Oxford University Gazette: 24 April 2003

Oxford University Gazette, Vol. 133, No. 4656: 24 April 2003

The following supplements were published with this Gazette:

  • Special Lecture List, Trinity Term (PDF file)
  • Institute for the Advancement of University Learning:
  • seminars and courses, Trinity Term (details may be found at the IAUL site).
  • University Funding and Fees: Report of Proceedings in Congregation

Note: due to the requirements of the Data Protection Act, some elements of the printed Gazette are not reproduced in the Web Gazette.

University Acts

COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of Congregation:

Abecassis, M., Faculty of Modern Languages

Bailey, S., MA status, Linacre

de Gasperin, V., Pembroke

Garratt, A., Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Green, F.R., Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Handley, R.C., Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Henderson, Per annum, Faculty of Biological Sciences

Herring, J.R., BA, Christ Church

Jones, A., MA, Pembroke

Keene, A.E., M.Sc., Linacre

Kemp, S.R., MA, St John's

Krishna, E.E., MA, Wolfson

Niederkorn, M., Merton

Thomson, R.W., MA, Pembroke

Tucker, M.E., MA, D.Phil., Wolfson

Whyte, W.H., BA, M.St., St John's

Wilkinson, P.B., Faculty of Clinical Medicine


EDUCATIONAL POLICY AND STANDARDS COMMITTEE OF COUNCIL

For changes in regulations concerning the First and Second Public Examinations, to come into effect on 9 May, see `Examinations and Boards' below.


DIVISIONAL BOARDS AND BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 9 May, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

University Agenda

CONGREGATION 20 May 2 p.m.

¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that written notice of any intention to vote against, or any proposed amendment to, the resolution below, signed by at least two members of Congregation, must be given to the Registrar by noon on Monday, 12 May (see the Guide to Procedures in Congregation cited in the note at the end of `University Agenda').

Voting on Resolution approving the conferment of a Degree by Diploma

Explanatory note

By longstanding tradition, the University has conferred by diploma upon the Chancellor-elect the Degree of Doctor of Civil Law (unless, of course, the Chancellor-elect already holds that degree, otherwise than honoris causa).

Council is in no doubt that it would be appropriate to continue this tradition and accordingly seeks the approval of Congregation for the following resolution.

Text of Resolution

That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Civil Law by Diploma upon THE RT. HON. CHRISTOPHER FRANCIS PATTEN, CH, PC, MA, Honorary Fellow of Balliol College, Chancellor-elect of the University, be approved.

¶ If the resolution is approved, the degree will be conferred as part of the ceremony on 25 June to admit Mr Patten to the office of Chancellor.


CONGREGATION 29 May

Elections

          Vacancies Retiring members Period from MT 2003
        Benefices, Ecclesiastical, Delegates for the Nomination of Candidates for Two (members of Convocation) The Very Revd R. Jefferey
Dr W.B. Stewart (not re-eligible)
6 years
6 years
        Buildings and Estates Subcommittee One Dr R.P. Martineau 3 years
        Council One (member of Congregation from members of the faculties in the Life and Environmental Sciences, Mathematical and Physical Sciences, and Medical Sciences Divisions) Dr W.D. Martineau 4 years
          One (member of Congregation from members of the faculties in the Humanities and Social Sciences Divisions) Rector of Lincoln 4 years
        Libraries, University, Curators of the Two (members of Congregation) Dr Y.C. Ferdinand
Professor I. Rivers (resigned)
4 years
3 years
        Military Instruction, Delegates for One (member of Convocation) Dr C.M. Davis 4 years
        Visitatorial Board Panel Three (members of Congregation, or other members of the University being at least MAs, of at least ten years' standing) Dr F.M. Heal
Professor Dame Louise Johnson
Warden of Rhodes House
4 years

4 years
4 years

¶ Nominations in writing by two members of Congregation other than the candidate will be received by the Head Clerk at the University Offices, Wellington Square, up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 5 May, and similar nominations by six members of Congregation other than the candidate up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 12 May.

Council has decided that nominations should show for each signatory the name and college or department in block capitals. Any names which are not so shown may not be published. At least one nomination in respect of each candidate must be made on an official nomination form. Copies of the form are obtainable from Miss R. Gibbs at the University Offices, Wellington Square (telephone: (2)80179; e-mail: Rebecca.Gibbs@admin.ox.ac.uk).

In the event of a contested election, a brief biographical note on each candidate will be published in the Gazette dated 22 May, and voters may wish to wait until they have read these notes before returning their ballot papers (which will be sent out to members of Congregation as soon as possible after the closing date for nominations, and which, after completion, must be received by the Head Clerk not later than 4 p.m. on 29 May).

Notes on the bodies concerned

The Delegates of Benefices are responsible: (a) for selecting, subject to the approval of Council, the priests to be offered presentation to vacant benefices in cases in which the University becomes entitled to exercise the right of presentation; and (b) for advising the Vice-Chancellor on the appointment of suitable representatives of the University in connection with the exercise of presentation to vacant benefices, as required under the Patronage (Benefices) Measure 1986.

The Buildings and Estates Subcommittee of the Planning and Resource Allocation Committee is responsible, under Council's Planning and Resource Allocation Committee, for proposals for the strategic development of the University's functional estate, taking account of institutional plans and environmental, planning, and heritage issues; the acquisition, leasing, disposal, and allocation of functional land and property; and all proposals for capital building projects for functional use, including the initiation and management of the design and construction of all major projects. The subcommittee has control of a substantial budget. Council is the University's chief executive body, with statutory responsibility for the administration of the University (both academic and other) and for the management of its finances and property, as well as dealing with the relationship between the University and all external bodies. Council submits legislative proposals and resolutions to Congregation for approval, and has the power to make regulations (which may be opposed in Congregation). Council meets three times a term, and twice in the Long Vacation. It has a number of committees (including Educational Policy and Standards, General Purposes, Personnel, and Planning and Resource Allocation), on which its members are expected to serve if invited to do so.

The Curators of the University Libraries are responsible, under Council, for the safe keeping, preservation, orderly administration, finance, and general policy of the collections, libraries, and other units within the Oxford University Library Services. They are expected to ensure that provision is made for the University's library and information requirements for teaching and research, and that the University's major research libraries are maintained as a national and international scholarly resource. The curators have control of a substantial budget.

The Delegates for Military Instruction are responsible for all aspects of co-operation with the Oxford University Officers' Training Corps, the University Air Squadron, and the University Royal Naval Unit in providing instruction in military subjects for members of the University.

The Visitatorial Board is responsible for making recommendations to the Vice-Chancellor (or other appropriate officer) on serious disciplinary cases involving members of the academic or academic-related staff. (It does not have responsibility for dealing with incapacity on medical grounds, or complaints against the Vice-Chancellor himself or herself.) Four members of the board, as from time to time constituted to consider an individual case, are selected by lot from a panel of twelve persons elected by Congregation. The board is chaired by a person with professional legal experience who is appointed by the High Steward of the University.


NOMINATIONS

The following nominations have been duly received:

Council

Member of Congregation from members of the faculties in the Life and Environmental Sciences, Mathematical and Physical Sciences, and Medical Sciences Divisions

W.D. MACMILLAN, MA, Fellow of Hertford

Nominated by:

Dame Fiona Caldicott, Principal of Somerville
D.C. Clary, St John's
K.A. Fleming, Green College
A.S. Goudie, Hertford
S.D. Iversen, Magdalen
P.C. Newell, St Peter's

Member of Congregation from members of the faculties in the Humanities and Social Sciences Division

P. LANGFORD, MA, D.PHIL., Rector of Lincoln

Nominated by:

I.W. Archer, Keble
A.K. Bowman, Brasenose
M.S. Butler, Rector of Exeter
B.W. Cunliffe, Keble
Sir Peter North, Principal of Jesus
R.C.S. Walker, Magdalen


Curators of the University Libraries

1. K.D. DUNCAN-JONES, B.LITT., MA, Somerville

Nominated by:

P.A. Bulloch, Balliol
R.J.A.I. Catto, Oriel
C.Y. Ferdinand, Magdalen
G.S. Garnett, St Hugh's
I. Rivers, St Hugh's
F.J. Stafford, Somerville

2. T.P. SOFTLEY, MA, Fellow of Merton

Nominated by:

M.E. Ceadel, New College
P.A. Cox, New College
R.A. Mayou, Nuffield
Dame Jessica Rawson, Warden of Merton
W.G. Richards, Brasenose
G.D.W. Smith, Trinity


Visitatorial Board Panel

1. F.M. HEAL, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Jesus

2. DAME LOUISE JOHNSON, DBE, MA, Fellow of Corpus Christi

3. J.S. ROWETT, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Brasenose

Nominated by:

S. Iversen, Magdalen
P. Langford, Rector of Lincoln
W.D. Macmillan, Hertford
P.N. Mirfield, Jesus
J.V. Peach, Brasenose
R.C. Repp, Master of St Cross
P.A. Slack, Principal of Linacre
R.J. Van Noorden, Hertford
R.C.S. Walker, Magdalen
C. Webb, Merton


There having been no nominations, the following vacancies have lapsed to the Vice-Chancellor and Proctors:
  Vacancies Retiring members Period from MT 2003
Benefices, Ecclesiastical,
Delegates for the Nomination
of Candidates for
Two (members of Convocation) The Very Revd R. Jefferey
Dr W.B. Stewart
(not re-eligible)
6 years
6 years
Buildings and Estates Subcommittee One Dr R.P. Martineau 3 years
Military Instruction, Delegates for One (member of Convocation) Dr C.M. Davis  

CONGREGATION 19 June

Election

 

  Vacancies Retiring members Period from MT 2003
Vice-Chancellorship,
Nominating Committee for the
Two (not also being
members of Council)
President of Wolfson
Professor H. Lee
5 years
5 years

¶ Nominations in writing for the elections on 19 June, by two members of Congregation other than the candidate, will be received by the Head Clerk at the University Offices, Wellington Square, up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 26 May, and similar nominations by six members of Congregation other than the candidate up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 2 June.

Council has decided that nominations should show for each signatory the name and college or department in block capitals. Any names which are not so shown may not be published. At least one nomination in respect of each candidate must be made on an official nomination form. Copies of the form are obtainable from Miss R. Gibbs at the University Offices, Wellington Square (telephone: (2)80179; e-mail: Rebecca.Gibbs@admin.ox.ac.uk).

In the event of a contested election, a brief biographical note on each candidate will be published in the Gazette dated 12 June, and voters may wish to wait until they have read these notes before returning their ballot papers (which will be sent out to members of Congregation as soon as possible after the closing date for nominations, and which, after completion, must be received by the Head Clerk not later than 4 p.m. on 19 June).

Note on the body concerned

The Nominating Committee for the Vice-Chancellorship is responsible for making proposals to Congregation for appointments and reappointments to the Vice-Chancellorship. The next such proposal after that which is due to be made in the current academic year, in respect of a Vice-Chancellor to serve from October 2004, will be due to be made in 2007--8 in respect of a Vice-Chancellor to serve from October 2009.

Notices

UNIVERSITY PREACHERS

Trinity Term 2003

Thursday, 24 April, at 8 a.m. THE REVD PETER SOUTHWELL, Chaplain of Queen's College and Fellow of Wycliffe Hall. Holy Communion (Latin). At St Mary's.

Sunday, 27 April, at 10 a.m. DOM HENRY WANSBROUGH, OSB, Master of St Benet's Hall. (St Mark's Day Sermon.) At Magdalen College.

Sunday, 4 May, at 10 a.m. THE REVD OLIVER O'DONOVAN, Regius Professor of Moral and Pastoral Theology, Canon of Christ Church. (Fifth Bampton Lecture. `Judgement in Institution: (i) Legitimate authority.') At St Mary's.

Sunday, 11 May, at 10 a.m. THE REVD OLIVER O'DONOVAN. (Sixth Bampton Lecture. `Judgement in Institution: (ii) Sovereign Judgment.') At St Mary's.

Sunday, 18 May, at 10 a.m. THE REVD OLIVER O'DONOVAN (Seventh Bampton Lecture. `Judgement in Institution: (iii) Judgement in War.') At St Mary's.

Sunday, 25 May, at 10 a.m. THE REVD OLIVER O'DONOVAN. (Eighth Bampton Lecture. `Judgement in Institution: (iv) "Judge not!".') At St Mary's.

Sunday, 1 June, at 10 a.m. DR MAURICE KEEN, Emeritus Fellow of Balliol College. At St Mary's.

* Sunday, 8 June, at 10 a.m. DR RONALD TRUMAN, Emeritus Student of Christ Church. University Sermon (Whit Sunday). At the Cathedral.

* Sunday, 15 June, at 10 a.m. THE VERY REVD VICTOR STOCK, Dean of Guildford. University Sermon (Trinity Sunday). At Keble College.

Saturday, 21 June, at 5.30 p.m. THE REVD PROFESSOR FRANCES YOUNG, OBE, Edward Cadbury Professor of Theology, University of Birmingham. (Sermon to Commemorate the Tercentenary of the birth of John Wesley.) At Lincoln College.

* Sunday, 22 June, at 10 a.m. THE MOST REVD AND RT HON. DR DAVID HOPE, Archbishop of York, Honorary Fellow of Linacre College. (Commemoration Day Sermon.) At St Mary's.

Sunday, 29 June, at 10 a.m. BARONESS WILLIAMS OF CROSBY (THE RT. HON. SHIRLEY WILLIAMS), Honorary Fellow of Somerville College. (St John Baptist's Day Sermon.) At Magdalen College.

* On these days Doctors will wear their robes.


HAROLD VYVYAN HARMSWORTH PROFESSORSHIP OF AMERICAN HISTORY 2004–5

JOEL H. SILBEY (PH.D. Iowa), President White Professor of History, Cornell University, has been appointed to the visiting professorship for the academic year 2004–5.

Professor Silbey will be a fellow of Queen's College.


DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING SCIENCE

The Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board has appointed PROFESSOR LIONEL TARASSENKO, Fellow of St John's College and Professor of Electrical Engineering, as Acting Head of the Department of Engineering Science during leave granted to Professor Rodney Eatock-Taylor, Head of the Department of Engineering Science, for a period of two months from 1 April 2003.


PROPOSALS FOR HONORARY DEGREES TO BE CONFERRED AT THE ENCAENIA IN 2004, AND FOR DEGREES BY DIPLOMA

Council's Advisory Committee for Degrees by Diploma and Encaenia Honorary Degrees gives preliminary consideration both to proposals received from members of Congregation for the conferment of degrees upon royal personages and heads of state on occasions other than Encaenia, and to proposals for the conferment of Encaenia honorary degrees. The committee is chaired by the Warden of Keble, and details of the other members may be obtained from Miss Noon, University Offices, Wellington Square.

Members of Congregation who wish to make suggestions to the committee about honorary degrees to be conferred at the Encaenia in 2004 or degrees by diploma are asked to do so by sending in proposals which provide information under the following headings:

name of nominee; brief biographical details;

reason for nomination.

Proposals should be sent to Miss Noon, under strictly confidential cover, not later than Friday, 9 May 2003.

Members of Congregation wishing to suggest candidates are asked in particular to note the following points:

(a) under Council's standing orders, no member of Council or of the Advisory Committee shall forward to that committee or propose directly to Council the name of any person for any honorary degree unless he or she is prepared personally to recommend that the conferment of such a degree be seriously considered;

(b) while informal soundings within the University on any proposal will often be desirable, every effort should be made to ensure that publicity is not at any stage given to any proposal for the conferment of an honorary degree.

The Advisory Committee will report to Council just before the beginning of Michaelmas Term, submitting a short-list of candidates for further consideration. Council will then decide which proposals should be referred to its Committee on Honorary Degrees. The final list of proposed honorands, drawn up by Council in the light of the latter committee's report, will be submitted to Congregation for approval.

Details of those on whom degrees by diploma and honorary degrees have been conferred in the years from 1993 are set out in pp. 439 of the University Calendar, 2002. This year's honorands are as follows:

The Rt. Hon. Baroness O'Neill of Bengarve

Professor Mary Douglas

Professor Dame Julia Higgins

Sir Paul Nurse

Professor Jean-Pierre Serre

Placido Domingo


COMPOSITION OF ELECTORAL BOARDS

The composition of the electoral board to the post below, proceedings to fill which are currently in progress, is as follows:

                                Appointed by

Nuffield Professorship
  of Clinical Medicine

The Vice-Chancellor             ex officio
The President of Magdalen       ex officio
Professor J.I. Bell             Council
Professor L. Borysiewicz        Council
Dr K. Fleming                   Medical Sciences Board
Professor A.R.M. Townsend       Medical Sciences Board
Professor H. Waldmann           Medical Sciences Board
Professor C. Black              Medical Sciences Board
Dr J. Morris                    ORHT
Professor J.F. Stein            Magdalen College







Nuffield Professorship
  of Clinical Medicine

Professor S.D. Iversen          Mr Vice-Chancellor [1]
The Warden of Green College     ex officio
Professor A.D. Smith            Council
Professor C.G. Swift            Council
Dr K. Fleming                   Medical Sciences Board
Professor D.A. Warrell          Medical Sciences Board
Dr S. Harper                    Medical Sciences Board
Professor R. Tallis             Medical Sciences Board
Dr H. Jones                     ORHT
Dr M. Donaghy                   Green College

[1] Appointed by Mr Vice-Chancellor under the provisions of Sects. 10 and 11 of Statute IX (Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4633, 9 October 2002, p. 108).


REVIEW OF CLASSICS

On behalf of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Academic) will chair a committee to review the Faculty of Classics. The committee's terms of reference are:

(a) To review the educational policy and quality of learning and teaching in the Faculty of Classics by reference to international standards of excellence, taking into account, in the context of the University's mission statement and corporate plan, all factors relevant to the faculty's practice and achievement in respect of: access and admissions; curriculum design and course structure; teaching, learning, and assessment and, in particular, the relationship between teaching and research; academic and pastoral support and guidance; the provision and use of learning resources (including staff resources); specific arrangements for the pursuit of graduate studies (including research degrees and research training) and part time study; and relationships with colleges.

(b) To report and make recommendations to the Educational Policy and Standards Committee (EPSC) and the Planning and Resource Allocation Committee (PRAC) for consideration in consultation with the divisional board. The report, or relevant sections of it, will be sent to the Academic Committee of the Conference of Colleges and to the faculty external advisory body for information and comment to EPSC/PRAC.

The membership of the Review Committee is:

Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Academic)—(Dr W.D. Macmillan) (Chairman)

Professor Alex Garvie, Glasgow

Professor Stephen Mitchell, Exeter

Dr Teresa Morgan, Oriel

Dr Christopher Pelling, University

Professor Harm Pinkster, Amsterdam

Professor Malcolm Schofield, Cambridge

The review committee would welcome written comments on matters falling within its terms of reference. These should be sent to the secretary to the review committee, Mr R.O. Hughes, University Offices, Wellington Square, by Monday, 12 May.


REVIEW OF THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY COMPUTING SERVICES

As part of the University's programme of regular departmental reviews, the Oxford University Computing Services (OUCS) will be reviewed in July by a panel appointed by the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Academic Services and University Collections).

The panel's terms of reference are:

`To review and report to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Academic Services and University Collections) on:

(a) the development of the Computing Services since the last review in 1996 and any significant changes in context and services since then; and

(b) in light of (a), the role, priorities, and future direction of the Computing Services; bearing in mind the level of resources likely to be available within the University.'

The panel will be chaired by Professor David Clary, Head of the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Division. Its other members are Professor Alan Bowman, Classics, Professor Bill Dutton, Oxford Internet Institute, Mrs Annette Haworth, University of Reading, and Dr David Popplewell, Experimental Psychology.

The review panel welcomes submissions. They should be sent, by Monday, 23 June, to the panel's secretary, Dr Nigel Berry, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (e-mail: nigel.berry@admin.ox.ac.uk).


APPROVAL TO HOLD OUTSIDE APPOINTMENTS

Guidelines on the holding of outside appointments

These guidelines outline new procedures for obtaining approval to hold outside appointments. No changes have been made to the University's policy, nor to the individuals and types of appointment covered by the policy.

All university employees, with the exception of CUF lecturers, are required to obtain approval for the holding of any outside appointment. The following do not count as outside appointments for this purpose (see Council Regulations 24, Sect. I, &;167; 5.A, cll. 10--11):

—the holding of the office of Proctor or Assessor;

—the holding of the office of examiner in any examination which is part of a degree course at any university;

—the holding of a commemorative lecturership or similar post in any university with the duty to give not more than eight lectures in any year of office;

—activities or responsibilities normally associated with, or arising from, scholarly work which do not involve a formal and continuing contract.

The University permits its employees to hold outside appointments without deduction of stipend subject to the following conditions:

—the total commitment to such outside appointments must not exceed thirty days per year;[1]

—any contractual terms proposed to cover the outside appointment must be scrutinised by Research Services on behalf of the University, and must not be amended without the prior written approval of Research Services;

—the employee's head of department[2] must approve the application.

Outside appointments can take a number of different forms, such as consultancy, private professional practice, expert witness, and non-executive directorships. (Approval will not be given for the holding of executive directorships.) These are activities carried out outside the University and are contracted for from the individual's personal address. University letterhead, facilities, and premises should not be used without the University's express permission.

Certain types of activity involving consultancy/services to industry may be carried out within the University and may be included, where appropriate, within projects funded by externally-funded research grants and contacts. These are described below.


Procedures for applying for approval to hold outside appointments

(a) Applicants must complete an application form (form OA1, available on the University's Web site at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/ps/outappts.shtml, or in hard copy from departmental administrators/faculty board secretaries).

(b) Applicants whose salaries are funded from externally-funded research grants or contracts, or who are Principal Investigators or Co-Investigators on outside-sponsored projects, must adhere to the terms and conditions stipulated by or agreed with the sponsor and, if necessary, seek written approval from the sponsor. [3] Research Services is able to provide advice on the terms and conditions of externally-funded research grants and contracts held by the University (telephone: (2)70143).

(c) Where it is appropriate for the outside appointment to be covered by a contract or letter of agreement, and particularly when the external organisation requires a written agreement to cover a consultancy, applicants must arrange for the terms governing the outside appointment to be scrutinised by Research Services in advance of signature. (All applicants are, in fact, advised to stipulate in writing the terms which will govern their outside activities for an external organisation, not least to limit their personal liability.) The University's legal advisers have drafted a standard personal consultancy document which serves as a useful starting point for discussions around the terms of a consultancy appointment. This is available from Research Services (telephone: (2)70143) or on the Research Services Web site at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/oxonly/agreements/pcaform.htm.

(d) Research Services scrutinise the terms of an agreement in order to consider their compatibility with the University's interests as employer. The office cannot advise the employee on the terms from the employee's standpoint; and the employee should take his or her own advice unless he or she makes use of Oxford University Consulting Limited (see below).

(e) Applicants must obtain the approval of their direct line manager where relevant.

(f) When Research Services has confirmed in writing that the terms proposed to govern the outside appointment meet the University's minimum requirements and the necessary approvals have been obtained from the relevant line manager or sponsor (as appropriate), applicants should submit the completed form to their head of department, who will be asked to sign to confirm that he/she is content to approve the outside appointment in the context of the applicant's university duties. Heads of department who themselves wish to hold outside appointments must submit their application forms to their head of division for approval. Heads of Division should submit applications to the Vice-Chancellor.

(g) If the above procedures are followed and the relevant approvals obtained, applicants will be granted insurance cover for the outside appointment in question under the University's professional indemnity insurance policy, subject to the limitations of that policy. Details may be obtained from the Insurance Officer, Mr G.C. Waite (telephone: (2)80307).


Consultancies within research grant applications and contracts

The holding of a consultancy may be included where appropriate within research grant applications and contracts. Where consultancies are included in this way and provision is made through the payroll to pay staff for such work, the Outside Grants (OG) form should itemise, among the costs of the project, the costs of the consultancy payment (including employers' on-costs). Indirect costs should also be calculated on the total cost of the project, including the fee for the consultancy. Research Services (telephone: (2)70143) will be able to advise on the most appropriate form of agreement to cover consultancies attached to research grants or contracts. Time spent on such consultancies will count towards the thirty-day limit.


Other services to industry and outside bodies

Not all work for outside bodies is governed by a contract with an external sponsor under the University's research grants and contracts procedures. Some is likely to be `service' work, i.e. the provision of a service to an external organisation which is not of academic benefit but which makes use of spare capacity in a department in return for payment. Such arrangements should nevertheless be covered by an agreement approved by the head of department which is drawn up in consultation with the departmental administrator and (for tax reasons) with the Finance Division. If the service agreement proposed by the outside body includes terms and conditions relating to intellectual property or confidentiality of information, or does not incorporate the University's standard disclaimer of liability, this will require an authorised signature on behalf of the University. In such cases, the agreement should be forwarded to Research Services which is required to ensure that appropriate disclaimers of liability have been issued in connection with the provision of services to industry and other outside bodies.

Where appropriate, as with consultancies within research grant applications and contracts, a payment may be made through the payroll to individuals for the additional work undertaken in performing the services. It is expected that the head of department will decide on an appropriate fee to be paid to the individual based on the time spent (which again will count towards the thirty-day per year limit). The instructions to the Finance Division to make such payments are processed through Research Services. In such cases, where an agreement has been made with the University in respect of the service, it is not expected that a further personal consultancy agreement with the academic concerned will be necessary.


Financial arrangements

The University does not generally seek details of remuneration which applicants are to receive under arrangements for outside appointments, but reserves the right to request to be provided with such details in certain circumstances, e.g. in the light of any potential conflict of interest with the outside appointment. Applicants wishing exceptionally to make a case to spend a total of more than thirty days in any one year on outside appointments will be required to provide details of remuneration.


Use of computing facilities

University IT and network facilities, including software, are provided for use for educational purposes only, in accordance with the `University Rules for Computer Use', which may be found on the University Web site at http://www.ox.ac.uk/it/rules/rules.html.


Monitoring and reporting

(a) Heads of department are responsible, through their departmental administration, for keeping records of the number of days spent on outside appointments by all staff (regardless of staff group) in their departments.

(b) Heads of department will report their approvals of outside appointments, and the basic details of the outside appointments, to their divisions on an annual basis, by the end of July each year.

(c) Divisions are responsible, through their divisional administration, for monitoring and co-ordinating information relating to all approvals for outside appointments submitted by departments within their remit, and for making an annual return to the Personnel Committee by the end of September each year.


Oxford University Consultancy Limited

The University has established a wholly-owned subsidiary company, Oxford University Consultancy Limited, to help members of the University to market their expertise to outside bodies, to negotiate commercial terms and payment on behalf of individuals, and to manage the administration associated with consultancy. OUC Limited offers a professional service for academics and departments throughout the University, which will identify consultancy and related opportunities with local, national, and international companies and organisations. Details of this service may be obtained by telephone ((2)80829) or by e-mail at enquiries@consulting.ox.ac.uk.

Members of the University choosing to use the services of OUC Limited must still follow the internal procedures for University approval of their outside appointments as outlined in these guidelines; OUC Limited will, however, assist the process on behalf of the individuals concerned.

Footnotes

[1] Approval for cases where the proposed commitment exceeds thirty days may still be sought; in such cases the department will refer the request to the divisional board and if it is approved a deduction in university stipend will be made. Partial or full secondment may be more appropriate for particularly time-consuming outside appointments.
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[2] Faculty board chairman in non-departmentally organised subjects, head of division in the case of heads of departments.
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[3] The Wellcome Trust's grant conditions, for example, include stringent conditions relating to the holding of consultancies and these apply equally to individuals who are in receipt of Wellcome Trust research grants, as well as to those whose salaries are paid from Wellcome Trust grants.
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PROJECT ISIDORE

Invitation to Oxford-specific software demonstrations

Project ISIDORE, which aims to improve processes related to student administration, invites staff of the collegiate University to attend Oxford-specific demonstrations of the two short-listed software packages which will support and enable these processes. To date many staff have contributed to the documentation of current processes, problems, and needs. Staff who are members of the project Working Groups have suggested scenarios that they would like to have demonstrated by the suppliers.

Staff are encouraged to become involved by attending a session relevant to their area of expertise. A variety of viewpoints will be helpful to the project. This is the opportunity for staff to contribute to the choice of software which they may be using. Each person attending will be invited to score the session, and these scores will be used in the evaluation of the software packages.

The demonstrations are scheduled for the start of Trinity Term (29 April–1 May, and 6–8 May, for each supplier respectively) and comprise a series of one-and-a-half-hour sessions, each session focusing on a different aspect of student administration. A detailed timetable is available on the project Web site. For further information, see www.admin.ox.ac.uk/isidore/, or contact Lorraine Cotterell on (2)84836.


WIDOWS OR WIDOWERS OF FORMER MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY'S PENSION SCHEMES

From time to time the attention of the University is drawn to individual cases of financial hardship among widows or widowers of former members of the Federated Superannuation System for Universities (FSSU) and the University of Oxford Employees Pension Scheme (EPS). Limited resources are available to alleviate proven cases of hardship and any enquiry should be addressed to the Superannuation Officer, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD. All cases are dealt with in the strictest confidence.


CIRCULATION OF THE GAZETTE TO RETIRED SENIOR MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY

It has been decided that any former member of Congregation over the age of seventy-five who is resident in Oxford may continue to receive the Gazette, if he or she so wishes, on application in writing to the Information Office, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD. Such applications must be renewed at the beginning of each academic year.


WOLFSON COLLEGE

Forthcoming exhibition

Life drawings: an exhibition of work by participants in the Wolfson Life Drawing Classes (28 April–16 May)

In the Private Dining Rooms, Wolfson College; open daily 10 a.m.–4 p.m., subject to college commitments. Intending visitors are advised to telephone the Lodge ((2)74100 beforehand.


MUSICAL EVENTS

Faculty of Music

Monday, 28 April, Bate Collection Of Musical Instruments: `Face the Music II: Handel and his Contemporaries'—an exhibition of Music Faculty Portraits (telephone for further information: (2)76139).

Monday, 28 April, 8.30 p.m., Holywell Music Room: a programme of scenes from Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin and Handel's Xerxes. An event for the University's fourth Hambro Visiting Professor of Opera, Graham Vick. In association with St Hilda's College. New Chamber Opera Studio, Producer—Michael Burden, Musical director—Stephen Rice. Tickets £6 (£4 concessions) on the door (telephone for further information: (2)76125).

Tuesday, 29 April, 2--5 p.m., New College Ante-Chapel: Masterclass on Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin with Graham Vick. Free of charge. All welcome (telephone for further information: (2)76125).

Wednesday, 30 April, 2--5 p.m., Holywell Music Room: masterclass on Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin with Graham Vick (telephone for further information: (2)76125).

Saturday, 3 May, 3 p.m., Bate Collection of Musical Instruments: Historic Sounds and Signals: Illustrated with historic instruments by David Edwards (telephone for further information: (2)76139).

Monday, 5 May, 1--1.45 p.m., Bate Collection of Musical Instruments: A Fantaisie on Baroque Flutes: Illustrated on examples from the Bate Collection, with music by Quantz and Telemann; with Claire Overbury (flute) (telephone for further information: (2)76139).

Tuesday, 6 May, 1--1.45 p.m., Bate Collection of Musical Instruments: the Sharp Family's Horns—the story of the pair of Hoffmaster horns shown in Zofcany's portrait of the Sharp family, with Hannah Evans (horn) (free of charge; telephone for further information: (2)76139).

Wednesday, 7 May, 2--5 p.m., Denis Arnold Hall, Faculty of Music: Oxford Philomusica Residency—Leading a Workshop with Kate Coberti (open to university students and staff only; further information: (2)76125).

Thursday, 8 May, 2--5 p.m., Denis Arnold Hall, Faculty of Music: Conway Vocal Masterclass with Teresa Cahill. (Free of charge. Telephone for further information: (2)76125.)

Friday, 9 May, 10 a.m., Holywell Music Room: Betts Organ Masterclass with Stephen Bicknell: exploring some Important Organs in Oxford. Free of charge and open to the public (booking not required; telephone for further information: (2)76125).

Friday, 9 May, 8 p.m., Holywell Music Room: Retrospective Concert: Music by John Caldwell. Ticket reservations and further information from Mrs J. Caldwell (telephone: Oxford 310956).

Thursday, 15 May, 2--5 p.m., Denis Arnold Hall, Faculty of Music: Conway Vocal Masterclass, with Ann Liebeck (free of charge; telephone for further information: (2)76125).

Thursday, 15 May, 5 p.m., Wolfson College Hall: a benefit concert of German lieder by Wolff, Schumann, Brahms, Berg, and Strauss (tickets £5/£3 at the door; tel. for further information: (2)74100).

Friday, 16 May, 8 p.m., Sheldonian Theatre: Oxford Philomusica: Rachmaninov, Piano Concerto in D minor, No. 3, and Tchaikovsky, Symphony No. 4 in F minor (Peter Donohoe, piano) (box office: 305305).

Friday, 17 May, 10 a.m.–1 p.m., Denis Arnold Hall, Faculty of Music: Oxford Philomusica: Piano Masterclass with Peter Donohoe (open to staff and students only).

Monday, 19 May, 4.30–6.30 p.m., Holywell Music Room: Ensemble ISIS—Composers' Workshop, with Diana Burrell, followed by lecture in series `The Composer Speaks' at 7.30 p.m. (telephone for further information: (2)76125).

Wednesday, 21 May, 8.30 p.m., New College Chapel: concert by The Band of Instruments (tickets £8 (£5 concessions) on the door; for more information see www.newchamberopera.com).

Thursday, 22 May, 8.00 p.m., Holywell Music Room: a recital of twentieth-century French and English music, including works by Ravel, Debussy, Britten, and Copland (with mezzo-soprano Kathryn Whitney) (tickets £7/£5 on the door).

Saturday, 24 May, 12 noon, Holywell Music Room: Conway Scholars Recital (free of charge) (telephone for further information: (2)76125).

Monday, 2 June, Jaqueline du Pré Music Building: the Arditti Quartet—Composers' Workshop, 1--3 p.m. and evening recital, 8 p.m. (for more information see www.ocmevents.org).

Tuesday, 3 June, 1--1.45 p.m., Bate Collection of Musical Instruments: Music from the Berlin Court by C.P.E. Bach, Benda, Frederick the Great, and J.S. Bach, with Joshua Getzler (baroque flute), and Francis Knights (clavichord) (telephone for further information: (2)76139).

Wednesday, 4 June, 8.30 p.m., New College Chapel: The Band of Instruments: New for Old—music for violin from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries (tickets £8 (£5 concessions) from Tickets Oxford, 305305, and at the door).

