Oxford University Gazette: 16 January 2003

Oxford University Gazette, Vol. 133, No. 4645: 16 January 2003

The following supplements were published with this Gazette:

  • Special Lecture List, Hilary Term (PDF file)
  • Institute for the Advancement of University Learning: Seminars and Courses, Hilary and Trinity Terms. Details may be found at the IAUL site.

Note: due to the requirements of the Data Protection Act, some elements of the printed Gazette are not reproduced in the Web Gazette.

University Acts

COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

Changes in Regulations

Council has made the following changes in regulations, to come into effect on 31 January.

College Accounts

1 Delete Council Regulations 29 of 2002 (Supplement (1) to Gazette no. 4629, 10 July 2002, p. 1451, as corrected by p. 1558) and substitute the following as Council Regulations 1 of 2002:

`Council Regulations 1 of 2003

REGULATIONS FOR THE ACCOUNTS OF THE COLLEGES

Made by Council on 16 January 2003

1. (1) The financial statements prepared annually by the colleges under the provisions of Part B of Statute XV shall conform to the pro-forma accounts and detailed guidelines which shall be circulated by the College Accounts Committee not later than the end of the financial year to which the financial statements will relate.

(2) Such extracts from the audited financial statements as are submitted annually by the colleges to permit combination of the accounts of all the colleges shall be submitted exactly in accordance with the format provided.

2. The financial statements shall include for the year concerned:

(1) the report of the governing body of the college;

(2) the statement of the responsibilities of the governing body, including a statement on charitable status and on the use of property and income for purposes which are charitable in law;

(3) the statement of principal accounting policies;

(4) the balance sheet of the college, and the consolidated balance sheet of the college together with its subsidiaries and connected entities;

(5) the consolidated income and expenditure account;

(6) the consolidated statement of total recognised gains and losses;

(7) the consolidated cash-flow statement;

(8) the notes to the financial statements.

3. The additional information required under section 11 of Statute XV shall consist of schedules, compiled in accordance with the formats issued by the College Accounts Committee, showing the analysis of the college's income and expenditure, and the computation of its liability for or exemption from college contributions.

4. The auditor or auditors who are appointed by the college to audit the financial statements shall be eligible to perform audits of limited companies in the UK.

5. The report of the auditors, to be published with the financial statements, shall include their opinion as to whether the financial statements for the year give a true and fair view of:

(1) the state of affairs of the college, and of the college together with its subsidiaries and connected entities, at the end of the financial year; and

(2) the consolidated income and expenditure of the college together with its subsidiaries and connected entities for that year; and have been properly prepared in accordance with the provisions of Statute XV made by the University under the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923.

6. (1) The auditors shall carry out such investigations as are necessary to enable them to form an opinion as to:

(a) whether proper accounting records have been kept by the college; and

(b) whether the college's accounts are in agreement with the accounting records.

(2) If the auditors reach a satisfactory opinion as to (a) and (b) in paragraph (1) above, they do not need to state this in their report.

7. If the auditors fail to obtain all the information and explanations which they consider necessary for the purposes of their audit, they shall state that fact in their report.

8. The auditors shall consider whether the information given in the report of the governing body is consistent with the financial statements and, if they are of the opinion that it is not, they shall state that fact in their report.

9. The auditors shall also, if they consider that they can justifiably do so, supply to the University's Director of Finance and Secretary of the Chest (for onward transmission to the external auditors of the University's Accounts), by such date as the College Accounts Committee shall specify:

(1) a statement that they have not identified any significant accounting or control weaknesses relating to the income received by the college from the University out of grants and income for specific purposes; and

(2) a statement that all such income has, in their opinion, been applied to the purposes for which it was received.'

2 These regulations shall first apply to the accounts for the financial year ending 31 July 2003. [No notice of opposition having been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor will declare carried, without holding the meeting of Congregation on 21 January, Statute (2), concerning College Accounts (see `University Agenda' below). Council has accordingly made these changes in regulations, which give effect to consequential provisions.]


GENERAL PURPOSES COMMITTEE OF COUNCIL

Changes in Regulations

The General Purposes Committee of Council has made the following changes in regulations, to come into effect on 31 January.

Buxton Nature Reserve and Godstow Nunnery

1 In Part 2 of Council Regulations 25 of 2002 (Statutes, 2000, p. 606, as renumbered by Decree (3) of 18 January 2001 and by the changes in regulations published on 14 November 2002, and redesignated as regulations by Decree (5) of 11 July 2002, Gazette, Vol. 131, p. 521; Vol. 132, p. 1461; Vol. 133, p. 404), insert § 37:

`§ 37. Buxton Nature Reserve

1. The land given to the University in 1943 by Mr and Mrs H.N. Spalding, being four fields, Nos. 184, 190, 192, and 195a of the Ordnance Survey, having an area of approximately 7.6 hectares, adjoining the Mesopotamia Walk, with the object of preserving this area in perpetuity as a nature reserve, shall be held for ever and maintained by the University as a nature reserve with the object:

(1) to preserve in perpetuity a piece of water meadow characteristic of the Oxford basin for the enjoyment of the public; and

(2) to afford facilities for the observation and study of plants and animals inhabiting this type of land.

2. The reserve shall be a memorial to Leonard Halford Dudley Buxton, MA, D.Sc., and shall always include a bird sanctuary.

3. The administrative control of the reserve shall be vested in the Curators of the University Parks who shall by appropriate management and by a system of controlled access carry out the objects defined in regulation 1 above, in accordance with arrangements determined by Council for consultation with natural history interests.

4. Regulation 3 above may be amended by Council.'

2 Ibid. (p. 641, as renumbered and redesignated), insert new § 128 as follows and renumber existing §§ 128--36 (pp. 641--7) as §§129--37:

`§ 128. Godstow Nunnery

1. The ruins of Godstow Nunnery and the adjoining land (accepted from Mr Raymond William ffennell in 1923) shall be held for ever by the University.

2. The net income derived from the land shall be carried to the credit of a separate fund and shall be applied to meeting all expenses incurred in connection with the ruins.

3. Council shall make arrangements for appropriate consultation on all questions connected with the preservation and maintenance of the ruins.

4. Regulation 3 above may be amended by Council.' [These changes add to the University's Trust Regulations, where these provisions seem to be most appropriately located, provisions for the trusts in respect of two gifts of land to the University.]


PLANNING AND RESOURCE ALLOCATION COMMITTEE OF COUNCIL

Changes in Regulations

The Planning and Resource Allocation Committee of Council, on the recommendation of the Medical Sciences Board, has made the following changes in regulations, to come into effect on 31 January.

Professorship of Cardiovascular Physiology

1 In Schedule A to Sect. I, § 5. B of Council Regulations 24 of 2002, concerning professorships (Statutes, 2000, p. 381, as redesignated as regulations by Decree (5) of 11 July 2002, and amended by the changes in regulations published on 31 October 2002, Gazette, Vol. 132, p. 1461; Vol. 133, p. 352), before `Professor of Cardiovascular Physiology' insert `British Heart Foundation'.

2 Ibid., Sect. III, § 262, concerning particular professorships (Statutes, 2000, p. 489, as redesignated, and renumbered by the same changes), delete the title and regulation 1 and substitute:[1]

`§ 262. British Heart Foundation Professor of Cardiovascular Physiology

1. The British Heart Foundation Professor of Cardiovascular Physiology shall undertake research in cardiovascular physiology and shall lecture and give instruction in this subject.' [This change renames the new Professorship of Cardiovascular Physiology in order to reflect the funding of the post by the British Heart Foundation.] [1] New wording is indicated by underlining.


COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of Congregation: Blair, K., Keble Chappell, C.E., St Catherine's Craze, J.L., Faculty of Clinical Medicine Davies, P.T.G., Faculty of Clinical Medicine Deutsch, J.-G., St Cross Edwards, J.E., Faculty of Clinical Medicine Hammersley, M.S., Faculty of Clinical Medicine Hermans, D., Faculty of Clinical Medicine Loux, A.C., Faculty of Law Quaghebeur, G., Faculty of Clinical Medicine Rousseau, G.S., Magdalen Santini, D., St Hilda's Shefler, A.G., Faculty of Clinical Medicine Squier, W.M.V., Green College Whittingham, M.J., Faculty of Biological Sciences Wright, N.J.G., MA, D.Phil., Christ Church


BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 31 January, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

University Agenda

CONGREGATION 21 January

Notice

The meeting of Congregation is cancelled. The sole business comprises questions to which no opposition has been notified and in respect of which no request for an adjournment has been received, and Mr Vice-Chancellor will accordingly declare the statutes approved without a meeting under the provisions of Sect. 7 (1) of Statute IV (Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4633, 9 October 2002, p. 100).


CONGREGATION 11 February 2 p.m.

¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that written notice of any intention to vote against any of the following resolutions, signed in each case by at least two members of Congregation, must be given to the Registrar by noon on Monday, 3 February (see the note on the conduct of business in Congregation at the end of `University Agenda').

Voting on Resolutions approving the conferment of Honorary Degrees

(1) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Civil Law, honoris causa, upon THE RT. HON. BARONESS O'NEILL OF BENGARVE, CBE, MA (MA Cambridge; PH.D. Harvard), FBA, F.MED.SCI., Honorary Fellow of Somerville College, Principal of Newnham College, Cambridge, be approved.

(2) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Letters, honoris causa, upon PROFESSOR MARY DOUGLAS, CBE, B.SC., MA, D.PHIL., FBA, Honorary Fellow of St Anne's College, Emeritus Avalon Foundation Professor in the Humanities, Northwestern University, be approved.

(3) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Science, honoris causa, upon PROFESSOR DAME JULIA HIGGINS, DBE, MA, D.PHIL., FRS, F.R.ENG., Honorary Fellow of Somerville College, Professor of Polymer Science and Director of the Graduate School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, University of London, be approved.

(4) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Science, honoris causa, upon SIR PAUL NURSE (B.SC. Birmingham; PH.D. East Anglia), FRS, Honorary Fellow of Linacre College, Chief Executive, Cancer Research UK, be approved.

(5) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Science, honoris causa, upon PROFESSOR JEAN-PIERRE SERRE, Honorary Professor at the Collège de France, be approved.

(6) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Music, honoris causa, upon PLACIDO DOMINGO, KBE, FRCM, opera singer, conductor, and administrator, be approved.

¶ If the resolutions are approved, the honorary degrees will be conferred at the Encaenia on 25 June 2003.

Notices

UNIVERSITY PREACHERS

Hilary Term 2003

Thursday, 16 January, at 8 a.m. THE REVD DR LIZ CARMICHAEL, MBE, Fellow and Chaplain of St John's College. Holy Communion (Latin). At St Mary's.

Sunday, 19 January, at 10 a.m. PROFESSOR RICHARD SHARPE, Professor of Diplomatic and Fellow of Wadham College. (Latin Litany and Sermon.) At St Mary's.

Sunday, 26 January, at 10 a.m. PROFESSOR RICHARD BAUCKHAM, Professor of New Testament Studies and Bishop Wardlaw Professor, St Andrews University. (Macbride Sermon.) At Hertford College.

* Sunday, 2 February, at 10 a.m. THE REVD OLIVER O'DONOVAN. (First Bampton Lecture. Judgement in Action: (i) the Act of Judgement.) At St Mary's.

Sunday, 9 February, at 10 a.m. THE REVD OLIVER O'DONOVAN. (Second Bampton Lecture. Judgement in Action: (ii) Political judgement.) At St Mary's.

Sunday, 16 February, at 10 a.m. THE REVD OLIVER O'DONOVAN. (Third Bampton Lecture. Judgement in Action: (iii) Messiness.) At St Mary's.

Sunday, 23 February, at 10 a.m. THE REVD OLIVER O'DONOVAN. (Fourth Bampton Lecture. Judgement in Action: (iv) Political agency.) At St Mary's.

Sunday, 2 March, at 10 a.m. DOM HENRY WANSBROUGH, OSB, Master of St Benet's Hall. (University Sermon on the Grace of Humility.) At St Mary's.

Sunday, 9 March, at 10 a.m. DR PAMELA SUE ANDERSON, Fellow in Philosophy and Christian Ethics, Regent's Park College. At St Mary's.

* Sunday, 16 March, at 10 a.m. THE REVD PROFESSOR JOHN BARTON, Oriel and Laing Professor of the Interpretation of Holy Scripture, Fellow of Oriel College, Emeritus Fellow of St Cross College. (Sermon for the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin.) At Oriel College.

* On these days Doctors will wear their robes.


COMMITTEE ON STATUTES BEFORE THE PRIVY COUNCIL

1 Notice of proposed consent to the amendment of the Statutes of Balliol College

The Committee on Statutes before the Privy Council, acting under authority delegated to it by Council, is minded to consent on behalf of the University to a new Statute VIII (a) of the Statutes of Balliol College as approved by the Governing Body on 22 May and 11 October 2002, in so far as such consent is required by Section 7 (2) of the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923. This consent will be effective unless written notice of a resolution, signed by at least twenty members of Congregation, calling upon Council to withhold the consent has been given to the Registrar by noon on Monday, 27 January. The effect of the new statute is to empower the college to adopt a policy of total return in relation to its investments and expenditure.


2 Notice of proposed consent to the amendment of the Statutes of Mansfield College

The Committee on Statutes before the Privy Council, acting under authority delegated to it by Council, is minded to consent on behalf of the University to the amendments to Statute VII of Mansfield College approved by the Governing Body on 5 June 2002, in so far as such consent is required by Section 7 (2) of the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923. This consent will be effective unless written notice of a resolution, signed by at least twenty members of Congregation, calling upon Council to withhold the consent has been given to the Registrar by noon on Monday, 27 January. The effect of the amendments is to reflect changes in the running of the ministerial training course and concerns about the interpretation of certain ecclesiastical terms of art.


DEPARTMENT OF PLANT SCIENCES

Headship of Department

The Life and Environmental Sciences Board has appointed PROFESSOR C.J. LEAVER, CBE, FRS, FRSE, MA, fellow of St John's College and Sibthorpian Professor of Plant Sciences, as Head of the Department of Plant Sciences from 1 October 2003 to 30 September 2007.


CONFERMENT OF THE TITLE OF VISITING PROFESSOR

On the recommendation of the Modern History Board, the Humanities Board has conferred the title of Visiting Professor in Modern European History on N.C. FERGUSON, MA, D.PHIL., currently John E. Herzog Professor of Financial History at the Leonard N. Stern School of Business, New York University, for a period of three years from 1 January 2003.


REVIEW OF EARTH SCIENCES

As part of its system of rolling reviews of departments to be carried out every ten years, the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board has established a committee to review the Department of Earth Sciences. The terms of reference are as follows:

(a) to review progress made in response to the last General Board review and to identify any further action required in the light of changed circumstances since the last review;

(b) to review, by reference to international standards of excellence, the quality of academic activities in the department and the balance between these activities, in the context of the University's mission statement and corporate plan, and taking into account all relevant factors, especially: (i) research, organisational and management structures within the department, including such matters as academic and non-academic staff planning and recruitment; (ii) undergraduate and graduate student numbers and recruitment; (iii) accommodation and future space needs; (iv) the relationship between units within the department and between the department and cognate subject areas and colleges with which it is involved in teaching and research: in particular, to consider the relationship between developments in environmental sciences/environmental studies within and outside the MPS Division;

(c) to consider the long-term financial viability and funding arrangements for the department. The review committee is chaired by Professor D.C. Clary, Head of the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Division, and the other members are Professor Dr A.N. Halliday, FRS, ETH Zentrum, Zürich; Professor P.S. Liss, University of East Anglia; Professor E.K.H. Salje, FRS, University of Cambridge; Professor G.A. Houseman, Leeds University; Professor J. Klein, Department of Chemistry; Professor D. Cockayne, FRS, Department of Materials; and Professor P.C. England, FRS, Department of Earth Sciences. The committee is in the process of inviting comments from senior and junior members of the department. Any other members of the University and members of the public who wish to submit comments in confidence on any issues covered by the committee's terms of reference are invited to send them to the secretary of the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Division, Dr A.M. Knowland, 9 Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PD (fax: Oxford (2)82571, e- mail: anne.knowland@admin.ox.ac.uk), as soon as possible, and in any case not later than 1 February.


REVIEW OF SOCIOLOGY

The Social Sciences Board is undertaking a review of the Department of Sociology as part of its programme of regular rolling reviews of units under its aegis. The Head of Division, Mr D.A. Hay, will chair the review committee, the terms of reference of which are:

(i) To review the quality of teaching and research in Sociology by reference to international standards of excellence, and having regard to the University's Mission Statement and Corporate Plan and to the divisional plan.

(ii) To review the organisational and management structures in Sociology including such matters as academic and non-academic planning and recruitment; accommodation and future space needs; and the relationship between the sub-units within the unit, and between the unit and cognate subject areas and colleges with which it is involved in teaching and/or research.

(iii) To review progress made in response to the last review and to identify any further action required in the light of changed circumstances during the period since that review.

(iv) To make recommendations to the divisional board, bearing in mind where there are financial implications the level of resources likely to be available within the University and possible alternative ways of raising funds to implement them.

(v) To refer the recommendations to the Planning and Resources Committee and the Educational Policy and Standards Committee as appropriate. The membership of the committee is as follows: Mr Donald Hay, Head of the Social Sciences Division (chairman) Professor Angela Dale, University of Manchester Professor Nan Dirk De Graaf, University of Nijmegen Professor Martin Ceadel, Department of Politics and International Relations Mr Andrew Dilnot, Principal of St Hugh's College Mr Michael Noble, Department of Social Policy and Social Work Professor Diego Gambetta, Department of Sociology The review committee would welcome written comments on matters falling within its terms of reference. These should be sent to the secretary of the review committee, Ms M.A. Robertson, Social Sciences Division, 34 St Giles', by 28 February 2003.


RECOGNITION OF DISTINCTION

Change of title

With effect from 1 October 2003, the recognition of distinction title held by W.J. Kennedy, MA, Fellow of Wolfson College, currently University Lecturer in Palaeontology and Curator of the Geological Collections, will be Professor of Natural History.


APPROVAL TO HOLD OUTSIDE APPOINTMENTS

Guidelines on the holding of outside appointments

These guidelines outline new procedures for obtaining approval to hold outside appointments. No changes have been made to the University's policy, nor to the individuals and types of appointment covered by the policy. All university employees, with the exception of CUF lecturers, are required to obtain approval for the holding of any outside appointment. The following do not count as outside appointments for this purpose (see Council Regulations 24, Sect. I, § 5.A, cll. 10--11): —the holding of the office of Proctor or Assessor; —the holding of the office of examiner in any examination which is part of a degree course at any university; —the holding of a commemorative lecturership or similar post in any university with the duty to give not more than eight lectures in any year of office; —activities or responsibilities normally associated with, or arising from, scholarly work which do not involve a formal and continuing contract. The University permits its employees to hold outside appointments without deduction of stipend subject to the following conditions: —the total commitment to such outside appointments must not exceed thirty days per year;[1] —any contractual terms proposed to cover the outside appointment must be scrutinised by Research Services on behalf of the University, and must not be amended without the prior written approval of Research Services; —the employee's head of department [2] must approve the application. Outside appointments can take a number of different forms, such as consultancy, private professional practice, expert witness and non-executive directorships. (Approval will not be given for the holding of executive directorships.) These are activities carried out outside the University and are contracted for from the individual's personal address. University letterhead, facilities, and premises should not be used without the University's express permission. Certain types of activity involving consultancy/services to industry may be carried out within the University and may be included, where appropriate, within projects funded by externally-funded research grants and contacts. These are described below.


Procedures for applying for approval to hold outside appointments

(a) Applicants must complete an application form (form OA1, available on the University's Web site at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/ps/outappts.shtml, or in hard copy from departmental administrators/faculty board secretaries).

(b) Applicants whose salaries are funded from externally-funded research grants or contracts, or who are Principal Investigators or Co-Investigators on outside-sponsored projects, must adhere to the terms and conditions stipulated by or agreed with the sponsor and, if necessary, seek written approval from the sponsor. [3] Research Services is able to provide advice on the terms and conditions of externally-funded research grants and contracts held by the University (telephone: (2)70143).

(c) Where it is appropriate for the outside appointment to be covered by a contract or letter of agreement, and particularly when the external organisation requires a written agreement to cover a consultancy, applicants must arrange for the terms governing the outside appointment to be scrutinised by Research Services in advance of signature. (All applicants are, in fact, advised to stipulate in writing the terms which will govern their outside activities for an external organisation, not least to limit their personal liability.) The University's legal advisers have drafted a standard personal consultancy document which serves as a useful starting point for discussions around the terms of a consultancy appointment. This is available from Research Services (telephone: (2)70143) or on the Research Services Web site at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/oxonly/agreements/pcaform.htm.

(d) Research Services scrutinise the terms of an agreement in order to consider their compatibility with the University's interests as employer. The office cannot advise the employee on the terms from the employee's standpoint; and the employee should take his or her own advice unless he or she makes use of Oxford University Consulting Limited (see paragraph 8 below).

(e) Applicants must obtain the approval of their direct line manager where relevant.

(f) When Research Services has confirmed in writing that the terms proposed to govern the outside appointment meet the University's minimum requirements and the necessary approvals have been obtained from the relevant line manager or sponsor (as appropriate), applicants should submit the completed form to their head of department, who will be asked to sign to confirm that he/she is content to approve the outside appointment in the context of the applicant's university duties. Heads of department who themselves wish to hold outside appointments must submit their application forms to their head of division for approval. Heads of Division should submit applications to the Vice-Chancellor.

(g) If the above procedures are followed and the relevant approvals obtained, applicants will be granted insurance cover for the outside appointment in question under the University's professional indemnity insurance policy, subject to the limitations of that policy. Details may be obtained from the Insurance Officer, Mr G.C. Waite (telephone: (2)80307).


Consultancies within research grant applications and contracts

The holding of a consultancy may be included where appropriate within research grant applications and contracts. Where consultancies are included in this way and provision is made through the payroll to pay staff for such work, the Outside Grants (OG) form should itemise, among the costs of the project, the costs of the consultancy payment (including employers' on-costs). Indirect costs should also be calculated on the total cost of the project, including the fee for the consultancy. Research Services (telephone: (2)70143) will be able to advise on the most appropriate form of agreement to cover consultancies attached to research grants or contracts. Time spent on such consultancies will count towards the thirty-day limit.


Other services to industry and outside bodies

Not all work for outside bodies is governed by a contract with an external sponsor under the University's research grants and contracts procedures. Some is likely to be `service' work, i.e. the provision of a service to an external organisation which is not of academic benefit but which makes use of spare capacity in a department in return for payment. Such arrangements should nevertheless be covered by an agreement approved by the head of department which is drawn up in consultation with the departmental administrator and (for tax reasons) with the Finance Division. If the service agreement proposed by the outside body includes terms and conditions relating to intellectual property or confidentiality of information, or does not incorporate the University's standard disclaimer of liability, this will require an authorised signature on behalf of the University. In such cases, the agreement should be forwarded to Research Services which is required to ensure that appropriate disclaimers of liability have been issued in connection with the provision of services to industry and other outside bodies. Where appropriate, as with consultancies within research grant applications and contracts, a payment may be made through the payroll to individuals for the additional work undertaken in performing the services. It is expected that the head of department will decide on an appropriate fee to be paid to the individual based on the time spent (which again will count towards the 30-day per year limit). The instructions to the Finance Division to make such payments are processed through Research Services. In such cases, where an agreement has been made with University in respect of the service, it is not expected that a further personal consultancy agreement with the academic concerned will be necessary.


