Oxford University Gazette: 15 January 2004

Oxford University Gazette, Vol. 134, No. 4682: 15 January 2004

Note: due to the requirements of the Data Protection Act, some elements of the printed Gazette are not reproduced in the Web Gazette.

The following supplement was published with this Gazette:

  • Special Lecture List, Hilary Term (PDF file)

PLANNING AND RESOURCE ALLOCATION COMMITTEE OF COUNCIL

Change in Regulations

The Planning and Resource Allocation Committee of Council has made the following change in regulations, to come into effect on 30 January 2004.

Clarification of Fee Liability for the M.St. in International Human Rights Law

In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 1066, l. 37, after `that degree.' insert: `Students studying for the Degree of Master of Studies in International Human Rights Law shall pay not more than six composition fees save for those students receiving tuition or supervision after failing an examination or those students requiring an extension of time shall continue to pay compositions for fees for each term in which they receive tuition or supervision'.

[These changes are made by the Planning and Resource Allocation Committee of Council, on behalf of Council, on the recommendation of the Continuing Education Board, to ensure that students studying for the M.St. in International Human Rights Law who are unable to attend the summer school required as part of their course do not pay fees for Trinity Term twice. The proposed change in regulations prevents students' being penalised financially in these circumstances, and fixes their maximum fee liability to six terms, unless they have failed the award and/or required an extension of time, in which cases they would continue to be required to pay fees for each and every term during which they receive tuition.]


COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of Congregation:

Briggs, J.H.Y., MA, Faculty of Theology, Regent's Park

Carney, S. M., Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Clavin, P.M., Faculty of Modern History, Jesus

Collins, T.A., Faculty of Oriental Studies

Dickins, A., BA, M.Phil., Faculty of Social Studies, St Antony's

Edwards, P., Faculty of Physical Sciences, St Catherine's

Empson, L.F., MA status, Faculty of Management, St Anne's

Etheridge, A.M., MA, D.Phil., Faculty of Mathematical Sciences, Magdalen

Fletcher, H.A., Faculty of Clinical Medicine, Linacre

Fort, J., International Development Centre

Gaine, S.G., BA, MA, D.Phil., Faculty of Theology, Blackfriars

Gonzalez, F.E., M.Phil., Faculty of Social Studies, Nuffield

Jurado, E.M., M.Phil.,D.Phil., Faculty of Social Studies, Oriel

Kerr, F.G., MA, Faculty of Theology, Blackfriars

Larrington, C.A., MA, Faculty of English Language and Literature, St John's

Lloyd, M.F., D.Phil., Faculty of Theology, St Stephen's House

Ludlow, M.A., BA, MA, Faculty of Theology, Wolfson

McDermott, D., D.Phil., Faculty of Social Studies, Keble

Menotti, F., D.Phil., Sub-Faculty of Archaeology, St Cross

Milliken, S., MA status, D.Phil., Sub-Faculty of Archaeology, St Cross

Oliver, S.A., BA, MA, Faculty of Theology, Hertford

Payne, F.P., Faculty of Physical Sciences, Lincoln

Percy, C.E., D.Phil., Faculty of English Language and Literature, Balliol

Rayner, S.F., MA, Faculty of Social Studies, Keble

Saward, J.N., MA, Faculty of Theology, Greyfriars

Shea, N.J., BA, Faculty of Philosophy, Somerville

Stacey, R.J., Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Stedall, J.A., Faculty of Mathematical Sciences, Queen's

Stone Sweet, A., MA, Faculty of Social Studies, Nuffield

Warman, C.J., Faculty of Modern Languages, Exeter

Wilson, B.A., Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Wilson, J., Faculty of Mathematical Sciences


BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect 30 January 2004, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • CONGREGATION 19 February 2004
    • Election: Botanic Garden, Visitors of the
  • CONGREGATION 24 February 2004 2 p.m.
    • Voting on legislative proposal: Eldon Law Scholarship Fund
  • * List of forthcoming Degree Days
  • * List of forthcoming Matriculation Ceremonies

CONGREGATION 19 February 2004

Election: Botanic Garden, Visitors of the

Vacancy: One (new place under Council Regulations 3 of 2003, Gazette, Vol. 133, pp. 861–2 Period: Until MT 2006

¶ Nominations in writing by six members of Congregation other than the candidate will be received by the Head of Student Administration, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD, up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 2 February 2004. Council has decided that nominations should show for each signatory the name and college or department in block capitals. Any names which are no so shown my not be published. At least one nomination in respect of each candidate must be made on an official nomination form. Copies of the form are available from the Head of Student Administration, University Offices, Wellington Square (telephone (2)70018; e-mail: Sue.Bennett@admin.ox.ac.uk). In the event of a contested election, a brief biographical note on each candidate will be published in the Gazette dated 12 February 2004, and voters may wish to wait until they have read these notes before returning their ballot papers (which will be sent out to members of Congregation as soon as possible after the closing date for nominations, and which, after completion, must be received by the Head of Student Administration not later than 4 p.m. on 19 February 2004).

Note on the body concerned

The Visitors of the Botanic Garden are responsible, under Council, for the safe keeping, preservation, orderly administration, finance, and general policy of the garden. The purpose of the Botanic Garden is to assemble, maintain, and exhibit the University's collection of plants at the Botanic Garden, the Glasshouses, and Harcourt Arboretum, and to promote research, teaching, conservation, and public education based on the garden's collections.


CONGREGATION 24 February 2004 2 p.m.

¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that written notice of any intention to vote against, or any proposed amendment to, the following legislative proposal, signed by at least two members of Congregation, must be given to the Registrar by noon on Monday, 16 February 2004 (see the Guide to Procedures in Congregation cited in the note at the end of `University Agenda').

Voting on legislative proposal: Eldon Law Scholarship Fund

Explanatory note

The following Legislative Proposal submitted by Council under Part 2 of Congregation Regulations 2 of 2002 (Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4633, 9 October 2002, Vol. 133, p. 161), which is promoted on the recommendation of the Law Board and the Social Sciences Board, makes changes to the existing legislation governing the Eldon Law Scholarship Fund, as amended by Congregation on 14 November 2000 (Gazette, 16 November 2000, Vol. 131, p. 330). The Law Board and the divisional board have concluded that the current restrictions on eligibility are too narrow to fulfil the purpose of the fund (to encourage the most able students in any subject to go to the Bar), and that eligibility should be extended also to members of the University who have gained a first-class degree in one of the four-year undergraduate degrees which lead to a Master's degree. The opportunity is also taken to remove the reference to `European and Comparative Law', which was included in error, it always having been the intention that all those awarded the BCL and M.Jur. should be eligible.

WHEREAS it is expedient to change the existing provisions governing the Eldon Law Scholarship Fund, NOW the university of oxford, in exercise of the powers in that behalf conferred upon it by the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923, and of all other powers enabling it, enacts as follows. 1 In section 15.4 (1) of Part 10 of the Schedule to the Statutes, concerning the Eldon Law Scholarship Fund (Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4533, 9 October 2002, Vol. 133, p. 140), as amended by Congregation on 14 November 2000 (Gazette, 16 November 2000, Vol. 131, p. 330), delete `the Degree of Bachelor of Arts' and delete `in European and Comparative Law'.

2 Delete section 15.4 (1) of Part 10 and substitute:[1] `(1) have passed their examination for any Second Public Examination or for the Degree of Bachelor of Civil Law or for the Degree of Magister Juris; and'.

3 This statute shall be effective from 1 April 2004. [This change, made on the recommendation of the Law Board and the Social Sciences Board, restores to the fund the ability to facilitate the most able students in any subject to go to the Bar, by enabling holders of recently introduced undergraduate degrees to apply for it, and by removing a clause restricting application to students of European and Comparative Law.] [1] New wording is indicated by underlining.

CONSULTATIVE NOTICES

Arrangements concerning representations on any matter currently before Congregation are set out in `University Agenda' above. Notices to which a response is invited may also be found under `General Notices' below.

REVIEW OF EDUCATIONAL STUDIES

The Social Sciences Board is undertaking a review of the Department of Educational Studies as part of its programme of regular rolling reviews of units under its aegis. The Head of the Division, Mr D.A. Hay, will chair the review committee, the terms of reference of which are:

(i) to review the quality of teaching and research in Educational Studies by reference to international standards of excellence, and having regard to the University's Mission Statement and Corporate Plan and to the divisional plan.

(ii) To review the organisational and management structures in Educational Studies including such matters as academic and non-academic planning and recruitment; accommodation and future space needs; and the relationship between the sub-units within the unit, and between the unit and cognate subject areas and colleges with which it is involved in teaching and/or research.

(iii) To review progress made in response to the last review [in 1998–9] and to identify any further action required in the light of changed circumstances during the period since that review.

(iv) To make recommendations to the divisional board, bearing in mind where there are financial implications the level of resources likely to be available within the University and possible alternative ways of raising funds to implement them.

(v) To refer the recommendations to the Planning and Resource Allocation Committee and the Educational Policy and Standards Committee as appropriate. The membership of the committee is as follows: Mr D.A. Hay, Head of the Social Sciences Division (Chairman)
Dr Chris Davies, Department of Educational Studies
Sir John Hanson, Warden of Green College
Dr Mary Gregory, Department of Educational Studies
Professor Margaret Brown, King's College, London
Professor Gareth Rees, Cardiff University
Professor Judyth Sachs, University of Sydney The review committee would welcome written comments on matters falling within its terms of reference. These should be sent to the Secretary to the Review Committee, Mrs Betsy Smith, Social Sciences Division, 34 St Giles', by 13 February.


REVIEW OF MATHEMATICS

As part of its system of rolling reviews of departments to be carried out every ten years, the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board has established a committee to review the Department of Mathematics. The terms of reference are as follows:

(a) to review progress made in response to the last General Board review and HEFCE teaching quality assessment, and to identify any further action required in the light of changed circumstances since those reviews;

(b) to review, by reference to international standards of excellence, and in the context of the University's mission statement and corporate plan, the quality of academic activities in the department, especially:

(i) the quality of the research of the department, including its participation in interdepartmental, interdivisional and interdisciplinary activities, its research profile and strategy, and future challenges and opportunities;

(ii) the quality of undergraduate and graduate programmes and their delivery

(including part-time M.Sc courses offered jointly with the Department for Continuing Education), and related issues including quality assurance mechanisms, proposals for new programmes, recruitment and access, resourcing;

(iii) the organisation of the department, its management structures and the relationship between the department and the division, including such matters as

  • strategic planning/fundraising
  • academic and non-academic staff planning and recruitment
  • student number planning
  • terms of appointment for academic staff (in particular CUF and UL lecturers), including career development and equal opportunities issues
  • accommodation and future space needs

(iv) the relationship (structural and operational) between units within the department, and between the department and cognate subject areas and colleges to which it is linked in teaching and research;

(c) to consider the financial position of, and funding arrangements for, the department. The review committee is chaired by Professor David Clary, FRS, Head of the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Division. The other members are

Professor Gary Gibbons, FRS, Professor of Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge;

Professor John Jones, Pro-Vice-Chancellor, University of Warwick;

Professor Dr Alain-Sol Sznitman, Department of Mathematics, University of Zürich;

Professor John Toland, FRS, Professor of Mathematics, Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Bath, and Scientific Director, International Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Edinburgh;

Professor Dr Helmut Neunzert, Technomathematics Group and Chair for the Mathematical Foundation of Physics and Technology, University of Kaiserslautern;

Professor David Pettifor, FRS, Isaac Wolfson Professor of Metallurgy, Department of Materials, Oxford;

Dr Peter Neumann, University Lecturer (CUF) in Mathematics and Fellow of Queen's College, Oxford.

The committee is in the process of inviting comments individually from senior and junior members of the department. Any other members of the University and members of the public who wish to submit comments in confidence on any issues covered by the committee's terms of reference are invited to send them to the secretary of the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Division, Dr A.M. Knowland, 9 Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PD (fax: Oxford (2)82571, e-mail: anne.knowland@admin.ox.ac.uk), as soon as possible, and in any case not later than 16 February.


GENERAL NOTICES

PROCEDURES FOR DEALING WITH CASES OF FRAUD AND SUSPECTED FRAUD

1 Introduction

(a) For the purposes of this procedure, fraud is defined as an irregular or illegal act or series of acts characterised by a deliberate intent to conceal or falsely represent an act or a series of acts, resulting in the diversion of resources whether or not for personal gain for the benefit of an individual or group of individuals at a consequent loss to the University.

(b) The objective of this procedure is to safeguard the proper use of the University's finances and resources, including the finances and resources of its subsidiary companies. The University, which derives much of its income from public funds, benefactions and charitable organisations, has a particular responsibility to ensure that income and resources are used solely for the purposes intended.

(c) Fraud is a serious matter and the Council of the University is committed to ensuring that all cases of suspected fraud are investigated. Any member of staff, regardless of their position or seniority, against whom prima facie evidence of fraud is found will be subject to disciplinary procedures that may result in dismissal.

(d) The University reserves the right to seek redress via civil proceedings against individuals whose fraudulent acts have resulted in financial loss to the University.

(e) The University reserves the right to involve the police in any case of fraud or suspected fraud at any stage of an investigation.

(f) The attention of staff is drawn to the University's financial regulations (http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/finance/finregs/index.shtml).


2 Reporting suspected fraud

(a) Any member of staff who suspects that a fraud has been committed must report the matter immediately to the office of the Chief Internal Auditor (telephone: (2)70185). (If it is the Chief Internal Auditor who is suspected of fraud, the matter must be reported to the Registrar and the Chairman of the Audit Committee.) The office of the Chief Internal Auditor will then advise the Registrar, the Director of Finance, the Head of Personnel Services and the head of department/faculty board chairman or the head of division of the suspected fraud. No other action should be taken, and no investigation should commence, without the explicit approval of the Director of Finance, as this may prejudice any subsequent action that the University may wish to take.

(b) An individual reporting a suspected fraud will not be penalised and will be protected from unwarranted detriment where the report is made in good faith and in the reasonable belief that the information reported is substantially correct (see the University's Code of Practice and Procedure on Public Interest Disclosure: http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/ps/codes/hcdoc040.shtml). The University will treat all such reports in a confidential manner. In some cases, however, for the investigation to be carried out fully and for appropriate action to be taken, it may be necessary for the identity of the individual making the report to be disclosed. The individual will be advised before such disclosure is made.

(c) An investigation under this procedure is will be treated as an investigation under the first part of the University's Code of Practice and Procedure on Public Interest Disclosure.

(d) In the event of any employee making malicious or vexatious allegations, disciplinary action may be taken against the employee concerned.

(e) Any person who believes that his or her concerns have not been fully investigated and dealt with under this procedure may request a review under the provisions of the Public Interest Disclosure Act 1999 (see the University's Code of Practice and Procedure on Public Interest Disclosure).

