Oxford University Gazette: 23 January 2003

Oxford University Gazette, Vol. 133, No. 4646: 23 January 2003

The following supplement was published with this Gazette:

  • Election of Chancellor of the University

Note: due to the requirements of the Data Protection Act, some elements of the printed Gazette are not reproduced in the Web Gazette.

University Acts

COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

Change in Regulations

Council has made the following change in regulations, to come into effect on 7 February. Management of complaints made under section 46 of Statute XI against persons other than student members The following regulations shall constitute Council Regulations 2 of 2003.

Council Regulations 2 of 2003

REGULATIONS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF COMPLAINTS MADE UNDER SECTION 46 OF STATUTE XI AGAINST PERSONS OTHER THAN STUDENT MEMBERS

Made by Council on 23 January 2003

1. References in these regulations to sections are references to sections of Statute XI unless otherwise stated.

2. These regulations apply to the investigation and consideration of all complaints made to the Registrar under section 46 (4) and to the making of all banning orders under section 46 (5) except those which concern student members of the University.

Non-urgent complaints

3. (1) If a complaint is made to the Registrar under section 46 (4), he or she shall consider whether to investigate the complaint personally or appoint another suitable person to do so.

(2) The person appointed under paragraph (1) above shall (unless the Registrar otherwise directs) have the same power in the name of and on behalf of the Registrar to do all things which the Registrar is entitled to do under section 46 and these regulations.

4. (1) The Registrar shall on receiving a complaint make full enquiries into the circumstances of it.

(2) In the light of the details disclosed in the initial complaint and any further enquiries the Registrar may interview any person, including the person who is the subject of the complaint.

(3) Any person invited for an interview may be accompanied by another person, and a record shall be kept of the interview.

(4) If the Registrar concludes that the complaint is justified, he or she shall, without prejudice to his or her duties or powers under regulations 10, 11, or 12 below, follow the procedures set out in regulations 5--9 below.

Complaints against members of staff of the University

5. If a complaint is made against a person who is subject to the provisions of Statute XII, the Registrar shall deal with the complaint under the provisions of Statute XII.

6. If a complaint is made against a person who is a member of the staff of the University but is not subject to the provisions of Statute XII, the Registrar shall ensure that the complaint is dealt with under the procedures set out in the staff handbook applicable to that person and to the department or unit in which that person is employed.

Complaints against persons who are not members of the staff of the University

7. If a complaint is made against a person who is a member of the University but is neither a member of the staff of the University nor subject to the provisions of Statute XII, the Registrar shall refer the complaint to Council, to the member's college, society, Permanent Private Hall, or other institution designated by Council by regulation as being permitted to present candidates for matriculation, or to such other body or committee within or outside the University as the Registrar considers appropriate.

8. If a complaint is made against a person who is not a member of the University or its staff but is working on university premises by virtue of an agreement with another body or person, the Registrar shall inform the body or person concerned that a complaint has been made and that the individual is suspended or may be suspended from access until appropriate steps have been taken under the agreement.

9. In the case of a complaint against any other person who is not a member of the University or its staff, the Registrar shall take such steps as are necessary in the interests of justice and fairness to ascertain whether the right of access should be terminated and notify the person concerned accordingly.

Criminal offences

10. If at any time the Registrar, in consultation with the University Marshal, is of the opinion that the evidence available appears to disclose the commission of a serious criminal offence, he or she shall invite the Marshal to seek the view of the appropriate police force before proceeding further internally (save in connection with any action to be taken under section 46 (5)).

Urgent complaints

11. If the person or body making the complaint considers that the circumstances are such that an immediate banning order is warranted under the provisions of section 46 (5), that person or body shall draw the order up in writing, annexing to it a statement of the right of appeal to the Visitatorial Board under section 46 (6), and deliver it as soon as reasonably practicable to the person against whom the order has been made and to the Registrar.

References by the Registrar to the Visitatorial Board

12. In any of the cases mentioned in regulations 7--9 above, or in any case in which the Registrar anticipates that a banning order made under regulation 11 above should be extended for more than twenty-one days, the Registrar may at any time, before, during, or after an investigation carried out under these regulations, apply to the Visitatorial Board for a banning order under section 46 (4).

Visitatorial Board procedures

13. For the purposes of proceedings under section 46 and these regulations the provisions of the Regulations for the Visitatorial Board made under section 22 of Statute XII shall apply with the following modifications:

(1) the selection of members of the panel referred to in regulation 4 of those regulations shall be made by the Vice-Chancellor;

(2) the presenter under regulation 11 of those regulations shall be the Registrar or a suitable person appointed by him or her;

(3) the appointment of the secretary to the Board referred to in regulation 12 of those regulations shall be made by the Vice-Chancellor;

(4) the periods of twenty-one and seven clear days referred to in regulations 21 and 22 of those regulations shall be reduced to seven and two clear days respectively;

(5) regulations 32, 35, 37 (3), 38, and 40--2 shall not apply; and

(6) any reference to a `charge' in those regulations shall include a complaint under section 46 and these regulations.

14. (1) Where an order is made under section 46 (5) any appeal to the Visitatorial Board under section 46 (6) shall be made in writing setting out the reasons for the appeal.

(2) The appeal shall be delivered to the Vice-Chancellor who shall as soon as reasonably practicable appoint a person other than the Registrar to act as secretary to the Board.

(3) The secretary shall set a date and time for the hearing as expeditiously as possible.

(4) The Registrar shall be the respondent to the appeal.

(5) The secretary shall give not less than two clear days' notice of the date and time of the hearing to the appellant and to the Registrar.

(6) The procedure for the conduct and hearing of any appeal under section 46 (6) shall be as set out in regulation 13 above with such modifications as are necessary to meet the circumstances of the case.

15. If a banning order is made, confirmed, or extended by the Visitatorial Board, the secretary to the Board shall send a copy of the document referred to in regulation 37 of the Regulations for the Visitatorial Board to the person against whom the complaint has been made, together with a written statement of his or her right of appeal to the Appeal Court under section 27.

Appeals

16. A notice of appeal to the Appeal Court shall be served on the Registrar within seven days of the date on which the document recording the decision appealed from was sent to he applicant. [These regulations, which are required under section 46 of Statute XI (the Disciplinary Statute, Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4633, 9 October 2002, p. 177), govern the management of complaints made against any persons, other than student members of the University (complaints against whom are dealt with by the Proctors), who are thought likely, or who threaten, to cause damage to property or inconvenience to other users of university land or buildings, or of facilities or services provided by or on behalf of the University.]


PLANNING AND RESOURCE ALLOCATION COMMITTEE OF COUNCIL

Changes in Regulations

The Planning and Resource Allocation Committee of Council, on the recommendation of the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board, has made the following changes in regulations, to come into effect on 7 February.

Establishment of Professorship of Statistics

1 In SCHEDULE A to Sect. I, § 5. B of Council Regulations 24 of 2002 (Statutes, 2000, p. 381, as redesignated as regulations by Decree (5) of 11 July 2002, Gazette, Vol. 132, p. 1461), after `King Alfonso XIII Professor of Spanish Studies' insert:

`Professor of Statistics'.

2 Ibid., Sect. III, concerning individual professorships (p. 506, as redesignated), insert new § 302 as follows and renumber existing §§ 302--6 (pp. 506--8, as renumbered by Decree (2) of 13 June 2002, Gazette, Vol. 132, p. 1314), as §§ 303--7:

`§ 302. Professor of Statistics

1. The Professor of Statistics shall undertake research in Statistics and shall lecture and give instruction in that subject and generally promote its study in the University.

2. The professor shall be elected by an electoral board consisting of:

(1) the Vice-Chancellor, or, if the head of the college specified in paragraph (2) below is Vice-Chancellor, a person appointed by Council;

(2) the head of the college to which the professorship shall be for the time being allocated by Council under any regulation in that behalf, or, if the head is unable or unwilling to act, a person appointed by the governing body of the college;

(3) a person appointed by the governing body of the college specified in paragraph (2) above;

(4), (5) two persons appointed by Council;

(6)--(9) four persons appointed by the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board.

3. The professor shall be subject to the General Provisions of the regulations concerning the duties of professors and to those Particular Provisions of the same regulations which are applicable to this chair.' [These changes establish a new Professorship of Statistics.]


CONGREGATION 21 January

Declaration of approval of unopposed Statutes

No notice of opposition having been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor declared the Statutes (1) concerning university discipline, and (2) concerning college accounts (pp. 614) approved.


COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of Congregation: Baker, J.M.R., BA, M.Phil., St Cross Carroll, W., Faculty of Theology Dent, M.J., Lady Margaret Hall Goodman, T.R., Faculty of Clinical Medicine Seymour, L.W., Wolfson

University Agenda

CONGREGATION 11 February 2 p.m.

¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that written notice of any intention to vote against any of the resolutions at item 1 below, or to vote against or to propose an amendment to the proposed change in Congregation regulations at item 2 below, signed in each case by at least two members of Congregation, must be given to the Registrar by noon on Monday, 3 February.

1 Voting on Resolutions approving the conferment of Honorary Degrees

(1) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Civil Law, honoris causa, upon THE RT. HON. BARONESS O'NEILL OF BENGARVE, CBE, MA (MA Cambridge; PH.D. Harvard), FBA, F.MED.SCI., Honorary Fellow of Somerville College, Principal of Newnham College, Cambridge, be approved.

(2) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Letters, honoris causa, upon PROFESSOR MARY DOUGLAS, CBE, B.SC., MA, D.PHIL., FBA, Honorary Fellow of St Anne's College, Emeritus Avalon Foundation Professor in the Humanities, Northwestern University, be approved.

(3) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Science, honoris causa, upon PROFESSOR DAME JULIA HIGGINS, DBE, MA, D.PHIL., FRS, F.R.ENG., Honorary Fellow of Somerville College, Professor of Polymer Science and Director of the Graduate School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, University of London, be approved.

(4) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Science, honoris causa, upon SIR PAUL NURSE (B.SC. Birmingham; PH.D. East Anglia), FRS, Honorary Fellow of Linacre College, Chief Executive, Cancer Research UK, be approved.

(5) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Science, honoris causa, upon PROFESSOR JEAN-PIERRE SERRE, Honorary Professor at the Collège de France, be approved.

(6) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Music, honoris causa, upon PLACIDO DOMINGO, KBE, FRCM, opera singer, conductor, and administrator, be approved.

¶ If the resolutions are approved, the honorary degrees will be conferred at the Encaenia on 25 June 2003.


2 Voting on Change in Congregation Regulations: Degree Ceremonies

Explanatory note

Because it is expected that an unusually large number of members of the University who have not yet been admitted to their degrees will wish to be admitted in time to become members of Convocation before the election of the new Chancellor on 14 and 15 March, Council has agreed that it would be desirable for an additional ceremony to be held this term for admission to degrees in absence. Council has accordingly agreed to promote the following change in regulations to permit this.

Change in Regulations

In regulation 3.18 of Congregation Regulations 3 of 2002 (Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4612, 13 February 2002, p. 771), delete paragraph (1) and substitute: [1]

`(1) Notwithstanding the provisions of regulations 3.1-3.17 above, a degree day shall be deemed to have been held on the Saturday of the first week of each Hilary Full Term, and on such other days as Council may in exceptional circumstances determine, for the purpose of the conferment of degrees in absence.' [1] New wording is indicated by underlining.


CONVOCATION 14 AND 15 MARCH

Election of Chancellor

For details of the arrangements concerning the election of a Chancellor of the University see Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4645.

Notices

HAROLD VYVYAN HARMSWORTH PROFESSORSHIP OF AMERICAN HISTORY 2005–6

KATHRYN KISH SKLAR (BA Harvard, MA, PH.D. Michigan), Distinguished Professor of History, and Co-Director, Center for the Historical Study of Women and Gender, State University of New York, Binghampton, has been appointed to the visiting professorship for the academic year 2005–6. Professor Kish Sklar will be a fellow of Queen's College.


PROFESSORSHIP OF DIABETIC MEDICINE

PATRIK RORSMAN (MED.KAND., PH.D. Uppsala), Professor of Membrane Physiology and Head of Department of Molecularn and Cellular Physiology, Lund University, has been appointed to the professorship with effect from 1 May 2003. Professor Rorsman will be a fellow of Harris Manchester College.


DIRECTORSHIP OF THE UNIVERSITY MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

WILLIAM JAMES KENNEDY, MA, D.SC. (B.SC., PH.D. London), Fellow of Wolfson College, Professor of Earth Sciences and Curator of the Geological Collections, University Museum of Natural History, has been appointed to the directorship with effect from 1 October 2003. Professor Kennedy will be a fellow of Kellogg College.


SOCIAL SCIENCES BOARD

Appointment of Peter Moores Dean, Saïd Business School

The Social Sciences Board has reappointed PROFESSOR ANTHONY G. HOPWOOD (B.SC. (ECON.) London, MBA, PH.D. Chicago), as Peter Moores Dean of the Saïd Business School, with effect from 1 December 2002 until 31 December 2004.


LIBRARY OF THE HOUSE OF ST GREGORY AND ST MACRINA

This library, at 1 Canterbury Road, contains books and periodicals on the Eastern Churches, and is open on Wednesdays, 2–5 p.m., during full term, or by appointment with the Librarian, The Revd Stephen Platt (telephone: Oxford 552991).


WOLFSON COLLEGE

Concert

KATHRYN WHITNEY (mezzo-soprano) and PHILIP BULLOCK (piano) will perform works by Haydn, Berg, Ravel, and arie antiche, at 7.30 p.m. on Saturday, 25 January, in Wolfson College (entrance £7, students £5; proceeds to the African Medical Research Foundation).

Lectures

INAUGURAL LECTURE

Professor of Indian History and Culture

PROFESSOR S. SUBRAHMANYAM will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 20 February, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `On the window that was India: the place of South Asia in early modern world history.'