Financial Arrangements

The University does not generally seek details of remuneration which applicants are to receive under arrangements for outside appointments, but reserves the right to request to be provided with such details in certain circumstances e.g. in the light of any potential conflict of interest with the outside appointment. Applicants wishing exceptionally to make a case to spend a total of more than thirty days in any one year on outside appointments will be required to provide details of remuneration.


Use of Computing Facilities

University IT and network facilities, including software, are provided for use for educational purposes only, in accordance with the `University Rules for Computer Use', which may be found on the University Web site at http://www.ox.ac.uk/it/rules/rules.html.


Monitoring and reporting

(a) Heads of department are responsible, through their departmental administration, for keeping records of the number of days spent on outside appointments by all staff (regardless of staff group) in their departments.

(b) Heads of department will report their approvals of outside appointments, and the basic details of the outside appointments, to their divisions on an annual basis, by the end of July each year.

(c) Divisions are responsible, through their divisional administration, for monitoring and co-ordinating information relating to all approvals for outside appointments submitted by departments within their remit, and for making an annual return to the Personnel Committee by the end of September each year.


Oxford University Consultancy Limited

The University has established a wholly-owned subsidiary company, Oxford University Consultancy Limited, to help members of the University to market their expertise to outside bodies, to negotiate commercial terms and payment on behalf of individuals, and to manage the administration associated with consultancy. OUC Limited offers a professional service for academics and departments throughout the University, which will identify consultancy and related opportunities with local, national and international companies and organisations. Details of this service may be obtained by telephone ((2)80829) or by e-mail at enquiries@consulting.ox.ac.uk. Members of the University choosing to use the services of OUC Limited must still follow the internal procedures for University approval of their outside appointments as outlined in these guidelines; OUC Limited will, however, assist the process on behalf of the individuals concerned.

Footnotes

[1] Approval for cases where the proposed commitment exceeds thirty days may still be sought; in such cases the department will refer the request to the divisional board and if it is approved a deduction in university stipend will be made. Partial or full secondment may be more appropriate for particularly time-consuming outside appointments.
Return to text [2] Faculty board chairman in non-departmentally organised subjects, head of division in the case of heads of departments.
Return to text [3] The Wellcome Trust's grant conditions, for example, include stringent conditions relating to the holding of consultancies and these apply equally to individuals who are in receipt of Wellcome Trust research grants, as well as to those whose salaries are paid from Wellcome Trust grants.
Return to text


INSTITUTE OF ARCHAEOLOGY

German classes for archaeologists

A week of intensive German classes for archaeologists, for beginners and intermediate learners, will be offered in the Institute of Archaeology in ninth week of Hilary Term (17–21 March). Enquiries and registration requests should be directed to the Receptionist, Institute of Archaeology, 36 Beaumont Street, Oxford OX1 2PG (telephone: (2)78240, e-mail: liz.strange@arch.ox.ac.uk). The course tutor will be Gertrud Seidmann, Research Associate, the Institute of Archaeology.


MUSICAL EVENTS

Queen's College

Organ recitals

Organ recitals will be given at 1.10 p.m. on the following Wednesdays in the college chapel. Admission is free, with a retiring collection. 22 Jan.: Philip Scriven (Lichfield Cathedral). 29 Jan.: Elizabeth Burgess (Christ Church). 5 Feb.: Clive Driskill-Smith (Christ Church). 12 Feb.: Olunkule Owalabe (St Antony's College). 19 Feb.: Jonathan Hardy (Magdalen College). 26 Feb.: Jonathan B. Hall (Church of the Epiphany, New York). 5 Mar.: Richard Pinel (Magdalen College). 12 Mar.: Andrew Lucas (St Albans Cathedral).

Choral Services

During full term, choral services are held in the college chapel at 6.15 p.m. on Sundays, and at 6.30 p.m. on Wednesdays and Fridays. Further details may be found on the college Web site, http://www.queens.ox.ac.uk.


St John's College and Colin Carr

THE RTÉ VANBURGH QUARTET will perform the following at 8.30 p.m. on Friday, 24 January, in the Auditorium, St John's College: Haydn, Strinq Quartet in F major, op. 77/2; Zhou Long, Harmony (commissioned by the RTÉ Vanburgh Quartet); Ravel, String Quartet. Admission is free, by programmes available from the Porters' Lodge. Each programme is valid as an admission ticket up until ten minutes before the event; any vacant seats will then be filled from the door.


VISITORS OF THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

Annual Report 2001-2

The Annual Report for 2001-2 of the Visitors of the Oxford University Museum of Natural History has recently been published, and a copy may be obtained by any member of Congregation on request to the Administrator at the Museum, Parks Road.


COMMITTEE FOR THE PITT RIVERS MUSEUM

Annual Report 2000-1

The Annual Report for 2000-1 of the Committee for the Pitt Rivers Museum has recently been published, and a copy may be obtained by any member of Congregation on request to the Administrator at the Museum, Parks Road.

Lectures

INAUGURAL LECTURE

Professor of Indian History and Culture

PROFESSOR S. SUBRAHMANYAM will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 20 February, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `On the window that was India: the place of South Asia in early modern world history.'


PROFESSOR OF POETRY

PROFESSOR P. MULDOON will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 21 January, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `The end of the poem: "Sea Poppies" by H.D.'


CYRIL FOSTER LECTURE 2003

THE RT. HON. CHRISTOPHER F. PATTEN, CH, European Commissioner for External Affairs, will deliver the Cyril Foster Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 30 January, in the Examination Schools. Admission will be by ticket only, available from Mrs Marga Lyall (telephone: Oxford (2)78705, e-mail: cis@politics.ox.ac.uk).p

Subject: ` "The End of History": the sequel.'


FORD'S LECTURES IN BRITISH HISTORY 2003

Freedom, representation, and revolution, 1603–51

PROFESSOR QUENTIN SKINNER, Cambridge, will deliver the Ford's Lectures in British History at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Examination Schools. 24 Jan.: `Critics of the crown: common law and neoclassical challenges.' 31 Jan.: `The rights and liberties of subjects.' 7 Feb.: `Parliament and the representation of the people.' 14 Feb.: `Critics of Parliament: Royalist and Leveller responses.' 21 Feb.: `The Free State proclaimed.' 28 Feb.: `The Free State denounced: Hobbes on freedom and representation.'


SLADE LECTURES 2003

Reconstructing Rembrandt: questions and answers in recent research

ERNST VAN DE WETERING, Professor of the History of Art, University of Amsterdam, and Chairman of the Rembrandt Research Project, Slade Professor of Fine Art 2002–3, will deliver the Slade Lectures at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Lecture Hall, the Taylor Institution, St Giles'. The lectures will be open to the public. 22 Jan.: `Rembrandt the stranger: the widening gulf between life and work.'

29 Jan.: `Rembrandt's anger: art lovers and asses.' 5 Feb.: `How to be a connoisseur in the seventeenth century.' 12 Feb.: `Pictor doctus or pictor vulgaris: tracing Rembrandt's thoughts on art.' 19 Feb.: `Rembrandt's workshop: training and production.' 26 Feb.: `Rembrandt's oeuvre: reduction and expansion.' 5 Mar.: `The impatient artist: seclusion in the studio and co- production.' 12 Mar.: `Rembrandt's genius: technique, style, and quality.'

Note

For health and safety reasons, the maximum number permitted in the Lecture Hall is 230. It is anticipated that places in the Hall may be oversubscribed, so those wishing to attend the lectures are advised to arrive as early as possible. The doors to the Hall will be open from 4.30 p.m. on each date. On each occasion, a numbered ticket will be issued to each person being admitted to the hall, in order to control numbers. These tickets will be issued on a first-come-first-served basis, one per person. Anyone wishing to attend the lectures who anticipates difficulties with access to the building (e.g. because of steps) should warn the porters at the Taylor Institution in advance.


CARLYLE LECTURES

The nature and significance of modern political theology

PROFESSOR M. LILLA, Chicago, will deliver the Carlyle Lectures at 5 p.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays in the Examination Schools. 17 Feb.: `The stillborn God.' 19 Feb.: `The sentimental God: Hobbes to Rousseau.' 24 Feb.: `The justifying God: Kant.' 26 Feb.: `The reconciling God: Hegel.' 3 Mar.: `The twice-born God: Barth and Rosenzweig.' 5 Mar.: `The redeeming God: Schmitt, Tillich, Bloch, Benjamin.'


LUBBOCK LECTURE IN MANAGEMENT STUDIES

PROFESSOR LORD MAY OF OXFORD, President, the Royal Society, will deliver the Lubbock Lecture in Management Studies at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 13 February, in the Saïd Business School. A reception will follow the lecture.

Subject: `Innovation: from new knowledge to new products.'


LITCHFIELD LECTURE

PROFESSOR KAY REDFIELD JAMISON, Professor of Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Maryland, USA, will deliver a Litchfield Lecture at 5.15 p.m. on Thursday, 6 February, in the Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary.

Subject: `Moods and the imagination.'


CLASSICS

Archive of Performances of Greek and Roman Drama

BARRIE RUTTER, Artistic Director, Northern Broadsides, will lecture at 2.15 p.m. on Wednesday, 29 January, in the Auditorium, Magdalen College. For further information, e- mail apgrd@classics.ox.ac.uk, or telephone (2)88210.

Subject: `Oedipus and Creon: double hybris.'

Note: it is regretted that the lecture to have been given by Greg Hicks (5 February) has been cancelled.


ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

News International Broadcast Media Lectures

BARRY COX, Deputy Chairman, Channel 4; Chairman, the Digital Television Stakeholders Group; and News International Visiting Professor of Broadcast Media, will deliver the News International Broadcast Media Lectures at 5.30 p.m. on the following Tuesdays. 28 Jan., Exeter College: `The coming of free-sheet television.' 4 Feb., Exeter College: `The reformation of the BBC.' 11 Feb., Green College: `Digital TV: paying the piper but not calling the tune.' 18 Feb., Green College: `Towards 2014: getting to the market.'


Romantic Realignments

The following seminars will be held at 5.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the Goodheart Seminar Room, University College. Further information may be obtained from Luisa Cale (e-mail: luisa.cale@univ.ox.ac.uk). PROFESSOR J. CHANDLER, Chicago
30 Jan.: `The structure of sentiment.' PROFESSOR M.G.H. PINNOCK, Strathclyde
20 Feb.: `Robert Burns and British poetry.' DR C. FRANKLIN, Swansea
6 Mar.: `Engendering nationalism: Owenson, Stael, Stowe, and Byron.'


LAW

THE RT. HON. LORD GOLDSMITH, QC, Attorney General, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Saturday, 8 March, in Rhodes House. Admission will be free, by ticket only, available from Jane Buswell (telephone: Oxford (2)82894, e-mail: jane.buswell@mansfield.ox.ac.uk). Applications for tickets will close at 5 p.m. on 7 March. Tickets will not be available at the door. The audience is requested to be seated ten minutes before the commencement of the lecture.

Subject: `An independent legal establishment: democratic necessity or optional extra?'


LIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Department of Zoology

The following departmental seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Mondays in Lecture Theatre B, the Department of Zoology.

Convener: Dr G. Taylor. DR N. CLAYTON, Cambridge
20 Jan.: `Mental time travel in food-caching Corvids.' PROFESSOR S. RANDOLPH
27 Jan.: `Climate, wildlife, and politics in the evolution and emergence of tick-borne zoonoses.' PROFESSOR L. HURST, Bath
3 Feb.: `The evolution of genomic anatomy.' PROFESSOR A. LOUDON, Manchester
10 Feb.: `Biological clocks and life in extreme environments.' DR N. HALL, Sanger Institute
17 Feb.: `Analysing plasmodium using comparative genomics.' PROFESSOR R. SIBLY, Reading
24 Feb.: `On the distribution and abundance of animals.' PROFESSOR A. COOPER
3 Mar.: `Ancient DNA: views of basic evolutionary and ecological processes.' DR D. SIMS, Marine Biological Association of the UK
10 Mar.: `Behavioural strategies in a fluid environment: sexual segregation and foraging in sharks.'


Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Biochemistry.

Convener: L.N. Johnson, MA, David Phillips Professor of Molecular Biophysics. PROFESSOR D. CHAKRABARTI, Central Florida
31 Jan.: `Inhibitors of protein prenylation as anti- malarials.' PROFESSOR R. PICKERSGILL, Queen Mary College, London
7 Feb.: `Structure of auxin-binding protein 1: it is no red herring but is it an auxin receptor?' PROFESSOR D. BARFORD, Institute for Cancer Research, Chester Beatty Laboratories, London
14 Feb.: `Molecular basis for activation of protein kinase B/Akt by multi-site phosphorylation.' PROFESSOR R. ACHARYA, Bath
7 Mar.: `The molecular architecture of the angiotensin converting enzyme: implications for cardiovascular disease.' PROFESSOR SIR TOM BLUNDELL, Cambridge
14 Mar.: `Structural biology of signalling systems and opportunities for drug discovery.'


Donald Baden-Powell Quaternary Research Centre

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the common room, 60 Banbury Road. DR C. CONNELLER, Cambridge
23 Jan.: `Starr Carr in context.' DR R. JACOBI, British Museum
30 Jan.: `Gough's Cave.' DR R. HOSFIELD, Southampton
6 Feb.: ` "It is only the wisest and stupidest that cannot change" (Confucius). Where lies the Lower Palaeolithic?' T. HARDAKER
13 Feb.: `Namibia on the surface—exploration of the Palaeolithic in Southern Africa.' PROFESSOR S. MITHEN, Reading
20 Feb.: `Stepping out: modelling hominid dispersals from Africa.' DR M. PETRAGLIA, Cambridge
27 Feb.: `Coming out of Africa: palaeoanthropological investigations in the Arabian peninsula and the Indian subcontinent.' DR H. WALKINGTON, PADMAC Unit, DBPQRC, Oxford
6 Mar.: `The contribution of pedology to archaeological investigation—implications for a study of palaeolithic artefacts on deposits mapped as clay-with-flints.' PROFESSOR D. ROE, DBPQRC, Oxford
13 Mar.: `Thirty years' involvement with Olduvai.'


Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology

Ethnicity and Identity Seminar: The identities of medical practitioners and traditional healers

The following seminars will be held at 11 a.m. on Fridays in 61 Banbury Road.

Conveners: S. Ardener, I. Fowler, E. Hs'u. DR J. LITTLEWOOD, Institute of Education, London
24 Jan.: `The ambiguity of labour; the identity of midwives.' DR K. MAYNARD, Denison, USA
31 Jan.: `The vicissitudes of Kedjem "traditional doctors" and an ambivalent clientele in Cameroon.' DR P. MOLE, College for Integrated Chinese Medicine, Reading
7 Feb.: `The identity of an acupuncturist.' DR J. DAVIES
14 Feb.: `Necessary in-betweens: auxiliary workers in the hierarchy.' DR L. GASK, Manchester
21 Feb.: `The psychiatrist: cultural perceptions and self- perceptions.' PROFESSOR G. BUIJS, Zululand
28 Feb.: `Sexual orientation and gender identity among Zulu diviners.' DR A. DIGBY, Oxford Brookes
7 Mar.: `Shaping changing identities: the general practitioner in Britain and South Africa.' DR I.-B. TRANKELL, Uppsala
14 Mar.: `Pharmacists in Cambodia: identities and experiences.'


Fertility and Reproduction Seminars: Reproductive technologies

The following seminars will be held at 11 a.m. on Mondays in the Seminar Room, 61 Banbury Road.

Convener: Dr Soraya Tremayne. DR S. KITZINGER
20 Jan.: `Visualising the foetus: cross-cultural perceptions of the unborn baby.' M. CARRANZA, Cambridge
27 Jan.: `Making sense of common sense: sterilisation in Costa Rica.' DR M. BONACCORSO, Cambridge
3 Feb.: `Programmes of gamete donation: strategies (in private clinics) of assisted conception.' DR J. MCCARTHY, University College, Cork
10 Feb.: `Procreative liberty and the welfare of future children.' PROFESSOR B. HAUSER-SCHAUBLIN, Gottingen
17 Feb.: `Experiencing the body in the context of reproductive technologies.' DR M. UNNITHAN, Sussex
24 Feb.: `Medical technologies and reproductive change in Rajasthan.'


MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Inorganic Chemistry Colloquia

The following colloquia will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Lecture Theatre, the Inorganic Chemistry Lecture Theatre.

Convener: M.L.H. Green, MA, Professor of Inorganic Chemistry. PROFESSOR S. HOWDLE, Nottingham
20 Jan.: `Putting the Fizz into chemistry.' DR J. OKUDA, Johannes-Gutenberg Universität, Mainz
27 Jan.: `Polymerisation catalysis by organo-rare earth complexes.' PROFESSOR S. MANN, Bristol
3 Feb.: `Synthesis and self-assembly of nanoparticle arrays and nanostructured materials.' PROFESSOR D. STEPHAN, Windsor, Ontario
10 Feb.: `Phosphinimide-based transition metal olefin polymerisation catalysts: highly active species with unusual deactivation pathways.' DR P. LIGHTFOOT, St Andrews
17 Feb.: `Unusual structural behaviour in inorganic frameworks.' PROFESSOR A. TURBERFELD
24 Feb.: `DNA nanostructures: molecular machines and artificial crystals.' PROFESSOR A. DOWNS
3 Mar.: `Some studies in matrix isolation: chasing real molecules or butterflies?' PROFESSOR GREEN
10 Mar.: `An inaugural retirement lecture: small matters.'


Theoretical Chemistry Group Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the John Rowlinson Seminar Room (20.12), opposite the Main Lecture Theatre.

Convener: M.S. Child, MA, Coulson Professor of Theoretical Chemistry. DR M. MELLA
20 Jan.: `The ground state and excitation dynamics of doped helium clusters.' DR T. KOEHLER
3 Feb.: `Microscopic theory of atom–molecule coherence in Bose–Einstein condensates.' PROFESSOR R. GEBHARD, Phillips University Marburg
17 Feb.: `Stoner versus Hund: theory of itinerant ferromagnetism.' PROFESSOR B. LEIMKUHLER, Leicester
3 Mar.: `Constant and inconstant temperature molecular simulation: improved methods for sampling and dynamics.'


Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory

The following departmental seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Mondays in the Lecture Theatre, the Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory.

Convener: J. Klein, MA, D.Phil., Dr Lee's Professor of Chemistry. PROFESSOR P.A. MADDEN
20 Jan.: `Ions at interfaces—some surprising effects.' PROFESSOR G. MEIJER, FOM Institute/Fritz Haber Institute
27 Jan.: `Cold molecules.' PROFESSOR S.I. STUPP, Northwestern, USA
3 Feb.: `Supramolecule self-assembly of materials.' PROFESSOR M.N.R. ASHFOLD, Bristol
10 Feb.: `Probing the gas phase chemistry involved in diamond chemical vapour deposition.' PROFESSOR J. YEOMANS
17 Feb.: `Mesoscale modelling: liquid crystals and polymers.' DR J.R. OWERS-BRADLEY, Nottingham
24 Feb.: `Production of hyperpolarised species and applications in NMR and MRI.' DR J.W. ESSEX, Southampton
3 Mar.: `The modelling of conformational change in proteins.' PROFESSOR I. SAMUEL, St Andrews
10 Mar.: To be announced.


Department of Materials

The following colloquia will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Mondays in the Hume Rothery Lecture Theatre. Talks by second-year research students will be held on Thursday, 6 March, and Friday, 7 March.

Convener: J.L. Hutchison, MA status, Reader in Materials. DR M. CASSIDY, Rolls-Royce PLC, Derby
23 Jan.: `Technology and process aspects of solid oxide fuel cells.' PROFESSOR H. BHADESHIA, Cambridge
30 Jan.: `Science and metallurgy: hard bainite.' DR D. LARSON, Seagate Technology
6 Feb.: `Atom probe studies of magnetic multilayers.' DR P. BUTLER, Crown, Cork and Seal, Wantage
13 Feb.: `Materials competition in the packaging industry.' PROFESSOR P. O'BRIEN, Manchester
20 Feb.: `Developing new chemistry for the processing of functional materials.' PROFESSOR J. WOOD, Council for the Central Laboratory of the Research Councils (CCLRC)
27 Feb.: `From the Higgs boson to global weather patterns, how does CCLRC contribute to materials and engineering research and development?' DR W. HUCK, Cambridge
13 Mar.: `Nanostructured polymers (and what to do with them).'


Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Planetary Physics

The following seminars will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Thursdays in the Dobson Lecture Room, the Atmospheric Physics Laboratory. Because on rare occasions the arrangements need to be changed, anyone intending to come to Oxford specially to attend should check first by telephoning Oxford (2)72933. DR A. ILLINGWORTH, Reading
23 Jan.: `EarthCARE: a proposed spaceborne radar and lidar mission to provide global profiles of clouds.' DR M. TITOV, Max-Planck-Institut für Aeronomie, Katlenburg-Lindau
30 Jan.: `Venus Express: a European orbiter mission to Venus in 2005.' PROFESSOR MICHAEL MENDILLO, Boston
6 Feb.: `Exospheres in the solar system: the science yield from sodium imaging experiments.' PROFESSOR N. MASON, Open University
13 Feb.: `Studies of the atmospheric aerosol: dust and ice analogues in the laboratory.' PROFESSOR A. THORPE, Reading
20 Feb.: `Predicting dynamical sensitivity to improve the skill of weather forecasts.' DR S. BEKKI, CNRS Service Aeronomie, Paris
27 Feb.: `Impact of large volcanic eruptions on the atmospher: importance of sulphur photochemistry.' PROFESSOR R. HARRISON, Birmingham
6 Mar.: `Aerosols and urban air quality.' DR H. COE, UMIST
13 Mar.: `Tropospheric aerosols—their composition, transformation, and interaction with clouds.'


MEDICAL SCIENCES

Oxford Clinical Neurosciences Lectures

The following lectures will be given at 11.30 a.m. on Fridays in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary. PROFESSOR J. PICKARD, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge
17 Jan.: `The modern management of ICP and CSF disturbances.' PROFESSOR R. FRACKOWIAK, Leopold Müller Functional Imaging Laboratory, Institute of Neurology
28 Feb.: `Functional and structural neuroimaging in the clinical context.' PROFESSOR P. INCE, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield
14 Mar.: `The neuropathology of a vascular dementia.'


Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics

The following research seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the Lecture Theatre, the Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics.

Convener: K.E. Davies, MA, D.Phil., Dr Lee's Professor of Anatomy. PROFESSOR P. MCNAUGHTON, Cambridge
24 Jan.: `Molecular basis of heat pain sensation.' PROFESSOR J. DAVIS, Manchester
31 Jan.: `Gene regulation in the pituitary—unexpected dynamics in living cells.' PROFESSOR A. GREEN, Cambridge
7 Feb.: `Haemotopoietic stem cells: establishing the transcriptional programme for blood.' DR L. GREENSMITH, Institute of Neurology, London
14 Feb.: `Rescuing vulnerable motorneurons from cell death.'(Jenkinson Seminar) DR L. YOUNG, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham
21 Feb.: `The epigenetic control of early development: implications for embryo technologies.' (Jenkinson Seminar) DR N. BROWN, Cambridge
28 Feb.: `Integrins, actin, and morphogenesis.' PROFESSOR C. PONTING
7 Mar.: `Conservation and innovation in mammals: a genomic view.' DR A. BRAND, Cambridge
14 Mar.: `Asymmetric cell division in the Drosophila embryonic CNS.' (Jenkinson Seminar)


Department of Psychiatry and the Oxford Regional Committee for Postgraduate Medical Education and Training

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Seminar Room, the University Department of Psychiatry, the Warneford Hospital. PROFESSOR M. MARSHALL, Manchester
28 Jan. (note—change of date): `Assertive outreach—experiencing the evidence.' PROFESSOR K. REDFIELD JAMISON, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
4 Feb.: `Exuberance.' PROFESSOR A. MATHEWS, Cambridge
25 Feb.: `Modifying emotional processing bias.' PROFESSOR S. WESSELY, King's College Hospital
4 Mar.: `Gulf War syndrome: something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue.'