(f) It is essential that all those involved in a case of suspected fraud (including the person who reported the matter) observe the strictest confidentiality consistent with operating this procedure.


3 Action to be taken when fraud is suspected

(a) Any individual who is suspected of fraud will, subject to clause 3(b) below, be suspended immediately on the currently appropriate rate of pay pending a full investigation. In some cases it may also be necessary to suspend other staff in order to conduct a proper investigation. The suspension of a member of staff does not constitute a finding of misconduct against him or her. Any staff suspended as a result of suspected fraud will be informed of the reason for the suspension.

(b) Personnel Services must be consulted before any staff member is suspended, and on the conduct of the investigation. No one person, acting only on his or her own volition, may move to suspend a member of staff suspected of fraud.

(c) Individuals suspended for suspected fraud or to enable a proper investigation to be carried out will normally be required to leave the University's premises immediately and will not be permitted to return to the premises, to make contact with staff or witnesses, or to act/trade on behalf of the University, unless given express permission to do so by the relevant university authorities, during the period of suspension. Any infringement of this requirement will be treated as a disciplinary offence.

(d) The Registrar and the Director of Finance will decide whether the police should be involved at any stage of each fraud investigation, on the basis of recommendations made by the office of the Chief Internal Auditor and with the advice of the University Marshal.

(e) In cases where the police are involved, the University reserves the right to proceed with its own disciplinary procedures when it would be reasonable to do so, bearing in mind the staff members' rights to a reasonable investigation, to defend him/herself, and to a fair and impartial hearing.


4 The conduct of the investigation

(a) The office of the Chief Internal Auditor will ensure that all fraud investigations take account of appropriate professional practice, and guidance issued by HEFCE. The Chief Internal Auditor will also ensure that an appropriate fraud response plan detailing the Internal Audit service's procedures is in place and is reviewed regularly.

(b) All reports of suspected financial irregularities or fraud will be investigated by the University's Internal Audit service. The Internal Audit service has unrestricted right of access to all vouchers, documents, books of account, computer data, and any other information which it considers relevant to its inquiries and which is necessary to fulfil its responsibilities. This includes the right to verify assets and to have direct access to any employee or person responsible for the administration or management of university funds with whom it is felt necessary to raise and discuss such matters (see Council Regulations 43, Part 3, Sect. 8.c) In cases that involve or may involve students, the Proctors will be informed by the Internal Audit service at an early stage.

(c) Fraud investigations shall be completed in a timely manner. The office of the Chief Internal Auditor will be responsible for ensuring that the Director of Finance and the Head of Personnel Services, and the Proctors in any cases involving students, are kept informed of the progress of the investigation.


5 The results of the investigation

(a) The Chief Internal Auditor will prepare a report on the suspected fraud that will be sent to the Registrar, the Director of Finance and the Head of Personnel Services, and to the Proctors in any cases involving students. The report may also be sent to the individual's head of division, head of department and/or line manager as appropriate. If the Vice- Chancellor is the employee under investigation, the report will be sent to HEFCE.

(b) The individual or individuals concerned will be informed of the outcome of the investigation when it has been completed.

(c) If the investigation concludes that there is prima facie evidence of fraud, then the matter will be referred under the University's disciplinary procedures (for staff under the jurisdiction of the Visitatorial Board as set out in Part D of Statute XII of the University's Statutes; for all other staff as set out in the relevant staff handbook). It will be the responsibility of the duly authorised person under those procedures to take forward the disciplinary process. Personnel Services must be consulted on all aspects of the process.


6 Reporting requirements

(a) All fraud investigations will be reported to the University's Audit Committee by the Chief Internal Auditor, who will submit a report describing the incident and the outcome of the investigation, any subsequent disciplinary process, the action taken against the individual or individuals involved if the fraud was proven to have taken place, and any measures taken to prevent a recurrence of a similar fraud.

(b) Under the HEFCE Audit Code of Practice (HEFCE 02/26 paragraphs 19 and 20) the HEFCE Chief Executive will be notified by the Vice-Chancellor, as the University's Accounting Officer, of any attempted, suspected or actual fraud where:

(i) the sums involved are, or are potentially, in excess of £10,000;

(ii) the particulars of the fraud are novel, unusual or complex; or

(iii) there is likely to be public interest because of the nature of the fraud or the people involved.

(c) In cases where fraud has resulted in disciplinary action and the police have not been involved, the Registrar will provide HEFCE with an explanation of this course of action.


7 Future references

All requests for references for individuals known to have been disciplined or dismissed for fraud must be referred to Personnel Services for advice on how to respond. In no circumstances must any person provide a reference for a member of staff whom they know to have been dismissed for fraud without first consulting Personnel Services.


APPROVAL TO HOLD OUTSIDE APPOINTMENTS

Guidelines on the holding of outside appointments

These guidelines outline new procedures for obtaining approval to hold outside appointments. No changes have been made to the University's policy, nor to the individuals and types of appointment covered by the policy. All university employees, with the exception of CUF lecturers, are required to obtain approval for the holding of any outside appointment. The following do not count as outside appointments for this purpose (see Council Regulations 24, Sect. I, § 5.A, cll. 10–11):

  • the holding of the office of Proctor or Assessor;
  • the holding of the office of examiner in any examination which is part of a degree course at any university;
  • the holding of a commemorative lecturership or similar post in any university with the duty to give not more than 8 lectures in any year of office;
  • activities or responsibilities normally associated with, or arising from, scholarly work which do not involve a formal and continuing contract.

The University permits its employees to hold outside appointments without deduction of stipend subject to the following conditions:

  • the total commitment to such outside appointments must not exceed thirty days per year;[1]
  • any contractual terms proposed to cover the outside appointment must be scrutinised by Research Services on behalf of the University, and must not be amended without the prior written approval of Research Services;
  • the employee's head of department[2] must approve the application.

Outside appointments can take a number of different forms, such as consultancy, private professional practice, expert witness and non-executive directorships. (Approval will not be given for the holding of executive directorships). These are activities carried out outside the University and are contracted for from the individual's personal address. University letterhead, facilities and premises should not be used without the University's express permission. Certain types of activity involving consultancy/services to industry may be carried out within the University and may be included, where appropriate, within projects funded by externally-funded research grants and contacts. These are described below.


Procedures for applying for approval to hold outside appointments

(a) Applicants must complete an application form (form OA1, available on the University's Web site at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/ps/outappts.shtml, or in hard copy from departmental administrators/faculty board secretaries).

(b) Applicants whose salaries are funded from externally funded research grants or contracts, or who are Principal Investigators or Co-Investigators on outside-sponsored projects, must adhere to the terms and conditions stipulated by or agreed with the sponsor and, if necessary, seek written approval from the sponsor. [3] Research Services is able to provide advice on the terms and conditions of externally-funded research grants and contracts held by the University (telephone: (2)70143).

(c) Where it is appropriate for the outside appointment to be covered by a contract or letter of agreement, and particularly when the external organisation requires a written agreement to cover a consultancy, applicants must arrange for the terms governing the outside appointment to be scrutinised by Research Services in advance of signature. (All applicants are, in fact, advised to stipulate in writing the terms which will govern their outside activities for an external organisation, not least to limit their personal liability.) The University's legal advisers have drafted a standard personal consultancy document which serves as a useful starting point for discussions around the terms of a consultancy appointment. This is available from Research Services (telephone: (2)70143) or on the Research Services Web site at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/oxonly/agreements/pcaform.htm.

(d) Research Services scrutinise the terms of an agreement in order to consider their compatibility with the University's interests as employer. The office cannot advise the employee on the terms from the employee's standpoint; and the employee should take his or her own advice unless he or she makes use of Oxford University Consulting Ltd (see paragraph 8 below).

(e) Applicants must obtain the approval of their direct line manager where relevant.

(f) When Research Services has confirmed in writing that the terms proposed to govern the outside appointment meet the University's minimum requirements and the necessary approvals have been obtained from the relevant line manager or sponsor (as appropriate), applicants should submit the completed form to their head of department, who will be asked to sign to confirm that he/she is content to approve the outside appointment in the context of the applicant's university duties. Heads of department who themselves wish to hold outside appointments must submit their application forms to their head of division for approval. Heads of Division should submit applications to the Vice-Chancellor.

(g) If the above procedures are followed and the relevant approvals obtained, applicants will be granted insurance cover for the outside appointment in question under the University's professional indemnity insurance policy, subject to the limitations of that policy. Details may be obtained from the Insurance Officer, Mr G.C. Waite (telephone: (2)80307).

Consultancies within research grant applications and contracts

The holding of a consultancy may be included where appropriate within research grant applications and contracts. Where consultancies are included in this way and provision is made through the payroll to pay staff for such work, the Outside Grants (OG) form should itemise, among the costs of the project, the costs of the consultancy payment (including employers' on-costs). Indirect costs should also be calculated on the total cost of the project, including the fee for the consultancy. Research Services (telephone: (2)70143) will be able to advise on the most appropriate form of agreement to cover consultancies attached to research grants or contracts. Time spent on such consultancies will count towards the thirty-day limit.

Other services to industry and outside bodies

Not all work for outside bodies is governed by a contract with an external sponsor under the University's research grants and contracts procedures. Some is likely to be `service' work, i.e. the provision of a service to an external organisation which is not of academic benefit but which makes use of spare capacity in a department in return for payment. Such arrangements should nevertheless be covered by an agreement approved by the head of department which is drawn up in consultation with the departmental administrator and (for tax reasons) with the Finance Division. If the service agreement proposed by the outside body includes terms and conditions relating to intellectual property or confidentiality of information, or does not incorporate the University's standard disclaimer of liability, this will require an authorised signature on behalf of the University. In such cases, the agreement should be forwarded to Research Services which is required to ensure that appropriate disclaimers of liability have been issued in connection with the provision of services to industry and other outside bodies. Where appropriate, as with consultancies within research grant applications and contracts, a payment may be made through the payroll to individuals for the additional work undertaken in performing the services. It is expected that the head of department will decide on an appropriate fee to be paid to the individual based on the time spent (which again will count towards the thirty-day per year limit). The instructions to the Finance Division to make such payments are processed through Research Services. In such cases, where an agreement has been made with University in respect of the service, it is not expected that a further personal consultancy agreement with the academic concerned will be necessary.

Financial arrangements

The University does not generally seek details of remuneration which applicants are to receive under arrangements for outside appointments, but reserves the right to request to be provided with such details in certain circumstances e.g. in the light of any potential conflict of interest with the outside appointment. Applicants wishing exceptionally to make a case to spend a total of more than thirty days in any one year on outside appointments will be required to provide details of remuneration.

Use of computing facilities

University IT and network facilities, including software, are provided for use for educational purposes only, in accordance with the `University Rules for Computer Use', which may be found on the University Web site at http://www.ox.ac.uk/it/rules/rules.html.

Monitoring and reporting

(a) Heads of department are responsible, through their departmental administration, for keeping records of the number of days spent on outside appointments by all staff (regardless of staff group) in their departments.

(b) Heads of department will report their approvals of outside appointments, and the basic details of the outside appointments, to their divisions on an annual basis, by the end of July each year.

(c) Divisions are responsible, through their divisional administration, for monitoring and coordinating information relating to all approvals for outside appointments submitted by departments within their remit, and for making an annual return to the Personnel Committee by the end of September each year.


Oxford University Consultancy Ltd

The University has established a wholly-owned subsidiary company, Oxford University Consultancy Ltd, to help members of the University to market their expertise to outside bodies, to negotiate commercial terms and payment on behalf of individuals, and to manage the administration associated with consultancy. OUC Ltd offers a professional service for academics and departments throughout the University, which will identify consultancy and related opportunities with local, national and international companies and organisations. Details of this service may be obtained by telephone ((2)80829) or by e-mail at enquiries@consulting.ox.ac.uk. Members of the University choosing to use the services of OUC Ltd must still follow the internal procedures for University approval of their outside appointments as outlined in these guidelines; OUC Ltd will, however, assist the process on behalf of the individuals concerned.

Footnotes

[1] Approval for cases where the proposed commitment exceeds thirty days may still be sought; in such cases the department will refer the request to the divisional board and if it is approved a deduction in university stipend will be made. Partial or full secondment may be more appropriate for particularly time-consuming outside appointments.
Return to text [2] Faculty board chairman in non-departmentally organised subjects, head of division in the case of heads of departments.
Return to text [3] The Wellcome Trust's grant conditions, for example, include stringent conditions relating to the holding of consultancies and these apply equally to individuals who are in receipt of Wellcome Trust research grants, as well as to those whose salaries are paid from Wellcome Trust grants.
Return to text


LANGUAGE CENTRE

Language courses

The Language Centre offers classes in nine popular languages at most levels on its Languages for Study and Research Programme as well as a wide range of courses in English for Academic Studies. Most courses continue from Michaelmas Term. If you have a particular requirement or interest now, please check the Web site for the courses on offer, then call in to find out availability and put your name on the waiting list.

The Language Centre Library and Independent Study Area

The Library's collection of audio/video cassettes, books, and computer programs covers over 130 languages and live TV is available in some languages. The Library also maintains a collection of Oxford University Faculty of Modern Languages Final Listening Comprehension Examination passages/questions from previous years. The Self-Study Area has rooms equipped with listening and viewing facilities for individual work and computer based learning resources. New users should aim to arrive shortly before 10 a.m. or 2 p.m. to register and attend an orientation session (not available Saturday). The Language Centre is open 9.30 a.m.–6.30 p.m., Monday–Friday during noughth week and 9.30 a.m.--8 p.m. (6.30 p.m. on Friday) in full term, as well as 10 a.m.- -1 p.m. on Saturday in full term. Further details of all courses and activities may be obtained from the Information Officer, Angela Pinkney, at the Language Centre, 12 Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6HT (telephone: (2)83360, e-mail: admin@lang.ox.ac.uk, Web pages: www.lang.ox.ac.uk).


SCHOOL OF ARCHAEOLOGY

Intensive German classes for archaeologists

A week of intensive German classes for archaeologists, for beginners and intermediate learners, will be held in the Institute of Archaeology in ninth week of Hilary Term (15–19 March). Enquiries should be directed to the Receptionist, the Institute of Archaeology (telephone: (2)78240, e-mail: liz.strange@arch.ox.ac.uk), from whom registration forms may also be obtained. The course tutor will be Gertrud Seidmann, Research Associate, the Institute of Archaeology.


WIDOWS OR WIDOWERS OF FORMER MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY'S PENSION SCHEMES

From time to time the attention of the University is drawn to individual cases of financial hardship among widows or widowers of former members of the Federated Superannuation System for Universities (FSSU) and the University of Oxford Employees Pension Scheme (EPS). Limited resources are available to alleviate proven cases of hardship and any enquiry should be addressed to the Superannuation Officer, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD. All cases are dealt with in the strictest confidence.


