another two Final Honour School papers. In addition, he or she will be expected to act as the senior subject tutor in Philosophy, playing a full role in the running of Philosophy in the college, including arranging tuition, participating in the admissions process, setting and marking college examinations, and the pastoral care of undergraduates.

The lecturer will be a member of the senior common room and will be entitled to twelve meals per week during term-time and during the admissions exercise in December, and two lunches and two dinners outside term, free of charge. The annual stipend will be £18,036 (pay award pending) and will be pensionable. A shared teaching room will be available in college.

Further particulars may be obtained from http://www.stcatz.ox.ac. uk/college_administration/vacancies/ or, in case of difficulty, from the Academic Registrar, St Catherine's College, Oxford OX1 3UJ (e-mail: academic.registrar@stcatz.ox.ac.uk).

The closing date for applications is Wednesday. 19 May.

The college and the University are equal opportunities employers.


ST HILDA'S COLLEGE

Stipendiary Lecturership in Engineering

St Hilda's College proposes to appoint a Stipendiary Lecturer to teach six hours a week and to take charge of the Engineering School at St Hilda's. The appointment will be from 1 October 2004, for one year in the first instance, with the possibility of renewal. Applicants should be able to teach a range of subjects for Prelims and the Final Honour School of Engineering. The person appointed will be paid on the stipendiary lecturers' scale, at present £8,563 per annum for six hours (reviewed annually---2003--4 pay increase still pending). The post is open to both men and women.

Further particulars and an application form should be obtained from the college Web site
(http://www.sthildas.ox.ac.uk/news) or from the Academic Office, St Hilda's College, Oxford OX4 1DY (telephone: Oxford (2)76815, e-mail: college.office@st-hildas.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for applications is Thursday, 20 May.


Randall-MacIver Junior Research Fellowship

Applications are invited for a Joanna Randall-MacIver Junior Research Fellowship, for studies in the music of any nation in any period. The appointment will be for one year only, from 1 October 2004. The Junior Research Fellowship is open to women graduates of any country.

Further particulars and an application form should be obtained from the college Web site
(http://www.sthildas.ox.ac.uk/news), or from the Academic Office, St Hilda's College, Oxford OX4 1DY (telephone: Oxford (2)76815, e-mail: college.office@st-hildas.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for applications is 27 May.


ST HUGH'S COLLEGE

Appointment of Bursar

St Hugh's College intends to elect a Bursar to take office in September 2004. The Bursar is the college's chief administrative officer, responsible to the governing body for the college's finances, non-academic staff, site and buildings, and domestic operation. The Bursar plays a central strategic and managerial role in college affairs. This is an exciting and challenging role at the heart of one of the University's largest colleges.

The Bursar will be a fellow of the college. Salary will be on the scale £45,000--£55,000 per annum.

Further information is available on the college Web site
(http://www.st-hughs.ox.ac.uk), or from the Principal's Secretary, St Hugh's College, St Margaret's Road, Oxford OX2 6LE (e-mail: libby.pasciak@st-hughs.ox.ac.uk, telephone: Oxford (2)74910). The closing date for applications is 14 May.


TEMPLETON COLLEGE

Appointment of HR and Administrative Manager

Templeton College wishes to appoint an HR and Administrative Manager. The post-holder will work within the senior management team which provides support across the full range of college activities. The successful candidate will be of graduate calibre, with managerial experience, and have the skills, enthusiasm, and flexibility to develop and implement effective systems and processes in an environment that is both academic and commercial.

A salary range of up to £35,000 (depending on background and experience), plus attractive terms and conditions, is offered for this post.

For further details see http://www.templeton.ox.ac.uk/jobs, telephone: Oxford 422769, or e-mail: HR@templeton.ox.ac.uk.


UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE

Fixed-term Lectureship in the Faculty of Philosophy

Applications are invited for a fixed-term appointment in the Faculty of Philosophy to replace Dr Michael Potter during his leave of absence. The appointment will run from 1 October 2004 to 30 September 2005. The salary will be at the level of £24,097 a year. Candidates must be prepared to teach philosophical and/or mathematical logic.The successful candidate will be required to give forty lectures, to supervise graduate students, and to examine at both undergraduate and graduate level.

Further particulars are available at http://www.phil.cam.ac.uk, or may be obtained from Mrs A. Elliott, Faculty of Philosophy, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge CB3 9DA (telephone: 01223 330525, fax: 01223 335091, e-mail: ae215@cam.ac.uk), to whom applications should be sent so as to reach her not later than Thursday, 20 May.

Applications should include a full curriculum vitae, a Cover Sheet for Employment (downloadable from http://www.admin.cam.ac. uk/offices/personnel/forms/pd18, or available from the faculty), and the names of two referees who are in a position to comment on the candidate's academic work and any teaching experience. Referees should be asked to write directly to Mrs Elliott so as to reach the faculty by the closing date. Informal enquiries may be addressed to Professor Edward Craig (e-mail: ejc11@cam.ac.uk).

Friday 30 April

PROFESSOR ANTHONY LEGGETT: `Does the everyday world really obey quantum mechanics?' (Cherwell–Simon Lecture), Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, Clarendon Laboratory, 4.30 p.m.

T.J. MURIS (Chairman, US Federal Trade Commission): `Current issues in competition and consumer policy: an international perspective', All Souls, 5 p.m.

DR J. BENNET: `Archaeologies of Homer' (Marett Memorial Lecture), Saskatchewan Lecture Room, Exeter, 5 p.m.

DR BILL PARK: `Turkey, the Kurds of Iraq, and the US; three sides of a triangular relationship' (Programme on Contemporary Turkey lecture), Dahrendorf Room, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR C. SEYMOUR-URE lectures in the Reuters Foundation Programme lecture series: `Media and Politics', Nuffield, 5 p.m.

OLIVIER DUTHEILLET DE LAMOTHE: `Evolution of European social policy since 1957', Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.


Sunday 2 May

THE REVD DR GILES FRASER preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.


Monday 3 May

J.-L. LEUTRAT: `Jean-Daniel Pollet: Dieu sait quoi, Trois jours en Grèce' (lecture series: `Les cinéastes de la "modernité" en France'), Maison Française, 5 p.m.


Tuesday 4 May

PROFESSOR J. JACKSON AND DR D. SAROOSHI: `State sovereignty and international economic law', Old Library, All Souls, 10 a.m.

W. ST CLAIR: `The Abinger papers: the biography of a family' (Friends of the Bodleian thirty-minute lecture), Cecil Jackson Room, Sheldonian, 1 p.m. (admission free).

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Assertiveness'—day 1, 2 p.m. (see information above).

PROFESSOR P. MULDOON (Professor of Poetry): `The End of the Poem: "Welsh Incident" by Robert Graves, "A Failure" by C. Day Lewis, and "Keeping Going" by Seamus Heaney', Schools, 5 p.m.

DR K. SCOTT: `A model book for Nicholas de Lyra's Postilla litteralis' (Lyell Lectures in Bibliography: `Suppleatur per ymaginacionem: exceptional images in later medieval English manuscripts'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. FORREST: `The existence of the primordial God' (Wilde Lectures in Natural and Comparative Religion: `From pure will to unbounded love'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. SENNETT: `Work' (lecture series: `The new culture of capitalism'), Rothermere American Institute, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. STIGLITZ: `Ethical dimensions of globalisation' (first of two Tanner Lectures in Human Values), Schools, 5 p.m.

A. GRANT: `Reliving the creative process: self-analysis and compositional principles in Cross Currents' (Graduate Students' Colloquia), Denis Arnold Hall, Music Faculty, 5.15 p.m.

