Oxford University Gazette: 24 March 2005

Oxford University Gazette, Vol. 135, No. 4729: 24 March 2005

Note: due to the requirements of the Data Protection Act, some elements of the printed Gazette are not reproduced in the Web Gazette.

The following supplement was published with this Gazette:

  • Oration by the Senior Proctor 2005

The list of courses arranged by the Institute for the Advancement of University Learning for Trinity Term was also published. For details see the IAUL site.

Gazette publication arrangements

This is the final Gazette of the present term. Publication for Trinity Term will begin on 21 April. The usual copy deadlines will apply.

CONGREGATION 17 March

Conferment of Degree by Diploma

The Degree of Doctor of Civil Law by Diploma, approved by Resolution of Congregation on 22 February 2005, was conferred upon HIS EXCELLENCY CARLO AZEGLIO CIAMPI, LL.B., President of the Italian Republic.

¶ The text of the Diploma read by the Public Orator at the conferment, and of the President's reply, appear in 'Notices' below.


COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of Congregation:

Bajpai, R., M.Phil., Balliol

Betts, P.J., Ashmolean Museum

Fielding, B.A., Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Gill, H.S., D.Phil, Exeter

Pulman, N.J., University Development Office

Stead, L.F., Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Stec, V.R., Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages


CONTINUING EDUCATION BOARD

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 8 April, see 'Examinations and Boards' below.

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CONFERMENT OF DEGREE BY DIPLOMA

The following Diploma of the Degree of Doctor of Civil Law was read by the Public Orator when the degree was conferred in a Congregation held on Thursday, 17 March 2005.

His Excellency CARLO AZEGLIO CIAMPI, President of the Italian Republic

CANCELLARIVS MAGISTRI SCHOLARES
VNIVERSITATIS OXONIENSIS
OMNIBVS AD QVOS PRAESENTES
LITTERAE PERVENERINT
SALVTEM IN DOMINO SEMPITERNAM

CVM diu ex more nobis fuerit civitatum externarum Praesides praecipuo aliquo honore quantum possumus insignire, eosque praesertim quorum labores et civibus suis et universae litterarum reipublicae profuerunt:

CVMque Vir Excellentissimus CAROLVS AZEGLIO CIAMPI, Rei Publicae Italicae Praeses, civitati praesideat quae nobiscum artissimis amicitiae vinculis coniungitur;

CVMque Saturnia illa terra, magna parens frugum, magna virum, omnibus maximam moveat admirationem;

CVMque Italicorum mos cultus artes orbem terrarum illustraverint;

CVMque nos Oxonienses res Italas Romanorumque triumphos per octo iam saecula examinaverimus;

CVMque studia item Italiae recentioris diu apud nos floruerint, quae promovit ipsorum civium magna liberalitas;

CVMque ipse Aerario Saturni quindecim annos summa diligentia praesederit;

CVMque multos commentarios de rebus oeconomicis stilo acutissimo exaraverit;

CVMque artem populi regendi sagaciter descripserit;

CVMque ad summum gradum honoris abhinc sex annos plausu universo sit creatus;

CVMque cives suos, gentem animosam ac facundam, consilio et ratione gubernaverit;

NOS ERGO, tanti viri prudentiam sapientiam humanitatem admirati, in frequenti Congregationis Domo praedictum Praesidem DOCTOREM in Iure Civili renuntiamus eumque vi ac virtute huius Diplomatis omnibus iuribus et privilegiis adficimus quae ad hunc gradum spectant.


Paraphrase

THE CHANCELLOR, MASTERS, AND SCHOLARS
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD
TO WHOMSOEVER THESE PRESENTS SHALL COME
MAY THE LORD EVER PRESERVE AND KEEP YOU

WHEREAS it has long been our custom to confer such honours as are in our power on the Heads of other nations, and more particularly on those whose achievements have conferred benefits both on their own citizens and on the Republic of Letters as a whole:

AND WHEREAS His Excellency CARLO AZEGLIO CIAMPI, President of the Italian Republic, is head of a state to which we are bound by close ties of friendship;

AND WHEREAS Italy, in Virgil's words the land of Saturn, great mother of crops, great mother of men, excites the admiration of all people;

AND WHEREAS Italian culture and civilisation have illuminated the whole world;

AND WHEREAS we in Oxford have studied ancient Rome—'Italian history and the triumphs of the Romans', to quote Virgil again—continuously for eight centuries;

AND WHEREAS Italian Studies too have long flourished among us, with generous support from citizens of Italy;

AND WHEREAS President Ciampi was an outstanding Governor of the Bank of Italy for fifteen years;

AND WHEREAS he has written many penetrating reports and articles on economic affairs;

AND WHEREAS he has discussed politics shrewdly in his book Un Metodo per Governare;

AND WHEREAS he was elected head of state six years ago to general approbation;

AND WHEREAS he has guided his fellow citizens, a spirited and eloquent people, with a judicious hand;

NOW THEREFORE WE, in admiration of his eminent sagacity, wisdom and culture, do here in this full House of Congregation pronounce the aforesaid President a DOCTOR in our Faculty of Civil Law, and by the virtue and power of this Diploma we invest him with all the rights and privileges which belong to that Degree.


HIS EXCELLENCY made the following reply:

Mr Chancellor, Ladies and Gentlemen,

Thank you for your kind words and for the warm welcome which you and all the Members of the University have extended to me.

Today you awarded me the Degree by diploma of Doctor of Civil Law and I am most grateful for this flattering distinction that has been conferred upon me.

Italian culture is at home here.

Academic relations between Oxford and Italian universities have continued without interruption since the first exchanges between jurists from Bologna and the Oxford School of Law. These relations were sustained by the values of humanism, and have created a lasting bond between Mediterranean and Northern Europe.

The European Union is today the most important political union in the world and the largest economic market.

The United Kingdom has played a decisive role in this process. Allow me to mention three examples: the development in the immediate post-war years, with the prominent contribution of Winston Churchill, of a strong sense of European solidarity which resulted in the creation of the Council of Europe; Britain's vision to involve and reunite the whole of Europe thus mending the fractures of the Cold War; and and the development of a European military capability, the absence of which became painfully evident following the disintegration of Yugoslavia.

The vision and determination of Europe's founding nations, which Italy is proud to be part of, helped eliminate the perverse logic of opposing alliances, led to the establishment of the first European institutions, and brought about a lasting reconciliation.

Successive enlargements of the European Union—especially the latest which seals Europe's historic reunification—have consolidated democracy and stability in our continent.

The Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe reinforces the identity of the European Union, ensures the effectiveness and transparency of its institutions and guarantees an easier application of the principle of subsidiarity. It also provides for better governance of the Union.

Without the rules laid down by the Treaty, it would be hard to imagine that a twenty-five-nation Europe, let alone one with twenty-seven or more members, could function. Therefore the prompt adoption of the European Constitution is a requirement for all Member States.

The European Union, resulting from the new constitutional framework, is based on the twin legitimacy of states and peoples.

It operates now, and will do so in the future , through a balance between inter-governmental co-operation and shared sovereignty. Its flexible architecture allows Member States to participate in certain areas of Union policies while staying out of others.

This is exemplified by the existence of institutions such as the European Central Bank—the body governing the joint monetary policy of the states who have freely chosen a common currency—alongside bodies where national economic policies are agreed and co-ordinated. This is a development unprecedented in history enabling nation-states to pool their sovereignty in order to have greater economic influence.

The European Union is the way for European nations to guarantee their own future.

This important and challenging process of European unification is occurring at a time of complex international developments. The pace of change in other parts of the world is in certain respects alarming for our continent and requires that we be up to the challenge.

It becomes clearer every day that separate national policies are insufficient when it comes to regulating the world market and improving Europe's competitiveness within a framework of clearly-defined rules, contributing to the complex process of building a lasting peace in the Middle East, fighting terrorism and the dissemination of weapons of mass destruction, bridging the world's glaring economic and social inequalities, and managing our planet's natural resources. Such daunting challenges cannot be met successfully on a purely national basis.

The very awareness of the extent and urgency of these issues has raised the need for the improved governance of the European Union and has started the process leading to the approval of the European Constitution.

The ratification of the Treaty is the opportunity to take on our global responsibilities as Europeans and to flesh out the freely-made decision of our Governments to join in a common endeavour.

Ladies and Gentlemen,

ltaly's participation in that endeavour stems from its auspicious decision to become a Founding Member of the European Community and from its determination to strengthen the European Union's role in the world. We continue to believe in the historic dream of European unity, which remains the guiding star of our international policy.

I was born in 1920. I served as a soldier in the Second World War. I will never forget the scourges of nationalistic rivalry and totalitarianism. As an Italian and a European citizen, I feel the duty to point out, especially to the younger generations, the value of the unity of our continent and the need to continue along the chosen path.

There has been growing awareness over the years that Europe must speak with a firm and authoritative voice. With this spirit, the Constitutional Treaty provides for comprehensive and well-defined mechanisms to increase the effectiveness of European foreign and security policy, which affirms and safeguards both common goals and the vital interests of Member States. It is the litmus-test for Europe's ability to fulfil its tasks.

The growing number of problems requiring a common approach, the existence of shared objectives, and the dynamism of new protagonists on the international scene demand that Europe make its voice heard on major international issues. Joining forces is a guarantee against the risk that individual countries lose ground in the hierarchy of international relations. Europe's experience holds a strong appeal for the whole world.

The constructive coexistence of different peoples sharing fundamental values within a common territory and system, the importance which Europe attaches to the primacy of law, the uniqueness of Europe's historic experience over the past fifty years, have kindled hopes in many parts of the globe, including Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

When Europe speaks with one voice, the effectiveness of its action is increased and meets with growing consensus.

It is no accident that whenever a political, economic, or environmental crisis occurs, pressure increases for a European presence and there is more room for joint initiatives. That much was clear during the recent institutional crisis in Ukraine and in the aftermath of the tragic tsunami which hit south-east Asia.

A European Foreign Minister, representing joint objectives which reflect our common interests, is the least we can aim for if we are to make Europe more visible and effective.

The European Union's tasks have increased in areas whose relevance is undisputed, as is the need for a common European approach.

The Union is called upon to take on its responsibilities, first and foremost in the areas close to its own borders, for example:

—in the Balkans, where our task is far from over. We must establish a model of dialogue and coexistence there, based on the rejection of nationalism and on the respect of minority rights;

—in the Mediterranean, whose stability is essential for Europe's security, and which must once again become the place where different cultures and religions meet, on the basis of mutual respect and understanding;

—in the Middle East, where encouraging developments are taking place which, however, now have to be translated into concrete progress—in the Israeli–Palestinian dialogue and in support of the democratic and civic renewal of the peoples in the region;

—in Africa, where the extent and urgency of problems requires increased collaboration with the African Union and the United Nations in order to stabilise crisis areas, consolidate the rule of law, and fight underdevelopment;

—and in the southern Caucasus, where European efforts at achieving stabilisation will support progress in a conflict-ridden area.

The Union plays a key role in advancing the major ethical and environmental issues—from the International Criminal Court to the Kyoto Protocol. It is playing a decisive role—contributing about half of all official international development aid—in the achievement of the Millennium Objectives, the United Nation's key project for helping a vast part of humankind escape from poverty.