Friday, 6 June, 8 p.m., Sheldonian: Oxford Philomusica—Brahms Series: Concerto for Violin and Cello in A minor and Symphony No. 2 (with Thomas Bowes, violin, Raphael Wallfisch, cello) (box office: 305305).

Tuesday, 24 June, 8 p.m., Somerville Chapel: Opera Gala Benefit (in aid of Somerville College), with mezzo-soprano Kathryn Whitney (contact Liz Cooke, tel. (2)70632, e-mail elizabeth.cooke@somerville.ox.ac.uk).

Saturday, 28 June, 4 p.m., Denis Arnold Hall, Faculty of Music: Bate Collection Clavichord Recital, with Paul Simmonds (clavichord). Admission free. (Telephone for further information: (2)76139.)

Sunday, 13 July--Friday, 18 July: Bate Collection of Musical Instruments: Bow-making course. For more information contact the Bate Collection ((2)76139), or to book contact Andrew Bellis ((01202) 534360).


St John's College and Colin Carr

The evolution of the piano trio

This concert will be given at 2.30 p.m. on Sunday, 18 May, in the Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's College.

Admission is free. Programmes are available from the Porters' Lodge, but are reserved for members of the college until about ten days before the event. Each programme is valid as an admission ticket up until ten minutes before the event; any vacant seats will then be filled from the door.

YAEL WEISS (piano), MARK KAPLAN (violin), and COLIN CARR (cello), with KARL LUCHTMAYER (lecturer), will give an extended, three-and-a-half-hour, three-part programme charting the life-story of the piano trio, with performances of works by J.C. Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, Bright Sheng, Dvorák, Haydn, Mendelssohn, Ravel, Schubert, Schumann, and Shostakovitch.


Maison Française

SOLON PIERCE: piano recital, including works by Alkan, Balakirev, Brown, Busoni, Fauré, Herskowitz, Johansen, Medtner, and Poulenc, Maison Française, 8 p.m., Friday, 25 April (admission free).

VIRGINIA BLAKEY (soprano), with pianist Mark Hooper, performs songs and arias by Bizet, Fauré, Gounod, Massenet, and Poulenc, Maison Française, 8 p.m., Friday, 23 May (admission free).


OXFORD UNIVERSITY CAREERS SERVICE

Careers advice service for contract research staff

This service, provided by the University Careers Service at 56 Banbury Road, aims to encourage and enable academic-related research staff, employed directly by the University on fixed-term contracts (contract research staff), to make and implement well-informed decisions about their careers by:

—providing impartial, professional, careers advice;

—supporting them in recognising and developing the attributes necessary for successful career development;

—enabling them to appreciate and explore the range of opportunities available;

—assisting them to clarify their values, interests, abilities and skills and to relate these to possible career options;

—Providing access to a wide variety of careers information and resources to facilitate the formulation and implementation of career plans.

The service operates flexibly in an attempt to cater for individual personal needs, whether researchers are:

—generally uncertain about the career options open to them;

—considering reviewing or changing their career direction;

—thinking about finding a new job in academia, commerce, industry, the public sector, or becoming self-employed, etc.

Following registration with the Service (which is free) individual researchers have access to up to four, confidential, one-to-one meetings with a careers adviser to help clarify personal and career objectives and to identify the main career options open to them. They may also drop-in to see the Duty Adviser at the Careers Service to help resolve brief queries and make use of the wide range of careers resources in the well resourced Information Room, including the Prospects Planner computerised careers guidance system. Psychometric ability testing and personality type profiling for career development purposes (using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) can also be arranged on an ad hoc basis. In addition, two one-day career development workshops, designed specifically for contract research staff who are looking to review their career options or to find alternative work, are run at various times throughout the year, and researchers also have access to activities in the student `Term Programme'.

Full details of the service (including how to register and book individual career discussions) can be found on www.careers.ox.ac.uk. To reserve a place on any of the career development workshops or seminars/briefings below (which are run in conjunction with the Institute for the Advancement of University Learning, IAUL) telephone, or e-mail, the IAUL (telephone: (2)86808, e-mail: services@learning.ox.ac.uk).

Career Development Workshops

The following workshops, provided as part of the Careers Advice Service for Contract Research Staff, supplement the individual careers guidance and information provisions.


Career Review and Planning for Contract Research Staff

(Seminar Code: EFF/CAR/R)


Wednesday, 11 June 2003, 9.30 a.m.–4.30 p.m. (Week 7, TT)

This workshop has been designed specifically for academic-related contract research staff employed on fixed-term contracts by the University. It is particularly suitable for researchers, at any stage in their career, who wish to consider what their future options might be. It will provide participants with the opportunity to step back and reflect on their careers in the context of their personal experience and factors in the academic research and wider employment environment. Through a combination of short individual exercises and small (informal) group discussions participants will be encouraged to focus on the key aspects of career decision making. This will include reviewing transferable skills and considering factors affecting job mobility. By the end of the day each participant should be in a position to begin developing a personal development career plan. In addition, there will usually be the opportunity to explore the wide range of careers resources available for use by contract research staff at the Careers Service.


Job Search and Interview Skills for Contract Research Staff (Seminar Code: EFF/JIS)


Thursday, 22 May 2003, 9.30 a.m.–4.30 p.m. (Week 4, TT)
Friday, 27 June 2003, 9.30 a.m.–4.30 p.m. (Vacation)

 

This workshop has been designed specifically for academic-related contract research staff employed on fixed-term contracts by the University and is particularly suitable for those who are considering, or seeking, alternative employment. While more emphasis is given to finding employment outside academic research, those intending to pursue careers in academia may also find the programme useful.

An interactive day, it will explore the skills and techniques used in searching for jobs effectively, finding sources of job information, utilising networking techniques, writing appropriate CVs and covering letters. Emphasis will be given to understanding the processes by which employers actually recruit staff and how to tailor applications accordingly. Participants will also explore the skills and attributes required for effective performance at interview: preparation, self-presentation and how to deal with typical interview questions, etc. Where possible, supportive practice in applying interview techniques will normally form part of the day and there will usually be the opportunity to explore the wide range of careers resources available for use by contract research staff at the Careers Service.

Note: the content of the above workshops may be varied in the light of feedback and other workshops may be added in due course.


Induction Seminars for New Contract Researchers

(Seminar Code: IND/CRS)



Tuesday, 13 May 2003, 12.30–2 p.m. (Week 3, TT)
Thursday, 15 May 2003, 3.30–5 p.m. (Week 3, TT)
Friday, 16 May 2003, 12.30–2 p.m. (Week 3, TT)

This new seminar will provide an introduction to the career and professional development opportunities available for contract research staff at the University. It will also clarify some of the contractual issues related to being a contract researcher. Staff from the Oxford University Careers Service and the Institute for the Advancement of University Learning will facilitate the session. These will take place on a variety of University sites.


Briefings for research supervisors, group leaders, and administrators

(Seminar Code: MAN/BRF)


Tuesday, 29 April 2003, 12.30–2 p.m. (Week 1, TT)
Tuesday, 6 May 2003, 12.30–2 p.m. (Week 2, TT)

These short briefing sessions are designed to enable managers of contract research staff to become up to date with developments relating to contract research staff. They will provide an overview of the key issues arising from `SET for Success' (Sir Gareth Roberts' recent report), clarification of the implications of the Fixed Term Employees Regulations, and information about services provided by the Careers Service and the Institute for the Advancement of University Learning. Departmental administrators may well find attending one of these sessions useful as well.

Lectures

INAUGURAL LECTURES

Professor of Bioinformatics

PROFESSOR J. HEIN will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 1 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Molecular evolution, variation, and bioinformatics.'


Corpus Christi Professor of Latin

PROFESSOR PHILIP HARDIE will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 2 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Contrasts.'


Philip Wetton Professor of Astrophysics

PROFESSOR R. DAVIES will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 7 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Telescopes, galaxies, and black holes.'


Professor of Taxation Law

PROFESSOR J. FREEDMAN will deliver her inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 12 May, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building.

Subject: To be announced.


Harmsworth Professor of American History

PROFESSOR M.P. LEFFLER will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 20 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `9/11 and the past and future of American foreign policy.'


Merton Professor of English Literature

PROFESSOR D.G.E. NORBROOK will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 20 May, in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `Women Lucretians: materialism, critique, and the canon.'


Professor of French Literature

PROFESSOR ALAIN VIALA will deliver his inaugural lecture, in French, at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 4 June, in the Taylor Institution.

Subject: `Réponse à Rousseau, ou: De La Modernité des Lettres.'


Camden Professor of Ancient History

PROFESSOR A.K. BOWMAN will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 13 June, in St John's College.

Subject: `Outposts of empire.'


PROFESSOR OF POETRY

PROFESSOR PAUL MULDOON will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 6 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `The end of the poem: "Poem of the End" by Marina Tsvetayeva.'


THE TIMES LECTURE 2003

RAY SNODDY, Media Editor, The Times, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 28 April, in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `The sensational future of the British press.'


MYRES MEMORIAL LECTURE

PROFESSOR J.M. WAGSTAFF, Emeritus Professor of Geography, University of Southampton, will deliver the twenty-second Myres Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 6 May, in the McGregor Matthews Room, New College.

Subject: `The contribution of early travel narratives to the historical geography of Greece.'


CHERWELL–SIMON LECTURE 2003

PROFESSOR BILL PHILLIPS, Distinguished Professor of the University of Maryland, and Nobel Laureate 1997, will deliver the Cherwell–Simon Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Friday, 16 May, in the Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon Laboratory.

Subject: `Time, Einstein, and the coldest stuff in the Universe.'


WEIDENFELD VISITING PROFESSOR IN EUROPEAN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 2002–3

ROBERT ALTER, Class of 1937 Professor of Hebrew and Comparative Literature, University of California, Berkeley, will lecture at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Main Lecture Hall, the Taylor Institution.

Professor Alter will also give seminars at 4 p.m. on Wednesdays 28 May and 11 June in Lecture Room 1, St Anne's College.

Thur. 15 May: `Flaubert: the demise of the spectator.'

Mon. 19 May: `Flaubert: urban poetics.'

Thur. 22 May: `Dickens: the realism of metaphor.'

Thur. 29 May: `Dickens: intimations of Apocalypse.'

Mon. 2 June: `Bely: phantasmatic city.'

Thur. 5 June: `Woolf: urban pastoral.'

Mon. 9 June: `Joyce: metropolitan shuttle.'

Thur. 12 June: `Kafka: suspicion and the city.'


CLARENDON LECTURES IN ECONOMICS

Is Keynes dead? Reviving a sensible macroeconomics

PROFESSOR JOSEPH STIGLITZ, Columbia University, will deliver the Clarendon Lectures in Economics at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination Schools.

Tue. 13 May: `Cycles in business cycle theory.'

Wed. 14 May: `Foundations of a new macroeconomics.'

Thur. 15 May: `Applications to economic policy.'


CLARENDON LECTURES IN FINANCE

PROFESSOR FRANKLIN ALLEN, Nippon Life Professor of Finance, Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, will deliver the Clarendon Lectures in Finance at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Saïd Business School.

Mon. 9 June: `Banking crises.'

Tue. 10 June: `Currency crises.'

Wed. 11 June: `Bubbles and crises.'


GRINFIELD LECTURES ON THE SEPTUAGINT

The study of the Septuagint in early modern Europe

SCOTT MANDELBROTE, Official Fellow and Director of Studies in History, Peterhouse, Cambridge, will deliver his first series of Grinfield Lectures on the Septuagint at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Examination Schools.

8 May: `Printing and publishing the text of the Septuagint.'

15 May: `The impact of the Codex Alexandrinus.'

22 May: `Eighteenth-century scholars and the manuscripts of the Septuagint.'


HENSLEY HENSON LECTURES 2002–3

The appeal to history as an integral part of Christian apologetics: did Henson waste his money?

PROFESSOR JOHN BOWKER, formerly Professor of Religious Studies, University of Lancaster, and Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, will delive the Hensley Henson Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination Schools.

Tue. 29 Apr.: `The appeal to history.'

Wed. 30 Apr.: `The appeal to art: China and the West.'

Tue. 6 May: `The appeal to value.'

Wed. 7 May: `The appeal to coherence.'


RADHAKRISHNAN MEMORIAL LECTURES

Between the lines: oblique angles on power and authority in ancient India

PROFESSOR STEPHANIE JAMISON will deliver the Radhakrishnan Memorial Lectures at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Examination Schools.

6 May: `Lions and tigers ... and bulls.'

13 May: `Sorcerer (or) king.'

20 May: `What do woment want?'


ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

PROFESSOR GEOFFREY HILL will lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 22 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `The poetry of Sidney Keyes.'


D.F. McKenzie Lecture

DR L. BRAKE, Birkbeck College, London, will deliver the eighth annual D.F. McKenzie Lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 12 May, in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building.

Subject: ` "Daily Calendars of Roguery and Woe": the politics of print in nineteenth-century Britain.'

Dr Brake will give the McKenzie Seminar at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, 13 May, in Lecture Room 2, the St Cross Building.


LIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Rodney Porter Memorial Lecture

SIR PAUL NURSE, Director-General, the Imperial Cancer Research Fund, will deliver the Rodney Porter Memorial Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Thursday, 22 May, in the University Museum of Natural History.

Subject: `Controlling the cell cycle.'


J.W. Jenkinson Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR M. BATE, Cambridge, will deliver a Jenkinson Lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 2 June, in Lecture Theatre B, the Zoology/Psychology Building. Tickets are not required for admission.

Subject: `Embryonic behaviour in Drosophila—assembling the moving parts.'


Koshland Lecture Series

DR DANIEL E. KOSHLAND, JR., University of California, Berkeley, will lecture at 4 p.m. on Thursday, 12 June, in the University Museum of Natural History. The lecture will be followed by a reception.

Subject: `The seven pillars of life.'


Department of Zoology

The following departmental seminars will be given as shown in the Tinbergen Building, the Department of Zoology.

For details of Professor Bate's Jenkinson Lecture (2 June), see above.

Convener: Dr G. Taylor.

PROFESSOR R. NESSE, Michigan
28 Apr., 4.30, Lecture Theatre B: `Darwinian medicine and the regulation of defensive responses.'

DR M. GAGE, East Anglia
12 May, 4.30, Lecture Theatre B: `Sexual selection and sperm form and function.'

PROFESSOR T. HUNT, Cancer Research UK
19 May, 5 p.m., Lecture Theatre A: `The cell cycle and cancer.' (Jenkinson Seminar)


Department of Plant Sciences

The following research talks will be given at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in the Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Plant Sciences.

Convener: H.G. Dickinson, MA, Sherardian Professor of Botany.

PROFESSOR A. MILLAR, Warwick
1 May: `Mechanisms, models, and physiological significance of the biological clock.'

PROFESSOR J. BARNETT, Reading
8 May: `Designer trees: a realistic goal?'

DR D. IGLESIAS-RODRIGUEZ, Nottingham
15 May: `Global coccolithophorid populations in a changing ocean.'

DR C. GRIERSON, Bristol
29 May: `Genetic control of root hair morphogenesis in Arabidopsis.'

PROFESSOR W. MARTIN, Düsseldorf
5 June: `Gene transfers in the wake of endosymbiosis: how many genes in Arabidopsis come from cyanobacteria?'

DR I. MOORE
12 June: `GTP, GFP, and membrane traffic in plants.'

PROFESSOR S. BLACKMORE, Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh
19 June: `The goals of systematics.'


Oxford Seminars in Cartography

DR C. BOARD, International Cartographic Association, will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 22 May, in the School of Geography and the Environment. For further details e- mail nam@bodley.ox.ac.uk, or telephone Oxford (2)87119.

Subject: `E.C. Willatts and the planning maps from central government: thirty years of achievement in British thematic cartography, 1953–82.'


MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Hinshelwood Lectures: Looking at how individual molecules go about their business

PROFESSOR STEVEN CHU, Department of Physics, Stanford University, will deliver the Hinshelwood Lectures at 11.15 a.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays in the Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, commencing on Tuesday, 29 April.

Convener: J. Klein, MA, D.Phil., Dr Lee's Professor of Chemistry.

29 Apr.: `Polymer dynamics with single molecules.'

1 May: `The coil--stretch transition: phase transitions and hysteresis.'

6 May: `Physically based measurements in biology.'

8 May: `Single molecule enzymology.'

13 May: `The study of more complex bio-molecular systems.'

15 May: `An atom interferometer measurement of the fine structure constant.'


Department of Earth Sciences

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Mondays in the Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Earth Sciences.

PROFESSOR D. RICKARD, Cardiff
28 Apr.: `Metastability, molecules, and minerals.'

DR P. KOKELAAR, Liverpool
12 May: `Anatomy of a crisis—Montserrat volcanic emergency, 1995–9.'

DR S. TUDHOPE, Edinburgh
19 May: `What controls variations in the El Niño Southern Oscillation ... evidence from annually banded massive corals.'

DR S. KELLEY, Open University
2 June: `Meteorite impacts and mass extinctions—do they really correlate?'


Theoretical Chemistry Group Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the John Rowlinson Seminar Room (20.12, opposite the Main Lecture Theatre).

Convener: M.S. Child, MA, Coulson Professor of Theoretical Chemistry.

DR S.C. CREAGH, Nottingham
5 May: `Tunnelling dynamics in a chaotic regime.'

PROFESSOR D. BIRD, Bath
19 May: `Theory of chemicurrents.'

PROFESSOR J.T. HYNES, Colorado and École Normale Supérieure, Paris
2 June: `How should we think about proton transfer reactions in solutions?'


MEDICAL SCIENCES

Oxford Clinical Neurosciences Lectures

The following lectures will be given at 11.30 a.m. on Fridays in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

DR T. WARNER, Royal Free Hospital
25 Apr.: `Hereditary spastic paraperesis.'

DR J. PLUNKETT, Regina Medical Center, Hastings, Minnesota
23 May: `Revisiting shaken baby syndrome and the death of Matthew Eappen.'

DR R. GRANT, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh
13 June: `What is the modern management of brain tumour?'


Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics

The following research seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the Lecture Theatre, the Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics.

Convener: K.E. Davies, MA, D.Phil., Dr Lee's Professor of Anatomy.

PROFESSOR J. ARENDT, Surrey
2 May: `Human biological rhythms: influence of melatonin and light.'

DR T. SETHI, Edinburgh
9 May: `The interaction between CD98 and integrins in transformation.'

PROFESSOR P. HOLLAND
16 May: `The evolution of homeobox gene clusters.'

DR D. ISH-HOROWICZ, Developmental Genetics Laboratory, Cancer Research UK
23 May: `Mechanisms and specificity of RNA trafficking in Drosophila.'

DR R. ADAMS, London Research Institute
30 May: `Control of embryonic development by Eph- ephrin signalling.' (Jenkinson Seminar)

PROFESSOR A. SIMONE, King's College, London
6 June: `Role of Otx genes in development and evolution of the mammalian brain.' (Jenkinson Seminar)

DR N. PLATT
13 June: `The class A macrophage scavenger receptor—a multifunctional receptor.'

DR P. FAIRCHILD
20 June: `Probing dendritic cell function through directed differentiation of ES cells.'


MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

Graduate Seminar in Spanish Studies

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in Room 3, the Taylor Institution.

Conveners: I.D.L. Michael, MA, King Alfonso XIII Professor of Spanish Studies, and J.D. Rutherford, MA, D.Phil., Faculty Lecturer in Spanish.

DR RUTHERFORD
29 Apr.: `Mirth in the Poema de Mio Cid.'

PROFESSOR MICHAEL
6 May: `Invention, fantasy, and parallel worlds in medieval Hispanic and later texts.'

DR S. LÓPEZ-RÍOS, Complutensian University, Madrid
20 May: ` "Pon tú en cobro este cuerpo que allá baja": Melibea y la muerte infamante en la Celestina.'

DR D. MORAN
27 May: `A forgotten text by Carpentier.'

PROFESSOR G.H. TUCKER, Reading
Wed. 28 May: `Halcyon days? Pietro Alcionio (1485–?1528) v. Juan Ginés de Sepúlveda on translating Aristotle.' (EHRC joint meeting with the Italian Research Seminar)

MS J. GILBERT, Cambridge
3 June: `Muslims and Christians in Spanish frontier ballads.'

DR A. BOULLÓN AGRELO, Santiago de Compostela
10 June: `Personal names in Galicia in the twentieth century.'

M. MURPHY
17 June: `The Spanish exiles of Eaton Hastings: Cernuda, Garfias, and Barea.'


Paget Toynbee Lecture

PROFESSOR L. LEONARDI, Università per Stranieri, Siena, will deliver the Paget Toynbee Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 8 May, in Room 3, the Taylor Institution.

Note: the lecture will be given on 8 May, and not, as previously announced, on 15 May.

Convener: M.L. McLaughlin, MA, D.Phil., Fiat–Serena Professor of Italian Studies.

 

Subject: `Le Rime di Dante: postille a una recente edizione.'


MODERN HISTORY

Special Faculty Lecture

PROFESSOR R. MCKITTERICK, Cambridge, will deliver the Special Faculty Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 2 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `History and memory in the early Middle Ages.'


Language and History Seminar

PETER BURKE, Cambridge, will give a seminar in this series at 2.15 p.m. on Tuesday, 29 April, in the Basil Mitchell Room, Oriel College.

Subject: `Cultures of translation in early modern Europe.'


Military History Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5.15 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

Convener: H.F.A. Strachan (MA, Ph.D. Cambridge), Chichele Professor of the History of War.

R. BRIGGS
30 Apr.: `The Great Naval Race, 1750–1815.'

G. SHEFFIELD, Joint Services Command and Staff College
7 May: `Command on the Somme: Hubert Gough and the Reserve Army.'


Commonwealth History: the Mediterranean world and the British Empire

This meeting will be held on Friday, 16 May, in the Modern History Faculty Building. The meeting will conclude with a period of discussion at 3.30 p.m.

D. BARCHARD
9.30 a.m.: `Turkey and the decline of Ottoman power.'

DR R. KATSIAOUNIS
10.10 a.m.: `Social and ethnic conflict during colonial rule: the case of Cyprus.'

PROFESSOR A. LAMBERT, King's College, London
11.15 a.m.: `The Mediterranean in British and imperial strategy in the long nineteenth century.'

PROFESSOR R. HOLLAND, Institute of Commonwealth Studies, London
1.30 p.m.: `The British Empire and Hellenism in the eastern Mediterranean world, 1860–1960.'

DR M. THOMAS, West of England
2.10 p.m.: `Anglo-French imperial relations in the Arab world: intelligence, liaison, and nationalist disorder, 1920–39.'

PROFESSOR M.J. COHEN, Bar-Ilan
2.50 p.m.: `Fighting World War Three from the Middle East: Anglo-American strategic planning, 1945–60.'


Seminar in Medieval History

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

M. STRICKLAND, Glasgow
28 Apr.: `Treason, feud, and the growth of political violence: Edward I and the "War of the Earl of Carrick".'

R. STACEY, Washington
5 May: ` "What He Said": learning to plead in medieval Welsh law.'

S. MILESON
12 May: `Landscape, power, and politics: the place of the park in later medieval aristocratic society.'

G. GASPER
19 May: `The context for Anselm of Canterbury's interest in medicine.'

T. THORNTON, Huddersfield
26 May: `Provincial power and civil conflict in fifteenth-century England.'

D. KORNGIEBEL
2 June: `English colonisation in medieval Wales and Ireland.'

J. STRATFORD, IHR, London
9 June: `Richard II's treasure and forfeiture.'

T. BURMAN, Tennessee
16 June: `Approaches to Qur'an reading in Latin Christendom, 1140–1540.'


Social and Economic History of the British Isles 1000–1600

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Hovenden Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: Professor R.R. Davies, Professor R.J.W. Evans, and others.

DR D. STONE, Cambridge
30 Apr.: `Decision-making in medieval agriculture.'

M. KEEN
7 May: `The gentry and chivalry.'

DR P. NIGHTINGALE
14 May: `Some new evidence on mortality in late medieval England.'

PROFESSOR C. DYER, Leicester
21 May: `Goats in the Middle Ages: perspectives on environment and poverty.'

A. HOPWOOD
28 May: `The Bishop of Winchester's manor of Witney in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries.'

PROFESSOR D. PALLISER, Leeds
4 June: `Village and town formation, c.850–1150.'

DR C. THORNTON, VCH, Essex
11 June: `Medieval populations trends: the Taunton hundred- penny.'

DR P. BOWMAN, Leicester
18 June: `The Midland village community and its territory before c.1200: some evidence from Leicestershire revisited.'


MODERN HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCES

Seminar in Economic History

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in Seminar Room 3, All Souls College.

Conveners: R.C. Allen, MA, Professor of Economic History, N.H. Dimsdale, MA, University Lecturer (CUF) in Economics, K.J. Humphries, MA, Reader in Economics History, and A. Offer, MA, D.Phil., Chichele Professor of Economic History.

K. O'ROURKE
30 Apr.: `The comparative performance of the Irish and Danish dairy industries in the late nineteenth century.'

T. GUINNANE, Yale
7 May: `External auditing of a small financial institution: German credit co-operatives, 1889–1914.'

MR DIMSDALE
14 May: `The staple industries and international competition in late Victorian Britain.'

PROFESSOR OFFER
21 May: `The markup for lemons: used car prices in America and Britain before 1973.'

K. SOKOLOFF, UCLA
28 May: `Lives of invention: the "Great Inventors" of the United States, 1790–1935.'

I. KEAY, Queen's, Canada
4 June: `Productivity comparisons: manufacturing in Canada and the United States along the international border, 1870–1.'

R. STECKEL, Ohio State
11 June: `Long-term trends in health in pre-Columbian America.'


MUSIC

Graduate Colloquia

The following colloquia will be held at 5.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Denis Arnold Hall, the Faculty of Music.

J. BUTT, Glasgow
29 Apr.: `Is there a work-concept in seventeenth- century music?'

B. ADAMS, California, Riverside
6 May: ` "Doth Burn ere It Transform": Roman Catholicism, decadence, and Elgar's The Dream of Gerontius.'

S. CLARK
13 May: `Analysing Schubert's songs: harmony and hermeneutics.'

S. ZERANSKA-KOMINEK, Warsaw
20 May: `The perfect musician in M. Mersenne's music theory.'

B. TITUS
27 May: `An "aesthetic changeling"? Programme music in the context of Friedrich Theodor Vischer's aesthetics.'

D. CODE, Glasgow
3 June: `Parting the veils of Debussy's Voiles.'

R. GIBSON
10 June: ` "In the sugary Viennese manner": parody and pastiche in Der Rosenkavalier.'

P. HARPER-SCOTT
17 June: ` "Fracted and corroborate": narrative implications of form and tonality in Elgar's Falstaff.'


Wolfson Creative Arts Fellowship Lecture Series

The following lectures will be given at 6 p.m. on the days shown in the Hall, Wolfson College.

R. MORGAN
Fri. 6 June: `The Palm Court, vamps, and tangos: dancing to Barber's Souvenirs.'

PROFESSOR J. CALDWELL
Thur. 19 June: `Composing sacred opera: some problems and some solutions.'


PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICS

DR PIERO PINZAUTI, Florence, will lecture at 4.15 p.m. on Wednesday, 21 May, in the Hovenden Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: Professor G.A. Cohen and Dr P.M.S. Hacker.

 

Subject: `Winch, Wittgenstein, and political authority.'


SOCIAL SCIENCES

Southern African texts and contexts

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 5.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Deakin Room, St Antony's College. Those attending are asked to note that three, not four, meetings will be held in Trinity Term.

Conveners: Professor William Beinart and Professor Elleke Boehmer.

L. CHRISMAN, York
29 Apr.: `Transatlantic countercalls: Black America and White England in Sol Plaatje and Peter Abrahams.'

R. BARNARD, Pennsylvania
13 May, the Library, Queen Elizabeth House: `Getting over the Rainbow.'

N. SHUNMUGAN
3 June, 3 p.m.: `The District Six Museum: from forced removals to justice and healing.'


African Studies Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Fellows' Dining Room, St Antony's College. Two student research presentations will be made at the meeting on 1 May.

Conveners: Professor W. Beinart and Dr D. Anderson.

D. BRANCH
1 May: `Loyalists and the nationalist struggle in Kenya.'

YU-CHUN CHENG
1 May: `Poverty in South Africa, 1929–34.'

S. ELLIS, Leiden
8 May: `The historical study of witchcraft in Africa and Europe: problems and promises of method.'

C. WEBERSIK
15 May: `Reinterpreting environmental scarcity and conflict: evidence from Somalia.'

J. WILLIS, Durham
22 May: `Abbadi Ali and his wife Khadija: law, tradition, and domestic authority in Condominium Sudan.'

P. TIYAMBE ZELEZA, Illinois
29 May: To be announced.

D. BROCKINGTON
5 June: `Politics and ethnography of Third World environmentalisms—notes from Tanzania.'

J. MYBERG
12 June: `ANC politics in the new South Africa.'

G. LESETEDI, Botswana
19 June: `Urban–rural linkages in rapidly urbanising Botswana.'


Evidence-based practice

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Violet Butler Seminar Room, the Department of Social Policy and Social Work.

Convener: F.E.M. Gardner, MA, Temporary University Lecturer in Applied Social Studies.

DR GARDNER
29 Apr.: `Community-based parenting groups for hard-to-manage children: findings from the Family Nurturing Network trial.'

A. WILCOX
6 May: `Evidence-based youth justice: some lessons from an evaluation for the youth justice board.'

PROFESSOR S. EYBERG, Florida
13 May: `Parent–child interaction therapy.'

PROFESSOR T. BURNS
Thur. 15 May: `Assertive community treatment: from model fidelity to identifying effective ingredients.'

PROFESSOR H. ROBERTS, City University
20 May: `Unfair shares: inequalities in child health and the evidence agenda.'


Centre for International Studies

GRAHAM DAY, Deputy High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina, will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Monday, 28 April, in Seminar Room A, the Department of Politics and International Relations.

Subject: `Policekeeping in post-ar Iraq.'


THEOLOGY

Bampton Lectures: The ways of Judgement: Judgement in institution

THE REVD PROFESSOR OLIVER O'DONOVAN will continue his series of Bampton Lectures at 10 a.m. on Sundays in the University Church.

4 May: `Legitimate authority (Hymn 379: "In the cross of Christ I glory").'

11 May: `Sovereign judgement (Hymn 361: "Forth in the peace of Christ we go").'

18 May: `Judgement in war (Hymn 441: "Pray that Jerusalem may have").'

25 May: `Judge not! (Hymn 362: "Glorious things of thee are spoken").'


Interdisciplinary Seminars in the Study of Religions

The following seminars will be held at 3.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Examination Schools.

Conveners: J.S.K. Ward, B.Litt., MA, Regius Professor of Divinity, and P. Morgan, MA status, Lecturer in the Study of Religions, Mansfield College.

PROFESSOR N.M. MARTIN, Chapman University, California
29 Apr.: `The Renunciant Rani and the Weaver of Dignity: the songs of Mirabai and Kabir.'

PROFESSOR D. KERR, Edinburgh
6 May: `Christian--Muslim encounters: perspectives from the south.'

R.L. NETTLER
13 May: `Sufi visions, Sufi metaphysics, and Qur'anic prophets: what is going on in Ibn Arabi's Fusus al-Hikam?'


Old Testament Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Mondays in the Theology Faculty Centre, 41 St Giles'.

Convener: J. Barton, MA, D.Phil., D.Litt., Oriel and Laing Professor of the Interpretation of Holy Scripture.

DR W. HOUSTON
28 Apr.: `Was there a social crisis in the eighth century?' (In search of Pre-exilic Israel series)

PROFESSOR C. ROWLAND
5 May: `The Temple in the New Testament.' (Temple and Worship series)

DR J. DAY
19 May: `How many pre-exilic psalms are there?' (Temple and Worship series)

DR I. WILSON, Cambridge
26 May: `The Ark in Deuteronomy: merely a container?' (Temple and Worship series)

DR J. JARICK
2 June: `The Temple of David in the Book of Chronicles.' (Temple and Worship series)

MS M. ZAHN
9 June: `New voices, ancient words: reuse of the Bible in the Temple Scroll.' (Temple and Worship series)

PROFESSOR B.M. LEVINSON, Minnesota
16 June: `Is the Book of the Covenant an exilic composition? A response to John Van Seters.' (In search of Pre- exilic Israel series)


Ian Ramsey Centre

Science, religion, and medicine

The following seminars will be held at 8.15 for 8.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the Hood Room, St Cross College.

Conveners: Professor J.H. Brooke and Dr M. Yee.

PROFESSOR J. SAVULESCU
8 May: To be announced.

DR J. MCGRATH
22 May: `The World Health Organisation model of disease and the healing ministry of Jesus.'

DR N. BOSTROM
5 June: `Our human and posthuman dignity.'


INTERDISCIPLINARY SAWYER SEMINAR (IN ASSOCIATION WITH THE ANDREW W. MELLON FOUNDATION)

The theory and politics of civil society

Except where otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held from 1.45 p.m. to 4.15 p.m. on Thursdays in the Rothermere American Institute. Those wishing to attend the seminars should register their interest in good time. All enquiries should be directed to Paul Bou-Habib (telephone: (2)82718, e-mail: paul.bou-habib@socres.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR P. VAN PARIJS, Louvain
1 May: `Cultural diversity and economic solidarity.'

PROFESSOR RICHARD RORTY, Stanford
8 May, Rhodes House: `Justice as a larger loyalty.'

PROFESSOR LORD (RAYMOND) PLANT, King's College, London, PROFESSOR ADALBERT EVERS, Giessen, BLAKE BROMLEY, writer and activist, and others
15 May: final panel discussion.


INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING

Research Seminars

The following research seminars will be held at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in the IAUL, Littlegate House, St Ebbe's. Those wishing to attend are asked to contact Joanna Buddery (e-mail: joanna.buddery@learning.ox.ac.uk, telephone: Oxford (2)86815).

For details of reading weeks, see below. PROFESSOR J. RICHARDSON, Open University
15 May: `Perceptions of academic quality and variations in student learning in electronically delivered courses.'

PROFESSOR S. CLEGG, Sheffield Hallam
22 May: `Contested practices: learning outcomes and disciplinary understandings.'

DR H. HAGGER
5 June: `Professional knowledge and the beginning teacher.'

MS D. SABRI, IAUL
12 June: `The assumptive worlds of policy- makers and practitioners in pedagogic enquiry.'

PROFESSOR D. HOUNSELL, Edinburgh
19 June: `More than words can say...? Reappraising feedback to students.'

Reading Weeks

The following reading weeks will be held as part of the Research Seminars series. They will take place at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in the IAUL, Littlegate House, St Ebbe's. A copy of each paper may be obtained from Joanna Buddery (e-mail: joanna.buddery@learning.ox.ac.uk, telephone: Oxford (2)86815).