CYRIL FOSTER LECTURE 2003

THE RT. HON. CHRISTOPHER F. PATTEN, CH, European Commissioner for External Affairs, will deliver the Cyril Foster Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 30 January, in the Examination Schools. Admission will be by ticket only, available from Mrs Marga Lyall (telephone: Oxford (2)78705, e-mail: cis@politics.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: ` "The End of History": the sequel.'


LUBBOCK LECTURE IN MANAGEMENT STUDIES

PROFESSOR LORD MAY OF OXFORD, President, the Royal Society, will deliver the Lubbock Lecture in Management Studies at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 13 February, in the Saïd Business School. A reception will follow the lecture.

Subject: `Innovation: from new knowledge to new products.'


SLADE LECTURES 2003

Reconstructing Rembrandt: questions and answers in recent research

Revised notice

ERNST VAN DE WETERING, Professor of the History of Art, University of Amsterdam, and Chairman of the Rembrandt Research Project, Slade Professor of Fine Art 2002–3, will continue the Slade Lectures at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Lecture Hall, the Taylor Institution, St Giles'. The lectures will be open to the public. This notice replaces previous announcements. The titles of the lectures to be given on 19 February, 26 February, and 5 March differ from those previously published. 29 Jan.: `Rembrandt's anger: art lovers and asses.' 5 Feb.: `How to be a connoisseur in the seventeenth century.' 12 Feb.: `Pictor doctus or pictor vulgaris: tracing Rembrandt's thoughts on art.' 19 Feb.: `Rembrandt's oeuvre: reduction and expansion.' 26 Feb.: `Rembrandt's workshop: training and production.' 5 Mar.: `The impatient artist: seclusion in the studio, unfinished works, and co-production.' 12 Mar.: `Rembrandt's genius: technique, style, and quality.'

Note

For health and safety reasons, the maximum number permitted in the Lecture Hall is 230. It is anticipated that places in the Hall may be oversubscribed, so those wishing to attend the lecture are advised to arrive as early as possible. The doors to the Hall will be open from 4.30 p.m. on each date. On each occasion, a numbered ticket will be issued to each person being admitted to the hall, in order to control numbers. These tickets will be issued on a first-come-first-served basis, one per person. Anyone wishing to attend the lectures who anticipates difficulties with access to the building (e.g. because of steps), should warn the porters at the Taylor Institution in advance.


ARCHAEOLOGY, CLASSICS

DR V. ADRYMI-SISMANI, Director, Thirteenth EPKA, Volos, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 28 January, in the Lower Lecture Room, Lincoln College.

Conveners: M. Stamatopoulou, M.St., D.Phil., Fellow and Tutor in Classical Archaeology, Lincoln College, and J. Bennet, MA, Sinclair and Rachel Hood Lecturer in Aegean Prehistory.

Subject: ` Dimini: the first palatial centre in Mycenaean Thessaly.'


ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

News International Broadcast Media Lectures

`It's TV, Jim, but not as we know it'---British television in the digital era

BARRY COX, Deputy Chairman, Channel 4; Chairman, the Digital Television Stakeholders Group; and News International Visiting Professor of Broadcast Media, will deliver the News International Broadcast Media Lectures at 5.30 p.m. on the following Tuesdays. 28 Jan., Exeter College: `The coming of free-sheet television.' 4 Feb., Exeter College: `The reformation of the BBC.' 11 Feb., Green College: `Digital TV: paying the piper but not calling the tune.' 18 Feb., Green College: `Towards 2014: getting to the market.'


Romantic Realignments

The following seminars will be held at 5.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the Goodhart Seminar Room, University College. Further information may be obtained from Luisa Cale (e-mail: luisa.cale@univ.ox.ac.uk). Two papers will be given at the meetings on 6 and 13 February. PROFESSOR J. CHANDLER, Chicago (Guest speaker)
30 Jan.: `The structure of sentiment.' S. BURLEY
6 Feb.: `Shelley, the United Irishmen, and the Illuminati'. A. AMEND
6 Feb.: `Morality and necessitarian psychology in Wordsworth, 1798.' L. EPP
13 Feb.: ` "The Rhetoric of Clarity": Priestley, Paine, Thelwall, and the nature of communication.' Q. BAILEY
13 Feb.: ` "All thoughts are in themselves perishable"—logics of abundance and redemption in Biographia Literaria.' PROFESSOR M.G.H. PITTOCK, Strathclyde (Guest speaker)
20 Feb.: `Robert Burns and British poetry.' M. SCOTT
27 Feb.: ` "Wonders of the Universe": understanding the Romantic culture of amazement.' DR C. FRANKLIN, Swansea (Guest speaker)
6 Mar.: `Engendering nationalism: Owenson, Stael, Stowe, and Byron.' DR S. KOVESI, Oxford Brookes (Guest speaker)
13 Mar.: `John Clare and the politics of egotism.'


ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE, MUSIC, THEOLOGY, HISTORY OF ART

The Bible in Art, Music, and Literature

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Danson Room, Trinity College.

Conveners: C.C. Rowland, MA, D.Phil., Dean Ireland's Professor of Exegesis of Holy Scripture, and C.E. Joynes, MA, M.St., D.Phil., Bampton Fellow in Theology, Trinity College. PROFESSOR H. MAYR-HARTING
27 Jan.: `Bible illustration c.800–1100: why Bibles when Bibles and Gospel Books when Gospel Books.' PROFESSOR V. CUNNINGHAM
10 Feb.: ` "I have understanding as well as you": nineteenth-century being with a biblical voice.' B. MORSE, Courtauld Institute of Art, London
24 Feb.: `Beyond the apocalyptic cult: Kandinsky's legitimacy within the prophetic tradition.' DR E. HORNBY
10 Mar.: `Exploring the role of early medieval chant as a reading of the biblical text.'


LIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES, MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Mathematical Biology and Ecology Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Fridays in the Higman Room, the Mathematical Institute. For correspondence and further details, contact Professor Philip Maini (e-mail: maini@maths.ox.ac.uk), or Dr Santiago Schnell (e-mail: schnell@maths.ox.ac.uk). PROFESSOR P. SAUNDERS, King's College, London
31 Jan.: `What is type 2 diabetes? An application of integral rein control.' PROFESSOR P. PADILLA, Mathematical Institute, UNAM, Mexico
7 Feb.: `From genes to patterns: developmental and morphogenetic implications of the dynamics of a genetic network in Arabidopsa.' DR G. NGWA, University of Buea, Cameroon
14 Feb.: To be announced. DR T. ROOSE, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
21 Feb.: `Solid stress in tumours.' DR C. CARRILLO, Bath
28 Feb.: `Dispersal and coexistence of two species modelled with integro-difference equations.' DR J. WHITE, Bath
7 Mar.: `Biological control, disease resistance, and agricultural issues—some recent modelling problems.' DR R. AHMAD
14 Mar.: `Theory and computation for 3-D vortex flows through internal geometries.'


Mathematical Genetics and Bioinformatics Group Seminar in Bioinformatics

CHRIS PONTING, Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics, will lecture at 4 p.m. on Thursday, 30 January, in the Medawar Seminar Room, Level 30, Medawar Building (entrance via Zoology reception).

Subject: `Comparison of mouse and human proteomes and transcriptomes.'


MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Department of Materials: Hirsch Lecture

PROFESSOR JOHN PETHICA, Professor of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin, and Visiting Professor of Materials, will deliver a Hirsch Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 31 January, in Lecture Room 1, the Thom Building, the Department of Engineering Science. Subject: `Nanotechnology—engineering with atoms.'


Oxford Physics Colloquia

The following colloquia will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Fridays in the Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon Laboratory.

Conveners: N.J. Johnson, MA, Professor of Physics, and J.I. Silk, MA, D.Phil., Savilian Professor of Astronomy. DR J. MARCH-RUSSELL
31 Jan.: `Extra dimensions and black holes at the LHC.' PROFESSOR J.-P. BOUCHAUD, Director, Centre CEA, Saclay, France
7 Feb.: `Financial markets: from statistical models to trading.' DR S. HOWISON
21 Feb.: `Mathematics, finance, and physics: a triple point?' PROFESSOR SIR CHRISTOPHER LLEWELLYN-SMITH, Chairman, Advisory Committee on Mathematics Education
28 Feb.: `Mathematics in schools: what should be done?' PROFESSOR S. TREMAINE, Princeton
7 Mar.: `The demography of supermassive black holes.' PROFESSOR O. GINGERICH, Harvard
14 Mar.: `Truth in science: proof, persuasion, and the Galileo affair.'


Soft matter, biomaterials, and interfaces

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 4 p.m. on Tuesdays in the John Rowlinson Seminar Room, the Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory.

Convener: J. Klein, MA, D.Phil., Dr Lee's Professor of Chemistry. PROFESSOR A. WINDLE, Cambridge
Thur. 30 Jan.: To be announced. PROFESSOR S. STUPP, Northwestern University, USA
4 Feb.: `Biomimetic nanomaterials: synthetic matrices for cells.' DR J. PENFOLD, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory
11 Feb.: `The adsorption of polymer/surfactant mixtures at interfaces.' PROFESSOR M. SANSOM
18 Feb.: `Water and ions in biological nanopores: simulation studies.' PROFESSOR S. HERMINGHAUS, Ulm
25 Feb.: `Complex fluid dynamics in confined geometry.' PROFESSOR N. SPENCER, ETH Zurich
4 Mar.: `Polyelectrolytes on surfaces: linkers, blockers, and boundary lubricants.' DR D. KLENERMAN, Cambridge
11 Mar.: `Watching and probing the surface of living cells.'


Theoretical Physics Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in the Dennis Sciama Lecture Theatre, the Department of Physics.

Conveners: I. Kogan, MA, and S. Sarkar, MA, Readers in Physics. DR J. MAGORRIAN
24 Jan.: `Supermassive black holes in galaxies.' DR N. MAVROMATOS, King's College, London
7 Feb.: `Quantum gravity, cosmology, and (Liouville) strings.' PROFESSOR G. SHORE, Swansea
21 Feb.: `Superluminal light.' PROFESSOR J. YEOMANS
7 Mar.: `Mesoscale modelling: polymers and liquid crystals.'


Theoretical Particle Physics Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in the Dennis Sciama Lecture Theatre, the Department of Physics.

Conveners: I. Kogan, MA, and S. Sarkar, MA, Readers in Physics. P. BALL, IPPP, Durham
31 Jan.: `Developments in B physics.' XENIA DE LA OSSA
14 Feb.: `Novel compactifications of M-theory.' C. DAVIES, Glasgow
28 Feb.: `Staggering results from lattice QCD.' M. HENNEAUX, Brussels
14 Mar.: `Local BRST cohomology and consistent interactions of gauge theories.'


Biophysical Chemistry Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Wednesdays in the John Rowlinson Seminar Room, the Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory.

Convener: Dr L.C. Snoek. DR R.M. BERRY
29 Jan.: `The bacterial flagellar motor.' PROFESSOR G. ATTARD, Southampton
19 Feb.: `Lipid-mediated feedback control of biological reaction networks.' PROFESSOR L.D. BARRON, Glasgow
12 Mar.: `Structure and behaviour of proteins, nucleic acids, and viruses from Raman optical activity.'


Earth Sciences

The following lectures will be given at 4.30 p.m. on Mondays in the Lecture Theatre, the Department of Earth Sciences.

Convener: J.H. Woodhouse, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Geophysics. DR D. PRIOR, Liverpool
27 Jan.: `Watching metamorphism.' DR C. BALLANTINE, Manchester
17 Feb.: `Numerical simulations, noble gases, and changing models of mantle evolution.' DR S. RUSSELL, Natural History Museum
24 Feb.: `The formation of chondrules.' DR K. BURTON, Open University
3 Mar.: `Resolving magma chamber processes and mantle signatures using the Re-Os isotope system.' PROFESSOR C. HAWKESWORTH, Bristol
10 Mar.: `The timescales of magmatic processes.'


Royal Statistical Society: Oxford local group meeting

PROFESSOR H. WHEATER, Imperial College, London, will lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 11 February, in the Large Lecture Room, Nuffield College.

Subject: `Some current statistical issues in hydrology.'


MEDICAL SCIENCES

Seminars in Public Health and Epidemiology

The following seminars will be given at 1 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Abraham Lecture Theatre, Green College. PROFESSOR R. PETO
28 Jan.: `Treatment of early prostate cancer.' DR S. DUNACHIE
4 Feb.: `The Oxford malaria vaccine trials.' PROFESSOR D. FORMAN, Leeds
11 Feb.: `Can cancer registries every say anything useful about cancer care? Examples from breast cancer.' PROFESSOR C. GILLIS, Glasgow
18 Feb.: `Inside a Multicentre Research Ethics Committee.' DR S. LEWINGTON
25 Feb.: `Homocysteine, heart disease, and stroke.' PROFESSOR K. DAY
4 Mar.: `The evolution of malaria parasites.' Z. LLOYD-WRIGHT, King's College, London
11 Mar.: `Studies in EPIC–Oxford vegan men.' DR J. VANDENBROUCKE, Leiden
18 Mar.: `Comparing like with like: when do observational studies achieve the same type of unbiasedness as randomised studies?'


Nuffield Department of Surgery: Immunology Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Tuesdays in the NDS Seminar Room, Level 6, the John Radcliffe Hospital. Anyone wishing to arrange to talk to the speaker should contact Andrew Bushell (telephone: 21301). DR R. CORNALL
4 Feb.: `T and B cell tolerance to sequestered self-antigens.' DR A. GALLIMORE, Cardiff
11 Feb.: `The impact of CD25 regulatory cells on the development of immunity to transplantable murine tumours.' DR P. SMETHURST, East Anglia Blood Centre, Cambridge
18 Feb.: `The platelet collagen receptor Glycoprotein VI.'