Department of Experimental Psychology

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Weiskrantz Room (C113), the Department of Experimental Psychology. DR P. MITCHELL, Nottingham
21 Jan.: `Autistic perception.' DR J. COLE, Poole Hospital
28 Jan.: `The subjective experience of facial difference: can loss reveal function?' DR R. NIJHAWAN, Sussex
4 Feb.: `Compensation for the afferent and efferent delays in the nervous system.' PROFESSOR P. FLEMING, Bristol
11 Feb.: `Babies at night: does Mum make a difference?' PROFESSOR T. CROW
18 Feb.: `Speciation and the evolution of language.' DR M. SHAFTO
25 Feb.: `The Moses effects: the influence of semantics and phonology on anomaly detection.' DR V. WALSH, UCL
4 Mar.: `William James was a liar: no one knows what attention is.' DR S. MICHIE, UCL
11 Mar.: `Genetic testing: informed choice?'


Glycobiology Institute: Distinguished Lecture Series

ROSCOE BRADY, MD, Chief Development and Metabolic Disorder Branch, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institute of Health, Maryland, USA, will lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 4 February, in the University Museum of Natural History. A reception will follow the lecture. Enquiries should be directed to Mrs Lynda Butters (telephone: Oxford (2)75344, e-mail: lynda@glycob.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `The past, present, and the future of sphingolipid storage disorders.'


Pharmacology and anatomical neuropharmacology seminars

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Lecture Theatre, the Department of Pharmacology. DR D. KULLMANN, University College, London
21 Jan.: `Cross-talk between GABAergic and glutamatergic signalling systems in the hippocampus.' PROFESSOR R. PERTWEE, Aberdeen
28 Jan.: `Recent advances in the pharmacology of cannabinoids.' PROFESSOR R. GARDNER
4 Feb.: `A role for pre-cleavage events in embryonic patterning in mammals.' PROFESSOR AHNERT-HILGER, Humboldt University, Berlin
11 Feb.: `How synaptic vesicles may contribute to synaptic plasticity.' DR M. RICE, New York
18 Feb.: `Modulation of striatal dopamine release by glutamate and GABA: role of diffusible H2O2.' DR W. SCHULTZ, Cambridge
25 Feb.: `Brains and behaviour.' DR G. FITZGERALD, Pennsylvania
4 Mar.: `Circadian aspects of vascular biology.' PROFESSOR T. SMART, University College, London
11 Mar.: `Pharmacology of GABA receptors.'


MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

Graduate Seminar in Spanish Studies

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in Room 3, the Taylor Institution.

Conveners: I.D.L. Michael, MA, King Alfonso XIII Professor of Spanish Studies, and J.D. Rutherford, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in Spanish. DR J. THACKER
21 Jan.: ` "Puedo yo con sola la vista oír leyendo": reading, seeing, and hearing the comedia.' MS K. MCKEVITT
28 Jan.: `Patriotism and self-sacrifice: Yeats' Cathleen ni Houlihan in the Galician context.'


MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES, MODERN HISTORY

Language and history

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the MacGregor Room, Oriel College.

Conveners: D.F. Cram, MA, University Lecturer in Linguistics, R.J.W. Evans, MA, D.Phil., Regius Professor of Modern History, and S. Romaine, MA, Merton Professor of English Literature. T. CHARLES-EDWARDS
21 Jan.: `Language and ethnicity in the British Isles, 400–700.' J. MCDOUGALL
28 Jan.: `Personally speaking: history, autobiography, and subjectivity in Algeria.' P. PORMANN
4 Feb.: `Trilingualism and translation in ninth-century Baghdad: how Paul of Aegina was translated from Greek via Syriac into Arabic.' PROFESSOR H. MAYR-HARTING
11 Feb.: `Language and the spread of Christianity in the early Middle Ages.' B. FRELLESVIG
18 Feb.: `The description of Japanese by the Swedish botanist and explorer C.P. Thunberg in the late eighteenth century.' W. POOLE, Cambridge
25 Feb.: `Is there a religious significance to seventeenth-century language planning?' J. SPURR, Swansea
4 Mar.: `Uncivil languages: oaths and swearing in early modern England.' PROFESSOR EVANS
11 Mar.: `Father Tongue and Mother Tongue: Latin and the vernaculars in eighteenth-century Hungary.' P. BURKE, Cambridge
29 Apr.: `Cultures of translation in early modern Europe.'


MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES AND EUROPEAN HUMANITIES RESEARCH CENTRE

Early Modern Seminar in French

PROFESSOR ULLRICH LANGER, University of Wisconsin at Madision, currently Visiting Professor, Centre d'Etudes Supérieures de la Renaissance, Tours, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 21 January, in the Taylor Institution.

Conveners: R.A. Cooper, MA, D.Phil., Professor of French; N.E. Cronk, MA, D.Phil., Director, Voltaire Foundation; R.J. Parish, MA, D.Phil., Professor of French; and A. Viala, MA, Professor of French.

Subject: `Literature and the theory of Pleasure in the French Renaissance.'


MODERN HISTORY

Curiosity and wonder in the early modern period

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Powicke Room, the Modern History Faculty Building.

Conveners: Professor Robert Evans and Mr Alexander Marr. DR S. BUTTERS, Manchester
21 Jan.: `Natural magic, artifical music, and the birds at Francesco de'Medici's Pratolino.' DR P. BERTUCCI, Bologna
28 Jan.: `Back from Wonderland: Jean Antoine Nollet's Italian tour (1749).' P. FORSHAW, Birkbeck College, London
4 Feb.: `Curious knowledge in the works of Heinridh Khunrath.' PROFESSOR G. ROUSSEAU, De Montfort
11 Feb.: `Curiosity and excess in the Englightenment: the case of Sir John Hill.' DR L. DACOME, UCL: Wellcome Centre for the History of Medicine
18 Feb.: `Somatic thresholds: modelling anatomy in eighteenth- century Italy.' DR D. HARKNESS, University of California, Davis
25 Feb.: `The body as a locus for curiosity in the early modern period.' MR MARR
4 Mar.: ` "Gentille curiosité": wonder- working in the late Renaissance.' PROFESSOR M.B. CAMPBELL, Brandeis
11 Mar.: `Micrographics and the smaller kingdoms—the wonder of insects.'


Seminar on popular and elite in early modern Europe

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Hovenden Room, All Souls College.

Convener: I.W.F. Maclean, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Renaissance Studies. DR C. WEBSTER
22 Jan.: `Paracelsus and the common man.' PROFESSOR MACLEAN
29 Jan.: `Popular and elite medical practice in central Europe: the case of Dr Jakob Horst (1537–1600).' PROFESSOR O. HUFTON
5 Feb.: `Establishing responsibility: elite prescription and popular practice in early modern Europe.' PROFESSOR R. COOPER
12 Feb.: `Readers of novels in sixteenth-century France.' R. BRIGGS
19 Feb.: `Devotional literature and religious cultures in seventeenth-century France.' DR A. WALSHAM, University of Exeter
26 Feb.: `Ignatian fables: miracles, visions, and the English Catholic Mission.' DR S. HINDLE, Warwick
5 Mar.: `Discourses of charity in England, c.1550–1700.' PROFESSOR SIR KEITH THOMAS
12 Mar.: `Manners and social differences in early modern England.'


Seminar in Medieval History

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College. D. POWER, Sheffield
20 Jan.: `The Bastards of Savigny: inheritance, custom, and lordship in north-western France, c.1150–c.1225.' A. CURRY, Reading
27 Jan.: `Harfleur and the English, 1415–22.' R. BALZARETTI, Nottingham
3 Feb.: `Angelo Fumagatti and the History of Lombard Women.' D. MORGAN, UCL
10 Feb.: `Memoirs and the self-consciousness of the court: the birth of a genre.' J. CAMPBELL
17 Feb.: `Belief in the seventh century.' L. GRANT, Courtauld Institute, London
24 Feb.: `Scenes from provincial life: architectural patronage in Normandy in the century after 1204.' J. STORY, Leicester
3 Mar.: `Charlemagne and Pope Hadrian: an epitaph fit for an emperor?' S. BAXTER
10 Mar.: `The Leofwinesons: power, property, and patronage in the Early English kingdom.'


Commonwealth History Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Modern History Faculty Building. Research Student presentations will be held on 7 March and 14 March. DR J.-G. DEUTSCH
24 Jan.: `Slavery under colonial rule in East Africa, c.1890–1914.' DR D. ANDERSON
31 Jan.: `Sexual threat and settler society: the Kenya casebook, 1905–39.' PROFESSOR C. BUNDY, SOAS, London
7 Feb.: `New nation, new history. Narrating the past in post- apartheid South Africa.' DR R. MITTER
14 Feb.: `Bombs and bath-houses: Chinese new journalism and understanding of the Sino-Japanese War, 1937–8.' DR D.K.L. CHOUDHURY, Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine
21 Feb.: `Making the twain meet: the New Imperialism of telegraphy, c.1850–1920.' PROFESSOR S. SUBRAHMANYAM
28 Feb.: `Palace or prison? The world as seen by a Mughal prince in Delhi, c.1800.'


Military History Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5.15 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

Convener: H.F.A. Strachan (MA, Ph.D. Cambridge), Chichele Professor of the History of War. C.M. DAVIS
22 Jan.: `Economic history of the Soviet defence sector 1965–91.' R. FOLEY, JSCSC
5 Feb.: `What's in a name? The development of strategies of attrition on the Western Front, 1914–18.' B. GUDMUNDSSON
19 Feb.: `The battle of the Ardennes, 1914.' M. EPKENHANS, Bismarck-Stiftung
5 Mar.: `German militarism revisited: Bismarck, Wilhelm II, and German military leadership.'


MODERN HISTORY, MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

Seminar on the history of the book 1450–1800

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: R.G. Lewis, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer (CUF) in Modern History, and I.W.F. Maclean, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Renaissance Studies. PROFESSOR B. RICHARDSON, Leeds
24 Jan.: `Print or pen? Modes of written publication in sixteenth-century Italy.' PROFESSOR T. DADSON, Birmingham
31 Jan.: `Women, books, reading, and literacy in the Spanish Golden Age.' J. ROBERTS
7 Feb.: `The history of the book in Britain, volume 4: some afterthoughts.' PROFESSOR J. BARNARD, Leeds
14 Feb.: `John Norton, John Bill, and the Frankfurt Catalogues of 1600–12.' DR C. DONDI
21 Feb.: `Early printed liturgical books in Oxford college libraries.' DR M. KAUFFMANN, Bodleian Library
28 Feb.: `Le livre de la vigne nostre Seigneur and fifteenth-century Carthusian apocalypticism.' DR B. CHAMBERS, Georgetown
7 Mar.: `When the titlepage is missing...': how to identify early modern Bibles in French.' DR F. EGMOND, Nationaal Archief, The Netherlands
14 Mar.: `Coenen's book on fishes: printed and other sources for pictures and text in Dutch natural history manuscript of the sixteenth century.'


MODERN HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCES

Seminar in economic and social history

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: R.C. Allen, MA, Professor of Economic History, K.J. Humphries, MA, Reader in Economic History, and A. Offer, MA, D.Phil., Chichele Professor of Economic History. PROFESSOR F. CAPIE, City University
21 Jan.: `The political economy of British financial stability.' DR M. CHICK, Edinburgh
28 Jan.: `Controlling public expenditure: pricing, investment, and energy policy in France and the UK, 1945–73.' DR C. DAVIS
4 Feb.: `Soviet armaments in the 1920s.' DR R. HARRIS, Tel Aviv
11 Feb.: `Government, economy, and law in Britain, c.1688–1850.' DR L. BRUNT
18 Feb.: `Grain prices, interest rates, and banks: measuring financial market integration in the Industrial Revolution.' DR P. SOLAR, Free University, Brussels
25 Feb.: `Rents in Ireland, 1780–1860.' DR M. ROSE, Lancaster
4 Mar.: `Communities of knowledge: entrepreneurship, innovation, and networks in the British outdoor trades since 1960.' PROFESSOR K. HONEYMAN, Leeds
11 Mar.: `The market for child labour in early industrial England: the case of parish apprenticeships.'


MODERN HISTORY AND THE VOLTAIRE FOUNDATION

Enlightenment workshop

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Voltaire Foundation, 99 Banbury Road (except 17, 24 February, 3 March: 2.15 p.m. in St Hugh's College).

Conveners: Professor Laurence Brockliss, Dr John Robertson, and Dr Jan Spurlock. PROFESSOR BROCKLISS and DR ROBERTSON
20 Jan.: Symposium on `Politics, culture, and the republic of letters in Enlightenment Europe'. (Discussion of T.W.C. Blanning, The Culture of Power and the Power of Culture, Old Regime Europe 1660–1789, and L.W.B. Brockliss, Calvet's Web. Enlightenment and the Republic of Letters in eighteenth-century France.) DR N. PHILLIPSON, Edinburgh
27 Jan.: The science of man in Scotland: an interim report on work in progress.' PROFESSOR G. ROUSSEAU, De Montfort University
3 Feb.: `The geriatric Englightenment.' PROFESSOR M. LINDEMANN, Netherlands Institute of Advanced Studies
10 Feb.: `Storied lives: the Guyard incest case in eighteenth- century Hamburg.' DR J. LIVESEY, Trinity College, Dublin
17 Feb., 2.15 p.m., St Hugh's College: `East of the Ecusson: the sins of the banal, gardeners in the Jardin des Plantes of Montpellier.' DR N. ASTON, Leicester
24 Feb., 2.15 p.m., St Hugh's College: `Counter-Englightenment: what's in a name?' DR J. HARRIS
3 Mar., 2.15 p.m., St Hugh's College: `Hume on the possibility of virtuous atheism.' DR T. HOCHSTRASSER, London School of Economics
10 Mar.: `The place of legal despotism in the political theories of the French Physiocrats.'


ORIENTAL STUDIES

`Abd al-Malik b. Marwan and the Marwanids

Unless otherwise indicated the following lectures will be given at 2 p.m. on Tuesdays in Lecture Room 1, the Oriental Institute.

Conveners: J. Johns, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in Islamic Archaeology, and C.F. Robinson, MA, University Lecturer in Islamic History. P. SIJPESTEIJN, Princeton
21 Jan.: `The papyri of the Marwanids.' C. ROBINSON
28 Jan.: `Marwanid letters.' N. JAMIL
4 Feb.: ` `Abd al-Malik and the poets.' A. SILVERSTEIN, Cambridge
11 Feb.: `The Marwanid barid (post).' DR JOHNS
18 Feb.: ` `Abd al-Malik and the mosque.' L. TREADWELL
25 Feb.: `The coins of `Abd al-Malik.' J. RABY
Mon. 3 Mar., 11 a.m.: `The Jerusalem of `Abd al-Malik.' J. HOWARD-JOHNSTON
11 Mar.: `Byzantium and `Abd al-Malik.'


ORIENTAL STUDIES, CLASSICS, THEOLOGY

Seminar on Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period

The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in Wolfson College.

Convener: M.D. Goodman, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Jewish Studies. PROFESSOR E. NETZER, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
21 Jan.: `The court of Herod's Temple.' DR J. AITKEN, Reading
28 Jan.: `The Septuagint as a source for Hellenistic Judaism: limits and possibilities.' E. MAIN, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
4 Feb.: `Dating material from Qumran.' DR S. WEINGARTEN, Tel Aviv
11 Feb.: `Talmudic food.' DR P. VAN BOXEL, Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies and Wolfson College
18 Feb.: `The Jerusalem Church and other Jewish groups after 70 CE.' RABBI JONATHAN MILGRAM, London School of Jewish Studies and SOAS
25 Feb.: `Between mimrot and anonymous statements: evidence for attributed redactionary material in the Babylonian Talmud.' PROFESSOR G. HATA, Tama Arts University
4 Mar.: `The origin of the Greek Bible: another explanation.' PROFESSOR G. VERMES, Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies and Wolfson College
11 Mar.: `Qumran: where do we stand now?'


PHILOSOPHY

Nellie Wallace Lectures

PROFESSOR S. BROADIE, St Andrews, will deliver the Nellie Wallace Lectures at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays and Wednesdays in the Examination Schools. The lectures will be followed in Week Four by a discussion session, to be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 12 February, in 10 Merton Street. 21 Jan: `Plato's intelligible world.' 22 Jan.: `Tale of a leftover.' 28 Jan.: `How Plato naturalised the elements (I).' 29 Jan.: `How Plato naturalised the elements (II).' 4 Feb.: `Beyond reason and necessity.' 5 Feb.: To be announced.


Seminar in the Philosophy of Physics

The following seminars will be given at 4.30 p.m. (not 4 p.m. as previously) on Thursdays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: H.R. Brown, MA, Reader in Philosophy, J.N. Butterfield, MA, Senior Research Fellow, All Souls College, and S. Saunders, MA, University Lecturer in the Philosophy of Science. DR M. KUHLMANN, Bremen
23 Jan.: `On what there is: properties and representations in quantum field theory.' DR C. DOLBY
30 Jan.: `Simultaneity and the concept of "particle".' PROFESSOR M. DICKSON, Indiana
6 Feb.: `A view from nowhere: quantum reference frames and the uncertainty principle.' DR K. HANNABUSS
13 Feb.: `Non-commutative geometry in physics.' PROFESSOR H. PRICE, Edinburgh and Sydney
20 Feb.: `New thoughts on the arrow of radiation.' DR J. DORLING, London
27 Feb.: `Why does the universe exist?' DR SAUNDERS
6 Mar.: `Derivation of the Born Rule from operational assumptions.' DR J. KETLAND, Leeds
13 Mar.: `Structuralism in mathematics and physics.'


SOCIAL SCIENCES

Seminar series: British government and politics

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in Lecture Room XI, Brasenose College.

Conveners: V.B. Bogdanor, MA, Professor of Politics and Government, and D.E. Butler, MA, D.Phil., Emeritus Fellow, Nuffield College. THERESA MAY, MP, Chairman, the Conservative Party
24 Jan.: `The organisation of the Conservative Party.' SAM YOUNGER, Chairman, the Electoral Commission
31 Jan.: `The role of the Electoral Commission.' ANDREW ADONIS, Head, the Prime Minister's Policy Unit
7 Feb.:: `Advising the Prime Minister.' PROFESSOR BOB WORCESTER, Chairman, MORI
14 Feb.: `Politics and public opinion.' SIR ANDREW TURNBULL, Secretary to the Cabinet and Head, the Home Civil Service
21 Feb.: `Public service reform.' LORD DHOLAKIA, President, the Liberal Democrats
28 Feb.: `The strategy of the Liberal Democrats.' LORD WILLIAMS OF MOSTYN, QC, Leader of the House of Lords
7 Mar.: `House of Lords reform: the Government's view.'


Current issues in social policy

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Violet Butler Seminar Room, the Department of Social Policy and Social Work.

Conveners: Professor J.E. Lewis and Ms S. Wright. PROFESSOR A. GLYN
21 Jan.: `Globalisation and financing the welfare state.' PROFESSOR C. UNGERSON, Southampton
28 Jan.: `Whose empowerment and independence? A cross- national perspective on "cash for care" schemes.' DR M. EVANS, Bath
4 Feb.: `Lessons from the New Deal for Lone Parents—where should policy go next?' H. SUTHERLAND, Cambridge
11 Feb.: `What are the prospects for meeting the child poverty targets? An exploration of the issues using microsimulation.' PROFESSOR A. DEACON, Leeds
18 Feb.: `Justifying conditionality? Welfare reform in the UK and the US.' PROFESSOR F. WILLIAMS, Leeds
25 Feb.: `Family values or an ethic of care.' PROFESSOR F. CASTLES, Edinburgh
4 Mar.: `The world turned upside down: below replacement fertility, changing preferences, and family-friendly public policy in twenty-one OECD countries.' PROFESSOR D. KING
11 Mar.: `American welfare transformed or ended? The 1996 reform and beyond.'


Oxford International Relations Theory Seminar: Topics in global justice

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 3 p.m. on Fridays in the Old Library, All Souls College. The course will be jointly taught by Dr David Miller, Dr Thomas Pogge, and Dr Henry Shue. Different scholars and their work will be featured each week. Except for the first session (24 January), this work will be precirculated by e-mail attachment and only briefly introduced at the sessions themselves. Casual attendance is therefore discouraged. DR THOMAS POGGE and DR HENRY SHUE
24 Jan.: `World poverty: explanations and responsibilities.' MICHAEL GREEN
31 Jan., Seminar Room 3: `Institutions, responsibility, and justice.' DAVID MILLER
7 Feb.: `National responsibility and international justice.' MICHAEL BLAKE
14 Feb.: `Global justice and local institutions.' RICHARD MILLER
21 Feb.: `Moral closeness and world community.' ANDY KUPER
28 Feb.: `Global representation: a non-state theory of democracy.' ELIZABETH ASHFORD
7 Mar.: `The demandingness of [Scanlon's] contractualism.' ALLEN BUCHANAN
14 Mar.: `The preventive use of force: a cosmpolitan institutional perspective' (co-authored with Bob Keohane).


Responsing to terrorism

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in All Souls College. They are co- sponsored by the Centre for International Studies, the Department of Politics and International Relations, and the All Souls Foreign Policy Programme.

Conveners: Dr Jane Boulden, CIS, and Sir Robert Wade-Gery, All Souls College. PROFESSOR S.N. MACFARLANE
24 Jan.: `The effect on UN Charter values.' SENATOR GARY HART, Co-Chair, Hart-Rudman Commission on National Security
31 Jan.: `Terrorism and the changing nature of war.' PROFESSOR E. LUCK, Columbia
7 Feb.: `The United States, counter-terrorism, and the prospects for a multilateral alternative.' DR C. DE JONGE OUDRAAT, Georgetown
14 Feb.: `Terrorism and the UN Security Council.' DR K. VON HIPPEL, Centre for Defence Studies, London
21 Feb.: `Responding to the root causes of terrorism.' S. SIMON, IISS
28 Feb.: `Terrorism and weapons of mass destruction.' DR M. SERRANO, El Colegio de Mexico
7 Mar.: `Pulling the financial plug: the political economy of terrorism.'


African Studies Seminar and Development Studies Seminar: Poverty and researching poverty in Africa

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in Queen Elizabeth House.