These results mirror the economic benefits of sharing a single, open market and the same regulatory framework for international trade, as well as those stemming from the physical elimination of internal frontiers and from the introduction of a single currency adopted to date by twelve Member States.

The European Union has to face new commitments which will increase its credibility and effectiveness.

The implementation of the Lisbon Strategy is necessary if the European economy is to grow and become more competitive, and if the great single market in which all Member States of the European Union participate is to be consolidated.

Other no less important benefits are provided by the European Union to its citizens. They include increased security stemming from the co-ordinated fight against terrorism and organised crime; and the education which hundreds of thousands of our young people receive through programmes such as Erasmus.

Europe does not act alone in the world, nor does it wish to antagonise anyone. The recent Euro-Atlantic summit in Brussels dispelled a source of worry. It confirmed that Europe and the United States share many values and interests developed through centuries of common history. It signalled the end of the harmful divisions which had emerged at the time of the Iraqi conflict.

The Euro-Atlantic summit launched a new challenge: an influential Europe will never be a rival of the United States; a strongly united Europe is in the interest of the United States too.

The success of the Atlantic partnership depends on acceptance of two fundamental prerequisites which, however, have yet to be consolidated and better defined: recognition by the United States of the European Union's political identity; and acceptance on Europe's part that it must be consistent in its dialogue with the United States.

The defence of freedom and democracy is the lifeblood of the Atlantic relationship. It reminds us that our ties are much stronger than anything that may divide us.

Renewed dialogue between Europe and the United States enables us, with mutual benefit, to strengthen our common effort to confront and defeat terrorism and poverty and to deal with environmental problems .

On that renewed basis the West, as a civilisation whose origins lie in the thousands-year-old history of the peoples of Europe, can once again be a source of inspiration to new generations and offer political ideals and models to countries around the world. 2005 must be the year when Europe confirms that it is determined to speak with one voice. It must show that Europe and the United States are prepared to face the challenges of the twenty-first century together. It must promote an increased dialogue with other cultures.


CONSULTATIVE NOTICES

Review of Politics and International Relations

The Social Sciences Board is undertaking a review of the Department of Politics and International Relations as part of its programme of regular rolling reviews of units under its aegis. The Head of Division, Mr D.A. Hay, will chair the review committee, the terms of reference of which are:

(i) to review the quality of teaching and research in Politics and International Relations by reference to international standards of excellence;

(ii) to review the strategy, resources and management structures in the department, including: departmental strategic plans; staff recruitment, retention and workload; accommodation and future space needs; finances; development; organisation and administration in the department; relations with other departments and with the colleges;

(iii) to review progress since the last review in 1998, and to identify any further action required in the light of changed circumstances during the period since that review;

(iv) to make recommendations to the divisional board, bearing in mind where there are financial implications the level of resources likely to be available within the University and possible alternative ways of raising funds to implement them;

(v) to refer the recommendations to the Planning and Resource Allocation Committee and the Educational Policy and Standards Committee as appropriate.

The membership of the committee is as follows:

Mr D.A. Hay, Head of the Social Sciences Division

Professor Bob Goodin, Australian National University

Professor James Mayall, Cambridge

Professor Susan Mendus, York

Mr Andrew Dilnot, Principal of St Hugh's College

Professor John Gardner, Faculty of Law

Professor Neil MacFarlane, St Anne's College

The review committee would welcome written comments on matters falling within its terms of reference. These should be sent to the secretary of the review committee, Ms Jane Dale, Social Sciences Division, 34 St Giles', by Wednesday, 27 April.


APPOINTMENTS

On the recommendation of the Saïd Business School, the Social Sciences Board has conferred the title of Visiting Professor of Accounting on PROFESSOR DAVID COOPER (B.SC. (ECON.), PH.D. Manchester), for three years from 24 April 2005.


Department of Social Policy and Social Work

The Social Sciences Board has appointed G.A.N. SMITH, B.PHIL., MA, Reader in Social Policy and Fellow of Green College, as Head of the Department of Social Policy and Social Work for two years from 1 October 2005.


ADVISORY COMMITTEE AND ELECTORAL BOARD

The composition of the advisory committee to the post below, proceedings to fill which are currently in progress, is as follows:

Regius Professorship of Civil Law



                                  Appointed by

Mr Vice-Chancellor                ex officio
The Warden of All Souls           ex officio
The Rt. Hon. Lord Rodger 
  of Earlsferry                   Council
Mr J. Cartwright                  Council
Mr D. Hay                         Social Sciences Board
Professor D. Ibbetson             Social Sciences Board
Professor E. McKendrick           Social Sciences Board
Dr A. Davies                      Social Sciences Board
Dr M. Ryan                        All Souls College



The composition of the electoral board to the post below, proceedings to fill which are currently in progress, is as follows:

Professorship of Computing Science


                                  Appointed by

Dr W.D. Macmillan                 Mr Vice-Chancellor [1]
Professor M.Y. Vardi              Council
Professor S. Goldwasser           Council
Professor M. Paterson             Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board
Professor A.W. Roscoe             Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board
Professor S. Abramsky             Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board
Professor D.C. Clary              Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board
Professor P. Jeavons              St Anne's College
Professor T.J. Lyons              St Anne's College

[1] Appointed by Mr Vice-Chancellor under the provisions of Sects. 10 and 11 of Statute IX (Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4633, 9 October 2002, Vol. 133, p. 108).

CHERWELL–SIMON LECTURE 2005

PROFESSOR FRANK WILCZEK, Herman Feshback Professor of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Nobel Laureate 2004, will deliver the Cherwell–Simon Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Friday, 13 May, in the Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon Laboratory.

Subject: 'The origin of mass and feebleness of gravity.'


CLASSICS

David Lewis Lecture

PROFESSOR SIMON HORNBLOWER, University College, London, will deliver the David Lewis Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 25 May, in the Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's College.

Subject: 'Theatre and the ancient Greek historian.'

MEDICAL SCIENCES

Oxford Osler Lecture

PROFESSOR J.I. BELL will deliver the inaugural Oxford Osler Lecture at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, 27 April, in the Lecture Theatre, the Medical Sciences Teaching Centre.

Subject: 'Will genomics change Oslerian medicine?'


Oxford Clinical Neuroscience Lectures

The following lectures will be given at 11.30 a.m. on Fridays in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

DR SANJAY SISODIYA, Institute of Neurology, London
13 May: 'Genetics and treatment of refractory epilepsy.'

PROFESSOR SETH LOVE, Bristol
27 May: 'Perineuronal mischief.'


MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

'Flaschenpost': German poetry and the long twentieth century

This colloquium will be held on 15 and 16 April in New College.

On Friday, 15 April, a bilingual poetry reading, with Michael Krüger, Ulrike Draesner, Iain Galbraith, and Karen Leeder, will be held at 5.30 p.m. in the Long Room.

Details of the papers to be given on Saturday, 16 April, in Lecture Room 4, the Noël Salter Room, are set out below.

Further details may be found at http://www.mod- langs.ox.ac.uk/german/flaschenpost. Places at the colloquium are available, but must be reserved by 1 April: enquiries should be directed to Dr Leeder.

Convener: Dr K.J Leeder (e-mail: karen.leeder@new.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR R. VILAIN, Robert Holloway, London
9.30 a.m.: ' "Le style. . . c'est le diable": early twentieth-century German poetry in dialogue with Paul Valéry.'

PROFESSOR M. ESKIN, Columbia
10.15 a.m.: ' "Of Poets and Sailors"—on Celan, Brodsky, and Grünbein.'

PROFESSOR H.-H. MÜLLER and DR TOM KINDT, Hamburg
11.30 a.m.: 'Die Liebeslyrik: Brecht und andere.'

DR K. KOHL
12.15 p.m.: ' "Grammatische Meditationen" und "Herzworte"—Sprache als Metapher in der Lyrik des 20. Jahrhunderts.'

PROFESSOR W. EMMERICH, Bremen
2 p.m.: 'Keine Lyrik nach Auschwitz? 50 Jahre Kontroversen und Gedichte nach Adornos Diktum.'

DR G. PAUL, Warwick
2.45 p.m.: 'Gender and tradition: Bewegte Differenzen: readings in contemporary poetry by women.'

PROFESSOR H. KORTE, Siegen
4 p.m.: 'Das epigrammatische Gedicht in Westdeutschland seit 1945.'

PROFESSOR H. GNÜG, Bonn
4.45 p.m.: ' "Das Ende der Landschaftsmalerei"—Problematik und Wiederentdeckung eines Genre.' (Followed by closing discussion at 5.30 p.m.)


SOCIAL SCIENCES

Are Labour's constitutional changes working?

The concluding seminars in this series will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in Magdalen College.

Conveners: Sir Michael Wheeler-Booth, Professor David Marquand, and Dr Richard Coggins.

SIR ALAN BUDD
25 Apr., Auditorium: 'The Budd Report.'

EDWARD GARNIER, QC, MP
9 May, Summer Common Room: 'Why opposition since 1997 has been difficult.'

LORD RENTON OF MOUNT HARRY
16 May, Summer Common Room: 'The role of the Whips in Parliament.'

LORD WOOLF, Lord Chief Justice
17 Oct., Auditorium: 'The courts' place in the constitution?'


OXFORD INSTITUTE OF AGEING

The future of social care policy for older people: the Green Paper and its context

The following seminars will take place at 12.30 p.m. on Thursdays in Seminar Room G, the Social Sciences Building, Manor Road.

Convener: Professor Bleddyn Davies.

DR STEPHEN LADYMAN, MP, DR RAY JONES, Wiltshire County Council, and NICK WELCH, Oxfordshire Social and Health Care
28 Apr.: 'Social care policy and older people: the Green Paper's logic.'

DR JULIEN FORDER, LSE, and JOSE-LUIS FERNANDEZ, LSE
5 May: 'Funding projected need for social care: how the Wanless Review is approaching the issues.'

PROFESSOR R. MEANS, University of the West of England
12 May: 'The Green Paper and the challenge of seamless services across housing, health, and social services.'

PROFESSOR I. PHILIP, Department of Health
19 May: 'The Green Paper, the National Service Framework for Older People, and new models at the interface of health and social care.'

PROFESSOR C. UNGERSON, Kent
26 May: 'The Green Paper and direct payments: British policy from an international perspective.'


Research on ageing in Africa: forging directions for the future

This three-day residential conference, for forty to fifty key UK, African, and international researchers, practitioners, policy-makers, and funding bodies, will take place in St Anne's College, 11–13 April. Although delegate numbers are restricted a few places are still available.

Anyone who wishes to attend the conference should contact the Administrator of the Oxford Institute of Ageing, Carole Newbigging (e-mail: carole.newbigging@ageing-ox.ac.uk).


ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM AND HUMANITIES DIVISION

Crossing cultures—crossing time

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Lecture Room, the Khalili Research Centre, 3 St John's Street.

Conveners: Jeremy Johns, Henry Kim, Luke Treadwell, and Susan Walker.

SUSAN WALKER and others
25 Apr.: 'Crossing cultures—crossing time.'