Sir William Dunn School of Pathology

The following research seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the Medical Sciences Lecture Theatre. DR A. DONALDSON, Dundee
6 Feb.: `Ku calls time: control of chromosome replication in budding yeast.' DR B. STOCKINGER, NIMR, Mill Hill
27 Feb.: `T cell regulation without regulatory T cells.' DR C. BUCKLEY, Birmingham
20 Mar.: `Why does chronic inflammation persist?' PROFESSOR S. BRENNER, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, la Jolla, California
27 Mar.: `From genes to organisms.' (Norman Heatley Lecture—entry by ticket only) PROFESSOR R. GRENCIS, Manchester
3 Apr.: `Chronic intestinal infection: induction and immunoregeneration during parasite infection.' DR J. ORTIN, Centre Nacional de Biotecnologia (CSIC)
10 Apr.: `Structural and functional studies on influenza virus replication.'


Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Mondays in the Lecture Theatre, the Oxford Eye Hospital.

Convener: N.N. Osborne, MA, D.Sc., Professor of Ocular Neurobiology. PROFESSOR C. PUGH
27 Jan.: `Cellular oxygen sensing—lessons from the HIV/VHL system.' PROFESSOR A. VINCENT
3 Feb.: `Antibodies in peripheral and central neurological diseases.' PROFESSOR K. REID
10 Feb.: `Lung surfactant proteins A and D: collectins, which play a role in the modulation of infection, allergy, and inflammation.' DR R. CASSON
17 Feb.: `Hyperglycaemia protects against injury caused by ischaemia to the retina.' DR S. BLACKSHAW
24 Feb.: `Genes regulated by injury in identified nerve cells of the medicinal leech.' PROFESSOR OSBORNE
3 Mar.: `The antioxidant properties of the beta-blocker, metipranolol.' DR J. WOOD
10 Mar.: `Monocarboxylate transporters: recent studies in the retina.'


MUSIC

Graduate Students' Colloquia

The following colloquia will be held at 5.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Denis Arnold Hall, the Faculty of Music. N. COOK, Southampton
28 Jan.: `The other Beethoven: heroism, exclusion, and the works of 1813–14.' G. OLWAGE, Amsterdam and Reading
4 Feb.: `Home-made hegemonies: Victorian choralism as a discipline.' R. STROHM
11 Feb.: `Music in Utopia—music in the pastoral.' R. COWGILL, Leeds
18 Feb.: ` "Such scientific and profound harmonies": the Italian opera orchestra and early performances of Mozart's Don Giovanni in London.' B. PARSONS
25 Feb.: ` "Choosing oneself and committing oneself": the rift between Pierre Boulez and René Leibowitz.' N. SIMEONE, Bangor
4 Mar.: `Messiaen and "les années noires": a composer under the German Occupation.' G. RICO
11 Mar.: `Music, morals, and ideas in thirteenth-century sermons and exempla literature.'


ORIENTAL STUDIES

Lectures on modern Korea

DR J. HOARE, former British Chargé d'Affaires in Pyongyang, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 27 January, in the Fellows' Dining Room, St Antony's College.

Conveners: J.B. Lewis, MA, University Lecturer in Korean, and S. Y.-S. Tsang, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Politics.

Subject: `From crisis to crisis—two years in North Korea.'


DR HYANJIN LEE, Professor of Korean Cinema, University of Sheffield, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 31 January, in Lecture Room 1, the Oriental Institute.

Convener: J.B. Lewis, MA, University Lecturer in Korean.

Subject: `Globalisation and isolationism: national cinemas in the two Koreas.'


PHILOSOPHY

Philosophy of Mathematics Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Mondays in the Ryle Room, the Philosophy Centre.

Convener: D. Isaacson, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in the Philosophy of Mathematics. DR ISAACSON
20 Jan.: `Philosophical significance of complex conjugation.' M. GIAQUINTO, University College, London
27 Jan.: `The distinction between geometrical and algebraic thinking.' J. MAYBERRY, Bristol
3 Feb.: `How to think about natural numbers.' M. LENG, Cambridge
10 Feb.: `Naturalism and linguistic frameworks: mathematical ontology in a post-Quinean setting.' M. POTTER, Cambridge
17 Feb.: `How far can you go? Some reflections on limitation of size.' J.R. LUCAS
24 Feb.: `Prototopology: the fourth volume of Principia Mathematica that never was.' (See J.R. Lucas, The Conceptual Roots of Mathematics, Routledge, London, 2000, ch. 10, for background to this talk.) P. SCOWCROFT, Wesleyan University
3 Mar.: `Brouwer's creative subject and variants of Kripke's schema.'


SOCIAL SCIENCES

British political history in the twentieth century

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in Lecture Room XI, Brasenose College.

Conveners: V.B. Bogdanor, MA, Professor of Politics and Government, and D.I. Marquand, MA, Honorary Fellow, Mansfield College. PROFESSOR MARQUAND
23 Jan.: `Visions of the state.' PROFESSOR A. GAMBLE, Sheffield
30 Jan.: `Conservatism.' PROFESSOR J. GRAY, LSE
6 Feb.: `Liberalism.' PROFESSOR D. SASSOON, Queen Mary College, London
13 Feb.: `Socialisms.' PROFESSOR BOGDANOR
20 Feb.: `The parties and the constitution.' PROFESSOR M. FREEDEN
27 Feb.: `Ideologies.' PROFESSOR J. LEWIS
6 Mar.: `Welfarism.'


Labour's undetected constitutional changes

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Summer Common Room, Magdalen College. Details of the 10 February seminar will be announced later.

Conveners: Sir Michael Wheeler-Booth, MA, Lecturer in Politics, Magdalen College, D.I. Marquand, MA, Honorary Fellow, Mansfield College, C.R. Brooke, Fellow and Tutor in Politics, Magdalen College, and G. Cappoccia (Ph.D. Florence), University Lecturer (CUF) in Politics. LORD CARRINGTON
27 Jan.: `Should a changing parliament exercise more control over foreign policy?' SIMON JENKINS
3 Feb.: `The imperial treasury.' LORD WAKEHAM and LORD CARTER
17 Feb.: `The handling of parliamentary business.' PROFESSOR MARQUAND
24 Feb.: `Is populism a threat to parliamentary democracy?'


Oxford Health Policy Network Seminar

PROFESSOR GREGORY P. MARCHILDON, Canada Research Chair in Public Policy and Economic History, University of Regina, will lecture at 1.30 p.m. on Wednesday, 29 January, in the Department of Social Policy and Social Work.

Convener: Dr Rebecca Surender.

Subject: `The Romanow Royal Commission and the future of public health care in Canada.'


THEOLOGY

Eastern Christian Studies Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in St Gregory's House, 1 Canterbury Road.

Convener: S.P. Brock, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Syriac Studies. DR BROCK
29 Jan.: `The now not so "new finds" at St Catherine's Monastery, Sinai, and their significance.' PROFESSOR R.W. THOMSON
12 Feb.: `Armenian traditions of exegesis: the example of Proverbs.' JAMES GEORGE
24 Feb.: `Division and justification in John of Ephesus' Lives of the Eastern Saints.' MARINA BAZZANI
5 Mar.: `Autobiographical aspects in the Hymns of Symeon the New Theologian.'


ROTHERMERE AMERICAN INSTITUTE

Public lecture

GARY HART, former US Senator and presidential candidate, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 17 February, in the Rothermere American Institute. The lecture will be followed by a reception.

Subject: `In search of national security in the twenty-first century.'


Americanisation and anti-Americanism: global views of the USA

The following seminars will be held on Tuesdays in the Rothermere American Institute. Further information may be found at the RAI's Web site, http://www.rai.ox.ac.uk, or from Cheryl Hudson, RAI (telephone: Oxford (2)82711, e-mail: cheryl.hudson@rai.ox.ac.uk). PROFESSOR S. FABBRINI, University of Trento, Italy
25 Feb., 2.30 p.m.: `Reacting to America: globalisation and American hyper-power in a European perspective.' PROFESSOR J. EPSTEIN, Vanderbilt
13 Mar., 5 p.m.: `Britain's "America": notes from the nineteenth century.' D. RYAN, De Montfort
29 Apr., 2.30 p.m.: `Americanisation and anti-Americanism at the periphery: from Central America to 9/11.' R. CROCKATT, East Anglia
13 May, 5 p.m.: `No common ground? Islam, America, and anti-Americanism.' PROFESSOR R. PELLS, University of Texas at Austin
27 May, 2.30 p.m.: `From Modernism to the movies: the globalisation of American culture in the twentieth century.' PROFESSOR H. ICKSTADT, Free University, Berlin
12 June, 5 p.m.: `The presence of America and post-war Germany's cultural responses.'


RESEARCH LABORATORY FOR ARCHAEOLOGY AND THE HISTORY OF ART

The following seminars will be held at 10.30 a.m. on Thursdays in the Seminar Room, the Research Laboratory for Archaeology and the History of Art.

Convener: M.S. Tite, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Archaeological Science. T. PRADELL, Catalunya
30 Jan.: `Technology of production of Hispano Moresque lustre pottery from Paterna.' A. WHITTLE, Wales
13 Feb.: `The early Neolithic experience: investigations on the Great Hungarian Plain.' P. CRADDOCK, British Museum
27 Feb.: `The AMS dating of iron: a snare and a delusion?' J. HENDERSON, Nottingham
13 Mar.: `Experimentation or "knee-jerk" reaction in first millennium AD glass production.'


CENTRE FOR BRAZILIAN STUDIES

PROFESSOR LESLIE BETHELL, Director of the Centre, will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Monday, 27 January, in the Centre for Brazilian Studies.

Subject: `Some reflections on the Left in Brazil: past and present.'


CENTRE FOR BRAZILIAN STUDIES AND THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL STUDIES

DR SIMON SCHWARTZMAN will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 28 January, in the Centre for Brazilian Studies.

Subject: `The challenges of education in Brazil.'


COMPUTING LABORATORY

Numerical Analysis Group

Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminars

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the Lecture Theatre, the Computing Laboratory. The co-ordinators are L.N. Trefethen and J. Scott (RAL). Further information may be obtained from Shirley Day (telephone: Oxford (2)73885). PROFESSOR TOBY DRISCOLL, Delaware
23 Jan.: `Computing solutions of Laplace's equation by conformal mapping.' PROFESSOR A. CHAN, UCLA
Fri. 24 Jan.: `Geometry, PDEs, fluid dynamics, and image processing.' PROFESSOR M. GILES
30 Jan.: `Convergence analysis of linear and adjoint approximations with shocks.' PROFESSOR E. DE STURLER, Illinois
6 Feb.: To be announced. DR A. GARRATT, Apen Tech Ltd., Cambridge
13 Feb., RAL: `Numerical issues arising in dynamic optimisation of process modelling applications.' PROFESSOR J.-P. BERRUT, Fribourg
20 Feb.: `Optimised rational interpolation and spectral methods.' PROFESSOR J. ASTLEY, Southampton
27 Feb.: `Generalised finite and infinite elements for flow acoustics.' DR K. BRIGGS, BTexact Technologies
6 Mar.: `Exact real arithmetic.' DR S. SCHOLTES, Cambridge
13 Mar., RAL: `Combinatorial structures in nonlinear programming.'


CENTRE FOR CRIMINOLOGICAL RESEARCH

The following seminars will take place at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Old Library, All Souls College.

Convener: R.G. Hood, MA, D.Phil., DCL, Professor of Criminology. DR D. ROCHE, LSE
29 Jan.: `Accountability and restorative justice.' K. BAKER and C. ROBERTS
12 Feb.: `Assessing risk: the development and validation of ASSET for young offenders.' PROFESSOR D. SMITH, Edinburgh
26 Feb.: `Victimisation and offending: two sides of the same coin?' P. NEYROUD, Chief Constable, Thames Valley Police
12 Mar.: `Police ethics in the twenty-first century.'


DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL STUDIES

The future of comprehensive secondary education

The following seminars, organised jointly by the Department of Educational Studies, the Centre for the Study of Comprehensive Schools, and the the Campaign for State Education, will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Department of Educational Studies. Two or three presentations will be made at each meeting. Those interested are asked to contact Sara Loosemore (e-mail: sara.loosemore@edstud.ox.ac.uk), stating which sessions will be attended. Refreshments will be available after each seminar, for which a single charge of £20 is made, regardless of the number of sessions attended (cheques should be payable to `Oxford University'). PROFESSOR G. WHITTY, Director, ULIE
29 Jan.: `Achievement and inclusion in comprehensive education.' PROFESSOR R. PRING
29 Jan.: `Managing public services and the professions.' PROFESSOR M. MADEN
29 Jan.: `Comprehensive education: some international perspectives.' DR H. JUDGE
5 Feb.: `The road not taken: the 1960s deconstructed.' DR N. MCCAFFERTY, Education Reform 21, Northern Ireland
5 Feb.: `Twenty-first-century educational priority: the poor.' M. HEWLETT, Director, CSCS
5 Feb.: `What is comprehensive education?' M. TULLOCH, Campaign for State Education
12 Feb.: `Grammar schools—can parents decide?' PROFESSOR A. WEST, Centre for Educational Research, LSE
12 Feb.: `Secondary school admissions: exploring the extent of overt and covert selection.' PROFESSOR S. GERARD, Cardiff University School of Social Sciences
12 Feb.: `Diversity, standards, and social separation—the underlying role of admissions.' DAVID MILLIBAND, MP
5 Mar.: `Future of comprehensive schooling.' (Provisional title) PROFESSOR S. TOMLINSON
5 Mar.: `Do we need selective and specialist schools? Research evidence.' PROFESSOR D. JESSON, York
12 Mar.: `Selective education—blueprint for lower standards?' F. HUSSAIN, Principal, Moat Community College, Leicester
12 Mar.: `Social inclusion from policy to practice: the ideal versus the contextual realities.' P. LAMPL, Chief Executive, the Sutton Trust
12 Mar.: `Comprehensive education and university access.' PROFESSOR T. BRIGHOUSE, Birmingham LEA
19 Mar.: `A comprehensively collegial curriculum and timetable.' DR J. DUNFORD
19 Mar.: `Comprehensive schools: continuing the success story.'


OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC STUDIES

PROFESSOR PAUL E. WALKER, University of Chicago, will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 29 January, in the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies.

Subject: `Systems of patronage under the Fatimids.'


NISSAN INSTITUTE OF JAPANESE STUDIES

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Lecture Theatre, the Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies, 27 Winchester Road.

Note: the seminar previously advertised for 24 January has been cancelled. PROFESSOR HIROSHI ODA, University College, London
31 Jan.: `Reform of corporate law in Japan, 2001–2: more freedom, less discipline?' PROFESSOR SHINYA YAMADA, National Museum of Japanese History
7 Feb.: `Transformation of funeral rituals and popular perception of death in contemporary Japan.' PROFESSOR SUSUMU YAMAUCHI, Fukuoka University
14 Feb.: `Analysis of the efficacy of special taxation measures in Japan.' DR SACHIKO HATAKENAKA, MIT
21 Feb.: `Higher education reform in Japan: a historical perspective.' PROFESSOR AKIO WATANABE, Emeritus Professor of Tokyo University, Research Institute for Pacific Studies, Tokyo
28 Feb.: `US–Japan–China relations.' DR MIKIKO ASHIKARI, Cambridge
7 Mar.: `Urban middle-class Japanese women and their white faces: gender, ideology, and representation.' PROFESSOR HIDEKAZU KAWAI, Gakushuin University, Tokyo
14 Mar.: `Japanese politics in comparative perspective.'


QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

Refugee Studies Centre

Seminars on Forced Migration

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House. Further information may be obtained from Dominique Attala (telephone: Oxford (2)70722, e-mail: rscmst@qeh.ox.ac.uk, Web site: http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk). G. KIBREAB, South Bank University
29 Jan.: To be announced. O. BAKEWELL, independent researcher
5 Feb.: `Finding durable but non-permanent solutions to a protracted refugee situation: the case of Angolan refugees in Zambia.' J.-F. DURIEUX, Deputy Director, Bureau for Europe, UNHCR
12 Feb.:`Non-refoulement through time: a few reflections on the legal dimensions of protracted refugee situations.' M. VAN BRUAENE, consultant in evaluations of international co-operation and humanitarian assistance
19 Feb.: `Protracted refugee situations of the Sahrawi and Tibetans: tentative comparisons and lessons learned.' PROFESSOR A. AGER, Queen Margaret University College, Edinburgh
26 Feb.: `Trends in the construction of psychosocial interventions: evidence from Sri Lanka.' G. AL-OMARI, Legal Adviser, Palestine Liberation Organisation
5 Mar.: `Where were the refugees in the Palestinian–Israeli peace negotiations?' PROFESSOR K. JACOBSEN, Tufts University
12 Mar.: `Supporting refugee households in protracted situations: what's new and what have we learnt?'


Other forthcoming courses

Further details on the following courses may be obtained from the Refugee Studies Centre (see contact details above). PROFESSOR J. HATHAWAY, Michigan
26–7 Apr.: `The rights of refugees under international law.' DR R. FARAH, Western Ontario, and F. MCKAY, Lawyer's Committee for Human Rights, New York
10–11 May: `Palestinian refugees and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.'


BRASENOSE COLLEGE

Edmund Croston Lectures 2003

Knowledge in the twenty-first century

The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the St Cross Building. The lectures are open to all members of the University. PROFESSOR STEVE JONES, University College, London
28 Jan.: `The life sciences.' PROFESOR A. FOWLER, Edinburgh
4 Feb.: `Literary criticism.' PROFESSOR ROGER CASHMORE
11 Feb.: `The physical sciences.' DR M. BEARD, Cambridge
18 Feb.: `Classics.' PROFESSOR JOHN GRAY, LSE
25 Feb.: `Political thought.' PROFESSOR SIR MICHAEL ATIYAH, Cambridge
4 Mar.: `Mathematics.'


CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE

F.W. Bateson Memorial Lecture 2003

PROFESSOR L. COLLEY, London School of Economics and Political Science, will deliver the F.W. Bateson Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 12 February, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Perceiving low literature: the captivity narrative.'


GREEN COLLEGE

Green College Lectures 2003

Science and the media: the challenge of adapting science to the mass media

The Green College Lectures will be held at 6 p.m. on Mondays in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

Note: the final lecture in the series will be given by Fiona Fox, in place of Dr Ian Gibson. PROFESSOR LORD MAY OF OXFORD, AC, KT, FRS, President, the Royal Society; Royal Society Research Professor of Zoology
20 Jan.: `Many scientists, many mediums, many publics: problems inherent in slogans like "Science and the media".' DR PALLAB GHOSH, BBC Science Correspondent
27 Jan.: `Trust no one, question everything, believe nothing: the new face of science journalism.' PROFESSOR I. HARGREAVES, Professor of Journalism and Director of the Centre for Journalism Studies, University of Cardiff
3 Feb.: `Lost in media-space: how science failed the communications test.' FIONA FOX, Director, the Science Media Centre, the Royal Institution
10 Feb.: `The truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth: so where does that leave journalism?'


LADY MARGARET HALL

Canada Seminars

THE HONOURABLE CLAIRE L'HEUREUX-DUBÉ, former Justice, Supreme Court of Canada, will speak at 5.15 p.m. on Tuesday, 4 February, in the Talbot Hall, Lady Margaret Hall. There will be an opportunity to meet the speaker informally afterwards. Enquiries should be directed to Vanessa Windsor, Lady Margaret Hall (telephone: Oxford (2)74302, e-mail: vanessa.windsor@lmh.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `Rights on trial: equality and the Canadian Charter of Rights.'


ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

Asian Studies Centre

South Asian History Seminars

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Deakin Room, the Founder's Building, St Antony's College. Enquiries should be directed to the Asian Studies Centre (telephone: Oxford (2)74559, e-mail: asian@sant.ox.ac.uk).

Conveners: Dr Nandini Gooptu and Dr Kaushik Bhaumik. T. MURSHID, Free University of Brussels
28 Jan., Fellows' Dining Room: `The social construction of Shariah in colonial India.' S. SHEIKH
4 Feb.: `Chieftain, merchant, and herder: religion and authority in Gujarat, c.1250–1450.' P. CHAKRABARTI, Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine
11 Feb.: `Science and the trajectories of Indian modernity.' A. JACKSON
18 Feb.: `Imperial base in the Indian Ocean: Ceylon and the Second World War.' Y. KHAN
25 Feb.: `The Muslims of Uttar Pradesh and the Partition of India.' R. GOPINATH, LSE
4 Mar.: `Space and change in South Indian fertility, 1881–1981.' DR BHAUMIK
11 Mar.: `Between trade and religion: popular orientalism in Bombay, 1900–40.'


Seminars

Unless otherwise indicated the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Buttery, the Hilda Besse Building, St Antony's College. Enquiries should be directed to the Asian Studies Centre (telephone: Oxford (2)74559, e-mail: asian@sant.ox.ac.uk).

Convener: S. Y.-S. Tsang, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Politics. DR P. EKLUND, formerly Senior Evaluation Officer, the International Fund for Agricultural Development, United Nations, and DR K. IMAI
28 Jan.: `Programme design for accelerated reduction in rural poverty and child malnutrition in Asia.' DATO SRI MOHD NAJIB BIN TUN HAJI ABDUL RAZAK, Defence Minister, Malaysia
Fri. 31 Jan., 3 p.m., Fellows' Dining Room, Hilda Besse Building: `Malaysia and regional security in the age of global terrorism.' R. WYE, Foreign and Commonwealth Office
4 Feb.: `China's diplomatic agenda in the era of global terrorism.' DR F. CIBULKA
11 Feb.: `The war on terror and the Philippines' security and foreign policy.' AMBASSADOR DELFIN COLOME, Director General, the Asia–Europe Foundation
18 Feb.: `Asia and Europe: co-operation in the post-Cold War world.' PROFESSOR YUN-HAN CHU, President, Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation, and Distinguished Research Fellow, Academica Sinica
25 Feb.: `Taiwan's struggling with the challenges of democratic governance.' (Taiwan Studies Programme Seminar) DR T. HUXLEY, Senior Fellow in Asian Security, International Institute for Strategic Studies, formerly Reader in South-East Asian Politics, University of Hull
4 Mar.: `Regional security in south-east Asia in the era of global terrorism.' SIN-MING SHAW
11 Mar.: `Rethinking China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong.'


TRINITY COLLEGE

Richard Hillary Lecture 2003

GRAHAM SWIFT will deliver the Richard Hillary Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 5 February, in the St Cross Building.

Subject: ` "I do like to be beside the seaside": the place of place in fiction.'


WOLFSON COLLEGE

Wolfson College Lectures 2003

History and fiction: celebrating the centenary of Sir Ronald Syme (1903–89)

The Wolfson College Lectures will be held at 6 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Hall, Wolfson College. The lectures are free of charge and open to the public. PROFESSOR K. COLEMAN, Harvard
4 Feb.: ` "Truth severe, by fairy Fiction drest": reality and the Roman imagination.' PROFESSOR R. HOLMES, Royal Military College of Science
11 Feb.: `War of words: describing the Great War.' PROFESSOR K. HOPKINS, Cambridge
18 Feb.: `How to be a Roman emperor—an autobiography.' PROFESSOR N.A.M. RODGER, University of Exeter
25 Feb.: `History repeated as fiction in the novels of Patrick O'Brian.' JULIAN MITCHELL, novelist and dramatist
4 Mar.: ` "How many times shall Caesar bleed in sport": history and drama.' DR M. GRIFFIN
11 Mar.: ` "Lifting the mask": Syme on fictional history.'


RIPON COLLEGE, CUDDESDON

Jaspers Lecture

THE REVD ANDREW SHANKS, York Diocese, will deliver the Jaspers Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 4 February, in the Examination Schools. The lecture will be followed by a reception in the Old Library, the University Church. Those interested in attending are asked to inform S. Farrant (telephone: Oxford 877404, e-mail: SFarrant@ripon-cuddesdon.ac.uk).

Subject: `The vocation of intellectuals.'


FRIENDS OF THE PITT RIVERS MUSEUM

Gala Benefit Event

PENELOPE LIVELY and PHILIP PULLMAN will be in conversation, on the inspiration they have found in the Pitt Rivers Museum, at 6.30 p.m. on Friday, 7 February, in the Lecture Theatre, the University Museum of Natural History. The meeting will be followed by a reception. Tickets, costing £15 (concessions £12.50), may be obtained from Oxford (2)70928.


OXFORD ITALIAN ASSOCIATION

Lectures

Corrigendum

Unless otherwise indicated, the following lectures and meetings will be held at 7.30 for 8 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Mary Ogilvie Theatre, St Anne's College. Admission for non- members costs £3 (free admission for students under thirty). Further information may be obtained from the Hon. Secretary (Oxford 377479).

Note: the first lecture will be given on 4 February, not on 6 February, as incorrectly stated in the Gazette of 16 January (p. 637). ANTONY and PORTIA VENTON
4 Feb., Pauling Centre for Human Sciences: `The Mille Miglia 1927–57.' PROFESSOR J. WOODHOUSE
18 Feb.: `Echoes of Michelangelo's poetry in his art and sculpture.' PROFESSOR J. LEWIN
6 Mar.: `Venice in peril from the sea.'

Other meetings

Tue. 28 Jan.: conversazione in italiano, 48 Common Room, St Anne's College, 7.30 for 8 p.m. Admission free.

Grants and Research Funding

SIR JOHN HICKS FUND

The Committee for the Sir John Hicks Fund invites applications from members of the University for grants towards the costs of research in economic history. Applications will be considered from undergraduates, graduate students, and members of academic staff, and may relate to research into the economic history of any period or country. Applicants should (a) provide sufficient information about the general nature of their research to establish that it falls within the field of economic history; and (b) specify the precise nature and cost of the expenditure for which a grant is requested. They should also give the name of one referee who might be consulted by the committee. It is intended by the committee that grants should normally be made for sums of up to £250, though this may on occasion be exceeded. Retrospective grants will be made only in exceptional circumstances. The committee will consider applications twice in each year. The closing date for the first round is Monday of the third week of Hilary Term, and for the second round Monday of the third week of Trinity Term. Applications should be sent to Mrs E.A. Macallister, Secretary of the Committee for the Sir John Hicks Fund, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD.

Colleges, Halls, and Societies

OBITUARIES

Christ Church

THE HON. COLIN MACARTHUR CLARK, 17 December 2002; commoner 1953. Aged 70.

HUMPHREY JOHN DOUGLAS COLE, 4 January 2003; commoner 1959; Deputy Secretary and Chief Economic Adviser, Department of Transport, and Chief Economic Adviser, Department of the Environment 1983–7. Aged 74.

DR WILLIAM FREDERICK COOK; commoner 1958.

THE RT. HON. LORD DE MAULEY (GERALD JOHN PONSONBY), 17 October 2002; commoner 1940. Aged 80.

WILLIAM HERBERT EARLE, 11 April 1994; commoner 1933. Aged 81.

DR JOHN RICHARD O'BRIEN, FRCP, F.R.C.PATH., 27 October 2002; commoner 1934. Aged 86.

PROFESSOR JOHN BORDLEY RAWLS, DCL, 24 November 2002; Harvard University.

DR RICHARD (MICHAEL) ROBBINS, CBE, FSA, 21 December 2002; commoner 1934. Aged 87.

MICHAEL KINCHIN SMITH, OBE, 30 October 2002; commoner 1939. Aged 81.

PROFESSOR RICHARD ANTHONY STRADLING, 26 November 2002; Lecturer 1963–5, Research Student 1965–8, Official Student 1968–78, Member of the Governing Body 1965–78. Aged 65.