ST JOHN'S COLLEGE AND COLIN CAR

COLIN CARR will perform the following Bach suites for cello at 8.30 p.m. on Saturdays in the Hall, St John's College. 17 Jan.: No. 1 in G major, no. 3 in C major, and no. 5 in C minor. 24 Jan.: No. 2 in D minor, no. 4 in E flat major, and no. 6 in D major. Admission is free. Programmes for each concert will be available from the porters' lodge at St John's. Each programme will be valid as an admission ticket until 8.20 p.m. Any vacant seats will be filled from the door during the last ten minutes before the concert starts.


OXFORD UNIVERSITY COMPUTING SERVICES

Address: 13 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6NN Telephone: Oxford (2)73200 Fax: (2)83401 Web: http://www.oucs.ox.ac.uk Opening hours: Monday--Friday, 8.30 a.m.–8.30 p.m.

Shop

The Computing Services Shop provides a counter service for the sale and distribution of computer hardware, software, consumables and stationery. All current members of the University are entitled to use the Shop; however, sales of software are restricted to full members. The Shop is just inside the main entrance to OUCS. Opening hours are 9 a.m.–4.45 p.m., Monday–Friday (except Thursdays: 9.30 a.m.–4.45 p.m.). Telephone: Oxford (2)7320, fax:

(2)83401, e-mail: shop@oucs.ox.ac.uk.


Help Centre

The Computing Services Help Centre is open between 8.30 a.m. and 8.30 p.m. It provides a variety of specialist equipment (scanners, zip drives) as well as access to terminals for e- mails, web browsing and use of specialist or standard software. Advisers are on hand between 8.30 a.m. and 8.30 p.m., Monday–Friday, to answer queries, and hardware support can be sought through a booking system. See www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/help/. E-mail: help@oucs.ox.ac.uk; tel.: (2)73200.


Personal Computer Maintenance Service

We offer a very competitively priced maintenance service for PC and Macintosh personal computers, as well as their printers and other peripherals. It is available to University Institutions, Colleges and to University members on a personal basis for their privately owned equipment, including a discount for students.. Full details can be found at www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/maintenance/.


NSMS: The Network Systems Management Services

NSMS provides a variety of chargeable IT support services to the University and its associated institutions. It can manage file servers, workstations, anti-virus software installations, holiday cover for support staff, web services, and web based conference registration. See /www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/nsms/.


HFS: Hierarchical File Server

The HFS is centrally funded service providing backup and archive services to senior members, postgraduates and staff. To protect your data on the HFS, you can register online, then install and configure the software on your computer. See www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/hfs/.


Printing facilities

OUCS operates a colour printing service from a wide range of PC and MAC applications onto laser printers or a large format inkjet printer, from A4 to A0 paper sizes. The poster printing service is the most popular, with choices of heavy-coated or glossy paper for the largest print. Prices start at £21 for an A0 poster. Further details: www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/printing/colour/.


Security

Oxford University Computer Emergency Response Team (OxCERT) responds to break-ins, system compromises and network abuse, 9 a.m.--5 p.m., Monday–Friday, and on a `best efforts' basis at other times. E-mail: oxcert@ox.ac.uk; voice-mail: (2)82222; www.ox.ac.uk/it/compsecurity/oxcert/

(Note: OxCERT does not handle virus related problems unless they have a major impact on e-mail servers or the network infrastructure. Virus incidents and assistance—see www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/viruses/.)


European Computer Driving Licence (ECDL)

OUCS is a training and testing centre for the European Computer Driving Licence. Drop-in sessions for the ECDL take place every Tuesday in Michaelmas Term, every Wednesday in Hilary Term, and every Thursday in Trinity Term, 10 a.m.–1 p.m., at OUCS (see www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/ecdl/). OUCS is also a testing and training centre for all four ECDL Advanced certificates which run periodically. For further details e-mail: ecdl@oucs.ox.ac.uk.


Courses

Full details on all courses can be found at http://www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/courses/, where it is also possible to book online. Any queries regarding the IT Learning Programme can be addressed to: courses@oucs.ox.ac.uk.


APPOINTMENTS

PROFESSORSHIP OF ENVIRONMENT AND PUBLIC POLICY

SARAH JANE WHATMORE (BA, M.PHIL, PH.D. London, D.SC. Bristol), Professor of Environmental Geography, Geography Discipline, the Open University, has been appointed to the professorship with effect from 1 July 2004. Professor Whatmore will be a fellow of Linacre College.


PROFESSORSHIP OF HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

LINDA MARGARET MCDOWELL (BA Cambridge, M.PHIL., PH.D. London), Professor of Economic Geography, University College London, has been appointed to the professorship with effect from 1 September 2004. Professor McDowell will be a fellow of St John's College.


PROFESSORSHIP OF STATISTICS

STEFFEN LILHOLT LAURITZEN (CAND.STAT., LIC. STAT., DR.SCIENT. Copenhagen), Professor, Department of Mathematical Sciences, Aalborg University, has been appointed to the professorship with effect from 1 May 2004.

Professor Lauritzen will be a fellow of Jesus College.


ELECTORAL BOARD

The composition of the electoral board to the post below, proceedings to fill which are currently in progress, is as follows:

MARSHAL FOCH PROFESSORSHIP OF FRENCH LITERATURE

                                                                                                  
Appointed by 

Mr Vice-Chancellor                      ex officio
The Warden of All Souls                 ex officio
Professor M.K. Atack                    Council
Professor D. Knight                     Council
Professor A. Viala                      Council of the University  of Paris
Professor B. Marchal                    Council of the University  of Paris
Dr R.C.S. Walker                        Humanities Board
Professor E. Fallaize                   Modern Languages Board
Professor C. Howells                    Modern Languages Board
Professor I. Maclean                    All Souls College

ZAHAROFF LECTURE 2004

Celebrating 100 years of Modern Languages at Oxford

ASSIA DJEBAR, author and Silver Chair Professor, New York University, will deliver the Zaharoff Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 26 February, in the Taylor Institution.

21 Jan.: `Time, space and agency in Ming visual and material culture.'

28 Jan.: `Sitting and roaming: visual and material cultures of direction and movement.'

11 Feb.: `Pictures in the Chinese encyclopaedia: image, category, and knowledge.'

25 Feb.: `Dark warriors: visual and material cultures of violence.' 3 Mar.: ` "Walking with a staff": visual and material cultures of age and death.' 10 Mar.: `Remnant subjects: the afterlives of Ming visual and material culture.'


PROFESSOR OF POETRY

PROFESSOR PAUL MULDOON will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 20 January, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `The nonlinear dynamics of vulnerability: how systems, whether ecosystems, or IT networks, or transmission networks for infectious diseases, respond to disturbance.'


CLASSICS

Archive of Performances of Greek and Roman Drama

DR A. WYGANT, Glasgow, will lecture at 2.15 p.m. on Wednesday, 28 January, in the Headley Lecture Theatre, the Ashmolean Museum.

 


CLASSICS, ORIENTAL INSTITUTE, NISSAN INSTITUTE OF JAPANESE STUDIES

PROFESSOR S. STEINGRÄBER, Rome Tre, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 9 February, in the Headley Lecture Theatre, the Ashmolean Museum.

D.J. TAYLOR
10 Feb.: `Orwell's personal myth.'

Conveners: Professor C. Rowland and Dr C. Joynes. DR L. KREITZER
26 Jan.: `Matthew 11:28 and bearing heavy burdens: Bunyan and De Niro meet Jesus.'

PROFESSOR R. HACOHEN, Hebrew University, Jerusalem
23 Feb.: `Cross-textuality and the Song of Songs: searching for the Beloved in Judeo/Christian Passions.'

Convener: Dr David Ferrier. PROFESSOR J. LEWIS, Cancer Research UK, London
19 Jan: To be announced (on the subject of vertebrate developmental biology). DR D. JOHNSTON, Natural History Museum, London
26 Jan.: `Genomics and functional genomics of Schistosoma sp.'

DR H. BENNET-CLARK
16 Feb.: `Cricket song: the mechanics and acoustics of sound production.'

DR S. HOOKER, Sea Mammal Research Unit, St Andrews
1 Mar.: `Foraging behaviour of a Southern Ocean marine predator—a fur seal's eye view.'

Convener: Professor L.N. Johnson. PROFESSOR H.P. BAYLEY
23 Jan.: `How do molecules get into and out of nanoscopic protein pores?' DR V. KORONAKIS, Cambridge
30 Jan.: `Bypassing the periplam—mechanisms of the tripartite Type I engines for drug efflux and protein export.'

PROFESSOR P.A. BULLOUGH, Sheffield
27 Feb.: `Membrane protein complexes: probing structure, function, and assembly by electron microscopy.'

DR C. KAY, Free University, Berlin
26 Jan.: `Application of modern electron spin resonance to biophysical puzzles.'

(RSC Bourke Lecture) PROFESSOR D. CHANDLER, Berkeley
9 Feb.: `Bubbles in space-time: dynamics on the way to forming glass.'

DR S. BLUNDELL
23 Feb.: `Implanted muons as a probe of magnetism and superconductivity.'

PROFESSOR R. DONOVAN, Edinburgh
8 Mar.: `Charge-transfer states: from zero-point level to the dissociation limit.'


Theoretical Chemistry Group Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the John Rowlinson Seminar Room (20.12), opposite the Main Lecture Theatre, the Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory. Details of the 2 February seminar will be announced later.

PROFESSOR P. GASPARD, Brussels
16 Feb.: `From dynamics to reactivity!' DR F. MANBY, Bristol
1 Mar.: `Accurate quantum chemistry for large molecules.'

Convener: Dr S. Sarkar. PROFESSOR R. EVANS, Bristol
23 Jan.: `Attraction out of repulsion: phase transitions and interfaces in colloidal fluids.'

PROFESSOR G. EMCH, Florida
20 Feb.: `Probabilities for micro- v. macro-physics.'

DR C. COCKELL, BAS
26 Jan.: `The recolonisation of asteroid and comet craters—new opportunities for life.'

DR M. ST ONGE, Geological Survey of Canada
16 Feb.: `The Trans-Hudson Orogen of North America—constraints for Palaeoproterozoic Earth.'

DR C. OPPENHEIMER, Cambridge
8 Mar.: To be announced.


Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Planetary Physics Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Thursdays in the Dobson Lecture Room, the Atmospheric Physics Laboratory. Because on rare occasions the arrangements need to be changed, anyone intending to come to Oxford specially to attend should check first by telephoning Oxford (2)72933). DR D. ROBINSON, National Physical Laboratory
22 Jan.: `The importance of measurement traceability and "valid data" for the exploration and exploitation of space.'

DR H. OLIVER
5 Feb.: `Meteorology and warfare.'

DR R. SUTTON, Reading
19 Feb.: `Climate impacts of changes in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation.'

PROFESSOR M. PILLING, Leeds
4 Mar.: `Developing mechanisms of tropospheric oxidation through laboratory, field, and modelling studies.'

Convener: Professor A.J. Wilkie. T. PHEIDAS, Crete
23 Jan.: `Solvability of polynomial equations in algebraic domains: a survey.'

T. DE PIRO, Edinburgh
6 Feb.: `The group configuration for 2-simple theories.'

A. BOROVIK, UMIST
20 Feb.: `Groups of finite Morley rank.'

A. SHLAPENTOKH, East Carolina
5 Mar.: `Hilbert's tenth problem and Mazur's conjectures.'

PROFESSOR A. SCHNIDER, University Hospitals, Geneva
12 Mar.: `Spontaneous confabulation and reality in thinking.'


University Department of Psychiatry

The following guest lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Seminar Room, the University Department of Psychiatry, the Warneford Hospital. DR I. ANDERSON, Manchester
27 Jan.: `Putting the pharma into fMRI: drugs, effects, and serotonin.'

PROFESSOR R. PASSINGHAM
27 Jan.: `Is brain imaging just the new phrenology?' C. HARMER
3 Feb.: `Cognitive mechanisms of antidepressant drug action.'

DR M. BAXTER
24 Feb.: `Actylcholine and memory: beware of dogma.'

PROFESSOR A. MATTHEWS, Cambridge
9 Mar.: `Cognitive control and emotional encoding.'


Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics

The following research seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the Lecture Theatre, the Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics. DR M. COLEMAN, Cambridge
23 Jan.: `Protecting axons in injury and disease: the WldS gene.'

DR P. SALINAS, Imperial College, London
6 Feb.: `Formation of neuronal connections: a role for Wnt signalling.' (Jenkinson Seminar) DR R. LOVELL-BADGE, NIMR
13 Feb.: `Sox genes, stem cells, and CNS development.' (Jenkinson Seminar) PROFESSOR J. SPARROW, York
20 Feb.: `Genetic studies of muscle thin filaments and nemaline myopathy in Drosophila.'

DR L. SEGALAT, Lyon
5 Mar.: `C. elegans as a tool to decipher the mechanisms of dystrophin-dependent myopathies.'

Conveners: Professor D. Cram, Professor R. Evans, and Professor S. Romaine. L. MUGGLESTONE
20 Jan.: `Hidden histories. The OED and the inventory of English.'

F. FERNANDEZ-ARMESTO, London
3 Feb.: `Language and cultural exchange in colonia contexts: reflections suggested by Negerengels.'

S. COLEMAN
17 Feb.: `Linguistic (non-)diversity on the Web.'

Convener: Professor I.W.F. Maclean. DR D. RUNDLE
23 Jan.: `The dispersals of the library of Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester.'

PROFESSOR D. NORBROOK
13 Feb.: `Women, Lucretius, and the Republic of letters.'

PROFESSOR V. WORTH-STYLIANOU, Brookes
27 Feb.: `Vernacular medical books on pregnancy and childbirth in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Europe.'

PROFESSOR I. MICHAEL
12 Mar.: `Thomas Bodley's Celestinas.'


Britain, Portugal, and empire, 1700–1900

The following lectures will be given at 11 a.m. on Thursdays in the Portuguese Studies Centre, Littlegate House, St Ebbe's. PROFESSOR S. SUBRAMANYAM
22 Jan.: `Britain, Portugal, and Britain's empire in Asia, 1700–1850.'

PROFESSOR L. BETHELL
5 Feb.: `Britain and the end of the Portuguese empire in Brazil.'

PROFESSOR R. RAMOS, Lisboa
19 Feb.: `Fear and expectation: Britain, Portugal, and the war of 1898 between the United States and Spain.'

DR G. DEUTSCH
4 Mar.: `German designs on Portuguese African colonies on the eve of World War I.'

30 Jan.: `Confluence: English council, feudal counsel, 1066–1189.'

13 Feb.: `Establishment: the first age of parliamentary politics, 1225–58.'

27 Feb.: `Expansion: Parliament and nation, 1272–1327.'

Subject: `Stalinist and Nazi rule: possibilities and limits of comparison.'


Military History Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5.15 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

P. PUREIGLE
11 Feb.: `Mobilisation, sacrifice, and citizenship in imperial societies at war: a comparative history of local communities at war in England and France 1914–18.'