EMILIE SAVAGE-SMITH and others
2 May: 'Crossing cultures: reading, writing, and arithmetic.'

RUTH BARNES and others
9 May: 'Crossing cultures: textiles.'

BERT SMITH and others
16 May: 'Crossing cultures: portraiture.'

JAS ELSNER and others
23 May: 'The Mediterranean in late antiquity: Christianity and Islam in the Mediterranean.'

PROFESSOR DAME JESSICA RAWSON and others
30 May: 'The making of the modern world: East meets West: the Silk Road.'

RUTH BARNES and others
6 June: 'The making of the modern world: East meets West: the spice trade.'

TIM WILSON and others
13 June: 'Crossing cultures: the world of ceramics.'


BEGBROKE SCIENCE PARK

NICOLA SCOTT, BMW Group, Oxford, will give a Begbroke Seminar at 6.30 p.m. on Wednesday, 30 March, in the Blenheim Room, Begbroke Sciene Park.

Ms Scott will discuss the radical 'culture change' at the BMW plant in Oxford, which has established teamwork and personal responsibility as central to its philosophy.

To reserve a place, e-mail Dr Rebecca Lingwood (rebecca.lingwood@begbroke.ox.ac.uk ).

Subject: 'Employees in the driving seat: innovation at BMW Oxford.'


TEACHING AND RESEARCH UNIT IN HEBREW AND JEWISH STUDIES

David Patterson Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 8 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor.

Convener: Dr Joseph Sherman.

DR D. PATTERSON
27 Apr.: 'Against all odds: the renascence of Hebrew literature.'

PROFESSOR L. HOCHMAN, Florida
4 May: 'Reading faces, reading souls: Jews, Judaism, and physiognomy in modern Europe.'

DR S. DEBENDETTI-STOW, Bar Ilan
11 May: 'The problem of free will and divine wisdom as a link between Dante Alighieri and medieval Jewish thought.'

DR D. WEINSTEIN, Wake Forest University
18 May: 'Exile and interpretation: Popper's reconstruction of western political thought.'

DR M. KRUTIKOV
25 May: '1929: an end of modernism in Yiddish literature?'

J. KIRKPATRICK
1 June: 'Jews and pagans in Roman Palestine.'

DR J. ZIMMERMAN, Yeshiva University, USA
8 June: 'The attitude of the Polish Home Army to the Jewish Question during the Holocaust.'

DR D. GROISER
15 June: 'Martin Buber and the myth of Judaism.'


ESRC CENTRE ON MIGRATION, POLICY, AND SOCIETY, AND THE INSTITUTE OF SOCIAL AND CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY

The anthropology of migration and multiculturalism

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Fridays in the Seminar Room, 64 Banbury Road.

Convener: Professor Steven Vertovec.

RALPH GRILLO, Sussex
29 Apr.: 'Debating cultural differences in multicultural societies.'

NADJE AL-ALI, Exeter University
6 May: 'Gender, identity, and reconstruction: diasporic spaces of Iraqi women.'

AYSE CAGLAR, Central European University
13 May: 'Immigrant incorporation and politics of scale.'

T.H. ERIKSEN, Oslo
20 May: 'Dynamics of openness and closure in contemporary majority/minority situations.'

M.P. SMITH, California, Davis
27 May: 'The Mexican migrant as political subject and transnational citizen.'

LOUIS LAMPHERE, New Mexico
3 June: 'Migration, multiculturalism, and identity: Navajo perspectives.'

J. COLLINS, University of Technology, Sydney
10 June: 'Ethnic precincts as contradictory tourist spaces: the case of Sydney, Australia.'


RHODES TRUST

German Rhodes Lecture

PROFESSOR DIETER GRIMM, Permanent Fellow, the Institute of Advanced Study, Berlin, and formerly Judge of the Federal Constitutional Court of Germany, will deliver the German Rhodes Lecture (in English) at 5 p.m. on Friday, 29 April, in Rhodes House.

The lecture is arranged jointly with the Association of German Rhodes Scholars, and is sponsored by the Boston Consulting Group.

Subject: 'Integration by constitution? Expectations and perspectives in the process of European constitutionalisation.'


SAID BUSINESS SCHOOL

PROFESSOR ART BRIEF, Lawrence Martin Chair of Business, A.B. Freeman School of Business, Tulane, and editor of the Academy of Management Review, will give seminars at 12.30 p.m. on the following days in Lecture Theatre 5, the Saïd Business School. All members of the University are welcome to attend.

Thur. 28 Apr.: 'Theory building and the Academy of Management Review.' (Chairman: Professor Richard Whittington)

Fri. 29 Apr.: 'Communities matter: the case of race relations in organisations.' (Chairman: Dr Alex Nicholls)


WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE

Medicine, surgery, and culture

The following seminars wil be held at 2.15 p.m. on Mondays in the Wellcome Unit, 45 Banbury Road. All members of the University are welcome to attend.

Seminars will not be held on 2 and 30 May.

Convener: Dr Margaret Pelling.

DR I. MORTIMER, University of Exeter
25 Apr.: 'The importance of towns to the seriously ill and dying in seventeenth-century Kent.'

DR M. BROWN, York
9 May: 'From foetic air to filth: the cultural transformation of British epidemiological thought, c.1780–c.1848.'

PROFESSOR A. CROWTHER, Glasgow
16 May: 'Surgery and empire: Lister's students in imperial service.'

DR H. KNIGHT, Queen Mary College, London
23 May: ' "More Copious, and less Unaccurate": Robert Boyle's planned second edition of his Memoirs for the History of Human Blood.'

DR D. HAYCOCK, LSE
6 June: 'Pills, balms, and elixirs: making and selling new medicines in later seventeenth-century London.'

DR L. ELDRIDGE, Ottawa
13 June: 'Eye surgery in thirteenth- and fourteenth-century Europe.'


ALL SOULS COLLEGE

LEONARD QUART, Professor Emeritus of Cinema Studies, City University of New York, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 27 April, in the Old Library, All Souls College.

Convener: Professor G.A. Cohen.

Subject: 'The state of New York City.'


GREEN COLLEGE

Brian Walker Lecture on Environment and Development

PROFESSOR G. CONWAY will deliver the Brian Walker Lecture on Environment and Development at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 28 April, in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

Subject: 'Science, technology, and development.'


JESUS COLLEGE

Don Fowler Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR M. WYKE, Reading, will deliver the Don Fowler Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 5 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: 'Julius Caesar in western culture: from Lucan to Las Vegas.'


MAGDALEN COLLEGE

Waynflete Lectures

CHRISTIANA M. LEONARD, Professor Emerita of Neuroscience, University of Florida, will deliver the Waynflete Lectures at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Grove Auditorium, Magdalen College.

12 May: 'Neural networks: under the hood of the learning machine.'

19 May: 'Neurodiversity: evolution and development of cortical maps.'

26 May: 'Epigenesis: how genes and experience shape unique individuals.'

2 June: 'Cerebral asymmetry: why a left and a right brain?'

9 June: 'Neuroplasticity: the effects of enrichment, deprivation, and intervention.'

16 June: 'Anomalous development: dyslexia and schizophrenia.'


ST EDMUND HALL

A.B. Emden Lecture

PROFESSOR G. HOSKING, Leverhulme Research Professor of Russian History at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, London, will deliver the A.B. Emden Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 13 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: 'Trust and distrust in European societies: a historian's approach.'


GRADUATE THEOLOGY SOCIETY

DR WILLIAM CRAIG will lecture at 8.15 p.m. on Wednesday, 27 April, in the Harris Lecture Theatre, Oriel College. Admission is free.

Subject: 'Evidence for the historical resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth.'

OPPENHEIMER FUND

The Oppenheimer Fund provides grants to assist the academic exchange of senior members between the University of Oxford on the one hand and universities and similar institutions of higher education in the Republic of South Africa on the other.

Applications are invited from senior members of the University who wish either to visit one or more universities in South Africa or to invite a staff member from a South African university to Oxford. Grants may be awarded to assist with living expenses for a maximum of six months, and travel costs. Visits for the sole purpose of attending a conference will not normally be eligible for support from the Fund. The maximum level of grants is likely to be up to £1,000 per month for subsistence and up to £700 for the cost of travel between Oxford and South Africa.

Applications for grants from the Fund should include a statement of the purpose of the proposed visit (including an outline of any research to be carried out during the visit), duration and estimated costs, details of any other available sources of funding, and, in the case of visits to Oxford, a curriculum vitae of the staff member it is proposed to invite and a letter of support from a senior member at Oxford. The closing date for applications is Friday, 13 May.

Applications and any enquiries about the Fund should be sent to James Tibbert, International Office, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: Oxford (2)70134, e-mail: james.tibbert@admin.ox.ac.uk).

APPOINTMENTS AND REAPPOINTMENTS

With the approval of the relevant divisional board, the following appointments and reappointments have been made for the periods stated.

Life and Environmental Sciences Division

Appointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

TOMMASO PIZZARI (B.SC. Aberdeen, PH.D. Sheffield), Fellow of St Catherine's. In Ornithology. From 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2009.

LEE SWEETLOVE (B.SC. East Anglia, PH.D. Cambridge), Fellow-elect of St Cross. In Plant Sciences. From 1 October 2006 to 31 December 2009.

MICHAEL BONSALL (B.SC., PH.D. London), Fellow-elect of St Peter's. In Mathematical Ecology. From 1 July 2007 to 30 June 2012.


Reappointments

PROFESSOR ANGELA MCLEAN, Department of Zoology. From 1 July 2005 to the retiring age.

DR JAMES MCDONNELL, Department of Biochemistry. From 1 October 2005 to the retiring age.


Mathematical and Physical Sciences Division

Appointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

JOHN HUBER (BA, M.ENG., PH.D. Cambridge), Fellow-elect of Oriel. In Mechanical Engineering (Design). From 1 April 2005 until 31 March 2010.

ANDREA CAVALLERI (B.SC, PH.D Pavia), Fellow-elect of Merton. In Atomic and Laser Physics. From 1 September 2005 until 31 August 2010.

SIMON MYERS, M.MATH, D.PHIL., Fellow-elect of St John's. In Bioinformatics. From 1 October 2007 until 30 September 2012.

ANGUS KIRKLAND, MA, D.PHIL. (BA, MA, PH.D., Cambridge), Fellow-elect of Linacre. In Materials. Titular from 1 October 2005, substantive from 1 October 2007 until 30 September 2010.


Reappointments

DR GILES BARR, Department of Physics, Sub-department of Particle Physics. From 27 March 2005 to the retiring age.

PROFESSOR TIM DONOHOE, Department of Chemistry, Sub-department of Organic Chemistry. From 1 October 2006 to the retiring age.

DR BEN HAMBLY, Mathematical Institute. From 1 September 2005 to the retiring age.

DR GAVIN LOWE, Computing Laboratory. From 1 October 2005 to the retiring age.

PROFESSOR GESINE REINERT, Department of Statistics. From 1 October 2005 to the retiring age.


Social Sciences Division

Reappointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

DR CHRISTOPHER MCKENNA (BA Amherst College, MA, PH.D. Johns Hopkins), Fellow of Brasenose. University Lecturer in Management Studies (Strategy). From 1 October 2005 to the retiring age.