1 May: Haggis, T. (2003): `Constructing images of ourselves? A critical investigation into "approaches to learning" research in higher education', British Educational Research Journal, Vol. 29, No. 1, pp. 89–104.

29 May: Andrews, R. (2003): `The end of the essay?', Teaching in Higher Education, Vol. 8, No. 1, pp. 117–128.


ROTHERMERE AMERICAN INSTITUTE

Americanisation and anti-Americanism: global views of the USA

The following seminars will be held on Tuesdays in the Rothermere American Institute.

Further information may be found on the RAI's Web site, http://www.rai.ox.ac.uk, or from Cheryl Hudson, RAI (telephone: Oxford (2)82711, e-mail: cheryl.hudson@rai.ox.ac.uk).

D. RYAN, De Montfort
29 Apr., 2.30 p.m.: `Americanisation and anti- Americanism at the periphery: from Central American to 9/11.'

R. CROCKATT, East Anglia
13 May, 5 p.m.: `No common ground? Islam, America, and anti-Americanism.'

PROFESSOR R. PELLS, Texas at Austin
27 May, 2.30 p.m.: `From Modernism to the movies; the globalisation of American culture in the twentieth century.'

PROFESSOR H. ICKSTADT, Free University, Berlin
12 June, 5 p.m.: `The presence of America and post-war Germany's cultural responses.'


ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM

Carpets and textiles in the Islamic world

DR J.M.A. THOMPSON, Beattie Fellow in Carpet Studies, Ashmolean Museum, and DR H. TEZCAN, Curator of Textiles, Topkapi Palace Museum, Istanbul, and Barakat Visiting Fellow, Ashmolean Museum, will lecture at 2 p.m. on Thursdays (except for Wednesday, 18 June) in Lecture Room 1, the Oriental Institute.

1 May, 8 May, 18 June: `Textile collections in the Topkapi Palace Museum, Istanbul.'

15 May, 22 May, 29 May: `Introduction to carpet studies.'

12 June: `Introduction to structural analysis of carpets' (practical session).


Conference

Carpets and textiles in the Iranian world, 1400–1700

This conference, organised by the Beattie Carpet Archive and the Iran Heritage Foundation, will be held in the Ashmolean Museum, 30–31 August. Further information may be obtained from Emma Dick, Ashmolean Museum (e-mail: emma.dick@ashmus.ox.ac.uk).


SAID BUSINESS SCHOOL

The following seminars will be held at 12 noon on Thursdays in the Saïd Business School.

S. CHAN, SOAS, London
1 May: `The difficulty of being Mugabe: questions Whitehall never asked.'

M. EARL
8 May: `Strategies for knowledge management.'

M. KILDUFF, Pennsylvania State
15 May: `The structuralist legacy in organisational network research: a critical review.'

T. CLARK, Durham
22 May: `Management fashion as spectacle: the production of management best-selling books.'

A. VAN WITTELOOSTUIJN, Durham
29 May: `The ecology of strategy.'

R. PECCEI, King's College, London
5 June: `Much ado about nothing? The impact of gender similarity on employee satisfaction and commitment at work.'

B. TOWNLEY, Edinburgh
12 June: `Organisation theory: the place of the subject.'

H. MOLLER, Helsinki School of Economics
19 June: `Managing in value networks: a key managerial capability or another buzzword?'


COMPUTING LABORATORY

Strachey Lecture

PROFESSOR M.H. WRIGHT, Silver Professor of Computer Science, New York University, will deliver a Strachey Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 29 April, in the Computing Laboratory Lecture Theatre, the Wolfson Building, Parks Road. Refreshments will be served from 4 p.m.

Subject: `The interior-point revolution in constrained optimisation: history, recent developments, and lasting consequences.'


CENTRE FOR CRIMINOLOGICAL RESEARCH

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Old Library, All Souls College.

Convener: R.G. Hood, MA, D.Phil., DCL, Professor of Criminology and Director of the Centre.

DR R. ERICSON, British Columbia; Professor-elect of Criminology
30 Apr.: `Risk, insurance, and terrorism.'

PROFESSOR R. MORGAN, HM Chief Inspector of Probation
7 May: `An inspectorate calls.'

DR L. ZEDNER
14 May: `Too much security?'

PROFESSOR J. SHAPLAND, Sheffield
21 May: `Evaluating restorative justice in the context of criminal justice.'


OXFORD CENTRE FOR HEBREW AND JEWISH STUDIES

David Patterson Seminars

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 8 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor.

The OCHJS minibus will depart from the Playhouse, Beaumont Street, at 6.40 p.m. and 7.30 p.m., and will leave Yarnton Manor at 9.45 p.m. Single fare £1.60 (students £1.20).

Convener: R.L. Nettler (BA Chicago, MA McGill), Academic Director of the Centre.

PROFESSOR M. JACOBS, Washington University in St Louis
30 Apr.: `Interreligious polemics in medieval Spain: a Jewish response to Ibn Hazm's biblical criticism.'

PROFESSOR T. LEVY, California
7 May: `Texts, maps, and archaeology: recent Iron Age explorations in southern Jordan.'

DR D. RYNHOLD, King's College, London
14 May: `Maimonides on divine attributes and human perfection (or how to imitate someone about whom you know nothing).'

PROFESSOR A. KAHANE, Northwestern
21 May: `Homer and the Jews in antiquity.'

PROFESSOR F. MILLAR, OUTRUHJS
28 May: `Christians, Jews, and Arabs in the later Roman Empire.'

E. BEN-EZER, Hebrew writer
Tue. 3 June: `Esther Raab: life and poetry.'

PROFESSOR W. WITAKOWSKI, Uppsala
11 June: `Yosippon, and Yerahme'el: two examples of Hebrew medieval historiography.'

DR J. MÌCHLIC, Yad Vashem International Institute for Holocaust Research
18 June: `Memory of traumatic history: response to Jan T. Gross's Neighbours.'


WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE

Medicine and culture before 1800

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Mondays in the Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine.

Convener: M.H. Pelling, MA, M.Litt., Reader in the Social History of Medicine.

DR J. ARCHER, Warwick
28 Apr.: `Women healers, recipe books, and the intellectual circle of Katherine, Lady Ranelagh (1614--91).'

DR M. SATCHELL, Cambridge
3 May: `The medieval hospitals GIS project.'

DR J. LANDERS
19 May: `Gunpowder, energy, and the costs of war: the enigma of English exceptionalism.'

DR A. CUNNINGHAM, Cambridge
2 June: `The curse of John Hunter's museum.'

DR R. SERJEANTSON, Cambridge
7 June: `Medicine in the New Atlantis.'

DR L. BROCKLISS
16 June: `Medical correspondence in eighteenth-century France: the case of Esprit Calvet and his colleagues in the Midi.'


OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC STUDIES

Meaning in Islamic Art

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, George Street.

DR V. GONZALEZ, Boston
30 Apr.: `Meaning of a word-image on an Ottoman calligraphy from the Museum of Raqqada (Tunisia).'

DR J. THOMPSON
7 May: `Intention, incoherence, and fantasy: carpet patterns and their symbolic content.'

DR O. PANCAROGLU
14 May: `Image before knowledge: frontispieces in medieval Islamic manuscripts.'

DR Z. KHOURY-KLINK
Thur., 22 May: `Attire, jewellery, and the social order.'

DR B. FLOOD, New York
28 May: `Translating India: booty and beauty in medieval Afghanistan.'

DR J. BLOOM, Boston College
4 June: `Meaning in Fatimid art and architecture.'

MS M. ROSSER-OWEN, Victoria and Albert Museum, London
11 June: `The meaning of `Amirid art: non-royal patronage in tenth-century Al-Andalus.'

T. HUSSEIN, London
18 June: `The Hamadan Qur'an at the Cairo National Library.'


MAISON FRANÇAISE

Lectures

The following lectures will be given at 5.15 p.m. on the days shown in the Maison Française.

MICHAEL SCREECH
Mon. 28 Apr.: `Laughter in Rabelais.'

ETIENNE BALIBAR, Paris X and California
Thur. 1 May: `Europe: vanishing mediator?'

HENRI QUÉRÉ, Paris III
Wed. 14 May: `Que fait la fiction?'

P. ROY, Université Libre de Bruxelles
Thur. 15 May: Camille Lemonnier (1844-1913): précurseur des lettres belges de langue française.'

PHILIPPE COLOMBANI, IFRI, Paris
Mon. 2 June: `World trade patterns in the twenty-first century.'

LIONEL KOCHAN, OCHJS
Tue. 3 June: `Louis XIV, his horses, and the Jews of Alsace.'

J. DUBOIS, Liège
Mon. 9 June: `Les cent ans de Simenon. Portrait de l'artiste en jeune singe, bon bougre, et vieux sage.'


French Politics and Society Seminar

The following seminars will be given at 5.15 p.m. on Fridays in the Maison Française. Details of the seminars on 2 May and 9 May will be announced later.

RENÉ MOURIAUX, CEVIPOF, Paris
16 May: `La grève, spécificité du mouvement ouvrier français.'

FRANÇOIS PLATONE, CEVIPOF, Paris
23 May: `Le PCF a-t-il un avenir?'


Other meetings

The following meetings will be held at the Maison Française.

Tue. 6 May: open forum with SYLVIE GERMAIN, novelist, Prix Fémina 1989, 5.15 p.m.

Sat. 17 May, Sun. 18 May, colloquium: `Border crossings in the Balkans', 9 a.m.–5.30 p.m. (continues on Sunday at St Antony's).

Mon. 19 May: open forum with ERIC-EMMANUEL SCHMITT, playwright and novelist, 5.15 p.m.

Tue. 27 May: ARMAND GOULIPIAN reads poems by Villon, Norge, Tardieu, Baudelaire, Paul Fort, and Claude Roy, 8 p.m.

Fri. 30 May, Sat. 31 May, conference: `Transmission and understanding in the sciences in Europe, 1730–1870' (Fri. 2.30–5 p.m., Sat. 9.30 a.m.–12 noon).

Mon. 23 June, Tue. 24 June, Second European Conference in First World War Studies: `Histoire comparée de la Grande Guerre' (Mon. 2–7 p.m., Tue. 9 a.m.–5 p.m.) For more information and to register, contact: purseig@univ-tlse2.fr.

Thur. 26 June, colloquium organised by the Rousseau Association: `Rousseau, Voltaire, and fanaticism', 6 p.m. (continues at St Hugh's on 27, 28, 29 June).

Fri. 27 June–Sun. 29 June, colloquium: `Britain and the war with Napoleon' (Fri. 2.30–10 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–5.30 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–4.30 p.m.).

Fri. 4 July, Sat. 5 July, colloquium: `La déviance sociale en Angleterre et en France au XIXe siècle (1830–1900)' (Fri. 4–7.15 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–6 p.m.).


QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

International Gender Studies Centre

Gender in transnational and transforming families: stretching boundaries and social conventions

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House. The International Gender Studies Centre incorporates the Centre for Cross- Cultural Research on Women.

Conveners: Dr P. Heinonen, Dr D. Bryceson, and Dr J. Davies.

DR D. BRYCESON, Birmingham and Leiden
1 May: `Europe's transnational families and migration: past and present' (followed at 4 p.m. by book-launch at St Giles' House, 16 St Giles').

DR U. EREL, Metropolitan University, London
8 May: `Transmitting and transforming ethnicity: migrant mothers from Turkey and their children.'

PROFESSOR F. ANTHIAS, Oxford Brookes
15 May: `The family: beyond feminism and multiculturalism.'

PROFESSOR N. CHARLES and B. BECKER, Swansea
22 May: `Layered meanings: the construction of "the family" in the interview.'

DR A. COLES
29 May: `Families out of context: the effect of constant change on expatriate and diplomatic family life.'

DR B. KNIGHTON, Oxford Centre for Mission Studies
5 June: `Saving space: women's time in Karamojong traditional religion, north-east Uganda.'

DR P. HEINONEN
12 June: `The family as the site of female oppression: female genital mutilation and HIV/AIDS.'

C. SWEETMAN, Leeds
19 June: `A woman and an empty house are never alone: marriage as a livelihood strategy in peri-urban areas of Lesotho and Ethiopia.'


Kaberry Lecture

PROFESSOR KARIN BARBER, Centre of West African Studies, Birmingham, will deliver the Kaberry Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 7 May, in the Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

Subject: `How texts transcend gender in African oral and popular cultures.'


Refugee Studies Centre

Adolescents, armed conflict, and forced migration: an international seminar series

The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Thatcher Conference Centre, Somerville College. Further information can be found at http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk.

The venue of the Elizabeth Colson Lecture (11 June) will be announced later.

DR J. HART
30 Apr.: `Years of conflict: adolescence in Palestine and Sri Lanka.'

DR E. PROTACIO-DECASTRO, University of the Philippines
7 May: `Young people's notions of well-being in the context of armed conflict in the Philippines.'

C. TALBOT, UNESCO
14 May: `Education in conflict, emergency, and reconstruction.'

DR L. DE BLOCK, London
21 May: `Using new media in research with adolescent refugees in six European countries.'

DR K. MILLER, San Francisco State University
28 May: `Growing up in exile: challenges facing south-east Asian, Afghan, and other refugee youth in the United States.'

R. BRETT, Quaker United Nations Office, Geneva
4 June: `Why do adolescents volunteer to fight?.'

PROFESSOR A. ZOLBERG, New York
11 June: `Asylum in crisis.' (Elizabeth Colson Lecture)

DR A. DAWES, Cape Town
18 June: `Adolescence and youth: challenges in post-conflict South Africa.'


CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES

Programme in Public Interest Law and Policy

The following seminars will be held on Thursdays in the Seminar Room, the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Wolfson College.

PROFESSOR C. HARLOW, LSE
1 May, 1 p.m.: `Public interest litigation: has it a future?'

PROFESSOR B. HADFIELD, Essex
8 May, 5 p.m.: `Constitutional change and the English Question: what is the question and is there an answer?'


TRANSPORT STUDIES UNIT

ESRC Seminar Series 2002–3: Transport investment and the economy

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in Lecture Room 1, St Anne's College. Those wishing to attend are asked to inform Sylvia Boyce (e-mail: sylvia.boyce@tsu.ox.ac.uk).

Convener: J.M. Preston, MA, Director of the Unit and Reader in Transport Studies.

PROFESSOR A. MAY, Leeds
22 May: `Determining levels of local transport investment.'

PROFESSOR D. BEGG, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen
19 June: `Delivering transport investment: socio- economic issues.'


ALL SOULS COLLEGE

PROFESSOR ROGER LOUIS, Kerr Professor in English History and Culture, University of Texas at Austin, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 23 May, in the Old Library, All Souls College.

Subject: `Sir Keith Hancock and the British Empire: the Pax Britannica and the Pax Americana.'


Chichele Lectures

All Souls in the era of the Second Founding, 1865–1914

DR SIMON GREEN, Fellow of the college, will deliver the Chichele Lectures at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Old Library, All Souls College. The lectures are open to the public.

30 May: `The years of the Constituent Assembly.'

6 June: `The impact of Anson.'

13 June: `The golden age of the Prize Fellows.'

20 June: `Chichele's professoriate and its peculiar purposes.'


BALLIOL COLLEGE

Oliver Smithies Lectures

Philosophy and culture

PROFESSOR RICHARD RORTY, Stanford, will deliver the Oliver Smithies Lectures at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Examination Schools.

30 Apr.: `Universalist grandeur, Romantic profundity, humanist finitude.'

7 May: `Analytic philosophy and narrative philosophy.'


BRASENOSE COLLEGE

Tanner Lectures on Human Values

Dilemmas of difference in democratic society

PROFESSOR DAVID KENNEDY, Donald J. McLachlan Professor of History, Stanford University, will deliver the Tanner Lectures on Human Values at 5 p.m. on the following days in Rhodes House.

Mon. 12 May: `The case of women.'

Tue. 13 May: `The case of race.'


EXETER COLLEGE

Marett Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR J. WEBBER, UNESCO Chair in Jewish and Interfaith Studies, Birmingham, will deliver the Marett Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 2 May, in the Saskatchewan Lecture Room, Exeter College.

Subject: `Making sense of the past: reflections on Jewish historical consciousness.'


GREEN COLLEGE

Alan Emery Lecture

PROFESSOR SIR DAVID WEATHERALL will deliver the Alan Emery Lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 29 May, in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

Subject: `Genomics and world health: myth or reality?'


JESUS COLLEGE

Don Fowler Lecture

PROFESSOR ELLEN OLIENSIS, Associate Professor of Classics, University of California at Berkeley, will deliver the Don Fowler Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 15 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `What Scylla wants: Freudian questions in Ovid's Metamorphoses.'


LADY MARGARET HALL

Canada Seminars

PROFESSOR JOY PARR, Farley Professor, Humanities, Simon Fraser University, British Columbia, will speak at 5.15 p.m. on Tuesday, 1 May, in the Talbot Hall, Lady Margaret Hall. There will be an opportunity to meet the speaker informally afterwards. Enquiries should be directed to Vanessa Windsor, Lady Margaret Hall (telephone: Oxford (2)74302, e-mail: vanessa.windsor@lmh.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `Is the drinking water safe? Reflections on a recent Canadian tragedy.'


MAGDALEN COLLEGE

Waynflete Lectures

Blake and the Terror: toward a biography of William Blake in Lambeth during the anti-Jacobin Terror in Britain, 1792--3

MICHAEL PHILLIPS, Centre for Eighteenth-century Studies, University of York, and guest curator of the William Blake exhibition at Tate Britain, 2000, will deliver the Waynflete Lectures at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Auditorium, Magdalen College.

14 May:` "A whole house to range in": recovering no. 13 Hercules Buildings, Lambeth, Blake's studios, method of "Illuminated Printing", and the production of "A Song of Liberty" .'

21 May: ` "GOD save the PEOPLE!!": Lambeth's manufactories, asylum, lying-in hospital, and workhouse, and the creation of Songs of Experience.'

28 May: ` "From the commencement of ALARM": Thomas Paine and Charles Ross, the Lambeth Association for the Preservation of Liberty and Property against Republicans and Levellers, "Our End is Come", and the prospect of Newgate.'

4 June: ` "The several Works now published and on Sale at Mr. Blake's": the Prospectus of 10 October 1793, meeting of the Society of Loyal Britons, Mount Row, Lambeth, America a Prophecy, and the politics of colour.'


Rowe Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR J.R. WOODHOUSE, FBA, Emeritus Fiat–Serena Professor of Italian, will deliver the Dorothy Rowe Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 30 May, in the Auditorium, Magdalen College.

Subject: `The Travels of Marco Polo.'


ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

Third Annual Researching Africa Day

This event will be held St Antony's College on Friday, 13 June, 10 a.m.-- 6 p.m.

Researching Africa Day is a multidisciplinary workshop for postgraduates who have recently engaged in research in Africa. Students of history, political science, geography, economics, anthropology, archaeology, and the natural sciences are invited to present and/or attend. It is an opportunity to meet fellow researchers, to exchange information and experiences, and to discuss research strategies and their practice in relation to the African continent.

The schedule is thematic and should allow for reflection on many of the challenges, both theoretical and practical, of doing research in the African context.

How the practicalities shape the material: translators; the research funnel; equipment; format of data; getting material home.

Making the connections: strengths and weaknesses of various research methodologies; selecting research methods that will help you get (what you think) you want; what you can say given your choice of research methods; defending your choices.

Budgeting for fieldwork: hidden costs, when to pay, what to pay, possible sources of fieldwork financial support.

Archival research: contents of archives; accessibility; difficulties involved.

Negotiating the politics: gaining access, national and local; finding contacts; ethical considerations.

Anyone interested in attending or presenting should contact Maitseo Bolaane (e-mail: maitseo.bolaane@sant.ox.ac.uk) or Andrew Hurst (e-mail: andrew.hurst@geog.ox.ac.uk).

The deadline for abstracts (maximum 100 words) was 11 April. The deadline for general registration is 30 April.

Registration is free. Coffee and tea will be provided, but those attending will need to purchase lunch.


European Studies Centre

Cyprus: from Ottoman province to European state

DR ROLANDOS KATSIAOUNIS will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Seminar Room, 70 Woodstock Road.

Convener: R. Clogg, MA, Senior Research Fellow, St Antony's College.

29 Apr.: `The Ottoman period, 1571–1878.'

6 May: `British rule: ethnic and social aspects, 1878–1931.'

13 May: `The anti-colonial movement, 1931–59.'

20 May: `The republic, 1960–2003.'


Programme for Trinity Term

The following meetings will be held as shown in the European Studies Centre.

DR H. MAYER and DR L. MCLAREN
Tue. 10 a.m., weeks 2, 4, 6, 8: `European integration.' (Class)

DR A. DEIGHTON
Tue. 10.30 a.m., weeks 5 and 7: `European integration.' (Revision seminars, for second year EPS M.Phil. students)

G. CASTILLO, Miami
Tue. 12.30 p.m., week 3: `From the Marshall Plan to the "Kitchen Debate": domesticity as a Cold War weapon.' (Brown-bag lunch)

DR A. DEIGHTON and PROFESSOR R. CRAMPTON
Tue. 2.15 p.m., weeks 2–5: `Truth and record.' (Class)

DR K. NICOLAÏDIS
Wed. 2 p.m., weeks 3, 4, 5, 6: `Game theory and negotiation.' (Class)


ST HUGH'S COLLEGE

Aung San Suu Kyi Lecture 2003

H.E. JUDGE RICHARD MAY will deliver the Aung San Suu Kyi Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 15 May, in the Maplethorpe Building, St Hugh's College.

Subject: `Upholding human rights through international law.'


ST PETER'S COLLEGE

Intellectual Property Research Centre

Intellectual Property in the New Millennium

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Latner Seminar Room, St Peter's College.

C. WADLOW, Simmons & Simmons
29 Apr.: `Patent claim interpretation: is Catnic right, wrong, or even relevant?'

MRS A. WARREN-JONES, Liverpool
6 May: `Beauty and the beast: patent mortality and human biotech.'

DR S. THOMAS, Nuffield Council on Bioethics
13 May: `Patenting DNA: the Nuffield Council on Bioethics' report.'

PROFESSOR W. GORDON, Boston University School of Law
20 May: `How long is a piece of copyright? Dreading Eldred.'


SOMERVILLE COLLEGE

Glaxo SmithKline Lecture

PROFESSOR J. MARTIN, Melbourne, will deliver the Glaxo SmithKline Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 13 May, in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary. The lecture will be followed by a reception in Somerville College.

Subject: `The skeletal complications of cancer.'


TRINITY COLLEGE

Margaret Howard Lecture

P.D. JAMES will deliver the Margaret Howard Lecture at 5.45 p.m. on Thursday, 15 May, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building. Admission is free. The lecture will be followed by a reception.

Subject: `Manners and murder: women detective writers as social historians.'


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture

RICHARD A. EPSTEIN, Distinguished Service Professor of Law, University of Chicago, and Senior Fellow, the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, will deliver the H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 6 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `The not so minimum content of natural law.'


WOLFSON COLLEGE

Isaiah Berlin Lecture

PROFESSOR AVISHAI MARGALIT, Schulman Professor of Philosophy, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, will deliver the annual Isaiah Berlin Lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 22 May, in the Hall, Wolfson College. The lecture will be open to the public.

Subject: `Compromise and appeasement: between peace and justice.'


TRANSLATION RESEARCH IN OXFORD AND THE EUROPEAN HUMANITIES RESEARCH CENTRE

Translating Freud again? (The New Penguin Freud, edited by Adam Phillips)

This seminar will be held from 9.30 a.m. on Saturday, 14 June, in St Hugh's College. Registration fee £18 (students £4); lunch £8.70. Further details may be obtained from Edith McMorran (e-mail: edith.mcmorran@st-hughs.ox.ac.uk), and from the Web site http://www.trio.org.uk.

ADAM PHILLIPS
10 a.m.: `Presentation of the project.'

PAUL KEEGAN
10.30 a.m.: `History of Freud in translation.'

MALCOLM BOWIE, RACHEL BOWLBY, HUGH HAUGHTON, AND JERI JOHNSON
11.30 a.m.: round table discussion.

ADAM PHILLIPS
2 p.m.: `Textual analysis of the translation: clinical implications.'

Mr Phillips' second paper will be followed by a round table discussion, by translators ALAN BANCE, ANTHEA BELL, JOYCE CRICK, NICOLA LUCKHURST, HELEN RAGG-KIRKBY, JOHN REDDICK, and ANDREW WEBBER, with a French view from FRANÇOISE COBLENCE.


NEW DICTIONARY OF NATIONAL BIOGRAPHY

DNB seminars on biography: Icons and celebrity

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on the days shown in the Rainolds Room, Corpus Christi College.

PROFESSOR N. RODGER, University of Exeter
Thur. 8 May: `Horatio Nelson.'

V. HEWITT, British Museum
Thur. 22 May: `Britannia, ruler of the waves.'

PROFESSOR C. BREWARD, London College of Fashion
Tue. 3 June: `Ambiguous role models: fashion, modernity, and the late Victorian actress.'


FRIENDS OF THE BODLEIAN

The following thirty-minute lectures will be given at 1 p.m. on the days shown in the Cecil Jackson Room, the Sheldonian Theatre.

Admission is free. Wine and sandwiches will be served after the lecture, at a cost of £4 per person, for which bookings should be made in advance with Mrs P.M. Sturgis, Membership Secretary, Friends of the Bodleian, Bodleian Library, Oxford OX1 3BG (telephone: Oxford (2)77234, e-mail: pms@bodley@ox.ac.uk).

MRS M. CLAPINSON
Tue. 13 May: `E.W.B. Nicholson, Bodley's first professional librarian.'

C. HURST
Wed. 4 June:`Homo ludens: games and pastimes in the Bodleian Library.'


OXFORD BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY

Annual General Meeting and lecture

KRISTIAN JENSEN will lecture at the Annual General Meeting, to be held at 3 p.m. on Wednesday, 30 April, in the Cecil Jackson Room, the Sheldonian Theatre.

Subject: `Importing humanism: marginal notes in Leipzig books.'

Grants and Research Funding

FACULTY OF MUSIC

Joan Conway Fund

Joan Conway Scholarships in Performance Studies 2003–4

The Board of Management of the Conway Fund intends to award up to five Joan Conway Scholarships in Performance Studies, to be granted in 2003--4 to students of music at Oxford (undergraduates and postgraduates) wishing to undertake advanced studies in the musical performance, historical performance practice, or the study of musical instruments.

The Joan Conway Scholars are ordinarily awarded sums up to a maximum of £750, depending on their specific requirements. The scholarships are intended to cover specific costs incurred by students for special performance tuition fees (excluding basic tuition), registration in advanced courses or masterclasses, travel expenses, or any other costs directly related to the study and research of musical performance. A number of smaller bursaries are also available. Applications will need to declare what part of these expenses is being met from other sources.

Applications should include a detailed plan of expenditure, and should reach the Faculty of Music by Friday of fifth week of Trinity Term 2003 (30 May). The Board reserves the right to audition applicants. It is expected that applicants will be informed of the Board's decisions by the end of ninth week of Trinity Term. Applicants should provide full vacation contact details in the event that they may be contacted after the end of that term. The awards will be publicised in the Faculty of Music and mentioned in its Annual Report. Receipts and a brief written report are required from each Conway Scholar by the end of the year of the award. Successful applicants will be expected to participate in a public concert in Oxford during the academic year following the year in which the award was made. Expenses incurred by the participation in the concert will be met from the fund, but no performing fee will be payable.

Applications should be sent to Mrs Cathy Wright, Faculty Administrator and Board Secretary, Faculty of Music, St Aldate's, Oxford OX1 1DB.


DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS

Doctoral Studentship Scheme

Introduced last year, this scheme has been created to help the funding of graduate students with Oxford D.Phil. status, or those who will hold that status from 1 October 2003. Four studentships were awarded in October 2002, one attached to Lincoln College.

The department is offering up to four such awards commencing in the academic year 2003–4. Each award offers funding of £8,000 per annum for two years. A condition of the award is that holders will be required to undertake teaching duties for the department or a college of four hours per week during term, as specified by the Head of Department (or Senior Tutor in respect of the college-associated studentships). From 1 October 2003, both University College and Wadham College have expressed their willingness to participate in the department's scheme. Where a fees-only award permits their doing so, successful candidates may simultaneously hold a doctoral studentship.

Applicants should send three copies of their curriculum vitae and the names of two referees, one of whom must be their doctoral supervisor, to the Administrator, Department of Economics, Manor Road Building, Oxford OX1 3UQ (e-mail: gillian.coates@economics.ox.ac.uk), by 31 May. Applicants should ensure that their referees write directly to the department by the closing date.


OPPENHEIMER FUND

The Oppenheimer Fund provides grants to assist the academic exchange of senior members between the University of Oxford on the one hand and universities and similar institutions of higher education in the Republic of South Africa on the other. Applications are invited from senior members of the University who wish either to visit one or more universities in South Africa or to invite a staff member from a South African university to Oxford. Grants may be awarded to assist with living expenses for a maximum of six months, and travel costs. Visits for the sole purpose of attending a conference will not normally be eligible for support from the fund.

The maximum level of grants is likely to be up to £1,000 per month for subsistence and up to £700 for the cost of travel between Oxford and South Africa. Applications for grants from the fund should include a statement of the purpose of the proposed visit (including an outline of any research to be carried out during the visit), duration and estimated costs, details of any other available sources of funding, and, in the case of visits to Oxford, a curriculum vitae of the staff member it is proposed to invite and a letter of support from a senior member at Oxford.

The closing date for applications is 16 May. Applications and enquiries should be sent to Mrs Katharine McGuire, International Office, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: Oxford (2)70134).

Examinations and Boards

MEDICAL SCIENCES DIVISION

Conferment of title

HONORARY SENIOR CLINICAL LECTURER

(title conferred with effect from 1 March 2003)

Corrigendum

ORLANDO J. WARNER (MB, BS London), FRCA, FRCS. In Anaesthetics.

Note: this replaces the notice of conferment of title on Dr Warner published in the Gazette of 20 March, p. 993, in which Dr Warner's title was given incorrectly.


CHAIRMEN OF EXAMINERS

EASTER VACATION

Final Honour School

Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology: B.J. ROGERS (B.SC., MA, PH.D. Bristol), Lecturer of Pembroke


Master of Philosophy

Politics: C. WLEZIEN (PH.D. Iowa), Fellow of Nuffield


Master of Science

Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition: D.G. PHILLIPS, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Edmund Hall

Educational Research Methodology: D.G. PHILLIPS, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Edmund Hall

Educational Studies (Syllabus B): D.G. PHILLIPS, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Edmund Hall

Politics and International Relations Research: C. WLEZIEN (PH.D. Iowa), Fellow of Nuffield

Professional Development in Education: D.G. PHILLIPS, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Edmund Hall


Master of Studies

Mathematical Modelling and Scientific Computing: S.J. CHAPMAN, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Mansfield


TRINITY TERM 2003

Final Honour Schools

Jurisprudence (Courses I and II): R.J. SMITH, MA (MA Cambridge), Fellow of Magdalen

Philosophy, Politics, and Economics: S.B.G. COWAN, MA, Fellow of Worcester


Preliminary Examination in Medicine

Part I: DR JAIDEEP PANDIT, BM, B.CH., MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Hugh's

Part II: DR SIMON HUNT, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Keble


Bachelor of Civil Law

P.B.H. BIRKS, QC, MA, DCL (LL.M. London, LL.D. Edinburgh), Fellow of All Souls


Magister Juris

P.B.H. BIRKS, QC, MA, DCL (LL.M. London, LL.D. Edinburgh), Fellow of All Souls


Master of Science

Biology: P.W.H. HOLLAND, MA (PH.D. London, D.SC. Reading), Fellow of Merton


Diploma

Legal Studies: R.J. SMITH, MA (MA Cambridge), Fellow of Magdalen


BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

The syndicated Special Topics for Course I, Paper 8 (i), and for Course II, Paper B7 ( h) for examination in 2004 will be:

(i) Approaches to Biography

(ii) Introduction to postcolonial studies

(iii) Anglo-American Film

(iv) E-lit: IT and English literature

The Board of the Faculty of English Language and Literature may cancel by the end of Trinity term 2003 any syndicated option which is undersubscribed or for which teaching becomes unavailable.


CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

The following changes in regulations made by the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council will come into effect on 9 May.

With the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, and, where applicable, of divisional boards, the following changes in regulations made by divisional boards, faculty boards, and committees will come into effect on 9 May.

1 Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council

First and Second Public Examinations

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 21, delete ll. 22–6 and substitute:

 

`3.9. Candidates may be admitted to each of the Moderations listed in Table 4 below not earlier than the term from matriculation specified in each case.


Table 4: admission to moderations

Moderations                   Earliest term from
                              matriculation
English Language and          3rd
 Literature
Law                           2nd
Oriental Studies:
 Chinese                      5th, subject to regulation
                                3.10 below
 Egyptology and Ancient       3rd
  Near Eastern Studies
 Japanese                     3rd, subject to regulation
                                3.11 below
Physics and Philosophy        3rd

3.10. A candidate may be admitted to Moderations in Oriental Studies (Chinese) only if he or she has:

(1) passed an examination in Chinese under the auspices of the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies; or

(2) otherwise satisfied the faculty board as to his or her competence in Chinese.

3.11. A candidate may be admitted to Moderations in Oriental Studies (Japanese) only if he or she has:

(1) during his or her first year of study passed an examination in Japanese under the auspices of the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies and spent a period of not less than ten weeks on an approved course of language study in Japan; or

(2) otherwise satisfied the faculty board as to his or her competence in Japanese.'

2 Ibid., p. 21, l. 27 and p. 22, l. 4, renumber existing regulations 3.11–3.12 as regulations 3.12–3.13.

3 Ibid., p. 22, ll. 5 and 7, renumber existing Table 4 as Table 5, and in the title delete `entry for' and substitute `admission to'.

4 Ibid., delete from p. 22, l. 33 to p. 23, l. 22 (existing regulations 3.13–3.15).

5 Ibid., p. 23, ll. 23, 27, and 31, renumber existing regulations 3.16–3.18 as regulations 3.14–3.16.

6 Ibid., p. 23, l. 39, p. 24, ll. 6 and 7, p. 26, l. 7, p. 29, ll. 37 and 38, p. 30, l. 38, and p. 31, l. 1, renumber existing Tables 5–7 as Tables 6–8.

[These changes put the existing regulations governing admission to Moderations into tabular form, to correspond to those governing admission to Preliminary Examinations. At the same time, they change the title of the existing table for Preliminary Examinations in the interests of clarity and uniformity.]


2 Humanities and Social Sciences Boards

(a) Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 421, delete l. 47 and substitute:

`226. Quantitative methods in Politics and Sociology'.