PROFESSOR N. DAVIES
10 Mar.: `The Warsaw rising 1944—the military aspects thereof.'


Seminar in medieval history

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

D. PALLISER, Leeds
26 Jan.: `Royal mausolea in England 1216–1422.'

J. FERNHOLZ
16 Feb.: `Local diplomacy in fifteenth-century Lancastrian France.'

M. AURELL, Poitiers
1 Mar.: `Gestures of a murder: Thomas Becket, 29 December 1170.'

PROFESSOR I. PHIMISTER, Sheffield
30 Jan.: `Foreign devils, finance, and informal empire: Britain and China, 1900–12.'

C. HARDING
13 Feb.: `Religion and social identity renewed: the founding of the Christian colony of Maryabad, Punjab.'

S. FREEDMAN and G.M. JACK
27 Feb.: M.St. presentations. K. DUMOUCHELLE and C. PARKINSON
5 Mar.: Probationer Research presentations. R. WORRALL and B. WHITE
12 Mar.: Probationer Research presentations.


MODERN HISTORY, THEOLOGY

Seminar on scepticism in early modern Europe

the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Hovenden Room, All Souls College.

PROFESSOR T. CAVE
28 Jan.: `Presentations of scepticism: Sextus Empiricus.'

DR R. SCHOLAR
11 Feb.: `Montaigne and his reception in England.'

DR N. MALCOLM
25 Feb.: `Hobbes.'

PROFESSOR BROOKE
10 Mar.: `Boyle.'


MODERN HISTORY AND THE VOLTAIRE FOUNDATION

Enlightenment Workshop

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Voltaire Foundation.

H. HOWARD
2 Feb.: `The illustrated Bible in eighteenth-century England.'

DR M. FITZPATRICK, Aberystwyth
16 Feb.: `Death and the maidens: David Samwell, the South Seas, and Enlightenment in Britain.'

DR J. RENDALL, York
1 Mar.: `Adaptations: gender, history, and political economy in the work of Dugald Stewart and Elizabeth Hamilton.'

Conveners: Dr J.A. Black, Professor F.G.B. Millar, and Dr C.F. Robinson. STEPHANIE DALLEY
19 Jan.: `Introduction: change and continuity.'

SAM LIEU, Macquarie
2 Feb.: `Mani and the early Sasanians.'

ALISON SALVESEN
16 Feb.: `Binding spells in the Aramaic incantation bowls from Babylonia.'

DAVID TAYLOR
1 Mar.: `Syricac communities and the coming of Islam.'

Conveners: Professor Vernon Bogdanor and Dr David Butler. DR BUTLER (Discussion opened by David Willetts, MP, Head of Policy Board and Shadow Secretary for Work and Pensions)
23 Jan.: `The strategy of the Conservative Party.'

DR BUTLER (Discussion opened by Lord Razzall, Treasurer, Liberal Democrats, 1987–2000)
6 Feb.: `The strategy of the Liberal Democrats.'

PROFESSOR BOGDANOR (Discussion opened by Lady Prashar, First Civil Service Commissioner)
20 Feb.: `Civil Service reform.'

PROFESSOR BOGDANOR (Discussion opened by the Rt. Hon. Lord Falconer, Secretary of State for Constitutional Affairs and Lord Chancellor)
5 Mar.: `The role of the Department for Constitutional Affairs—the Secretary of State's view.'


Current issues in social policy

The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Violet Butler Seminar Room, Barnett House. PROFESSOR H. GLENNERSTER, LSE
20 Jan.: `Can we afford our future?' DR T. BURCHARDT, LSE
27 Jan.: ` "One man's rags are another man's riches": identifying adaptive preferences using panel data.'

PROFESSOR J. WALDFOGEL, Columbia and LSE
10 Feb.: `Inequality in pre-school education and school readiness.'

DR H. DEAN, LSE
24 Feb.: `Popular discourse and the ethical deficiency of "Third Way" conceptions of citizenship.'

Conveners: Karen Brown and Lotte Hughes. A. AFIGBO
22 Jan.: `On reparation for the African slave trade: contestations and refutations.'

L. WHITFIELD
5 Feb.: `Who represents whom? Political representation in Ghana (1947–81).'

D. RUBINSTEIN, Princeton
19 Feb., Dahrendorf Room: `Utilising African landscapes: tensions among people and wildlife.'

A. MOKVIST, Uppsala
4 Mar.: `Traditional leaders, governance, and the Communal Land Rights Bill in South Africa.'

Conveners: Dr D. Johnson and Professor W. Beinart. DR A. LEMON
20 Jan.: `Redressing school inequalities in the Eastern Cape, South Africa.'

DR C. BROCK
3 Feb.: `Aspects of education in Sierra Leone: from "jewel in the crown" to "basket case"?' DR M. SCHWEISFURTH, Birmingham
10 Feb.: `Education and democracy in the Gambia.'

DR S. NEWELL, Sussex
24 Feb.: ` "What the Dickens?": debates about English literature and English literacy in West Africa.'

C. LOW
9 Mar.: `Gatherers of knowledge: informal learning and transmission of healing knowledge amongst rural Namibian Khoisan.'


SOCIAL SCIENCES, LAW

The UN Security Council and War

The following seminars, which are part of the Leverhulme Programme on `The changing character of war', will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in Seminar Room B, the Department of Politics and International Relations.

PROFESSOR D. SCHEFFER, Georgetown
28 Jan.: `The Council and military occupations.'

DR N. KRISCH
11 Feb.: `Great Powers and the Security Council.'

PROFESSOR G. GOODWIN-GILL
25 Feb.: `The Council and international humanitarian organisations.'

PROFESSOR G. NOLTE, Göttingen
10 Mar.: `The Council and international humanitarian law.'


THEOLOGY

Old Testament Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Mondays in the Seminar Room, the Theology Faculty Centre.

PROFESSOR K. CATHCART
23 Feb.: ` "The most learned Englishman I know": Sir Peter le Page Renouf (1822–97), theologian and Egyptologist.'

Convener: W.M. Morgan, Mansfield College. PROFESSOR G. SAMUEL, Newcastle, NSW, Australia
30 Jan.: `Teaching non-western religions today: finance, politics, and identity.'

DR J. REYNELL
27 Feb.: `Opportunities for female autonomy and leadership within the Jain religious tradition.'

Conveners: Professor J. Hedley Brooke and Dr Margaret Yee.

DR K. HUTCHISON, Melbourne
29 Jan.: `An angel's view of heaven? Heliocentricity before Copernicus.'

Convener: Dr K. Howse.

PROFESSOR B. DAVIES, LSE
22 Jan: `Matching care management to needs: how well did the reforms succeed?' PROFESSOR A. GRAY
29 Jan.: `Ageing and health expenditure: a new look at the evidence.'

PROFESSOR A.D. SMITH
12 Feb.: `Oxford Project to Investigate Memory and Ageing (OPTIMA): from diagnosis to prevention of dementia.'

DR S. FAZEL
26 Feb. `Psychiatric aspects of crime and the elderly.'

PROFESSOR R. HANCOCK, Leicester
11 Mar.: `A micro-simulation model for long-term care costs.'


BEGBROKE SCIENCE PARK

Formula 1 Motorsport Evenings

The following talks will be given on Mondays in the Begbroke Science Park, Sandy Lane, Yarnton. Admission is free, but those wishing to attend are asked to e-mail to reserve a place (e-mail: elen.wade-martins@begbroke.ox.ac.uk, elen.humphreys@begbroke.ox.ac.uk, or rebecca.lingwood@begbroke.ox.ac.uk).

PAT SYMONDS, Executive Director of Engineering, the Renault F1 Team
26 Jan., 7 p.m.: `Success in competition: the application of science of just sheer luck?'

BRIAN O'ROURKE, Chief Composites Engineer, BMW Williams F1 Team
2 Feb., 6 p.m.: `Composite materials and safety structures in F1 racing cars.'


CENTRE FOR BRAZILIAN STUDIES

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Centre for Brazilian Studies.

DR JOSE ESTEBAN CASTRO
20 Jan.: `Private participation in the water sector in Brazil: issues of governance and citizenship.'

DR JOSE AUGUSTO PADUA, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro
3 Feb.: `Nature conservation and nation building in the thought of Brazil's founding father Jose Bonifacio (1763--1838).'

PROFESSOR L. KOWARICK, Sao Paulo
17 Feb.: `Social vulnerability in urban Brazil, France, and the United States.'

DR JOAO CESAR DE CASTRO ROCHA, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro
2 Mar.: `The dialectic of marginality: towards a new paradigm of contemporary Brazilian culture.'

Convener: Professor S. Woolgar.

DR C. HAYDEN, Cambridge and Berkeley
21 Jan.: `Taking as giving: bioscience and the rise of an ethic of benefit-sharing.'

PROFESSOR K. HETHERINGTON, Lancaster
4 Feb.: `Manchester's Urbis: regeneration, interactivity, subjectivity.'

DR A. BARRY, Goldsmiths' College, London
25 Feb.: `Why invention?'

DR M. JACOB, Copenhagen Business School
3 Mar.: `Public--private boundary crossing and the commodification of knowledge.'

Subject: `Automated reasoning and formal verification.'


OXFORD e-SCIENCE CENTRE

Will e-science change the University?

The Oxford e-Science Centre will hold an Oxford University e-Science Open day on Wednesday, 21 January, 9.30 a.m.–4 p.m., in the Saïd Business School. The keynote talk will be given by Professor Tony Hey. For registration and further details, contact Miranda Turner (e-mail: miranda.turner@oucs.ox.ac.uk).


OXFORD CENTRE FOR HEBREW AND JEWISH STUDIES

The quest for peace in the Arab–Israeli conflict

PROFESSOR SHLOMO BEN-AMI, formerly Foreign Minister of the State of Israel, will lecture at 5 p.m. on the following Thursdays in the Examination Schools.

5 Feb.: `The early years: a missed opportunity?'

12 Feb.: `1967–77: the tortuous road to Jerusalem.'

11 Mar.: `The rise and fall of the Oslo process.'


David Patterson Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 8 p.m. on Wednesdays in Yarnton Manor. The OCHJS minibus will depart from the Playhouse, Beaumont Street, at 6.40 and 7.30 p.m., and will leave Yarnton Manor at 9.45 p.m. Single fare: £1.60 (students £1.20).

PROFESSOR B. NEUBERGER, Open University of Israel
28 Jan.: `Education and democracy in Israel—dilemmas and constraints.'

PROFESSOR L. KRAVITZ, Hebrew Union College, New York
11 Feb.: ` "Where the dog lies buried...": hidden problem areas in medieval and modern theological systems.'

PROFESSOR E. SICHER, Ben-Gurion University
25 Feb.: `Between hope and despair: Jewish writers and the Russian Revolution.'

PROFESSOR R. LOEWE, University College, London
10 Mar.: `Ibn Sahula's Meshal haqadmoni: a failed educational endeavour.'


WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE

Surgery, physic, and culture

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Mondays in the Wellcome Unit, 47 Banbury Road.

R. RALLEY, Cambridge
26 Jan.: `The "comminalte" of London physicians and surgeons, 1423–4.'

DR A. WARWICK, London
9 Feb.: `Rethinking the early history of X-rays through orthopaedic surgery in the German-speaking lands.'

DR L. VAUGHAN
23 Feb.: ` " The morbid destruction of the parts necessary to life": William Heberden and the "usefulness" of clinico-pathological correlation in eighteenth- century England.'

A. STOBART, Middlesex
8 Mar.: ` "The Right Honourable the Lady Clifford's Booke of Receipts": variations in domestic medicine at Ugbrooke House, Devon, in the seventeenth century.'


MUSEUM OF THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE

Public lecture

DR JIM BENNETT will lecture at 7 p.m. on Thursday, 5 February, in the Museum of the History of Science. The lecture is linked to the current exhibition `Ingenuity in Restoration England'. Admission is free.

DR B. MILTON-EDWARDS, Queen's, Belfast
28 Jan.: `The concept of Hudna (ceasefires) in Islamic political thought.'

DR G. JOFFÉ, Cambridge
11 Feb.: `The ideology of the Algerian crises.'

DR F. BURGAT, Institut de Recherches sur le Monde Arabe et Musulman, Aix-en-Provence
25 Feb.: `Divergent agendas in United Yemen: the politics of Islah and Da'wah Salafiyya.'

DR G. KRAMER, Free University, Berlin
10 Mar.: `Justice and equality in contemporary Islamic discourse.'


QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

Development Studies Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House. Details of the 12 February and 11 March seminars will be announced later.

DR V. FITZGERALD
29 Jan.: `Productivity growth in Latin America during the twentieth century.'

DR D. CHATTY
26 Feb.: `The politics of oil and pastoral nomadic societies: the case of Oman.'

Subject: `The Samaritan's dilemma: an institutional analysis of aid and development.'


Neill Lecture

LORD BINGHAM OF CORNHILL will deliver the Neill Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 27 February, in the Examination Schools.

PROFESSOR SIR DAVID WATSON, Brighton
26 Jan.: `A new university world? National and international perspectives on change in higher education.'

Conveners: Geoffrey Evans, Iain McLean, and Christopher Wlezien, Nuffield College. D. KELEMEN
23 Jan.: `The globalisation of American law.'

SEAN CAREY, Sheffield
6 Feb.: `Election cycles and the economic voter.'

G. CAPOCCIA
20 Feb.: `Reactions to extremism and democratic survival: defending democracy in interwar Europe.'

P. MAIR, Leiden
5 Mar.: `The passing of popular democracy.'

Convener: Dr D.A. Washbrook.

HER EXCELLENCY DR MALEEHA LODHI, High Commissioner for Pakistan
Fri. 30 Jan., 5 p.m., Dahrendorf Room: To be announced.

PROFESSOR F. ROBINSON, Royal Holloway College, London
3 Feb.: `Other-worldly and this-worldly Islam and the Islamic revival.'

DR M. HARRISON, Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine
17 Feb.: `Networks of knowledge: medicine and natural history in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century India.'

Convener: Dr S. Tsang.