DR R GODFREY KELLER, BA, M.SC., D.PHIL (M.SC., PH.D. LSE), Fellow of Hertford. University Lecturer in Economics. From 1 October 2005 to the retiring age.

DR KATHRYN GRADDY (BS, BA Tulane, MBA Columbia, PH.D. Princeton), Fellow of Exeter. University Lecturer (CUF) in Economics. From 1 October 2005 to the retiring age.

DR GAVIN CAMERON, D.PHIL. (B.SC. Lancaster, M.SC. Bristol), Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall. University Lecturer (CUF) in Economics from 1 October 2005 to the retiring age.

DR CHRISTOPHER WALLACE, D.PHIL. (B.SC., M.SC. LSE), Fellow of Trinity. University Lecturer (CUF) in Economics. From 1 October 2005 to the retiring age.

DR BENT NIELSEN, (MA , PH.D. Copenhagen), Fellow of Nuffield. University Lecturer in Econometrics. From 1 October 2005 to the retiring age.


CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, the following changes in regulations made by the Continuing Education Board will come into effect on 8 April.

Continuing Education Board

Probationary Research Student and Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Evidence-based Health Care

With effect from October 2005

1 In Examination Regulations, 2004, p. 958, l. 32, after 'History,' insert 'the M.Sc. in Evidence-based Health Care,'.

2 Ibid., after 'the M.St.' insert 'or M.Sc'.

3 Ibid., p. 959, l. 4, after 'History' insert 'or Evidence-based Health Care'.

4 Ibid., l. 21, after 'History' insert 'the M.Sc. in Evidence-based Health Care,'.

5 Ibid., after 'the M.St.' insert 'or M.Sc'.

6 Ibid., l. 38, after 'Archaeology' delete 'and' and substitute ','.

7 Ibid., after 'History' insert 'and Evidence-based Health Care'.

8 Ibid., p. 960, l. 41, after 'Archaeology' delete 'and' and substitute ','.

9 Ibid., after 'History' insert 'and Evidence-based Health Care'.

10 Ibid., l.46, after 'Archaeology' insert 'and Evidence-based Health Care'.

11 Ibid., p. 961, l. 24, after 'History' insert 'and in Evidence-based Health Care'.

12 Ibid., l. 43, after 'Archaeology' delete 'and' and substitute ','.

13 Ibid., l. 44, after 'History' insert 'and Evidence-based Health Care'.

OBITUARIES

Corpus Christi College

HENRY REX AUDLEY, 19 February 2005; commoner 1948–51. Aged 77.


St Hilda's College

MILDRED ARCHER (née Bell), OBE, MA, D.LITT., 4 February 2005; commoner 1931–4, Honorary Fellow 1978–2005. Aged 93.


St Hugh's College

MISS ELIZABETH STELLA BANNING, 19 February 2004; Classics 1934. Aged 89.

MRS JUDITH MARY BOYD (née Martin), 15 March 2003; PPE 1952 (Abbott Scholar). Aged 69.

MISS MARY PRUST CIANTAR; PPE 1940.

MRS MARIE-JACQUELINE GAUTHIER (née Mason), September 2004; Modern Languages 1950 (Gamble Scholar). Aged 74.

MRS MARGARET HOPWOOD (née Sheehan), 6 February 2004; English 1935. Aged 87.

MISS RACHEL MARY HOWARD, 3 February 2005; Law 1936. Aged 87.

MRS SHARLEE MARGARET RUTH MANSFIELD (née Keay), 19 December 2004; Classics 1935. Aged 88.

MRS DOREEN MARGARET SHELBOURN (née Forster), 14 January 2005; Modern Languages 1937. Aged 86.

Oxford University Newcomers' Club

The Club welcomes the wives, husbands and partners of visiting scholars, graduates and members of the University who are new to Oxford. It aims to offer help, advice and information, and the opportunity to meet others socially. Informal coffee mornings are held at 13 Norham Gardens every Wednesday 10.30 a.m.–12 noon except for two weeks at Christmas and Easter. Newcomers with children (0–4 years) meet every Friday in term 10.15 a.m.–12 noon. Other term-time activities include a Book Group, informal Conversation Group and tours to colleges, museums, and other places of interest, also country walks, garden trips and a visit to an antique centre. Second-hand items can be bought on Wednesday mornings 10.30 a.m.–12 noon from the equipment room. Visit our website: www.ox.ac.uk/staff.


Graduate Student Workshop

The OU Greek Society organises the Graduate Student Workshop 'Aegean Koinç. A diachronic approach to the Aegean World and its cultures: 3000 bc–ad 2000' (University of Oxford, Taylor Institute, on 22–23 Apr.). Keynote speakers: Professor Angelos Chaniotis (University of Heidelberg) and Professor Elizabeth Zachariadou (University of Crete). http://users.ox.ac.uk/~greeksoc/aegean/index.htm.


Mayneord Phillips Summer School

The Mayneord Phillips Summer School will be held at St Edmund Hall, Oxford, from Sat., 3 July to Fri., 8 July, and will explore the rapidly emerging field of 'Ultrasound and Other Minimally Invasive Therapies'. The course is fully residential and will be given at postgraduate level. The faculty includes distinguished clinicians, medical physicists, and engineers from around the world. For further details, please contact valberry@utlltd.com or visit www.m-pss.org.


School Scholarship Offered

Summer Fields, Oxford: the Maclaren Trust Scholarship. A scholarship, of up to 90% of full fees, is awarded to a boy of outstanding ability between the ages of 10 and 12 who, without this financial support, would not be able to come to Summer Fields. For an application form please write to or telephone the Registrations Secretary, Summer Fields, Oxford OX2 7EN. Tel.: 01865 459204. Email: schoolsec@summerfields.org.uk.


Volunteers Needed

We are studying links between diet and heart disease. Would you like to take part in our studies on diet and blood fats? If you are healthy and above 18 years, we would like to hear from you. Please contact Mary Chong at OCDEM, The Churchill Hospital, on 01865 857262 or email enquiries@oxlip.ox.ac.uk.


Charity Event

Worcester College, 20 April. Savant Daniel Tammet returns to Oxford a year after setting a new British and European 'Pi in the Sky' record by using his incredible memory to recall the mathematical constant Pi to more than 22,500 decimal places. Daniel will be talking about his astonishing mental skills in aid of the National Society for Epilepsy. Call 01494 601410 for tickets (£7.50).


Cafe Zouk

Mughal Indian cuisine: 1st floor, 135 High Street, Oxford. From our kitchen to your table, we would like to bring you herbs, spices, roots, beauty, fragrances and the Mughal tradition of passion for good food. Tel.: 01865 251600. Open: daily 12 p.m. to 2.30 p.m. and 5.30 p.m. to 11.30 p.m. Web site: http://www.cafezouk.co.uk.


Antiques Bought and Sold

Antiques and decorative objects bought and sold: desks and library furniture always wanted, also garden stonework and large gilt picture frames—any condition. Please call: Greenway Antiques, 90 Corn Street, Witney, Oxon. Open Mon.–Fri., 9.30 a.m.–5 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Tel.: 01993 705026, mobile: 07831 585014.


Restoration and Conservation of Antique Furniture

John Hulme undertakes all aspects of restoration: 30 years' experience; collection and delivery. For free advice, telephone or write to: The Workshop, 11A High Street, Chipping Norton, Oxon. OX7 5AD. Tel.: 01608 641692.


Personal Training Services

One of the highest qualified exercise and nutritional consultants/personal trainers in the UK. 35 years' experience. MSc Biomechanics and Applied Human Movement; BSc (Hons 1st) Sports Nutrition; Adv. Dip in Clinical Stress Management; Adv. Dip in Clinical Sports Therapy. Member of the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences. Member of the International Society of Biomechanics. Expert attention for tone, weight loss, injury and rehabilitation and performance, from total novice levels to advanced, regardless of sex, age or physical limitations. Web site: www.alangordon-health.co.uk.


Services Offered

Marshall & Galpin Solicitors, Family Department. We are an established Oxfordshire private client firm with offices in Oxford, Thame and Abingdon. We have six specialist family lawyers who advise on a wide range of issues: divorce and separation, children, financial agreements on divorce, pre-nuptial agreements, cohabitee disputes, separation agreements and pensions. Our lawyers are members of Resolution (formerly The Solicitors Family Law Association). One of our team members is a Deputy District Judge and two are trained mediators. We offer a range of competitive rates and a short free initial interview. French, Spanish and Italian spoken. Other services provided by the firm include property adviceconveyancing, wills & probate, personal injury & medical negligence, employment and businesscommercial. For further information visit our web site at: www.marshallgalpin.com or contact Mark Phillips on 01865 792300 (Oxford), Simon Bassett on 01235 555345 (Abingdon), James Stonham 01844 261966 (Thame).

Big or small, we ship it all, plus free pick up anywhere in Oxford. Also 24-hour photocopying, private mailing addresses (24-hour access, and mail forwarding world-wide), binding, fax bureau, colour photocopying, mailing services, and much more. Contact or visit Mail Boxes Etc., 266 Banbury Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 514655, fax: 514656. Email: summertown@020.mbe.uk.com, also at: 94 London Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 741729, fax: 01865 742431. Email: staff@mbeheadington.co.uk.

Town and Country Trees: arboricultural contractors; modern arboricultural techniques; local authority approved; safeguarded by full Public Liability insurance. Free advice and quotations. Tel.: 0845 458 2980 or 07976 261850 (mobile).

Oxford Literary Consultancy. Manuscript assessment. Editorial guidance. Publishing advice. For beginners and experienced writers. For fees and services, visit our website: www.oxfordwriters.com. Tel.: 01865 725786.

Do you have any books to sell? We provide a completely free service. Email details of the books you wish to sell in the form of a Word attachment and we will upload it onto the 'Books for Sale & Wanted'-page on our website free of charge. Make sure you add a contact email address to your document. Your buyer then deals with you direct. Contact us now at books@footstepstooxford.co.uk.

Personal Assistant. Is time often at a premium and could a professional with university experience assist you with diary management, help you organise conferences, greet your visitors or attend to telephone calls for you? Could a personal assistant check your emails, attend to correspondence, type articles or do library searches when you could be tackling another important job? Immediate availability. Please telephone 01865 378982 for more details.


Domestic Services

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: 01865 726983 or 01235 555533.

Responsible Italian graduate student (26) would like to work as an au pair, preferably in Oxford. For a period from 6 months to 1 year, starting Apr. or May 2005 (dates flexible). Work experience with 'Save the Children' and WWF. Experience with children. Wide interests. References available. Contact Chiara Ciaschi on 0039 329 8017612 or chiaraciaschi@hotmail.com.


Situations Vacant

Mandarin teaching job offered. Semi-beginners in Chinese Mandarin looking for a teacher (native Mandarin speaker only) for private course: 1–2 courses p.w. Knowledge of Pinyin required. Teaching experience preferred. Students welcome! Contact Estelle on 01865 552010 or 07795 844641. Email: estelle_rolin@yahoo.com.


Houses to Let

An Englishman's home is his castle—so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Visit our web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or email us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: 01865 764533. Fax: 764777. Email: info@qbman.co.uk.