FRANCIS JOSEPH WALTER, 26 November 2002; commoner 1928. Aged 93.


Corpus Christi College

WARREN DE WITT ANDERSON, MA (PH.D.), 12 November 2001; Rhodes Scholar 1947–9. Aged 81.


Magdalen College

(BRYAN) ROGER ADAMS, 8 December 2002; commoner 1958–61. Aged 93.

CLAUDE TAYLOR ANDERSON, June 2002; Rhodes Scholar 1949–51. Aged 80.

ORMUS NEVILLE TALBOT DAVENPORT, 17 December 2002; commoner 1923–6. Aged 98.

JOHN HUGH RATHBONE DAVIES, 18 October 2002; commoner 1948 and 1951–2. Aged 84.

PETER IVOR THOMAS RADCLIFFE, 2 September 2002; exhibitioner 1969–73. Aged 51. JOHN MURRAY THOMSON, 17 November 2002; demy 1950. Aged 74.

BRIAN WEEKES, 23 May 2002; commoner 1963–5. Aged 66.

ADRIAN WRIGHT, 13 October 2002; commoner 1945–8. Aged 76.


St Hilda's College

HESTER JENKINS, B.LITT., MA, 26 October 2002; commoner 1950–2. Aged 82.

PATRICIA PERKINS (née Grady), MA, 2002; scholar 1964–7.

RUTH LEAH STANLEY (née Brenner), BA, 31 October 2002; commoner 1948–51. Aged 72.


Wolfson College

DESMOND KAY, MA, D.PHIL., 10 December 2002; Assessor 1973–4; Governing Body Fellow 1967–88, College Archivist 1987–93, Supernumerary Fellow 1988–9, Emeritus Fellow 1989–2002. Aged 76.


MEMORIAL SERVICE

Brasenose College

A Memorial Service for JOHN KIERAN BARRY MOYLAN NICHOLAS, FBA, formerly Scholar, Fellow, and Principal, will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 15 February, in the University Church of St Mary the Virgin. Tea will be served afterwards in the college.

Advertisements

Concerts

Oxford Chamber Music Society concert at Holywell, Sun., 2 Feb., 2.45 p.m. Thomas Carroll (cello) and Carole Presley (piano) play Beethoven's Magic FluteVariations, Kodaly's sol sonata, Schumann's 5 Folk Pieces op. 102 and the BridgeSonata (1913-17). Tickets from Oxford Playhouse, 01865 305305 or www.ticketsoxford.com: £13, seniors £11; at the door £14, £12; students/juniors £5, but some free Cavatina Trust tickets for 8–22 year-olds.

The Oxford Millennium Orchestra plays Music for Spring: Elgar's Serenade for Strings; Vaughan Williams' Five Mystical Songs; Rachmaninov's 2nd Symphony. Principal conductor, Nick Mumby; baritone, David Somerville Wright. Fri., 31 Jan., 8 p.m. Sheldonian Theatre. Tickets £12/£10, £5 available from the Oxford Playhouse, 01865 305305 or www.ticketsoxford.com.


Pemberley International Study Centre

Situated 4,000 ft above sea-level in the magnificent hills of Haputale in Sri Lanka, in a tea plantation with panoramic views, the Centre provides an atmosphere of tranquillity and peace, a congenial milieu for scholars of all disciplines, writers and artists, in which research projects can be initiated or completed, and books or monographs planned and written. For 3 months in each year (June–Aug.) it is open to Residential Scholars who have been chosen on the basis of the merit of their applications by a Selection Committee of international experts in the field. For details and application forms, see the 8 pp. in colour on Pemberley's Web site: http://www.pemberleyhouse.com.


Society for Graduates

Meetings are held on Fri., at 8 p.m. in Wadham College, Parks Road. Visitors are welcome. Graduates of any university and of all ages are eligible for membership (undergraduates welcome). 24 Jan.,: Problems of Portraiture: an artist's view, Helen Ganly; 31 Jan.,: The badgers of Wytham Woods, Drs Chris Newman and Christina Buesching; 7 Feb.,: Homeopathy–Past, Present and Future, Dr Karima Brooke; 14 Feb.,: Print and Pomegranates–A history of Oxford University Press, Dr Martin Maw; 21 Feb..: 75 years of the Oxford Preservation Trust, Debbie Dance; 28 Feb.,: Manned Missions to Mars–closer than you think?!, Emily C. MacDonald; 7 Mar.,: Mind your language–international English for the 21st Century, Alison Haills; 14 Mar.,: RAF Falcons Parachute Display team, RAF Weston on the Green. Subscriptions: £5 per term, members; £1.50 per meeting, visitors.


David Goldblatt in Conversation with Okwui Enwezor

The South African photographer talks to the Director of the recent Documenta 11 and co-curator of the exhibition David Goldblatt: Fifty-One yearsat Modern Art Oxford, Tues. 4 Feb., 7.30 p.m. Admission is free but advance booking is recommended as places are limited. David Goldblatt: 51 Years, 1 Feb.,–30 March. Modern Art Oxford, 30 Pembroke Street, Oxford OX1 1BP. Tel.: 01865 722733. Web site: www.modernartoxford.org.uk.


Oxford Brookes University

Centre for Family and Household Research Spring seminar series: 23 Jan., Elisabeth Silva (Open University), Researching Technologies and Intimacies in Family Life (Gibbs Building, room G4.01); 27 Feb., Rosalind Edwards (South Bank University), Families and social capital (Research Centre, room SG05); 26 March, Floya Anthias (Oxford Brookes), Where do I belong? Narrating identity among young British Cypriots (Research Centre, room SG05). All seminars will begin at 5.30. Open seminars–all welcome.


Oxford University Newcomers' Club

The Club welcomes the wives and partners of visiting scholars, graduate students, and members of the University who are new to Oxford. It aims to offer help, advice, information, andthe opportunity to meet each other socially. Informal coffee mornings are held at 13, Norham Gardens every Wed., 10.30–12 noon. Other activities in the club room include the Craft Group, Book Group, and informal Conversation Group. Newcomers with children (0--4 years) meet every Fri. in term, 10.15 a.m.--12 noon. We organise tours of colleges and museums, visits to places of interest, country walks, and outings to gardens and antique shops. Secondhand items can be bought on Wed. mornings from the basement. Visit our Web site on www.ox.ac.uk/staff.


Oxford University Research Staff Society

The Research Staff Society (RSS) membership consists of Post- doctoral/Junior Research Fellows and Research Assistants who work for the University of Oxford. As most Research Staff are not attached to a college and may be new to Oxford our social events provide a unique opportunity to meet researchers outside your group or department. We aim to provide an interesting and varying social setting in which to mix and to become a voice for research staff within the University. We run social events each month to suit all tastes. Please visit our Web site http://users.ox.ac.uk/~rss/, which provides information on how to join the society as well as details on events which we will be running in the near future. We hope you will decide to join us and very much look forward to meeting you at one of our events this year.


Restoration and Conservation of Antique Furniture

John Hulme undertakes all aspects of restoration: 30 years experience; collection and delivery. For free advice, telephone or write to: The Workshop, 11A High Street, Chipping Norton, Oxon. OX7 5AD. Tel.: 01608 641692.


Periodicals Bought and Sold

Back-issues of scholarly periodicals and journals bought and sold. Graham Jeffrey, Periodicals (est. 1967), 29 Cuddesdon Road, Horspath, Oxford, OX33 1JD. Tel.: 01865 872528, fax: 776398. E-mail: gjeffreysatu@aol.com.


Services Offered

Oxford Academic Services: indexing, project management, history research projects. Details of all services: judith@history.u-net.com, or Judith Loades, P.O.Box 323, Burford, Oxon. OX18 4XN.

Thinking of publishing your own book or thesis? We can help with editing, proof-reading, desing, typesetting and printing. Contact David Mowat at New Cherwell Press, tel.: 01865 310216.

Painting, carpentry, building and design: small and medium sized projects undertaken, from shelving through kitchens to home extensions; decorating, internal and external; planning applications. Free advcie, quotations and references. Tel.: Ian on 01865 308188 or 07773 712829.

Big or small, we ship it all, plus free pick up anywhere in Oxford. Also 24-hour photocopying, private mailing addresses (24-hour access, and mail forwarding world-wide), binding, fax bureau, colour photocopying, mailing services, and much more. Contact or visit Mail Boxes Etc., 266 Banbury Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 514655, fax: 514656, e-mail: summertown@020.mbe.uk.com, also at: 94 London Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 741729, fax: 01865 742431, e-mail: staff@mbeheadington.co.uk.

Town and Country Trees: arboricultural contractors; modern arboricultural techniques; local authority approved; safeguarded by full Public Liability insurance. Free advice and quotations. Tel.: 0845 458 2980 or 07976 261850 (mobile).


Domestic Services

Blue House, a small, intimate nursery for children 2–5 years, established 10 years. Open Mon.–Fri., 8.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m., full or half-days. NNEB staff. All pre-school activities inc. numeracy and literacy skills to prepare children for school entry. Short-term vacancies for visiting academics. Call Kimberley for further information, or come to visit. Tel.: 01865 247877.

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: 01865 726983 or 01235 555533.


Tuition Offered

Piano lessons: experienced teacher; adults and children; all grades. Beginners welcome. contact Miss P. Read BA (Hons) L.R.A.M., near Kidlington. Tel.: 01865 331147


Situations Vacant

Felicity Bryan Limited Literary Agency: full-time Administrative assistant/Receptionist required for North Oxford company. We are looking for someone with good organisational abilities, computer skills, numeracy and a flexible approach to work, who would fit well into a small team and be willing to learn new skills. For full details of the vacancy please e-mail: agency@felicitybryan.com, tel. 01865 513816, or write to 2a North Parade, Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6LX.

Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies: Director's Secretary. Applications are invited for this full-time position from persons with superior secretarial and organisational skills. The successful applicant will have the proven ability to use their professional skills and initiative in ways which support the Director's wide range of activities. A sense of responsibility, initiative, flexibility and ability to work under pressure are essential. Initial salary in the range £16,000–£18,000 p.a. Applications, including curriculum vitae and full details of two referees, should be sent to the Personal Assistant to the Director, Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, George Street, Oxford OX1 2AR. Closing date for applications 31 Jan.

Washington International Studies Council:Administrator, some experience, to manage office of U.S. overseas study programme. Should have ability to meet deadlines, to follow through, to supervise staff, to deal with student problems (esp. housing). Age around 30 with some knowledge of Oxford University preferred (not required). Salary £25k–£30k, depending. Four weeks paid vacation, good prospects for an able self-starter. Smokers welcome. Please mail C.V. to: Dr Richardson, Fl.8, Tennyson Lodge, Paradise Square, Oxford OX1 4UD.

University of Oxford:The Voltaire Foundation. Desk and Research Editor. The Voltaire Foundation is looking for an energetic and organised person to help progress the definitive edition of The Complete Works of Voltaire. For full details including how to apply please visit: www.voltaire.ox.ac.uk, then click on 'jobs'.

University of Oxford: The Voltaire Foundation. Electronic publishing and IT–an exciting opportunity. The Voltaire Foundation is looking for a new member for its digital development team. The succesful candidate will report directly to the R & D Director, and play an important role especially on the Electronic Enlightenment Project (EE), an ambitious, innovative and international humanities project sponsored by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. For full details including how to apply please visit: www.voltaire.ox.ac.uk then click on 'jobs'.


Houses to Let

1908 family house (furnished) for let Apr.,–Aug.: 2 reception rooms (piano), large kitchen/dining room, utility room (washing machine, dishwasher), 3 bedrooms plus study/bedroom. Garden and parking; 15 minutes cycle/bus to city centre. £1,000 p.m. Contact: 01865 739070.

Furnished 5-bedroom, 3 bathroom house over 3 floors in a wing of a Victorian Manor house in a very quiet village. Two reception rooms, large kitchen, chapel incorporating dining room and family room, completely modernized to a high standard, wonderful character. Large garden, parking, garage. Available Feb. £2,500 p.m. Tel.: 044 (0)1993 702325 or e-mail: cmcgachen@aol.com.

North Oxford , Banbury Road, OX2 7RG: fully-furnished, spacious 4-bedroom semi-detached house; newly modernised and decorated; very good condition; large luxury fitted kitchen and dining room; living room; children's playroom; bathroom; 2 toilets; front and good-size back garden; d.g., gas c.h.; washing machine and drier; dishwasher; piano. Off-road parking. Within excellent schools catchment area, frequent bus services, 10 minutes' walk to Summertown, local banks and shops. Available from end March for 1 year. £1,250 plus bills and council tax. Non-smoking professional families by reference. No pets. Tel.: 01865 559490 (eves.), 01865 274576 (day) or e-mail: roger.goodman@sant.ox.ac.uk.

Iffley: lovely 2/3-bedroom house with garden, quiet cul-de-sac, off- street parking, internet, fully furnished, all conveniences. Available March–June. £900 p.m. incl., all bills except tel. Daniel 01865 451674 or e-mail: d.nettle@open.ac.uk.

Superb, modern, architect-designed house in residential North Oxford. Easy access to city centre (several bus routes, or walk along road or canal). Easily looked- after garden, has feeling of being out in the country. Very large kitchen/dining room; large living room upstairs, to take advantage of view over large green open space. Modern furniture, fully equipped. Central heating. Available Apr.–Aug. Non-smokers and no children preferred. E-mail: l.lyons1@physics.ox.ac.uk, or message to: Dr L. L. Lyons at Jesus College, Oxford OX1 3DW.

An Englishman's home is his castle---so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or e-mail us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: 01865 764533, fax: 764777, e-mail: info@qbman.co.uk.