SEAMUS HEANEY and PAUL MULDOON: poetry-reading, Sheldonian, 7.30 p.m. (tickets, £1, on sale at the Sheldonian, 10.30 a.m.–6.30 p.m., today only).


Wednesday 5 May

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Servicing committees', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

CHRISTOPHER BUCKNALL: organ recital, the chapel, Queen's, 1.10 p.m. (admission free, with retiring collection).

PROFESSOR P. FORREST: `God changes' (Wilde Lectures in Natural and Comparative Religion: `From pure will to unbounded love'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. STIGLITZ: `Ethical dimensions of globalisation' (second of two Tanner Lectures in Human Values), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR C. PANTER-BRICK: `Cross disciplinary issues of mental health and social resilience: Afghan youth in Kabul and Peshawar' (Refugee Studies Centre public seminars), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR H. LEE: `Literature' (`Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: problems and methods in biography'), Modern History Faculty Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. PENSLAR: `Is Israel a colonial state? Reflections on the relationship between Zionism, colonialism, and post-colonialism' (David Patterson Seminars), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor, 7 p.m.

PROFESSOR SIR CHRISTOPHER FRAYLING: `Museum without walls: the image of the museum in movies' (Friends of the Pitt Rivers Museum Beatrice Blackwood Lecture), Saïd Business School, 7 p.m.


Thursday 6 May

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Listening skills'—day 1, 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

DR E. FERRARO: `Gendered economics' theory and methodology. Androcentric bias in economic policy and discourse in urban Quito. The case of women street sellers in the time of dollarisation' (International Gender Studies Centre seminars: `Research methodologies: theories—realities'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

DR G. HAGE: `structure and culture in researching the transnational family', Boardroom, Centre on Migration, Policy, and Society (58 Banbury Road), 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. BETTENCOURT and DR G. LOCK: `Machiavelli's Prince and the Machiavelliana (adventures of Machiavelli's Prince in comparison with his other major political writings, 1532--1900)', Lecture Room, 10 Merton Street, 2.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR A. DAVIES: `Comparing languages in the heroic age' (James Bryce Memorial Lecture), Flora Anderson Hall, Somerville, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR A. KULL: `James Barr Ames and the early modern history of the law of restitution' (Astor Lecture), Lecture Room 1, Faculty of Law, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

DR K. SCOTT: `The enigma of All Souls MS 10' (Lyell Lectures in Bibliography: `Suppleatur per ymaginacionem: exceptional images in later medieval English manuscripts'), Schools, 5 p.m.

M. LEISERACH: `An Englishman's reaction to the Napoleonic Wars: J.M.W. Turner' (lecture series: `Turner and Napoleon'), Headley Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean Museum, 5 p.m.

SCOTT MANDELBROTE: `The Letter of Aristeas and its meaning for early modern scholarship' (Grinfield Lectures on the Septuagint: `Critics and controversies: early modern debates about the meaning of the Septuagint'), Schools, 5 p.m.

L. GOLDMAN, B. YOUNG, AND A.S. BELL: `Sir Leslie Stephen as scholar, thinker, and editor' (Pre-publication seminars: `The Dictionary of National Biography past, present, and future'), Rainolds Room, Corpus Christi, 5 p.m.

J. CÉARD: `Variété et monstruosité: la difficile synthèse d'Ulisse Aldrovandi', Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

MARIO VARGAS LLOSA (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor of European Comparative Literature): `The dark vein of destiny' (lecture series: `The tempation of the impossible: Victor Hugo's Les Misérables'), Nelson Mandela Lecture Theatre, Saïd Business School, 5.30 p.m.


Friday 7 May

STUDY-DAY: `Nature et contre-nature au seuil de la modmodernite', Maison Française, 11 a.m.–4.30 p.m.

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Briefing for research supervisors, group leaders, and administrators', 12.30 p.m. (see information above).

PROFESSOR SIR ADAM ROBERTS: `The "War on Terror" in historical perspective' (A.B. Emden Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR A. AHMAD: `Antinomies of nationalism—an overiew' (Radhakrishnan Memorial Lectures: `Nationalism and secularism in modern India'), Schools, 5 p.m.