2 Ibid., p. 427, delete ll. 18–19 and substitute:

`226. Quantitative Methods in Politics and Sociology

Candidates will be expected to show an understanding of applications of quantitative methods in politics and sociology including the following: the principles of research design in social science: data collection, the logic of causal inference, and comparative method; major statistical methods and concepts: types of random variables, independence, correlation and association, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, linear and non-linear regression models, event-history analysis, and time-series. Candidates will also be expected to interpret information and show familiarity with major methodological debates in politics and sociology.'

3 Ibid., p. 430, l. 22, delete `*' and associated footnote.

4 Ibid., delete ll. 43–6.

(b) Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 421, after l. 47 insert:

`297. Special Subject in Politics (199, 298, 299, 399)'.

2 Ibid., p. 427, after l. 19 insert:

`297. Special Subject in Politics (199, 298, 299, 399)

Special Subjects will be examined by examination paper. No candidate may offer more than one Special Subject. A Special Subject may not be offered by candidates also offering a thesis (199, 299, 399) or Supervised dissertation (298). Depending on the availability of teaching resources, not all Special Subjects will be available to all candidates in every year. Candidates may obtain details of the choice of Special Subjects for the following year by consulting lists posted at the beginning of the Fourth Week of Hilary Term in the Department of Politics and International Relations and circulated to Politics tutors at colleges admitting undergraduates.'

(c) Honour School of Modern History and Politics

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 321, l. 11 and l. 16, after `thesis' insert `, Special Subject in Politics,'.

2 Ibid., p. 322, l. 19 after `thesis' insert `, Special Subject in Politics,'.


(d) Honour Moderations in Modern History and Politics

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 60, delete ll. 30–3, and substitute:

`Candidates will be required to answer three questions drawn from section (b) of the paper Introduction to Politics: The Theory and Practice of Democracy as specified for the Preliminary Examination in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics. Candidates must show knowledge of at least three of the following political systems: the United States of America; the United Kingdom; France; Germany.'


(e) Preliminary Examination for Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 104, l. 26, delete `Introduction to Politics' and substitute `Introduction to Politics: The Theory and Practice of Democracy'.

2 Ibid., delete from p. 105, l. 26 to p. 106, l. 6 inclusive, and substitute:

`Introduction to Politics: the Theory and Practice of Democracy

The paper will contain two sections. Candidates are required to answer four questions, of which at least one must be from section (a) and two from section (b). Candidates choosing to answer two questions from section (b) must show knowledge of at least two of the following political systems: the United States of America; the United Kingdom; France; Germany. Candidates choosing to answer three questions from section (b) must show knowledge of at least three of the following political systems: the United States of America; the United Kingdom; France; Germany.


(a) Theorising the Democratic State

Questions will be set on the following topics: the nature and grounds of democracy; power and influence in the democratic state; ideology; civil society; public choice approaches to democracy; the nature and limits of liberty. Questions will also be set on the following texts: J.J. Rousseau, The Social Contract; J.S. Mill, On Liberty; Alexis de Toqueville, Democracy in America; Karl Marx and Freidrich Engels, The Communist Manifesto, Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Napoleon, Preface to a Critique of Political Economy, Critique of the Gotha Programme, plus readings 14, 37, 39 in David McLellan, ed., Karl Marx: Selected Writings, Second Edition (Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2000).


(b) Analysis of Democratic Institutions

Questions will be set on the following topics: the state and its institutions (executives, legislatures, parties and party systems, courts, constitutions and centre-periphery relations); political representation; the politics of instability; policy continuity and policy change; democratic transitions and consolidation. Questions will also be set on these topics with reference to the following political systems: the United States of America, the United Kingdom; France; Germany.'


(f) Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 432, ll. 1–2, delete

`either the chairman of the sub-faculty of Philosophy, or' and ll. 3–5, delete `care of the Administrator, Department of Politics and International Relations, George Street, Oxford,'.

2 Ibid., ll. 15–17, delete `via the Administrator, Department of Politics and International Relations, George Street,'.


(g) Preliminary Examination for Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 105, delete ll. 22–5, and substitute:

`These topics may be studied in Wilfrid Hodges, Logic, 2nd edition (Penguin Books), sections 1–11 and 16–40, omitting theorem XII of section 24. The logical symbols and tableaux rules to be used are those found in that book. Some philosophical questions about logic may be studied by reading Mark Sainsbury, Logical Forms, 1st or 2nd edition (Blackwell), chapters 1–2.'


() Honour Moderations in Modern History and Economics )h

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 57, delete ll. 8–21.

2 Ibid., ll. 25, 27, 34, and 37, delete `Honour Moderations' and insert `the Preliminary Examination'.

3 Ibid., p. 58, after l. 43 insert :

`Candidates who fail one or more of papers 1, 2, 3, or 4 above may resit that subject or subjects at a subsequent examination.'

4 Ibid., p. 89, delete ll. 2–4.

5 Ibid., reposition special regulations from l. 22 on p. 57 to l. 43 on p. 58 (as amended) after l. 1 on p. 89.


3 Humanities and Mathematical and Physical Sciences Boards

Honour Moderations in Mathematics and Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 55, l. 38, after `Logic' insert `, second edition'.


4 Life and Environmental Sciences Board

(a) Honour Moderations in Biological Sciences

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 33, delete ll. 28–36 and substitute:

`2. The Chairman of the Steering Committee, or a deputy, shall make available to the moderators, by the end of the seventh week of the term in which the examinations are first held, records showing the extent to which each candidate has completed the prescribed class work and laboratory work to a satisfactory standard in each of the four sections (1–4) of the schedule below. The moderators may request coursework from any candidate; such candidates will be named in a list posted by the day of the first written paper. Each notebook submitted shall be accompanied by a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that the notebook is the candidate's own work. Failure to complete the coursework to the satisfaction of the moderators, in the absence of appropriate documentary evidence, will normally constitute failure of the examination.'

2 Ibid., l. 41, delete `Teaching' and substitute `Steering'.


(b) Honour School of Natural Science (Biological Sciences)

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 357, after l. 48 insert:

`After completion of these two papers, the examiners will issue a list of candidates deemed to have completed Part A of the examination'.

2 Ibid., p. 358, l. 1, delete `Teaching' and substitute

`Steering'.

3 Ibid., ll. 12–13, delete `subject in which his or her Part A essay has been written' and substitute `same subject offered in Part A'.

4 Ibid., l. 16, after `of biology.' insert `The project report shall be of not more than 7,000 words, excluding any tables, figures, or references, and must be prefaced by an Abstract of not more than 250 words, to be included within the word limit.'

5 Ibid., ll. 16–18, delete `shall be submitted on or before

12 noon on the Friday of week 6 of Hilary Full Term of the academic year in which the examination is held' and substitute `(two copies) must be legibly typed or wordprocessed on one side only of A4 paper, held firmly in a stiff cover, and submitted on or before 12 noon on the Friday of week 6 of Hilary Full Term of the academic year in which Part C of the examination is taken'.

6 Ibid., delete ll. 27–38 and substitute:

`(ii) All candidates shall be assessed as to their practical ability in coursework under the following provisions:

(a) The Chairman of the Steering Committee, or a deputy, shall make available to the examiners, at the end of the first week of the term in which the examinations in Part C are held, records showing the extent to which each candidate has completed the prescribed practical work and exercises in Quantitative Methods to a satisfactory standard.

(b) The examiners may request coursework from any candidate. Such candidates will be named in a list posted by the day of the first written paper in Part C of the examination. Each notebook submitted shall be accompanied by a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that the notebook is the candidate's own work.

(c) In assessing the record of practical work and exercises in Quantitative Methods, the examiners shall have regard to the attendance record of the candidates at the classes provided, and to the marks awarded for the classes provided. Candidates whose overall performance in practical work and Quantitative Methods is judged by the examiners to be insufficient to warrant the award of Honours may either be deemed to have failed the examination, or may, at the discretion of the examiners, be awarded a Pass degree.'

7 Ibid., l. 43, after `or references' insert `, and must be prefaced by an Abstract of not more than 250 words, to be included within the word limit'.

8 Ibid., l. 46, delete `eighth week of the Hilary Term' and substitute `noughth week of the Trinity Term'.

9 Ibid., l. 51, delete `essays' and substitute `assignments'.

10 Ibid., l. 52, delete `essay' and substitute `assignment'.

11 Ibid., l. 53, delete `essay' and substitute `assignment'.

12 Ibid., p. 359, l. 1, delete `essay' and substitute `assignment'.

13 Ibid., l. 3, delete `essay' and substitute `assignment' and delete `Extended essays' and substitute `Assignments'.

14 Ibid., l. 4, delete `essay' and substitute `assignment'.

15 Ibid., l. 7, delete `essay' in two places and substitute `assignment' in each case.

16 Ibid., l. 9, delete `essays' and substitute `assignments' and delete `essay' and substitute `assignment'.

17 Ibid., l. 11, delete `essay' and substitute `assignment'.

18 Ibid., reposition regulations on p. 358, l. 39 to p. 359, l. 11, after l. 3. on p. 358.

19 Ibid., p. 359, l. 14, delete `Teaching' and substitute `Steering'.

20 Ibid., l. 17, after `be examined' insert `on their project'.

21 Ibid., ll. 17–18, delete `Discussion of the project will be included in the viva voce examination.'.


5 Mathematical and Physical Sciences and Social Sciences Boards

Honour School of Engineering, Economics, and Management

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first Part I examination in 2005)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 172, l. 11, delete

`Electricity and Electronics' and substitute `Electrical Systems'.

2 Ibid., l. 12, delete `Control, Dynamics and Computers' and substitute `Modelling, Dynamics and Control'.

3 Ibid., l. 19, delete `Electrical' and substitute `Electronic'.


6 Social Sciences Board

(a) Master of Business Administration

With effect from 1 September 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 750, l. 1, delete `examination' and substitute `assessment'.

2 Ibid., l. 30, delete `four' and substitute `eight'.

3 Ibid., l. 31, delete `annually'.

4 Ibid., l. 32, delete `Hilary Term' and substitute `the preceding term'.

5 Ibid., l. 35, after `the MBA Director;' insert `or, an individual project which would be supervised by one of the SBS faculty or associates. Such projects must be approved by the MBA Director;'.

6 Ibid., p. 751, delete from p. 751, l. 12 to p. 762, l. 30 inclusive, and substitute:

`(a) Decision Science

(b) Managerial Economics

(c) Financial Reporting

(d) Strategy

(e) Finance I

(f) Developing Effective Managers

(g) Operations Management

() Marketing )h

(i) Financial Management

(j) International Business and Global Governance'.


(b) Master of Business Administration

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 747, l. 6, after

`Administration' insert `(full-time and part-time)'.

2 Ibid., l. 25, after `Administration.' insert:

`Decision on entry is made by the Head of MBA programmes or the EMBA Director (for part-time students) following an interview.'

3 Ibid., p. 748, delete ll. 3–6, and renumber paragraphs

3 and 4 as 2 and 3 respectively.

4 Ibid., l. 12, delete `Secretary of Faculties' and substitute `Head of MBA programmes'.

5 Ibid., p. 749, after l. 23 insert:

`3. Part-time students for the Degree of Master of Business Administration shall in each case be required to pursue their course of study over an elapsed time of 21 months. Part-time students shall not be required to keep statutory residence but must attend for such instruction and undertake such supervised coursework as the MBA committee shall require. The part-time MBA Director shall keep a register of attendance of part-time students. No student shall be granted leave to supplicate unless the register shows satisfactory attendance by him or her.

4. Part-time students may hold the status of Student for the Part-time Degree of Master of Business Administration for a period not exceeding 48 months.'

6 Ibid., l. 24, delete `3' and substitute `5'.

7 Ibid., p. 750, after l. 25 insert `A. Full-time students'.

8 Ibid., l. 40, delete `schedule' and substitute `course handbook'.

9 Ibid., p. 751, after l. 8 insert:

`B. Part-time students

1. Every candidate wishing to take the course on a part-time basis must follow for not less than 21 months a course of instruction in Management Studies. Candidates must complete:

(a) all courses from the schedule of required courses, and satisfy the examiners in the assignment and/or examination associated with each course;

(b) four electives, and satisfy the examiners in the assignment and/or examination associated with each course, the list of electives to be published not later than the first Monday of First Week of the term preceding the term in which the electives take place;

(c) a written report on a new business development project of not more than 8,000 words. Such projects must be approved by the part-time MBA Director;

(d) a written report on a business project of not more than 15,000 words. Such projects must be approved by the part-time MBA Director;

(e) a case study examination, on which questions may be set relevant to all the required courses held throughout the year (details of which are set out in the course handbook);

(f) candidates may be required to attend an oral examination on any of the above.'

10 Ibid., delete from p. 751, l. 10 to p. 752, l. 30 inclusive, and substitute:

`The following courses are required to be taken during Michaelmas and Hilary Terms for full-time students, and during the first year of the course for part-time students. Details can be found in the course handbook.

(a) Financial reporting

(b) Finance 1

(c) Finance 2

(d) People and Organisations

(e) Operations Management

(f) Marketing Management

(g) Strategic Management

() Global and Comparative Business )h

(i) Business Law and Ethics

(j) Decision Science

(k) Financial Management

(l) Industrial Organisation

(m) Macro-economics and Finance'.

11 Ibid., p. 985, l. 13, p. 1014, l. 2, and p. 1031, l. 31, after

`Administration' insert `(full-time and part-time)'.

12 Ibid., p. 1044, l. 16, after `Administration' insert `(full-time)'.

13 Ibid., l. 16, after `£19,600;' insert `for members of the University working for the Degree of Master of Business Administration (part-time), `£32,000;'.


(c) M.Phil. in Russian and East European Studies

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 580, l. 20, after `with a' insert `good'.

2 Ibid., l. 27, delete `at the beginning' and substitute `in the First Week'.

3 Ibid., l. 31, after `with' insert `little or'.

4 Ibid., l. 31, delete `Trinity Term in the year in which they begin the course' and substitute `the Michaelmas Term of their second year'.

5 Ibid., l. 34, delete `two terms after matriculation' and substitute `year of the course'.

6 Ibid., l. 36, after `First Week' delete `in the Trinity Term in the year which began the course' and substitute `of the Michaelmas Term of their second year'.

7 Ibid., l. 38, delete `Ninth Week of that Trinity Term' and substitute `Seventh Week of that Michaelmas Term'.

8 Ibid., delete ll. 41–51 inclusive.


(d) M.Phil. in Russian and East European Studies

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 579, delete l. 46, and renumber subsequent lines 8–10 as 7–9 accordingly.


(e) M.Sc. in Economics for Development

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, delete from p. 697, l. 21 to p. 698, l. 3 inclusive.

2 Ibid., p. 698, delete ll. 30–8, and substitute:

`Candidates are expected to reach a postgraduate level in modern micro- and macroeconomic theory, and to be able to explain how this theory should be modified to take account of the structural and institutional characteristics of developing countries. The topics covered will normally include the following (with candidates required to answer at least one question each in micro and macro economics). Microeconomics: producer and consumer theory with applications to development; household models; general equilibrium, welfare theorems; welfare analysis and policy evaluation; imperfect competition with applications to public service delivery; investment and savings with applications to human capital; economics of information with applications to sharecropping; and open economy models. Macroeconomics: open economy macroeconomics; dynamic macroeconomic models; investment, savings and money; fiscal issues and debt; exchange rates; international macroeconomic transmission; and economic growth.'

3 Ibid., delete ll. 40–4, and substitute:

`Questions will be set on development topics from a series of taught modules. The modules offered may vary from year to year but will normally include such topics as: human development, poverty and inequality; human capital and economics of education; industry and technology; rural development; macroeconomic management; liberalisation and reform; international issues; and poverty, risk and development.'


(f) M.Phil. in Latin American Studies

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 551, l. 36, delete `first' and substitute `fifth'.


(g) M.Phil. in Development Studies

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 509, delete ll. 4–13 and substitute:

`Candidates must pursue a core course in development studies which runs through the two years of the degree. The core course covers the following three aspects: 1) social theory and development theory, ii) analysis of major interdisciplinary issues, and iii) international dimensions of development. Issues which may be included are, under i) the intellectual origins and legacies of development; under ii) the agrarian questions; industrialisation; urbanisation; gender, ethnicity, culture and development and environmental aspects of development; and under iii) finance, trade, aid, information technology, the United Nations and global governance.'


(h) M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 676, after l. 31 insert:

`Two word-processed or printed copies of each of four module assignments must be delivered to the M.Sc. Examiners, c/o Department of Educational Studies, 15 Norham Gardens, Oxford OX2 6PY, no later than 5 p.m. on the Friday of Week 1 of Hilary Full Term, and two word-processed or printed copies of each of four further module assignments must be delivered to the M.Sc. Examiners, c/o Department of Educational Studies, 15 Norham Gardens, Oxford OX2 6PY, no later than 5 p.m. on the Friday of Week 1 of Trinity Full Term. Part-time students must submit assignments for two module assignments on each of these occasions over a period of two years.'

2 Ibid., p. 677, l. 6 after `two' insert `of the eight (or six where the diploma has been completed)'.

3 Ibid., after l.8 insert the following:

`9. If more than two of the eight module assignments are failed, or if either or both of any resubmitted module assignments are failed, the candidate may retake the entire examination for the eight modules one further time on the next occasion they are examined (usually the following year).

10. The candidate may also be examined orally. The oral examination may only be on the candidate's dissertation.

Schedule

Module A        First Language Acquisition and Bilingualism
Module B        Theories, Progression, and Methods
Module C        Individual and Group Differences
Module D        Input and Interaction
Module E        Accessing Meaning
Module F        Producing and Communicating Meaning
Module G        Vocabulary Acquisition
Module H        Error, Analysis, Interlanguage, and Testing

Optional Double Module: Teaching English as a Foreign Language Certificate'.


(i) M.Phil. in Economics

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, delete from p. 518, l. 42 to p. 520, l. 46 inclusive, and substitute:

`All candidates must offer two advanced papers and submit a thesis.* Candidates may offer both papers from Schedule I, or they may apply to offer one paper from those listed in Schedule II, below. Candidates must deliver two copies of the thesis (clearly marked with the candidate's name, college, and the words `MPhil in Economics' and accompanied by a statement signed by the candidate that it is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated) to the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG, by noon on Wednesday in the third week of Trinity Full Term in which the final examination is to be taken. Successful candidates will be required to deposit one copy of their thesis in the Economics Library.

The Examiners may also examine any candidate viva voce.

SCHEDULE I

Advanced Papers for the M.Phil. in Economics

Advanced Papers are normally available in the following subject areas:

1. Public Economics

2. International Economics

3. Economics of Industry

4. Advanced Econometrics

5. Advanced Economic Theory

6. Labour Economics

7. Development Economics

8. Financial Economics

Other Advanced Papers may sometimes be available. Some that have been offered in recent years are:

1. The History of Economic Thought from Hume to J.S. Mill

2. Command and Transitional Economies

3. The Economics of OECD Countries

4. Economic Growth in History

A descriptive list of Advanced Papers for an academic year, together with their rubrics, will be published before the beginning of the year by the Department of Economics. The rubrics attached to each paper will give general guidance on the topics on which questions may be set; but candidates will not be expected to answer questions from all parts of the field. Not all Advanced Papers on the descriptive list may be available in that year.

The definitive list of titles of Advanced Papers for any one year will be circulated to candidates and their supervisors before Friday of the second week of Michaelmas Term of that year.

SCHEDULE II

The following Advanced Papers (if available) from the M.Phil. in Economic and Social History

1. The Economic History of Europe between the Wars

2. Industrial and Business History of Britain since 1870

3. Macroeconomic Behaviour of the British Economy since 1870

Choices under Schedule II have to be approved by the Director of the M.Phil. in Economics not later than Friday of the second week of the second Michaelmas term of the course.'


(j) Research degrees in Development Studies

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 849, l. 5 delete `at the discretion of' and substitute `with the formal approval of the Director of Graduate Studies, the Course Director of the course concerned, and'.

2 Ibid., l. 7 after `Development Studies' insert `or appropriate course from another postgraduate degree at Oxford University'.


(k) M.Sc. in Politics and International Relations Research

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 730, delete ll. 37–8, and renumber subsequent paragraphs 2–7 as 1–6.

2 Ibid., l. 45, after `complete' insert `the Induction Programme and'.

3 Ibid., p. 730 delete l. 48, and p. 731 delete l. 1.

4 Ibid., p. 731, l. 10, delete `Principles of'.

5 Ibid., delete ll. 11–12, and substitute `At least two short courses from the Department's Research Methods programme.'

6 Ibid., p. 731, l. 23 (as amended in Gazette, Vol. 133, No. 4633, p. 73) after `International Relations' insert `(Contemporary Debates in International Relations Theory)'.

7 Ibid., after l. 41 insert:

`7. The examiners may also examine any candidate viva voce; they shall not fail any candidate without entitling him or her to attend such an examination. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'


(l) M.Sc. in Political Theory Research

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 730, after l. 35 insert:

 

`Political Theory Research

1. A candidate for the M.Sc. in Political Theory Research shall follow for three terms a course of instruction in Political Theory Research and will, when entering for the examination, be required to produce a certificate from his or her society to this effect. Notice of the subjects in which the candidate is to be examined must be submitted to the Department of Politics and International Relations as required by the Department's timetable.

2. Candidates must attend, and satisfactorily complete the designated coursework for assessment according to the Department's timetable, the following courses of lectures and classes from the Department's Research Methods Programme:

An approved course from the M.Phil. in Politics (Political Theory) as directed by the Politics Graduate Studies Committee

Ethics

Philosophy of the Social Sciences

either Formal Analysis for Politics Research or Research Methods for Political Theory

Research Design

At least two short courses from the Department's Research Methods Programme.

Candidates who fail an assessed piece of work must successfully resubmit the coursework by the end of the sixth week of Trinity Term.

3. Candidates are required to sit a written examination paper. The examination paper shall consist of the Qualifying Test for the M.Phil. in Politics (Political Theory). Candidates who fail the Qualifying Test Examination may retake the examination at a date stipulated in the Regulations for the relevant M.Phil.

4. Two copies of a Research Design paper of 4,000 to 6,000 words must be submitted. The Research Design paper must be printed on one side of A4 sheets. It must be handed to the Clerk of the Examination Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford by noon on Friday of noughth week of Trinity Term. Papers must be clearly marked on the front page with the candidate's examination number and the words `M.Sc. in Political Theory Research'. Candidates who fail may, at the discretion of the Examiners, be allowed to resubmit by the end of sixth week of Trinity Term.

5. Two copies of a thesis of not more than 10,000 words must be submitted. The thesis must be typed or printed on one side of A4 sheets. It must be handed to the Clerk of the Examination Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford by noon on the Friday of seventh week of Trinity Term. The thesis must be clearly marked with the candidate's examination number and the words `M.Sc. in Political Theory Research'.

6. The examiners may also examine any candidate viva voce; they shall not fail any candidate without inviting him or her to attend such an examination. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'


(m) M.Phil. in Politics (Comparative Government, Political Theory, European Politics and Society)

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 573, ll. 25–6, after `designated course of research training' delete `, and candidates must submit ... research methods training.'

2 Ibid., delete ll. 29–30.

3 Ibid., delete ll. 31–43, and substitute:

`4. Candidates in European Politics and Society will be required to have a working (i.e. good reading) knowledge of two of the following languages of the European Union, viz. English, and one of French, German, Italian, and Spanish. Unless exempted by the Politics Graduate Studies Committee, candidates will be tested in the language or languages they propose to offer by the end of their third term.

Candidates who fail the examination part of the qualifying test may retake it in the seventh week of the same Trinity Term. Candidates whose research design fails to satisfy may resubmit on the Friday of the week falling two weeks before week one of the following Michaelmas Full Term. Arrangements for the resubmission of other coursework are set out in the Notes of Guidance for Graduate Studies in Politics.'

4 Ibid., ll. 47–50, delete `No candidate for the M.Phil. (European Politics and Society ... European Union.'

5 Ibid., p. 574, l. 1 after `bibliography,' insert `two copies'.

6 Ibid., l. 9 delete `e–s' and insert `e–u'.

7 Ibid., l. 11 after `k, l, m, n, o, p' insert `, q'.

8 Ibid., l. 12 delete `t–z, aa' and insert `v–z, aa–ac'.

9 Ibid., l. 14 delete `r–z, aa' and insert `t–z, aa–ac'.

10 Ibid., l. 16 delete `e–ag' and insert `e–ai'.

11 Ibid., p. 575, l. 41 delete `(k–p)' and insert `(k–q)'.

12 Ibid., l. 47 delete `.' and substitute `;'.

13 Ibid., after l. 47 insert `(q) The Politics and Government of China.'

14 Ibid., l. 51 after `Russia' insert `and China'.

15 Ibid., p. 576, l. 1 delete `(q)' and substitute `(r)'.

16 Ibid., after l. 7 insert:

`(s) Executive Government

Candidates will explore generic and comparative themes in executive government and bureaucracy using a range of analytical perspectives. Candidates are expected to be familiar with the politics of bureaucracy in at least one country and to show awareness of the basic literature in the comparative study of bureaucracy.' and renumber subsequent paragraphs (r)–(ag) as (t)–(ai) accordingly.


(n) M.Phil. in International Relations

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 548, l. 37, after `United Nations.' insert:

`Details of the international law documents that will be available to candidates in the examination room will be given in the Notes of Guidance to Graduate Students in International Relations and in the examiners' Advice to Candidates.'


7 Board of the Faculty of Classics

(a) Honour Moderations in Classics

(i) With immediate effect

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 41, l. 17, delete `or (c)'.

2 Ibid., p. 42, l. 1, after `De Rerum Natura' insert `IV'.

3 Ibid., p. 43, l. 32, remove italics.

4 Ibid., p. 45, l. 7, delete `Cicero' and substitute `I. Cicero'.


(ii) With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 43, l. 30, delete `III' and insert `IV'.

2 Ibid., p. 45, l. 3, delete `III' and insert `IV'.


(b) Honour School of Literae Humaniores

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 238, l. 27, delete

`Cicero, Seneca and Augustine' and substitute `Cicero and Seneca'.

2 Ibid., p. 247, delete ll. 33–4, and substitute:

`133 Cicero, De Finibus III; De Officiis I, in translation; Seneca, Epistulae Morales 92, 95, 121, De Constantia, De Vita Beata (Course II only)'.

3 Ibid., p. 248, delete ll. 11–12, and substitute:

`Cicero, De Finibus III; De Officiis I, in translation; Seneca, Epistulae Morales 92, 95, 121, De Constantia, De Vita Beata (Course I only)'.

4 Ibid., l. 13, delete `I.15' and insert `I.14'.

5 Ibid., p. 250, l. 32, delete `IV' and insert `III'.

6 Ibid., p. 255, l. 24, p. 256, l. 27, p. 257, l. 14, and l. 40, delete `I.15' and insert `I.14'.

7 Ibid., p. 259, ll. 20–3, left-hand column, delete `; De Mendacio, Combès (Desclée de Brouwer; offprints available from the Classics Office, 37 Wellington Square)'.


(c) Honour School of Literae Humaniores

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 247, delete ll. 33–4 and substitute:

`Cicero, De Finibus III, De Officiis I in translation; Seneca, Epistulae Morales 92, 95, 121, De Constantia, De Vita Beata.'

2 Ibid., p. 259, l. 31, delete `, *Winterbottom' and substitute `in translation, Griffin and Atkins, Cicero, On Duties, Cambridge)'.


(d) Byzantine literature

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 255, after l. 2 insert:

`(c) Byzantine Literature. Compulsory passages for translation and comment will be set; candidates will be required to take all the passages they offer either from (i) below or from (ii). In their essays, candidates will be expected to show knowledge of both (i) and (ii). Texts will be available in a leaflet from the Classics Office, Classics Centre, 65–67 St Giles'.

(i) [sixth century AD]. Romanos the Melodist, Kontakia 1, 17, and 54, from Sancti Romani Melodi Cantica: Cantica Genuina, ed. C.A. Trypanis and P. Maas (Oxford, 1963); Procopius, Persian Wars 1.24, 2.22–23, Gothic Wars 4.20, Secret History 6–12, from Opera omnia, ed. J. Haury, rev. P. Wirth (Leipzig, 1962–4); Agathias, Book 1, from Historiarum libri quinque, ed. R. Keydell (Berlin, 1967); Agathias, Epigrams 1–24, 66–75, from G. Viansino, Epigrammi (Milan, 1967).

(ii) [twelfth century AD]. Anna Komnene, Alexias, Book 1, ed. D.-R. Reinsch (Berlin, 2001); Niketas Choniates, Historia, Book 4, ed. J.-L. van Dieten (Berlin, 1975); Digenis Akritis, Grottaferrata version Book 4, from Digenis Akritis, ed. E.M. Jeffreys (Cambridge, 1998); Theodore Prodromos, Poems 3, 4, and 6, from Historische Gedichte, ed. W. Hörandner (Vienna, 1974).'

2 Ibid., l. 3, delete `(c)' and substitute `(d)'.

3 Ibid., l. 6, delete `(d)' and substitute `(e)'.


8 Boards of the Faculties of Classics and Medieval and Modern Languages

(a) Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages

With immediate effect

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 148, delete ll. 9–10 and re-letter options (i) to (n) on ll. 11–21 as (h) to (m).


(b) Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 144, l. 23, after

`Modern Greek Poetry' insert `and all candidates may offer the subject Byzantine Literature'.

2 Ibid., p. 147, after l. 27 insert:

`or **(d) Byzantine Literature [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.11(c)]. (This subject is not available to candidates offering Medieval and Modern Greek as their modern language.)'.

3 Ibid., insert footnote: `**Paper (xii) (d) on Byzantine Literature may not be offered before October 2005 by candidates following Course II.'

4 Ibid., p. 148, l. 34, delete `III.11(c)' and substitute `III.11(d)'.

5 Ibid., l. 36, delete `Procopius' and substitute `Byzantine Literature'.


9 Boards of the Faculties of Classics and Oriental Studies

Honour School of Oriental Studies

(i) With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 383, l. 46, delete `V.4(c)' and substitute `III.11(c)'.


(ii) With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 383, before l. 1 insert:

`Or (d) Byzantine Literature [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.11(c)].'

2 Ibid., l. 46, delete `V.4 (c)' and substitute: `III.11(d)'.

3 Ibid., l. 48, delete `Procopius' and substitute `Byzantine Literature'.

4 Ibid., p. 398, after l. 46, insert

`Or (d) Byzantine Literature [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.11(c)].'

5 Ibid., p. 399, l. 30, delete `III.11(c)' and substitute `III.11(d)'.

6 Ibid., l. 31, delete `Procopius' and substitute `Byzantine Literature'.


10 Board of the Faculty of English Language and Literature

(a) Moderations in English Language and Literature

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 62, l. 42, after `Literature' insert:

`The paper will contain a compulsory element involving a prose translation or commentary as specified in the English Undergraduate Handbook, Mods edition.'

2 Ibid., l. 43, after `Literature' insert:

`The paper will contain a compulsory commentary element as specified in the English Undergraduate Handbook, Mods edition.'

3 Ibid., p. 63, l. 1, after `following:' insert:

`options (a), (b), (c), (d), (h), (i), (j), (k), and (l) will each contain a compulsory commentary element as specified in the English Undergraduate Handbook, Mods edition.'

4 Ibid., delete ll. 3, 5, 7, 8, 10, 11, 32, 33, 34, 37, 39, 41, 42, 44, 45.

5 Ibid., l. 36, delete `. A passage for', and substitute:

`and poetry.'


(b) Honour School of English Language and Literature

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 193, delete l. 13, and substitute:

`(f) (i) Tennyson, or (ii) Dickens, or (iii) Wilde.'


(c) Master of Philosophy in English Studies

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 520, l. 47, after `English Studies' insert:

`(medieval period)'.

2 Ibid., delete from l. 1 on p. 521 to l. 8 on p. 530, and substitute:

`Every candidate must follow for at least six terms a course of study in English. In the first year candidates must follow the courses and submit the essays and dissertations prescribed for the M.St. in English. Candidates must have achieved a pass mark in the first-year assessments before they are allowed to proceed to the second year. In the second year candidates must offer three of the following subjects, or two subjects and a dissertation of 20,000 words on a topic related to their course of study. The dissertation may incorporate work submitted for the first-year dissertation.

Syllabus

1. The Palaeography of Manuscripts written in England from 1100–1500. (Candidates will be required to transcribe from and comment on specimens written in English under examination conditions (1 hour).)

2. Special author: Cynewulf, Alfred, Aelfric, Wulfstan, Gower, Langland, Chaucer, Dante, or Malory.

3. Old English metre and poetic diction.

4. Early Middle English Literature. Candidates are expected to have read widely in English literature of the period c.1100–c.1350.

5. Devotional literature of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries.

6. The medieval drama.

7 Old Norse Literature, I. The following texts are prescribed: Njáls saga, Egils saga, Óláfs saga helga (Heimskringla), Kormaks saga, Skáldskaparmál, Haustlöng.

8. Old Norse Literature, II. The following texts are prescribed: Grettis saga, Laxdoela saga, Eyrbyggja saga, Völsunga saga, Hrólfs saga kraka, Gautreks saga, Sólarljó[eth]; Íslendinga saga (Sturla).

9. Eddaic and Skaldic Verse. The following texts are prescribed: Gu[eth]rónarkvi[eth]a I–III, Grottasöngr, Vafpró[eth]nismál, Baldrs draumar; Ragnarsdrápa (Bragi), Haraldskvoe[eth]i

(porbjörn hornklofi), Hákonarmál (Eyvindr), Vellekla (Einarr skálaglamm), the verses in Eyrbyggja saga.

10. The Latin Literature of the British Isles: from the Origins to the Norman Conquest. The following texts are prescribed: Gildas, de Excidio pref., chaps. 1–10, ed. M. Winterbottom, Arthurian Period Sources 7 (London/ Chichester, 1978); 45 Aldhelm, de Virginitate, prose, chaps. 1–5; verse, ll. 1–105, 2861–904, ed. R. Ehwald, MGH, Auctores Antiquissimi, xv (Berlin, 1919); Bede, Vita S. Cuthberti, prose, pref., chaps. 1–5, ed. B. Colgrave, Two `Lives' of Saint Cuthbert (repr. New York, 1969), metrical Life pref., chaps. 1–5, ed. W. Jaager, Palaestra, 198; Alcuin, Two Alcuin Letter-Books, I, nos. 1–14, ed. C. Chase, Toronto Medieval Latin Texts (Toronto, 1975); Oxford Book of Medieval Latin Verse, no. 80, rev. edn. F.J.E. Raby (Oxford, 1970); Versus de ... Sanctis Euboricensis Ecclesiae, ll. 1–130, 1596–1657, ed. E. Dümmler, MGH, Poetae, I (Berlin, 1881); Asser, Vita Alfredi, chaps. 1–15, ed. Stevenson, rev. D. Whitelock (Oxford, 1959); Aethelweard, Chronicle, Book IV, ed. A. Campbell (London, 1962); Aelfric, Life of St Aethelwold, ed. M. Winterbottom, Three Lives of English Saints, Toronto Medieval Latin Texts (Toronto, 1972); Columbanus, Epistle, I, ed. G. Walker, Scriptores Latini Hiberniae II (Dublin, 1970); Hisperica Famina vv. 571–612, ed. M. Herren (Toronto, 1975).