Flats to Let

Grandpont–£895 p.c.m. Modern 2-bedroom first-floor apartment close to Folly Bridge. Available furnished from mid.–Jan., also short lets. For further details please contact Sarah James on 01865 554577, Lifestyle Lettings & Property Management. E-mail: sarah@lifestyle-lettings.co.uk.


Serviced Accommodation

Finally! the luxurious and economical alternative to 5-star luxury hotels, in central Oxford. Ambassador's Oxford offers clients short-stay 2-bedroom, 2 bathroom–1 en suite–5-star apartments in the centre of Oxford with allocated parking. Only 3 minutes' walk from the railway station and the Saïd Business School. Furnished to a very high standard to include well-equipped kitchen and lounge, computer, printer, internet access, and weekly Maid Service. From less than £100 per apartment per night, to accommodate up to 4/5 guests. Contact: www.ambassadorsoxford.co.uk, or tel.: 07876 203378.


Accommodation Offered

Delightful rooms in North Oxford available now. £55 p.w. Book by telephone or fax: 01865 511657 or e-mail: mcadex@gofornet.co.uk.

Professional person only, graduate, postdoctor, to share lovely spacious flat in Headington; fantastic bus route, 8 minutes into Oxford; available immediately. Rent £450 p.c.m. incl. of all bills. For further details contact Michelle on 01865 276460 or e-mail: michelle.jepson@pembroke.oxford.ac.uk, or 01865 308698.

Self-contained split-level comfortable room with all mod cons in old family house in pretty location in Upper Wolvercote, highly convenient for University and Oxford City. En suiteshower/loo, kitchen/dining area with washing machine; bedroom area in gallery at top of stairs. Parking and/or bus ride 15 minutes to city centre. Suit academic/other professional. Available Feb., 2003. £625 p.c.m. excl. telephone. References required. E-mail: wrldco@aol.com.

Single rooms available in centrally placed street of unique coloured houses within easy walk of university departments. Short or long stays in comfortable small Victorian house. Bed-and-breakfast, access to microwave, use of kettle, and all bills included. £95 p.w. Non-smokers. Foreign academics especially welcome. Owner has lived abroad for some years. Tel. and fax: 01865 516142.

Paying guests, visiting academics, welcomed for short or long stays in the comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple, in exclusive, quiet, leafy central north Oxford, within walking distance of all main university buildings, town centre, parks, river, good shops, and restaurants. All rooms have colour TV, tea-/coffee-making facilities, microwave, and refrigerator and/or deep-freeze availability, c.h., and independent heating. Breakfast included in the very moderate terms. Tel./fax: 01865 557879.


Accommodation Sought

NZ doctor and wife, working in Didcot for 7 months from mid-Feb., require fully-furnished, 2-bedroom accommodation in Didcot or Oxford, or nearby. References available. Please contact Win Gebbie, Ireland 00353 877651241, or e-mail: antwingeb@hotmail.com.

Academic family (visiting fellows from Germany with 2 children) seek 2- or 3-bedroom flat/house to rent short term from 25 Apr.,–20 July. Oxford or South Oxfordshire. Contact Prof. M. Havenith-Newen on 0049 234 3224249 or Dr A. Newen on 0049 4221 9160 222.

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us: 01865 764533, fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk. Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.


Accommodation Sought to Rent or Exchange

House exchange or rental Canberra Australia. Canberra academic and family seek house exchange close to Oxford, Apr.,–June '03; 2 bedroom Canberra cottage close city, ANU and Renault. Contact: ajf@management.canberra.edu.au.


Holiday Lets

Las Alpujarras–Las Canadas: rustic cottage in olive terraces, mountain views, pool, 2 doubles and 1 twin, kitchen, dining , bath and living rooms; edge of village, 10 minutes drive to Ugijar market town. Car hire preferable. Tel.: 0034 958 851773 or e-mail: L.bond@wanadoo.es.

Winter/early spring breaks in cosy north Pembrokeshire coast cottage. Books to read and paths to walk. Find a glowing fire and freshly made bara brith on arrival! £120 p.w., shorter periods negotiable. Accessible by public transport. Tel.: 01348 872080.

Dordogne–France: charming restored stone cottage hidden on a hillside close to the famous Chateau of Beynac. Large living room, newly equipped kitchen/dining room both 5x5 m., 2 bedrooms, 1 new bathroom, utility room. Large independent studio giving onto private swimming pool, 12x5 m. Access to 3½ hectares of private land. Available June, £500 p.w., mid-July–end Aug. £800 p.w. Contact Barbara Emerson on 01235 553944 or e-mail: barbaracemerson@yahoo.co.uk.

Crete. A traditional Cretan house in old town Rethimno, superbly renovated to provide space and comfort in beautifully furnished surroundings. Elevated, vine- covered, sitting area with brick barbecue—perfect for alfresco dining. It is in a quiet area, and close to long, sandy beach, taverns, shops, and the many interesting sights in and around this historic area. Sleeps 4 (1 double, 1 twin). Available all year round. All linen, electricity and cleaning inc. 2002 rates on request. Tel./fax: Nikolaos Glinias, 0030 831 56525, e-mail: nglynias@ret.forthnet.gr.

Normandy: charming half-timbered cottage in the Normandy countryside. Sleeps 7 (4 bedrooms). Comfortable and fully equipped (incl. for children; also a downstairs double bedroom suitable for the elderly); an excellent base for exploring the Pays d'Auge region and only 30 minutes from sandy beaches. Available all year round. £250–£600 p.w. Tel., or fax Impey, 0033 231 32 87 92.

Flat to let on the Estoril coast in Portugal: lovely, large, fully furnished Duplex; 3 bedrooms, 2 living rooms, with garden and barbecue. All mod. cons. TV with Cable. Close to delightful beaches similar to the Cote d'Azur. Twenty minutes by car to Lisbon, 30 minutes to the Sintra-Cascais Natural Park. £250 p.w. until Easter. Tel.: 01865 769328, e-mail: julian@jdgross.fsworld.co.uk.

Umbria–near Perugia, easy reach of Assisi, Lake Trasimene, Orvieto. Restored farmhouse, own private valley, large swimming pool: 2 spacious flats sleeping 4 and 2, or can be combineds. £220–£710 p.w. depending on number of beds and season. For further details phone or fax 01865 390581.

Andalusia: chaplain's house in beautiful mountain village. Sleeps 6. Immaculate and newly furnished, spacious with large roof terrace overlooking orange groves and hills. Dishwasher, washing machine. Sea, 25 mins.; Granada 20 mins.; Sierra Nevada peaks 40 mins. July, Aug., and Easter £380 p.w., otherwise £260 p.w., both incl. linen and cleaner. More information from Annette Mountford 01865 515778 or e-mail: brian.mountford@oriel.

Tuscany: family-owned wine estate, producing highly recognised wines, olive oil and cheese; offers ancient farmhouse and apartments accommodation 2 up to 12+. Secluded rural setting, half-hour central Flroence. Contact: tel/fax: (0039) 055 824 9120, e-mail: sulpoggio@bcc.tin.it.

Two farmhouse with pools to let in SW France; both stunningly situated, these sunny and luxurious properties reside in private and spacious grounds and offer good views; sleep 10 (4 in independent `granny' house) and 6 respectively. Suitable for superb holidays or longer stays. Further details on: www.hidden-sw-france.com, or contact Marion on 00 33 5 63 24 08 78/00 33 5 63 02 11 98, or e-mail: emailenquirie@hidden-sw- france.com.

Cevennes–Gard/Lozere/Ardeche borders: spacious, newly refurbished apartment in stone Cevenol 'mas', on the periphery of Mont Lozere National Park. Vine-covered terrace, adjoining modern kitchen; salon; 3 double bedrooms–sleeps 8+; bathroom and 2 shower rooms. Well separated from owners' accommodation which is usually unoccupied when this apartment is let. Set at about 1000ft, in over 2 acres of mature gardens, the house is on the edge of a very quiet hamlet–near a village with shops–in an area of dramatic mountain scenery, with attractive river swimming. Uzes, Nimes, Pont du Gard, Avignon, Arles, Montpellier, Southern Rhone vineyards, Gorges du Tarn–and the Mediterranean–all within easy reach. For those who do not wish to drive, there is easy access via cheap Stansted flights. Booking now open for 2003 (from £210 p.w.). Non-smokers only please. Full c.h. available for autumn and winter lets. A smaller, second flat should be available from May onwards. It will sleep 4 or 5 in 2 bedrooms, and will have a large living area and a cool covered terrace. Though entirely separate from the larger flat–and available separately–this may be of particular interest to families who enjoy holidays together but who would appreciated a greater degeree of privacy and independence. For further details of either of these flats, please apply (eves.): 01527 541360.

Really lovely location in the Upper Tamar Valley on the borders of Devon and Cornwall. Large, comfortable 17th-c., listed farmhouse with 6 double bedrooms, 3 bath/shower rooms, 2 sitting room, and large farmhouse kitchen. Also available is a recently converted barn with 2 double bedrooms (1 with a 4-poster bed), 2 bath/shower rooms, large open-plan living/dining room/kitchen. Very nicely furnished. Both are stocked with books and games as well as TV and video. Outdoor heated swimming pool, games room (table tennis, pool, bar billiards, darts). Not far from Eden Project, Dartmoor and Bodmin Moor. Half an hour from coast. Easily accessible from A30 though set in totally secluded peaceful countryside. Privately owned. Contact Michele or Jeremy Smith on 01865 310998 or e-mail: smithatpalla@yahoo.co.uk for more details or look at our Web site: www.pallastreet.co.uk.

Venice: large flat in the heart of Venice, near Palazzo Grassi, in the heart of Venice, with large traditional sitting-room, and separate dining room, well-appointed kitchen, 1 double bedroom with en suite bathroom, second bedroom with twin beds, third bedroom with 1 bed (+ 1), and a second bathroom. The flat is ideal for a family, in pristine condition, and available for short periods on a weekly basis at £600 per week. Tel.: + 39 0423 723582, e-mail: tagariello@libero.it.

Greek Island rentals: Skopelos, Alonissos and Skiathos: local villa specialist offers lovely villas, island houses and apartments available for rent. Town, country and seaside locations. Accommodation for 2–16 persons. Prices from GBP 100 p.p.p.w. For information see: www.holidayislands.com. E-mail: thalpos@otenet.gr, fax: 0030 4240 23057.


For Sale

Special Offer: high quality chrome frame folding chairs. Wine colour padded seat and backrest. Chairs link together and fold flat for storage. £25.99 (normally £60). Call now on 07866721618 or 01865 727918.

Appointments

COOKSON PROFESSORSHIP OF MATERIALS

Applications are invited for the above post, tenable from October 2003, or such later date as may be arranged. A non-stipendiary fellowship at St Catherine's College is attached to the professorship. The Cookson Professorship of Materials, endowed by the Cookson Group PLC, is held in the Department of Materials.

The University seeks to appoint a person with a record of internationally esteemed research within the field of materials processing who, through leadership and the distinction of his or her contribution to the field, will ensure its continued vigorous development in the department, and its wide recognition outside.

Further particulars, including details of how to apply, are available from http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/ or from the Registrar, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: Oxford (2)70200). The closing date for applications is 31 March.


DEPARTMENT OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

University Lecturership in Cognitive Psychology

In association with a Tutorial Fellowship at Magdalen College

Applications are invited for the above lecturership, tenable from 1 October 2003. Candidates should be able to contribute to the department's teaching in Cognitive Psychology and have a proven record of research achievement. The lecturership is associated with a tutorial fellowship at Magdalen College, under arrangements described in the college further particulars. The salary will be according to age on a combined college and university scale from £26,734 up to a maximum of £42,900 per annum. Additional college allowances are available, as set out in the further particulars. The post is tenurable, subject to review.

Further particulars, containing an outline of the department's staff, research, and teaching, details of the duties and requirements of both university and college posts, and the full range of emoluments and allowances attached to both appointments, may be obtained at http:// www.psych.ox.ac.uk/ or from Ms J. Newman, Department of Experimental Psychology, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3UD (fax: Oxford (2)71354), to whom applications should be sent (seven copies, except for overseas applicants who may send a single copy), including a curriculum vitae, a summary of research, and names and contact details of three referees, to arrive no later than 18 February. Informal enquiries can be directed to Professor O.J. Braddick (telephone: Oxford (2)71355, e-mail: oliver.braddick@psy.ox.ac.uk).

The University and Magdalen College are equal opportunities employers.


UNIVERSITY LECTURERSHIP IN PALAEOLITHIC ARCHAEOLOGY

In association with Hertford College

Applications are invited for the above post, tenable from 1 October 2003 or as soon as possible thereafter. The successful candidate will be offered a tutorial fellowship at Hertford College. The combined college and university salary will be according to age on a scale up to £42,900 per annum.

The University and the college are seeking candidates with a proven record of research and teaching. The lecturership is established in the broad field of Palaeolithic Archaeology and applications are sought particularly from those with an interest in Africa, although those interested in other areas that complement existing strengths of the School of Archaeology are also encouraged to apply. An ability to situate teaching and research within the broad field of anthropological approaches to archaeology would also be an advantage.

The appointee will be required to engage in research which will contribute to the School of Archaeology's research reputation; to teach, supervise, and examine undergraduate and graduate students; and to contribute to administration in the college and the department.

Further particulars are available from http://www.archaeology.ox.ac.uk or from the Administrator, Institute of Archaeology, Beaumont Street, Oxford OX1 2PG (telephone: Oxford (2)78242). Applications (electronic copies are not acceptable) including a curriculum vitae, a list of principal publications, and the names and contact details of three referees (eight copies, except from candidates overseas who need send only one), should be sent for receipt not later than Monday, 3 March. There is no application form, and separate application is not required for the college post. Interviews are expected to take place on Wednesday, 9 April. Those interviewed will be requested to give a brief overview of their research interests and teaching expertise.