N. JONES lectures in the Reuters Foundation Programme lecture series: `Media and Politics', Nuffield, 5 p.m.


Saturday 8 May

ORGAN RECITAL: Daniel Collins, the chapel, Magdalen, 5.25 p.m. (admission free).


Sunday 9 May

THE REVD DR SIMON JONES preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.


Monday 10 May

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Induction seminar for new contract researchers', 12.30 p.m.; `Heads of department and chairmen of boards: "Directions" seminar', 1 p.m.; and `Inducting staff', 12.45 p.m. (see information above).

SIDNEY BLUMENTHAL and MATTHEW TAYLOR: `Politics, policy, and the press' (Transatlantic Dialogues in Public Policy), Rothermere American Institute, 4.30 p.m.

THE HON. GARETH EVANS (formerly Foreign Minister of Australia): `When is it right to fight? Rethinking the jurisprudence of military force' (Cyril Foster Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

J.-L. LEUTRAT: `Chris Marker' (lecture series: `Les cinéastes de la "modernité" en France'), Maison Française, 5 p.m.

DR G. ZUCKERMANN: `Lexical genetics in the third millennium: how one word can have two parents' (OED Forum), Rewley House, 5 p.m.


Tuesday 11 May

THE REVD PROFESSOR G. PATTISON (Lady Margaret Professor of Divinity): `Thinking about God in an age of technology' (Inaugural Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. WIGGINS: `Objectivity in ethics: two difficulties, two responses' (H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

MS VAIRA VIKE-FREIBERGA (President of Latvia) lectures in the Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m. (subject to be announced).

DR K. SCOTT: `The unique pictorial "Afterpiece" to The Abbey of the Holy Ghost in BL Stowe 39' (Lyell Lectures in Bibliography: `Suppleatur per ymaginacionem: exceptional images in later medieval English manuscripts'), Schools, 5 p.m.

C. DOGGETT AND S. BURNETT:: `Sharing knowledge globally—Australian social work's Cochrane connection' (seminar series: `Evidence-based practice'), Violet Butler Seminar Room, Department of Social Policy and Social Work, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. SENNETT: `Talent' (lecture series: `The new culture of capitalism'), Rothermere American Institute, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR I. PAPERNO: `Why did we all love Stalin? Memoirs and diaries of the Soviet experience' (Astor Lecture), Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

J. ROUBAUD (writer) presents his work (Littérature Française Actuelle à Oxford series), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

M. BENT: `What is isorhythm?' (Graduate Students' Colloquia), Denis Arnold Hall, Music Faculty, 5.15 p.m.


Wednesday 12 May

ANDREW REID: organ recital, the chapel, Queen's, 1.10 p.m. (admission free, with retiring collection).

MARIO VARGAS LLOSA (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor of European Comparative Literature): `Touchy monsters' (lecture series: `The tempation of the impossible: Victor Hugo's Les Misérables'), Nelson Mandela Lecture Theatre, Saïd Business School, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. J. EVANS: `Coercion and consent in Nazi Germany', Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR HELEN VENDLER: `Forms in "Nineteen Hundred Nineteen" ' (Clarendon Lectures in English: `Yeats and Lyric Form'), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. FORREST: `Developmental theism and another look at the problem of evil' (Wilde Lectures in Natural and Comparative Religion: `From pure will to unbounded love'), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR D. TURTON: `The meaning of place in a world of movement: lessons from long-term field research in southern Ethiopia' (Elizabeth Colson Lecture), Rhodes House, 5 p.m.

DR S. SCHAFFER: `History of science' (`Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: problems and methods in biography'), Modern History Faculty Building, 5 p.m.

S. AVAYOU: `The Dönme literature in Ladino prose and poetry, form and language' (David Patterson Seminars), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor, 7 p.m.