Conveners: W. Beinart, MA, Rhodes Professor of Race Relations, F.J. Stewart, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Development Economics, and J.F.J. Toye, Visiting Professor in Economics. C. MURRAY, Manchester
23 Jan.: `Livelihoods research and rural poverty in southern Africa.' PROFESSOR STEWART
30 Jan.: `Everyone agrees that poverty reduction is paramount, but there is no agreement on what poverty is: does this paradox matter?' K. ORLEANS-LINDSAY, Centre for the Study of African Economies
6 Feb.: `Property rights, mortgage banking, and poverty alleviation in Ghana.' M. VAUGHAN
13 Feb.: `Poverty and famine in Malawi, 2002.' M. NOBLE
20 Feb.: `Using administrative data to inform pro-poor policy in South Africa.' D. BRYCESON, Birmingham and Leiden
27 Feb.: `Poverty policies or policy poverty: paradoxes of economic reform and social displacement in sub-Saharan Africa.' PROFESSOR TOYE
6 Mar.: `Poverty in sub-Saharan Africa.' M. LOCKWOOD, Action Aid, and R. MARCUS, Childhood Poverty Research and Policy Centre, Save the Children
13 Mar.: `NGOs, poverty research, and policy in Africa and Asia.'


Southern African texts and contexts

The following seminars will be held at 5.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Seminar Room, the Nissan Institute. Further details may be obtained from Ulli Parkinson (telephone: Oxford (2)74477 or (2)74470, e-mail: ulli.parkinson@sant.ox.ac.uk).

Conveners: Professor William Beinart and Professor Elleke Boehmer. G. PECHEY, Cambridge
21 Jan.: `Poetry is in the world: Roy Campbell's rhyming universe.' B. HANIMANOLIS, Johnson State College, USA
11 Feb.: ` "Let no one who reads be amazed": spectacle and normalising narrative in the account of two southern African shipwrecks: the Sacramento and the Nossa Senhora de Atalia (1647).' D. SEDDON, Cambridge
18 Feb.: `Sol Plaatje and William Shake-the-Sword: identification in translation.' J. POYNER, Warwick
4 Mar.: `The lives of J.M. Coetzee: writer/critic/citizen.'


THEOLOGY

Old Testament Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Mondays in the Seminar Room, the Theology Faculty Centre.

Convener: J. Barton, MA, D.Phil., D.Litt., Oriel and Laing Professor of the Interpretation of Holy Scripture. DR T. FENTON, Haifa
27 Jan.: How much pre-exilic Hebrew is there in the Bible?' (In search of Pre-Exilic Israel series) DR J. DAY
10 Feb.: `Whatever happened to the Ark of the Covenant?' (Temple and Worship series) DR S. GILLINGHAM
24 Feb.: `The Zion tradition and the editing of the Hebrew Psalter.' (Temple and Worship series) DR K. GRUNEBERG
3 Mar.: `The niphal: what the grammars won't tell you.' PROFESSOR H. BARSTAD, Oslo
10 Mar.: `Dating the prophets: Amos and Hosea as examples.' (In search of Pre-Exilic Israel series)


Joint Old Testament/New Testament seminar

MOLLY ZAHN and JEREMY DUFF will lecture at 2.15 p.m. on Thursday, 6 March, in Queen's College.

Convener: J. Barton, MA, D.Phil., D.Litt., Oriel and Laing Professor of the Interpretation of Holy Scripture.

Subject: `Pseudonymity.'


Lectures

The following lectures will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in Lecture Room 2, Christ Church.

Convener: Peggy Morgan, MA status, Lecturer in the Study of Religions, Mansfield College. DR N. GREEN
28 Jan.: `Local saints and foreign bodies: questions of identity in the Sufi biographical literature of south Asia.' DR M. FREUD-KANDEL
11 Feb.: `Contemporary Orthodox Jewish interpretations of the concept of the Faithful Remnant.' DR F. CLOONEY, Oxford Centre for Vaishnava and Hindu Studies and Boston College, USA
25 Feb.: `Hindu goddesses and Christian theology.' DR R. GETHIN, Bristol
11 Mar.: `Meditation, mysticism, and contradiction in early Buddhism.'


Ian Ramsey Centre

Science and religion

The following seminars will be held at 8.15 for 8.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the Hood Room, St Cross College.

Conveners: Professor J.H. Brooke and Dr Margaret Yee. DR J. WEAVER, Cardiff
30 Jan.: `Theology of energy.' DR C. CONTI, Sussex
13 Feb.: `Feuerbach and religious projection.' DR M. CULHANE, Limerick, Ireland
27 Feb.: `Did the Creator dispense with time and history?—Newman on false dichotomies in the Darwinian debate.'


INTER-FACULTY SEMINAR

Restoration to Reform 1660–1832: British political, literary, intellectual, and social history

The following seminars will be held at 5.15 p.m. on Mondays in the Wordsworth Room, St Hugh's College. The seminar will continue in Trinity Term.

Conveners: Dr Ros Ballaster (Mansfield), Professor Marilyn Butler (Exeter), Dr Faramerz Dabhoiwala (Exeter), Dr Christine Gerrard (LMH), Dr Thomas Keymer (St Anne's), Dr James Raven (Mansfield), Professor Isabel Rivers (St Hugh's), Professor Kathryn Sutherland (St Anne's), and Dr Abigail Williams (St Peter's). PROFESSOR P. GARSIDE, Cardiff
20 Jan.: `Scott, Scotland, and the masculinisation of the novel, 1770–1830.' DR LL. BREE, Cambridge University Press
3 Feb.: ` "No situation so deplorable": gentility, poverty, and Sarah Fielding.' PROFESSOR S. WEST, Birmingham
17 Feb.: `Laughter in eighteenth-century English visual culture.' DR J. WATT, York
3 Mar.: `The oriental pseudo-traveller in the long eighteenth century.'


INTERDISCIPLINARY SAWYER SEMINAR (IN ASSOCIATION WITH THE ANDREW W. MELLON FOUNDATION)

The theory and politics of civil society

The following seminars will be held from 1.45 p.m. to 4.15 p.m. on Mondays in the Rothermere American Institute. The series will continue throughout the academic year. Papers will be precirculated to participants. Those wishing to attend the seminars should register their interest in good time. All enquiries should be directed to Paul Bou-Habib (telephone: (2)82718, e-mail: paul.bou-habib@socres.ox.ac.uk). Web site: http://www.law.ox.ac.uk/jurisprudence/civilsociety.htm. PROFESSOR BO ROTHSTEIN, Gothenburg
27 Jan.: `The welfare state and social capital.' PROFESSOR ROBERT PUTNAM, Harvard
10 Feb.: `Community in America.' PROFESSOR STEVEN LUKES, New York
24 Feb.: To be announced. PROFESSOR THEDA SKOCPOL, Harvard
10 Mar.: `Civic engagement.'


INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING

Research Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in the Institute for the Advancement of University Learning, Littlegate House, St Ebbe's. Those wishing to attend are asked to contact Joanna Buddery (telephone: Oxford (2)86815, e-mail: joanna.buddery@learning.ox.ac.uk). For details of Reading Weeks (30 January, 27 February), see below. DR K. TRIGWELL
23 Jan.: `Students' comments on their Oxford degrees: an analysis of feedback on the Student Course Experience Questionnaire.' PROFESSOR M. MENTKOWSKI, Alverno College, USA
6 Feb.: `Learning that lasts: what is it? How does it happen? How do we know?' DR P. TROWLER, Lancaster
13 Feb.: `Insider research close up: the case of academics responding to change.' DR G. HAYWARD
20 Feb.: `Cultural historical activity theory.' PROFESSOR M. YORKE, Liverpool John Moores
6 Mar.: `The assessment of portfolios, and some implications for wider assessment practice.'


Reading Weeks

The following meetings will be held as part of the Research Seminars series. They will take place at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in the IAUL, Littlegate House. A copy of each paper may be obtained from Joanna Buddery (telephone: Oxford (2)86815, e-mail: joanna.buddery@learning.ox.ac.uk). 30 Jan.: Hagoel, L., and Kalekin-Fishman, D. (2002), `Crossing borders: towards a trans-disciplinary scientific identity', Studies in Higher Education, 27[3], pp. 297–308. 27 Feb.: Higgins, R., Hartley, P., and Skelton, A. (2002), `The conscientious consumer: reconsidering the role of assessment feedback in student learning', Studies in Higher Education, 27[1], pp. 53–64.


ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM

William Cohn Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR I. BIERMAN, Director, the American Research Centre in Egypt, will deliver the thirty-sixth William Cohn Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 21 January, in the Headley Lecture Theatre, the Ashmolean Museum.

Subject: `Medieval Cairo: a Mamluk city of nineteenth-century design?'


SAID BUSINESS SCHOOL

Issues in Science and Technology Studies

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 3.30 p.m. on Fridays in Seminar Room 14, the Saïd Business School. For up-to-date and background information and more details e-mail Sara Ward (e-mail: sara.ward@sbs.ox.ac.uk), or see http://www.sbs.ox.ac.uk/html/faculty_seminars_science_technology.asp. Details of the 14 February seminar will be announced later.

Convener: S. Woolgar (MA, Ph.D. Cambridge), Professor of Marketing. PROFESSOR E. SHOVE, Lancaster
24 Jan.: `Things in the making and things in action: a discussion of design, use, and consumption.' DR S. BROWN, Loughborough
Thur. 30 Jan., 12 noon: `The baby as virtual object: agency and accountability in neonatal intensive care.' DR M. ASHMORE, Loughborough
31 Jan.: `Death and furniture: the rhetoric, politics, and theology of bottom-line arguments against relativism.' DR B. RAPPERT, Nottingham
7 Feb.: Towards understanding the abusability of technology.' PROFESSOR N. THRIFT, Bristol
13 Feb.: Cultures on the brink: re-engineering the soul of capitalism.' DR M. MICHAEL, Goldsmiths' College, London
21 Feb.: `Always connect...: towards a sociotechnics of prepositions.' DR D. SLATER, LSE
28 Feb.: `The "new economy" in Sri Lanka?---comparative ethnographies of ICTs.' C. COOPMANS
7 Mar.: Images and accountability: some preliminary observations.' DR G. COOPER, Surrey
14 Mar.: Dial logic: locating the mobile as practical and mythical object.'


INSTITUTE FOR CHINESE STUDIES

China Research Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Institute for Chinese Studies.

Convener: R.S.R. Mitter, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in the Modern History and Politics of China. ZHONGYING PANG, Qinghua University
23 Jan.: `Contemporary China and East Asian new regionalism.' S.A. SMITH, SUSSEX
30 JAN.: `Anti-superstition campaigns in the People's Republic of China, 1949--75' (Workshop session on project in progress). K. HAMMOND, New Mexico
6 Feb.: `Making the Martyr's Tale: Late Ming biographical texts on Yang Jishengo.' WANG HSIEN-CHUN
13 Feb.: `Did conservatism kill China's first railway?' N. CHAPUIS, French Embassy
20 Feb.: `Translation of classical Chinese poetry: a multidisciplinary approach.' J. STRAUSS, SOAS; editor, cThe China Quarterly
27 Feb.: `Governance in the contemporary PRC: attempted reforms in forestry administration.' j. pottenger, Yale Law School
6 Mar.: `Legal aid and legal education: a worm's-eye view of legal reform in the PRC.' K . SEKINE, Keio University
13 Mar.: `A-Long and Hu Feng schools: the stranger in the Chinese modern literature field.'


COMPUTING LABORATORY

PROFESSOR TONY HEY, Director, e-Science Core Programme, EPSRC, will deliver a Strachey Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Thursday, 21 January, in the Lecture Theatre, the Computing Laboratory.

Subject: `The challenge of e-science.'


DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL STUDIES AND THE CENTRE FOR BRAZILIAN STUDIES

The Department of Educational Studies and the Centre for Brazilian Studies are organising a joint seminar series on `Education in Brazil'. Seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays of weeks 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, and 8, and on Fridays of weeks 3 and 6. For further details contact: enquiries@brazil.ox.ac.uk.


WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE

Ridding the Empire of leprosy: a grand undertaking and its legacy

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Mondays in the Wellcome Unit, 45–7 Banbury Road.

Convener: J. Robertson (Ph.D Queensland), Research Officer on ILA global project on the history of leprosy. DR J. BUCKINGHAM, Canterbury, New Zealand
20 Jan.: `Religion, health, sexuality, and the criminality of assisted suicide in early nineteenth-century British India.' DR ROBERTSON
27 Jan.: `Leprosy and the elusive M. leprae: colonial and imperial medical exchanges in the nineteenth century.' J. MANTON
3 Feb.: `Missionary leprosy control: ideologies and practices in Ogoja Province, Nigeria, 1944–8.' DR R. EDMOND, Kent
10 Feb.: `Heredity or contagion? The debate over the causation of leprosy in the later nineteenth century.' PROFESSOR M. WORBOYS, Manchester
17 Feb.: `Leprosy, germs, and contagion in the British Empire, 1860–1900.' S. HORWITZ
24 Feb.: `Inside Westfort: race, sex, and segregation within a South Africa leprosarium, during the first half of the twentieth century.' DR H. DEACON, freelance historian, Robben Island
3 Mar.: `The spatial politics of an African leprosarium.' DR S. KAKAR, Delhi
10 Mar.: `Leprosy in India: the unique role of oral history.'


OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC STUDIES

PROFESSOR M. ROGERS, SOAS, will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 22 January, in the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies.

Subject: `Sinan and imperial patronage.'


QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

Contemporary South Asia Seminar

The following seminars will be held at2 p.m. on Fridays in the Blackhall Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

Conveners: Dr Nandini Gooptu and Professor Barbara Harriss-White. L. HALANI
31 Jan.: `Negotiating fertility: the case of Muslim women in a northwestern city of India.' L. MICHELUTTI, LSE
7 Feb.: `The political recruitment of Krishna: popular democracy in a North Indian town.' J. ARUN
14 Feb.: `The myth of beef-eating and identity of the Paraiyars of Tamil Nadu.' A. SHAH, LSE
21 Feb.: `Local politics and the state in Jharkand, eastern India.' R. SUBRAHMANIAN, Sussex
28 Feb.: `Imprints of discrimination: the dynamics of educational inclusion in two states of India.' (Provisional title) L. SAEZ and G. CAPPOCCIA
7 Mar.: `Where state responses fail: religious extremism and separatism in India.'


International Gender Studies Centre

Gender and religions: sacralising time and space

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the Blackhall Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House. In place of the usual seminar, celebrations for Oxford's International Women's Festival will be held on 13 March. The International Gender Studies Centre incorporates the Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women.

Conveners: Dr M. Jaschok and Dr J. Reynell. DR M. RAPHAEL, Cheltenham and Gloucester College
23 Jan.: `Jewish women's consecration of space and time in Auschwitz: a Jewish feminist reading of the memoir literature.' DR E. FERRARO, Quito, Ecuador
30 Jan.: `Kneading life: women and the celebration of the dead in the northern Andes of Ecuador.' DR L. NIXON
6 Feb.: `Mothers and daughters inside and outside the ancient Greek city: the cults of Demeter and Kore.' DR E. KALNY, Vienna
13 Feb.: `Performing religion in Guatemalan Ma communities: space, gender, and the sacred.' DR M. KLEIN, Jewism Museum, London
20 Feb.: `Sacralising childbirth in the Jewish community.' DR Z. MORRISON
27 Feb.: `Ethics, gender, space, and scale: constructions of relationships between places in Oxford.' PROFESSOR W. JAMES
6 Mar.: `Women and the qualities of time.'


TRANSPORT STUDIES UNIT

Transport investment and the economy

PROFESSOR R. VICKERMAN, Kent, will lecture in this series at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 23 January, in Lecture Room 1, St Anne's College. Further details may be obtained from the Transport Studies Unit (telephone: Oxford (2)74715, Web site: http://www.tsu.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `Trans-European networks and economic development: appraising the benefits.'


CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE

F.W. Bateson Memorial Lecture 2003

PROFESSOR L. COLLEY, London School of Economics and Political Science, will deliver the F.W. Bateson Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 12 February, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Perceiving low literature: the captivity narrative.'


GREEN COLLEGE

Green College Lectures 2003

Science and the media: the challenge of adapting science to the mass media

Amended notice

The Green College Lectures will be held at 6 p.m. on Mondays in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary. The final lecture in the series will be delivered by Fiona Fox, in place of Dr Ian Gibson. PROFESSOR LORD MAY OF OXFORD, AC, KT, FRS, President, the Royal Society; Royal Society Research Professor of Zoology
20 Jan.: `Many scientists, many mediums, many publics: problems inherent in slogans like "Science and the media".' DR PALLAB GHOSH, BBC Science Correspondent
27 Jan.: `Trust no one, question everything, believe nothing: the new face of science journalism.' PROFESSOR I. HARGREAVES, Professor of Journalism and Director of the Centre for Journalism Studies, University of Cardiff
3 Feb.: `Lost in media-space: how science failed the communications test.' FIONA FOX, Director, the Science Media Centre, the Royal Institution
10 Feb.: `The truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth: so where does that leave journalism?'


LINACRE COLLEGE

Linacre Lectures 2003

Designing successful environmental policies

The Linacre Lectures will be held at 5.30 p.m. on Thursdays in Lecture Theatre A, the Zoology/Psychology Building. The Linacre Lectures are sponsored by Linacre College and the Environmental Change Institute. DR R. PACHAURI, Director-General of TERI, India, and Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
23 Jan.: `Climate change on a global scale.' PROFESSOR D. BEGG, Director, Centre for Transport Policy, Robert Gordon University
30 Jan.: `Transport and congestion in Edinburgh and London.' DR B. BOARDMAN
6 Feb.: `Lessons from transforming the cold market.' PROFESSOR D. KING, Government adviser and Head of the Office of Science and Technology
13 Feb.: `The role of government in response to global warming.' DR M. HOELZ, Global Head of Public Affairs and Sustainable Development, Deutsche Bank
20 Feb.: `Sustainable development—a business issue.' PROFESSOR K. HOMEWOOD, Department of Anthropology, University College, London
27 Feb.: `Policy, environment, and development in African rangelands.' DR M. COLCHESTER, Forest Peoples Programme
6 Mar.: `Conservation policy and indigenous peoples.' PROFESSOR R. CORELL, School of Government, Harvard
13 Mar.: `The role of government.'


ST ANNE'S COLLEGE

MARTHA KEARNEY, presenter of Woman's Hour and Political Editor of Newsnight (Literae Humaniores 1976), will give a talk at 6.30 p.m. on Saturday, 25 January, in the Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, St Anne's College. This event is organised by the St Anne's College Association of Senior Members. Admission will cost £10. Tickets may be obtained by sending a cheque payable to St Anne's College to Christine Foard, St Anne's College, Oxford OX2 6HS. Tickets will also be available at the door.

Subject: `From college to career.'


ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

Interests, identities, and interventions

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

Conveners: Professor Archie Brown, Alan Duncan, MP, and Gordon Marsden, MP. LORD HURD, PC, YASMIN ALIBHAI-BROWN, The Independent, and PROFESSOR SIR ADAM ROBERTS
21 Jan.: `What are British interests now?' (Chair: Gordon Marsden, MP) THE RT. HON. MICHAEL ANCRAM, PC, MP, GORDON MARSDEN, MP, and PROFESSOR ARCHIE BROWN
28 Jan.: `Building democracy and building capitalism: conflicting or complementary goals?' (Chair: Alan Duncan, MP) LORD HOWELL, PC, FELIPE FERNANDEZ-ARMESTO, and SIR MARRACK GOULDING
4 Feb.: `When is foreign military intervention justified?' (Chair: Gordon Marsden, MP) H.E. GRIGORY KARASIN, Ambassador of the Russian Federation, DR ANDREI GRACHEV, Paris and Moscow, JOHN LLOYD, former Moscow correspondent, The Financial Times, and DR ALEX PRAVDA
11 Feb.: `Russian national identity and national interests.' (Chair: Professor Brown) GLYN T. DAVIES, Deputy Head of Mission, American Embassy, London, CHARLES WHEELER, former Washingon correspondent, the BBC, and PROFESSOR HENRY SHUE
18 Feb.: `Is American unilateralism out of control?' (Chair: Alan Duncan, MP) BARONESS SCOTLAND, QC, DOMINIC GRIEVE, MP, MRS ANN CRYER, MP, and DANIEL SNOWMAN
25 Feb.: `National identity and migration: pluses and minuses.' (Chair: Professor Brown) LORD WRIGHT OF RICHMOND, ALAN DUNCAN, MP, ERNIE ROSS, MP, and PROFESSOR AVI SHLAIM
4 Mar.: `Shifting sands: Iraq and its neighbours.' (Chair: Gordon Marsden, MP) THE RT. HON. MICHAEL PORTILLO, PC, MP, LORD OWEN, PC, and DR ANNE DEIGHTON
11 Mar.: `EU and NATO: cousins or rivals?' (Chair: Alan Duncan, MP)


European Studies Centre

Brown-bag lunches: Foreigners in Europe

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Mondays in the Seminar Room, 70 Woodstock Road.

Convener: R. Harris, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer (CUF) in Modern History. D. GORDON
20 Jan.: `Guarding the borders of the nation-state: the deportation of politically active foreigners in twentieth-century France.' K . LAGOS
27 Jan.: `Paradigms of inclusion and exclusion: Greek Jewry and Hellenism, 1936--41.' (In conjunction with the Jewish History Seminar---see below) L. DOUGLASS
3 Feb.: `The double-edged sword of the 1907 Austrian electoral reform: the problem of Jewish representation in the Czech lands.'


Seminar in Modern European Jewish History

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Mondays in the Seminar Room, 70 Woodstock Road.

Convener: Dr David Rechter, Oriental Institute. K. LAGOS
27 Jan., 1 p.m.: `Greek Jewry and Hellenism: paradigms of inclusion and exclusion, 1936--41.' (In conjunction with the `Brown-bag lunches' series---see above) PROFESSOR D. SORKIN, Wisconsin
3 Feb.: `The three regions of emancipation.' DR J. HEPPELL, Warwick
10 Feb.: Jews, Communism, and modernity: a new perspective.' PROFESSOR D. PENSLAR, Toronto
17 Feb.: `Zionism and post-colonialism.' S. SCHNITZER
24 Feb.: `How to be "A Worthy Citizen of England and a True Son of Israel": instructions from the Anglo-Jewish clergy during the Boer War, 1899--1902.' DR A. GREEN
3 Mar.: `Sir Moses Montefiore (1784--1885): new perspectives.' DR N. ROEMER, Southampton
10 Mar.: `Mapping Jewish identities in nineteenth-century Germany.'


Citizenship and national minorities in Europe: history, theory, and practice

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Seminar Room, 70 Woodstock Road. Details of the 24 February seminar will be announced later.

Conveners: J.M. Welsh, MA, M.Phil., D.Phil., University Lecturer in International Relations, K.A. Noicolaïdis, MA, University Lecturer in International Relations, and R. Hansen, MA, M.Phil., D.Phil., University Lecturer (CUF) in Economics. PROFESSOR R.J. CRAMPTON
20 Jan.: `Nationalism in the Balkans.' I. TANASE, Paris I---Sorbonne
27 Jan.: `Defining national minorities: old criteria and new minorities.' J. MORENO, CEACS, Instituto Juan March
3 Feb.: `Peripheral nationalism and European integration: the case of Spain and the Basque Country.' SPEAKER TO BE ANNOUNCED
10 Feb.: `Czechoslovakia's velvet divorce.' S. GREEN, Birmingham
17 Feb.: `The German nation.' G. HAARSCHER, Universite libre de Bruxelles
3 Mar.: `Turkey and the Kurdish minority.' D. MILLER, Nuffield, and A. GEDDES, Liverpool
10 Mar.: `National minorities and European citizenship.'


Britain and Germany in the twentieth century

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Seminar Room, 70 Woodstock Road.