11. Medieval Latin Language and Literature. The following texts are prescribed: Abelard: Historia Calamitatum, ed. J. Monfrin (Paris, 1967); Peter the Venerable: Selected Letters, nos. 9, 24, 43, 53, 115, ed. J. Martin, Toronto Medieval Latin Texts (Toronto, 1974); Notker, Liber Hymnorum, ed. W. v. den Steinen (Bern/Munich, 1960), proemium, pp. 10–18, 84, 88; Ruodlieb, vv. 1–252 (ed. Reclam); The Archpoet, Poems (ed. Reclam); Walter of Chëtillon, Moralische-satirische Gedichte, nos. 2, 6, 17, 18, ed. Strecker (Heidelberg, 1929); Oxford Book of Medieval Latin Verse (rev. edn.), ed. F.J.E. Raby (Oxford, 1970), nos. 75–80, 83, 92, 103, 119–29, 157–9, 169–73, 175–6, 207–32, 239; Geoffrey of Monmouth: Historia Regum Britanniae, Book IX, ed. I. Hammer, Medieval Academy of America (Cambridge, Mass., 1951).

12. Medieval Welsh literature. Candidates may offer one of the following:

(a) Medieval Welsh tales and romances with special reference to Pedeir Keinc y Mabinogi (ed. I. Williams, 1951), Culhwch ac Olwen (ed. R. Bromwich and D.S. Evans, 1988), Owein (ed. R. L. Thomson, 1975), Peredur vab Efrawc (ed. G.W. Goetinck, 1976), Gereint vab Erbin in Llyfr Gwyn Rhydderch (ed. J.G. Evans and R.M. Jones, 1973, pp. 193–226), Cyfranc Lludd a Llevelys (ed. I. Williams, 1922), Breuddwyd Maxen (ed. I. Williams, 1920), Breudwyt Ronabwy (ed. M. Richards, 1948).

(b) Medieval Welsh religious literature with special reference to Blodeugerdd Barddas o Ganu Crefyddol Cynnar (ed. M. Haycock, 1994), The Medieval Welsh Religious Lyric (ed. C.A. McKenna, 1991), and Llyvyr Agkyr Llandewivrevi (ed. J. Morris Jones and J. Rhys).

(c) Gwaiath Dafydd ap Gwilym (ed. T. Parry) and Gwaith Iolo Goch (ed. D. Johnston, 1988).

13. Anglo-Norman Literature. The following texts are prescribed: Benedeit, Voyage of St Brendan; Gaimar, Estorie des Engleis; La Seinte Resureccion (ANTS); Les Fragments du Tristan de Thomas (ed. B.H. Wind); M. Paris, Life of St Edward the Confessor (ANTS); The Romance of Horn (ANTS).

14. Old French Literature: either Chrétien de Troyes or Le Roman de la Rose.

15. Medieval Philosophy. Candidates must offer topic (i) below and any one other topic. Candidates are recommended to study the texts indicated.

(i) Aristotelian philosophy in the thirteenth century: Aquinas, De Unitate Intellectus, and Summa Theologica, I. i–ii. Recommended reading: F. van Steenberghen, Aristotle in the West (The Origins of Latin Aristotelianism), trans. L. Johnston (Louvain, 1955).

(ii) Dialectic and theology from 1070 to 1150: Anselm, Proslogion; Abelard, Historia Calamitatum, Sic et Non (Prologue).

(iii) English philosophy in the first half of the fourteenth century: Duns Scotus, De Primo Principio; Ockham, Philosophical Writings, ed. and trans. P. Boehner (1957), section II (pp. 18–45).

(iv) Philosophy outside the Schools: Boethius, Consolatio Philosophiae (Books I, IV, V), its tradition, translation, imitations, commentaries.

16. The Archaeology of Anglo-Saxon England. (This paper will be identical with the paper of the same title of the M.St. in European Archaeology and will be examined by written paper as specified in paragraph 4(a) of the regulations for the M.St. in European Archaeology.)

17. The History of the English Church, either to the death of Bede, or from the death of Alfred to the Norman Conquest.

18. The Reigns of Ethelred the Unready and Canute.

19. The Norsemen in England. The study of contemporary texts in the original languages will be expected. Attention is particularly directed to The Old English Chronicle 800–955 (MS A), 979–1042 (MS C), The Battle of Maldon, Encomium Emmae, Historia de Sancto Cuthberto, Höfu[eth]lausn (Egill), Víkingarvísur (Sigvatr), Knótsdrápa (Sigvatr), Höfu[eth]lausn (Ottarr svarti), Knótsdrápa (Ottarr svarti).

Examination

The method of examination will be by library paper. Candidates must offer three papers (or two if they are submitting a dissertation) and answer two questions per paper. One list of questions for each option they have selected will be delivered to candidates' colleges on the Thursday of the Fourth Week of Trinity Term. Candidates must submit a completed library paper for each option to the Schools by noon on Thursday of the seventh week of Trinity Term, except that candidates who are taking a third option may submit one paper by noon on Thursday of eighth week. For subjects 2–6 and 9–10 and 16 there will also be a one-hour translation test in eighth week. Candidates offering a dissertation must seek approval of the topic from the board or by a person or persons to whom it may delegate the function of giving such approval. (A dissertation involving the edition of a text may, if the candidate so wishes, exceed 20,000 words by not more than the length of the text.) Candidates submitting a dissertation must deliver two copies to the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford, by noon on Thursday of the first week of the Trinity Full Term in which the examination is to be taken.

Each candidate's choice of subjects shall require the approval of a person or persons to whom the board may delegate the function of giving such approval. Approval must be applied for on or before Saturday of the second week of Michaelmas Term preceding the examination. Candidates who have offered Medieval Latin Language and Literature or The Latin Literature of the British Isles before the Norman Conquest in List B of Course II of the Honour School of English Language and Literature or candidates who have offered Medieval Latin Language and Literature in the Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages will not be permitted to offer the corresponding subject or subjects (10 and 11) in the M.Phil. in English Studies.

Any candidate may be examined viva voce about the extended essays, library papers, and dissertation. Candidates are warned that they must avoid duplicating in their answers to one part of the examination material that they have used in another part of the examination.

No candidate who has failed any of the above subjects will be awarded the degree in that examination. Candidates who fail any one of the three papers (or any one of the two papers and the dissertation) may re-submit that element by noon on the last Monday of the Long Vacation; candidates who fail more than one element of the examination (including one element plus the translation paper where applicable) must resubmit those elements (and, where applicable, take the translation paper) according to the timetable for the examination in the following year. A candidate may only resubmit or retake a paper on one occasion.'


(d) Master of Studies in English

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 614, after l. 10 insert:

`English

Every candidate must follow for at least three terms a course of study in English.

Syllabus

The following subjects are prescribed: A. Literature, Contexts and Approaches

B. Bibliography, Palaeography and Theories of Text

C. Special Options

The Faculty Board shall prescribe from year to year the particular courses which will be offered for each of these subjects. Courses under A will be taught over Michaelmas and Hilary Terms. Courses on bibliography and palaeography will be taught mainly in Michaelmas Term and courses on Theories of Text in Hilary Term. There will be two lists of Special Options, one for Michaelmas Term and one for Hilary Term.

Candidates must take A and four other subjects: two in Michaelmas Term (of which one at least must be a Special Option) and two in Hilary Term (of which one at least must be a Special Option). They must also offer a dissertation. Courses under A will be divided according to chronological period and candidates must take the course appropriate to their period of specialisation.

Candidates will be required to attend the lectures and classes prescribed by the Faculty Board for the courses they have chosen, and undertake such written work, exercises, or presentations for those courses as the course tutors shall prescribe.

Essays

In Michaelmas Term candidates will be required to submit an essay of 5,000–7,000 words on a topic related to one of the special options taken under C in that term; the essay must be delivered to the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, not later than noon on Thursday of the tenth week of Michaelmas Term. In Hilary Term candidates will be required to submit two essays of 5,000–7,000 words each, of which one must be on a topic related to one of the special options taken under C in that term and the other on a topic related either to an option taken under B (in either term) or to a second special option taken under C in that term. The two essays must be delivered to the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, not later than noon on Thursday of the tenth week of Hilary Term. Candidates must gain approval of the topic of their essays by writing to the Chairman of the M.St. Examiners, care of the English Faculty Office, by Friday of the sixth week of Michaelmas Term (for the first essay) and of Hilary Term (for the second and third essays).

Not later than noon on Monday on the sixth week of Trinity Term, candidates must deliver to the Clerk of the Schools two copies of a dissertation (about 10,000 words) on a subject related to their course of study. The dissertation must be presented in proper scholarly form. Candidates must gain approval of the topic of their dissertation by writing to the Chairman of the M.St. Examiners, care of the English Faculty Office, by Friday of the sixth week of Hilary Term, providing a provisional essay title and an outline of the topic of not more than 200 words. Candidates who fail any part of the examination may resubmit that part by noon on the last Monday of the following Long Vacation.

The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'

2 Ibid., delete from l. 35 on p. 645 to l. 33 on p. 646.


(e) D.Phil. in English

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, delete p. 814, l. 12 to p. 817, l. 2 (inclusive), and substitute:

`Candidates for admission to D.Phil. and M.Litt. status must have been interviewed by one of the persons appointed by the board for this purpose, unless the board determines otherwise.

1. Transfer to M.Litt. and D.Phil. status

Research students are normally registered in the first instance for the Degree of Master of Studies in English, and follow the requirements laid down for that degree. Transfer to M.Litt. or D.Phil. status normally takes place at the end of the first year and, in addition to meeting the requirements set out below, is dependent on successful completion of the M.St. course.

The board may however permit candidates who have already obtained an equivalent qualification to register as Probationer Research Students for the first year, following such courses as the Board may require. Candidates wishing to transfer to D.Phil status after completing the M.St. in English will be expected to have taken courses in bibliography, palaeography, and theories of text as appropriate to their period of specialisation. Those who have not may, in certain circumstances, be allowed to transfer provisionally, on condition of taking those courses in the subsequent year.

2. Admission to M.Litt. status

Candidates must give notice of intention to apply for transfer in writing to the Graduate Studies Office by the Friday of the third week of the Trinity Term before they seek entry to M.Litt. status, giving the title of the proposed thesis. By Monday of the seventh week they should submit an application form together with two copies of a detailed outline (not more than 1,000 words) of the proposed subject and of the manner in which it will be treated, including a provisional list of chapters and their proposed coverage; students not taking the M.St. should also submit a piece of written work on the topic of their proposed thesis (of about 10,000 words). The material shall be sent to two assessors who will be asked to report to the Graduate Studies Committee for its meeting in July.

3. Admission to D.Phil. status

Candidates must give notice of intention to apply for transfer in writing to the Graduate Studies Office by the Friday of the third week of the Trinity Term before they seek entry to D.Phil. status, giving the title of the proposed thesis. By Monday of the seventh week they should submit an application form together with two copies of a detailed outline (not more than 1,000 words) of the proposed subject and of the manner in which it will be treated, including a provisional list of chapters and their proposed coverage; students not taking the M.St. should also submit a piece of written work on the topic of their proposed thesis (of about 10,000 words). The material shall be sent to two assessors who will be asked to report to the Graduate Studies Committee for its meeting in July.

Any candidate whose application for transfer to M.Litt. or D.Phil. status is refused may reapply on one (only) further occasion.

4. Admission to D.Phil. status after successful completion of the M.Phil.

Candidates must give notice of intention to apply for transfer in writing to the Graduate Studies Office by the Friday of the third week of the Trinity Term before they seek entry to D.Phil. status, giving the title of the proposed thesis. By Monday of the seventh week they should submit an application form together with two copies of a detailed outline (not more than 1,000 words) of the proposed subject and of the manner in which it will be treated, including a provisional list of chapters and their proposed coverage. Applicants who have not submitted a dissertation as part of the final-year work for the M.Phil. should also provide a piece of research of not less than 10,000 words. The material shall be sent to two assessors who will be asked to report to the Graduate Studies Committee for its meeting in July. The Graduate Studies Committee may direct the candidate to attend specified classes organised for M.St. Students and to complete the test(s) associated with those classes.'


11 Board of the Faculty of Law

M.Sc. in Criminology and Criminal Justice

With effect from 1 September 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 686, l. 33 delete `for two hours a week for' and substitute `throughout'.

2 Ibid., p. 688, l. 14 delete `four' and substitute `six'.

3 Ibid., l. 16 delete `five' and substitute `three'.


12 Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages

Honour School of Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 325, l. 21, after `Unprepared translation into the language' insert `(except that candidates for French are required to offer an essay in French)'.

2 Ibid., l. 22, after `((i) Modern, and (ii) [dagger symbol]Earlier)' insert

`(except that candidates for IIA(i) in French are required to offer Literary translation into French)'.

3 Ibid., l. 23, after `((i) Modern, and (ii) áEarlier)' insert

`(except that candidates for IIB(i) in French are required to offer Literary translation from French)'.

4 Ibid., l. 24, after `literary and other subjects' insert

`(except that candidates for French are required to offer Non-literary translation from and into French)'.

5 Ibid., l. 27, delete `or Period Topics (French only)' and substitute `(except that candidates for French are required to offer Period Topics)'.

6 Ibid., l. 28, delete `or Period Topics (French only)' and substitute `(except that candidates for French are required to offer Period Topics)'.

7 Ibid., l. 29, delete `or Period Topics (French only)' and substitute `(except that candidates for French are required to offer Period Topics)'.


13 Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages

Honour School of Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006), but with effect from 1 October 2003 for first examination in 2005 for candidates on Course I

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 326, delete ll. 40–1 and renumber existing clauses (iii) and (iv) as (ii) and (iii).

2 Ibid., after l. 49 insert:

`(iv) a candidate offering two languages is required to offer either one of papers IV or V in one language, or at least one Pre-modern paper in one language, as designated below:

French: VI, VII, IX, X

German: VI, VII, IX, XI

Italian: VI,VII, IX, X

Spanish: VI, IX

Portuguese: VI, VII, IX, X

Russian: VI, VII, IX

Medieval and Modern Greek: VI, VII, IX, X;

And designated Paper XIIs in each language.

Details of Paper XII subjects which have been designated as Pre-modern will be provided in the list of Special Subjects published in the University Gazette by the beginning of the fifth week of the Trinity Term two years before the examination.'


14 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and English Language and Literature

Honour School of English and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, delete from l. 36 on p. 184 to l. 7 on p. 185 and substitute:

`1. Honour School of Modern Languages, Paper I.

2. Honour School of Modern Languages, Papers IIA(i) and IIB(i).

3. Honour School of Modern Languages, one paper chosen from Papers VI, VII, or VIII.

4. Honour School of Modern Languages, one paper chosen from Papers IV, V, IX, X,XI, or XII.'


15 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Classics

Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 145, delete ll. 12–28 and substitute:

`1. Honour School of Modern Languages, Paper I.

2. Honour School of Modern Languages, Papers IIA(i) and IIB(i).

3. Honour School of Modern Languages, one paper chosen from Papers VI, VII, or VIII.

4. Honour School of Modern Languages, one paper chosen from Papers IV, V, IX, X, XI, or XII.'


16 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Modern History

Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 316, delete ll. 7–14 and substitute:

`3. Honour School of Modern Languages, Paper I.*

4. Honour School of Modern Languages, Papers IIA(i) and IIB(i).

5. Honour School of Modern Languages, one paper chosen from Papers VI, VII, or VIII.

6. Honour School of Modern Languages, one paper chosen from Papers IV, V, IX, X, XI, or XII.'


17 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Oriental Studies

Honour School of European and Middle Eastern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 202, delete ll. 34–43 and substitute:

`1. Honour School of Modern Languages, Paper I.

2. Honour School of Modern Languages, Papers IIA(i) and IIB(i).

3. Honour School of Modern Languages, Paper III.

4. Honour School of Modern Languages, one paper chosen from Papers VI, VII, or VIII.'

[Until 1 October 2004: 5, 6. Honour School of Modern Languages, two papers chosen from IV, V, IX, X, XI, or XII.] [From 1 October 2004: 5. Honour School of Modern Languages, one paper chosen from IV, V, IX, X, XI, or XII.]'.


18 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Oriental Studies

Preliminary Examination in European and Middle Eastern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 82, l. 7, after `Modern Languages' insert `(Candidates in French must offer Paper IV)'.


19 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Philosophy

Honour School of Philosophy and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 417, delete ll. 30–8 and substitute:

1. Three papers as follows:

(a) Honour School of Modern Languages Paper I.

(b) Honour School of Modern Languages, Papers IIA(i) and IIB(i).

2. Honour School of Modern Languages, one paper chosen from VI, VII, or VIII.'

2 Ibid., delete ll. 40–8 and substitute:

`3. Honour School of Modern Languages Paper IV.

4. Honour School of Modern Languages Paper V.

5. Honour School of Modern Languages Paper IX.

6. Honour School of Modern Languages Paper X.

7. Honour School of Modern Languages Paper XI.

8. Honour School of Modern Languages Paper XII.'


20 Board of the Faculty of Modern History

(a) Honour School of Modern History

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 300, l. 5, delete `IV and VI' and substitute `V and VI'.

2 Ibid., l. 7, delete `(V below)' and substitute `IV, below'.

3 Ibid., l. 10, delete `1409' and substitute `1550'.

4 Ibid., delete `Periods (i) or (II)' and substitute `Periods (i), (II), or (III)'.

5 Ibid., ll. 22–4, delete from `Candidates who offer' to `material in those two papers.'

6 Ibid., delete ll. 25–31 and substitute:

`II. General History: any one of the listed periods:

(i) 285–476; (ii) 476–750; (iii) 700–900; (iv) 900–1122; (v) 1122–1273; (vi) 1273–1409; (vii) 1409–1525; (viii) 1517–1618; (ix) 1618–1715; (x) 1715–1799; (xi) 1799–1856; (xii) 1856– 1914; (xiii) 1914–1945; (xiv) 1941–1973; (xv) The History of the United States 1600–1830; (xvi) The History of the United States since 1815; (xvii) Europe and the Wider World 1815–1914.'

7 Ibid., delete ll. 32–4.

8 Ibid., delete ll. 35–8 and substitute:

`The four periods of British and General History offered by a candidate in the First Public Examination and the Honour School must include at least one from the following groups:'.

9 Ibid., l. 40, l. 44, and ll. 48–9, delete `Honour Moderations' and substitute `the First Public Examination'.

10 Ibid., p. 301, ll. 4–5, delete `at least'.

11 Ibid., ll. 8–9, delete `rather than Honour Moderations'.

12 Ibid., l. 10, delete `1409' and substitute `1550'.

13 Ibid., delete `Periods (i) or (II)' and substitute `Periods (i), (II), or (III)'.

14 Ibid., delete ll. 12–14.

15 Ibid., l. 15, renumber `IV.' as `III.'.

16 Ibid., l. 44, renumber `V.' as `IV.'

17 Ibid., l. 46, delete `(b) a second paper.' and substitute `(b) an extended essay.'

18 Ibid., p. 302, delete ll. 19–21 and substitute:

`Candidates will be examined by means of a timed paper including compulsory passages for comment, and by means of an extended essay, which shall not exceed 6,000 words (including footnotes but excluding bibliography), and shall be on a topic or theme selected by the candidate from a question paper published by the examiners on the Friday of the fourth week of Michaelmas Term in the year of examination.

Essays should be typed or word-processed in double spacing and should conform to the standards of academic presentation prescribed in the course handbook.

Essays (two copies) shall normally be written during the Michaelmas Term in the year of examination and must be delivered by hand to the Examination Schools (addressed to the Chairman of Examiners, Honour School of Modern History, Examination Schools, Oxford) not later than 12 noon on the Friday before the beginning of Hilary Full Term of the year of examination.

Candidates delivering essays will be required to complete a receipt form, which will only be accepted as proof of receipt if it is countersigned by a member of the Examination Schools staff. Each essay must be accompanied by a sealed envelope (bearing only the candidate's examination number) containing a formal declaration signed by the candidate that the essay is his or her own work. The University's regulations on Late Entries will apply. Any candidate may be examined viva voce.'

19 Ibid., l. 25, delete `Modern Faculty' and substitute `Modern History Faculty, on the Modern History Faculty website,'.

20 Ibid., delete ll. 27–48 and substitute:

`V. Disciplines of History

Candidates will be expected to answer three examination questions selected from a paper divided into three sections. No more than two questions may be answered from one section. The sections are:

1. Comparative History (Candidates will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of at least two societies or historical periods);

2. Sources of History;

3. Varieties of History.'

21 Ibid., delete from p. 302, l. 49, to p. 304, l. 14, and substitute:

`VI. A thesis from original research

1. Candidates must submit a thesis as part of the fulfilment of their Final Examination.

2. Theses shall normally be written during the Hilary Term of the Final Year. All theses must be submitted not later than noon on Friday of Eighth Week of the Hilary Term of the Final Year.

3. A candidate may submit

(a) any essay or part of any essay which the candidate has submitted or intends to submit for any university essay prize; or

(b) any other work

provided in either case that (i) no thesis will be accepted if it has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for a final honour school other than one involving Modern History, or another degree of this University, or a degree of any other university, and (ii) the candidate submits a statement to that effect, and (iii) the subject is approved by the Chairman of the Examiners for the Honour School of Modern History.

4. The provisos in cl. 3 above shall not debar any candidate from submitting work based on a previous submission towards the requirements for a degree of any other university provided that

(i) the work is substantially new;

(ii) the candidate also submits both the original work itself and a statement specifying the extent of what is new. The examiners shall have sole authority to decide in every case whether proviso (i) to this clause has been met.

5. Every candidate except when offering a thesis as defined in cl. 3(a) must submit the title proposed together with the written approval of their College History Tutor to the Chairman of the Examiners for the Honour School of Modern History, the History Faculty, Broad Street, Oxford, not earlier than the beginning of Trinity Full Term in the year preceding that in which the candidate takes the examination and not later than the Friday of Eighth Week of Michaelmas Term in the Final Year. If no notification is received from the Chairman of Examiners by the first Monday of Hilary Full Term of the Final Year, the title shall be deemed to be approved. Any subsequent changes to title require formal application to and approval by the Chairman of Examiners.

6. Theses should normally include an investigation of relevant printed or unprinted primary historical sources, and must include proper footnotes and a bibliography. They must be the work of the author alone. In all cases, the candidate's tutor or thesis adviser shall discuss with the candidate the field of study, the sources available, and the methods of presentation. Candidates shall be expected to have had a formal meeting with their College History Tutor, and, if necessary, an additional meeting with a specialised thesis adviser in the Trinity Term of their Second Year, as well as a second formal meeting with their thesis adviser in the Michaelmas Term of their Final Year prior to submitting the title of their thesis. In addition candidates are permitted to have no more than three one-hour advisory sessions at which bibliographical, structural, and other problems can be discussed. A first draft of the thesis may be commented on by the thesis adviser.

7. No thesis shall exceed 12,000 words in length (including footnotes, but excluding bibliography and, in cases for which specific permission has been obtained from the Chairman of Examiners, appendices). All theses must be typed or word-processed in double spacing on one side of A4 paper with the notes and references at the foot of each page, with a left-hand margin of one-and-a-half inches and all other margins of at least one inch. The thesis should conform to the standards of academic presentation prescribed in the course handbook. Failure to conform to such standards may incur penalties as outlined in the course handbook.

8. All candidates must submit two copies of their thesis, addressed to the Chairman of Examiners, Honour School of Modern History, Examination Schools, Oxford, not later than noon on Friday of Eighth Week of the Hilary Term of the year in which they are presenting themselves for examination. The University's regulations on Late Entries will apply. Every candidate shall present a certificate, signed by him or herself and by his or her College History Tutor, in a separate envelope bearing the candidate's examination number, addressed to the Chairman of Examiners. The certificate (forms are available from the Modern History Faculty Office) should declare that (a) the thesis is the candidate's own work, (b) that no substantial portion of it has been presented for any other degree course or examination, (c) that it does not exceed 12,000 words in length, (d) that no more than five advisory meetings have taken place between the candidate and his or her College History Tutor or thesis adviser, and (e) that only the first draft of the thesis has been seen by the thesis adviser. Candidates delivering theses will be required to complete a receipt form, which will only be accepted as proof of receipt if it is countersigned by a member of the Exmination Schools staff.

9. Candidates shall not answer in any other paper, with the exception of Disciplines of History (V), questions which fall very largely within the scope of their thesis. Candidates should not choose a thesis that substantially reworks material studied in the Further or Special Subjects, and should demonstrate familiarity with and use of substantially different and additional primary sources.

VII. An Optional additional thesis

1. Any candidate may offer an optional additional thesis.

2. Regulation VI 3. above applies.

3. Regulation VI 4. above applies.

4. Every candidate intending to offer an optional thesis except as defined in VI 3 (a) above must submit the title proposed together with the written approval of a thesis adviser or College History Tutor to the Chairman of the Examiners for the Honour School of Modern History, the History Faculty, Broad Street, Oxford, not earlier than the beginning of Trinity Full Term in the year preceding that in which the candidate takes the examination and not later than Friday of the first week of the following Hilary Full Term. The Chairman shall decide whether or not to approve the title, consulting the faculty board if so desired, and shall advise the candidate as soon as possible.

5. Optional additional theses should normally include an investigation of relevant printed or unprinted primary historical sources, and must include proper footnotes and a bibliography. They must be the work of the author alone. In all cases, the candidate's College History Tutor or thesis adviser shall discuss with the candidate the field of study, the sources available, and the methods of presentation (which should conform to the standards of academic presentation described in the course handbook). The College History Tutor or thesis adviser may comment on the first draft.

6. No optional additional thesis shall exceed 12,000 words in length (including footnotes but excluding bibliographies). All theses must be typed or word-processed in double spacing on one side of A4 paper with the notes and references at the foot of each page, with a left-hand margin of one-and-a-half inches and all other margins of at least one inch.

7. Candidates must submit two copies of their theses, addressed to the Chairman of Examiners, Honour School of Modern History, Examination Schools, Oxford, not later than noon on Monday of the first week of Trinity Full Term in which they are presenting themselves for examination. Every candidate shall present a certificate signed by him or herself and by a College History Tutor or thesis adviser, in a separate envelope bearing the candidate's examination number, addressed to the Chairman of Examiners. The certificate (forms are available from the Faculty Office) should declare that (a) the thesis is the candidate's own work, (b) that no substantial portion of it has been presented for any other degree course or examination,

(c) that it does not exceed 12,000 words in length.

8. Candidates shall not answer in any other paper, with the exception of Disciplines of History (V), questions which fall very largely within the scope of their optional additional thesis.'


(b) Pass School of Modern History

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 304, l. 31, after `Honour School of Modern History' insert `, according to Regulation VII An Optional Additional Thesis.'


(c) Honour Moderations in Modern History

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 56, delete ll. 6–12.

2 Ibid., l. 25 and p. 57, ll. 1, 3, and 7, delete `Honour Moderations' and insert `the Preliminary Examination'.

3 Ibid., p. 57, after l. 7 insert:

`Candidates who fail one or more of papers 1, 2, 3, or 4 above may resit that subject or subjects at a subsequent examination.'

4 Ibid., p. 88, delete ll. 22–31.

5 Ibid., reposition special regulations from l. 13 on p. 56 to l. 7 on p. 57 (as amended) after l. 21 on p. 88.


(d) Honour School of Ancient and Modern History

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 117, delete ll. 21–32 and substitute:

`I. A period of Ancient History (one paper). One of the following:

(a) Greek History 478–323 BC;

(b) Greek History 404–200 BC;

(c) Roman History 80 BC–AD 138;

(d) Roman History AD 14–284;

II. A period of Modern History (one paper).

Either:

(a) Any one of the periods of General History specified for the Honour School of Modern History;

or:

(b) Any one of the periods of the History of the British Isles specified for the Honour School of Modern History except any such period that has already been offered on passing the First Public Examination.'

2 Ibid,. reposition special regulations at p. 117, l. 33– p. 118, l. 5 on p. 120 after l. 47.

3 Ibid., p. 118, l. 6, delete `4.' and substitute `III.'

4 Ibid., ll. 8–9, delete `or (ii) a thesis on a subject within the scope of the school (one paper)'.

5 Ibid., l. 11, delete `5' and substitute `IV'.

6 Ibid., l. 12, delete `4' and substitute `III'.

7 Ibid., delete ll. 14–43.

8 Ibid., delete from l. 45 on p. 118 to l. 43 on p. 119.

9 Ibid., p. 119, delete ll. 46 and 47 and substitute:

`(iv) Art under the Roman Empire, ad 14–337, as specified for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores.'

10 Ibid., l. 48, delete `5.' and substitute `IV.'

11 Ibid., l. 50, delete `(two papers)' and substitute `(one paper and one extended essay)'.

12 Ibid., p. 120, l. 1, delete `4' and substitute `III'.

13 Ibid., l. 2, delete `5' and substitute `IV'.

14 Ibid., delete from `The following texts are prescribed' on l. 3 to `(Loeb, Brunt).' on l. 16.

15 Ibid., delete ll. 18–47.

16 Ibid., after l. 17 insert:

`The individual specifications for the Further and Special Subjects in Ancient History will be given in the Handbook for the Joint Honour School of Ancient and Modern History and on the Modern History Faculty Website. This will be published by the Modern History Board by Monday of Week 1 of the first Michaelmas Full Term of candidates' work for the Honour School.'

17 Ibid., delete ll. 48–50 and substitute:

`V. DISCIPLINES OF HISTORY

Each candidate shall be examined in the Disciplines of History in accordance with regulation V of the Honour School of Modern History.'

18 Ibid., delete from l. 51 on p. 120 to l. 19 on p. 121 and substitute:

`VI. A THESIS FROM ORIGINAL RESEARCH

Regulation VI of the Honour School of Modern History applies with the following modifications:

Cl. 3.(a) (For the avoidance of doubt) the Arnold Ancient History Prize and the Barclay Head Prize in Numismatics are to be read with the schedule.

Cl. 5. For `Honour School of Modern History' read `Honour School of Ancient and Modern History'. For theses concerning the years before ad 285 read `Chairman of the Board of the Faculty of Classics' for `Chairman of the Examiners, Honour School of Modern History'.

Cl. 8. For `Chairman of Examiners, Honour School of Modern History' read `Chairman of Examiners, Honour School of Ancient and Modern History'.

VII. AN OPTIONAL ADDITIONAL THESIS

Regulation VII An Optional Additional Thesis of the Honour School of Modern History shall apply with the following modifications:

Cl. 4. For dissertations concerning the years before ad 285 read `Chairman of the Board of the Faculty of Classics' for `Chairman of the Examiners, Honour School of Modern History'.

Cl. 7. For `Chairman of Examiners, Honour School of Modern History' read `Chairman of Examiners, Honour School of Ancient and Modern History'.


(e) Pass School of Ancient and Modern History

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 121, l.35, after `shall be those prescribed', insert `under Regulation VII An Optional Additional Thesis'.


21 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and English Language and Literature

(a) Honour Moderations in Modern History and English

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 58, delete ll. 44–6.

2 Ibid., l. 47 and p. 59, ll. 6, 14–15, 17, 19, 21, 23, 25, and 27 delete `Honour Moderations' and insert `the Preliminary Examination'.

3 Ibid., p. 59, ll. 3–4, delete `Moderators for Honour Moderations in Modern History and' and substitute

`Examiners for the Preliminary Examination in Modern History and of the Moderators'.

4 Ibid., after l. 45 insert:

`Candidates who fail one or more of papers 1, 2, 3, or 4 above may resit that subject or subjects at a subsequent examination.'

5 Ibid., p. 89, delete ll. 8–21.

6 Ibid., reposition special regulations from l. 47 on p. 58 to l. 45 on p. 59 (as amended) after l. 7 on p. 89.


(b) Honour School of Modern History and English

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 309, l. 27, after `compulsory additional papers,' insert `one of which is to be examined by extended essay,'.

2 Ibid., p. 309, insert after l. 32:

`(d) Postcolonial historiography: Writing the (Indian) Nation.'

3 Ibid., l. 34, after `Modern History Faculty Office.', insert `Candidates may choose to submit an extended essay in lieu of a timed paper for both interdisciplinary papers provided that no more than two out of the total of seven Final Honour School papers are extended essays. Candidates should note that some English and Modern History papers are examined only by extended essay and should bear this restriction in mind when making their choices.'

4 Ibid., l. 35, delete `Honour Moderations' and insert `the First Public Examination'.

5 Ibid., p. 310, delete ll. 1–4 and substitute:

`either (a) Special Subject (which comprises a three hour paper and an extended essay),

or (b) Two of the following:

1. a Further Subject,

2. a General History Period,

3. an additional British History period not taken in the First Public Examination.'

6 Ibid., l. 25, after `one of the two interdisciplinary papers.' insert `Candidates offering a Modern History Special Subject must do an extended essay for the Special Subject second paper, and therefore can only do one other extended essay for the Final Honour School examination.'

7 Ibid., l. 26, after `6,000 words including' insert `footnotes and'.

8 Ibid., l. 27, after `bibliography' insert `and should conform to the standards of academic presentation prescribed in the course handbook'.

9 Ibid., delete from l. 37 to `In addition, an optional thesis' on l. 40 and substitute `An optional additional thesis'.

10 Ibid., delete from `The optional thesis' on l. 42 to `on an interdisciplinary theme.' on l. 45 and substitute:

`The optional additional thesis shall be as under the regulations of the Modern History syllabus except that it shall not be less than 8,000 words and shall not exceed 10,000 words, including footnotes and notes, but excluding the bibliography, and shall be on an interdisciplinary theme. For regulations VII 4 and 7 of the Modern History syllabus regulations read "Honour School of Modern History and English" instead of "Modern History".'


(c) Pass School of Modern History and English

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 311, ll. 13–14, delete from `A thesis may be offered' to `in lieu of either (i) or (ii);'.


22 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Medieval and Modern Languages

Preliminary Examination in Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 89, l. 30, delete

`Moderators for Honour Moderations' and substitute

`examiners for the Preliminary Examination'.