Charlbury. Newly renovated 2-bedroom bungalow in central Charlbury available now, unfurnished or partly furnished. Very quiet location, but close to shops, buses and mainline railway station. New g.c.h.; fully rewired and redecorated; new carpets throughout. Spacious deck at rear, with lovely views over the town to Wychwood Forest. Long let to careful tenant(s) preferred. Unsuitable for young children or pets. £650 p.c.m., plus bills. Tel.: 01608 810571. Email: j.milsom@lineone.net.

Jericho, Walton Cr. Family house in ideal central Oxford location available mid-Apr.–July/Aug. Large kitchen/dining/lounge area, 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, fully equipped (cot available), garden. £1,000 p.c.m. or house swap in Edinburgh. Tel. 01865 510558. Email: lmason@maths.ox.ac.uk.

Furnished coach house in the centre of Old Marston village. Two bedrooms, kitchen, lounge, bathroom (bath and shower). G.c.h., off-street parking, on bus route (no. 13C) into central Oxford. Basic rent: £800 p.m. No smoking, no pets. To be let for 1 or 2 years, suitable for visiting academics, graduate students, hospital doctors, nurses. Deposit required. Tel.: 01865 244130.

Stunning 4-bedroom country cottage with private garden and off-road parking. Very convenient for train, bus, and road links to Oxford and London. 'The Bothy' overlooks the village green and Church, local pub is within walking distance. The village of Tackley offers an excellent primary school and a thriving community. Ideal for a professional family, who need access to Oxford Colleges, or other local businesses, yet want to enjoy the country life. To let, either furnished or unfurnished, from Sept. for a minimum of 12 months, at £1,950 p.c.m. Email: amanda.gooding@balliol.ox.ac.uk or mike.gooding@ariafoods.co.uk.

Four-bedroom Edwardian family house available for 6 months from Sept. East Oxford, quiet side road near Oxford Brookes and hospitals. Modern kitchen and bathroom. Beautiful south-facing garden. Suit family or professionals. Tel.: 01865 722737 or email george@ukhq.co.uk.


Flats to Let

Central North Oxford: 10 minutes' walk from city centre, all main university buildings and parks, also very close to the river: available now for short/long let in extremely quiet, civilised, large Victorian house in this exclusive, leafy, residential Victorian suburb with large, light airy rooms: two lovely ground floor flats, fully furnished, each with large double bedroom, large single bedroom, large drawing room, kitchen, bathroom. Flat 1 (recently refurbished to a high standard) is available at the end of March. Flat 2 is available now. Off-street parking, large secluded garden. Tel./fax: 01865 552400. Mobile: 07789092274.

North Oxford purpose built furnished one- and two-bedroom apartments in the centre of Summertown. One-bedroom flat (2nd floor) available early Apr. at £675 p.c.m.; two-bedroom flat (1st floor) available late Apr. at £795 p.c.m., both exclusive of utility and council tax where applicable. Best suited to n-s mature professionals or visiting academics. Located within easy reach to all local amenities, shops, restaurants, hospitals and University departments. Off-street parking available. Tel.: 01865 516144. Email: a.fiorentino@ntlworld.com.

Self-contained (apart from shared house entrance) one-bedroom flat with mod. cons. on second floor of house overlooking Port Meadow in Wolvercote. £695 p.c.m. inclusive, excl. telephone and internet connection. Convenient for University and Oxford city, with rural surroundings. Parking, cycling and/or bus ride 15 min. to city centre. Immediately available for six months. Suitable for one person (academic or professional). References required. Email: wrldco@aol.com.

Summertown. First floor apartment situated in highly sought after location close to local amenities and with good access the city centre. Sitting room, kitchen, bathroom, double bedroom. Allocated off-street parking. Non-smoker. Available early Apr. £685 p.c.m. Tel.: 01367 244408. Email: coxwell1@tiscali.co.uk.


Vacation Lets

Summertown. Light, spacious detached Victorian house. Four bedrooms, two bathrooms, lovely large family kitchen, garden and patio. Easy access to city centre (1 ½ miles). Available 6 Aug. to 27 Aug. £550 p.w. Email: dblee@btinternet.com. Tel.: 01865 514080.

North Oxford . Edwardian family house to let 30 July to 27 Aug. £2,000 whole period. Light, spacious, overlooking leafy college playing fields. Excellent access to city centre, colleges, river, shops, cinemas etc. Four bedrooms (sleep up to 8), book-lined study, large sitting room, 3 bathrooms with power showers etc., large kitchen with Aga. TV, dishwasher, washing machine, dryer etc. Front and rear gardens with big trampoline, off-street parking. Tel.: 01865 512397. Email: mj@martinjennings.com.

Summertown, Oxford. Spacious 4-bedroom furnished house and garden available for rent from mid-July to mid-Sept. 1,5 miles to city centre. Good buses. Two min. from Summertown shops. Study. Broadband connection. Good rates offered for holiday period. For details, contact d18m01@yahoo.com.

Modern, bright, newly refurbished two-bedroom 1st-floor flat in quiet countryside lane: large living/dining room; south-facing balcony; 1 double bedroom; 1 single bedroom with desk; fully equipped kitchen; brand new bathroom. Beautiful views over stream and meadows, yet just 10 min. walk from Oxford railway station and 15 minutes from Oxford city centre. Available for July and Aug. £1,100 p.m. incl. bills (excl. telephone) and weekly cleaner. Non-smokers only. michael.collins@st-johns.oxford.ac.uk.


Accommodation Offered

OxfordShortlets offers a portfolio of high quality self-catering short let properties as an excellent alternative to hotel/guesthouse and bed and breakfast accommodation in Oxford and the surrounding villages. We have a wide selection of quality homes available for short stay lets from 1 week up to several months. OxfordShortlets provides property rental on a short-term basis for professional individuals, groups or families requiring housing while visiting Oxford for holiday/vacation, business/academic, relocation purposes or temporary accommodation in between homes. For more information, please contact us on tel: 0870 1602325, fax: 0870 1602327, email: admin@oxfordshortlets.co.uk or visit our website at www.oxfordshortlets.co.uk.

Paying guests, visiting academics, welcomed for short or long stays in the comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple, in exclusive, quiet, leafy central north Oxford, within walking distance of all main university buildings, town centre, parks, river, good shops, and restaurants. All rooms have colour TV, tea-/coffee-making facilities, microwave, and refrigerator and/or deep-freeze availability, c.h., and independent heating. Breakfast included in the very moderate terms. Tel./fax: 01865 557879. Email: eaton@norham23.freeserve.co.uk.

Comfortable, pleasant accommodation available for academics in attractive, private house, just over a mile from the centre of Oxford. B&B basis. Dinner by arrangement. One minute to bus stop. River walks nearby. Quiet. A home away from home. £39 per night. Discounts for long bookings. Please telephone 01865 770 501.

Oxford City Apartments. Modern and bright apartments within walking distance of the city centre. These very attractive one-bedroom apartments both have private outside dining areas and designated parking. Available for visiting academics, business lets, relocation or vacation shortlets. The ideal base for exploring Oxford and the Cotswolds. For more information please visit our web page at www.oxfordcity.co.uk/acco m/oxfordcityapartments, and mention the Gazette in any enquiry.

Summertown. Large furnished bed-sitter, kitchenette, bathroom, in self-contained area on second floor of family house. Viewing after 7 Apr. C.h., telephone. Rent incl. all bills, except telephone and hot-water heater. Reduced rent for one quiet, non- smoking, long-term tenant (over one year). Yearly contract and references required. Suitable for one person only. Write to Dr S. L. Altmann, Brasenose College, Oxford OX1 4AJ or email simon.altmann@bnc.ox.ac.uk.

Keep your independence with support at Brian Lewis House, Oxford. En suite rooms for nine elderly residents, lovely garden, situated near the city centre, with good bus connections. The House has a resident House Manager and friendly, supportive staff. Four- day or longer respite care breaks sometimes available. For details contact the Administrator on 01865 790439 or brianlewis@ukonline.co.uk.

Summertown, Oxford. Comfortable fully-furnished single room for short or long stays in a brand new apartment. Continental breakfast provided. Evening meal can be arranged. Shared bathroom and lounge. Close to charming river walks and delightful Port Meadow. Close to bus stop. Street parking available. £400 p.c.m. incl. Deposit required. Tel.: 01865 553882 (3.30 p.m. ' 10.30 p.m.). Email: lilybulmer@hotmail.com.

Flatshare. Tenant sought for double room with large private bathroom in spacious penthouse flat in the Waterways, off Woodstock Road. Walking distance to Jericho and centre town. Modern, bright and fully equipped. Parking, gardens, overlooking the canal. Broadband. Available from mid-Apr. Flexible lease. Would suit young professional or academic n/s. £450 plus bills. 07710077843 (evenings) or email myflatinoxford@hotmail.com.

To share: a large, quiet apartment in central North Oxford. N-s. Large sunny bedroom, spacious sitting room, 2 toilets, bath and shower. TV, washer/dryer; ample storage. Off-street parking. Suitable for academic, professional or postgraduate student. May remain indefinitely. £375 p.m. plus share of utilities. Tel.: 01865 511555.

Unique opportunity to lodge in a beautifully restored Grade II listed property. Located in Old Marston this cottage offers a home from home experience. Ten min. from the city centre, walking distance from local shops and easy access to Headington hospitals. All mod. cons., fire, private garden, parking, and cleaner. Ideal for mature, n-s individual. Available now. Tel.: 01865 250722.

Academic visitors welcome for short or long stays in friendly home of an academic. The house is located in East Oxford. Walking distance from the centre through the University Park. A good sized furnished room with colour TV. Shared kitchen, washing machine, and garden. Ample parking space in front of the house. Moderate terms. Email: miriamoxford@yahoo.com.


Office Accommodation

North Oxford , 800 yards from St Giles. A complex of four rooms (garden bungalow) incl. an annexe in detached premises off the Woodstock Road. Separate entrance, with all facilities. Computer and fax input, BT telephone, car parking, c.h. and hot/cold water. Total alarmed security. Five star interior and exterior appearance. Available immediately. Tel.: 01865 51 11 11.


Self-catering Apartments

Fully-furnished and serviced 3 and 4-star self-catering apartments available in North Oxford; 15 min. from Oxford city centre. Suitable for short lets for visiting academics or business people. From £330 p.w. all inclusive. Sleeps 2–5 people. Tel.: 07870 234725. Web site: http://www.weeklyhome.com. E-mail: info@weeklyhome.com.


Accommodation Sought

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us: 01865 764533, fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk. Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.

Home exchange: Kapiti Coast, New Zealand. Exchange sought by couple for sabbatical leave in Oxford area, Jan.–July 2006. Beach front, modern home within one hour's access of Wellington (by car or train) and Palmerston north (by car). Three double bedrooms, two bathrooms, study, three large living areas, plus outdoor living spaces. Willing to negotiate car swap. Contact Annette Beasley: waitoa@xtra.co.nz.

Academic family with two school children is looking for 3-bed house to rent long-term in Jericho area, from asap, for around £1,300 p.c.m. Non-smokers. References available. Please contact jpgm@hotmail.co.uk. Tel.: 01865 559247.