Conveners: M. Gortemaker (Dr.Phil. Berlin), Visiting Fellow, St Antony's College, T.J. Garton Ash, MA, Fellow, St Antony's College, and J.C. Wright, MA, University Lecturer (CUF) in Economics. DR J. DUPPLER, Military History Research Centre, Potsdam
21 Jan.: `Rivals at sea: Anglo-German naval policies before World War I.' (Commentator: Professor H. Strachan) DR B.D. FULDA, Cambridge
28 Jan.: `Lloyd George and the Weimar Republic.' (Commentator: Dr Wright) PROFESSOR DR. M.-L. RECKER, Frankfurt am Main
4 Feb.: `Appeasement revisited: Chamberlain, Hitler, and the policy of Munich.' PROFESSOR DR B. HEUSER, King's College, London
11 Feb.: `The silent alliance: British--German co-operation in NATO 1977--87.' (Commentator: Sir Michael Quinlan, Ministry of Defence) PROFESSOR DR D. JUNKER, Heidelberg
18 Feb.: `The United States, Germany, and Europe in the twentieth century.' PROFESSOR DR L. KETTENACKER, German Historical Institute, London
25 Feb.: `The British in Germany: foes and friends 1945--55.' (Commentator: Professor Dr H.-P. Schwarz, Bonn) DR GORTEMAKER
4 Mar.: `The case of Rudolf Hess: a chance for peace?' PROFESSOR DR K.-R. KORTE, Duisburg
11 Mar.: `Kohl--Thatcher: discord over German reunification.' (Commentator: Mr Garton Ash)


Germany after the elections

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Seminar Room 70 Woodstock Road.

Convener: A.C. Busch, MA, Fellow, St Antony's College. M.G. SCHMIDT, Heidelberg
24 Jan.: `What is special about Germany? The political system in international comparison.' T. SAALFELD, Kent
31 Jan.: `End of the catch-all model? Change and continuity in the Germany party system.' DR BUSCH
7 Feb.: `Struggling to extend civil rights: the cases of citizenship, gay partnership, and immigration.' R. ZOHLNHÖFER, Heidelberg
14 Feb.: `Destination anywhere? The Schröder Government's inconclusive search for a "Third Way" in economic policy.' A.HASSEL, MPI Cologne
21 Feb.: `Dysfunctional tripartism? Why the "Alliance for Jobs" didn't work.' C. JEFFERY, Birmingham
28 Feb.: `Discovering territory in German federalism.' R. CZADA, Osnabruck
7 Mar.: `Unification: the ongoing challenge.' AMBASSADOR THOMAS MATUSSEK
14 Mar.: `Germany in Europe.'


Other programmes for Hilary Term

The following seminars will be held at the European Studies Centre, 70 Woodstock Road, weeks 1--8. DR A. DEIGHTON
Tue., 10 a.m.: `European integration.' (M.Phil. class) DR A. DEIGHTON
Tue., 2 p.m.: `European international history.' (M.Phil. class) PROFESSOR R. CRAMPTON
Thur.,2.15 p.m.: `History and politics of Central and Eastern Europe since 1945.' (M.Phil. class)


Russian and East European Centre

Under western eyes, under eastern eyes

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

Conveners: R.J. Service, MA, University Lecturer in Modern Russian History, and D.R. Priestland, MA, University Lecturer (CUF) in Modern History. S. PONS, Istituto Gramsci, Rome
20 Jan.: `Italian Communists and the Soviet Union.' M. KOTT
27 Jan.: `Latvians and the Holocaust: the view from the west.' A. OSTROVSKY, \The Financial Times\
3 Feb.: `The idea of Britain in the Russian Revolution.' F. CIBULKA
10 Feb.: `Western perceptions of the extreme political right in east–central Europe.' P. DUNCAN, SSEES, London
17 Feb.: `Soviet views of Britain since Lenin.' P. HANSON, CREES, Birmingham
24 Feb.: `Western commentaries and postwar Soviet economic performance.' DR SERVICE
3 Mar.: `The West and the totalitarian diagnosis.' R. PYNSENT, SSEES, London
10 Mar.: `The British woman in Czech literature and thought.'


TRINITY COLLEGE

Richard Hillary Lecture 2003

GRAHAM SWIFT will deliver the Richard Hillary Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 5 February, in the St Cross Building.

Subject: ` "I do like to be beside the seaside": the place of place in fiction.'


WOLFSON COLLEGE

Wolfson College Lectures 2003

History and fiction: celebrating the centenary of Sir Ronald Syme (1903–89)

The Wolfson College Lectures will be held at 6 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Hall, Wolfson College. The lectures are free of charge and open to the public. PROFESSOR K. COLEMAN, Harvard
4 Feb.: ` "Truth severe, by fair Fiction drest": reality and the Roman imagination.' PROFESSOR R. HOLMES, Royal Military College of Science
11 Feb.: `War of words: describing the Great War.' PROFESSOR K. HOPKINS, Cambridge
18 Feb.: `How to be a Roman emperor—an autobiography.' PROFESSOR N.A.M. RODGER, University of Exeter
25 Feb.: `History repeated as fiction in the novels of Patrick O'Brian.' JULIAN MITCHELL, novelist and dramatist
4 Mar.: ` "How many times shall Caesar bleed in sport": history and drama.' DR M. GRIFFIN
11 Mar.: ` "Lifting the mask": Syme on fictional history.'


REGENT'S PARK COLLEGE

Centre for the Study of Christianity and Culture

Life at the limits: reflections on religion and death

The following public lectures will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in Regent's Park College. PROFESSOR G. JANTZEN, Manchester
21 Jan.: ` "The Depth of the Abyss": medieval mysticism and the nihilism of postmodernity.' DR B. CLACK, Oxford Brookes
28 Jan.: `Sex and death in Augustine.' M.O'SIADHAIL
4 Feb.: Poetry reading and launch of cThe Gossamer Wall. DR M. RAPHAEL, Gloucester
11 Feb.: `God's face in darkness: a Jewish feminist perspective on the hiddenness and the revelation of God in Auschwitz.' DR D. ROOKE, King's College, London
18 Feb.: `Sex and death, or the death of sex: the case of Jephthah's daughter (Judges 11:29--40).' PROFESSOR G. CURRY, Georgetown College, Kentucky
25 Feb.: `Poetry, death, and Christian faith.' (McCandless Lecture 2003) DR A. MOORE, Regent's Park College
4 Mar.: `Explanation, suffering, and death in the Bible: a test case for the science and theology debate.' DR R. ELLIS, Regent's Park College
11 Mar.: `God in the trenches: Woodbine Willy and the problem of pain.'


NEW DICTIONARY OF NATIONAL BIOGRAPHY

DNB Seminars in Biography

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Rainolds Room, Corpus Christi College. PROFESSOR I. DONALDSON, Cambridge
30 Jan.: `Biographical uncertainty.' DR G. FERRY
13 Feb.: `The lives of scientists.' PROFESSOR E. IVES, Birmingham
27 Feb.: `Will the real Henry VIII please stand up?'


OXFORD BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY

JOHN RANDLE will lecture at 5.15 p.m. on Thursday, 23 January, in the Taylor Institution. The lecture will be open to the public.

Subject: `The Whittington Press and Oxford.'


OXFORD UNION SOCIETY

Oxford and literature

The following lectures, which are open to all members of the University, will be held at 8.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Oxford Union Society. SIR ANTHONY KENNY
28 Jan.: `Three Oxford poets: Matthew Arnold, Arthur Hugh Clough, and Gerard Manley Hopkins.' LORD QUINTON OF HOLYWELL (ANTHONY QUINTON)
4 Feb.: `Oxford in Victorian fiction.' BEVIS HILLIER
11 Feb.: `Betjeman's Oxford.' DR NICHOLAS SHRIMPTON
18 Feb.: `Lewis Carroll, Charles Dodgson, and Oxford.' LADY JAMES OF HOLLAND PARK (P.D. JAMES)
25 Feb.: `The Oxford detective story.' PROFESSOR PETER CONRAD
4 Mar.: `Iris Murdoch and Oxford.'


OXFORD ITALIAN ASSOCIATION

Lectures

Unless otherwise indicated, the following lectures and meetings will be held at 7.30 for 8 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Mary Ogilvie Theatre, St Anne's College. Admission for non- members costs £3 (free admission for students under thirty). Further information may be obtained from the Hon. Secretary (Oxford 377479). ANTONY and PORTIA VENTON
6 Feb., Pauling Centre for Human Sciences: `The Mille Miglia 1927–57.' PROFESSOR J. WOODHOUSE
18 Feb.: `Echoes of Michelangelo's poetry in his art and sculpture.' PROFESSOR J. LEWIN
6 Mar.: `Venice in peril from the sea.'


Other meetings

Wed. 22 Jan.: showing of film Aprile by Nanni Moretti (with sub-titles), Rewley House Theatre, Wellington Square, 8 p.m. Admission free. Tue. 28 Jan.: conversazione in italiano, 48 Common Room, St Anne's College, 7.30 for 8 p.m. Admission free.


OXFORD LYCEUM

PROFESSOR JOSEPH NYE, Dean of the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 21 January, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `The paradox of American power.'

Grants and Research Funding

ST HUGH'S COLLEGE

Colin Matthew Fund

The Colin Matthew Fund has been established for the promotion and encouragement of historical study or research within the University. The Committee for the Fund now invites applications for grants from Junior Members, undergraduate or graduate. The grants are primarily intended to support travel for the purposes of research (which may lead to a dissertation or an extended essay), but other uses will be considered. It is intended to make two awards of up to £500 each, but the committee may determine different levels of award, or no award, in the light of applications received. Application forms may be obtained from the Senior Bursar, St Hugh's College, Oxford OX2 6LE, and must be submitted by the end of Hilary Full Term, i.e. 14 March. Applicants will be notified of the outcome before the beginning of Trinity Term.

Examinations and Boards

CHAIRMEN OF EXAMINERS

TRINITY TERM 2003

Honour Moderations

Archaeology and Anthropology: P.J. MITCHELL, MA, D.PHIL. (MA Cambridge), Fellow of St Hugh's Biological Sciences: M.R. SPEIGHT, MA (B.SC. Wales, D.PHIL. York), Fellow of St Anne's


Moderations

English Language and Literature: M. REYNOLDS, MA (MA, PH.D. Cambridge), Fellow of St Anne's Law Moderations: N.C. BAMFORTH, BCL, MA, Fellow of Queen's


Preliminary Examinations

Archaeology and Anthropology: P.J. MITCHELL, MA, D.PHIL. (MA Cambridge), Fellow of St Hugh's Biological Sciences: M.R. SPEIGHT, MA (B.SC. Wales, D.PHIL. York), Fellow of St Anne's Chemistry: P.A. MADDEN, MA (B.SC., D.PHIL. Sussex), Fellow of Queen's Earth Sciences: B.E. PARSONS, MA (MA, PH.D. Cambridge), Fellow of St Cross


CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, and of the Humanities Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties will come into effect on 31 January.

1 Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages

(a) Preliminary Examination for Modern Languages

(i) With immediate effect

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 94, delete ll. 13–17 and substitute:

`IIB. Comprehension exercise. A modern passage in the language will be set to test comprehension. All answers in this paper will be in English.'


(ii) With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 91, delete l. 18 and substitute:

`(d) Further topics (for candidates taking French sole or German sole only);

(e) Russian Course B (for candidates who entered Oxford without A-level or equivalent knowledge of Russian).'

2 Ibid., delete from l. 19 in p. 91 to l. 2 on p. 92, and substitute:

`3. A candidate shall be deemed to have passed the examination if he or she shall have satisfied the Moderators either (i) in both subjects (a) and (b) in each of two languages, at least one of the languages being modern;

or (ii) in both subjects (a) and (b) in one modern language (other than Czech (with Slovak) or Celtic) and in subject (c); or (iii) in both subjects (a) and (b) in either French or German and in subject (d) in the same language; or (iv) in subject (e). Provided that

(1) candidates must offer all the papers at one examination, provided that a candidate may at a subsequent examination offer any paper or papers in which he or she has previously failed to satisfy the Moderators; and

(2) a candidate shall not be required to resit a paper or papers in which he or she has satisfied the Moderators.'

3 Ibid., p. 92, delete ll. 15–18 and substitute:

`Or: BI, BIIA, BIIB, BIII, and an oral test (for candidates admitted to Russian Course B). These papers may not be offered with papers V, VI, VII, VIII, IX, X.'

4 Ibid., delete from l. 19 on p. 92 to l. 12 on p. 93.

5 Ibid., p. 99, after l. 33, insert:

`d. Further Topics.

XI.

French: Introduction to French Film Studies:

Four films as prescribed from time to time by the sub-faculty of French. Films chosen will be publicised in the University Gazette in Week Nought of Michaelmas Term immediately preceding the examination.

German: Introduction to German Film Studies:

The paper will consist of one commentary and two essays from a choice of questions. The commentary will be on a set of stills from one of the films.

Siegfrieds Tod (Dir. Fritz Lang, 1924)

Menschen am Sonntag (Dir. Robert Siodmak, Billy Wilder, Edgar G. Ulmer, 1929)

Maedchen in Uniform (Dir. Leontine Sagan, 1931)

Kuhle Wampe oder Wem gehort die Welt (Dir. Slatan Dudow, 1932)

XII.

French: Introduction to French Literary Theory:

Four texts as prescribed from time to time by the sub-faculty of French.

Texts chosen will be publicised in the University Gazette in Week Nought of Michaelmas Term immediately preceding the examination.

German: Introduction to German Medieval Studies:

The paper will consist of one commentary and two essays from a choice of questions.

Close study of a single text: Hartmann von Aue, Gregorius (Reclam edition Middle High German text with a facing page translation in modern German).

XIII.

French: Key Texts in French Thought:

Four texts as prescribed from time to time by the sub-faculty of French. Texts chosen will be publicised in the University Gazette in Week Nought of Michaelmas Term immediately preceding the examination.

German: Key Texts in German Thought:

Kant, Idee zu einer allgemeinen Geschichte in weltburgerlicher Absicht

Marx und Engels, Das kommunistische Manifest

Nietzsche, `Zur Naturgeschichte der Moral' in Jenseits vom Gut und BÜse Freud, Warum Krieg?

Candidates will be permitted to use translations alongside, but not instead of, the original texts.'

6 Ibid., l. 35, delete `d' and substitute `e'.

7 Ibid., p. 95, delete l. 33 and substitute:

`Graciliano Ramos, São Bernardo'.


(b) Honour School of Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005 for Course I candidates and 2006 for Course II candidates)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 339, after l. 6 add:

`(7) Duras, with a special study of Un barrage contre le Pacifique, Le Revaissement de Lol V. Stein, L'Amant, and Hiroshima, mon amour (film script).'


2 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and English Language and Literature

Honour School of English and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005 for Course I candidates and 2006 for Course II candidates)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 1 (b) above).


3 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Classics

Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005 for Course I candidates and 2006 for Course II candidates)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 1 (b) above).


4 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Modern History

Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005 for Course I candidates and 2006 for Course II candidates)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 1 (b) above).


5 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Oriental Studies

Honour School of European and Middle Eastern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005 for Course I candidates and 2006 for Course II candidates)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 1 (b) above).


6 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Philosophy

Honour School of Philosophy and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005 for Course I candidates and 2006 for Course II candidates)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 1 (b) above).


7 Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages Honour School of Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 343, delete from `The subject of' on l. 48 to `extensively repeated' on l. 51, and substitute:

`The subject of an essay may, but need not, overlap any subject or period on which the candidate offers a paper, but candidates should avoid repetition of material presented in the extended essay in other parts of the examination.'

2 Ibid., p. 344, after l. 2 insert:

`(iii) Candidates are prohibited from making the same text or texts the principal subject of their Special Subject or Extended Essay and of an answer or essay in papers VI–XI but they are not prohibited from making an author the focus of their Special Subject or Extended Essay on whom they also intend to write in another part of the examination, as long as they make use of different texts and have due regard to the need to avoid repetition of the same material.'

3 Ibid., renumber existing (iii) to (vi) as (iv) to (vii).

4 Ibid., l. 41, after `comment on a first draft.' insert:

`All quotations, whether direct or indirect, from primary or secondary sources must be explicitly acknowledged. The use of unacknowledged quotations will be penalised.'

5 Ibid., p. 345, delete l. 9 and substitute:

`There must be a select bibliography, listing all primary and secondary sources consulted when writing the essay, and full details must be given of all citations (either in the text, or in footnotes).'


8 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and English Language and Literature

Honour School of English and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 7 above).


9 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Classics

Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 7 above).


10 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Modern History

Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 7 above).


11 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Oriental Studies

Honour School of European and Middle Eastern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 7 above).


12 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Philosophy

Honour School of Philosophy and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 7 above).


13 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Oriental Studies

Preliminary Examination in European and Middle Eastern Languages

With immediate effect

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 82, ll. 7–8, delete:

`(Paper III may not be offered in German)'.


14 Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies

(a) M.Phil. in Oriental Studies

With effect from 1 October 2004(for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 559, after l. 19 insert:

`5. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'


(b) M.St. in Modern Middle Eastern Studies

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 640, after l. 48 insert:

`5. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'


(c) M.St. in Oriental Studies

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 643, after l. 6 insert:

`9. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'


15 Board of the Faculty of Theology

(a) Postgraduate Diploma in Theology

With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 923, ll. 8–9, delete `(the version used will be the New Revised Standard version)'.

2 Ibid., ll. 7, 15, 22, and 29, after `the English text' insert `[dagger sign]'.

3 Ibid., l. 13, after `the Greek text' insert `*'.

4 Ibid., ll. 21 and 28, after `the Hebrew text' insert `[double dagger sign]'.

5 Ibid., after l. 49 insert:

`[dagger sign] The English text used will be the New Revised Standard version.

[double dagger sign] The Hebrew text used will be the Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (Stuttgart, 1977).'


(b) Certificate in Theology and Certificate for Theology Graduates

With immediate effect

In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 961, ll. 31 and 35, delete `Certificate in Theology' and substitute `above mentioned certificates'.

Colleges, Halls, and Societies

OBITUARIES

Corpus Christi College

THE REVD GARETH EDWARD MOORE, Priest of the Order of Preachers (Dominicans), 6 December 2002; scholar 1966–71. Aged 54.


Merton College

JAMES MICHAEL COULSON, 18 June 2002; commoner 1949–50. Aged 74.

JAMES ROBERT FROLIK, 30 August 2002; Rhodes Scholar 1948–51. Aged 78.

JOHN ALWYN HALL, 6 May 2002; exhibitioner-elect 1945; 1948–52. Aged 75.

RODNEY HOWARD HILTON, 7 June 2002; Harmsworth Scholar 1939–40. Aged 86. GEOFFREY RICHARD HORSFALL, September 2002; commoner 1947–9. Aged 76.

HUMPHREY GILBERT BOHUN LYNCH, 25 October 2002; postmaster 1930–4. Aged 90.

JAMES BEAVIS POLLARD, December 2001; commoner 1949–52. Aged 71.

BASIL WALTER SMEED, 11 June 2002; commoner 1924–8. Aged 95.


St Hugh's College

DR PAMELA OLIVE ELIZABETH GRADON, 27 November 2002; Fellow and Tutor in Medieval English 1950–82. Aged 87.

MRS JOAN WILLIAMSON PHELIPS (née Helps), 20 June 2002; Modern Languages 1925. Aged 96.

MRS MARLIN DAVIS HARGRAVE (née Davis), 15 October 2002; 1938. Aged 86.

MRS PATRICIA HELEN RICHARDSON (née Robotham), 27 September 2002; Modern History 1964. Aged 56.

MRS JENNIFER MARGARET WRAY, FCA (née Green), 12 October 2002; Physics 1975. Aged 45.


MEMORIAL SERVICES

All Souls College and Jesus College

A Memorial Service for SIR HROTHGAR JOHN HABAKKUK (1915--2002), Vice-Chancellor 1973--7, Principal of Jesus College 1967--84 and Honorary Fellow 1984-- 2002, Chichele Professor of Economic History and Fellow of All Souls College 1950--67, and Distinguished Fellow 1988--2001, Honorary Fellow 2001--2, will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 8 February, in the University Church of St Mary the Virgin. After the service, tea will be served in Jesus College.


Magdalen College

A Memorial Service for DIRK TER HAAR (1919–2002), Lecturer in Theoretical Physics 1956–9, Reader 1959–86, Fellow and Tutor in Physics 1959–86, Emeritus Fellow 1986–2002, will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 1 February, in the college chapel. Tea will be served in the hall after the service.


NOTICE

St Edmund Hall

Philip Geddes Memorial Prizes 2003

The Philip Geddes Memorial Prizes are intended to encourage undergraduates who want to pursue a career in journalism by providing them with funds to be used in furtherance of their journalistic education and training. The Prizes were founded in memory of Philip Geddes, journalist and former member of St Edmund Hall, who was killed in the IRA bombing at Harrods in 1983. In 2003, St Edmund Hall intends to award a prize to the value of £1,000. Entries are therefore invited from members of the University who will, at the end of Trinity Term 2003, have completed their second year, and who have involved themselves in journalism (including radio and television) in the University and elsewhere. Candidates are required to submit four copies of the following: (i) examples of journalistic work completed during their period at the University, and (ii) a description of the journalistic project on which the candidate proposed to spend the award. The Prize will be judged by two practising journalists, one fellow of St Edmund Hall and one other senior member of the University. Candidates should ask their tutor to write separately to Professor Richard Crampton at St Edmund Hall, certifying that the candidate's journalism has not interfered with academic work. They should also note that awards are made on condition that the successful candidates later submit a report (approximately 3,000 words), detailing the use to which their prize-money has been put. Entries should reach Professor Richard Crampton at St Edmund Hall by midday on Wednesday of fourth week of Hilary Term. Envelopes should be clearly marked `The Philip Geddes Awards'. Sports entries should also include the word `Sport'.

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Cafe Zouk

Mughal Indian cuisine. 1st floor, 135 High Street, Oxford. Food individually blended, with a distinctive range of unique dishes. No artificial ingredients in the food. Restful backdrop to high-quality food and service. Tel.: 01865 251600. Open: daily 12 p.m.–2.30 p.m, and 6 p.m.–11.30 p.m. Website: http://www.cafezouk.co.uk.


Pemberley International Study Centre

Situated 4,000 ft above sea-level in the magnificent hills of Haputale in Sri Lanka, in a tea plantation with panoramic views, the Centre provides an atmosphere of tranquillity and peace, a congenial milieu for scholars of all disciplines, writers and artists, in which research projects can be initiated or completed, and books or monographs planned and written. For 3 months in each year (June–Aug.) it is open to Residential Scholars who have been chosen on the basis of the merit of their applications by a Selection Committee of international experts in the field. For details and application forms, see the 8 pp. in colour on Pemberley's Web site: http://www.pemberleyhouse.com.


Art Exhibition

Elaine Brown paintings Mon., 20 Jan.,–Fri., 7 Feb. Wolfson College, Linton Road, Oxford OX2 6UD. Open daily 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Subject to college commitments. Visitors are advised to ring the lodge (01865) 274100 beforehand.


Oxford Peace Studies Circle

The Roots of Conflict in Contemporary Indonesia: Dr Peter Carey, Wed., 22 Jan. 7.45 p.m. at 43 St Giles, Oxford. Tel.: 01865 557373. Free Admission.