Friday, 27 February. Session 1: Drivers behind policy-making (Chair: Dr Tsang)

PROFESSOR MAOCHUN YU, US Naval Academy
9.30 a.m.: `China: what are the political and military factors that determine China's policy over the use of force?' (Discussant: Wei Zhang, Cambridge)

DR P. YANG, Politics, National Taiwan
11 a.m.: `Taiwan: what are the primary factors that determine Taiwan's policy over its security?' (Discussant: Antonio Chiang, National Security Council)

DR R. BUSH, Brookings Institution
12.05 p.m.: `The US: what are the capacity and the limits of the US in deterring China from using force and constraining Taiwan from provoking China?' (Discussant: Dr Yuen-Foong Khong)


Saturday, 28 February. Session 3: Beyond traditional military balance across the Strait (Chair: Rear-Adm. Richard Cobbold, Royal United Services Institute)

PROFESSOR J. POLLACK, Naval War College
9.30 a.m.: `Missile threat: can Taiwan defend itself effectively against the PLA's missile threat in military and political terms?' (Discussant: Dr H. Liao, Taiwan Research Institute)

R. FISHER, Jamestown Foundation
10.55 a.m.: `Unconventional warfare: what is the scope for the PLA to conduct electronic warfare and stage other unconventional operations that may break Taiwan's will to fight?' (Discussant: Capt. J. Settele, US Navy)

DR K. CAMPBELL, CSIS
12 noon: `US role; under what conditions and in what form will the US intervene militarily in a military confrontation across the Taiwan Strait?' (Discussant: Dr Su-ya Chang, Academic Sinica)

Conveners: Kalypso Nicolaidis and Othon Anastasakis.

H. GRABBE, Centre for European Reform, and DIMITRIS PAPADIMITRIOU, Manchester
22 Jan.: `What can the EU learn from the enlargement process to improve its policies for south-east Europe?'

M. GLENNY, SEE Change 2004, and A. FATIC, Montenegro
29 Jan.: `The informal sector and organised crime.'

L. KEKIC, Economist Intelligence Unit, and V. BOJICIC-DZELILOVIC, LSE
12 Feb.: `Prospects and challenges for economic development.'

V. FOUSKAS, Kingston, and T. DIEZ, Birmingham
4 Mar.: `On Cyprus.'

Subject: `Words are the part of silence that can be spoken: what art might mean in the twenty-first century.'


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE AND THE CENTRE FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

Making globalisation work for developing countries

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Fridays in the Goodhart Seminar Room, University College.

DR V. JOSHI
30 Jan.: `Globalisation and exchange rate regimes.'

PROFESSOR R. WADE, LSE
27 Feb.: `The World Bank and its critics.'

DR W. MATTLI
12 Mar.: `The role international standards can play in regulating global corporate behaviour.'


BLACKFRIARS

The Blackfriars Aquinas Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Thursdays in Blackfriars.

DR R. CROSS
5 Feb.: `Aquinas on the common nature.'

DR S. BALDNER, St Francis Xavier University, Nova Scotia
26 Feb.: `Aquinas on prime matter and the heavens.'

4 Feb.: `New World Missions I: music and culture.'

18 Feb.: `Jesuit chapels and musical catechisms.'

DR D. KILLINGLEY, Newcastle
29 Jan.: `Christian and Indian traditions in historical perspective.'

V. KALPEI, Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies, and THE REVD DR STEPHEN FINAMORE, Bristol
12 Feb.: `Violence and peacemaking in Hindu and Christian traditions.'

DR SAVITA VIJ, Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies
26 Feb.: `Hindus and Hinduism in contemporary Britain.'


FRIENDS OF THE BODLEIAN

Thirty-minute lectures related to current exhibition `Benjamin Disraeli: scenes from an extraordinary life'

The following thirty-minute lectures, related to the Bodleian Library's current exhibition on Benjamin Disraeli, will be given at 1 p.m. on the days shown in the Cecil Jackson Room, the Sheldonian Theatre. Admission to the lectures is free. Wine and sandwiches will be served after the lectures at a cost of £5 per person. Pre-booking (for both lectures and wine and sandwiches) is essential, with Mrs P.M. Sturgis, Membership Secretary, Friends of the Bodleian, Bodleian Library, Oxford OX1 3BG (telephone: Oxford (2)77234, e-mail: pms@bodley.ox.ac.uk).

DR REBECCA ADAMS
Wed. 21 Jan.: `Dizzy's women—the private life behind the public success.'

TIMOTHY WILSON
Tue. 2 Mar.: `Ashmolean acquisitions old and new.'


Other meetings

Mon. 19 Jan., 8 p.m., Rewley House Theatre: showing of film Il più bel giorno della mia vita (Comencini; 100 minutes; no subtitles). Admission free.

Wed. 28 Jan., 7.45 for 8 p.m., Pauling Centre for the Human Sciences, 58 Banbury Road: `Una panoramica dell'Italia', a survey of recent Italian news, with Luciana John and Anna Proudfoot. Cost of admission as for lectures (see above).

Tue. 3 Feb., 7.45 for 8 p.m., 48 Common Room, St Anne's: conversazione in italiano. Admission free.


MEDICAL HUMANITIES FORUM

The following lectures will be given at 6 p.m. on Thursdays in Lecture Room 6, New College. Further information on the Medical Humanities Forum may be obtained from Jamilah Meghji, New College.

PROFESSOR S. PATTISON, Cardiff
29 Jan.: `A vision of medical humanities.'

THE REVD PROFESSOR SIR JOHN POLKINGHORNE, formerly of Cambridge
13 May: `Genetic engineering and the soul.'


OXFORD BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY

P. WALLER will lecture at 5.15 p.m. on Thursday, 22 January, in Seminar Room 3, the Taylor Institution. Admission is free.

Convener: Philip Carter, Oxford University Press.

A. SHIRLEY, National Maritime Museum
29 Jan.: `Some heroes (and one heroine) of polar exploration.'

M. CHRIMES, Institution of Civil Engineers
4 Mar.: `The engineer as hero? Perceptions of the greatness of British engineers.'


ASSOCIATION OF WOMEN IN SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Oxford Science Festival: Equal Opportunities in Science

NICHOLA CARTER, McGrath and Co., Solicitors, will lecture at 2.30 p.m. on Wednesday, 4 February, in the Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Plant Sciences.

Those attending will also be able to participate in a post-lecture clinic that will address specific questions regarding immigration to the UK and USA, 3.30-- 4.30 p.m., Wednesday, 4 February, Rajah Brooke Room, Department of Plant Sciences.


Panel Discussion: Access All Areas: The future of women and minorities in science, engineering and technology

A panel of experts discuss the opportunities and challenges for widening access to science in the twenty-first century, at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 4 February, in the Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Plant Sciences. The discussion will be chaired by Anna Fazackerley (journalist: the Guardian, The Scientist, THES), and the panellists will be Dr Evan Harris, MP; Professor Carole Jordan; Dr Harriet McWatters; Nichola Carter, McGrath and Co.; Sarah Clayton, Policy Adviser, Office of Science and Technology; Sarah Loyd, Technical Consultant, LogicaCMG; and Judith Finch, Diversity and Equal Opportunities Officer. The events are organised by Oxford AWiSE (Association of Women in Science and Engineering). For further information and to register for either event contact Dr Gail Preston (e-mail: gail.preston@plants.ox.ac.uk).

NATIONAL TEACHING FELLOWSHIP SCHEME 2004

The Higher Education Funding Council for England is again inviting institutions to nominate candidates for the National Teaching Fellowship Scheme (NTFS). The scheme is intended to recognise and reward `excellence as a teacher and facilitator of students' learning'. The National Teaching Fellowship Scheme was run for the first time in 2000. This year for the first time there will be three routes to a National Teaching Fellowship: thirty awards for `Experienced Staff' who have been teaching for more than six years, ten awards for `Rising Stars' who have been teaching for fewer than six years in Higher Education, and ten awards for `Learning Support Staff'. Each award will continue to be to the value of £50,000. Awards are intended to enable fellowship holders to carry out a project during their fellowship year that contributes to the development and dissemination of good practice in learning and teaching. Initial selection of nominees is to be carried out by the institution. The Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Academic) is accordingly now inviting applications from individuals who wish to be considered for nomination to any one of the three categories of award. The University's nominees will be selected in accordance with the criteria specified by the NTFS, and one nomination may be made in each category. The closing dates for submission of nominations by the institution are Friday, 5 March, for the `Experienced Staff' category of award, and Friday, 16 April, for the `Rising Stars' and `Learning Support Staff' categories. In view of this, the closing date for individual submissions to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Academic) will be Friday, 6 February. Extensive information about the National Teaching Fellowship Scheme may be found on the scheme's Web site (www.ntfs.ac.uk). Completed submissions, prepared in the format specified by the National Teaching Fellowship Scheme, should be sent in hard copy to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Academic), c/o Richard Hughes, University Offices, Wellington Square by, at the latest, Friday, 6 February.


SIR JOHN HICKS FUND

The Committee for the Sir John Hicks Fund invites applications from members of the University for grants towards the costs of research in economic history. Applications will be considered from undergraduates, graduate students, and members of the academic staff, and may relate to research into the economic history of any period or country. Applicants should (a) provide sufficient information about the general nature of their research to establish that it falls within the field of economic history; and (b) specify the precise nature and cost of the expenditure for which a grant is requested. They should also give the name of one referee who might be consulted by the committee. It is intended by the committee that grants should normally be made for sums of up to £250, though this may on occasion be exceeded. Retrospective grants will be made only in exceptional circumstances. The committee will consider applications twice each year. The closing date for the first round is Monday of the third week of Hilary Term, and for the second round Monday of the third week of Trinity Term. Applications should be sent to the Secretary of the Committee for the Sir John Hicks Fund, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford.

APPOINTMENTS AND REAPPOINTMENTS

With the approval of the relevant divisional board, the following appointments and reappointments have been made and titles conferred for the periods stated.

HUMANITIES DIVISION

Appointments

FIXED-TERM UNIVERSITY LECTURER

Oriental Studies

IMRE BANGHA, MA, PH.D. In Hindi. From 1 October 2003 to 30 September 2005.

UNIVERSITY LECTURER (CUF)

Classics

TOBIAS REINHARDT, D.PHIL. Fellow of Somerville. In Classical Languages. From 1 October 2003 to 30 September 2007.

DEPARTMENTAL LECTURER

Oriental Studies

JONATHAN WILLIAM KIRKPATRICK, MA. In Jewish Studies. From 1 October 2003 to 30 September 2005.

TEMPORARY DEPARTMENTAL LECTURER

Medieval and Modern Languages

CLARE TERESA MONICA SHAWCROSS, BA, M.PHIL. In Modern Greek. From 1 January 2004 to 30 September 2004.

INSTRUCTOR

Oriental Studies

JUNKO HAGIWARA (BA Tokyo, MA Ealing). In Japanese. From 1 October 2003 to 30 September 2006. KAORI NISHIZAWA (BA Tsukuba, MA Monash). Nissan Instructor in Japanese. From 1 October 2003 to 30 September 2006. HIROE KAJI (BA Kansai, MA Ulster). In Japanese. From 1 October 2003 to 30 September 2006.

FIXED-TERM INSTRUCTOR

Oriental Studies

NADIA MARIE JAMIL, D.PHIL. (MA Edinburgh). In Arabic. From 1 October 2003 to 30 September 2008. not confirmed

TEMPORARY TUTOR

Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art

LYNN TURNER (BA Northumbria, MA, PH.D. Leeds). In Fine Art (History and Theory of Visual Culture). From 1 October 2003 to 30 June 2004.

Reappointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURER (CUF)

English

SUSAN JONES, MA, D.PHIL. Fellow of St Hilda's. In English. From 1 January 2004 to the retiring age.

Conferment of title

UNIVERSITY LECTURER (CUF)

Modern History

PATRICIA CLAVIN (BA, PH.D. London). Fellow-elect of Jesus College. In Modern History. From 1 October 2003 to 30 September 2008.

FACULTY LECTURER

Classics

SCOTT SCULLION (BA TORONTO, PH.D. Harvard). In Classics. From 1 December 2003 to 30 November 2008.


LIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES DIVISION

Reappointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

LOUIS C. MAHADEVAN, MA (B.SC. New Delhi, M.SC., PH.D. London), Fellow of Trinity. In Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry. From 1 October 2004 to the retiring age. MARTIN E.M. NOBLE (BA Cambridge, PH.D. Heidelberg). In Molecular Biophysics. From 1 October 2004 to the retiring age.


MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES DIVISION

Appointment

UNIVERSITY LECTURER

CHRISTOPHER C. HOLMES (B.SC. Brighton, M.SC. Brunel, PH.D. Imperial), Fellow-elect of Lincoln. In Statistical Genomics (in collaboration with the MRC Mammalian Genetics Unit). From 17 February 2004 to 16 February 2009.

UNIVERSITY LECTURER (FIXED-TERM)

CONSTANTIN C. COUSSIOS (BA, M.ENG., PH.D. Cambridge), Fellow of Magdalen. In Biomedical Engineering (Powderject). From 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2008.

Reappointment

UNIVERSITY LECTURER

ALEXANDER M. KORSUNSKY, MA, D.PHIL. (B.SC., M.SC. Moscow), Fellow of Trinity. In Engineering Science. From 1 October 2004 to the retiring age.


MEDICAL SCIENCES DIVISION

Appointment

CLINICAL LECTURER

RAM K. MALLADI (BA Cambridge, MB, BS London), MRCP, M.R.C.PATH.). In Haematology. From 1 February 2004 to 31 January 2008.


CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, and, where applicable, of divisional boards, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties and the Continuing Education Board will come into effect on 30 January.

1 Board of the Faculty of Law

(a) Special regulations relating to research students

In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 876, delete ll. 23–42.


2 M.Sc. by coursework in Criminology and Criminal Justice

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 709, delete ll. 8--11 and substitute: `2. There shall be a board of studies for the course, to be chaired by the Director of Graduate Studies for Criminology and also comprising all the members of the Board of Examiners for the Master of Science in Criminology and Criminal Justice for the current year, the Director or assistant Director of the Centre for Criminological Research and a student representative (the latter for open business only).'

2 Ibid., l. 13, delete `thesis' and substitute `dissertation'.

3 Ibid., l. 32, delete `Design and Evaluation of Research' and substitute ` "Methods 1" and "Methods 2" '.

4 Ibid., l. 34, after `5,000 words' insert `(inclusive of footnotes, but excluding bibliography and appendices)'.

5 Ibid., l. 35, delete `A title, or choice of titles' and substitute `A selection of three titles'.

6 Ibid., l. 35, after `as determined by the' delete `course leader for the option' and substitute `Board of Examiners'.

7 Ibid., l. 38, delete `the essay' and substitute `two typewritten copies of each essay'.

8 Ibid., delete ll. 41--5 and substitute: ` "Methods 1" shall be examined by means of an assessed essay of no less than 2,500 and no more than 3,000 words (inclusive of footnotes, but excluding bibliography and appendices). A selection of three titles (as determined by the Board of Examiners) will be posted on the designated noticeboard at the Centre for Criminological Research by noon on the Friday of Week 6 of Michaelmas Term. Candidates shall be required to submit two copies of the essay to the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford not later than three weeks after this date, by noon. "Methods 2" shall be examined by means of an assessed essay of no less than 2,500 and no more than 3,000 words (inclusive of footnotes, but excluding bibliography and appendices). The essay shall be a research proposal; a selection of three topics (as determined by the Board of Examiners) will be posted on the designated noticeboard at the Centre for Criminological Research by noon on the Friday of Week 6 of Hilary Term. Candidates shall be required to submit two copies of the essay to the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford not later than three weeks after this date, by noon. In addition, candidates taking either Methods 1 and/or Methods 2 shall be required to complete to the satisfaction of the course tutor for the option a form of continuous assessment, which will be approved by the Board of Studies and the details of which will be published in the Coursebook for the relevant year. The Course Director will certify to the Clerk of the Schools the names of those students who have successfully completed the form of continuous assessment.'