2 Ibid., p. 90, ll. 10, 12–13, 14, 17, and 19, delete `Honour Moderations' and insert `the Preliminary Examination'.

3 Ibid., delete from `Candidates who fail only' on l. 32 to `Preliminary Examination in Modern History' on l. 36 and substitute `Candidates who fail one or two subjects of part 2 may resit that subject or subjects at a subsequent examination'.


23 Board of the Faculty of Modern History and the Social Sciences Board

Honour Moderations in Modern History and Politics

(i) With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 59, delete ll. 46–8.

2 Ibid., l. 49, and p. 60, ll. 7, 13, 14, 21, 24, 25, and 35, delete `Honour Moderations' and insert `the Preliminary Examination'.

3 Ibid., p. 60, ll. 3–5, delete `The Chairmen of the Moderators for Honour Moderations in Modern History and the Chairman of the Examiners for the Preliminary Examination' and substitute `The Chairmen of the Examiners for the Preliminary Examinations in Modern History and'.

4 Ibid., l. 21, delete `paper VI' and substitute `paper VII'.

5 Ibid., after l. 42 insert:

`Candidates who fail one or more of papers 1, 2, 3, or 4 above may resit that subject or subjects at a subsequent examination.'

6 Ibid., p. 90, delete ll. 40–7.

7 Ibid., reposition special regulations from l. 49 on p. 59 to l. 42 on p. 60 (as amended) after l. 39 on p. 90.


24 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Medieval and Modern Languages

(a) Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p.315, l. 5, delete `a thesis in accordance with Regulation VII, THESES' and substitute `an optional additional thesis in accordance with Regulation VII An Optional Additional Thesis'.

2 Ibid., p. 316, l. 16, delete `(two papers)' and substitute `, except that assessment of the Special Subject paper (b) shall be by timed paper rather than by extended essay,'.

3 Ibid., l. 19, delete `;' and substitute `, except that British History Paper VI covers the period since 1830, and British History Paper VII is not available for this Joint School.'

4 Ibid., l. 21, after `as specified for the Honour School of Modern History', insert `under Regulation VII An Optional Additional Thesis, except Cl. 4 of that regulation should read `beginning of Trinity Full Term of the academic year preceding that in which the students spend a year abroad'.

5 Ibid., l. 48, after `subject of an answer in both the papers.', insert `The same regulation applies to the use of material in the Bridge essay and any other papers.'


(b) Pass School of Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 317, ll. 8–9, delete

 

`, except any such period as has already been offered in passing the First Public Examination'.


(c) Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 314, l. 21, delete `or an alternative to a Special Subject'.

2 Ibid., p. 315, delete ll. 14–17.

3 Ibid., p. 316, delete ll. 15–23 and substitute:

`7, 8, 9. Either (a) a Special Subject as specified for the Honour School of Modern History (two papers, paper (b) of which shall be by extended essay) and one of the items (b) (i), (ii), (iii), or (iv) below. or (b) any three of the following four items:

(i) A period of The History of the British Isles as specified for the Honour School of Modern History;

(ii) A Further Subject as specified for the Honour School of Modern History;

(iii) Any one of the Papers IV, V, IX, X, XI, XII not already offered, as specified for the Honour School of Modern Languages;

(iv) An Extended Essay as specified for the Honour School of Modern Languages or a thesis based on original research as specified in Regulation VI for the Honour School of Modern History, except Cl. 4 of that regulation should read Ңeginning of Trinity Full Term of the academic year preceding that in which the candidates spends a year abroadӮ'


25 Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies

(a) Honour School of Oriental Studies

With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 376, l. 48, insert `Japanese' in the list of Additional Languages.

2 Ibid., l. 50, insert `Chinese' in the list of Additional Languages.

3 Ibid, p. 381, l. 28, delete `Three papers in Tibetan and Korean.' and insert: `Three papers in Japanese, Tibetan, or Korean.'

4 Ibid., p. 387, delete ll. 29–36.

5 Ibid., after l. 37, insert:

`Or, for Japanese with a subsidiary language, papers 1, 4–6, and 9 above; and

10. One paper in Japanese: Unprepared translation; and

11, 12, and 13. Three papers in Chinese, Korean, or Tibetan.'

6 Ibid., p. 397, after l. 3, insert:

`Chinese (for candidates offering Japanese as main subject) The following papers will be set:

1. Chinese Prescribed Texts. (Lists of texts will be available from the Oriental Institute.)

2. Unprepared translation, Prose Composition, and Grammatical Questions.

3. Modern China.'

7 Ibid., p. 400, after l. 35, insert:

`Japanese (for candidates offering Chinese as main subject) The following papers will be set:

1. Japanese Prescribed Texts. (Lists of texts will be available from the Oriental Institute.)

2. Unprepared translation, Prose Composition, and Grammatical Questions.

3. Modern Japan.'

8 Ibid., after l. 40, insert:

`Korean (for candidates offering Japanese as main subject) The following papers will be set:

1. Prescribed Texts. (Lists of texts will be available from the Oriental Institute.)

2. Korean History and Culture. Essay questions on the background to the texts studied under 1. above.

3. Unprepared translation, Prose Composition, and Grammatical Questions.'

9 Ibid., p. 402, l. 7, after `Chinese' insert `or Japanese'.


(b) Honour School of Oriental Studies

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 385. l. 30, delete `Mishnaic' and substitute `Rabbinic'.


(c) Honour School of Oriental Studies

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 377, ll. 7–9, delete

`, and candidates offering Classics, Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies, or Sanskrit must offer an additional language as specified below.' and substitute:

`; candidates offering Classics or Sanskrit must offer an additional language as specified below; and candidates offering Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies must offer either an additional language or Archaeology and Anthropology as specified below.'

2 Ibid, p. 384, after l. 10 insert:

`Either, for Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies with a subsidiary language,'.

3 Ibid, delete l. 24, and substitute `Candidates will be required to offer the following papers:'.

4 Ibid., p. 385, after l. 16, insert:

`or, for Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies with Archaeology and Anthropology, candidates will be required to offer papers 1, 3–4, and 7–11 above, and the following papers:

12. Anthropological theory and archaeological enquiry.

13. Urbanisation and change in complex societies: comparative approaches.

14. Social analysis and interpretation or Cultural representations, beliefs, and practices.

All candidates will be required to undertake a course of practical work, including laboratory work.

Candidates will be assessed, at the end of the sixth term from matriculation, on their practical ability, under the provisions for Honour Moderations in Archaeology and Anthropology.

Candidates will be required to take part in approved fieldwork as an integral part of their course. The fieldwork requirement will normally have been discharged before the Long Vacation of six terms from matriculation'.


(d) Honour School of Oriental Studies

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 376, delete ll. 36–40 and substitute:

`Oral examinations for Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, Persian, and Turkish will be held in the week before Trinity Full Term in the year in which the Honour School examination is taken.'

2 Ibid., p. 389, delete from the footnote `The oral examination will be held in the week of Trinity Term which precedes the commencement of the written part of the Honour School of Oriental Studies.' and substitute `The oral examination will be held in the week before Trinity Full Term in the year in which the Honour School examination is taken.'

3 Ibid., p. 392, delete from the footnote `The oral examination will be held in the week of Trinity Term which precedes the commencement of the written part of the Honour School of Oriental Studies.' and substitute `The oral examination will be held in the week before Trinity Full Term in the year in which the Honour School examination is taken.'


(e) M.Phil. in Modern Chinese Studies

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 558, after l. 27, insert:

`(xii) Modern Chinese Art and Literature.'

2 Ibid., l. 28, renumber existing clause number (xii) as number (xiii).

3 Ibid., l. 40–9, delete `wishing to offer papers ɠprofit from the M.Phil. in Modern Chinese Studies.' and replace with `will normally have a first degree in a discipline relevant to their elective subject.'

4 Ibid., l. 49 after `... Chinese Studies.', insert `For subject (xii), Modern Chinese Art and Literature, candidates shall normally have a first degree in art or literature.'

5 Ibid., replace p. 568, l. 34–p. 571, l. 24, with:

`I. Qualifying Examination

Candidates are required to spend a period of at least four months on an approved course of language study in East Asia, unless exempted by the Oriental Studies Faculty Board. Every candidate must pass a qualifying examination before the end of the third term from the candidate's admission to the M.Phil. degree programme. The examination shall take place not later than the end of the second term from the candidate's admission to the programme. Full details of the Qualifying Examination will be provided in the examination conventions, which will be made available to the candidates in the eighth week of the first term of the candidate's admission. Candidates must make their entries for the Qualifying Examination on the appropriate form obtainable from the University Offices, by Friday in the eighth week of the first term of the candidate's admission. Candidates who fail either or both parts of the Qualifying Examination may be allowed to retake that part or parts at the end of the Long Vacation of the first year of the course.

The Qualifying Examination shall consist of two parts, as follows:

(1) General paper on Modern China

This is a single, three-hour examination paper on topics on Modern China, which all candidates will study in a course of lectures, classes, and tutorials during the first and second terms of the first year. Details of this two-term course shall be provided in the M.Phil. handbook and the course syllabus available from the Course Director.

(2) Chinese language paper

All candidates must offer a Chinese language paper, which includes an oral test. An outline of the oral test and written paper will be provided in the M.Phil. handbook and will be provided in detail in the examination conventions.

II. Final Examination

No candidate shall enter the Final Examination unless he or she has already passed the two parts of the first-year Qualifying Examination. The examination shall take place not later than the end of the third term of the second year from the candidate's admission to the M.Phil. degree programme. Full details of the examination will be provided in the examination conventions that will be made available to the candidates in the second term of the second year of the course. Candidates must make their entries for the Final Examination by filling out the appropriate examination entry form, obtainable from the University Offices, by Friday of the first week of the second term of the second year from the candidate's admission to the course. A candidate who fails this examination will be permitted to retake it on one further occasion only, not later than one year after the initial attempt.

Such a candidate whose dissertation has been of a satisfactory standard may resubmit the same piece of work, while a candidate who has reached a satisfactory standard on the written papers will not be required to re-take that part of the examination.

The Final Examination shall consist of four parts, as follows:

(1) Thesis

The thesis will be not be more than 30,000 words on a subject approved by the Oriental Studies Faculty Board, to be delivered to the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford, by Noon of Monday of the Second Week of Trinity Term of the second year from the candidate's admission to the programme. The thesis must be accompanied by a statement that it is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated. Successful candidates will be required to deposit one copy of the thesis in the Bodleian Library, and to sign a form stating whether they give permission for it to be consulted.

(2) Paper on Modern China: Frameworks, methodologies, research tools

This is a single, three-hour examination paper on approaches and methods of research on modern China. In preparation for this paper, a course of weekly seminar classes and tutorials will be provided in the first and the second term of the second year. Details of this course shall be provided in the M.Phil. handbook and in the course syllabus available from the Course Director.

(3) Elective paper

Candidates must elect one examination paper offered as part of another Master's (M.Phil. M.Sc., or M.St.) degree programme in the University. A list of papers approved for this purpose by the Oriental Studies Faculty Board will be available from the Course Director. Students are free to elect any one of these papers in consultation with their supervisor, and must do so by filling out the examination entry form. The examiners may, at their discretion, either require candidates to sit the standard examination paper for this elective paper, or else set a paper specifically for students on the M.Phil. in Modern Chinese Studies.

(4) Two Chinese language papers (one oral, one written)

The Oral examination will consist of two parts: a comprehension group test and an individual test. Full details of the oral examination will be provided in the course handbook and the examination conventions. The written language paper will be of a duration of three hours and will comprise a translation into Chinese, comprehension exercise, and translation into English.

The papers under (2) and (4) above will be taken in the Eighth Week of the third term of the final year. The examiners may examine any candidate viva voce.'

6 Ibid., p. 571, after l. 24 insert:

`(xii) Modern Chinese Art and Literature

I Qualifying Examination

Candidates are required to spend a period of at least four months on an approved course of language study in East Asia unless exempted by the Oriental Studies Faculty Board. Every candidate must pass a qualifying examination before the end of the third term from the candidate's admission to the M.Phil. degree programme. The examination shall take place not later than the end of the second term from the candidate's admission to the programme. Full details of the Qualifying Examination will be provided in the examination conventions, which will be made available to the candidates in the eighth week of the first term of the candidate's admission. Candidates must make their entries for the Qualifying Examination on the appropriate form obtainable from the University Offices, by Friday in the eighth week of the first term of the candidate's admission. Candidates who fail either or both parts of the Qualifying Examination may be allowed to retake that part or parts at the end of the Long Vaca tion of the first year of the course.

The Qualifying Examination shall consist of two parts, as follows:

(1) General paper on Modern China This is a single, three-hour examination paper on topics on Modern China, which all candidates study in a course of lectures, classes, and tutorials during the first and second terms of the first year. Details of this two-term course shall be provided in the M.Phil. handbook and the course syllabus available from the Course Director.

(2) Chinese language paper

All candidates must offer a Chinese language paper, which includes an oral test. An outline of the oral test and written paper will be provided in the M.Phil. handbook and will be provided in detail in the examination conventions.

II Final Examination

No candidate shall enter the Final Examination unless he or she has already passed the two parts of the first-year Qualifying Examination. The examination shall take place not later than the end of the third term of the second year from the candidate's admission to the M.Phil. degree programme. Full details of the examination will be provided in the examination conventions that will be made available to the candidates in the second term of the second year of the course. Candidates must make their entries for the Final Examination by filling out the appropriate examination entry form, obtainable from the University Offices, by Friday of the first week of the second term of the second year from the candidate's admission to the course. A candidate who fails this examination will be permitted to retake it on one further occasion only, not later than one year after the initial attempt.

Such a candidate whose dissertation has been of a satisfactory standard may resubmit the same piece of work, while a candidate who has reached a satisfactory standard on the written papers will not be required to retake that part of the examination.

The Final Examination shall consist of four parts, as follows:

(1) Thesis

The thesis will be not more than 30,000 words on a subject approved by the Oriental Studies Faculty Board, to be delivered to the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford, by Noon of Monday of the Second Week of Trinity Term of the second year from the candidate's admission to the course. The thesis must be accompanied by a statement that it is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated. Successful candidates will be required to deposit one copy of the thesis in the Bodleian Library, and to sign a form stating whether they give permission for it to be consulted.

(2)–(3) Two written papers on Modern Chinese Art and Literature

Candidates will be introduced to the development of modern Chinese painting and fiction throughout the twentieth century. They will learn about the major artists and writers; the modes of production; influences from abroad; the effect of politics, especially extreme Leftist policies such as the Cultural Revolution; trends and fashions; and the fragmentation of contemporary arts and literature. Topics include the following:

(i) Art and Literature 1900–49

Chinese painting 1900–49: addressing the past

Chinese painting 1900–49: approaching the foreign

May 4th and republican Fiction

Leftist ideology and practice in fiction


(ii) Art and Literature 1949–2000

Painting 1949–79: from the Yan'an Forum to the Cultural Revolution

The Avant-garde in Art, 1979–

Taiwan fiction

Fiction and the State 1949–79

Post-reform fiction: unity to fragmentation

(4) Two Chinese language papers (one oral, one written)

The Oral examination will consist of two parts: a comprehension group test and an individual test. Full details of the oral examination will be provided in the course handbook and the examination conventions. The written language paper will be of a duration of three hours and will comprise a translation into Chinese, comprehension exercise, and translation into English.

The papers under (2), (3), and (4) above will be taken in the Eighth Week of the third term of the final year. The examiners may examine any candidate viva voce.'

7 Ibid., p. 571, l. 25, renumber existing clause number (xii) as number (xiii).


26 Board of the Faculty of Philosophy

(a) Special Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 410, l. 47, after `the word limit.', insert `The word count should be indicated at the front of the thesis.'


(b) Special Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools involving Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 409, delete ll. 30–2 and substitute:

`Candidates will be expected to have read books I–IV and VIII in Greek (Ross, Oxford Classical Texts), and books V–VII in translation (in Barnes, ed., The Complete Works of Aristotle: The Revised Oxford Translation (Princeton), vol. 1). There will be a compulsory question containing passages for translation and comment from the books read in Greek; any passages for comment from the remaining books will be accompanied by a translation.'


(c) Special Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 408, delete ll. 33–7.


27 Boards of the Faculties of Philosophy and Theology

Special Regulations for the Honour School of Philosophy and Theology

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 436, l. 48, delete `The subject of every thesis should fall within the scope of Theology' and substitute `A thesis may be offered either in Theology or in Philosophy or in both Philosophy and Theology jointly. A candidate who offers a thesis in Philosophy and Theology cannot also offer any other thesis.'


28 Board of the Faculty of Theology

(a) Confirmation of Probationer Research Student status

With immediate effect

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 829, ll. 36–40, delete `Where candidates choose to replace one examination paper by a 15,000 word essay, they should also submit one typed copy of the essay. Where candidates replace one other examination paper by essays written during the first year, typed copies of the essays should, with the necessary approval, also be submitted.'


(b) Master of Studies in Theology

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 654, l. 5, after `held' insert `at two points in the year:'.

2 Ibid., l. 6, after `examination' insert `; and in the last week of September or the first week of October for candidates who submit such essays (see paragraph 2. above) at the end of the Long Vacation. Candidates must notify examiners of their intention to submit early or late when seeking approval of their essay topic'.


29 Committee for Comparative Philology and General Linguistics

(a) M.St. in General Linguistics and Comparative Philology

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 619, delete l. 5 and substitute:

`6. The examination shall consist of three parts:'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 7–10 and substitute:

`(b) two papers both of which must be chosen either from those listed in B, or from those listed in C (except that, at the discretion of the committee, candidates may submit a paper from list B in place of one of those from list C), or from those listed in D.'

3 Ibid., after l. 41 insert:

`7. Option B(ii) shall consist of:

(a) an exercise, set during Week 8 of Michaelmas Term, on a topic directly related to material covered during lectures given during that term. Candidates will be required to submit a written answer to the Chairman of Examiners, c/o the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by not later than noon on Friday of Week 1 of the following Hilary Term.

(b) An essay of not more than 5,000 words on some problem in syntactic theory to be selected in consultation with the supervisor and approved by the Chairman of Examiners for report to the Committee for Comparative Philology and General Linguistics not later than Monday of Week 1 of Hilary Term in the year of the examination. The essay (in two typewritten copies) must be sent in a parcel bearing the words "Essay for the Syntax option in the M.St. in General Linguistics and Comparative Philology" to the Chairman of Examiners for the Degree of M.St. in General Linguistics, c/o the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on Friday of Week 1 of Trinity Term in the year of the examination. The essays shall be accompanied by a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that it is the candidate's own work, except where otherwise specified. This certification must be submitted separately in a sealed envelope addressed to the Chairman of Examiners for the M.St. in General Linguistics and Comparative Philology.'

4 Ibid., pp. 619–20, renumber existing cll. 7–12 as 8–13.


(b) M.Phil. in General Linguistics and Comparative Philology

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2005)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 538, delete l. 16 and substitute:

`3. The examination shall consist of four parts:'.

2 Ibid., after l. 41 insert:

`4. Option B(ii) shall consist of:

(a) an exercise, set during Week 8 of Michaelmas Term of the second year, on a topic directly related to material covered during lectures given during that term. Candidates will be required to submit a written answer to the Chairman of Examiners, c/o Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by not later than noon on Friday of Week 1 of the following Hilary Term.

(b) An essay of not more than 5,000 words on some problem in syntactic theory to be selected in consultation with the supervisor and approved by the Chairman of Examiners for report to the Committee for Comparative Philology and General Linguistics not later than Monday of Week 1 of Hilary Term in the year of the examination.

The essay (in two typewritten copies) must be sent in a parcel bearing the words "Essay for the Syntax option in the M.Phil. in General Linguistics and Comparative Philology" to the Chairman of Examiners for the Degree of M.Phil. in General Linguistics, c/o Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on Friday of Week 8 of Hilary Term in the second year. The essays shall be accompanied by a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that it is the candidate's own work, except where otherwise specified. This certification must be submitted separately in a sealed envelope addressed to the Chairman of Examiners for the M.Phil. in General Linguistics and Comparative Philology.'

3 Ibid., pp. 538–9, renumber existing cll. 4–9 as 5–10.

Colleges, Halls, and Societies

OBITUARIES

Christ Church

MARK ECHALAZ ALLEN, CMG, CVO, 15 March 2003; commoner 1936. Aged 85.

PROFESSOR FLOYD MCKEE CAMMACK, 31 December 2002; commoner 1954. Aged 69.

COL. LIONEL ARTHUR LIDDELL, OBE, 8 November 1988; commoner 1920.

EDWARD GEORGE GREY LILLINGSTON, 7 August 1966; commoner 1911.

PROFESSOR MICHAEL YORK MASON, 13 March 2003; commoner 1959; Emeritus Professor of English, University of London. Aged 61.

LT.-COL. ALEXANDER ARCHIBALD MCBEAN, OBE, 31 January 1983; commoner 1914.

JOHN LIONEL PEGLER, 14 April 1988; commoner 1943.

JOHN TIMOTHY CECIL PEMBER, 16 February 1987; commoner 1929.

GORDON ALEXANDER PRINGLE, 2003; commoner 1967.


Corpus Christi College

PROFESSOR EBERHARD HERIBERT BUHL, DM, 18 January 2003; Research Fellow 1996–9. Aged 43.


Keble College

WILLIAM SPOONER HEMP, 27 February 2003; Fellow and Emeritus Fellow 1983–2003. Aged 86.


Lady Margaret Hall

DR ANNIE MADELEINE BARNES (née Sessely), 17 January 2003; 1929–33. Aged 99.

MISS EVELYNE MARY BIRD, 10 February 2002; Modern Languages 1936–9. Aged 83.

MISS ANNE ELIZABETH BRIMELOW, 2001; PPE 1969–72.

MRS VALERIE PATRICIA FREEDMAN (née Alexander), 7 August 2002; Modern Languages 1949–52. Aged 71.

THE HON MRS ANNE MARIE FREMANTLE (née Huth-Jackson), 26 December 2002; History 1927–30.

MRS JUNE ELIZABETH GAMON (née Temple), 10 March 2003; 1947–50.

MRS MARGERY ELIZABETH HARPER (née Elkington), 31 October 2002; Modern Languages 1921–4. Aged 100.

MRS PAMELA HARDINGE HERRON (née Veitch), 2003; English 1950–3.

MRS JULIA DIANA HOPTON (née Spencer-Bernard), 1 September 2002; History 1955–8.

MISS EILEEN DOROTHY IVELAW-CHAPMAN, 3 July 2002; English 1914–17. Aged 107.

MISS KATHARINE JOHNSTON LAMONT, 19 February 2003; History 1928–31. Aged 97.

MRS MURIEL LAYCOCK (née SANDS), 22 December 2002; Physics 1924–7. Aged 97.

MRS MAVIS JUNE LOCKE, 23 November 2002; PGCE 1973–6. Aged 73.

ELIZABETH, COUNTESS OF LONGFORD (née Harman), 22 October 2002; Classics 1926–9. Aged 96.

MRS PAMELA MARY RICKETT (née Shekleton), 13 December 2002; Chemistry 1929–32.

MISS CATHERINE MARGARET ROBSON, 3 January 2003; History 1942–5.

MISS BARBARA JEAN SCOTT, 7 December 2002; English 1956–9. Aged 65.

MRS KATHARINE HERMIONE SMITHIES (née Ripman), 2003; English 1925–8. Aged 97.

MISS ANGELA TAMVAKI, 26 November 2002; Archaeology 1968–72. Aged 57.

MISS ETHEL JOAN WALSH, 20 February 2003; English 1934–7. Aged 86.

MRS AUDREY MURIEL WARD-JACKSON (née Jenkins), 11 November 2003, PPE 1933–6. Aged 88.

MISS FRANCES HOLMAN BENTLEY WILLIAMS, 2002; English 1941–3.

MRS BRIGITTE WOOD (née Blumenthal), 27 February 2003; History 1944–7.


Lincoln College

LEWIS BERNARD CANNELL, 17 March 2003; commoner 1948–51. Aged 76.

EMILE ALSTORPHIUS BISSCHOP GREVELINK, 6 March 2003; 1938. Aged 89.

COSTAS INDIANOS, 20 February 2001; commoner 1960–4. Aged 59.

CHARLES CHRISTOPHER KING, 24 April 2002; commoner 1959–62. Aged 64.

JOHN GABRIEL MARKHAM, 15 March 2003; commoner 1927–31. Aged 97.

PAUL O'FLINN, 6 March 2001; commoner 1961–4. Aged 58.

JOHN A. SMITHIES, 4 February 2003; commoner 1946–8.

DANIEL CHARLES SOMMER, 10 February 2003; commoner 1992–5. Aged 28.

JEAN PAUL VICTOR TONDELIER, 12 January 2003; commoner 1945–7. Aged 80.


Magdalen College

GIOVANNI AGNELLI, 24 January 2003; Honorary Fellow 1991. Aged 81.

FREDERICK VALENTINE ATKINSON; senior demy 1940.

MICHAEL ELLIOT DE PIRO, 20 December 2001; exhibitioner 1965–8. Aged 53.

NICHOLAS MILFORD, 10 December 2002; commoner 1957–60. Aged 65.

GEORGE SAVILL PALMER; commoner 1938–9.

VANESSA CLAIRE PICKFORD, 27 March 2003; commoner 1998. Aged 22.

JULIAN ROBINSON, 10 February 2003; demy 1962–5. Aged 58.

DAVID GRAHAM SARGANT, 11 January 2003; exhibitioner 1952–60. Aged 68.

LIONEL BENJAMIN SYDNEY SIMMONDS, 30 December 2002; commoner 1941–2 and 1945–7. Aged 80.

NICHOLAS ANTHONY STEVENS, January 2002; Doncaster Scholar 1970–3. Aged 49.

EDMUND JOHN SUTTON, 1 January 2003; commoner 1999. Aged 21.


St Hilda's College

VIOLET MURRAY CARRUTHERS, BA, 5 March 2003; commoner 1927–30. Aged 95.

ANNIE EAGLESHAM (née Rintoul), MA, 18 March 2003; scholar 1946–9. Aged 74.

ELIZABETH MARGARET FATHERS (née Brewer), MA, 22 March 2003; commoner 1949–52. Aged 72.

JOAN MARIE WILLS (née Collier), MA, 20 March 2003; exhibitioner 1931–5. Aged 89.


St Hugh's College

MISS KATHLEEN MARY ABBOTT, 26 February 2003; English 1925. Aged 96.

MISS OLIVE CHANDLER, 26 March 2003; Modern Languages 1929. Aged 92.

MRS BARBARA ANN CLUTTERBUCK (née Bristow), 4 February 2003; aged 78.

MRS JEAN MELITA SINKER (née Bullen), 2002; Geography 1945.

MRS ANNABEL SANDFORD SENIOR (née Robinson), 8 January 2003; Geography 1961. Aged 60.

MS CAROLINE NIEBUHR OSBORN (née Tod), 28 January 2003; Modern History 1962. Aged 59.

MRS HELEN CATHERINE COLLINS (née Wilson), 21 October 2002; Modern Languages 1975. Aged 47.


MEMORIAL CONCERT

Keble College

A Memorial Concert for ALEXANDER ELMSLIE CAMPBELL, formerly Emeritus Fellow, will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 24 May, in the O'Reilly Theatre, Keble College. Tickets are available from Ruth Cowen, Keble College (e-mail: ruth.cowen@keble.ox.ac.uk).


NOTICE

Oriel College

Eugene Lee-Hamilton Prize 2003

The Provost and Fellows of Oriel College offer a prize of £60 for the best Petrarchan Sonnet in English submitted by an undergraduate of Oxford or Cambridge, on a subject to be chosen by the candidate. Enjambment between the eighth and ninth lines will be permitted.

No candidate may submit more than one sonnet, nor may the prize be awarded more than once to the same person. The competing sonnets should be sent to Mrs Yvonne Scott, College Secretary, Oriel College, Oxford OX1 4EW, not later than Friday, 6 June.

Each sonnet must be accompanied by a certificate from the Head or a fellow of the candidate's college, stating that the candidate is an undergraduate. The winner will have been deemed to have given permission to publish his/her sonnet in the Oriel Record.

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St Giles Thursday Lunchime Talks

Burning Issues: 1 May, The Purposes of a University, Dame Ruth Deech, Principal, St Anne's; 8 May, The Qualities of Conflict, Frances Stewart, Professor of Development Economics/Director QEH; 15 May, Cultural Conflict and Political Instability, Dr ahmed Al-Shahi, St Antony's. The talks will be held in St Giles' Church, 12.30 p.m. Everyone is welcome. In order to help us with our costs, a small donation would be appreciated. Web site: www.st-giles-church.org.


Concert

James Bowman joins Fiori Musicali, Holywell Music Room, Sat., 26 Apr., 8 p.m. Monteverdi, Ego flos campi; A. Scarlatti, Infirmata vulnerata; Vivaldi, La folia; Tarini, Devil's TrillSonata; Leclair, Sonata op.2 no. 8 in D; Legrenzi, O mirandum mysterium. Tickets £10 (concessions £4 for children, students and unemployed) available from: Tickets Oxford, The Oxford Playhouse, Beaumont Street, tel.: 01865 305305, or online from Classic Concerts Box Office, 01327 360931, or on the door.


French Speakers Wanted

Two male French-speakers required (with very good command of French) to read "Dans la solitude des champs de coton" by Bernard Marie Koltes at the Maison Francaise d'Oxford in Michaelmas Term. (Reading organised by Nicole Gore who is responsible for theatre at the Maison Francaise). Please contact Claire Stevenson at : maison@herald.ox.ac.uk, if interested.


Tennis in the Parks?

Oxford University Lawn Tennis Association has an extremely limited number of places available for University and College staff to become members for the coming season. Members are entitled to use the grass courts in the Parks from the end of April until late Aug. Staff membership rates are £25 for the season; enquiries should be made to: enquiries@sport.ox.ac.uk.


Oxford University Research Staff Society

The Research Staff Society (RSS) membership consists of Post- doctoral/Junior Research Fellows and Research Assistants who work for the University of Oxford. As most Research Staff are not attached to a college and may be new to Oxford our social events provide a unique opportunity to meet researchers outside your group or department. We aim to provide an interesting and varying social setting in which to mix and to become a voice for research staff within the University. We run social events each month to suit all tastes. Please visit our Web site http://users.ox.ac.uk/~rss/, which provides information on how to join the society as well as details on events which we will be running in the near future. We hope you will decide to join us and very much look forward to meeting you at one of our events this year.


Oxford University Newcomers' Club

The Club welcomes the wives and partners of visiting scholars, graduate students, and members of the University who are new to Oxford. It aims to offer help, advice, information, andthe opportunity to meet each other socially. Informal coffee mornings are held at 13, Norham Gardens every Wed., 10.30–12 noon. Other activities in the club room include the Craft Group, Book Group, and informal Conversation Group. Newcomers with children (0--4 years) meet every Fri. in term, 10.15 a.m.--12 noon. We organise tours of colleges and museums, visits to places of interest, country walks, and outings to gardens and antique shops. Secondhand items can be bought on Wed. mornings from the basement. Visit our Web site on www.ox.ac.uk/staff.


Antiques Bought and Sold

Antiques and decorative objects bought and sold: desks and library furniture always wanted, also garden stonework. Please call: Greenway Antiques, 90 Corn Street, Witney, Oxon. Open Mon.,–Fri., 9.30 a.m.–5 p.m., Sat., 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Tel.: 01993 705026, mobile: 07831 585014.


Restoration and Conservation of Antique Furniture

John Hulme undertakes all aspects of restoration: 30 years experience; collection and delivery. For free advice, telephone or write to: The Workshop, 11A High Street, Chipping Norton, Oxon. OX7 5AD. Tel.: 01608 641692.


Periodicals Bought and Sold

Back-issues of scholarly periodicals and journals bought and sold. Graham Jeffrey, Periodicals (est. 1967), 29 Cuddesdon Road, Horspath, Oxford, OX33 1JD. Tel.: 01865 872528, fax: 776398. E-mail: gjeffreysatu@aol.com.


Services Offered

Secretary, with academic experience, offers word processing. Based East Oxford. Tel.: 01865 241515. E-mail: sallynabav@onetel.net.uk

Panthessalia fast delivery translation services, Greece: offering special rates for students; free delivery; special rates for large texts, £10 per page for normal text. Translations from/to English from/to German, French, Italian, and Russian. Panthessalia, Falani-Larissa 41500, Greece. Tel.: 00302 410 941 109, 0030 693 700 2173 (mobile). E-mail: panthessalia@yahoo.com.

Homeopathy: experienced, well-qualified homeopath offers help in both chronic and acute conditions, mental and physical. Home and workplace visits available. Special service for travellers–including e-mail support. Spanish, French and Urdu spoken. Contact Karima Brooke on 01865 201438.

Painting, carpentry, building and design: small and medium-sized projects undertaken, from shelving through kitchens to home extensions; decorating, internal and external; and planning applications. Free advice, quotations and references. Tel.: Ian 01865 308188, or 07773 712829.

Oxford Academic Services: indexing, project management, history research projects. Details of all services: judith@history.u-net.com, or Judith Loades, P.O.Box 323, Burford, Oxon. OX18 4XN.

Big or small, we ship it all, plus free pick up anywhere in Oxford. Also 24-hour photocopying, private mailing addresses (24-hour access, and mail forwarding world-wide), binding, fax bureau, colour photocopying, mailing services, and much more. Contact or visit Mail Boxes Etc., 266 Banbury Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 514655, fax: 514656, e-mail: summertown@020.mbe.uk.com, also at: 94 London Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 741729, fax: 01865 742431, e-mail: staff@mbeheadington.co.uk.

Town and Country Trees: arboricultural contractors; modern arboricultural techniques; local authority approved; safeguarded by full Public Liability insurance. Free advice and quotations. Tel.: 0845 458 2980 or 07976 261850 (mobile).


Penfriend Wanted

A French family living 20 minutes from Paris is looking for an English girl of the same age as a penfriend for their twelve year old daughter. If the girls get on well together they would like to arrange an exchange this summer. E-mail: akchouraqui@libertysurf.fr.


Domestic Services

Gardener needed for 6 months to help maintain cottage garden. Light duties and all tools provided. References required. Tel.: 01865 250722.

All Counties Nannies: Lynda M. Sattelle N.N.E.B., Lincoln House, Abingdon Road, Drayton, OX14 4SU. Phone/fax: 01235 524462, mobile 07702068165, e- mail: lyndasattelle@allcountiesnannies.co.uk. For all your childcare needs.

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: 01865 726983 or 01235 555533.