A furnished flat/house required for two adults and a child for the month of July, in central Oxford or within easy reach of Headington hospitals by public transport. Please contact Professor Michelle Craske at Craske@psych.ucla.edu.

Looking for a furnished 3- or 4-bedroom home to let for the 2005/6 academic year (Aug./Sept. '05–June/July '06). My family and I will be on sabbatical, arriving from Chapel Hill, North Carolina (very near UNC Chapel Hill and Duke Unviersity). A house exchange is possible for a UNC or Duke-bound Oxford academic family. Please contact Mike Gagne at mgagne@unc.edu for further information.


Holiday Lets

Greek Island Rentals. Skopelos and Alonissos. Local villa specialist offers lovely pool villas, town houses and cottages available for rent. Town, country and seaside locations. Accommodations for 2–16 persons. Prices from £100 p.p./p.w. For information see www.holidayislands.com. Email : thalpos@otenet.gr. Fax : +30 24240 23057.

Tuscany. Holiday house and cottage to let. Superb scenic setting near mountains. Florence, Arezzo, Siena, and many more amazing places in easy reach. Ideal for walking, sightseeing, swimming, cycling, museums and galleries, enjoying wonderful Tuscan food and wine. Can accommodate from 2 to 15 people. Air conditioning, large garden with BBQ. Very reasonable prices. Details and photos at http://freespace.virgin.net/gp.ck (no 'www'). Email: gp.ck@virgin.net. Tel.: 020 8699 8883.

Tuscany. Small traditional farmhouse in Chianti, 15 min. from Siena, set in olive groves on hill side overlooking unspoilt valley; beautiful view of Siena's skyline. Sleeps up to 6; simply but decently equipped; car essential. Small pool and idyllic surroundings. http://utenti.lycos.it/fabiopetri for photos and rates. Email: petri@unisi.it.

Tuscany. Family-owned wine estate, producing highly recognised wines, olive oil, and cheese. Offers ancient farmhouse and apartments accommodating 2 up to 12+. Secluded rural setting, 30 min. to central Florence. Contact: Tel/Fax (0039) 055 824 9120. Email: sulpoggio@bcc.tin.it.

Paris apartment available for short or longer stays: delightful 1- bedroom, first-floor flat overlooking the Place du Marche St Catherine (Marais). Period building with large windows and high ceilings. Attractively furnished and well-equipped with TV, CD, hairdryer, etc. Linens and cleaning provided. Three nights minimum. £55 per night, £325 p.w. or £950 p.c.m. for members of the University. (Non- member rates: £65 per night, £395 p.w., and £1,050 p.c.m.). Contact Dr J.J. Chamberlain on 07957 588 448 or email: joe.chamberlain@ukgateway.net.

Southern France: 27 miles from Perpignan Airport. Tastefully restored traditional village house with character in the heart of 'Cathar Country'; 5 double bedrooms (3 en suite) plus family bathroom; 2 living rooms; large fully-equipped kitchen. Large roof terrace. Other airports: Carcassone, Montpellier, Barcelona. Local swimming, rivers and lakes, beaches within 30 miles, and hiking. Available from now. Call Tony Venables on 01491 825035, or 01865 557767 evening. Email: janevenab@aol.com.

Italy, Venice. Charming apartment, fully furnished, 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, can sleep 5. Just in the centre, S. Samuele public transport stop. £650 p.w. Contact: tagariello@libero.it.

Old Tuscany. In gorgeous countryside, south-east of Siena. Two well- equipped apartments, in a medieval building with garden, facing west, on the edge of a charming village. Friendly bar, restaurant, shops etc. Good plumbing, soft water; original art, books, ceiling fans. Weekly cleaning. Flat A (sleeps 4): £350 p.w. Flat B (sleeps 2): £260 p.w. Flats A and B together: £525 p.w. Contact Gordon Neale on 01428 714363 or 07747 6663311 (mobile) or 0039 3331236091 (Italy). Email: uliviera@hotmail.com.

Italy. Lovely, small, sunny village house (historic centre), 45 min. to Rome by bus/train (frequent service). Suitable for max. 2 n-s people. Fully furnished, linen, duvets etc. provided. You need take nothing. Very quiet, ideal for study. £300 p.m. (plus bills, which amount to very little). Ideally for at least one month or more. Photos provided if interested. Contact Angela Fuller on 01284 704441.

Tuscan hills. In superb situation near Siena. Our restored farmhouse standing amidst its own olives and vineyard. Spectacular hill and forest views. Walking, art, food and wine abundant. Easy access to cities. Very peaceful with full services (but no pool). Sleeps up to 8. Reasonable rates. Tel./Fax: 0039 0577963123 (English spoken). Email: richfran1321@msn.com.

Italy. A large selection of beautiful accommodations, including villas, nicest farm holidays, residences and apartments in Tuscany, Umbria, Sicily, Sardinia, Amalfi Coast, Apulia, Cinque Terre, Rome, Florence, Naples, Venice. Also many optional services for a real personalized vacation. Website: http://www.tuscanyandworld.com/. Contact: info@tuscanyandworld.com or 0039 3287133951.

Southwest France, between Albi and the medieval bastide town of Cordes. Lovely 100-year old stone farmhouse on edge of village in the Tarn's 'Golden Triangle'. Six-acre grounds, 15 m. swimming pool, set amid sunflower fields and vineyards. Three bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2 living rooms, large well-equipped kitchen, separate wc/utility room. Sleeps eight. Fully serviced. Several airports within easy reach. Call 0033 563 561 885 or email barrymsimpson@hotmail.com for details.

Sardinia, Costa Smeralda, Italy. Tasteful villa in rural village of San Pantaleo on the North Eastern coast of Sardinia, suitable for 2–6 people. Beautiful mountain views over the Roche Sarde from house and garden. Three double bedrooms (2 double beds, 1 twin); balcony and large terrazzo for al fresco dining; deckchairs on terrace and garden; self-catering kitchen and spacious living room. Only 10 min. by car from Porto Cervo, world-renowned Pevero golf course and all major beaches. Close to wide range of activities (e.g. village market, restaurants, mountain trails, tennis, diving, riding, sailing and windsurfing schools). See http://www.sanpantaleo.co.uk. Email: margareta@sanpantaleo.co.uk. Tel.: 0039 078965413.

Gascony, south-west France. Rich in history, foie gras, and armagnac! Two self-catering holiday gites to rent. Sleep up to 4 and 6 people. Quiet, rural Le Vieux Presbytère in hamlet near market town Eauze. 1½ hours from airports at Pau and Toulouse. Gites, at end of owner's property, with fruit trees, vines and views to Pyrenees. Salt water pool for a completely relaxing stay. Prices from £300 p.w. Website: www.escapetogascony.com. Tel.: 0871 2220901. Email: wallacejones@escapetogascony.com.

Southern Ardèche, France. Beautiful old converted barn high in unspoilt Cevennes mountains (sleeps 6). Own entrance, terrace and paddock. Spectacular landscape; fields and forests; views to 100 miles. More wild life than people. Walk, ride, and swim in rivers—go fishing or canoeing. Great markets and fairs. Eat, drink, sleep well. £475 p.w. Tel.: 020 77226740. Email: v.brinton@which.net.

Devon at it's best. Stylishly converted small barn available for holiday let (sleeps 4). Very comfortably furnished and well equipped; use of games room, also outdoor pool from June onwards. Set in 13 acres of own land in secluded valley near River Tamar. Available during Apr., May, and first half of June, and again from Sept. from £315 p.w. www.pallastreet.co.uk. Contact Jeremy Smith on 01822 870682.

Self-catering accommodation in a converted barn in rural Normandy, 14 km west of Bayeux and close to sea. Sleeps six (one double, two twin-bedded rooms). Spacious living area incorporated and fully-equipped kitchen. Bed linen supplied. Self- contained garden. Enquiries to: nicholas.kennedy@wanadoo.fr.

Tuscany. Siena, Castel Nuovo Berardenga. Beautifully located apartment in the countryside with great view, swimming pool, 2 bedrooms, bathroom, small sitting room, kitchen, garden. Please visit http://users.ox.ac.uk/~sant1033/poggiolo/index.htm. Email: filippo.ippolito@sbs.ox.ac.uk.

Gozo. Charming Mediterranean island. Superb views from our comfortable villa with pool, suitable for families of up to six. Rates are £800 p.w. in high season, other rates by application. For full colour photos and more details, ring 01367 240049 or see www.malcolmwarner.doctors.org.uk.

Farrò di Follina, Veneto. Comfortable country house near tiny village in undiscovered Alpine foothills. One hour to Venice, Venice airport, skiing resorts, 15 min. to lake. Four bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2 terraces with stunning views, all mod. cons. Open all year. Tel.: 01865 515264. Email: elsiearnold@hotmail.com.


House for Sale

Retirement bungalow in 22 acres of parkland at Oaken Holt, Farmoor, backing onto Wytham Woods (setting for TV series 'Waiting for God'). Two bedrooms, 18- foot living room with dining alcove, fully-fitted kitchen with built-in fan oven and hob, conservatory. Communal lounge, laundry and guest flat, 24-hour alarm system. Weekly minibus to shops. Lunch available daily. Offers in the region of £170,000. Tel.: 01865 864802.


For Sale

2003 SAAB 9-5 Vector Estate, 2.0 litre petrol. 16,500 miles, silver, heated seats, parking assist., full service history, electric windows, warranty protection, immaculate condition. Tel.: 01235 206528.

BMW 1997, 3.18 compact, sun roof, automatic. Only 41,000 miles, excellent condition. £4,000 or best offer. Call O'Donnell on 01865 2 78658 (Nuffield College).

FINANCE DIVISION

Appointment of Research Accounts Manager

The University has recently implemented Oracle Financial v11i, and is the first university to use this version of the Grants module. Since implementation, a number of new processes and responsibilities have been taken on by Research Accounts, and as a result the team has been restructured. This is the first of several new posts to be advertised.

The Research Accounts Manager will provide leadership and take initiative in relation to the financial management of the University's research projects, though the highest priorities of the post-holder initially will be to provide continuing support to the existing and new team members, and to work with his/her staff and the information services department to identify and address functionality issues. Salary range £32,666–£39,114 (discretionary range to £44,616).

Reporting to the Deputy Director of Finance, the post-holder will be responsible for policy and strategy in research accounts management across the University. This will involve defining and promoting the service, working with divisions and departments, and proactively resolving complex or high-profile issues.

Applicants should hold a degree in an accountancy-related discipline, and a professional accounting qualification. The person appointed will also have a proven track record of managing a finance department and solid experience of systems development. Experience with Oracle Financials will be an advantage.

Applicants should be able to demonstrate evidence of leadership qualities and strong interpersonal skills, the abilitiy to work constructively as part of a close-knit team, and to take a lead on policy/strategy issues.

Further particulars, including details of how to apply, are available at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/, or from Miss Melanie Holdak (telephone: Oxford (2)70120, e-mail: posts@admin.ox.ac.uk). Applications, in the form of a full covering letter and a curriculum vitae, giving contact details for two references, should be sent to Mrs J.A. Pengelly, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD, by noon on Thursday, 31 March. Interviews will be held in mid-April.