9 Ibid., p. 710, l. 3, after `the dissertation' insert `, and, in the case of candidates who have taken Methods 1 and/or Methods 2, have also satisfactorily completed the form of continuous assessment required for the relevant option.'

10 Ibid., l. 6, after `papers' insert `(and, in the case of candidates who have taken Methods 1 and/or Methods 2, have also satisfactorily completed the form of continuous assessment required for the relevant option)'.

11 Ibid., l. 7, delete `option' and substitute `assessed essay'.

12 Ibid., l. 15, after `course.' insert `Candidates may also, where relevant, carry forward their certificate of satisfactory completion of the continuous assessment element of Methods 1 and/or Methods 2.'

13 Ibid., l.24, after `course.' insert `Candidates may also, where relevant, carry forward their certificate of satisfactory completion of the continuous assessment element of Methods 1 and/or Methods 2.'

14 Ibid, l.29, after `course.' insert `Candidates may also, where relevant, carry forward their certificate of satisfactory completion of the continuous assessment element of Methods 1 and/or Methods 2.'

15 Ibid., l. 25, insert: `Continuous assessment element of Methods 1 and Methods 2: Candidates who fail to complete an assignment which forms part of the continuous assessment element of either Methods 1 or Methods 2 to the satisfaction of the Course Tutor for the option may resubmit that assignment once by noon on the Friday of Week 9 of the relevant term.'

16 Ibid., p. 710, l.31, delete `Policing' and substitute `British Policing ` myths and reality'.

17 Ibid, l. 33, delete `Dilemmas of Custody' and substitute `Public and Private Policing'.

18 Ibid., l. 34, delete `Design and Evaluation of Research' and renumber 5.--10. as 4.--9. accordingly.

19 Ibid., l. 40, delete `in the Criminal Justice System' and substitute `and the Law'.

20 Ibid., after l.40, insert: `10. Methods 1

11. Methods 2

12. Desistance from Crime: the role of criminal justice agencies

13. Mafias'.


2 Board of the Faculty of Management

Master of Business Administration

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 777, l. 39, delete `the schedule of required courses' and substitute `Schedule A'.

2 Ibid., p. 778, l. 33, delete `the schedule of required courses' and substitute `Schedule B'.

3 Ibid., ll. 37--8, delete `Monday of First Week of the term preceding the term in which the electives take place' and substitute `day of the of the first module of the second year of the programme'.

4 Ibid., l. 39, delete `new business development' and substitute `business'.

5 Ibid., l. 40 and l. 42, delete `part-time MBA Director' and substitute `Director of the part-time MBA'.

6 Ibid., delete ll. 43--5.

7 Ibid., l. 46, delete `(f)' and substitute `(e)'.

8 Ibid., l. 47 delete `.' and substitute `;'.

9 Ibid., after l. 47 insert: `(f) candidates may substitute a thesis of not less than 12,000 words and not exceeding 14,000 words on a topic to be approved by the Director of the part-time MBA in place of 2 electives (these cannot be core electives).'

10 Ibid., l.48 after `Schedule' insert `A'.

11 Ibid., ll. 50--1, delete `, and during the first year of the course for part-time students'.

12 Ibid., p. 779, after l. 25 insert:

`Schedule B

The following courses are required to be taken by part-time students. Details can be found in the course handbook.

(a) Understanding General Management

(b) Decision Science

(c) Strategy

(d) Developing Effective Managers

(e) Marketing

(f) Managerial Economics

(g) Financial Reporting

( h) Finance

(i) Operations Management

(j) Financial Management

(k) International Business and Global Governance'.


3 Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages

(a) Preliminary Examination in Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

1 In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 88, l. 14, after `Language Papers;' insert `(including in French certification of attendance and participation in oral classes)'.

2 Ibid., p. 89, l. 4, after `6. a. Language papers' insert `*' and the following footnote: `* Colleges will submit to the Moderators via the Clerk of the Examination Schools by noon on Friday of Week 5 of Trinity Term a certificate stating that their candidates have attended and participated in at least eight oral classes, consisting of reading aloud in French with attention to pronunciation and intonation, and discussion in French of passages dealing with issues in French contemporary culture.'

3 Ibid., delete ll. 7--11 and substitute: `French: The paper will consist of: (a) French grammar (twenty short sentences for translation into French); (b) a prose passage for translation into French; and (c) a prose passage for translation into English.'

4 Ibid., delete ll. 33--4 and substitute: `French: IIA. Synthesis: A summary in French of a passage of French dealing with one of the texts prescribed for French Paper IV. IIB. Translation: Translation of a passage from one of the texts prescribed for French Paper IV, excluding La Chastelaine de Vergi.'


4 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and English Language and Literature

Preliminary Examination in English and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 72, l. 43, after `and-a-half hours).' insert `(including in French certification of attendance and participation in oral classes, as specified for the Preliminary Examination in Modern Languages).'


5 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Modern History

Preliminary Examination in Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 86, l. 4, after `half hours).' insert `(including in French certification of attendance and participation in oral classes, as specified for the Preliminary Examination in Modern Languages).'


6 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Oriental Studies

Preliminary Examination in European and Middle Eastern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 74, l. 22, after `two papers each of one-and-a-half hours).' insert `(including in French certification of attendance and participation in oral classes, as specified for the Preliminary Examination in Modern Languages).'


7 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Philosophy

Preliminary Examination in Philosophy and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 102, l. 25, after `a half hours).' insert `(including in French certification of attendance and participation in oral classes, as specified for the Preliminary Examination in Modern Languages).'


8 Continuing Education Board

(a) M.St. in Professional Archaeology

With effect from October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 664, delete ll. 4--27.


(b) M.Sc. in Professional Archaeology

With effect from October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2003, p. 753, after l. 35 insert:

`Professional Archaeology

1. Every candidate must follow for three terms (full-time) or six terms (part-time) a course of instruction in Professional Archaeology.

2. The course will consist of lectures, seminars, individual tutorials and, in the case of full-time students, three approved placements of approximately ten weeks each, or in the case of part-time students, approved work-place projects undertaken.

3. The examination will consist of the following parts:

(a) a portfolio which shall include:

(i) a written report of 5,000 words maximum of the work undertaken at the first placement;

(ii) a written report of 5,000 words maximum of the work undertaken at the second placement;

(iii) a written report of 5,000 words maximum of the work undertaken at the third placement;

(in the case of part-time students, a written report of 15,000 words maximum on work-place projects undertaken with an approved relevant organisation); the portfolio material for each placement must represent ten weeks of professionally competent work;

(iv) three written assignments of 2,000--2,500 words each, one during each of the placements on an agreed topic;

(v) five written reports of 1,000 words maximum each, one on each of the following courses: four optional short courses and a survey week. The portfolio shall be forwarded to the examiners, c/o Registry, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford, for consideration by such a date as the examiners shall determine and shall notify the candidates and tutors at the start of each academic year.

(b) A dissertation (two copies) of not more than 15,000 words on a topic selected by the student in consultation with his or her tutor and approved by the examiners. The dissertation must be delivered not later than noon on the third Friday in September of the final year of the course to the Chairman of Examiners for the Degree of M.Sc. in Professional Archaeology, c/o the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford. The dissertation must be accompanied by a statement that it is the candidate's own work.

(c) A viva voce examination.

4. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.

5. With the approval of the Board of Studies in each case, a candidate who has obtained a pass mark on section 3 (a), but who is prevented by exceptional circumstances from completing section 3 (b), may be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma in Professional Archaeology.

6. A candidate who fails to satisfy the examiners in 3 (a) or (b) may be permitted to resubmit work in respect of part or parts of the examination which they have failed for examination on one further occasion, not later than one year after the initial attempt.'


(c) Diploma in Professional Archaeology

With effect from October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

In Examination Regulations, 2003, delete p. 967, delete l. 9 to p. 968, l. 5, and substitute: `1. Every candidate must follow for three terms (full-time) or six terms (part-time) a course of instruction in Professional Archaeology.

2. The course will consist of lectures, seminars, individual tutorials and, in the case of full-times students, three approved ten week placements, or in the case of part-time students, approved work-place projects undertaken.

3. The examination will consist of the following parts:

(a) a portfolio which shall include:

(i) a written report of 5,000 words maximum of the work undertaken at the first placement;

(ii) a written report of 5,000 words maximum of the work undertaken at the second placement;

(iii) a written report of 5,000 words maximum of the work undertaken at the third placement;

(in the case of part-time students, a written report of 15,000 words maximum on work-place projects undertaken with an approved relevant organisation); the portfolio material for each placement must represent ten weeks of professionally competent work;

(iv) three written assignments of 2,000--2,500 words each, one during each of the placements on an agreed topic;

(v) five written reports of 1,000 words maximum each, one on each of the following courses: four optional short courses and a survey week. The portfolio shall be forwarded to the examiners, c/o Registry, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford for consideration by such a date as the examiners shall determine and shall notify the candidates and tutors at the start of each academic year.

(b) A viva voce examination.

4. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.

5. A candidate who fails to satisfy the examiners in 3 (a) may be permitted to resubmit work in respect of part or parts of the examination which they have failed for examination on one further occasion, not later than one year after the initial attempt.'

OBITUARIES

Christ Church

ROBERT ALEXANDER DUNDAS, 1 November 2003; commoner 1966. Aged 56.

PROFESSOR CHARLES HENRY GIFFORD, 23 November 2003; commoner 1932. Aged 90.

PROFESSOR DAVID JOHN LEVY, 2 December 2003; commoner 1965. Aged 56.

PROFESSOR KENNETH MAYHEW, 7 July 2003; commoner 1935. Aged 86.


St Edmund Hall

REGINALD ERNEST ALTON, MC, MA, 15 December 2003; commoner 1938, Fellow and Tutor in English 1953--87, Bursar 1953--70, Emeritus Fellow 1987--2003, Dean of Degrees 1989--2000. Aged 83.


St Hilda's College

ELIZABETH FLORENCE HALSALL, MA, DIP.ED., 13 September 2003; exhibitioner 1935–9. Aged 86.

ALICE MURIEL JONES (née Smart), BA, 22 November 2003; commoner 1934–8. Aged 88.

DOROTHY MARGARET MORTON, MA, DIP.ED., 17 July 2003; exhibitioner 1935–40. Aged 87.

ETHEL IRENE PARKER (née Creed), MA, 2003; commoner 1936–40.

BARBARA MARY GLADWIN PAYNE (née Pratt), MA, 14 September 2003; commoner 1949–52. Aged 73.

BERYL MALLORIE TURNER (née Hobbs), MA, 21 December 2003; exhibitioner 1938–41. Aged 83.


Worcester College and St Edmund Hall

HIS HONOUR SIR STEPHEN TUMIM, KT., MA, 8 December 2003; Scholar 1950, Worcester College, Honorary Fellow 1994--2003; Principal, St Edmund Hall, 1996--8. Aged 73.


MEMORIAL SERVICES

Jesus College

A Memorial Service for DR DAVID REES (1922--2003), Official Fellow and Tutor in Philosophy, Jesus College, 1954--87, Emeritus Fellow 1987--2003, Scholar and Postmaster, Merton College, 1942--6, will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 28 February, in the chapel, Jesus College. Tea will be served in the college after the service.


Lady Margaret Hall

A Memorial Service for THE REVD PETER BIDE, Emeritus Fellow and former Chaplain, will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 31 January, in the chapel, Lady Margaret Hall.


COMMEMORATION

Wadham College

A Commemoration of JOHN STANTON FLEMMING, CBE, MA, FBA, formerly Warden and Honorary Fellow, will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, 24 January, in the University Church of St Mary the Virgin.

Refreshments will be served afterwards in Wadham College.

Volunteer Wanted

Retired teacher wanted to help with visits of teachers, school children and others at the Food Animal Initiative at the University Farm at Wytham. No pay but great opportunities for developing practical educational approaches to food production, farming and wildlife. See the FAI web site at: www.faifarms.co.uk. Contact: marian.dawkins@zoo.ox.ac.uk or tel.: 01865 271215.


Oxford University Newcomers' Club

The Club welcomes the wives, husbands, and partners of visiting scholars, graduates and members of the University who are new to Oxford. It aims to offer help, advice and information, and the opportunity to meet others socially. Informal coffee mornings are held at 13 Norham Gardens every Wednesday in term, also on the Wednesday before term starts, the Wednesday after the end of term and during the summer holidays. Newcomers with children (0-4 years) meet every Friday in term from 10-15 a.m. to 12 midday. Other term time activities include a Book Group, informal Conversation Group, and tours to colleges, museums, and other places of interest, also country walks and garden trips. Secondhand items can be bought on Wed. mornings 10.30 a.m. to 12 midday from the equipment room–open all year except for 2 weeks at Christmas and Easter. Visit our Web site: www.ox.ac.uk/staff.


Cafe Zouk

Mughal Indian cuisine: 1st floor , 135 High Street, Oxford. From our kitchen to your table, we would like to bring you herbs, spices, roots, beauty, fragrances and Mughal tradition of passion for good food. Tel.: 01865 251600. Open: daily 12 p.m. to 2.30 p.m. and 5.30 p.m. to 11.30 p.m. Web site: http://www.cafezouk.co.uk.


Concerts

Saturday 31 Jan., 8 p.m. Sheldonian Theatre: Brahms Series. Brahms symphony no 3 in F major, Op.90; Piano concerto no. 2 in B flat major, Op. 83. The Oxford Philomusica Orchestra; Marios Papadopoulos, piano; Paul Mann, conductor. Tickets: £30, £24, £17, £10. Book online at www.oxfordphil.com, Box Office 01865 305305.

The Oxford Millennium Orchestra plays Strauss, Richard: 1st Horn Concerto (soloist Charlie Wilson); Dvorak: Symphony No 9 in E minor 'From the New World'; Phillip A. Cooke: Five Mythical Creatures. Conductor Nicholas Mumby. Tues. 17 Feb., 8 p.m. Sheldonian Theatre. Tickets £12/£10, £5 available from the Oxford Playhouse on 01865 305305 or www.ticektsoxford.com.

The Oxford Millennium Orchestra plays Baroque Classics. J.S.Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No 5, Cantata 82 'Ich habe enug', Toccata and fugue in D minor; Albinoni: Adagio in G minor. Harpsichord, Jonathan Wikeley, Baritone, David Somerville Wright, conductor/organ, Nicholas Mumby. Sat., 31 Jan., 8 p.m., Merton College Chapel.