FACULTY OF CLASSICS

Grocyn Lecturership

Applications are invited for the Grocyn Lecturership, tenable from 1 October 2003. The lecturer will co-ordinate the faculty's language-teaching programme; give Greek and Latin classes to undergraduates; train graduates to teach language classes; examine language papers, and develop language courses. A fellowship at Wadham College is attached to the lecturership, and the lecturer will be required to undertake three hours of tutorial teaching per week. The combined faculty and college salary will be in the range £20,481--£31,404.

Candidates should have a high level of ability in teaching in both Latin and Greek, in course design and development, in teacher training, and in organisation of teaching.

Applications, consisting of a curriculum vitae and the names and addresses of two referees, should be sent to Mrs K. Brill, Classics Faculty Board, 34 St Giles', Oxford OX1 3LH (e-mail: karen.brill@admin.ox.ac.uk). Referees must be asked to send references to Mrs Brill by the closing date. Further particulars are available at http://www.classics.ox.ac.uk/jobs/. Deadline: Wednesday, 12 February.


APPOINTMENT OF UNIVERSITY DRAMA OFFICER 2003--4

Applications are invited for a one-year fixed-term post of University Drama Officer from self-motivated, recent graduates or soon to be graduates. Applicants should have extensive experience of university student theatre and a broad range of theatre skills. Priority will be given to applications from candidates who have experience of Oxford University drama.

Duties include helping to programme the three major venues for student productions (the Old Fire Station, the Burton Taylor Studio Theatre, and the Playhouse); helping students to plan and publicise their productions; and arranging drama workshops. The appointment is for twelve months, starting in September 2003. Salary: £11,897 per annum.

Further particulars can be obtained from Max Todd, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: Oxford (2)80299, e-mail: max.todd@admin.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for receipt of applications is Friday, 28 February. Interviews will be held in the second week of April.


EXETER COLLEGE

Stipendiary Lecturership in Modern Languages (French)

Exeter College proposes to appoint a Stipendiary Lecturer in French with responsibility for teaching French literature in the period 1715 to the present. The position will be tenable from 1 October 2003 until 30 September 2005 with the possibility of renewal for a third and final year. The lecturer will be required to undertake tutorial and class teaching of undergraduates up to a maximum of twelve hours per week averaged over the three terms of the academic year, to set and mark college examinations, and to participate in the admissions process.

Further particulars may be obtained from the Academic Administrator, Exeter College, Oxford OX1 3DP (e-mail: academic.administrator@exeter.ox.ac. uk). Applications, including a curriculum vitae and the names of two referees, should be received by the Academic Administrator not later than 14 February. The college expects to short-list shortly thereafter and to hold interviews on 10/11 March. Referees should be asked to write without request from the college, their letters to be received by the Academic Administrator not later than the closing date.


Appointment of Chaplain/Fellow

Exeter College proposes to elect a Chaplain/Fellow from 1 October 2003 until 30 September 2008. The principal duty of the Chaplain will be the pastoral care of members of the college. The appointment is open equally to men and women, but is not renewable. Further particulars may be obtained either from the Web site http://www.exeter.ox.ac.uk, or from the Academic Administrator, Exeter College, Oxford OX1 3DP (telephone: Oxford (2)79660, fax: (2)79630, e-mail: academic.administrator@exeter.ox.ac. uk), to whom applications should be submitted. Candidates are asked to submit a curriculum vitae and to ask three referees to write directly to the Academic Administrator by the closing date for applications, 14 February.

Exeter College is an equal opportunities employer.


JESUS COLLEGE

Tutorial Fellowship in English

Applications are invited for a Tutorial Fellowship in English from 1 October 2003. The fellowship will be held in conjunction with a Titular University Lecturership (CUF), for which no separate application is requested.

Applicants should be qualified to teach English Literature 1509--1832, including Shakespeare. Candidates should also be willing to contribute to the teaching strength of the English Faculty within this period: preference may be given to those with expertise in bibliography, textual criticism, and manuscript studies within his or her period of expertise.

The combined college and university salary will be according to age on a scale up to £42,900 per annum. The college operates an equity sharing scheme, to assist fellows in purchasing houses. Additional college allowances are available.

Further particulars, containing details of the duties and full range of emoluments and allowances, may be obtained from the Principal's Secretary, Jesus College, Oxford OX1 3DW (telephone: Oxford (2)79718, e-mail: hgee@jesus.ox.ac.uk), or they may be viewed on the college's Web site, http://www.jesus.ox.ac.uk.

Applications, with a curriculum vitae and the names of three referees, should reach the Principal, Jesus College, Oxford OX1 3DW, not later than 14 February. Referees should be asked to write directly to the Principal by the same date.


Tutorial Fellowship in Modern History

Applications are invited for a Tutorial Fellowship in Modern History from 1 October 2003. The fellowship will be held in conjunction with a titular university lecturership (CUF), for which no separate application is requested. Applicants should be qualified to contribute to the tutorial teaching of the college in British and European history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. They should also be willing to contribute to the teaching strength of the History Faculty within these fields: preference may be given to those with an interest in twentieth-century international relations.

The combined college and university salary will be according to age on a scale up to £42,900 per annum. The college operates an equity sharing scheme, to assist fellows in purchasing houses. Additional college allowances are available.

Further particulars, containing details of the duties and full range of emoluments and allowances, may be obtained from the Principal's Secretary, Jesus College, Oxford OX1 3DW (telephone: Oxford (2)79718, e-mail: hgee@jesus.ox.ac.uk), or they may be viewed on the college's Web site, http://www.jesus.ox.ac.uk.

Applications, with a curriculum vitae and the names of three referees, should reach the Principal, Jesus College, Oxford OX1 3DW, not later than 14 February. Referees should be asked to write directly to the Principal by the same date.


KEBLE COLLEGE

Stipendiary Lecturership in History

Keble College invites applications from men and women for a Lecturership in History for the academic year 2003--4. The starting date will be 1 October 2003. The successful candidate will be expected to teach an average of twelve hours per week over the year.

The lecturer will be responsible for the teaching courses in early modern British and/or European history as well as in Approaches to History and Disciplines in History to undergraduates reading History or joint schools involving History. In addition to teaching duties, the lecturer will be expected to set and mark college examinations, to participate in admissions and in the routine administration of History, and to assist in the pastoral care of undergraduates reading History.

The post might suit someone who is about to complete or has recently completed a doctoral thesis. There is no age limit for applicants. The salary is on the scale £17,246-- £21,125. The lecturer will be offered certain dining rights and a teaching room in Keble College.

Further details are available from the Senior Tutor, Keble College, Oxford OX1 3PG. Letters of application should include a statement of the candidate's research interests and teaching experience, and an indication of those parts of the syllabus the candidate would be willing and able to teach, as well as a curriculum vitae and the names of two referees. Candidates should ask their referees to write directly to the Senior Tutor. Letters of application and reference should reach the Senior Tutor of Keble College by Friday, 28 February.


Research Fellowship and Tutorship in Mathematics

Keble College proposes to elect a Research Fellow and Tutor in Mathematics for a period of three years from 1 October 2003, with the possibility of re-election for a further period of two years. The person elected will have research interests in Pure Mathematics, and will be required to teach Mathematics at undergraduate level. The teaching stint will be four hours per week averaged over the academic year. The fellow may be asked to help in a limited way with the academic and pastoral organisation of the subject.

The fellow will not be a member of the governing body, but will be a full member of the senior common room and be entitled to lunch and dinner at the common table as well as to an academic allowance of £387 per annum (adjustable annually). A shared room will be available. The stipend for up to four hours of teaching per week averaged over the year will be £3,516 per annum (adjustable annually). In addition, a fellow not in receipt of other financial support will receive a housing allowance of £3,318 per annum (adjustable annually). The fellow will be eligible to join USS. Selection will be made on the basis of research potential and teaching ability. Candidates should submit a curriculum vitae (including the names, addresses, and telephone numbers of two referees) and a statement of research activity to the Warden's Secretary, Keble College, Oxford OX1 3PG by Friday, 14 February, and should ask their referees to write directly to the Warden's Secretary by the same date.

Keble College is an equal opportunities employer committed to excellence in research and teaching.


LINCOLN COLLEGE

Appointment of Archivist

Lincoln College is seeking to appoint an Archivist. The records of the archive reflect the history of the college, spanning five centuries, and include the original founding charter of 1427, manorial records, accounts, and deeds. More modern papers include college societies' memorabilia, photographs, and the papers of Sir Osbert Lancaster. The Archivist will be responsible for managing all aspects of the archive, including acquisitions, access, cataloguing, and storage. This includes facilitating access to the collections, answering enquiries, and promoting the archive through exhibitions, articles, and presentations as required.

The successful applicant will have an honours degree and a postgraduate qualification in archive administration and records management, together with at least two years' experience in archive work. The appointment will be for one day per week, on the senior librarian, administrative, and computer staff grade 2 scale, starting at £21,125 (pro rata).

A job description may be obtained from Mrs F.M. Piddock, Lincoln College, Oxford OX1 3DR (telephone: Oxford (2)79831, e-mail: library@lincoln.ox.ac.uk). Applicants should send a curriculum vitae and letter of application together with the names of two referees to Mrs Piddock at the above address. The closing date for the receipt of applications is 7 February.


ST ANNE'S COLLEGE

Appointment of Development Office Assistant

Applications are invited for the part-time position of Development Assistant in the Development Office, which is responsible for fund-raising and alumni/ae relations. The successful candidate will be a good communicator, with proven IT and administrative skills, and the ability to work effectively to meet deadlines.

The standard working week will be 18.25 hours. Days on duty can be flexible. Salary will be in the clerical and library grade 3 range (£12,997-- £15,908 per annum, pro rata).

Further details may be obtained from Stephen Tall, Development Director, St Anne's College, Oxford OX2 6HS (telephone: Oxford (2)84672, e-mail: stephen.tall@st-annes. ox.ac.uk), to whom letters of application, together with a curriculum vitae, and the full contact details of two referees, should be sent to arrive no later than 31 January.


ST HILDA'S COLLEGE

Randall-MacIver Junior Research Fellowship

Applications are invited for a Joanna Randall-MacIver Junior Research Fellowship, for studies in the fine art, music, or literature of any nation in any period. The appointment will initially be for one year from 1 October 2003, renewable for a second. The Junior Research Fellowship is open to women graduates of any country. Further particulars and an application form should be obtained from the college Web site
(http:://www.sthildas.ox.ac.uk/news) or from the Academic Office, St Hilda's College, Oxford OX4 1DY (telephone: Oxford (2)76815, e-mail: college.office@st-hildas.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for applications is 20 February.


ST HUGH'S COLLEGE

Graduate Scholarships

St Hugh's College is offering up to ten scholarships for research to graduates of any nationality from October 2003, each of £2,000 per annum and for a period not extending beyond their fee-paying status. Scholarships are offered in all subjects, including named scholarships in classics, modern languages, and theology.

Each graduate scholar will be entitled to a room in St Hugh's graduate accommodation for up to two years (i.e. the duration of their fee-paying or two years, whichever is shortest) at the standard charge, and to dine periodically at the high table.

Awards to applicants not already reading for a higher degree at Oxford will be conditional on their being accepted to do so by the relevant faculty board of the University.

Awards to applicants currently reading for a higher degree at Oxford will be conditional on permission being granted by their present college for migration to St Hugh's.

Further particulars of the scholarships and of the application procedure may be obtained from the Academic Administrator, St Hugh's College, Oxford OX2 6LE (e-mail: marie.mcallister@st-hughs.ox.ac.uk), who should receive applications by Friday, 14 February.


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

Appointment of part-time IT Assistant

University College is looking for a well-organised graduate for the half-time post of IT Assistant to help in the day-to-day running of the college's extensive computing facilities. He/she will assist the IT Officer, along with a number of student helpers, to provide an efficient support service to all members of the college and its staff. The IT Assistant requires experience in a wide variety of computer environments (including Windows and Linux) together with skills in helping people in the use of IT and basic hardware maintenance. Skills in the maintenance of databases (Access and SQL), web pages, Novell networks, and Mackintosh systems are highly desirable.

The position is offered for a fixed period of two years from 1 February 2003 or as soon as possible thereafter.

The salary will be on the university library and clerical scale grade 4, point 6, national spinal point 39 (£17,416, pro rata), with excellent pension scheme and other benefits and twenty-eight half-day holidays including Bank Holidays.

The post may suit someone in the final stages of a graduate degree, but applications are not restricted to this category and are welcomed from any suitably qualified candidate.

Applications should be sent to the Domestic Bursar, University College, Oxford OX1 4BH, by 31 January, and should include a full curriculum vitae and statement of relevant experience.

University College is an equal opportunities employer.


WOLFSON COLLEGE

Non-stipendiary Junior Research Fellowships 2003 in Humanities and Social Studies

The college proposes to elect up to six non-stipendiary Junior Research Fellows in Humanities and Social Studies, if candidates of sufficient merit present themselves, without limitation of subject, for two years in the first instance, from 1 October 2003. A fellowship is renewable for a further term of two years subject to certain conditions which include satisfactory progress in research, normally submission of a doctoral (or equivalent) thesis by those not holding a doctorate at time of election, and adequate funding. Candidates should have had at least three years' relevant postgraduate experience by commencement of the fellowship, and in the case of postdoctoral applicants, no more than three years should have elapsed since receipt of a doctorate. For full details and an application form see below.

Note: science-based non-stipendiary Junior Research Fellowships will be advertised in September/October 2003 for 1 January 2004.


Stipendiary Junior Research Fellowship in Humanities 2003

European Civilisation of the Medieval and Modern Periods

Languages, Literature, Art, Music (to include English, any literature written in English; Latin American Literature, etc.)