Modern Art Oxford

David Goldblatt Fifty-one years: 1 Feb.,–30 March 2003. A retrospective exhibition of outstanding photographs that document the social and political landscape of South Africa since 1948. Modern Art Oxford is the only UK venue for this touring exhibition. Tel.: 01865 722733. Recorded information: 01865 813830. Web site: www.modernartoxford.org.uk. Free admission. Open: Tues.–Sat., 10 a.m.–5 p.m., and Sun. 12–5 p.m.


Concert

Musica Mirabilis: The Spacious Firmament. Sun., 19 Jan., St Barnabas Church, Jericho, 3.30 p.m. Arias by Handel, Vivaldi and Haydn; Cantata No 84, Ich bin vergnugt and Trio Sonata in F, J.S. Bach; Ciacona in F minor, Johann Pachelbel; Megan Hooper, soprano; Jane Downer, baroque oboe and recorder; Andrea Morris, baroque violin; Judith Dallosso, baroque cello and Kah Ming Ng, harpsichord. Tickets £9 or £6 for children, students or unemployed. Available on the door or for advanced bookings ring 01993 891313. Parking in St Barnabas First School, Hart St, off Great Clarendon St.


Oxford Brookes University

Centre for Family and Household Research Spring seminar series: 23 Jan., Elisabeth Silva (Open University), Researching Technologies and Intimacies in Family Life (Gibbs Building, room G4.01); 27 Feb., Rosalind Edwards (South Bank University), Families and social capital (Research Centre, room SG05); 26 March, Floya Anthias (Oxford Brookes), Where do I belong? Narrating identity among young British Cypriots (Research Centre, room SG05). All seminars will begin at 5.30. Open seminars–all welcome. For further information contact: Sara Ryan. E-mail: fam@brookes.ac.uk.


Conference

Centre for Jewish-Christian Relations, Cambridge: 7–9 Sept. Call for papers: stories and tales are fundamental to the encounter between Jews and Christians. This conference will consider the place of story and storytelling in the Jewish and Christian traditions, and it simpact upon their encounter. We invite proposals for papers on any aspect relating to tale or storytelling, stories, and storytellers in Jewish-Christian relations past or present. Possible themes could include: Biblical interpretation; biography; children's literature; gender; liturgy; memory; myth; propaganda; 'race'; tradition; (mis)translation; visual storytelling. This list is intened to be suggestive rather than exhaustive. We invite original and innovative contribtuions from those working the disciplines of art history, history, literature, cinema studies, cultural studies, sociology, politics, and psychology, as well as those drawing on biblical, theological and religious studies. Interdisciplinary papers are also very welcome. Deadline for proposals: 28 Feb. Proposals for 20 minute papers should be no more than 1 page in length. Please submit your proposal to: Ms Tunde Formadi, Centre for Jewish-Christian Relations, Wesley House, Jesus Lane, Cambridge CB5 8 BJ, to whome general enquiries about the conference may also be addressed. E-mail proposals may be sent to: m.wright@cjcr.cam.ac.uk.


Oxford University Newcomers' Club

The Club welcomes the wives and partners of visiting scholars, graduate students, and members of the University who are new to Oxford. It aims to offer help, advice, information, andthe opportunity to meet each other socially. Informal coffee mornings are held at 13, Norham Gardens every Wed., 10.30–12 noon. Other activities in the club room include the Craft Group, Book Group, and informal Conversation Group. Newcomers with children (0--4 years) meet every Fri. in term, 10.15 a.m.--12 noon. We organise tours of colleges and museums, visits to places of interest, country walks, and outings to gardens and antique shops. Secondhand items can be bought on Wed. mornings from the basement. Visit our Web site on www.ox.ac.uk/staff.


Oxford University Research Staff Society

The Research Staff Society (RSS) membership consists of Post- doctoral/Junior Research Fellows and Research Assistants who work for the University of Oxford. As most Research Staff are not attached to a college and may be new to Oxford our social events provide a unique opportunity to meet researchers outside your group or department. We aim to provide an interesting and varying social setting in which to mix and to become a voice for research staff within the University. We run social events each month to suit all tastes. Please visit our Web site http://users.ox.ac.uk/~rss/, which provides information on how to join the society as well as details on events which we will be running in the near future. We hope you will decide to join us and very much look forward to meeting you at one of our events this year.


Society for Graduates

Meetings are held on Fri., at 8 p.m. in Wadham College, Parks Road. Visitors are welcome. Graduates of any university and of all ages are eligible for membership (undergraduates welcome). 24 Jan.,: Problems of Portraiture: an artist's view, Helen Ganly; 31 Jan.,: The badgers of Wytham Woods, Drs Chris Newman and Christina Buesching; 7 Feb.,: Homeopathy–Past, Present and Future, Dr Karima Brooke; 14 Feb.,: Print and Pomegranates–A history of Oxford University Press, Dr Martin Maw; 21 Feb..: 75 years of the Oxford Preservation Trust, Debbie Dance; 28 Feb.,: Manned Missions to Mars–closer than you think?!, Emily C. MacDonald; 7 Mar.,: Mind your language–international English for the 21st Century, Alison Haills; 14 Mar.,: RAF Falcons Parachute Display team, RAF Weston on the Green. Subscriptions: £5 per term, members; £1.50 per meeting, visitors.


Periodicals Bought and Sold

Back-issues of scholarly periodicals and journals bought and sold. Graham Jeffrey, Periodicals (est. 1967), 29 Cuddesdon Road, Horspath, Oxford, OX33 1JD. Tel.: 01865 872528, fax: 776398. E-mail: gjeffreysatu@aol.com.


Free to collector

Back numbers of 'Oxford' (formerly the Oxford Society magazine), 45 issues from Dec., 1974–Nov., 2000. For further information and to arrange collection please tel.: 01732 (Sevenoaks) 452644 (Mr Leonard Taylor).


Antiques Bought and Sold

Antiques and decorative objects bought and sold: desks and library furniture always wanted, also garden stonework. Please call: Greenway Antiques, 90 Corn Street, Witney, Oxon. Open Mon.,–Fri., 9.30 a.m.–5 p.m., Sat., 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Tel.: 01993 705026, mobile: 07831 585014.


Restoration and Conservation of Antique Furniture

John Hulme undertakes all aspects of restoration: 30 years experience; collection and delivery. For free advice, telephone or write to: The Workshop, 11A High Street, Chipping Norton, Oxon. OX7 5AD. Tel.: 01608 641692.


Services Offered

Painting, carpentry, building and design: small and medium sized projects undertaken, from shelving through kitchens to home extensions; decorating, internal and external; planning applications. Free advcie, quotations and references. Tel.: Ian on 01865 308188 or 07773 712829.

Big or small, we ship it all, plus free pick up anywhere in Oxford. Also 24-hour photocopying, private mailing addresses (24-hour access, and mail forwarding world-wide), binding, fax bureau, colour photocopying, mailing services, and much more. Contact or visit Mail Boxes Etc., 266 Banbury Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 514655, fax: 514656, e-mail: summertown@020.mbe.uk.com, also at: 94 London Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 741729, fax: 01865 742431, e-mail: staff@mbeheadington.co.uk.

Town and Country Trees: arboricultural contractors; modern arboricultural techniques; local authority approved; safeguarded by full Public Liability insurance. Free advice and quotations. Tel.: 0845 458 2980 or 07976 261850 (mobile).


Domestic Services

Room and board (in north Oxford) plus some remunerations for someone to look after household with 14-year-old boy and his 19-year-old brother (both responsible good kids–out at school all day) from mid-Jan., to end of March while parents are away. Would suit mature postgraduate (or equivalent) or couple who enjoy young people. Contact Dr Martin on 01865 559061 or e-mail: djlm@aol.com.

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: 01865 726983 or 01235 555533.


Tuition Offered

Piano lessons: experienced teacher; adults and children; all grades. Beginners welcome. contact Miss P. Read BA (Hons) L.R.A.M., near Kidlington. Tel.: 01865 331147


Tuition Wanted

Italian lady needs lessons in Mandarin Chinese: grammar, reading, writing, basic conversation; texts, Colloquial Chinese (T'ung and Pollard), and Practical Chinese Reader nos. 1 and 2. Please call Mrs Palau on 00 39 328 4240910, e-mail: vestacat@libero.it.


Situations Vacant

Weekend cook: part-time cook wanted for Saturdays and Sundays to cook meals for a religious community and university students. Will be cooking for up to 30 people. Hours: 10 a.m.–3 p.m. each day. Hourly rate: £6 per hour. Must have basic Food & Hygiene Certificate. Experience essential. For application form preferably tel.: 01865 243694 or write to The Guardian/or The Bursar, Greyfriars, 182 Iffley Road, Oxford OX4 1SB.

Wycliffe Hall Oxford: a thriving and friendly Permanent Private Hall of the University of Oxford, and an evangelical theological college of the Church of England. (1) Fund-raising Manager (35 hrs p.w.). This role will involve the management of Wycliffe Hall's growing fund-raising operations, to resource its exciting development plans. An important aspect of this will be the development and maintenance of relationships with former members. Successful experience of fund-raising operations will be a significant advantage; (ii) Fund-raising Assistant (17 hrs p.w.). To provide support for the Manager in the task of raising funds to resource the college's development plans. This position will require financial, administrative, and IT skills. A key part of the role will be to administer and maintain a database system to keep track of old members, donors and donations. The position may be combined with that of Finance Assistant to make a full-time post. (iii) Finance Assistant (14–17 hrs p.w.).The person appointed will assist the Bursar with basic but important accounting tasks and other tasks as required in the financial management of the college. The position may be combined with that of Fund-raising Assistant to make a full-time post. Closing date for applications is 31 Jan. Further details from: The College Administrator, Wycliffe Hall, 54 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PW. E-mail: helen.mitchell@wycliffe.ox.ac.uk.

St Clare's Oxford: required as soon as possible a well qualified teacher of Norwegian to prepare students for the International Baccalaureate. Applicants should be native speakers who are able to teach literature to students in their mother tongue for 1.5–2 hours p.w. For full details please contact Mrs C. Gospel, Head of Languages, as soon as possible. Tel.: 01865 517333. Fax: 01865 310002. E-mail: catherine.gospel@stclares.ac.uk.

Washington International Studies Council:Administrator, some experience, to manage office of U.S. overseas study programme. Should have ability to meet deadlines, to follow through, to supervise staff, to deal with student problems (esp. housing). Age around 30 with some knowledge of Oxford University preferred (not required). Salary £25k–£30k, depending. Four weeks paid vacation, good prospects for an able self-starter. Smokers welcome. Please mail C.V. to: Dr Richardson, Fl.8, Tennyson Lodge, Paradise Square, Oxford OX1 4UD.

Playground Supervisor, Christ Church Cathedral School (www.cccs.org.uk): required no later than April, to work about 15 hours per week mostly with 4–7 years at this family-based school in historic surroundings. Further details from the Headmaster, Christ Church Cathedral School, 3 Brewer Street, Oxford OX1 1QW, to whom applications with C.V. should be sent by 24 Jan. Tel.: 01865 769744.


Houses to Let

Temple Cowley: newly renovated house to let, 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, completely refurbished throughout, quiet location. £775 p.c.m. Tel.: 01865 711415.

Furnished 5-bedroom, 3 bathroom house over 3 floors in a wing of a Victorian Manor house in a very quiet village. Two reception rooms, large kitchen, chapel incorporating dining room and family room, completely modernized to a high standard, wonderful character. Large garden, parking, garage. Available Feb. £2,500 p.m. Tel.: 044 (0)1993 702325 or e-mail: cmcgachen@aol.com.

Temple Cowley: newly renovated house to let; 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, fully refurbished throughout. £775 p.c.m. Tel.: 01865 711415.

North Oxford , Banbury Road, OX2 7RG: fully-furnished, spacious 4-bedroom semi-detached house; newly modernised and decorated; very good condition; large luxury fitted kitchen and dining room; living room; children's playroom; bathroom; 2 toilets; front and good-size back garden; d.g., gas c.h.; washing machine and drier; dishwasher; piano. Off-road parking. Within excellent schools catchment area, frequent bus services, 10 minutes' walk to Summertown, local banks and shops. Available from end March for 1 year. £1,250 plus bills and council tax. Non-smoking professional families by reference. No pets. Tel.: 01865 559490 (eves.), 01865 274576 (day) or e-mail: roger.goodman@sant.ox.ac.uk.

Iffley: lovely 2/3-bedroom house with garden, quiet cul-de-sac, off- street parking, internet, fully furnished, all conveniences. Available March–June. £900 p.m. incl., all bills except tel. Daniel 01865 451674 or e-mail: d.nettle@open.ac.uk.

Cosy 2-bedroom terrace cottage in Old Marston to let. Around £800 p.c.m. Tel.: 01785 851161 or mobile: 07903 244821.

Hilary Term Short Let: a comfortable 4-bedroom semi-detached traditional family home in Marston; sitting room, large fully-equipped kitchen, 3 double bedrooms, 1 single bedroom, bathroom with separate shower cubicle. Garden and off-road parking. Available from 10 Jan.,–31 March. £1,200 p.c.m. (inc. Council Tax). For more information please contact Anna Turner at Finders Keepers, 27 St Clements, Oxford OX1 4AB. Tel.: 01865 200012, e-mail: annat@finders.co.uk, or visit our Web site: www.finders.co.uk.

Superb, modern, architect-designed house in residential North Oxford. Easy access to city centre (several bus routes, or walk along road or canal). Easily looked- after garden, has feeling of being out in the country. Very large kitchen/dining room; large living room upstairs, to take advantage of view over large green open space. Modern furniture, fully equipped. Central heating. Available Apr.–Aug. Non-smokers and no children preferred. E-mail: l.lyons1@physics.ox.ac.uk, or message to: Dr L. L. Lyons at Jesus College, Oxford OX1 3DW.

An Englishman's home is his castle---so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or e-mail us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: 01865 764533, fax: 764777, e-mail: info@qbman.co.uk.


Flats to Let

Bardwell Road, central north Oxford–£1,250 p.c.m. Spacious 2-bedroom ground and lower-ground floor apartment forming part of a large period building. Unfurnished (furnished by negotiation). Available now; Victoria Gate, Summertown–£1,100 p.c.m. Top floor modern 2-bedroom apartment with balcony and parking space, situated close to Summertown shops. Furnished. Contact Sarah James, Lettings Manager, Lifestyle Lettings & Property Management, tel.: 01865 554577, fax: 01865 554578, e-mail: sarah@lifestyle-lettings.co.uk.

Islip: spacious top-floor apartment in beautiful old 17th-century house in this quiet riverside village, 6 miles from Oxford and well-connected by trains and buses. Recently redecorated with large living room, double bedroom, kitchen and bathroom, all with magnificent views over surrounding countryside. Own off-street parking. Available Feb. Rent £650 p.c.m. Tel.: 01865 373794.

Central North Oxford: spacious 1-bedroom apartment in large Victorian house, 2 minutes' from Jericho and Port Meadow. Large living-room, kitchen/breakfast room, hall/study (with separate Internet line), bathroom (with power shower), and double bedroom. All rooms with high ceilings and large windows overlooking secluded leafy garden. Own off-street parking. Perfect for visiting academic or professional couple (non-smokers). Available June 2003. Tel.: 01865 429377. E-mail: mcsharry@robots.ox.ac.uk. More details: www.maths.ox.ac.uk/~mcsharry/house/.

Superb new flat in quiet cul-de-sac 10 minutes from city centre, 5 minutes walk to Brookes: 1 large bedsitting, studio room with roof garden terrace. Beautiful views. Well-equipped kitchen (washing machine, dishwasher etc); shower/toilet. Victorian spiral staircase from second balcony to large garden. Suit 1 or 2 professionals. £800 p.c.m. Vacant Jan. Tel.: 01865 247150 to view or for Web site address.

North Oxford , Summertown: spacious, comfortable, cheerful flat with character in convenient quiet position; 2 bedrooms, 2 reception, 2 bathrooms. Mod. cons. Off-street parking. £800 p.c.m. Tel.: 01736 786249.

Central north Oxford: 10 minutes' walk from city centre, all main university buildings and parks, and very close to the river. Available now for short/long let. Completely newly refurbished ground-floor flat to very high standard, new bathroom, new John Lewis kitchen with washer, dishwasher, dryer, etc., in extremely quiet, civilised, large Victorian house in this exclusive, leafy residential suburb, with large, light airy rooms. Double bedroom, single bedroom, drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom. Available Dec., a second-floor flat for short/long let with large double bedroom, large drawing room, kitchen, bathroom. Off-street parking, large secluded garden. Tel./fax: 01865 552400.

From now till late April, part of academic's lovely, luxurious Victorian house while owner away on sabbatical. Available as 1-bedroom, bathroom, double living room, conservatory, kitchen/diner, gardens and off-street parking. Sought after location south of Summertown. Suit visiting academic (1 or couple) for all or part of the period. Tel.: 0131 447 9880.


Serviced Accommodation

Finally! the luxurious and economical alternative to 5-star luxury hotels, in central Oxford. Ambassador's Oxford offers clients short-stay 2-bedroom, 2 bathroom–1 en suite–5-star apartments in the centre of Oxford with allocated parking. Only 3 minutes' walk from the railway station and the Saïd Business School. Furnished to a very high standard to include well-equipped kitchen and lounge, computer, printer, internet access, and weekly Maid Service. From less than £100 per apartment per night, to accommodate up to 4/5 guests. Contact: www.ambassadorsoxford.co.uk, or tel.: 07876 203378.


Accommodation Offered

Available by the week for visitors to Oxford: self-contained, fully-furnished studio flat, centrally located in Kingston Road. En suite shower, toilet and washbasin, and fully-equipped kitchen area. Sleeps 2. £300 p.w. all inc. British Tourist Board approved 3 Stars. For further information tel.: 01865 516913 or visit: http://www.oxfordcity.co.uk/accom/studioflat.

Room to let in charming cottage in Eynsham, 1 minutes walk from frequent bus service into Oxford, shops and pub: attic room with large window, very light and airy. Suit female non-smoker. Price £230 p.c.m. plus bills. Tel.: 07776 015964.

Large room to let in Summertown (Lonsdale Road), North Oxford: own telephone line; limited use of kitchen; quiet non-smoking house. £320 p.c.m. (includes bills). Contact Peter 01865 510010.

Self-contained split-level comfortable room with all mod cons in old family house in pretty location in Upper Wolvercote, highly convenient for University and Oxford City. En suite shower/loo, kitchen/dining area with washing machine; bedroom area in gallery at top of stairs. Parking and/or bus ride 15 minutes to city centre. Suit academic/other professional. Available Feb., 2003. £625 p.c.m. excl. telephone. References required. E-mail: wrldco@aol.com.

Single rooms available in centrally placed street of unique coloured houses within easy walk of university departments. Short or long stays in comfortable small Victorian house. Bed-and-breakfast, access to microwave, use of kettle, and all bills included. £95 p.w. Non-smokers. Foreign academics especially welcome. Owner has lived abroad for some years. Tel. and fax: 01865 516142.

Paying guests, visiting academics, welcomed for short or long stays in the comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple, in exclusive, quiet, leafy central north Oxford, within walking distance of all main university buildings, town centre, parks, river, good shops, and restaurants. All rooms have colour TV, tea-/coffee-making facilities, microwave, and refrigerator and/or deep-freeze availability, c.h., and independent heating. Breakfast included in the very moderate terms. Tel./fax: 01865 557879.


Accommodation Sought

Oxford senior research fellow, male, 40s, fairly housetrained, requires room/s (weekdays mainly) in Oxford (north or central preferred), Jan.,–July. Please contact Ian Harris on 015242 62456 or e-mail: ianc.harris@st-hughs.ox.ac.uk.

One-bedroom flat wanted for trainee teacher, until 30 June. Preferably with washing machine, for no more than £600 p.m. Phone: 07952 119646, or e-mail: hadriancoulton@yahoo.com.

Academic family (visiting fellows from Germany with 2 children) seek 2- or 3-bedroom flat/house to rent short term from 25 Apr.,–20 July. Oxford or South Oxfordshire. Contact Prof. M. Havenith-Newen: martina.havenith@ruhr-uni-bochum.de, or Dr A. Newen on 0049 4221 9160 222.

Responsible, tidy, non-smoking female academic seeks to rent self- contained, furnished or unfurnished accommodation, preferably in East Oxford area though other locations with good access to public transport will be considered. Preference for light, airy, peaceful surroundings. Contact: 01865 483914 (work), or 07729 350555, e-mail: lford@brookes.ac.uk.

American professor and wife, retired, desire furnished house or flat in North Oxford for annual visit. Time is flexible: 4–8 weeks in May, June, July, or Aug. Local references available. Tel.: 001 530 756 5415 (reverse charges) or e-mail to: jermurphy@ucdavis.edu. Fax 001 530 756 0227. James J. Murphy, Dept. of English, University of California, Davis CA 95616.

Furnished flat urgently required by Italian lady. Minimum 2 bedrooms, reasonable walking distance to High Street, colleges. From last week Jan.,–first week March. Bright rooms, all comforts, possibly cleaning lady. No budget. Mrs Palau. Tel.: 0039 328 4240910. Fax: 0039010 2461494. E-mail: vestacat@libero.it.

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us: 01865 764533, fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk. Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.

College & County, a new letting agency, require high quality properties for clients within the academic world in Oxford. Please contact Mark on 01865 722277 or call in at the office at 116b Cowley Road.


Accommodation sought to rent or exchange

Oxford/Cambridge. Moving from Cambridge to Oxford. Looking for 2- bedroom house or flat in central Oxford to rent, or exchange with 2-bedroom Victorian terrace house in Gwydir Street, central Cambridge (excellent location, nice garden, near railway station and town centre). Moving in mid- Feb. for 2/3 years, but start/end dates could be flexible within that period. Gary Snapper. E-mail: gabrielsnapper@ntworld.com; tel.: 01223 503272.


Holiday Lets

Crete. A traditional Cretan house in old town Rethimno, superbly renovated to provide space and comfort in beautifully furnished surroundings. Elevated, vine- covered, sitting area with brick barbecue—perfect for alfresco dining. It is in a quiet area, and close to long, sandy beach, taverns, shops, and the many interesting sights in and around this historic area. Sleeps 4 (1 double, 1 twin). Available all year round. All linen, electricity and cleaning inc. 2002 rates on request. Tel./fax: Nikolaos Glinias, 0030 831 56525, e-mail: nglynias@ret.forthnet.gr.

Normandy: charming half-timbered cottage in the Normandy countryside. Sleeps 7 (4 bedrooms). Comfortable and fully equipped (incl. for children; also a downstairs double bedroom suitable for the elderly); an excellent base for exploring the Pays d'Auge region and only 30 minutes from sandy beaches. Available all year round. £250–£600 p.w. Tel., or fax Impey, 0033 231 32 87 92.

Flat to let on the Estoril coast in Portugal: lovely, large, fully furnished Duplex; 3 bedrooms, 2 living rooms, with garden and barbecue. All mod. cons. TV with Cable. Close to delightful beaches similar to the Cote d'Azur. Twenty minutes by car to Lisbon, 30 minutes to the Sintra-Cascais Natural Park. £250 p.w. until Easter. Tel.: 01865 769328, e-mail: julian@jdgross.fsworld.co.uk.

Explore the real Mallorca: 3-bedroom flat (2 double, 1 single), 2 minutes walk from Paseo Maritimo in Palma de Mallorca available from 1 Apr., for 250 euros p.w. or 800 euros p.m. Further details from e-mail: lhochma@retemail.es. Umbria–near Perugia, easy reach of Assisi, Lake Trasimene, Orvieto. Restored farmhouse, own private valley, large swimming pool: 2 spacious flats sleeping 4 and 2, or can be combineds. £220–£710 p.w. depending on number of beds and season. For further details phone or fax 01865 390581.