Tickets £8, £4 (concessions) available from the Oxford Playhouse on 01865 305305 or www.ticketsoxford.com.


Personal Trainer

Paul Hornsby offers professional and effective advice to those members of the University (and their families) who would like to make a difference to their fitness and health this year. Weight loss, injury rehabilitation or sports specific training programmes can be devised for individuals or groups, at home or at the University Sports Centre, Iffley Road. discounted rates for University staff. Call 07980 818574, e-mail: pjh_personaltraining@yahoo.com.


St Giles' Thursday Lunchtime Talks

Hilary Term 2004: Artists and their Inspiration. 22 Jan., Dodos, Dogs and Saints, Susan Moxley; 29 Jan, Adventures with Porcelain and Light, Margaret O'Rorke; 5 Feb., Following my Nose, Alec Peever; 12 Feb., A Painter;s Progress, Ken Messer; 19 Feb., Title to be announced, Nick Mynheer; 26 Feb., Discovering the Creativity Within, Valerie Petts; 4 March, Contemporary Art and Catharsis, Mark Cazalet; 11 March, Title to be announced, roger Wagner; 18 March, Seeing Music; Hearing Colour, Mark Rowan-Hull.

The talks will be held in St Giles' Church at 12.30 p.m. Everyone is welcome. In order to help us with our costs, a small donation would be appreciated. Web site: http://www.st-giles- church.org.


Restoration and Conservation of Antique Furniture

John Hulme undertakes all aspects of restoration: 30 years experience; collection and delivery. For free advice, telephone or write to: The Workshop, 11A High Street, Chipping Norton, Oxon. OX7 5AD. Tel.: 01608 641692.


Periodicals Bought and Sold

Back-issues of scholarly periodicals and journals bought and sold.

Graham Jeffrey, Periodicals (est. 1967), 29 Cuddesdon Road, Horspath, Oxford, OX33 1JD.

Tel.: 01865 872528, fax: 776398. E-mail: gjeffreysatu@aol.com.


Services Offered

Conservation and restoration specialists Oxford Conservation Associates provide a comprehensive conservation and restoration service to colleges and private clients; from furniture to clocks; books to ceramics; paintings and gilding. Whatever your requirement call 01295 750998 for the right expert. E-mail: oxfordconservation@btopenworld.com.

Luker Bros (Removals and Storage) Ltd. Storage of personal effects for as little as £5 + VAT per week. Weekly deliveries to mainland Europe. Shipping services to all worldwide destinations. Contact: Matthew Elbro on 01865 740709 or e-mail: melbro@lukerbros.com.

Big or small, we ship it all, plus free pick up anywhere in Oxford.

Also 24-hour photocopying, private mailing addresses (24-hour access, and mail forwarding world-wide), binding, fax bureau, colour photocopying, mailing services, and much more.

Contact or visit Mail Boxes Etc., 266 Banbury Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 514655, fax: 514656, e-mail: summertown@020.mbe.uk.com, also at: 94 London Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 741729, fax: 01865 742431, e-mail: staff@mbeheadington.co.uk.

Town and Country Trees: arboricultural contractors; modern arboricultural techniques; local authority approved; safeguarded by full Public Liability insurance. Free advice and quotations. Tel.: 0845 458 2980 or 07976 261850 (mobile).


Domestic Services

Au pair 20+. De luxe accommodation with lively academic family, French Switzerland. Own apartment in ground-floor of village farmhouse. Three-generation family. Babymind 2-year-old and light housework. Tel.: 01993 898536 or 004121 869 9010.

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: 01865 726983 or 01235 555533.


Tuition Offered


Situations Vacant

Public Relations Office, University Offices, has the following vacancies: (i) Assistant Editor, University Gazette (full-time established post); (ii) Assistant Web Officer (fixed term of 6 months). For further information see 'Appointments' in this Gazette.

St Clare's Oxford: required as soon as possible, a well qualified teacher of Albanian to prepare students for the International Baccalaureate. Applicants should be native speakers who are able to teach literature to young native speakers in their mother tongue. For full details please contact Mrs C. Gospel, Head of Languages, as soon as possible. Tel.: 01865 517333. Fax: 01865 517319 or e-mail: catherine.gospel@stclares.ac.uk. Web site: www.stclares.ac.uk.

Oxford University Library Services, Sackler Library: Reader Services, Library Assistant.Clerical & Library Grade 2 (term-time). This is a part-time permanent position on the Reader Services desk of the Sackler Library. We require someone with a flexible approach for reading room duties, shelving and general clerical work. 25 hours per wee. Mon.–Fri. late morning and early afternoon, weeks 0–9 (30 weeks per year). However the hours may be open to negotiation. Further details are avialable from the Administrator, Sackler Library, OX1 2LG (e-mail: jo.collins@saclib.ox.ac.uk). Closing date: 28 January. Probable interview date: 6 February.


Commercial Office Space

Near the Plain/Magdalen Bridge: small office spaces available from beginning Feb. on flexible terms in recently refurbished building. Tel.: 01865 311557 or 078 666 727 22.


House to Let/For Sale

Normandy: Village au Brun, Notre Dame de Cenilly: old farm house, newly tiled roof, all mod cons, and set in approx. 13½ acres of farmland. Peaceful yet within 4 kms from Cerisy la Salle (local village; Saint-Lo, Coutance approx. 20 kms; Cherbourg, Bayeux, Mont St Michel and Caen within 100 kms. Ground floor: kitchen/dining room; gas cooker; separate electric oven; microwave; large fridge with separate freezer; gas c.h.; bathroom with toilet; sitting room. First floor: music room (with Grand piano), 2 bedrooms (1 with small office). Second floor: large bedroom; shower room with toilet; gallery (suitable for office) which overlooks music room below. Open fire in sitting room.

Ideal retreat for writer or musician seeking peace and quiet to work. Long-term let or for sale (sensible offers). For further details please contact Alexander Kok on tel.: 00 33 2 33 45 52 16, fax: 00 33 2 33 17 22 96.


Houses/Flats for Sale

A new agency: Space, Woodstock Road, Oxford (opposite Browns restaurant), tel.: 01865 557333. For property details and virtual tours of 320 towns and villages in Oxfordshire, visit www.spaceagency.co.uk. See Oxford and the county at street level.


Houses to Let

Charlbury(frequent trains to Oxford/London), magnificent Grade II Listed Cotswold stone house in enclosed courtyard/garden. Large kitchen, utility, dining room, living room, 4 large bedrooms, study/bedroom 5, 2 bathrooms. From March for 1 year or more. £1,800 p.c.m. Tel.: Simpson, 01608 810818.

Temple Cowley, newly renovated and furnished Victorian house with garden, close to local amenities; 1–2 reception rooms; 3 bedrooms (1 with en suiteshower and toilet); fitted kitchen with dishwasher and w/machine. Available mid-Aug. to end Dec. 04. £825 p.m. plus bills. Ideal for professionals and family.

Tel.: Yasmin Sidhwa on 01865 711341 or e-mail : sidaley@hilldale.fsnet.co.uk.

Ideal for 2 sharer or family: 2-bedroom house in north Oxford. Clean and fully furnished; lovely kitchen/diner; newly equipped kitchen. Parking. Good links to university departments. Three months or 6 months. Available now. £900 p.c.m. Tel.: 01865 512854 or 07968 286575.

Very convenient city centre house, near castle and bordering the original River Thames. To let for 6 months from April. Excellent condition: 4 bedrooms, 1 with en suiteshower room; family bathroom and separate toilet; first-floor lounge and large kitchen diner; garage and parking space; pleasant garden. Non-smoking, professional family preferred. £1, 175 p.m. plus bills and council tax. E-mail: rob@satin.co.uk. Tel.: 07768 316868.

Witney: to let unfurnished. Three-bedroom, link-detached house. Hall, sitting room, dining room, well-fitted kitchen with some domestic appliances; 3 bedrooms, bathroom, gas fired c.h., double glazing, fitted carpets, front and rear gardens, single garage. £800 p.c.m. King & Woolley Estate Agents, 9 Sheep Street, Charlbury, Oxon.

Tel.: 01608 811235.

Charlbury: to let fully furnished. Two-bedroom detached period cottage. Entrance lobby, sitting room, dining room, kitchen, 2 bedrooms, study, bathroom, garage, gardens, gas c.h. £850 p.c.m. King & Woolley Estate Agents, 9 Sheep Street, Charlbury, Oxon. Tel.: 01608 811235.

North Oxford furnished house available from 1 Sept., for 1 year or less. Charming, cosy, quiet, easy to maintain, fully furnished house in Jericho/north Oxford.

Walk to university, train and coach stations, near best schools, parks, c.h., recently re- decorated, secluded garden, 2½ bathrooms, washing machine, drier, telephone, linen, dishes; 2 bedrooms £1,250 p.m. or 3 bedrooms £1,500 p.m (includes bedsit with separate kitchen and entrance). Contact: Oxford: J.Mackrell (eves. or 7-8 a.m.), 01865 775567, e-mail: mackrelj@btopenworld.com; Canada: A. Gaston, tel.: 001 613 745 1368, fax: 001 613 745 0299, e-mail: gaston@cyberus.ca.

Two-bedroom modern terrace house with garden: fully furnished and fitted in excellent condition; gas c.h.; washer-drier; ample storage space in attic with ladder access. Situated in quiet cul-de-sac in Rewley Park behind Said Business School, near train and bus stations. Reserved parking space. Available from 11 February. £895 p.c.m., deposit required. Ian and Josephine Macdonald, tel.: 01865 421234 or e-mail: josephine.reynell@qeh.ox.ac.uk, or macdonaldreynell@ntlworld.com.

Oxford, Iffley Fields: sweet and sunny Victorian terrace cottage, 10 minutes' walk Magdalen Bridge, frequent city buses, suit academic/professional couple.

Sitting room, dining room/study, modern kitchen, bathroom, second WC, large double bedroom, study/spare bedroom (sofa bed), utilities cellar, stripped pine stair, sanded floors, period fireplaces, antiques, attractive garden (care by arrangement). Available from January for 6–8 months (or less, all dates negotiable). £850 p.m. E-mail: ayers@wadh.ox.ac.uk or tel. 01865 798069, or 01873 810982.

An Englishman's home is his castle---so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or e-mail us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: 01865 764533, fax: 764777, e-mail: info@qbman.co.uk.


Flats to Let

Summertown: quiet, newly refurbished 1-bedroom flat, easy parking.

Non-smoking professional. £750 p.c.m. excl. Available February. Tel.: 01865 556053.

Brand new ground-floor fully furnished apartment in a quiet position within easy reach of the Summertown shops. Suit professional couple. Accommodation includes: entrance hall, open-plan sitting-room/dining room/fitted kitche, master bedroom with en suiteshower room, guest bedroom/study, 2nd bathroom. Allocated parking space and secure entry system. Available now £950 p.c.m. Contact Mrs L.

Yip on 07802 767988 or 01865 246894. E-mail: lorenayip@aol.com.

Botley (lower part of Cumnor Hill), 2-bedroom flat (or 3 study bedrooms). All mod.cons, by bus stop, parking for 2 cars. Available late December onwards.

Long or short let. £700 p.m. exclusive. Tel.: 01865 862034.

Temple Cowley: double bedroom furnished apartments in a recent development in quiet cul-de-sac. Very convenient for buses and swimming pool. Allocated parking. Non-smoker. £650/£675. Tel.: 01844 279416.

Granville Court, London Road: fully furnished, 2-bedroom flat; adjacent Brookes University and ten mintues' walk to city centre; en suiteshower to main bedroom. £800 p.c.m. excl. bills. Available early-mid- Feb. Tel.: 01865 512149 or e-mail: dorothymyers@gn.apc.org.

Central north Oxford–corner North Parade: 1-bedroom flat excellent position avialable end Jan. for short/medium term. Double bedroom; living room; kitchen; bathroom, shower. Fully furnished and equipped; c.h. Suit visiting academic or postgraduate. Tel.: 01865 311557 or 078 666 727 22.

Central North Oxford: furnished 1-bedroom garden flat, double bedroom,living room/kitchen, bathroom. Quiet location, convenient for University and town centre. £675 incl. utilities. Tel.: 01865 515091.

One-bedroom flat, central Oxford, Jericho Victorian suburb: open plan, large study room, separate bedroom, W.C., kitchen and shower room. Newly decorated, gas c.h. Non-smoker. For 1 person only. Professionals, academics, postgrads, mature students welcome. Long let preferred. Tel.: 07766187036. £600 p.m. plus bills.

Available by the week for visitors to Oxford: self-contained, fully-furnished studios, centrally located in Kingston Road. En suiteshower, toilet and washbasin, and fully-equipped kitchen area. Sleep 2. From £320 to £350 p.w. all inc. British Tourist Board approved 3 Stars. For further information tel.: 01865 516913 or visit: http://www.oxfordcity.co.uk/accom/studioflat.


Self-catering Apartments

Fully furnished and serviced 3 and 4-star self-catering apartments available in North Oxford; 15 minutes' from Oxford city centre. Suitbale for short lets for visiting academics or business people. From £330 per week all inclusive. Sleeps 2–5 people. Tel.: 07870 234725. Web site: http://www.weeklyhome.com. E-mail: info@weeklyhome.com.


Accommodation Offered

Private rooms in thatched cottage in the heart of beautiful Eynsham (4 miles north west Oxford, direct bus routes to Summertown and town centre). Fully furnished comprising comfortable single bedroom and good size study/living room. Own telephone line. £65 p.w. incl. bills. Tel.: 01865 881039.

Florence Park house share with 1 other; 3-bedroom period terrace in quiet cul-de-sac; gas c.h., modern kitchen, garden, off-street parking. Two minutes' to bus direct to centre. Suit academic or professional. No smokers or pets. Available now.

£350 p.c.m. plus bills. E-mail: janet_may_roberts@yahoo.co.uk or 07803 508 068.

Tranquil room overlooking garden available in house in central North Oxford; would suit DPhil sutdent or similar, non-smoker; use of kitchen, etc. £275 monthly; references essential. Tel.: 01865 556916, or, for messages, 020 7487 3153.

Accommodation offered in family home in north Oxford for mature person. £60 p.w. (incl. heating and lighting), FREE plus food for short periods when mother away in return for care of 15 year-old schoolboy son. Available now. Contact: djlm@aol.com.

Academic on sabbatical seeks tenant for beautiful 2-bedroom home in East Oxford. In exchange for a very reasonable rent, inclusive of all bills, you will have access to a large living room, kitchen/diner with washing machine; double bedroom, and bathroom with shower. The property would suit a visiting academic and is available late Jan., until Sept. Contact: mark@collegeandcounty.biz, or call 01865 722277 for further details.

Unexpectedly available bedroom and study in lovely north Oxford house. Close to all amenities and all mod cons. Almost self-contained. £550 p.c.m.

plus bills. Three months negotiable. Call 07789 361 977.