The college proposes to make one election to a stipendiary Junior Research Fellowship in the above subject area, for three years, to commence on 1 October 2003 at an annual stipend of £12,445 plus any general percentage increase in academic salaries that may come into effect, together with single accommodation (or an allowance in lieu) and common table meals. Candidates should have had at least three years' relevant postgraduate experience by commencement of the fellowship, and in the case of postdoctoral applicants, no more than three years should have elapsed since receipt of a doctorate. For full details and an application form see below.


Stipendiary Junior Research Fellowship in Indology 2003

The college proposes to make one election to a stipendiary Junior Research Fellowship in the above subject area, for three years, to commence on 1 October 2003 at an annual stipend of £12,445 plus any general percentage increase in academic salaries that may come into effect, together with single accommodation (or an allowance in lieu) and common table meals. Candidates should have had at least three years' relevant postgraduate experience by commencement of the fellowship, and in the case of postdoctoral applicants, no more than three years should have elapsed since receipt of a doctorate. The fellow may be permitted to spend up to half the period of his or her tenure away from Oxford, if this is necessary for research purposes. The cost of one return air ticket to the area of study will, in an appropriate case, be offered during the three-year tenure. For full details and an application form see below.


Charter Fellowship 2004--5 in Humanities and Social Sciences

One Charter Fellowship, to be chosen from the above subject areas, will be offered for one year from 1 October 2004. The timescale is designed to enable the successful candidate to apply for sabbatical leave from his/her home university. Applications are invited from persons holding a university lecturership (or comparable position in the UK or abroad). The fellow will be expected to carry out research in Oxford for at least one university term, but may hold the fellowship for up to one academic year in all. The fellowship carries with it common table meals, but no stipend. However, the college will make available up to £2,000 towards appropriate expenses in connection with the fellowship. College accommodation at the normal rent may be available. For full details and an application form see below.


Wolfson/AEA Technology Industrial Fellowships 2003--5

Wolfson College proposes to make elections to two two-year Wolfson/AEA Technology Industrial Fellowships to commence on 1 October 2003. These fellowships are intended to enable those working at AEA Technology or in industry to come to Oxford to engage in a joint research project with a university department. The intention is that these fellowships should give an opportunity for collaborative research which would not otherwise have taken place, but the college is prepared to receive proposals in respect of already established research projects. Proposers will be expected to negotiate an agreement with the company by whom the candidate is employed, under which the company would continue to pay his or her full salary but would permit him or her to spend one-fifth of his/her time on a joint research project in Oxford. The college is willing to consider a variation from this pattern to suit current conditions or individual circumstances. The college will offer up to £1,000 per annum towards any expense reasonably incurred in pursuance of the aims of the fellowship. For full details and an application form see below.

The closing date for applications for all of the above fellowships is 17 March. For full details and an application form for any of the above, send a stamped, self-addressed envelope specifying for which fellowship(s) you would like information, to the President's Secretary, Wolfson College, Oxford OX2 6UD. The college reserves the right not to accept applications received after the closing date.


COOKSON PROFESSORSHIP OF MATERIALS

Applications are invited for the above post, tenable from October 2003, or such later date as may be arranged. A non-stipendiary fellowship at St Catherine's College is attached to the professorship. The Cookson Professorship of Materials, endowed by the Cookson Group PLC, is held in the Department of Materials.

The University seeks to appoint a person with a record of internationally esteemed research within the field of materials processing who, through leadership and the distinction of his or her contribution to the field, will ensure its continued vigorous development in the department, and its wide recognition outside.

Further particulars, including details of how to apply, are available from http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/ or from the Registrar, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: Oxford (2)70200). The closing date for applications is 31 March.

Diary

Institute for the Advancement of University Learning Seminars: places should be booked in advance through the IAUL (telephone: (2)86808, e-mail: services@learning.ox.ac.uk, Internet: http://www.learning.ox.ac.uk).


Friday 24 January

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Job search and interview skills for contract research staff', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

DR J. LITTLEWOOD: `The ambiguity of labour; the identity of midwives' (Ethnicity and Identity Seminar: `The identities of medical practitioners and traditional healers'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Small treasures of the Ashmolean', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

PROFESSOR QUENTIN SKINNER: `Critics of the crown: common law and neoclassical challenges' (Ford's Lectures in British History: `Freedom, representation, and revolution, 1603–51'), Schools, 5 p.m.

THERESA MAY, MP: `The organisation of the Conservative Party' (seminar series: `British government and politics'), Lecture Room XI, Brasenose, 5 p.m.

P. PERRINEAU: `The National Front in French politics' (West European Seminar: `Populism, the extreme right, and the crisis of representation in Western Europe'), Maison Française, 5 p.m.

THE RTÉ VANBURGH QUARTET performs works by Hadyn, Zhou Long, and Ravel, Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's, 8.30 p.m. (admission by free programme, available from the Porters' Lodge).


Saturday 25 January

ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY OF MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY FRANCE conference: `Tremblement de terre politique ou accident de parcours: les élections présidentielles et législatives de 2002', Maison Française, 9.30 a.m.–4.15 p.m. (To register, tel. Oxford (2)74220, or e-mail: maison@herald.ox.ac.uk.)

KATHRYN WHITNEY (mezzo-soprano) and PHILIP BULLOCK (piano) perform works by Haydn, Berg, Ravel, and arie antiche, Wolfson, 7.30 p.m. (entrance £7, students £5; proceeds to the African Medical Research Foundation).


Monday 27 January

M. CARRANZA: `Making sense of common sense: sterilisation in Costa Rica' (Fertility and Reproduction Seminars: `Reproductive technologies'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

COMPUTING SERVICES courses: `What Linux can do for you', and `A gateway to library riches—searching online catalogues', OUCS, 12.30–1.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR B. ROTHENSTEIN: `The welfare state and social capital' (Interdisciplinary Sawyer Seminar: `The theory and politics of civil society'), Rothermere American Institute, 1.45 p.m. (enquiries to: paul.bou-habib@socres.ox.ac.uk, tel. (2)82718).

DR J. ROBERTSON: `Leprosy and the elusive M. leprae: colonial and imperial medical exchanges in the nineteenth century' (seminar series: `Ridding the Empire of leprosy: a grand undertaking and its legacy'), Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 2.15 p.m.

LORD CARRINGTON: `Should a changing parliament exercise more control over foreign policy?' (seminar series: `Labour's undetected constitutional changes'), Summer Common Room, Magdalen, 5 p.m.

DR PALLAB GHOSH: `Trust no one, question everything, believe nothing: the new face of science journalism' (Green College Lectures: `Science and the media: the challenge of adapting science to the mass media'), Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 6 p.m.


Tuesday 28 January

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Small group teaching' (first meeting), 12.15 p.m. (see information above).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Teacups and teapots', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

THE RT. HON. MICHAEL ANCRAM, MP, GORDON MARSDEN, MP, and PROFESSOR ARCHIE BROWN: `Building democracy and building capitalism: conflicting or complementary goals?' (seminar series: `Interests, identities, and interventions'), Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR C. UNGERSON: `Whose empowerment and independence? A cross-national perspective on "cash for care" schemes' (seminar series: `Current issues in social policy'), Violet Butler Seminar Room, Department of Social Policy and Social Work, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR STEVE JONES: `Knowledge in the twenty-first century: the life sciences' (Edmund Croston Lectures), St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

DR N. GREEN: `Local saints and foreign bodies: questions of identity in the Sufi biographical literature of south Asia' (lecture), Lecture Room 2, Christ Church, 5 p.m.

BARRY COX (News International Visiting Professor of Broadcast Media): `The coming of free-sheet television' (News International Broadcast Media Lectures: ` "It's TV, Jim, but not as we know it"—British television in the digital era'), Exeter, 5.30 p.m.


Wednesday 29 January

COMPUTING SERVICES courses: `European Computer Driving Licence: drop-in sessions', OUCS, 10 a.m.–1 p.m., and `Brush up your Shakespeare: online teaching for alumnae' (Emma Smith), OUCS, 1–1.45 p.m.

ORGAN RECITAL: Elizabeth Burgess, the chapel, Queen's, 1.10 p.m. (admission free; retiring collection).

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Welcome to the University' (for non-academic staff), 2 p.m., and `Descriptive statistics for research—probability', 3 p.m. (see information above).

B. RUTTER: `Oedipus and Creon: double hybris' (Archive of Performances of Greek and Roman Drama lecture), the Auditorium, Magdalen, 2.15 p.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM introductory gallery talk: `Islam', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

PROFESSOR ERNST VAN DE WETERING: `Rembrandt's anger: art lovers and asses' (Slade Lectures: `Reconstructing Rembrandt—questions and answers in recent research'), Lecture Hall, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m. (open to the public).

R. MONTGOMERY: `The State of Florida v. American Tobacco—an account of a major lawsuit' (lecture), Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

G. KIBREAB lectures in series Seminars in Forced Migration, Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.


Thursday 30 January

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Writing research papers, abstracts, and posters', 9.15 a.m.; `Appraisal skills', 2 p.m.; `Voice coaching' (one-hour sessions) [OK AS IS - NO TIME GIVEN] (see information above).

COMPUTING SERVICES courses: `The Research Technologies Service at OUCS', OUCS, 12.30–1.30 p.m., and Unix Systems Administration Seminar, OUCS, 12.45–1.45 p.m.

DR E. FERRARO: `Kneading life: women and the celebration of the dead in the northern Andes of Ecuador' (International Gender Studies Centre seminars: `Gender and religions: sacralising time and space'), Blackhall Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

K. WATSON: `A Briton's envied name: local defence forces, state control, and the politics of patriotism in England, 1793–1815' (seminar series: `Britain and the war with Napoleon'), Maison Française, 2.15 p.m.

CHRIST CHURCH PICTURE GALLERY guided tour: `Glass', 2.15 p.m. (booking not required).

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING Research Seminars: reading week (details from joanna.buddery@learning.ox.ac.uk), Littlegate House, 4 p.m.

THE RT. HON. C.F. PATTEN: ` "The End of History": the sequel' (Cyril Foster Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m. (tickets required, from Mrs Marga Lyall—tel. (2)78705, e- mail: cis@politics.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR A. GAMBLE: `Conservatism' (seminar series: `British political history in the twentieth century'), Lecture Room XI, Brasenose, 5 p.m.

G. CAPOCCIA: ``Anti-democratic challenges and democratic survival: elite reactions to extremism in inter-war Europe' (West European Seminar: `Populism, the extreme right, and the crisis of representation in Western Europe'), Maison Française, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR I. DONALDSON: `Biographical uncertainty' (DNB Seminars in Biography), Rainolds Room, Corpus Christi, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. BEGG: `Transport and congestion in Edinburgh and London' (Linacre Lectures: `Designing successful environmental policies'), Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building, 5.30 p.m.


Friday 31 January

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Minutes and agendas—an advanced programme', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

DR K. MAYNARD: `The vicissitudes of Kedjem "traditional doctors" and an ambivalent clientele in Cameroon' (Ethnicity and Identity Seminar: `The identities of medical practitioners and traditional healers'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

COMPUTING SERVICES courses: `Computing for the terrified', OUCS, 9.15 a.m.–12.15 p.m., and `Teaching and/with the Web', OUCS, 12.30–1.30 p.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk (Gertrud Seidmann, FSA): `A new acquisition: the Seal of Sir Joshua Reynolds', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

PROFESSOR QUENTIN SKINNER: `The rights and liberties of subjects' (Ford's Lectures in British History: `Freedom, representation, and revolution, 1603–51'), Schools, 5 p.m.

SAM YOUNGER: `The role of the Electoral Commission' (seminar series: `British government and politics'), Lecture Room XI, Brasenose, 5 p.m.

M. WIEVIORKA: `La République et la violence' (lecture), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.


Monday 3 February

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Recruitment and selection for administrators' (day 1), 9.30 a.m., and `Pre-retirement programme', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

DR M. BONACCORSO: `Programmes of gamete donation: strategies (in private clinics) of assisted conception' (Fertility and Reproduction Seminars: `Reproductive technologies'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

COMPUTING SERVICES courses: `E-mail and Web browsing on Linux', and `Full text to your desktop: introduction to e-journals', OUCS, 12.30–1.30 p.m.

J. MANTON: `Missionary leprosy control: ideologies and practices in Ogoja Province, Nigeria, 1944–8' (seminar series: `Ridding the Empire of leprosy: a grand undertaking and its legacy'), Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 2.15 p.m.

SIMON JENKINS: `The imperial treasury' (seminar series: `Labour's undetected constitutional changes'), Summer Common Room, Magdalen, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR I. HARGREAVES: `Lost in media-space: how science failed the communications test' (Green College Lectures: `Science and the media: the challenge of adapting science to the mass media'), Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 6 p.m.


Tuesday 4 February

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Recruitment and selection for administrators' (day 2), 9.30 a.m., and `Small group teaching' (second meeting), 12.15 p.m. (see information above).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Dutch still life painting', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

LORD HOWELL, PC, FELIPE FERNANDEZ-ARMESTO, and SIR MARRACK GOULDING: `When is foreign military intervention justified?' (seminar series: `Interests, identities, and interventions'), Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

MICHAEL HOLROYD: `The search for nobility in literary biography' (lecture series: `Biographers at work'), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

DR M. EVANS: `Lessons from the New Deal for Lone Parents—where should policy go next?' (seminar series: `Current issues in social policy'), Violet Butler Seminar Room, Department of Social Policy and Social Work, 5 p.m.

PROFESOR A. FOWLER: `Knowledge in the twenty-first century: literary criticism' (Edmund Croston Lectures), St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

BARRY COX (News International Visiting Professor of Broadcast Media): `The reformation of the BBC' (News International Broadcast Media Lectures: ` "It's TV, Jim, but not as we know it"—British television in the digital era'), Exeter, 5.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR K. COLEMAN: ` "Truth severe, by fairy Fiction drest": reality and the Roman imagination' (Wolfson College Lectures: `History and fiction: celebrating the centenary of Sir Ronald Syme (1903–89)'), the Hall, Wolfson, 6 p.m. (open to the public).