Appointment of Period End and Development Support Specialist

The University has recently implemented Oracle Financials v11i and is one of the first universities to use this version of the grants module. This is one of several new posts that have been created to service the post-implementation responsibilities of the restructured Research Accounts Team. Salary scale: £22,507–£29,128.

Reporting to the Development Team Leader, the post-holder will be responsible for all aspects of period end procedures and development including the creation of control reports, liaison with the appropriate Information Services teams to address developmental issues, and provision of the interface with the operational teams to create technical specifications.

Applicants should hold a degree in an accountancy or systems related discipline and be CCAB qualified. In addition, they should have three years' business or systems analysis experience, most likely in a financial accounting environment. Experience with developing reporting tools is essential; experience with Discoverer will be an advantage, as will experience with Oracle Financials.

Further particulars, including details of how to apply, are available at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/, or from Miss Melanie Holdak (telephone: Oxford (2)70120, e-mail: posts@admin.ox.ac.uk). Applications, in the form of a full covering letter and a curriculum vitae, giving contact details of two references, should be sent to Mrs J.A. Pengelly, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD, by noon on Monday, 11 April. Interviews will be held the following week.


Appointment of Training and Development Support Specialist

The University has recently implemented Oracle Financials v11i and is one of the first universities to use this version of the grants module. This is a new two year fixed term post that has been created to service the post-implementation responsibilities of the restructured Research Accounts Team. Salary scale £22,507–£29,128.

Reporting to the Development Team Leader, the post-holder will be responsible for the overall training needs of the Research Accounts Team. He or she will be responsible for input to the training group providing services to other University-wide users of the grants module.

Applicants should have a degree in a training or communication related discipline and hold CIPD, IITT, or equivalent. In addition, they should have three years' experience, scoping designing and delivering training, with at least one year in systems training. Evaluation skills and the ability to creatively devise access to training are essential. Experience training in Oracle Financials will be an advantage.

Further particulars, including details of how to apply, are available at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/, or from Miss Melanie Holdak (telephone: Oxford (2)70120, e-mail: posts@admin.ox.ac.uk). Applications, in the form of a full covering letter and a curriculum vitae, giving contact details of two references, should be sent to Mrs J.A. Pengelly, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD, by noon on Monday, 18 April. Interviews will be held the following week.


SAID BUSINESS SCHOOL

ESRC AIM Studentship

Applications are invited for a doctoral studentship, to be awarded by the Saïd Business School, as part of the ESRC-EPSRC Advanced Institute of Management Research (AIM—see www.aimresearch.org). Scholarships will be tenable from October 2005 for a period of three years.

AIM is a major initiative to improve management research and practice in the United Kingdom. AIM has appointed sixteen fellows from leading UK institutions to work together in this effort. Its mission is to initiate and conduct research on significant issues related to productivity, innovation, and promising practices. Successful candidates will conduct research under the supervision of Professor Mari Sako, an AIM Fellow at the Saïd Business School, whose research is on outsourcing and offshoring of business services.

Applicants should indicate how the proposed area of study contributes to the research literature in management practice, innovation, corporate performance, or productivity. Candidates will have a good first degree and a postgraduate (Master's level) qualification in the social sciences, and will register for a D.Phil. degree at the University of Oxford.

Informal academic enquiries may be addressed to Professor Mari Sako at mari.sako@sbs.ox.ac.uk.

Full details and links to application forms are available from http://www.sbs.ox.ac.uk/ht ml/doctoral_studentship_ea.asp.


Research Studentships (James Martin Institute for Science and Civilisation)

Applications for Research Studentships are invited by the James Martin Institute for Science and Civilisation. The James Martin Institute was established by the James Martin Trust in 2004 at the University of Oxford's Saïd Business School. The mission of the institute is to initiate and conduct research on significant issues related to science, technology and environmental issues that are likely to shape society in the twenty-first century. To this end, the Martin Institute includes a core faculty, university, visiting and external fellows and M.Sc. and doctoral students in its activities (see www.martininstitute.ox.ac.uk). The Institute contributes to the development of major research interests in the field of science and technology at Oxford's business school and is currently home to the ESRC Science in Society programme (www.sci-soc.net).

Existing areas of research interest include the social impact of new technologies (see www.virtualsociety.org.uk), science and governance, technology and accountability, technology and inequality, risk and the environment, ethics, evidence, the practices of futuring, e-Science and e- Social Science. See http://www.sbs.ox.ac.uk/html /faculty_area_sci_tech.asp for more details.

Informal academic enquiries may be addressed to Professor Steve Woolgar (e- mail: steve.woolgar@sbs.ox.ac.uk).

Full details and links to application forms are available from http://www.sbs.ox.ac.uk/h tml/doctoral_scholarship_sts.asp.


MAGDALEN COLLEGE

Stipendiary Lecturership in Inorganic Chemistry

Magdalen College invites applications for a one-year, fixed-term Stipendiary Lecturership in Inorganic Chemistry from 1 October 2005 until 31 July 2006. The stipend payable is on the scale £9,730–£11,254.

The Lecturer will be required to undertake six tutorial-hours (weighted hours) per week of teaching for Magdalen College. Applicants should hold a doctoral degree.

Applications (eight copies), containing a curriculum vitae, A statement of research and teaching experience, and the names of two referees should be sent to the Senior Tutor, Magdalen College, Oxford OX1 4AU, by 13 April 2005. Candidates should ask referees to write directly to the Senior Tutor by that date. The further particulars are located on the college Web site, http://www.magd.ox.ac.uk.


Stipendiary Lecturership in Physical Chemistry

Magdalen College invites applications for a fixed-term Stipendiary Lecturership in Physical Chemistry for a period of three years from 1 October 2005 until 30 September 2008. The stipend payable is on the scale £9,730– £11,254.

The lecturer will be required to undertake six tutorial-hours (weighted hours) per week of teaching for Magdalen College. Applicants should hold a doctoral degree.

Applications (eight copies), containing a curriculum vitae, a statement of research and teaching experience, and the names of two referees should be sent to the Senior Tutor, Magdalen College, Oxford OX1 4AU by 13 April. Candidates should ask referees to write directly to the Senior Tutor by that date. The further particulars are located on the college Web site, http://www.magd.ox.ac.uk.


Stipendiary Lecturership in Modern British History

Magdalen College invites applications for a one-year, fixed-term Stipendiary Lecturership in nineteenth- and twentieth-century British history, from 1 October 2005 to 31 July 2006. The stipend payable is on the scale £19,460– £22,507.

The lecturer will be required to undertake up to eight contact hours per week of tutorial teaching for Magdalen College and up to sixteen hours over the year of lectures or classes for the Faculty of Modern History. Applications in all fields of nineteenth- and twentieth- century British history are welcomed and applicants should hold, or be about to be awarded, a doctoral degree.

Applications (eight copies), containing a curriculum vitae, a statement of research and teaching experience, and the names of two referees should be sent to the Senior Tutor, Magdalen College, Oxford OX1 4AU, by 12 April. Candidates should ask referees to write directly to the Senior Tutor by that date. The further particulars are located on the college Web site, http://www.magd.ox.ac.uk.

Magdalen College is an equal opportunities employer.


SOMERVILLE COLLEGE

Appointment of Junior Dean 2005–6

Somerville College is seeking to appoint a Junior Dean for the forthcoming academic year, 2005–6, for weeks 0–10 inclusive in Michaelmas Term, and weeks 0–9 inclusive in Hilary and Trinity Term. Consideration will be given to requests for re- appointment for a further one-year term.

The Decanal team comprises the Dean and two Junior Deans. Together they have responsibility for welfare and good order among students. The current Dean is Dr Judith Pollmann, Tutorial Fellow in Early Modern History.

The two Junior Deans support the Dean by assisting in the day-to-day execution of administrative, pastoral and disciplinary duties. They are both required to reside in college. They are expected to be 'on call' for three or four evenings/nights per week, and day and night over alternate weekends. They also need to be available for some day-time commitments on weekdays.

The pastoral role of the Junior Dean is a very important one; the Junior Dean needs to be able to communicate with and obtain the confidence of all sections of the college, in particular the Junior Members. Liaison with the JCR and MCR welfare representatives will be an important and valuable part of the role. The Junior Dean should also be as active as possible in college, getting to know the undergraduates, graduates, tutors and fellows and facilitating better information flows, approachability and general visibility.

Applicants will normally be expected to be graduate students engaged in research. Benefits include free year-round single accommodation, free meals when in residence whenever the college is open, USS pension membership and access to private healthcare. The annual stipend is currently £2,647.12 (to be reviewed in October 2005). A research grant, currently up to £1,662.00, may also be payable if no other grant or stipend is held.

Further particulars and an application form may be obtained from the college Web site www.some.ox.ac.uk or via e-mail to recruitment@some.ox.ac.uk. Alternatively you may collect an application pack from the Lodge, Somerville College, Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6HD (telephone: Oxford (2)70600.

The closing date for receipt of completed application forms is the close of Monday, 25 April. In addition applicants should ensure that two references in support of their application are received by the Personnel Administrator by the closing date. Interviews are expected to be held on Wednesday, 18 May.

Somerville College is committed to achieving equal opportunities.


ST ANNE'S COLLEGE

Lecturership in Modern History

Applications are invited for a six-hour Lecturership in Modern History, from 1 October 2005 for ten months. The stipend will be in the range £9,187– £10,270 per annum (subject to review on 1 August 2005).

The lecturer will be primarily responsible for teaching history in the early modern period at undergraduate level. The appointment is open to men and women.

Further particulars may be obtained from the Senior Tutor's Secretary, St Anne's College, Oxford OX2 6HS (telephone: Oxford (2)74825, e-mail: heather.law@st-annes.ox.ac.uk), or can be found at http://www.stannes.ox.ac.uk/. The closing date for applications is 22 April.


Lecturership in Philosophy

Applications are invited for a twelve-hour Lecturership in Philosophy from 1 October 2005. The appointment will be for one year in the first instance, with the possibility of extension for a second. The stipend will be in the range £18,374–£19,460 (subject to review on 1 August 2005).

Applications are invited from candidates in any area of Philosophy, although the ability to teach logic will be an advantage. The appointment is open to men and women.

Further particulars may be obtained from the Senior Tutor's Secretary, St Anne's College, Oxford OX2 6HS (telephone: Oxford (2)74825, e-mail: heather.law@st-annes.ox.ac.uk), or can be found at http://www.stannes.ox.ac.uk/. The closing date for applications is 22 April.

St Anne's College is an equal opportunities employer.


ST HILDA'S COLLEGE

Stipendiary Lecturership in English

St Hilda's College proposes to appoint a Stipendiary Lecturer in English for one year from 1 October 2005. The lecturer will be expected to teach up to nine hours a week in nineteenth- and twentiteth-century English literature. The person appointed will be paid on the stipendiary lecturers' scale, at present £13,781 per annum for nine hours (reviewed annually). The post is open to both men and women.