Academic Study and Travel

Short Study Tour of the Welsh Marches, 22-24 Aug. £185 p.p. Day schools on Enigma and the Intelligence War at Bletchley Park, 11 Oct., and 22 Nov. For further details of these and other events contact Academic Study and Travel, 14 Walton Grange, Bath Road, Swindon SN1 4AH.


Tuition Offered

Painting Workshop in Florence: spend an exciting month painting and drawing in an air-conditioned studio with internationally acclaimed artist, Philippa Blair. 4–22 Aug., 2003. Combining Plein aire and Studio Painting, places still available. Tuition: US $1,800/£1,139. Accommodation starting at $750/£500 per person. Contact August Program Director, Dan Welden. E-mail: solarplate@aol.com. Web site: www.fionline.it/santareparata/welden.html.

Piano lessons: experienced teacher; adults and children; all grades. Beginners welcome. contact Miss P. Read BA (Hons) L.R.A.M., near Kidlington. Tel.: 01865 331147


Situations Vacant

Picker Institute Europe: Health Services Researchers, Oxford. Picker Institute Europe is an independent, not-for-profit research organisation specialising in obtaining feedback from patients and using this to improve the quality of health services throughout Europe. We currently have 2 vacancies for experienced health services researchers with excellent quantitative skills: (i) Senior research manager to initiate and supervise studies of the patient's perspective on service quality and policy initiatives. Experience at a senior level in health servicees research and strong publications record is essential. Salary range: £35,000-£45,000 depending on experience. (ii) Research Officer to work on studies of patients' experience of healthcare. Higher degree and survey research experience essential. Salary range: £20,000-£30,000 depending on experience. This is an exciting opportunity to develop your career in health services research both by pursuing your research interests and being involved in our existing research projects. Closing date for applications: Fri., 2 May. For job descriptions and information about how to apply see: www.pickereurope.org (/job vacancies). Any queries phone An Gay at: 01865 208100 or e-mail: an.gay@pickereurope.ac.uk.

Worcester College: temporary part-time Chaplain required, to hold up to 4 services per week in the College Chapel, for Trinity Term 2003 only. Further details may be obtained from the Domestic Bursar, Worcester College, OX1 2HB, to whom C.V.s from suitably qualified candidates should be sent.

Friendly, evolving, 4-doctor, central university based General Practice seeks replacement Practice Manager. Ideal candidate should have skills in management, finance and I.T. Previous NHS experience desirable but not essential. Sense of humour vital. Salary and hours negotiable. 20–30 hours. Please reply with C.V.: Dr John Sichel, 28 Beaumont Street, Oxford OX1 2NP. Enquiries 01865 316991.

Polish Editor: we are seeking someone with fluent Polish and English to work as an assistant editor on a dictionary project. We require someone with a linguistic background and experience in translation and/or editing, ideally of dictionary text. Employment would be for approximately 6 months for up to 2 days or 15 hours p.w. If you consider you have the necessary qualifications, please send your C.V. and covering letter to: Emma Harte , Personnel Manager, ELT Personnel, Oxford University Press, Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP. E-mail: elt.personnel@oup.co.uk. Closing date for applications: Fri., 9 May.

A typesetting house based in south India and already processing a large volume of work from the UK, is looking for a Resident Representative living in or near Oxford to expand their existing business. Those with a flair for selling and with a computer at home preferred. Terms negotiable. Contact the Managing Director at: roy_home@sify.com.

The Examination Schools: Temporary Room and Office Assistants. We are looking for a team of people to work full time (8.30 a.m.–6.30 p.m.), incl. some Sats., for a 6 week period in Trinity Term to cover the exam season (19 May–27 June), with a possible extension to 11 July 2003. Office assistants will be required to deal with all aspects of office administration. Room assistants will be required to work either at the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford or at Ewert House Examination Hall, Summertown, Oxford. If you have a preference please state this clearly in your covering letter. The duties include setting up examination rooms, tidying up between sessions, laying out script booklets and exam materials, and delivering packages in central Oxford. If you would like to apply please send a C.V. and covering letter to the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG. For further information phone the Deputy Clerk (Building) on 01865 276905.

The Examination Schools: Invigilators. We are looking for reliable individuals to add to our Register of Invigilators. Work is on a temporary basis during the main exam period which starts this year on 19 May and finishes on 27 June. There are openings to work on either a session basis, where you invigilate individual exam sessions based on your availability, or on a block booking basis. A block (half-days) booking option requires a commitment to work one of the following: full time for the 6 week exam period; specific weeks during the exam period; specific days in the week during the exam period. These options can be discussed in more details with the Deputy Clerk of Schools (Exams). The work involves laying out of question papers, completing relevant paperwork and invigilating during the examination session. The majority of exam papers are 3 hours duration which require an invigilation session of approximately 4 hours (morning session: 9.00 to 13.00, afternoon session: 14.00 to 18.00). The payment details for a standard invigilator working a 4 hour sessions are as follows: 4 hr session (for 3 hr papers) £27. There are opportunities for suitable invigilators to act as the senior invigilator at a higher rate of pay. If you are interested please send a C.V. and covering letter to the Deputy Clerk of Schools (Exams), Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG.


Wyndham Housing Association

The Wyndham Housing Association provides worry-free accommodation for active over 60s.Situated close to the cultural and social life of historic Oxford, we offer self-contained 1-bedroom flats for sale or rent. Services provided include heating, lighting, repairs, laundry facilities, guest rooms, pleasant court yard gardens. The house manager is on call 24 hours a day. A cooked lunch and a light supper are served to each flat daily. For further information please contact: The Administrator, Wyndham House, Plantation Road, Oxford OX2 6JJ. Tel.: 01865 511239.


Summer Lets

Live in comfort near the Thames, just a short walk to the city centre. Beautiful Victorian house, 4 bedrooms, c.h., large split-level living room, dining room, modern and fully-equipped kitchen. Bathroom 1, with large bath, bidet and W.C.; bathroom 2, with shower and W.C. South-facing garden. Possible use of bicycle(s). Available 6 weeks, from Sat., 20 July–Sun., 31 Aug. Price negotiable. Tel.: +44(0) 1865 725193.

Three-bedroom house belonging to current Oxford University postgraduate going abroad for fieldwork available for short-term let from 20 April for 2 months. Situated in Littlemore, a small village to the SE of central Oxford just outside of the Oxford ring road. Direct bus service from outside of house to central Oxford in 20 minutes. Close to the River Thames at Sandford Lock, the house is in a quiet cul-de-sac with parking space for 2 cars in front, and a small garden at the rear. Suitable for academic, professional couple with children. The house is available fully furnished, incl. washing machine, fridge/freezer and microwave. £700 p.m. incl. of all bills, except telephone. Please contact alan.harding@economics.ox.ac.uk.

Delightful Victorian 3-bedroom house in central north Oxford conservation area; fully furnished and renovated; sunny garden; private parking; 2 receptions;kitchen diner; all mod cons. Close to city centre and university. No smokers. £450 p.w. June–Sept.(negotiable). Tel.: 01865 554743. E-mail: kay.millar@virgin.net.

North Oxford : to let in August-9th-30th, spacious Edwardian house just south of Summertown; 4 bedrooms; bathroom plus shower room; large sitting room and kitchen dining room. Detached garden room/games room. Off street parking. All very well equipped and tastefully decorated. £600 p.w. Contact: 01865 513812 or e-mail: bruce.cockburn@bgsarchitects.co.uk.


Houses to Let

Spacious family home: excellently presented double fronted house in Iffley Fields; 4 reception rooms; 4 bedrooms; character kitchen with beamed ceiling. Large garden and garage. Available Aug. £1,500 p.c.m. For more information please contact Anna Turner at Finders Keepers, 27 St Clements, Oxford OX1 4AB. Tel.: 01865 200012 or e-mail: annat@finders.co.uk, or visit our Web site: www.finders.co.uk.

Summertown: family taking 10 month exchange to Washington offer 4-bedroom furnished and equipped family home with garden for academic year 2003/4. Quiet area and friendly neighbours; good access town centre/colleges/schools; currently set up to include home office with broadband, and 2 phone lines. Optional cat and car. £1,350 p.m. plus utilities and Council Tax. (Also interested in swap for Washington DC apartment). Contact: jill.shankleman@btinternet.com. Tel.: +44 1865 512365.

Middleway, Summertown–£1,700 p.c.m. Stunning 4- bedroom unfurnished townhouse with garage and parking. Available 17 April. Contact Sarah Richardson, Lettings Manager, Lifestyle Lettings & Property Management. Tel.: 01865 554577. Fax: 01865 554578. Web site: www.letitbetter.co.uk.

St Clements: freshly decorated Victorian terrace house, steps from Magdalen Bridge, shops, restaurants and parks. Airport and London buses stop at the end of this quiet cul-de-sac street with resident parking. Living room with coal-effect gas fire, opens to dining room and includes antique rugs and furnishings. Fitted kitchen with double fridge, gas range, electric oven, microwave, washer and dryer. Back door to sunny patio and rear access. Large bathroom with tub and shower stall. Two double bedrooms and attic room suitable for office or occasional use. Broadband and bikes. Available June £900 p.c.m. E-mail: jperot@yahoo.com, or tel.: 01865 727 775.

Recently renovated 4-storey town house in Grandpont, within 10 minutes' walk of city centre. Flexible, spacious accommodation comprises entrance hall, open-plan kitchen/living area, dining room, library, study, bedroom and 2 very large, well- equipped bathrooms (in all potential for 3 bedrooms). Large basement, currently used for storage. South-facing garden with pation. G.c.h. Available from 1 Aug.,–end of Michaelmas 2003. £950 p.c.m. Contact Riitta Heino, tel.: 01865 244745.

North Oxford furnished house available from 1 Sept. Charming, cosy, quiet, easy to maintain, fully furnished house in Jericho/north Oxford. Walk to university, train and coach stations, near best schools, parks, centrally heated, recently re-decorated, secluded garden, 2½ bathrooms, washing machine, dryer, telephone, linen, dishes, 2 bicycles. Two bedrooms £1,225 p.m., 3 bedrooms £1,500 p.m. (incl. bedsit with separate kitchen and entrance). Contact: OXFORD: J.Mackrells (eves., or 7-8 a,m,), tel. 01865 775567, e-mail: mackrelj@btopenworld.com; CANADA: A. Gaston, tel. 001 (613) 745 1368, fax 001 (613) 745 0299, e-mail: gaston@cyberus.ca.

An Englishman's home is his castle---so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or e-mail us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: 01865 764533, fax: 764777, e-mail: info@qbman.co.uk.

Make finding accommodation easy. Finders Keepers have a dedicated approach to helping you find the right property. Browse through our Web site for up-to-date detailed information on properties available and make use of our interactive database, priority reservation service (credit cards accepted), personal service and professional advice. For further information please contact Finders Keepers at 226, Banbury Rd., Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: 01865 311011. Fax: Oxford 556993. E-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk. Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

Normandy: Village au Brun, Notre Dame de Cenilly: Old Farm House, newly tiled roof, all mod cons and set in approx. 13½ acres farmland. Peaceful but within 200 yards of tarred road. Saint-Lo, Coutance approx. 20 kms, Cherbourg, Bayeux, Mont St Michel and Caen within 100 kms. Ground floor: kitchen/dining room, gas cooker, separate electric oven, microwave, large fridge with separate freezer, gas c.h.; bathroom with toilet; sitting room. First floor: music room, 2 bedrooms (1 with small office). Second floor: large bedroom; shower room with toilet; gallery (suitable for office) which looks on to music room below. Open fire in sitting room. Would suit writer or musician seeking peace and quiet to work. Flexible lease. Rental to include heating, linen and crockery but excluding telephone and electricity. For further details please contact Alexander Kok on 00 33 2 33 45 52 16 or e-mail: akok2@wanadoo.fr.


Flats to Let

Studio flat at token rent in Old Rectory in exchange for regular dog walking and occasional house-sitting. Five miles from Oxford centre in Old Kidlington. Suit graduate student. Available 1 May. On No.2/2a bus route (every 15 mins) and walking distance to shops and amenities. References essential. Tel.: 01865 513816 office hours and 01865 842103 eves and weekends.

Short walk to Summertown–£825 p.c.m. Spacious 2 double bedroom first floor furnished flat with garage. Available 1 May. Contact Sarah Richardson, Lettings Manager, Lifestyle Lettings & Property Management. Tel.: 01865 554577. Fax 01865 554578. E-mail: sarah@lifestyle-lettings.co.uk. Web site: www.letitbetter.co.uk.

Park Town–off Banbury Road, easy walk from Science Area. Modern furnished s/c flatlet in quiet non-smoking family home. Shared front door/staircase to own entrance/lobby. Available now, single post-doc or academic visitor preferred. £410 p.c.m. No extras. E-mail: peter@crossfell.co.uk or tel.: 01736 731933.

Self-contained 1-bedroom flat overlooking Port Meadow, with mod cons on top floor of old family house in pretty location in Upper Wolvercote. Convenient for university and Oxford city, with rural surroundings. Bedroom with en suiteshower/toilet; kitchen/dining/living room. Parking, cycling and/or bus ride 15 minutes to city centre. Suit academic/other professional. £725 p.c.m. excl. tel. Available late May 2003. References required. E-mail: wrldco@aol.com.

Central North Oxford: 10 minutes' walk from city centre, all main university buildings and parks, also very close to the river: 4 furnished flats available for short/long lets in extremely quiet, civilised, large Victorian house in this exclusive, leafy, residential Victorian suburb with large light airy rooms. Available now, first-floor flat: double bedroom, drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom. Available end-June: 2 ground-floor flats, each with double and single bedrooms, drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom. Available July: second-floor flat, double bedroom, drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom. Off-street parking, large secluded garden. Tel.:/fax: 01865 552400.


Serviced Accommodation

Finally! the luxurious and economical alternative to 5-star luxury hotels, in central Oxford. Ambassador's Oxford offers clients short-stay 2-bedroom, 2 bathroom–1 en suite–5-star apartments in the centre of Oxford with allocated parking. Only 3 minutes' walk from the railway station and the Saïd Business School. Furnished to a very high standard to include well-equipped kitchen and lounge, computer, printer, internet access, and weekly Maid Service. From £118 per apartment per night, to accommodate up to 4/5 guests. Contact: www.ambassadorsoxford.co.uk, or tel.: 07876 203378.


Accommodation Offered

Oxford B & B. A home from home. £55 double/£40 single. Tel.: 01865 770 501, e-mail: open@europe.com.

Country Retreat? Occasional use of huge room in peaceful country house (gardens, lake, sheep), half-hour drive from Oxford, offered in exchange for similarly occasional use of room in central Oxford. Might suit single, mature, academic/writer or similar. Tel.: 01608 643922.

Finders Keepers is celebrating its 30th year as Oxfordshire's leading letting agent, providing a specialist service to both landlords and tenants throughout the Oxfordshire and the surrounding counties. With experienced letting and management teams Finders Keepers provide a high standard of service to all our clients. If you would like more information about Finders Keepers' services please contact us at our Head Office at 226 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford, OX2 7BY, tel.: (00 44) 1865 311011, or visit the Finders Keepers Web site at www.finders.co.uk.

Paying guests, visiting academics, welcomed for short or long stays in the comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple, in exclusive, quiet, leafy central north Oxford, within walking distance of all main university buildings, town centre, parks, river, good shops, and restaurants. All rooms have colour TV, tea-/coffee-making facilities, microwave, and refrigerator and/or deep-freeze availability, c.h., and independent heating. Breakfast included in the very moderate terms. Tel./fax: 01865 557879.

Delightful rooms in North Oxford available now. £55 p.w. Book by telephone or fax: 01865 511657 or e-mail: coulsonm@btconnect.com.

Available by the week for visitors to Oxford: self-contained, fully-furnished studio flat, centrally located in Kingston Road. En suiteshower, toilet and washbasin, and fully-equipped kitchen area. Sleeps 2. £315 p.w. all inc. British Tourist Board approved 3 Stars. For further information tel.: 01865 516913 or visit: http://www.oxfordcity.co.uk/accom/studioflat.


Accommodation Sought

Two quiet and tidy females (medical doctor 29, graduate researcher 31) seek furnished 2-bedroom flat or house from June/July onwards (for more than 1 year). North and central Oxford or Jericho preferred. Please contact Dr Christiane Wegner, 01865 248781.

Non-smoking academic, Faculty Director for a Study Abroad program at Oxford, seeks a furnished 2-bedroom flat, central heating, bright rooms, conveniently located (walking distance from the centre), washing machine, if possible from mid- Aug.,–mid-Dec. Please contact Dr Toni Travis, Department of Public and International Affairs, 3F4, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA. E-mail:ttravis@gmu.edu. Fax: 001 703 993 1399, tel.: 001 703 993 1453.

Academic couple, with 2 children (ages 4 and 7), seeking accommodation in Paris from 28 June to 19 July . Also seeking accommodation in the country in France (with 4 bedrooms) from 20 July to 15 Aug. Please contact Dr Peter Holbrook, School of English, University of Queensland, Australia. E-mail: P.Holbrook@mailbox.uq.edu.au.

Visiting academic and family from University of Pittsburgh, USA, will be at Oxford University from 1 June–31 Aug. We are looking for a furnished 3-or4- bedroom house we could rent during that time. Please contact Lee Harrison at lharriso@edc.pitt.edu or tel.: 001 (412) 487 9516 (reverse charges).

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us: 01865 764533, fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk. Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.


Accommodation Sought to Exchange

House exchange: 5-bedroom Victorian house on 0.75 acres of wooded land in Newton, Massachusetts, USA for a house in or near Oxford for 9–12 months between Aug.,2003 and July 2004. Situated on a secluded cul-de-sac, large garden, all modern conveniences and 1 car; 20-30 minute drive to Longwood Medical Area, Cambridge and downtown Boston. Easy access to the train. Non-smokers preferred. Contact Colin and/or Gill Sieff. Tel.: 001 617 632 3531 (work) or 001 617 527 1417, e-mail: colin_sieff@dfci.harvard.edu.


Holiday Lets

Venice: large flat in the heart of Venice, near Palazzo Grassi, in the heart of Venice, with large traditional sitting-room, and separate dining room, well-appointed kitchen, 1 double bedroom with en suitebathroom, second bedroom with twin beds, third bedroom with 1 bed (+ 1), and a second bathroom. The flat is ideal for a family, in pristine condition, and available for short periods on a weekly basis at £600 per week. Tel.: + 39 0423 723582, e-mail: tagariello@libero.it.

Cote d'Azur: 2-bedroom apartment available for winter let, Oct.–March. Quiet, sought-after village location in forested hills. Tel.: 0033494 551684. E-mail: philip.gartrell-mills@isipisi.com.

Dordogne cottage to let with glorious panoramic view in `best bit' between Sarlat and Domme. Family home since 1970; good antique furniture, many books, top quality beds, linen, crockery etc. Three bedrooms, 2 luxurious bathrooms. Sleeps 6-8, more if children piled in attic! Kitchen extremely simple but has 2 fridges. Some weeks available in late May, July/Aug., from £350 p.w. Details: 00 33 5 53 28 14 85 or e- mail: angelambert@compuserve.com.

S.W. France: artist's restored 15th-century cottage in truffle-country hamlet near Perigueux. Prehistoric caves, Romanesque architecture, tennis, swimming, and walking nearby. Sleeps 5. £350 p.w., July and Aug.; £300 p.w., May, June, Sept., Oct. Central heating allows comfortable winter and spring holidays @ £250 p.w. Additional separate accommodation in former cart-shed (la remise) sleeps 3, fully-equipped and heated, available from May 15 @ £225 p.w., July and Aug.; £200 p.w. May, June, Sept., Oct.; £175 p.w. rest of year. Contact: chauzan@hotmail.com.

York Holiday Apartment: 1-bedroom riverside apartment (sleeps 2): 5 minutes walk to historic city centre; sitting/dining room, small balcony, new kitchen, bathroom. Oct.–Apr., £280 p.w. Short breaks £45/night (min., 3 nights). May-Sept., £320 p.w. (£50/night). Christine Turner 01954 201218, e-mail: cmt22@hermes.cam.ac.uk, Web site: http://www.yorkholidayflat.co.uk.

South-west France: attractive farmhouse set in over 1 acre garden, beautiful quiet position, 10 x 5 metre swimming pool; 3 km from medieval village Lauzerte, auto-route from Bordeaux 2 hrs/Toulouse Airport 1 hr. Golf, tennis, fishing nearby and Cahors wine region. Sleeps 6 plus attic bedroom with 5 beds so equally suitable for couples or larger group. Still available Sept., £500 p.w., autumn/winter lets negotiable. Tel.: Helen 01367 810218 or Sally 01494 864573.

Tuscan Farmhouse, 16th-century: charming private country home, beautifully appointed, between Siena and Arezzo. Four bedrooms (sleeps 7); 2 sitting-rooms, piano, library. Private lake 5 minutes away. Riding and 13th-century spa nearby. E-mail: mellerma@brandeis.edu. Web site: www.ilvallone.com.

Paris apartment available for short stays: delightful 1-bedroom, first- floor flat overlooking the Place du Marche St Catherine (Marais). Period building with large windows and high ceilings. Attractively furnished and well-equipped with television, CD, hairdryer, etc. Linens and cleaning provided. Available from 1 June for short lets, 3 nights minimum. £55 per night, £325 per week or £950 per month for members of the university. (Non-member rates are £65 per night, £395 p.w., and £1,050 p.c.m.). We also have a small studio available (again in the Marais) from 26 Mar.,–10 Apr., and for the month of May at £40 per night, £250 p.w., and £750 p.c.m. Contact Dr J.J. Chamberlain on 07957 588 448 or e-mail: joe.chamberlain@ukgateway.net.

Edinburgh: lovely light spacious Victorian flat, in quiet cul de sac in central Edinburgh (Bruntsfield). Walk across Bruntsfield Links and the Meadows to the Royal Mile, Festival Theatre etc. Just off Bruntsfield Place with its excellent restaurants and food shops. Three bedrooms (2 double), sleeps up to 6. Unrestricted parking, garden. Available from 24 Apr. E-mail: doreen@mcbarnet.fsnet.co.uk.

Cornwall, near Sennen Cove: converted barn, sleeps 4/5. Comfortable, well-equipped, sea view, small garden. £155-£350 p.w., incl. of electricity and linen. Currently booked from 26 July–23 Aug. Visit www.hayloftcottage.co.uk, or tel.: 01865 557713.

Gardens of Cornwall B & B: if you are visiting the gardens of Cornwall this year why not stay at Colgare House B & B, strategically placed on the Lanhydrock Estate near Bodmin, surrounded by woodlands and pasture Colgare is a tranquil Victorian house offering 2 double and 2 single bedrooms for guests all of which have magnificent views to the south. From this central point, with access to the A30 and A38 it is only 20 minutes to The Eden Project and 35 minutes to the Lost Gardens of Heligan as well as either of Cornwall's North or South coasts. Well behaved dogs are welcome. B & B from £28–£35 per person per night. Phone Colgare House 01208 269 605. E-mail: colgarehouse@onetel.net.uk.

Corsica, Sardinia and Provence: we are a small family owned and run villa specialist offering excellent quality self-catering accommodation, and a selection of hotels in these 3 beautiful destinations. Excellent availability end of June and throughout the summer. Please see our Web site: www.voyagesilena.co.uk or tel.: 020 7924 4440.

Tuscany: "Corzano & Paterno", a top award winning family run wine and cheese producing farm, half-hour south of Florence (Chianti), offers faithfully restored farmhouses and apartments for rent. Swimming pool. Contact Sibilla Gelpke (Wadham '01) at: corzpaterno@libero.it.

Gower Coast: holiday house available from July. Two self-contained halves each sleep 4–6 (10 max.). Ideal families/groups sharing or independent. Private road adjacent Pennard Golf course above Three Cliffs bay. Large sheltered garden. Dogs welcome. From £350 p.w. E-mail: swainsonjc@aol.com, or tel.: 01865 433499.


Crete. A traditional Cretan house in old town Rethimno, superbly renovated to provide space and comfort in beautifully furnished surroundings. Elevated, vine- covered, sitting area with brick barbecue—perfect for alfresco dining. It is in a quiet area, and close to long, sandy beach, taverns, shops, and the many interesting sights in and around this historic area. Sleeps 4 (1 double, 1 twin). Available all year round. All linen, electricity and cleaning inc. 2002 rates on request. Tel./fax: Nikolaos Glinias, 0030 831 56525, e-mail: nglynias@ret.forthnet.gr.

Deepest S.W. France: two spacious and beautifully converted farmhouse properties, each with pool and large gardens. Sleep 6 and 10 comfortably. Ring Marion on 01865 554122 or 00 33 5 63 24 08 78, or e-mail: marion@hidden-sw-france.com. Http://www.hidden-sw-france.com.

South West France, 18th-c., farmhouse near Duras; quiet, lovely views set amidst vineyards and woods. Bicycles, excellent walking, beautiful 15m pool, non- chlorinated, 2 terraces, sleeps 6. Well-equipped, large barn with pingpong etc. Available now until 12 July, and from 30 Aug. Autumn generally warm, and good for swimming. Very reasonable rates from Oct., and for longer lets.Tel.: 01865 553685, e-mail: ewtoucan@globalnet.co.uk.


Houses for Sale

Central Oxford–Grandpont: walking distance of city centre; 3- bedroom, stylishly restored Victorian house. Period features, open fireplaces, sash windows. Fully equipped kitchen. First-floor bathroom. Gas c.h. West facing garden. £299,950. Tel.: 01865 469005, e-mail: ameasham@hotmail.com, or 07919336452.

Marston: well-appointed modern end-terrace townhouse, located close to University Parks/Science area. Spacious and flexible accommodation: 4 bedrooms (1 en suite); living room;large kitchen; family room; gas c.h. Attractive gardens front/rear. Good cycle route to city centre. Price: £250,000. Tel.: 01865 427773.

Marston/Headington: first-floor maisonette with own garden. Well presented throughout. Re-fitted kitchen, d.g., and gas c.h. Good access to JR and number 10 and 13 buses. £135,000. contact Buckell and Ballard 01865 760 881.

Three-bedroom house on quiet 1930's estate. Walking distance of Iffley Lock and of Cowley shops. Well-maintained and decorated. Lovely south-facing garden. Brick-built garage plus off-road parking. Asking price £215,000. Will accept reduction for quick sale. E-mail: judith.secker@admin.ox.ac.uk. Tel.: 01865 777015.

Savoie, France: by the beautiful Lac du Bourget, a 1982-built, 4- bedroom house with superb views of the lake and the Jura mountains, standing in 2,300 sq metres of lovely gardens. All modern conveniences. Double garage. Excellent condition. 320,000 Euros. Tel.: 00 33 479 52 29 51/Fax: 00 33 479 52 21 28, or e-mail: hancock@wanadoo.fr.

Appointments

NUFFIELD PROFESSORSHIP OF CLINICAL MEDICINE

The Nuffield Professorship of Clinical Medicine is a key position within the Medical Sciences Division of the University, and is amongst the most prestigious academic posts in medicine in Europe. The Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, within which the professorship is held, is one of the largest academic medical departments in the UK and conducts research of the highest calibre ranging from human genetics and molecular medicine to clinically-based research.

Applications are invited for the above post, tenable from 1 October 2003, or such later date as may be arranged. The successful candidate will be a recognised international authority in some area of medical science and will be expected to lead his or her own substantial research programme which will reinforce or complement the existing research strengths of the department.

The Nuffield Professor will be required both to give a lead in research and management and to make a demonstrable commitment to teaching and training and engagement in clinical practice. A non-stipendiary fellowship at Magdalen College is attached to the professorship.

Further particulars, including details of how to apply, are available from http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/, or from the Registrar, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: Oxford (2)70200). The closing date for applications is Monday, 2 June.


PROFESSORSHIP OF STATISTICS

The University seeks to appoint a world-class statistician with proven leadership skills to take up this new professorship from 1 October 2003 or as soon as possible thereafter.

The professorship will be held in the Department of Statistics, which has recently experienced an exciting period of growth and development, and is now one of the leading UK departments. The successful candidate will be expected to establish a substantial research group in the modern mainstream of the subject, to contribute to its teaching, and to further the academic planning and strategic development of statistics in the University as a whole. The person appointed will be elected to a professorial fellowship at Jesus College.

Further particulars, including details of how to apply, are available from http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/, or from the Registrar, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: Oxford (2)70200). The closing date for applications is Monday, 2 June.


DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES

University Lecturership (Medical) in Clinical Neurology

In association with Green College

Applications are invited for the post of University Lecturer (Medical) in Clinical Neurosciences, the post to be taken up from a date to be agreed. The university lecturer will be required to carry out teaching, clinical work, and administrative duties under the Head of Department's overall direction.

The successful candidate will be clinically qualified and have an independent research programme. In addition he/she will be expected to undertake a programme of research which will be based predominantly at the Radcliffe Infirmary. There are numerous opportunities for collaborative research within the University. The university lecturer will be eligible for honorary NHS consultant status, if suitably qualified, and will be expected to undertake clinical work related to his/her research and in general neurology.

The salary will be in the range £52,640–£68,505 per annum, according to age and qualifications. The successful candidate may be offered a fellowship at Green College, in the circumstances set out in the further particulars.

Ten copies of applications (or one from overseas candidates), with the names of three referees (at least one of which should be from outside Oxford), should be sent to Professor G.C. Ebers, Head of Department of Clinical Neurology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford OX2 6HE (telephone: Oxford 228568, fax: 790493), from whom further particulars may be obtained. Interested candidates are encouraged to visit the department. The closing date for applications is Saturday, 10 May.


AREA AND DEVELOPMENT STUDIES COMMITTEE

University Lecturership in International Political Economy and Academic Directorship of the Foreign Service Programme, Queen Elizabeth House

Queen Elizabeth House in association with St Cross College

The University wishes to appoint a University Lecturer to direct and teach on the Foreign Service Programme at Queen Elizabeth House, the University's International Development Centre, and to contribute to teaching on the M.Phil. in Development Studies and to the departmental research activity. The post, which is to take effect from 1 September 2003 or as soon as possible thereafter, is to be filled in conjunction with a fellowship at St Cross College. The person appointed should have a doctorate in international political economy or related subject, an extensive, active research record, and academic management experience.

Practical experience of international politics or diplomacy would be relevant; a diplomatic director supports the teaching of diplomatic practice on the Programme.

The stipend will be according to age, on the ULNTF scale £22,191–£42,900 per annum.

Further particulars are available from the QEH Web site, http://www2.qeh.ox.ac.uk/people/va cancies.html, and from the Administrator, Queen Elizabeth House, 21 St Giles', Oxford OX1 3LA (telephone: Oxford (2)73599, e-mail: sarah.abbott@qeh.ox.ac.uk), to whom completed applications, with a curriculum vitae and the names and addresses of three referees (eight copies, or one if airmailing), should be sent by Friday, 9 May.


DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY

University Lecturership in Genetics

In association with Magdalen College

Applications are sought from scientists with a proven record of research in molecular genetics, preferably with relevance to human genetics, for a vacant lecturership in a large and successful multidisciplinary department. Candidates should be able to give lectures and devise and conduct practical classes in molecular genetics for students of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, Biological Sciences, and Human Sciences. The lecturership is associated with a Tutorial Fellowship in Genetics at Magdalen College, under arrangements described in the college further particulars. The salary will be according to age on a combined college and university scale from £26,734 up to a maximum of £42,900 per annum. Additional college allowances are available, as set out in the further particulars.

Further particulars, with details of university and college duties and emoluments, and information about the department can be obtained from http://www.bioch.ox.ac.uk, or from the Head of Department, Department of Biochemistry, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU (e-mail: head@bioch.ox.ac.uk). Informal enquiries may be addressed to Professor Jonathan Hodgkin (e-mail: jah@ bioch.ox.ac.uk).

Applications (eight copies except from candidates overseas, who need send only one), including a curriculum vitae, a summary of research, a list of principal publications, and the names of three referees, should be sent to the Head of Department (address above), before Monday, 19 May. Electronic applications are not acceptable. Candidates will be notified if they are required for interview.


FACULTY OF LAW

University Lecturership in Commercial Law

In association with Brasenose College

University Lecturership in Intellectual Property Law

In association with St Catherine's College

Applications are invited for these two posts, which are both tenable from 1 October 2003. Each post is associated with a tutorial fellowship, at Brasenose College and St Catherine's College respectively. For both posts, the combined university and college salary would be according to age on the scale up to £42,900 per annum. Additional college allowances may be available.

Further particulars, containing details of the duties and full range of emoluments and allowances attaching to both the university and the college posts, may be obtained at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/, or from Mrs S.E. Samuelson, Faculty Administrator, Faculty of Law, St Cross Building, St Cross Road, Oxford OX1 3UL (telephone: Oxford (2)71560, e-mail: simonne.samuelson@law.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for applications is Monday, 12 May (5 p.m.).


DEPARTMENT FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

Half-time University Lecturership in Literature

Applications are invited for a half-time University Lecturership in Literature, with effect from 1 September 2003. A fellowship of Kellogg College is associated with the post. Salary according to age, on the scale £22,191–£35,845 (pro rata).

The successful candidate will be well-qualified academically in some aspect of literary study, and will have a proven record of teaching and research. Specialist knowledge of twentieth-century literature in English would be advantageous, though not essential, as would experience in continuing education. The successful candidate will be expected to be research active.

Further particulars and application forms can be obtained by e-mail from personnel@conted.ox.ac.uk or by telephoning Oxford (2)80152. Applications should be sent to Anne Holmes, OUDCE, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA, no later than noon on Friday, 16 May.


Fixed-term Staff Tutorship in Computing

Applications are invited for a full-time Staff Tutorship in Computing, with effect from 1 September 2003 for a period of three years, with the possibility of renewal. A Supernumerary Fellowship of Kellogg College is associated with the post. Salary according to age, on the scale £22,191–£35,845.

The successful candidate will be well-qualified academically in Computing and have a broad knowledge of modern developments in information and communication technology. It is desirable that the successful candidate have a proven record of teaching and research and especially a record in the teaching of adult learners and independent learners.

Further particulars and application forms can be obtained by e-mail from personnel@conted.ox.ac.uk or by telephoning Oxford (2)80152. Applications should be sent to Anne Holmes, OUDCE, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA, no later than noon on Friday, 16 May.


Part-time Associate Tutorship in Theology and Religious Studies (0.4 fte)

Applications are invited for a part-time Associate Tutor in Theology and Religious Studies (two days per week—0.4 fte), to begin as soon as possible. Salary according to age and experience, on the scale £18,265–£24,121 per annum (pro rata). The contract is on an annually renewable basis.

The successful candidate will be well-qualified academically in Theology; familiarity with Religious Studies would be desirable. The successful candidate will also have a proven record of teaching. Experience of adult education would be advantageous.