Tuscany: family-owned wine estate, producing highly recognised wines, olive oil and cheese; offers ancient farmhouse and apartments accommodation 2 up to 12+. Secluded rural setting, half-hour central Florence. Contact: tel/fax: (0039) 055 824 9120, e-mail: sulpoggio@bcc.tin.it.

Two farmhouse with pools to let in SW France; both stunningly situated, these sunny and luxurious properties reside in private and spacious grounds and offer good views; sleep 10 (4 in independent `granny' house) and 6 respectively. Suitable for superb holidays or longer stays. Further details on: www.hidden-sw-france.com, or contact Marion on 00 33 5 63 24 08 78/00 33 5 63 02 11 98, or e-mail: emailenquirie@hidden-sw- france.com.

Really lovely location in the Upper Tamar Valley on the borders of Devon and Cornwall. Large, comfortable 17th-c., listed farmhouse with 6 double bedrooms, 3 bath/shower rooms, 2 sitting room, and large farmhouse kitchen. Also available is a recently converted barn with 2 double bedrooms (1 with a 4-poster bed), 2 bath/shower rooms, large open-plan living/dining room/kitchen. Very nicely furnished. Both are stocked with books and games as well as TV and video. Outdoor heated swimming pool, games room (table tennis, pool, bar billiards, darts). Not far from Eden Project, Dartmoor, and Bodmin Moor. Half an hour from coast. Easily accessible from A30 though set in totally secluded peaceful countryside. Privately owned. Contact Michele or Jeremy Smith on 01865 310998 or e-mail: smithatpalla@yahoo.co.uk for more details or look at our Web site: www.pallastreet.co.uk.

South West France, 18th-c., farmhouse near Duras; quiet, lovely views set amidst vineyards and woods. Bicycles, excellent walking, beautiful 15m pool, non- chlorinated, 2 terraces, sleeps 6. Well-equipped, large barn with pingpong etc. Available now until 12 July, and from 30 Aug. Autumn generally warm, and good for swimming. Very reasonable rates from Oct., and for longer lets.Tel.: 01865 553685, e-mail: ewtoucan@globalnet.co.uk.

Andalusia: chaplain's house in beatufiful mountain village. Sleeps 6. Immaculate and newly furnished, spacious with large roof terrace overlooking orange groves and hills. Dishwasher, washing machine. Sea 25 minutes, Granada 20 minutes, Sierra Nevada peaks 40 minutes. July, Aug., and Easter £380 p.w., otherwise £260 p.w.–both incl. linen and cleaner. More information from Annette Mountford, 01865 515778 or e-mail: brian.mountford@oriel.oxford.ac.uk.

Appointments

RUPERT MURDOCH PROFESSORSHIP OF LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION

Applications are invited for the above post, tenable from October 2003, or such later date as may be arranged. The professor will be a scholar of international distinction who will provide academic leadership over a wide area of English Language and Communication. The successful candidate will play a full and active role in the development and delivery of the English Faculty's aims and objectives, especially the encouragement and support of such fields as the history of the English Language and the use of language in the media.

A non-stipendiary fellowship at Worcester College is attached to the professorship.

Further particulars, including details of how to apply, are available from http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/ or from the Registrar, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: Oxford (2)70200). The closing date for applications is 10 March.


PROFESSORSHIP OF EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS

Applications are invited for the above post, tenable from 1 October 2003, or such later date as may be arranged. A non-stipendiary fellowship at Balliol College is attached to the professorship. The post will be in the Sub-department of Particle Physics, within the Department of Physics.

The professor will be required to deliver lectures and give instruction in physics, and to undertake original work and the general supervision of research and advanced work in his/her subject. The successful candidate will have an international reputation in scholarship and research, and will be expected to contribute, through personal research endeavour and through leadership, to maintaining a programme of research and teaching at the highest level in experimental particle physics at Oxford, and to exercise leadership in the subject in the UK. The Sub-department of Particle Physics has a wide research programme covering experiments at accelerators and in particle astrophysics. This includes preparations for the ATLAS, LHCb, and MINOS experiments. CDF is taking data at the Tevatron, ZEUS is running with an upgraded detector at HERA II, and analysis of DELPHI data is being completed. The sub-department is engaged in RandD for a neutrino factory, including the HARP experiment to measure hadron production rates and the MICE experiment to demonstrate muon cooling. It is also participating in the LCFI collaboration to develop new CCDs for a vertex detector for the next linear collider, as well as schemes for collider beam alignment. The SNO solar neutrino detector is taking data and results of the first phase have recently been announced. The CRESST collaboration is preparing its second phase search for dark matter.

The sub-department is engaged in all aspects of particle physics projects, from design through to final physics analysis. An important part of its programme consists of major responsibilities in hardware development carried out with the help of its excellent support staff in computing, electronics and mechanical design and construction.

Further particulars, including details of how to apply, are available from http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/ or from the Registrar, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: Oxford (2)70200). The closing date for applications is 17 March.


PROFESSORSHIP OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

Applications are invited for the above post in the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, tenable from 1 October 2003, or such later date as may be arranged. The successful candidate will have demonstrated a capacity or potential for senior academic leadership in the area of molecular biology as applied to human disease, will hold an impressive publication record, will have the ability to raise extensive research grant income, and be committed to the organisation and delivery of undergraduate and postgraduate teaching. The research area of the chair is complemented by strong representation in other parts of the University not only in molecular biology and molecular medicine but also in genetics and genomics.

A non-stipendiary fellowship at Lincoln College is attached to the professorship.

Further particulars, including details of how to apply, are available from http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/ or from the Registrar, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: Oxford (2)70013). Informal enquiries about the post should be directed to Professor H. Waldmann (telephone: Oxford (2)75503) or e-mail: gillian.helstrom@ path.ox.ac.uk. The closing date for applications is 3 March.


FACULTY OF MODERN HISTORY (DEPARTMENT OF THE HISTORY OF ART)

University Lecturership in the History of Art

Applications are being invited for the above post, tenable from 1 October 2003. University salary will be according to age, on the scale £22,191-- £35,845 per annum. The successful candidate may be associated with an Official Studentship (Tutorial Fellowship) in History of Art at Christ Church, in which case the combined university and college salary would be according to age on a scale up to £42,900 per annum. Additional college allowances would also be available.

The person appointed will offer specialisation(s) in either Renaissance or the period from 1800 onwards. The successful candidate will be required to develop and teach courses (through lectures, classes, and tutorials) for the new undergraduate degree of History of Art (first intake October 2004), as well as teaching/supervising graduates on taught courses and D.Phil. research programmes.

Further particulars, including details of the duties and full range of emoluments and allowances attaching to the post, may be obtained from the Administrator, Modern History Faculty, Broad Street, Oxford OX1 3BD (telephone: Oxford (2)77253, e-mail: administrator@history.ox.ac.uk (from 2 January), or immediately from the Web sites http://www.history.ox.ac.uk/fa culty/staff/ulhistart.htm and http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/.

Applicants should send ten copies of their application (except for overseas candidates, who need send only one) to the Chairman of the Modern History Faculty Board at the above address by Tuesday, 28 January. Candidates are asked to arrange for three references to be sent to the Chairman at the above address by the closing date.


MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES DIVISION (DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS)

University Lecturership in High-Intensity Light--Matter interactions

In association with Merton College

The Department of Physics proposes to appoint to a University Lecturership in the Sub-department of Atomic and Laser Physics, to be held in conjunction with a Tutorial Fellowship at Merton College. The combined university and college salary will be according to age on a scale that currently peaks at £42,900 per annum, in addition to which the college pays a number of allowances as described in the further particulars.

Preference will be given to experimentalists with recognised expertise in light- -matter interactions in the strong-field and ultra-fast regimes, including attosecond pulse generation, laser plasmas, and ultrafast X-ray diffraction. He or she will be expected to lead an internationally excellent research effort and be an effective teacher at both the undergraduate and postgraduate levels. It is expected that the successful candidate will interact closely with existing experimental programmes. See http://www2.physics.ox.ac.uk/AL/a tomlaser.html for current research in the department.

Further particulars are available from Professor Ian Walmsley, Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (telephone: Oxford (2)72205, fax: (2)72375, e-mail: walmsley@physics.ox.ac.uk). The application procedure is described therein. Applications should be submitted by Saturday, 29 March.

The University and Merton College are equal opportunities employers.


FACULTY OF PHILOSOPHY

University Lecturership in Philosophy

In association with Mansfield College

The Faculty of Philosophy and Mansfield College propose to appoint a University Lecturer in Philosophy, associated with a fellowship at Mansfield College, with effect from 1 October 2003. For the faculty, the lecturer will be expected to give thirty-six hours of lectures or classes per year, and to take special responsibility for teaching the history of early modern philosophy. For the college, he or she will be expected to give six hours of tutorials per week during term-time in the history of philosophy and in other areas of philosophy. In addition, the lecturer will be expected to supervise graduate students if requested to do so, and to participate in examining and administration for the college and the faculty.

The combined college and university stipend will be according to age on a scale up to £42,900 per annum. College allowances, and remuneration for certain university duties, are available in addition.

Further particulars may be obtained from the Administrator, Faculty of Philosophy, 10 Merton Street, Oxford OX1 4JJ (telephone: Oxford (2)76925, fax: (2)76932, e-mail: enquiries@philosophy.ox.ac.uk, Web site: http://www.philosophy.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for receipt of applications is Friday, 7 February.

The University and Mansfield College are equal opportunities employers.


DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING SCIENCE

Lecturership/Fellowship in Control Engineering

In association with Lincoln College

Applications are invited for the above fixed-term post in the Department of Engineering Science, tenable for four years from 1 October 2003 or as soon as possible thereafter. The lecturership is associated with a Tutorial Fellowship at Lincoln College. The combined university and college salary will be according to age on a scale up to £42,900 per annum.

Candidates should be able to teach a wide range of subjects (including Electrical and Control Engineering topics) within a four-year Engineering Science syllabus, and have a specialised research interest in modern control theory and its applications.

The further particulars, containing full details of the application procedure, and information on the duties and the full range of emoluments and allowances attached to both the university and college appointments, may be found at http://www.eng.ox.ac.uk/. The department's Research Summary may also be found at this Web address. Applications should be sent by 17 February to Professor R. Eatock Taylor, F.R.Eng., Department of Engineering Science, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PJ (fax: Oxford (2)83310).


DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY

Appointment of Postdoctoral Research Officer

A postdoctoral researcher is required, for up to four years, to join the TALA Research Group to support the remote sensing, GIS, and geostatistics requirements of a newly funded project to map human population distribution in Africa in relation to malaria risk. Relevant background experience will include a doctorate in remote sensing and geosciences, with evidence of considerable quantitative expertise.

The post will be on the RS1A scale (salary £22,191-- £24,121).

Further particulars are available from Sally Burton, Department of Zoology, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS (e-mail: sally.burton@zoo.ox.ac.uk). Applications should be sent to the Administrator, quoting reference AT02048.

The closing date is Friday, 31 January.


STUDENT ADMINISTRATION PROJECT (PROJECT ISIDORE)

Appointment of Process Support Officer

The University of Oxford Student Administration Project (Project ISIDORE) was recently launched with the objectives of improving the quality of information relating to students within the University through changes in process, supported by an integrated IT package. The project is now seeking to extend the team.

Applications are invited for the post of Process Support Officer for Project ISIDORE, to provide support to the elements of the project concerned with business process and change management. The post-holder will be expected to contribute towards the design and planning of process workshops and to assist in the running and documentation of these workshops. He or she will also be involved in the change management and communication work of the project, and in supporting the process design and implementation.

Excellent communication and teamwork skills, strong organisational capabilities, initiative, enthusiasm, and flexibility are required for this post. The successful candidate would be expected to demonstrate some previous experience of analysing an administrative problem, and defining, agreeing, and implementing a solution that involved other people. This is a development role, with the expectation being that the post-holder would eventually be able to take on responsibility for specified process work areas. The appointment will be for a fixed period of three years.

The post will be on the academic-related grade ALC2 (salary £21,125--£27,339).

If you feel you can meet this challenge please apply by sending a curriculum vitae with a covering letter to Ms J.M. Williams, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD, by noon on 29 January. Further particulars of the post can be obtained by telephone (Oxford (2)70128); or by e-mail (e-mail: posts@admin.ox.ac.uk, Internet: http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/).


CHRIST CHURCH

Four-year fixed-term Fellowship (Studentship) In Roman History

Christ Church hopes to appoint a fixed-term Student (i.e. Fellow) for four years from 1 October 2003, whose primary duty will be to take charge of the teaching of Ancient History in the college and to do up to nine hours per week of undergraduate teaching in the area of Roman History. The appointee will also be expected to undertake advanced study or research and will be a member of the Faculty of Classics. The salary is on a scale starting at £19,279 per annum.

Further details, including the application procedure, may be obtained from the Censors' Administrator, Christ Church, Oxford OX1 1DP, and will also be at http://www.chch.ox.ac.uk/jobs/romanhist< /a>. The closing date for applications is 7 February.


CHRIST CHURCH AND THE FACULTY OF CLASSICS

Five-year fixed-term College and Faculty Fellowship in Ancient Greek

Christ Church and the Faculty of Classics hope to appoint a fixed-term Student (i.e. Fellow) of Christ Church and Faculty Fellow in Greek Literature. The primary duty of the appointee will be to take over most of the teaching of Dr Dirk Obbink, who has extended leave from these duties for this period as a result of the award of a MacArthur Fellowship.

The appointee will be required to undertake advanced study or research as well as to teach up to six hours per week for the college and to give in the region of eighteen hours' lectures or classes per year for the Faculty of Classics. The salary is on a scale starting at £19,279 per annum.

Further details, including the application procedure, may be obtained from the Censors' Administrator, Christ Church, Oxford OX1 1DP, and will be available at http://www.chch.ac.uk/jobs/ancientgreek. The closing date for applications is 7 February.


HERTFORD COLLEGE

Five-year Fellowship in Modern Languages

Hertford College wishes to appoint a five-year Fellow in Modern Languages. The stipend will be based on band A of the national university lecturers' scale, £20,311 rising by annual increments to £26,270.

The duties of the fellow will be: (i) the organisation of the tutorial teaching arrangements for those studying languages as a single subject or as part of a joint degree with other subjects; (ii) a weekly twelve-hour teaching stint in French language and literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Further details can be found at http://www.hertford.ox.ac.uk/advert/ad 4.html, or obtained from the Principal's Secretary, Hertford College, Oxford OX1 3BW (e-mail: lihua.li@hertford.ox.ac.uk, telephone: Oxford (2)79405), to whom written applications should be sent not later than 16 February.

Hertford College is an equal opportunities employer.


KEBLE COLLEGE

Senior Tutorship and Official Fellowship

Keble College intends to elect a Senior Tutor and Official Fellow with effect from 1 September 2003. This is a major new post combining three administrative offices (Senior Tutor, Tutor for Admissions, Tutor for Graduates) that have hitherto been held by Tutorial Fellows. The appointee will have general oversight of the academic work of the college and will be responsible for advising the governing body on matters of academic policy.

The salary will be the academic-related grade 5 scale (£35,251--£45,423, depending on age and experience), with additional allowances.

Further particulars are available from the Warden's Personal Assistant, Keble College, Oxford OX1 3PG (e-mail: trish.long@keble.ox.ac.uk). Applications should reach the Warden at the same address no later than Friday, 7 February.


LINACRE COLLEGE

Junior Research Fellowships

Linacre College proposes to make elections to not more than three Junior Research Fellowships tenable for one year in the first instance from 1 October 2003 and renewable for a second year. Junior Research Fellows will receive a book allowance of £250 per annum and enjoy dining rights in college. The fellowships are open to men and women graduates of any university; there is no restriction of subject, but candidates should be intending to engage in research at postdoctoral level.

Applicants will normally be expected to have submitted for a higher research degree before taking up a Junior Research Fellowship; and to be assured of adequate funding for the duration of a Junior Research Fellowship.


EPA Cephalosporin Junior Research Fellowships

Linacre College proposes to make elections to not more than three EPA Cephalosporin Junior Research Fellowships tenable for one year in the first instance from 1 October 2003 and renewable for a second year. Junior Research Fellows will receive a book allowance of £250 per annum and enjoy dining rights in college. The fellowships are open to men and women graduates of any university, but candidates should be intending to engage in research at postdoctoral level in the fields of the medical, biological, or chemical sciences.

Applicants will normally be expected to have submitted for a higher research degree before taking up a Junior Research Fellowship; and to be assured of adequate funding for the duration of a Junior Research Fellowship. Application for either of the Junior Research Fellowships detailed above, on a form available from the Principal's Secretary or electronically
(http://www.linacre.ox.ac .uk/college/scholarships/jrfsapp.doc), should be made to the Senior Tutor, Linacre College, Oxford OX1 3JA, giving details of the applicant's academic record and proposed course of research.

Nine copies of the full application (UK applicants only) should be submitted by the closing date and applicants should request two referees to write directly to the Senior Tutor. Closing date for applications and references: 31 January.


Domus Research Studentships

Linacre College proposes to elect to not more than four Domus Studentships, tenable in the first instance for one year from 1 October 2003, with the possibility of election for a second or third year subject to satisfactory work and progress. The value of these studentships will be £250 per year. They will not normally be tenable after the students' liability for university and college fees has ended.

Holders of Domus Studentships will be given priority in the allocation of college accommodation. Candidates for these studentships will be either students who intend to begin reading for a higher degree or diploma at the University in October 2003, or current students of Linacre College in their first or second years. There is no restriction of subject.

Candidates for these awards should submit an account of their previous academic work and a brief description of their proposed topic of research to the Senior Tutor, Linacre College, Oxford OX1 3JA, before 31 January, and should ask two academic referees to write directly to the Senior Tutor about them by that date.


Mary Blaschko Graduate Scholarships

Linacre College proposes to elect to two Graduate Scholarships, of a value of £2,000 per annum, tenable for one year from 1 October 2003, with the possibility of renewal for a second year. The scholarships are open to suitably qualified students reading or intending to read for a research degree in the arts and humanities. At the time of taking up the scholarships, scholars must have been admitted as postgraduate students by a relevant faculty of the University, and must be, or become, members of Linacre College.

Applications forms may be obtained from the College Secretary, Linacre College, Oxford OX1 3JA, or at http://www.linacre.ox.ac.uk/college /scholarships/. Closing date for applications: 31 January.


Heselton Legal Research Scholarship

This scholarship, of a value of £1,000, is open to a suitably qualified student studying, or intending to study, for a research degree in an area of English Law or European Community Law. The scholar must be accepted by the University to read for a higher degree, and must be, or become, a member of Linacre College.

The scholarship, tenable from 1 October 2003, will be awarded for one year and is not renewable.

Application forms may be obtained from the College Secretary, Linacre College, Oxford OX1 3JA. Closing date for applications: 1 March.


Appointment of Development Assistant

Linacre College invites applications for a permanent part-time Development Assistant from 1 March onwards. Applicants should have excellent interpersonal and written skills, be competent in the areas of word-processing, Excel spreadsheets, and Access databases, and be well-organised and outgoing. In addition, s/he will have a good understanding of the aims of the Development Office and be able to fit into a small, friendly working environment.

The post is for twenty hours per week, 9 a.m.--1 p.m. over five mornings, and will be on the university clerical grade 3 scale (salary £12,997--£14,148, pro rata).

Further information and application forms may be obtained from Dr Anne Keene, Director of Development, Linacre College, Oxford OX1 3JA (telephone: Oxford (2)71671, e-mail: anne.keene@linacre.ox.ac.uk). Closing date for applications: Friday, 24 January.

Linacre College is an equal opportunities employer.


LINCOLN COLLEGE

Appointment of Archivist

Lincoln College is seeking to appoint an Archivist. The records of the archive reflect the history of the college, spanning five centuries, and include the original founding charter of 1427, manorial records, accounts, and deeds. More modern papers include college societies' memorabilia, photographs, and the papers of Sir Osbert Lancaster. The Archivist will be responsible for managing all aspects of the archive, including acquisitions, access, cataloguing, and storage. This includes facilitating access to the collections, answering enquiries, and promoting the archive through exhibitions, articles, and presentations as required.

The successful applicant will have an honours degree and a postgraduate qualification in archive administration and records management, together with at least two years' experience in archive work. The appointment will be for one day per week, on the senior librarian, administrative, and computer staff grade 2 scale, starting at £21,125 (pro rata).

A job description may be obtained from Mrs F.M. Piddock, Lincoln College, Oxford OX1 3DR (telephone: Oxford (2)79831, e-mail: library@lincoln.ox.ac.uk). Applicants should send a curriculum vitae and letter of application together with the names of two referees to Mrs Piddock at the above address. The closing date for the receipt of applications is 7 February.


NEW COLLEGE

One-year Stipendiary Lecturership in English

New College invites applications for a twelve-hour Stipendiary Lecturership in Old and Middle English and the History of the Language for one year from 1 October 2003. The post-holder will be required to offer twelve hours per week of tutorial teaching for New College in these areas, together with the normal range of pastoral and administrative activities. This post has been created to replace Dr Mark Griffith while he is on sabbatical leave, so there is no possibility of renewal beyond the academic year 2003--4.

The appointment will be paid on the university junior lecturer scale according to experience. The scale goes from point 1: £17,246 to point 5: £21,125. The successful candidate will also receive a research allowance of £310, a book allowance of £450, and an entertainment allowance of £140. The lecturer will be a member of the senior common room, entitled to full rights of commons during term and vacation, and will have a teaching room in college, but there is no guarantee of accommodation.

Further particulars and an application form may be obtained from the Senior Tutor, New College, Oxford OX1 3BN (telephone: Oxford (2)79596, fax: (2)79590, e-mail: tuition@new.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for receipt of applications is Friday, 14 February.


One-year College Stipendiary Lecturership in German together with a Junior Lecturership in the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages

New College and the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages invite applications for a ten-hour College Stipendiary Lecturership in German, together with a Junior Lecturership in the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages for one year from 1 October 2003. The post-holder will be required to offer ten hours' per week tutorial teaching in German language and modern German literature for New College and to give lectures and classes in the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages, plus the normal range of pastoral and administrative activities. This post has been created to replace Dr Karen Leeder while she is on special paid leave, so there is no possibility of renewal beyond the academic year 2003--4.

The appointment will be paid on the scale for junior lecturers, £18,265--£19,279 (points 1 and 2 on the scale), according to experience. The successful candidate will also receive a research allowance of £310, a book allowance of £450, and an entertainment allowance of £140. The lecturer will be a member of the senior common room, entitled to full rights of commons during term and vacation, and will have a teaching room in college, but there is no guarantee of accommodation.

Further particulars and an application form may be obtained from the Senior Tutor, New College, Oxford OX1 3BN (telephone: Oxford (2)79596, fax: (2)79590, e-mail: tuition@new.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for receipt of applications is Friday, 14 February.


One-year College Stipendiary Lecturership in Russian together with a Junior Lecturership in the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages

New College and the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages invite applications for a six-hour College Stipendiary Lecturership in Russian, together with a Junior Lecturership in the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages for one year from 1 October 2003. The post-holder will be required to offer six hours' per week language and tutorial teaching for New College in Russian and to give lectures and classes in the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages, plus the normal range of pastoral and administrative activities. This post has been created to replace Professor Catriona Kelly while she is on special paid leave, so there is no possibility of renewal beyond the academic year 2003--4.