Further particulars and an application cover sheet should be obtained from the college Web site (www.st- hildas.ox.ac.uk/news) or from the Academic Office, St Hilda's College, Oxford OX4 1DY (telephone: Oxford (2)76815, e-mail: college.office@st-hildas.ox.ac.uk). The closing date is 21 April; interviews will probably be held in the week beginning 23 May.


WORCESTER COLLEGE

Junior Research Fellowships in the Humanities or Social Sciences

Worcester College proposes to elect two non-stipendiary Junior Research Fellows in the Humanities or Social Sciences, to hold office for two years, possibly renewable for a third, from 1 October 2005.

The fellowships carry senior common room membership with free lunches and dinners, and assistance with book and research expenses. They are open to men and women. Although it is expected that candidates will not normally be older than thirty on 1 October 2005, consideration will be given to applications submitted by candidates who can demonstrate that the application of this age limit would be inappropriate in their circumstances. The college is an equal opportunities employer.

Application forms and further particulars can be obtained from http:www.worc.ox.ac.uk/notices or from the Provost's Secretary, Worcester College, Oxford OX1 2HB (telephone: Oxford (2)78362, e- mail: jill.drake@worc.ox.ac.uk). The closing date is Friday, 8 April. Reference JRF/03/05 should be quoted in correspondence.


WORCESTER COLLEGE AND BRASENOSE COLLEGE

Fixed-Term Tutorial Fellowship in Law with University Lecturership (CUF)

In association with the Faculty of Law

Worcester College and Brasenose College propose to appoint a fixed-term Tutorial Fellow in Law, with effect from 1 September 2005 at the latest, until 31 December 2009. The fellowship will be held in conjunction with a fixed-term University (CUF) Lecturership in the Faculty of Law. The person appointed will be a Tutorial Fellow of Worcester College and a Lecturer of Brasenose College.

The successful applicant will have a high standard of research and teaching ability, and will be expected to teach Criminal Law and Jurisprudence for the two colleges, and to give lectures and undertake graduate teaching and supervision for the faculty.

The combined college and university salary will be on an age-related scale up to £45,707 per annum. Additional college allowances are available. The Faculty of Law will also provide the lecturer with a start-up grant of £4,000 (unless the appointee currently holds an established Oxford University academic post), to be spent at the lecturer's discretion on any purpose connected with his or her academic work.

Further particulars, covering both the college and the university posts, and information about how to apply may be obtained from the Academic Administrator, Worcester College, Oxford OX1 2HB (telephone: Oxford (2)78342, e-mail: jane.hornsby@worcester.ox.ac.uk), or from http://www.worcester.ox.ac.uk/N otices/a_index.php. The closing date for applications, including references, is Friday, 15 April. Informal enquiries may be made to the Academic Administrator.

Worcester College, Brasenose College and the University are equal opportunities employers.


WYCLIFFE HALL

Appointment of Tutor for Student Affairs

Wycliffe Hall's partner, Scholarship and Christianity in Oxford (SCIO), seeks to appoint a Tutor for Student Affairs for the Hall's Visiting Student programme.

The Tutor for Student Affairs will oversee student life for Visiting Students offering pastoral support, organising health and safety, and dealing with day-to-day disciplinary matters with the help of two Junior Deans who will report to the Tutor. The Tutor's other administrative duties may include overseeing the rental of student properties during the summer, organising a summer school, assisting in marketing and Web-related work, and other tasks supporting the academic programmes. Ideally the Tutor will also be equipped to teach on the Visiting Student programme in English, history, classics, philosophy, or theology. The successful candidate will hold at least a Master's degree, have requisite experience and be computer- literate. Familiarity with both British and American higher education will be beneficial.

The Tutor must identify with the ethos, aims and objectives of Wycliffe Hall and SCIO. The position is full-time, has a salary range of £21,000–£24,000 (plus USS), and has a start-date of 1 July 2005.

Programme information can be found at www.cccu.org/scio. Applications by covering letter with a curriculum vitae and details of three referees, should be sent (by paper or electronically) to Dr S. Rosenberg, Wycliffe Hall, Oxford OX2 6PW (e-mail: simon.lancaster@wycliffe.ox.ac.uk). Applications should be received by 31 March.


FACULTY OF ENGLISH, UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE

University Lectureship

Applications are invited from established scholars with a significant publications record for a university lectureship in any literary field in English since 1789. Appointment will be from 1 October 2005 or as soon thereafter as possible. There is a probationary period of five years, with appointment to the retiring age thereafter. The pensionable stipend is on the scale £28,420– £38,303.

Applications (eleven copies) should be sent to the Secretary of the Appointments Committee, Faculty of English, 9 West Road, Cambridge CB3 9DP, by the closing date of Friday, 29 April. Further particulars, including the application form and information on college affiliation and benefits, may be obtained by writing to the Secretary (e-mail: chgd2@cam.ac.uk). Applicants should ask their referees (three) to write to the Appointments Committee by the closing date. Interviews will be held at the end of May.

Friday 25 March

BODLEIAN LIBRARY: all buildings closed, reopening 29 March (some exceptions: see full details in 'University Libraries' notice, above).

SACKLER LIBRARY closed (reopens 29 March).

TAYLOR INSTITUTION library closed (reopens 29 March).


Tuesday 29 March

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: 'Eighteenth-century paintings and sculpture', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Wednesday 30 March

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: 'Introduction to Dutch paintings', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

NICOLA SCOTT: 'Employees in the driving seat: innovation at BMW Oxford' (seminar), Blenheim Room, Begbroke Science Park, 6.30 p.m. (to reserve a place, e-mail: rebecca.lingwood@begbroke.ox.ac.uk ).


Friday 1 April

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: 'Gardens in art', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Tuesday 5 April

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: 'Small treasures of the Ashmolean', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Wednesday 6 April

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk in series 'The Curator and the Collection': 'Introduction to the Tradescant Collection' (Dr Arthur MacGregor), 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Booking essential: tel. (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Thursday 7 April

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: 'Introduction to personnel management', 9.30 a.m. (for details see the IAUL site).

SPECIAL INTEREST WEEKEND PROGRAMME, 7–10 April, Christ Church, with a choice of themes: (i) 'An English revolution: the Civil War 1642–9', or (ii) 'A passion for plants—a garden revolution' (for further information e-mail: conferences@chch.ox.ac.uk).


Friday 8 April

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: 'Shakespeare's world', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Tuesday 12 April

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: 'The building of Cockerell's Ashmolean', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Wednesday 13 April

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: 'Grading and regrading of university posts', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: 'Introduction to modern art', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Thursday 14 April

GODFREY HOWARD, writer, with NICOLA HARRISON, mezzo-soprano, and JONATHAN GOOING, piano: 'Paris in words and music' (Sunday Times Oxford Literary Festival event), Maison Française, 5.45 p.m. (tickets £6/£4.50 from the Oxford Playhouse, tel.: 305305).


Friday 15 April

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: 'Blossom time', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

ANDREI MAKINE, writer, presents his work (Sunday Times Oxford Literary Festival event), Maison Française, 6 p.m. (tickets £5/£3.50 from the Oxford Playhouse, tel.: 305305).


Monday 18 April

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: 'Leadership—what it means to lead a team', 12.45 p.m. (for details see the IAUL site).


Tuesday 19 April

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: 'Recruitment and selection—for all staff' (day 1), 9.30 a.m., and 'Job search and interview skills for contract research staff', 9.30 a.m. (for details see the IAUL site).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: 'Turner, Constable, and Corot', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Wednesday 20 April

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: 'Recruitment and selection—for all staff' (day 2), and 'Contracts', both 9.30 a.m. (for details see the IAUL site).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: 'Introduction to the Chinese Gallery', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Thursday 21 April

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: 'Dealing with stress', 9.30 a.m. (for details see the IAUL site).


Friday 22 April

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: 'Springboard—programme 3', 9.30 a.m. (for details see the IAUL site).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: 'The legacy of Homer', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Monday 25 April

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: 'Staff selection', 12.45 p.m. (for details see the IAUL site).

DR I. MORTIMER: 'The importance of towns to the seriously ill and dying in seventeenth-century Kent' (seminar series: 'Medicine, surgery, and culture'), Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 45 Banbury Road, 2.15 p.m.

SIR ALAN BUDD: 'The Budd Report' (seminar series: 'Are Labour's constitutional changes working?'), Auditorium, Magdalen, 5 p.m.

SUSAN WALKER and others: 'Crossing cultures—crossing time' (New Ashmolean Museum and Humanities Division seminars: 'Crossing cultures—crossing time'), Khalili Research Centre, 3 St John's Street, 5 p.m.

PASCAL DEVOYON (piano), PHILIPPE GRAFFIN (violin), CHARLES NEIDICH (clarinet), and COLIN CARR (cello) perform Hindemith's Quartet and Messiaen's Quartet for the End of Time, the Auditorium, St John's, 8.30 p.m. (admission by free programme, available in advance from the Porters' Lodge reserved for college members until ten days before the event).


Tuesday 26 April

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: 'Introductory Certificate in First-line Management', 9.30 a.m. (for details see the IAUL site).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: 'Arts of the Renaissance—bronzes and maiolica', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Wednesday 27 April

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: 'India—myths and reality', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

PROFESSOR T. EARLE: 'Portuguese intellectual culture in Elizabethan and Jacobean Oxford: evidence from the Bodleian and college libraries' (Oxford Bibliographical Society: Annual General Meeting and Lecture), Cecil Jackson Room, Sheldonian, 3 p.m.

PROFESSOR LEONARD QUART: 'The state of New York City' (lecture), Old Library, All Souls, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J.I. BELL: 'Will genomics change Oslerian medicine?' (annual Oxford Osler Lecture), Lecture Theatre, Medical Sciences Teaching Centre, 6 p.m.

DR D. PATTERSON: 'Against all odds: the renascence of Hebrew literature' (David Patterson Seminars), OCHJS, Yarnton Manor, 8 p.m.


Thursday 28 April

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: 'Induction and probation', 9.30 a.m., and 'Recruitment and selection—for those involved in academic appointments', 2 p.m. (for details see the IAUL site).

DR STEPHEN LADYMAN, MP, DR RAY JONES, and NICK WELCH: 'Social care policy and older people: the Green Paper's logic' (Oxford Institute of Ageing seminar series: 'The future of social care policy for older people: the Green Paper and its context'), Seminar Room G, Social Sciences Building, 12.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR ART BRIEF: 'Theory building and the Academy of Management Review' (seminar), Lecture Theatre 5, Saïd Business School, 12.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR G. CONWAY: 'Science, technology, and development' (Brian Walker Lecture on Environment and Development), Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 6 p.m.


Friday 29 April

PROFESSOR ART BRIEF: 'Communities matter: the case of race relations in organisations' (seminar), Lecture Theatre 5, Saïd Business School, 12.30 p.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: 'Symbols in Western painting', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £2. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

RALPH GRILLO: 'Debating cultural differences in multicultural societies' (Centre on Migration, Policy, and Society and Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology seminars: 'The anthropology of migration and multiculturalism'), Seminar Room, 64 Banbury Road, 4.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR DIETER GRIMM: 'Integration by constitution? Expectations and perspectives in the process of European constitutionalisation' (German Rhodes Lecture), Rhodes House, 5 p.m. (The lecture will be delivered in English.)