Further particulars and an application forms can be obtained by e-mail from personnel@conted.ox.ac.uk or by telephoning Oxford (2)80152. Applications should be sent to Anne Holmes, OUDCE, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA, no later than noon on Friday, 16 May.


Part-time Associate Tutorship in Creative Writing (0.2 fte): Course Directorship of the Undergraduate Diploma in Creative Writing

Applications are invited for a part-time Associate Tutor in Creative Writing (one day per week—0.2 fte), to undertake the course direction of the two-year part-time Undergraduate Diploma in Creative Writing. The successful candidate will be expected to take up post on 1 August 2003. Salary according to age and experience, on the scale £18,265–£24,121 per annum (pro rata). The contract is on an annually renewable basis.

The successful candidate will be a published author with experience of teaching Creative Writing. A proven record in administration and some experience of continuing education would also be advantageous.

Further particulars and an application forms can be obtained by e-mail from personnel@conted.ox.ac.uk or by telephoning Oxford (2)80152. Applications should be sent to Anne Holmes, OUDCE, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA, no later than noon on Friday, 16 May.


LECTURERSHIP/FELLOWSHIP IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

In association with New College or St Hilda's College

Applications are invited for the above post, tenable from 1 October 2003. Candidates should be able to teach a wide range of subjects in Chemical Engineering within a four-year Engineering Science syllabus, and have substantial research expertise in this field. The lecturership is associated with a Tutorial Fellowship at New College if the appointee is a man, or if the appointee is a woman, at either New College or St Hilda's College, whose statutes permit the appointment only of women fellows. If a woman is appointed and offered a fellowship by both St Hilda's College and New College, she may choose which one to accept. The combined university and college salary will be according to age on a scale of up to £42,900 per annum.

Further particulars, which include information about selection procedures, and details of the duties and the full range of emoluments and allowances attached to both the university and college appointments, may be seen at http://www.eng.ox.ac.uk/, where the department's research summary and information on the undergraduate courses may also be found.

Applications should be sent to the Head of Department, Department of Engineering Science, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PJ (fax: Oxford (2)83310, e-mail: nikki.johnson@eng.ox.ac.uk), including a statement of proposed research and the names and addresses of three referees, to arrive no later than 8 May.

The University, St Hilda's College, and New College are equal opportunities employers.


LECTURERSHIP/FELLOWSHIP IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (FLUIDS)

In association with Wadham College or St Hilda's College

Applications are invited for the above post, tenable from 1 October 2003. Candidates should be able to teach a wide range of subjects in Mechanical Engineering within a four-year Engineering Science syllabus, and have substantial research expertise in fluid dynamics. The lecturership is associated with a Tutorial Fellowship at Wadham College if the appointee is a man, or if the appointee is a woman, at either Wadham College or St Hilda's College, whose statutes permit the appointment only of women fellows. If a woman is appointed and offered a fellowship by both St Hilda's College and Wadham College, she may choose which one to accept. The combined university and college salary will be according to age on a scale of up to £42,900 per annum.

Further particulars, which include information about selection procedures, and details of the duties and the full range of emoluments and allowances attached to both the university and college appointments, may be seen at http://www.eng.ox.ac.uk/, where the department's research summary and information on the undergraduate courses may also be found.

Applications should be sent to the Head of Department, Department of Engineering Science, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PJ (fax: Oxford (2)83310, e-mail: nikki.johnson@eng.ox.ac.uk), including a statement of proposed research and the names and addresses of three referees, to arrive no later than 8 May.

The University, Wadham College, and St Hilda's College are equal opportunities employers.


LECTURERSHIP/FELLOWSHIP IN ELECTRONIC MATERIALS ENGINEERING

In association with Lincoln College

Applications are invited for the above post, tenable from 1 October 2003. Candidates should be able to teach a wide range of subjects in Electrical Engineering within a four-year Engineering Science syllabus, and have substantial research expertise in electronic materials. The successful candidate will be offered a tutorial fellowship by Lincoln College, under arrangements described in the college further particulars. The combined university and college salary will be according to age on a scale of up to £42,900 per annum. The further particulars, which include information about selection procedures, and details of the duties and the full range of emoluments and allowances attached to both the university and college appointments, may be viewed at http://www.eng.ox.ac.uk/, where the department's research summary and information on the undergraduate courses may also be found.

Applications should be sent to the Head of Department, Department of Engineering Science, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PJ (fax: Oxford (2)83310, e-mail: nikki.johnson@eng.ox.ac.uk), including a statement of proposed research and the names and addresses of three referees, to arrive no later than 2 May.

The University and Lincoln College are equal opportunities employers.


LECTURERSHIP/FELLOWSHIP IN IMPACT ENGINEERING

In association with Exeter College

Applications are invited for the above post, tenable from 1 October 2003. Candidates should be able to teach a wide range of subjects in Mechanical Engineering within a four-year Engineering Science syllabus, and have substantial research expertise in solid mechanics and impact engineering. The successful candidate will be offered an official fellowship by Exeter College, under arrangements described in the college further particulars. The combined university and college salary will be according to age on a scale of up to £42,900 per annum. The further particulars, which include information about selection procedures, and details of the duties and the full range of emoluments and allowances attached to both the university and college appointments, may be viewed at http://www.eng.ox.ac.uk/, where the department's research summary and information on the undergraduate courses may also be found.

Applications should be sent to the Head of Department, Department of Engineering Science, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PJ (fax: Oxford (2)83310, e-mail: nikki.johnson@eng.ox.ac.uk), including a statement of proposed research and the names and addresses of three referees, to arrive no later than 2 May.

The University and Exeter College are equal opportunities employers.


DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL STUDIES

Departmental Lecturership in Educational Studies (Geography Education) (0.5, fixed-term)

The University wishes to appoint a part-time (0.5) fixed-term Departmental Lecturer (Geography Education) for a period of three years, beginning 1 September 2003.

The person appointed will be expected to contribute mainly to the PGCE (secondary education) course, especially in the teaching of geography. The PGCE course received top gradings in the recent OFSTED inspections, and the person appointed will be expected to have the experience and ability to help the department maintain this very high standard.

There will be opportunities for the person appointed to be closely associated with professional development courses in geography education, and with the research of the department (graded 5 at the last RAE), to which the successful candidate will be expected to contribute. The post provides an ideal opportunity for a geography educator who may wish to pursue part-time studies for a higher degree.

The appointment will be on the Oxford scale for departmental lecturers (£18,265–£29,621 per annum, pro rata).

Further particulars are available from the Secretary to the Director, Department of Educational Studies, 15 Norham Gardens, Oxford OX2 6PY (telephone: Oxford (2)74024, e-mail: sara.loosemore@edstud.ox.ac.uk), to whom applications (six copies including a letter of application, a curriculum vitae, and the names and contact details of two referees) should be sent by post to arrive not later than 6 May (reference number EP03004 should be quoted in correspondence). It is hoped that interviews will take place before the end of May.


UK CLIMATE IMPACTS PROGRAMME (ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE INSTITUTE)

Appointment of Scientific Officer

The UK Climate Impacts Programme (UKCIP), part of the Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford, was established in April 1997. The Programme is funded by the Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs, currently until March 2005.ukCIP supports a stakeholder-led integrated impacts assessment, and works with organisations to prepare adaptation strategies for climate change.

The post of Scientific Officer is required to (1) provide scientific advice and support to UKCIP studies especially in relation to use of scenarios, datasets, and quantification and visualisation techniques; (2) help UKCIP develop an integrated national assessment of vulnerability to climate change; (3) acquire, maintain, and develop datasets for UKCIP studies; and (4) manage some of UKCIP's portfolio of projects.

The person appointed will have a good scientific degree, relevant postgraduate experience, awareness of climate change issues, and will have demonstrable communication and team-working skills. The appointment is initially for a fixed term to 31 March 2005. The salary will be on the RS IA scale, commensurate with experience, within the range £18,265–£27,339. Copies of the job description may be obtained from Sally Jeffery (telephone: Oxford 432076), or see the Web site http://www.ukcip.org.uk.

Applicants are required to send a covering letter and curriculum vitae to the Administrator, UKCIP, Union House, 12–16 St Michael's Street, Oxford OX1 2DU (e-mail: sally.jeffery@ukcip.org.uk).

For an informal talk about this post telephone Chris West, Director, UKCIP (telephone: Oxford 432076).

The closing date for all applications is 28 April, and interviews will take place on 8 May.


FACULTY OF ORIENTAL STUDIES

Instructorships in Japanese

Applications are invited for three Instructorships in Japanese, tenable from 1 October 2003. These are permanent posts (subject to a satisfactory review after the third year), with stipend on the instructors' salary scale A12 (£18,265–£21,125 per annum).

The instructors will give up to twenty hours of instruction in all aspects of Japanese (including translation into English and giving explanation of grammar in English) in each week of the university full term. Applicants should have a native command or equivalent of Japanese, good command of English, and experience of teaching Japanese as a foreign language. The instructor will join a team comprising three language instructors in all and four university lecturers in Japanese in the Faculty of Oriental Studies, together with the teaching staff at the Nissan Institute of Modern Japanese Studies.

There is no application form. Further particulars of the post (which all applicants are asked to consult) are available on the University's Web site at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/, or alternatively may be obtained from the office of Ms Charlotte Vinnicombe, Secretary to the Oriental Studies Board, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE (telephone: Oxford (2)78210, fax: (2)78190, e-mail: charlotte.vinnicombe@orinst.ox.ac.uk), to whom five copies of applications (or one from candidates who are based overseas) should be sent no later than Friday, 2 May.


PERSONNEL SERVICES, UNIVERSITY OFFICES

Appointment of Personnel Officer (Reward Project)

The University is an exciting organisation offering stimulating work. It enjoys an international reputation as a world-class centre of excellence in research and teaching, and employs over 7,000 staff.

For this newly created post in the central Personnel Services Section, the University seeks a highly motivated person, with strong communication and numerical skills, to provide an informed contribution to policy development work specifically relating to job evaluation and reward systems.

Candidates will be expected to have knowledge of job evaluation and relevant employment law (especially equal value legislation), some interviewing experience, and the ability to demonstrate analytic and problem solving skills equivalent to those derived from education to honours degree level. They will be computer literate with competence in word-processing, Excel, and database systems.

The post is offered for three years in the first instance. The role offers focused professional experience for someone who has recently obtained membership of the CIPD (or is pursuing qualification). The post is on the academic-related administrative grade 2 scale (salary £21,125–£27,339 per annum). Further particulars, including details of how to apply, are available at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/, or may be obtained from Mrs J. Pengelly (telephone: Oxford (2)70128), University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD. The closing date for applications is 9 May. Interviews will be held on 19 May.


BALLIOL COLLEGE

Appointment of Secretary to the Development Director

The Development Office is responsible for fund-raising and for relations between Balliol College and its former students. The college is looking for someone with excellent secretarial and administrative skills who is confident about using databases. The ideal candidate will have a secretarial qualification, a cheerful and outgoing personality, excellent communication skills—both verbal and written—and a professional approach to his/her work. This is a varied and demanding position requiring energy, enthusiasm, and effective time management.

The starting salary will be £17,340 (with annual cost of living award pending).

Further particulars may be obtained from Alastair James, Development Director, Balliol College, Oxford OX1 3BJ (telephone: Oxford (2)77691, e-mail: alastair.james@ balliol.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for applications is 9 May, and interviews will be held on 19 May.

Balliol College is an equal opportunities employer.


CHRIST CHURCH

Millard and Lee Alexander Postdoctoral Fellowship

Christ Church invites applications for the Millard and Lee Alexander Fellowship, to be taken up at the beginning of the academic year 2003–4. The fellowship is intended to give college affiliation to a postdoctoral research worker from outside Oxford. It is non-stipendiary, but includes membership of the senior common room, subsidised lunches, and free dinners, and a housing allowance or, if available, college accommodation. Applicants must have carried out their doctoral research at a university other than Oxford, and must have been appointed to a salaried post in the research group of a member of staff in one of the laboratories or departments of the Oxford University Mathematical and Physical Sciences Division with a tenure of at least twelve months from the date of taking up the fellowship. The initial period of the fellowship is for one year, but it may be renewed for up to a further year while the departmental appointment continues.

Application forms and further particulars can be obtained from the Dean's Secretary, Christ Church, Oxford OX1 1DP (fax: Oxford (2)76238); further particulars also appear on http://www.chch.ox.ac.uk/jobs. Applications should include the names and addresses of three referees, who should be asked to write directly to the Dean's Secretary. One reference should be a statement of support from the staff member responsible for the departmental appointment to be held by the applicant. Applications should also include a full curriculum vitae, together with an account of the applicant's proposed research and its significance. This should not exceed 1,000 words, and be written in non-technical language.

The deadline for applications and the receipt of references is Friday, 30 May.


GREEN COLLEGE

E.P. Abraham Research Fellowship

With the support of the Trustees of the E.P. Abraham Research Fund, Green College is proposing to appoint an E.P. Abraham Research Fellow for a maximum of three years with effect from Michaelmas Term 2003. The fellowship is open to graduates of any university who are undertaking relevant research in the University in the fields of biological, medical, or chemical science, and who do not have another college attachment.

The research fellowship is non-stipendiary and is expected to be held in conjunction with a research appointment. It provides access to all college facilities, dining rights, and an academic expenses allowance of £250 per annum.

An application form and notes for applicants are available from the Warden's Secretary (telephone: Oxford (2)74775, e-mail: jan.dean@green.ox.ac.uk). Forms should be returned with four copies of a full curriculum vitae to the Warden, Green College, Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6HG, not later than Tuesday, 6 May. Selection will take place as soon as possible thereafter.


MERTON COLLEGE

Stipendiary Lecturership in French

Merton College proposes to appoint a Stipendiary Lecturer in French for two years from 1 October 2003, to teach up to six hours a week. The lecturer will be paid at a point on the stipendiary lecturers' scale (currently £9,133–£10,562 per annum, plus a book allowance of £637), with entitlement to join USS, and membership of the common room, with the right to take lunch and dinner free of charge.

The successful candidate, who should have completed (or be about to complete) his/her doctoral studies, will specialise in any area of modern French studies (post-1800). He/she will be expected to teach language (mainly translation from French and essay work) and literature, including all of the texts studied for the Prelims examination and as much as possible of the post-1800 Finals syllabus (Papers VIII, XI, and certain Paper XIIs). In addition to his/her teaching duties, the successful candidate will be expected to attend Warden and tutors' meetings during term, to help with the organisation of modern languages within college, to lend pastoral support to the modern linguists, and to assist with admissions.

Applicants should send a copy of their curriculum vitae to the Tutorial Secretary, Merton College, Oxford OX1 4JD (telephone: Oxford (2)76329, fax: (2)86500, e-mail: clare.bass@admin.merton.ox.ac.uk), by 16 May, and should ask two referees to write directly to the Tutorial Secretary by this date. Interviews will be held in college in early June.


ORIEL COLLEGE

Seton-Watson Senior Scholarship

Oriel College proposes to elect a Seton-Watson Senior Scholar for a period of two years from 1 October 2003.

The scholarship is open to graduates of any university who are currently reading, or have been accepted to read, for a higher degree at the University. Although the scholarship was founded for the study of Italian History or Politics, applications are also encouraged from students in International Relations generally.

The scholar will be a member of the senior common room and will be entitled to free lunches and dinners at the common table and, if unmarried, to rooms in college. If married, the scholar will be allowed a study room free of charge in college and paid a housing allowance, and may also receive a sum not exceeding £600 for each year of the tenure of the scholarship.

Applicants should write to the Academic Registrar, Mrs Yvonne Scott, enclosing a curriculum vitae and an outline of proposed research (eight copies of each) together with the names of three referees. Candidates are asked to request their referees to send references direct to the Academic Registrar before Friday, 23 May.

The closing date for applications is Friday, 23 May, and references should reach the Academic Registrar, Oriel College, Oxford OX1 4EW, by this date. References may also be either faxed to Oxford 791823 or e-mailed to Mrs Yvonne Scott (e-mail: yvonne.scott@oriel.ox.ac.uk).


ST CROSS COLLEGE

Knoop Junior Research Fellowship 2003

St Cross College proposes to make an election to this Junior Research Fellowship, tenable from 1 October 2003 (or another date by agreement), for one year in the first instance. The fellowship is to be held in conjunction with a position in the Department of Ophthalmology, involving research work in the general area of the composition and properties of tears and their interaction with the ocular surface. The aim is to study the contributions of these properties in normal functions of the external eye, and in relation to dry-eye disorders. The fellowship will be particularly suitable for graduates in physiology, biochemistry, or optometry and candidates with an interest in biophysics or surface chemistry are especially encouraged to apply. The fellowship is open to men and women and carries a stipend of £18,265 per annum, together with common table rights (five lunches a week).

Applicants should have submitted their doctoral dissertations by the date of taking up the appointment or have obtained the D.Phil./Ph.D. or equivalent within the last five years, but the college will exercise flexibility in the case of applicants whose academic careers have been interrupted.

Applications (marked Knoop JRF) should include a full curriculum vitae and the names of two referees and should be addressed to the Master, St Cross College, Oxford OX1 3LZ. The closing date for applications is 14 May. Applicants should ask their referees to send references direct to the Master by that date. It is expected that interviews will be held on 28 May.

Further details about scientific aspects can be obtained from Dr J.M. Tiffany, Nuffield Department of Ophthalmology, Walton Street, Oxford OX2 6AW (telephone: Oxford 248996, e-mail: john.tiffany@eye.ox.ac.uk).

The college exists to promote excellence in education and research, and is an equal opportunities employer.


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

Appointment of Library Assistant

Applications are invited for the full-time post of Library Assistant in the college Library. The successful applicant will assist the Librarian with most aspects of the day-to-day running of the Library. IT skills and experience of library work, especially in an automated library, are highly desirable. The salary will be on clerical and library grade 3 (£12,997–£15,053). There are attractive terms and conditions.

Further particulars of the post are available from the Librarian, University College, Oxford OX1 4BH (telephone: Oxford (2)76621, fax: Oxford (2)76987, e-mail: library@univ.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for applications is 9 May.


WORCESTER COLLEGE

Francis Reynolds Fellowship in Public and EC Law

Worcester College proposes to appoint a Senior Research Fellow in Public and EC Law for up to, but not more than, four years from 1 October 2003. The fellowship will be associated with an eight-hour Stipendiary Lecturership in Law and will carry full tutorial responsibility. The stipend is £21,125–£27,339 per annum, plus allowances.

The appointee will have a high standard of research and teaching ability. The fellowship is a career development position and it is expected that candidates will not normally be over the age of thirty. The college is an equal opportunity employer, and consideration will be given to applications submitted by candidates who can demonstrate that the application of this age limit would be inappropriate in their circumstances.

Application forms and further particulars, including details of the allowances, may be obtained from the Academic Administrator, Worcester College, Oxford OX1 2HB (telephone: Oxford (2)78342, e-mail: jane.gover@worc.ox.ac.uk), or from the Web pages at http://www.worc.ox.ac.uk/notices. The closing date for applications is Friday, 2 May.


WYCLIFFE HALL

Appointment of Finance Bursar

Wycliffe Hall wishes to appoint a Finance Bursar (thirty-five hours per week). The Finance Bursar is the senior financial officer of this flourishing theological college, playing a critically important role in its day-to-day financial management, and in planning for its future development.

The closing date for applications is Friday, 2 May (12 noon). Further details may be obtained from the College Administrator, Wycliffe Hall, 54 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PW (e-mail: helen.mitchell@wycliffe.ox.ac.uk).


UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE

Directorship of Continuing Education and Lifelong Learning

Applications are invited for the Directorship of Continuing Education and Lifelong Learning, which will become vacant on 1 October 2003 on the retirement of Dr M.E. Richardson. It is hoped the successful candidate will take up appointment on 1 October 2003 or as soon as possible thereafter.

The Director, as Head of the Institute of Continuing Education and the principal adviser to the University's Council for Lifelong Learning, has a key leadership and managerial role, which requires considerable personal stature, academic vision, and the ability to think and plan strategically.

The current pensionable stipend is £62,106, and an attractive recruitment package will be offered.

The appointment will be subject to the statutes and ordinances of the University of Cambridge. The University of Cambridge is committed to equality of opportunity.

Further information may be obtained from the Academic Secretary, University Offices, The Old Schools, Cambridge CB2 1TT (e-mail: ibise@admin.cam.ac.uk), to whom a letter of application and a curriculum vitae should be sent, together with the names of three referees, so as to reach him not later than Friday, 23 May.

Further information is available at http://www.cont-ed.cam.ac.uk.


CHRIST'S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE

College Lectureship and Fellowship in Economics

Applications are invited for a College Lectureship in any branch of Economics, associated with a fellowship of Christ's College.

The college lectureship will be tenable from 1 October 2003 for four years. The successful candidate will be expected to reside in Cambridge, to undertake at least six hours of teaching per week for the college during Full Term (equivalent to 120 hours per academic year), to act as a Director of Studies in Economics if requested to do so by the College Council, and to undertake research. The basic stipend of a college teaching officer, which is linked to the national academic university lecturers' scale, will be between £14,688 and £21,463 (reviewed annually in line with the national scale), at a starting point depending on age and experience. The stipend is subject to a small deduction if the fellow is resident in college. The basic stipend may be supplemented by additional teaching, which will be paid for at the normal hourly rates for college supervision.

Further particulars are available on the college Web site at http://www.christs.cam.ac.uk/ or may be requested in writing from the Master's Secretary. Letters of application (no forms) should be sent to the Master's Secretary, Christ's College, Cambridge CB2 3BU, to arrive by 15 May. These should include details of qualifications and experience, and the names and addresses of two persons who have agreed to act as academic referees. Candidates should arrange for their referees to write directly to the Master's Secretary so that references are received by the closing date of 15 May. Short-listed candidates will be asked for interview in late May.

The successful candidate should be active in research and would be encouraged to work and take a full part in the activities of the Faculty of Economics and Politics, or the Department of Applied Economics. Please see http://www.econ.cam.ac.uk/ for further details.


DOWNING COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE

Fellowship and College Lectureship in Law

Downing College invites applications for a Fellowship in Law, with effect from 1 September 2003, or as soon as possible thereafter. The appointment will be associated with a College Lectureship at St Edmund's College. The person appointed will be responsible, with the college Director of Studies in Law, for the academic work of undergraduates in Law. Applicants with a special interest in European Law, Administrative Law, and/or Land Law will be especially welcome.

The appointment will be for two years and is subject to the statutes and ordinances of the college. The stipend of a college lecturer, which can be pensionable under the Universities Superannuation Scheme, will be at a point in the range £21,125–£25,451 (university assistant lecturer scale), depending on age and experience. Further particulars and application forms can be obtained from the Senior Tutor, Downing College, Cambridge CB2 1DQ (e-mail: ceb34@cam.ac.uk), or can be downloaded from the college Web site
(http://www.dow.cam.ac.uk).

Applications, including a curriculum vitae and list of publications, should be sent to the Senior Tutor, Downing College, Cambridge CB2 1DQ, by 23 May. Applicants should arrange for three academic referees to write directly to the Senior Tutor (or e-mail: senior-tutor@dow.cam.ac.uk) by the closing date.


ST CATHARINE'S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE

Directorship of College Music

St Catharine's College seeks applications for the new post of Director of College Music. This is a part-time post requiring an average of 17.5 hours per week, although there will be periods during the vacations of relatively low activity. It is expected that the applicant will have a degree in music or similar professional qualification and be able to oversee the activities of the college Choir, the Choral and Organ Scholars, and the flourishing Music Society. A generous salary is offered.

Further details are available at http://www.caths.cam.ac.uk/fello ws/dirmusdet.html or from the Senior Bursar's Secretary, St Catharine's College, Cambridge CB2 1RL (telephone: 01223 338329, e-mail: bursars.secretary@caths.cam.ac.uk).

Diary

Institute for the Advancement of University Learning Seminars: places should be booked in advance through the IAUL (telephone: (2)86808, e-mail: services@learning.ox.ac.uk, Internet: http://www.learning.ox.ac.uk).


Friday 25 April

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The human face', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

CONFERENCE: `Muslims in Europe post-9/11' (conference arranged jointly by St Antony's and Princeton University), St Antony's, 25 and 26 April (attendance restricted to members of the University: those interested should apply in person or by e-mail to antonians@sant.ox.ac.uk).

SOLON PIERCE: piano recital, including works by Alkan, Balakirev, Brown, Busoni, Fauré, Herskowitz, Johansen, Medtner, and Poulenc, Maison Française, 8 p.m.


Sunday 27 April

TRINITY FULL TERM begins.

DOM HENRY WANSBROUGH, OSB, preaches the St Mark's Day Sermon, Magdalen, 10 a.m.


Monday 28 April

DR J. ARCHER: `Women healers, recipe books, and the intellectual circle of Katherine, Lady Ranelagh (1614--91)' (seminar series: `Medicine and culture before 1800'), Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 2.15 p.m.

R. SNODDY: `The sensational future of the British press' (Times Lecture), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

MICHAEL SCREECH: `Laughter in Rabelais' (lecture), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

MUSICAL EVENT for the University's fourth Hambro Visiting Professor of Opera, Graham Vick: a programme of scenes from Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin and Handel's Xerxes, with New Chamber Opera, Holywell Music Room, 8.30 p.m. (tickets £6 (£4 concessions) on the door; telephone for further information: (2)76125).


Tuesday 29 April

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Contract research staff—briefings for research supervisors', 12.30 p.m. (see information above).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Venetian painting', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

MASTERCLASS on Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin with Graham Vick, 2--5 p.m., New College Ante-Chapel (free of charge) (telephone for further information: (2)76125).

PETER BURKE: `Cultures of translation in early modern Europe' (Language and History Seminar), Basil Mitchell Room, Oriel, 2.15 p.m.

D. RYAN: `Americanisation and anti-Americanism at the periphery: from Central America to 9/11' (seminar series: `Americanisation and anti-Americanism: global views of the USA'), Rothermere American Institute, 2.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. BOWKER: `The appeal to history' (Hensley Henson Lectures: `The appeal to history as an integral part of Christian apologetics: did Henson waste his money?'), Schools, 5 p.m.

J. BUTT: `Is there a work-concept in seventeenth-century music?' (Graduate Colloquia), Denis Arnold Hall, Faculty of Music, 5.15 p.m.


Wednesday 30 April

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Recruitment and selection for occasional recruiters', 9.30 a.m., and `Introductory statistical modelling for research—introduction to modelling', 3 p.m. (see information above).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk in series `The Curator and the Collection': ` "The Dress of an Oriental Gentleman": Edward Lane in Egypt' (Dr R. Barnes), 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

MASTERCLASS on Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin with Professor Graham Vick, 2--5 p.m., Holywell Music Room (telephone for further information: (2)76125).

K. JENSEN: `Importing humanism: marginal notes in Leipzig books' (Oxford Bibliographical Society: Annual General Meeting and lecture), Cecil Jackson Room, Sheldonian, 3 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. BOWKER: `The appeal to art: China and the West' (Hensley Henson Lectures: `The appeal to history as an integral part of Christian apologetics: did Henson waste his money?'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR RICHARD RORTY: `Universalist grandeur, Romantic profundity, humanist finitude' (Oliver Smithies Lectures: `Philosophy's role in culture'), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR J. HART: `Years of conflict: adolescence in Palestine and Sri Lanka' (Refugee Studies Centre Public Seminars: `Adolescents, armed conflict, and forced migration'), Thatcher Conference Centre, Somerville, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR M. JACOBS: `Interreligious polemics in medieval Spain: a Jewish response to Ibn Hazm's biblical criticism' (David Patterson Seminars), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor, 8 p.m. (minibus from the Playhouse, Beaumont Street, 6.40 p.m. and 7.30 p.m.).


Thursday 1 May

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Listening skills' (day 1), 9.30 a.m., and `Writing at work' (week 1), 3.30 p.m. (see information above).

PROFESSOR P. VAN PARIJS: `Cultural diversity and economic solidarity' (Interdisciplinary Sawyer Seminar: `The theory and politics of civil society'), Rothermere American Institute, 1.45 p.m.

CHRIST CHURCH PICTURE GALLERY guided tour: general tour, 2.15 p.m. (booking not required).

DR D. BRYCESON: `Europe's transnational families and migration: past and present' (International Gender Studies Centre seminars: `Gender in transnational and transforming families: stretching boundaries and social conventions'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m. (followed by book-launch, St Giles' House, 16 St Giles', 4 p.m.).

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING Research Seminars: Reading Week meeting, IAUL, Littlegate House, 4 p.m. (To attend, contact joanna.buddery@learning.ox.ac.uk.)

PROFESSOR J. HEIN (Professor of Bioinformatics): `Molecular evolution, variation, and bioinformatics' (inaugural lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

ETIENNE BALIBAR: `Europe: vanishing mediator?' (lecture), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.


Friday 2 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Mesopotamia and India', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

PROFESSOR PHILIP HARDIE (Corpus Christi Professor of Latin): `Contrasts' (inaugural lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. MCKITTERICK: `History and memory in the early Middle Ages' (Modern History Faculty: Special Faculty Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. WEBBER: `Making sense of the past: reflections on Jewish historical consciousness' (Marett Memorial Lecture), Saskatchewan Lecture Room, Exeter, 5 p.m.

MAISON FRANÇAISE: French Politics and Society seminar, 5.15 p.m.


Sunday 4 May

THE REVD OLIVER O'DONOVAN: `Judgement in institution: legitimate authority (Hymn 379: "In the cross of Christ I glory")' (Bampton Lectures: `The ways of judgement: action and institution'), St Mary's, 10 a.m.


Tuesday 6 May

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Minutes and agendas—an introductory programme', 9.30 a.m.; `Contract research staff—briefings for research supervisors', 12.30 p.m.; `Assertiveness' (day 1), 2 p.m. (see information above).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `A bird-watcher's guide to the Ashmolean', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

PROFESSOR PAUL MULDOON (Professor of Poetry): `The end of the poem: "Poem of the End", by Marina Tsvetayeva', Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R.A. EPSTEIN: `The not so minimum content of natural law' (H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. BOWKER: `The appeal to value' (Hensley Henson Lectures: `The appeal to history as an integral part of Christian apologetics: did Henson waste his money?'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J.M. WAGSTAFF: `The contribution of early travel narratives to the historical geography of Greece' (Myres Memorial Lecture), McGregor Matthews Room, New College, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR S. JAMISON: `Lions and tigers ... and bulls' (Radhakrishnan Memorial Lectures: `Between the lines: oblique angles on power and authority in ancient India'), Schools, 5 p.m.

MAISON FRANÇAISE: open forum with SYLVIE GERMAIN, novelist, Prix Fémina 1989, 5.15 p.m.

B. ADAMS: ` "Doth Burn ere It Transform": Roman Catholicism, decadence, and Elgar's The Dream of Gerontius' (Graduate Colloquia), Denis Arnold Hall, Faculty of Music, 5.15 p.m.


Wednesday 7 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM introductory gallery talk: `Glass', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Telephone skills', 2 p.m., and `Introductory statistical modelling for research—linear models', 3 p.m. (see information above).

OXFORD PHILOMUSICA RESIDENCY—Leading a Workshop, with Kate Coberti, 2--5 p.m., Denis Arnold Hall, Faculty of Music (open to university students and staff only; further information: (2)76125).

PROFESSOR ROGER DAVIES (Philip Wetton Professor of Astrophysics): `Telescopes, galaxies, and black holes' (inaugural lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. BOWKER: `The appeal to coherence' (Hensley Henson Lectures: `The appeal to history as an integral part of Christian apologetics: did Henson waste his money?'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR K. BARBER: `How texts transcend gender in African oral and popular cultures' (Kaberry Lecture), Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR RICHARD RORTY: `Analytic philosophy and narrative philosophy' (Oliver Smithies Lectures: `Philosophy's role in culture'), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR E. PROTACIO-DECASTRO: `Young people's notions of well-being in the context of armed conflict in the Philippines' (Refugee Studies Centre Public Seminars: `Adolescents, armed conflict, and forced migration'), Thatcher Conference Centre, Somerville, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR T. LEVY: `Texts, maps, and archaeology: recent Iron Age explorations in southern Jordan' (David Patterson Seminars), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor, 8 p.m. (minibus from the Playhouse, Beaumont Street, 6.40 p.m. and 7.30 p.m.).


Thursday 8 May

MAISON FRANÇAISE exhibition opens: `Market day in Provence'—photographs by Fred Jarvis (open Monday–Friday 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.–1 p.m., until 24 May; closed 17 May).

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Listening skills' (day 2), 9.30 a.m., and `Writing at work' (week 2), 3.30 p.m. (see information above).

PROFESSOR RICHARD RORTY: `Justice as a larger loyalty'(Interdisciplinary Sawyer Seminar: `The theory and politics of civil society'), Rothermere American Institute, 1.45 p.m.

DR U. EREL: `Transmitting and transforming ethnicity: migrant mothers from Turkey and their children' (International Gender Studies Centre seminars: `Gender in transnational and transforming families: stretching boundaries and social conventions'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

CONWAY VOCAL MASTERCLASS with Teresa Cahill, 2--5 p.m., Denis Arnold Hall, Faculty of Music (free of charge. Telephone for further information: (2)76125).

CHRIST CHURCH PICTURE GALLERY guided tour: `Portraits', 2.15 p.m. (booking not required).

SCOTT MANDELBROTE: `Printing and publishing the text of the Septuagint' (Grinfield Lectures on the Septuagint: `The study of the Septuagint in early modern Europe'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR L. LEONARDI: `Le Rime di Dante: postille a una recente edizione' (Paget Toynbee Lecture), Room 3, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR N. RODGER: `Horatio Nelson' (DNB seminars on biography: `Icons and celebrity'), Rainolds Room, Corpus Christi, 5 p.m.


Friday 9 May

BETTS ORGAN MASTERCLASS with Stephen Bicknell: exploring some Important Organs in Oxford, 10 a.m., Holywell Music Room. Free of charge and open to the public (booking not required; (telephone for further information: (2)76125).

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Appraisal skills', 11 a.m. (see information above).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The Edward Lane Exhibition', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

MAISON FRANÇAISE: French Politics and Society seminar, 5.15 p.m.

RETROSPECTIVE CONCERT: music by John Caldwell, 1958–2003, with the Aldate Quartet, Ben Linton, Will Tallon, and Guy Newbury, Holywell Music Room, 8 p.m.


Saturday 10 May

DR S. CRETNEY delivers the Blackstone Lecture, Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 11.30 a.m.


Sunday 11 May

THE REVD OLIVER O'DONOVAN: `Judgement in institution: sovereign judgement (Hymn 361: "Forth in the peace of Christ we go")' (Bampton Lectures: `The ways of judgement: action and institution'), St Mary's, 10 a.m.