The appointment will be paid on the scale for Junior Lecturers, £18,265-- £19,279 (points 1 and 2 on the scale), according to experience. The successful candidate will also receive a research allowance of £310, a book allowance of £450, and an entertainment allowance of £140. The lecturer will be a member of the senior common room, entitled to full rights of commons during term and vacation, and will have a teaching room in college, but there is no guarantee of accommodation.

Further particulars and an application form may be obtained from the Senior Tutor, New College, Oxford OX1 3BN (telephone: Oxford (2)79596, fax: (2)79590, e-mail: tuition@new.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for receipt of applications is Friday, 14 February.

New College is an equal opportunities employer.


ORIEL COLLEGE

Official Fellowship and Lecturership in Philosophy

Oriel College invites applications for the above post with effect from 1 October 2003. The fellowship will be held in conjunction with a titular University Lecturership, which may at a later date (but without commitment on the part of the University) be converted into a University (CUF) Lecturership.

The college has a preference for appointing, ceteris paribus, someone with research interests in philosophy of language, philosophical logic, or metaphysics and epistemology, but those specialising in other areas are encouraged to apply. The fellow will be expected to engage in advanced study and original research.

The fellow appointed will be required to teach up to twelve hours per week for the college and sixteen hours per year for the University. He or she must be competent to teach elementary logic and the history of early modern philosophy (Descartes to Kant).

The combined college and university stipend will be according to age on a scale up to £42,900 per annum. Additional college allowances are available.

Further particulars may be obtained from the Academic Registrar, Oriel College, Oxford OX1 4EW (telephone: Oxford (2)76543, fax: 791823, e-mail: registrar@oriel.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for completed applications is Friday, 12 February.


QUEEN'S COLLEGE

Appointment of Academic Administrator

Applications are invited for the post of Academic Administrator. The successful applicant will have responsibility for the general supervision of the College Office, which looks after the academic affairs of the college. The post will offer a challenging opportunity to work with a wide range of people within and without the college, to deploy high-level personal, management, and communications skills across the wide range of the college's academic affairs, and to play a part in the development of the college's academic procedures and policy-making. The successful applicant will have good experience in administration, preferably (but not essentially) in a university or educational environment. It is hoped that the successful applicant will be able to be in post by the beginning of Trinity Term 2003. The salary will be within the range £28,498-- £41,876 (ALC grade 3/4).

Further particulars may be obtained from the Provost's Secretary, Queen's College, Oxford OX1 4AW (e-mail: provost.secretary@queens.ox.ac.uk), or from the college Web site, http://www.queens.ox.ac.uk. The closing date for applications is Friday, 7 February.


ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

Appointment of Secretary to the Domestic Bursar

A part-time Secretary to the Domestic Bursar is required to provide full secretarial support to the Domestic Bursar. The successful applicant will have a good level of written and verbal communication skills, audio-typing, and familiarity with the use of the usual office IT equipment. Shorthand would be an advantage but is not essential.

The post will be for 17.5 hours per week over five days, the specific hours each day to be agreed.


Appointment of Bursary Assistant

A part-time Bursary Assistant is required to help mainly with the administration for visiting academics to St Antony's. The college is looking for an adaptable person with excellent interpersonal skills and experience of word-processing, databases, and office organisation.

The post will be for fifteen hours per week, the specific hours to be agreed. The salary for both posts will be on the university library and clerical grade 3 scale, pro rata. There are also generous benefits.

For further details contact the Bursar's Secretary, St Antony's College, Oxford OX2 6JF (telephone: Oxford (2)84722, e-mail: jennifer.cable@sant.ox.ac.uk).

Interested applicants should send a letter of application, a brief curriculum vitae, and the names and addresses of two referees, to the Bursar, St Antony's College, Oxford OX2 6JF. The closing date for applications is 31 January.


ST HUGH'S COLLEGE

Graduate Scholarships

St Hugh's College is offering up to ten scholarships for research to graduates of any nationality from October 2003, each of £2,000 per annum and for a period not extending beyond their fee-paying status. Scholarships are offered in all subjects, including named scholarships in classics, modern languages, and theology.

Each graduate scholar will be entitled to a room in St Hugh's graduate accommodation for up to two years (i.e. the duration of their fee-paying or two years, whichever is shortest) at the standard charge, and to dine periodically at the high table.

Awards to applicants not already reading for a higher degree at Oxford will be conditional on their being accepted to do so by the relevant faculty board of the University.

Awards to applicants currently reading for a higher degree at Oxford will be conditional on permission being granted by their present college for migration to St Hugh's.

Further particulars of the scholarships and of the application procedure may be obtained from the Academic Administrator, St Hugh's College, Oxford OX2 6LE (e-mail: marie.mcallister@st-hughs.ox.ac.uk), who should receive applications by Friday, 14 February.


ST PETER'S COLLEGE

Bodossaki Graduate Scholarship in Science

Applications are invited for a Graduate Scholarship established by the Bodossaki Foundation in any field of science, including mathematics, engineering, and medicine (preference will be given to immunology, oncology, and cardiovascular diseases).

Applicants should be Greek citizens under the age of thirty (thirty-five for candidates in medicine). The scholarship is tenable for a period of not more than three years from 1 October 2003. The emoluments, totalling up to £10,500 per annum, cover university and college fees and a grant for maintenance. The successful applicant will be required to read for a higher degree of the University of Oxford (for further information see the University Graduate Prospectus at: http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/gsp/).

Applicants, who should normally have obtained a first-class degree of a British university or an equivalent Greek or other overseas qualification, should write to the Master, enclosing a curriculum vitae and an outline of the research proposed, together with the names of two referees. Referees should be asked to send references direct to the Master, St Peter's College, Oxford OX1 2DL. Applications and references should arrive by 14 February. Interviews will be held in Oxford, probably during March.

Note: Candidates are advised to make early contact with the university department in which they wish to undertake research in order to identify a possible supervisor. They should confirm in their application that they have done this. Scholarship candidates who are short-listed for interview may like to arrange to visit the relevant department at the time of the interviews.


SOMERVILLE COLLEGE

Senior Scholarships 2003

Somerville College proposes to offer two Senior Scholarships from October 2003, one in the Humanities and Social Sciences, one in the Sciences.

The scholarships will be valued at £5,000 a year each for two years, with the possibility of renewal for a third. They will also carry dining rights twice a week for the duration of the scholarships, and the right to a room in Margery Fry House (the graduate accommodation block) for one year at the usual rate. Applications are open only to those already enrolled on a postgraduate course at Oxford, and who are applying in their second or fifth term in one of the subjects for which the college admits graduate students. Those already in receipt of an award from a funding body will not be debarred.

Application forms are available from the College Secretary, Somerville College, Oxford OX2 6HD (telephone: Oxford (2)70619, e-mail: scholarships@somerville.ox.ac.uk). A copy may also be downloaded from http://www.somerville.ox.ac.uk (`Admissions and Prospectus' section).

Completed application forms should be returned to the College Secretary by 1 March.


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

Donnelly Junior Research Fellowship in Ethics

University College invites applications for a Junior Research Fellowship in Ethics, tenable for a period of three years from 1 October 2003. Applications from those working in ethics as applied to law, medicine, biotechnology, or the environment are particularly encouraged, and may be preferred over others.

A stipend of £15,245 will normally be paid, though at a reduced rate if the successful candidate is in receipt of other funding. The fellow will be entitled to accommodation in college or a housing allowance (£4,062.50 per annum). S/he will receive an academic allowance of £1,254 per annum There will be opportunities for undergraduate teaching in ethics, for which separate payment will be made.

Application forms, further particulars, and information for referees may be obtained from the College Secretary, University College, Oxford OX1 4BH (e-mail: jrf@univ.ox.ac.uk), or may be downloaded from http://www.univ.ox.ac.uk.

The closing date for applications is 17 February. Six copies of the application should be sent.


MEDICAL RESEARCH COUNCIL (MRC ANATOMICAL NEUROPHARMACOLOGY UNIT, UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD)

Appointment of Research Technician/Light and Electron Microscopic Imaging/IT

Applications are invited for an MRC post (Band 4) to join a multidisciplinary team of scientists studying the central nervous system. The post-holder will be responsible for the Unit electron microscope suite, provide imaging, photography, and IT support to all members of the Unit, and research support to one aspect of the Unit's programme of research.

Experience in management of electron microscopes, IT (including imaging packages and maintenance of a Web site) and histological techniques would be an advantage. Salary range £20,625--£26,000 depending on experience.

Candidates who hold a BTEC/HNC or a degree in an appropriate field (including biology, IT, physics, engineering) should apply in writing enclosing a curriculum vitae and the names, addresses, and contact numbers of two referees to: Professor J.P. Bolam, MRC Anatomical Neuropharmacology Unit, Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3TH (telephone: Oxford (2)71898, e-mail: paul.bolam@pharmacology.ox. ac.uk), from whom further information can be obtained. Closing date: 1 February.

The Unit's Web site is at http://mrcanu.pharm.ox.ac.uk/.

The MRC is an equal opportunities employer.


UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE

Rouse Ball Professorship of English Law

The Board of Electors to the Rouse Ball Professorship of English Law invite applications for this professorship to take up appointment on 1 October 2003 or as soon as possible thereafter. The appointment will be subject to the Statutes and Ordinances of the University of Cambridge. The University of Cambridge is committed to equality of opportunity.

Further information may be obtained from the Academic Secretary, University Offices, The Old Schools, Cambridge CB2 1TT (e-mail: ibise@admin.cam.ac.uk), to whom a letter of application, marked `Confidential', including details of current and future research plans, a curriculum vitae, and a publications list should be sent, together with the names of two referees, so as to reach him not later than Friday, 28 February.

Informal enquiries can be made to Professor James Crawford SC, FBA, Lauterpacht Research Centre for International Law, 5 Cranmer Road, Cambridge CB3 9BL (telephone: 01223 335358, e-mail: JRC1000@hermes.cam.ac.uk).


Sir Patrick Sheehy Professorship of International Relations

The Board of Electors to the Sir Patrick Sheehy Professorship of International Relations invite applications for this professorship to take up appointment on 1 October 2004 or as soon as possible thereafter. The appointment will be subject to the Statutes and Ordinances of the University of Cambridge. The University of Cambridge is committed to equality of opportunity.

Further information may be obtained from the Academic Secretary, University Offices, The Old Schools, Cambridge CB2 1TT (e-mail: ibise@admin.cam.ac.uk), to whom a letter of application, marked `Confidential', including details of current and future research plans, a curriculum vitae, and a publications list should be sent, together with the names of two referees, so as to reach him not later than Friday, 28 February.

Informal enquiries about the Centre of International Studies should be addressed to Dr Geoffrey Edwards, Deputy Director, Centre of International Studies, Fitzwilliam House, 32 Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1QY (telephone: 01223 741318, fax: 741313, e-mail: afk21@cam.ac.uk).


Grosvenor Professorship of Real Estate Finance

The Board of Electors to the Grosvenor Professorship of Real Estate Finance invite applications for this professorship to take up appointment on 1 September 2003 or as soon as possible thereafter. The appointment will be subject to the Statutes and Ordinances of the University of Cambridge. The University of Cambridge is committed to equality of opportunity. Further information may be obtained from the Academic Secretary of the Faculties, University Offices, The Old Schools, Cambridge CB2 1TT (e-mail: ibise@admin.cam.ac.uk), to whom a letter of application, marked `Confidential', including details of current and future research plans, a curriculum vitae, and a publications list should be sent, together with the names of two referees, so as to reach him not later than Friday, 7 February.

Informal enquiries can be made to Dr Ian Hodge (telephone: 01223 337147, e-mail: idh3@cam.ac.uk), at the Department of Land Economy, 19 Silver Street, Cambridge CB3 9EP.


HOMERTON COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE

Junior Research Fellowships in Science and Social Sciences

Homerton College invites applications for two Junior Research Fellowships. Applications may be made in the fields of: natural sciences, mathematics, computing, and engineering, and in the social sciences. Candidates should be graduates of any university and will have completed or be about to complete a Ph.D. (or equivalent). There is no age limit for eligibility, but the college will not normally appoint Junior Research Fellows who are more than three years beyond the award of a doctorate. A Junior Research Fellowship is tenable for three years with effect from 1 October 2003.

Further details of the fellowships and of the fields of study may be obtained from the Principal's Secretary, Homerton College, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 2PH (telephone: 01223 507132, fax: 507130, e-mail: enm25@cam.ac.uk), or on the college Web site
(http://www.homerton.cam.ac.uk).

The closing date for applications is 7 February.


PETERHOUSE, CAMBRIDGE

Appointment of Senior Bursar

Applications are invited for the post of Senior Bursar with effect from no later than October 2003. The Senior Bursar is the principal financial officer of the college, with responsibility for the management of its finances and of its stock exchange and property investments. The successful candidate will work closely with a Domestic Bursar who is responsible for the day-to-day maintenance of the fabric of the college, for the employment of certain staff and for residential conferences; and with a Junior Bursar who is responsible for Cambridge residential properties; and will also be expected to work closely with the Development Director in fund-raising and related activities.

Applicants should be of outstanding ability, with established administrative and financial experience at a senior level, and with good management and communication skills. The ability to absorb and respond sympathetically to the ethos of a self-governing residential college, and to participate enthusiastically in its corporate life, will be very important. The appointment will be for three years in the first instance and thereafter with eligibility for reappointment every five years until the retirement age of sixty-seven. The Senior Bursar will be elected a fellow of the college.

Salary and other terms and conditions of the appointment will be negotiable, but the salary for a full-time Senior Bursar would be likely to be in the range of £42,000 per annum according to qualifications and experience.

Further particulars may be obtained from the College Secretary, Peterhouse, Cambridge CB2 1RD. Applications, which should be accompanied by a curriculum vitae and the names of three referees, should be submitted to the College Secretary not later than 31 January.

The college is an equal opportunities employer.


TRINITY COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE

Junior Research Fellowships 2003

Trinity College intends to hold an election of Junior Research Fellows on 6 October 2003. Two of the fellowships will be open to candidates who are not already members of the college and are working in the biological sciences or in literature. The purpose of Junior Research Fellowships is to offer men and women of exceptional calibre who are at an early stage of their academic careers an opportunity to pursue research for up to four years. The emoluments of a fellow are reviewed annually. Currently the stipend is £18,638 per year, and there are various additional benefits. Candidates must not have completed more than three-and-a-half years of full-time research by 6 October 2003.

Further particulars and application forms are available from the college Web site, at http://www.trin.cam.ac.uk/. Alternatively, hard-copy versions of the further particulars and application forms will be sent out by post on request by e-mail to ccerf@trin.cam.ac.uk or by post to the Co-ordinator of the Committee on External Research Fellowships, Trinity College, Cambridge CB2 1TQ. Completed application and supporting documents must reach the college by 1 March. No faxed or e-mailed applications will be accepted.

Diary

Institute for the Advancement of University Learning Seminars: places should be booked in advance through the IAUL (telephone: (2)86808, e-mail: services@learning.ox.ac.uk, Internet: http://www.learning.ox.ac.uk).


Friday 17 January

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Springboard, Programme 1' (fourth workshop), 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The painted garden', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Sunday 19 January

HILARY FULL TERM begins.


Monday 20 January

DR S. KITZINGER: `Visualising the foetus: cross-cultural perceptions of the unborn baby' (Fertility and Reproduction Seminars: `Reproductive technologies'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

DR J. BUCKINGHAM: `Religion, health, sexuality, and the criminality of assisted suicide in early nineteenth-century British India' (seminar series: `Ridding the Empire of leprosy: a grand undertaking and its legacy'), Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 2.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR LORD MAY: `Many scientists, many mediums, many publics: problems inherent in slogans like "Science and the media" ' (Green College Lectures: `Science and the media: the challenge of adapting science to the mass media'), Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 6 p.m.


Tuesday 21 January

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Chairing meetings', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The art of ancient Egypt', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

LORD HURD, YASMIN ALIBHAI-BROWN, and PROFESSOR SIR ADAM ROBERTS: `What are British interests now?' (seminar series: `Interests, identities, and interventions'), Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR PAUL MULDOON (Professor of Poetry): `The end of the poem: "Sea Poppies", by H.D.', Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR I. BIERMAN: `Medieval Cairo: a Mamluk city of nineteenth-century design?' (William Cohn Memorial Lecture), Headley Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean Museum, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR A. GLYN: `Globalisation and financing the welfare state' (seminar series: `Current issues in social policy'), Violet Butler Seminar Room, Department of Social Policy and Social Work, 5 p.m.


Wednesday 22 January

ORGAN RECITAL: Philip Scriven, the chapel, Queen's, 1.10 p.m. (admission free; retiring collection).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk in series `The Curator and the Collection': `Carnac: a megalithic wonderland', 1.15 p.m., by Professor Andrew Sherratt, Curator of European Prehistoric Archaeology. (Booking essential. Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Descriptive statistics for research—overview and exploratory data analysis', 3 p.m. (see information above).

PROFESSOR ERNST VAN DE WETERING: `Rembrandt the stranger: the widening gulf between life and work' (Slade Lectures: `Reconstructing Rembrandt—questions and answers in recent research'), Lecture Hall, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m. (open to the public).

PROFESSOR F. ASTREN: `Between Muslim triumphalism and Jewish resistance: looking for Islamisation in the medieval Middle East' (David Patterson Seminars), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor, 8 p.m.


Thursday 23 January

DR M. RAPHAEL: `Jewish women's consecration of space and time in Auschwitz: a Jewish feminist reading of the memoir literature' (International Gender Studies Centre seminars: `Gender and religions: sacralising time and space'), Blackhall Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

K. NAVRICKAS: `Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph Hanson, the "Weavers' Friend": the implications of volunteering and the Napoleonic War for South Lancashire politics and society' (seminar series: `The invasion of Britain'), Maison Française, 2.15 p.m.

CHRIST CHURCH PICTURE GALLERY guided tour: general tour, 2.15 p.m. (booking not required).

DR K. TRIGWELL: `Students' comments on their Oxford degrees: an analysis of feedback on the Student Course Experience Questionnaire' (Institute for the Advancement of University Learning: Research Seminars), Littlegate House, 4 p.m.

J. RANDLE: `The Whittington Press and Oxford' (Oxford Bibliographical Society lecture), Taylor Institution, 5.15 p.m. (open to the public).

DR R. PACHAURI: `Climate change on a global scale' (Linacre Lectures: `Designing successful environmental policies'), Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building, 5.30 p.m.


Friday 24 January

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Job search and interview skills for contract research staff', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

DR J. LITTLEWOOD: `The ambiguity of labour; the identity of midwives' (Ethnicity and Identity Seminar: `The identities of medical practitioners and traditional healers'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Small treasures of the Ashmolean', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

PROFESSOR QUENTIN SKINNER: `Critics of the crown: common law and neoclassical challenges' (Ford's Lectures in British History: `Freedom, representation, and revolution, 1603–51'), Schools, 5 p.m.

THERESA MAY, MP: `The organisation of the Conservative Party' (seminar series: `British government and politics'), Lecture Room XI, Brasenose, 5 p.m.

CONFERENCE: `Les élections présidentielles et législatives de 2002 en France', Maison Française, from 5 p.m. (continues tomorrow).

THE RTÉ VANBURGH QUARTET performs works by Hadyn, Zhou Long, and Ravel, Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's, 8.30 p.m. (admission by free programme, available from the Porters' Lodge).


Monday 27 January

M. CARRANZA: `Making sense of common sense: sterilisation in Costa Rica' (Fertility and Reproduction Seminars: `Reproductive technologies'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

PROFESSOR B. ROTHENSTEIN: `The welfare state and social capital' (Interdisciplinary Sawyer Seminar: `The theory and politics of civil society'), Rothermere American Institute, 1.45 p.m. (enquiries to: paul.bou-habib@socres.ox.ac.uk, tel. (2)82718).

DR J. ROBERTSON: `Leprosy and the elusive M. leprae: colonial and imperial medical exchanges in the nineteenth century' (seminar series: `Ridding the Empire of leprosy: a grand undertaking and its legacy'), Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 2.15 p.m.

DR PALLAB GHOSH: `Trust no one, question everything, believe nothing: the new face of science journalism' (Green College Lectures: `Science and the media: the challenge of adapting science to the mass media'), Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 6 p.m.


Tuesday 28 January

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Small group teaching' (first meeting), 12.15 p.m. (see information above).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Teacups and teapots', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

THE RT. HON. MICHAEL ANCRAM, PC, MP, GORDON MARSDEN, MP, and PROFESSOR ARCHIE BROWN: `Building democracy and building capitalism: conflicting or complementary goals?' (seminar series: `Interests, identities, and interventions'), Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR C. UNGERSON: `Whose empowerment and independence? A cross-national perspective on "cash for care" schemes' (seminar series: `Current issues in social policy'), Violet Butler Seminar Room, Department of Social Policy and Social Work, 5 p.m.

DR N. GREEN: `Local saints and foreign bodies: questions of identity in the Sufi biographical literature of south Asia' (lecture), Lecture Room 2, Christ Church, 5 p.m.

BARRY COX (News International Visiting Professor of Broadcast Media): `The coming of free-sheet television' (News International Broadcast Media Lectures: ` "It's TV, Jim, but not as we know it"—British television in the digital era'), Exeter, 5.30 p.m.


Wednesday 29 January

ORGAN RECITAL: Elizabeth Burgess, the chapel, Queen's, 1.10 p.m. (admission free; retiring collection).

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Welcome to the University' (for non-academic staff), 2 p.m., and `Descriptive statistics for research—probability', 3 p.m. (see information above).

B. RUTTER: `Oedipus and Creon: double hybris' (Archive of Performances of Greek and Roman Drama lecture), the Auditorium, Magdalen, 2.15 p.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM introductory gallery talk: `Islam', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

PROFESSOR ERNST VAN DE WETERING: `Rembrandt's anger: art lovers and asses' (Slade Lectures: `Reconstructing Rembrandt—questions and answers in recent research'), Lecture Hall, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m. (open to the public).

R. MONTGOMERY: `The State of Florida v. American Tobacco—an account of a major lawsuit' (lecture), Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.


Thursday 30 January

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Writing research papers, abstracts, and posters', 9.15 a.m.; `Appraisal skills', 2 p.m.; `Voice coaching' (one-hour sessions) [OK AS IS - NO TIME GIVEN] (see information above).

DR E. FERRARO: `Kneading life: women and the celebration of the dead in the northern Andes of Ecuador' (International Gender Studies Centre seminars: `Gender and religions: sacralising time and space'), Blackhall Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

K. WATSON: `A Briton's envied name: local defence forces, state control, and the politics of patriotism in England, 1793–1815' (seminar series: `The invasion of Britain'), Maison Française, 2.15 p.m.

CHRIST CHURCH PICTURE GALLERY guided tour: `Glass', 2.15 p.m. (booking not required).

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING Research Seminars: reading week (details from joanna.buddery@learning.ox.ac.uk), Littlegate House, 4 p.m.

THE RT. HON. C.F. PATTEN: ` "The End of History": the sequel' (Cyril Foster Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m. (tickets required, from Mrs Marga Lyall—tel. (2)78705, e- mail: cis@politics.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR I. DONALDSON: `Biographical uncertainty' (DNB Seminars in Biography), Rainolds Room, Corpus Christi, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. BEGG: `Transport and congestion in Edinburgh and London' (Linacre Lectures: `Designing successful environmental policies'), Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building, 5.30 p.m.