College & County have a range of quality properties to let in Oxford.

Contact: info@collegeandcounty.biz to see how we can meet your accommodation needs.

Paying guests, visiting academics, welcomed for short or long stays in the comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple, in exclusive, quiet, leafy central north Oxford, within walking distance of all main university buildings, town centre, parks, river, good shops, and restaurants. All rooms have colour TV, tea-/coffee-making facilities, microwave, and refrigerator and/or deep-freeze availability, c.h., and independent heating.

Breakfast included in the very moderate terms. Tel./fax: 01865 557879.

Oxford B & B: attractive, quiet and convenient home from home. Per night, single £38, double £50. Weekly rate less 20%. Monthly rates negotiable.

Tel.: 01865 770501, e-mail: charmaine.cole@cliffordchance.com


Accommodation Sought

American professor and wife, retired, desire furnished house or flat in north Oxford for annual visit. Time is flexible: 4–8 weeks in June, July, Aug., or Sept. Local references available. Phone to 1-530-756-5415 (reverse charges) or e-mail to: jermurphy@ucdavis.edu. Fax is 1-530-756-0227. James J. Murphy, Department of English, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

College & County is seeking to increase their portfolio of high quality Oxford property suitable for post graduate and academic lets. Ethical letting Works! A high level of personalised service and a less adversarial approach is in the interest of all. Would you like us to let and manage your house for you? Contact: mark@collegeandcounty.biz.

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us: 01865 764533, fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk. Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.


Accommodation Sought to Exchange

House swap required: Our 3-bedroom, 2 bathroom detached 1 storey house with garden, in central north Oxford, is within walking distance of the town centre/university, and close to the park. We would like to exchange it for a large house or flat in the south east area of Barcelona for 2/3 weeks from 1 July. Tel.: 01865 556980 or e-mail: mganddharman@btinternet.com.


Travel Afghanistan

Travel in Afghanistan in association with the Afghan Ministry of Tourism. Trips to Herat, Bamiyan, Panjshir Valley, the northern cities and Badakshan. See: www.matthewleeming.com for details.

 

Holiday Lets

Tuscan Hills: in superb situation near Siena our own restored farmhouse standing amidst its own olives and vineyard. Spectacular hill and forest views.

Walking, are, food and wine abundant. Easy access to cities. Very peaceful with full services (but no pool). Sleeps up to 8. Reasonable rates. Tel./Fax: 01252 660899. E-mail: richfran1321@msn.com.

Southwest France, between Albi/Cordes, farmhouse with 6 acres, swimming pool, set amid sunflower fields and vineyards. Three bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2 living rooms, large kitchen, sleeps 8. Several airports within easy reach. Call 01608 810818 or e-mail barrymsimpson@hotmail.com for brochure.

Southern France: 27 miles from Perpignon Airport. Tastefully restored traditional village house with character in the heart of 'Cathar Country'; 5 double bedrooms (3 en suite) plus family bathroom; 2 living rooms; large fully equipped kitchen. Large roof terrace. Other airports: Carcassone, Montpelier, Barcelona. Local swimming, rivers and lakes, beaches within 30 miles, and hiking. Available from now. Call Tony Venables on 01491 825035, or 01865 557767 evening. E-mail: janevenab@aol.com.

Les Bournizeaux: Dordogne/Lot et Garonne. Traditional farm house in small rural hamlet sensitively converted with country furniture, set in 2 acres of meadow, lawn and a pool (11 x 5 m), overlooking fields, vineyards and woods. Two large hayloft bedrooms (1 divided)sleeping 6/7, large open-plan dining room/lounge/kitchen (with fridge- freezer, washing machine), library/study, shower, huge cool veranda for dining, barbecues, games. Local village a short drive away with shop, church and post office. Nearby world class golf club of Chateau Vigier, tennis, riding, lake with water sports, restaurants, bastide towns and markets; Bergerac, St Emilion, Sarlat and Monbazillac nearby. Ryan Air flies to Bergerac and BA to Bordeaux. £550 Oct.–May, June £700, £800 July–Aug. Tel.: 01993 881408. E-mail: jangeoff@onetel.net.uk.

Good things should be shared–winter breaks in Austria. Take Ryanair to Klagenfurt and beat the crowds. Hotel transfer from the airport and a free ski bus make this small 4* hotel the ideal destination for short breaks for downhill skiing; well signed walks or cross country skiing. The surprisingly light and varied cooking make it a trip worth making for the food alone. D/B & B from £60. English speaking staff helps with equipment hire and ski passes: info@landhof-lenzhofer.at or tel.: 0043 4718 3370 or 01865 513896.
Tuscany: family owned Wine Estate, producing highly recognised wines, olive oil and cheese: offers ancient farmhouse and apartments accommodation 2 up to 12+. Secluded rural setting, half hour central Florence. Contact: tel./fax: 0039 055 824 9120. E-mail: sulpoggio@bcc.tin.it.

Andalusia: Lecrin Valley; Chaplain's house in beautiful mountain village; 3 bedrooms (1 en suite); living room on to courtyard; immaculate and well furnished, spacious with large roof terrace overlooking orange groves and hills.

Dishwasher, washing machine. Sea 25 minutes; Granada 20 minutes; Sierra Nevada peaks 40 minutes. July, Aug., and Holy Week £350 p.w., otherwise £260 p.w.–both incl. linen and cleaner (at end of let). More information from Annette Mountford 01865 515778 or brian.mountford@oriel.oxford.ac.uk.

Tuscany, Italy: Villa S. Stefano, beautifully restored 2-storey country house on the top of a hill, amid large vineyards, and olive trees (biological-organic farming methods, no pesticides): 5 bedrooms (accommodation for up to 9 people); 2 bathrooms; kitchen; lounge; sitting-room; private swimming pool; garden; cable; VCR;Internet.

Wonderful and quiet, in the Chianti area, only 5 minutes' drive from Chiusi town, shops, railway/highway. One hour from Rome and Florence, 30 minutes from Siena and Assisi.

Contact: info@demata.tuscany.it. Tel.: + 39 055 602044, +39 328 7133951. Web site: www.demata.tuscany.it.

Cottage in rural Normandy: sleeps 6. All details at www.gitelacroix.com. Tel.: 0033 231 92 4712.

Rome: apartment for holiday or longer stays: 1-bedroom, Pigneto District, 15 minutes by bus from city centre; convenient; well located; well equipped; off roads accommodation. Linens and cleaning included. £200 p.2., £600 p.m.

Contact: 01865 728830 or e-mail: buceti@frascati.enea.it.

Andalucia Gaucin: Casa Alta, a delightful private house in white mountain village to let while author/owner away; 2 double bedrooms; 2 bathrooms; large living area with open fireplace; fully fitted kitchen leading on to terracem with magical views over valleys to coast and mountains of Africa. Very comfortably furnished, TV, video, washing machine, deep freeze, excellent maid by arrangement. £450–£550 p.w.; reduction for longer lets. Also Casa Flora, a self-contained guest house to Casa Alta.

Separate entrance. Large studio with double bed, en suitebathroom, and French windows on to terrace with same wonderful views. Sleeps 2–3. Plus single bedroom with en suiteshower. Nice kitchen with wood stove, fridge, washing machine etc. Price according to season £200-£300 p.w. Tel.: 01985 844560 , e-mail: venetiaspain@aol.com, after Jan 20 , tel: 00 34 95 215 11 11 or e-mail: venetia@ari.es.

Tuscany–writer's hilltown retreat near Siena: 2 charming apartments in medieval building, with shaded terraces and orchard. Weekly linen and cleaning. Walk to shops, restaurants, or out into spectacualr countryside. Rent from £270 p.w. Tel.: +44 (0) 1428 714363. E-mail: uliviera@hotmail.com.

Caribbean–Bequia, The Grenadines: 2-bedroom villas on Bequia Island, include unique beach front 'Anthony Eden House'; 4-bedroom villas–`New Eden' set in palm groves on Friendship Beach, `Star Dust' perched on a hill with watchtower and swimming pool. Prices from approx. £200–£700 per person per week.

Beaches/activities–Bequia has 7 pristine white sand beaches, sailing, windsurfing, kayaking, scuba diving, hobie cats, snorkelling, fishing, shopping, sightseeing. Web site villa and yacht brochures: www.grenadine-escape.com. Please contact Lara Cowan Hadley, The Old Farm House, Weald, Bampton, OX18 2HW. Tel.: 01993 850285. E-mail: lara@grenadine-escape.com.

Tuscany: Fattoria Corzano e Paterno, family owned and run award winning wine and cheese producing farm, half an hour from Florence, offers faithfully restored houses and apartments for short and longer term rentals. Web site: corzanoepaterno.it. Please contact Sibilla Gelpke (Wadham, 2000), e-mail: corzpaterno@libero.it.

Experience the Greek islands of Sporades with Thalpos Holidays.

Local villa specialist offers lovely houses and villas in the beautiful islands of Skopelos and Alonissos in the Aegean Sea. Whether you are 2 or 20 persons in the party , and whether you wish to stay in the picturesque town, by the clear blue sea or in the breathtaking countryside, we have just what you are looking for. With more than 10 years of experience we are proud to offer high quality holidays and the very best service. See our programme for 2004 on: www.holidayislands.com, or contact us on e-mail: thalpos@otenet.gr. Tel.: 0030 24240 29036. Fax: 0030 24240 23057.

Deepest SW France. Relax in a luxuriously renovated farmhouse with large seculded grounds in a stunning rural area. Generous facilities include en suiteaccommodation, heated pool, satellite TV. Suitable for great holidays or sabbatical breaks. Tel.: Marion on 01865 554122 or e-mail via Web site: www.hidden-sw- france.com.

Paris apartment available for short or longer stays: delightful 1- bedroom, first-floor flat overlooking the Place du Marche St Catherine (Marais). Period building with large windows and high ceilings. Attractively furnished and well-equipped with television, CD, hairdryer, etc. Linens and cleaning provided. Available from late July, 3 nights minimum. £55 per night, £325 per week or £950 per month for members of the university. (Non-member rates are £65 per night, £395 p.w., and £1,050 p.c.m.). Contact Dr J.J. Chamberlain on 07957 588 448 or e-mail: joe.chamberlain@ukgateway.net.


Retirement Flat for Sale

Large, light ground-floor flat in Warden run residence in Summertown, north Oxford. Ideal for a couple or single person. £65,000 + £550 p.c.m. service charge to include food, heating etc. Further details, tel.: 01223 357778 or 0117 9372511.

PROFESSORSHIP OF DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS

Applications are invited for the above post, tenable from 1 October 2004, or such later date as may be arranged. The post will be held in Queen Elizabeth House, the University's Department of Development Studies, which is the focus for the University's resesarch and teaching in this area.

The professor will be a social scientist of distinction, and must have an international reputation for research, as measured by national and international collaborations, success in obtaining external funding, and publications.

The successful candidate will lecture and provide graduate supervision in development economics, be an outstanding scholar with innovative research in the field of development economics, have a proven capacity for institution building, and have an understanding of different academic approaches and disciplines.

An official fellowship at Wolfson College is attached to the professorship.

Further particulars, including details of how to apply, are available from http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/ or from the Registrar, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: Oxford (2)70200). The closing date for applications is Monday, 8 March.


J.R.R. TOLKIEN PROFESSORSHIP IN ENGLISH LITERATURE AND LANGUAGE

Applications are invited for the above post, tenable from 1 October 2004, or such later date as may be arranged. The professor will be a scholar of international distinction who will provide academic leadership in the field of Medieval English (Literature and Language in the period 1100--1500). The successful candidate will play a full and active role in the development and delivery of the English Faculty's aims and objectives, and will reinforce and extend the faculty's expertise in the period.

A non-stipendiary fellowship at St Hilda's College or at Lady Margaret Hall is attached to the professorship.

Further particulars, including details of how to apply and the arrangements for college association, are available from http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/ or from the Registrar, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: Oxford (2)70200). The closing date for applications is Monday, 9 February.


BODEN PROFESSORSHIP OF SANSKRIT

Applications are invited for the above post, tenable from 1 October 2004, or such later date as may be arranged. The professor will be a scholar of international distinction in any area or areas of specialisation in Sanskrit and Indology, broadly conceived; will provide academic leadership in promoting and sustaining research and teaching within the Faculty of Oriental Studies; and will contribute fully to the development and delivery of the aims and objectives of the faculty. A non-stipendiary fellowship at Balliol College is attached to the professorship.

Further particulars, including details of how to apply, are available from http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/ or from the Registrar, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: Oxford (2)70200). The closing date for applications is Monday, 8 March.


FACULTY OF CLASSICS

University Lecturership in Ancient History

In association with Worcester College

The Faculty of Classics proposes to appoint a University Lecturer in Ancient History, in conjunction with a Tutorial Fellowship at Worcester College, under arrangements described in the further particulars. The combined university and college salary will be according to age on a scale up to £42,900 per annum (pay award pending).

The successful candidate must have a substantial achievement or potential (commensurate with the candidate's career) in ancient history, and will be expected to teach the subject to a high standard at both undergraduate and graduate level. Preference may be given to candidates with particular expertise in Roman history.

Further particulars, containing details of the application procedure and of the duties, may be obtained from http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/ or from Ms K. Brill, Classics Faculty Board Secretary, 34 St Giles', Oxford OX1 3LH (telephone: Oxford (2)70253, e-mail: karen.brill@admin.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for applications is Friday, 30 January.


DEPARTMENT OF POLITICS AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

University Lecturership in International Relations

In association with St Edmund Hall

The Department of Politics and International Relations proposes to appoint a University Lecturer in International Relations. The lecturership is tenable from 1 September 2004, or an agreed date thereafter, and will be held in conjunction with a Tutorial Fellowship in Politics at St Edmund Hall.

Applicants should have a doctorate or equivalent and have an outstanding record of research and publication in any field within international relations. They should have experience of teaching in international relations and be able to supervise doctoral students and to contribute to graduate and undergraduate teaching.

Candidates will be considered on the basis of the selection criteria outlined in the further particulars which can be obtained by e-mailing (e-mail: vacancies@politics.ox.ac.uk), by visiting http://www.politics.ox.ac.uk/about/vaca ncies, or by telephoning Oxford (2)78700. Candidates are asked to submit written or e-mail applications in the form of a letter which addresses the selection criteria accompanied by a full curriculum vitae, and to ask three referees to write or e-mail in support of their application to Emily Constantine, Department of Politics and International Relations, George Street, Oxford OX1 2RL, by noon on Friday, 6 February. It is expected that interviews will be held during the week beginning 1 March.


DEPARTMENT OF AREA AND DEVELOPMENT STUDIES AND THE DEPARTMENT OF POLITICS AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

University Lecturership in Japanese Politics

In association with St Antony's College

The Department of Area and Development Studies and the Department of Politics and International Relations seek applications for a full-time University Lecturer in Japanese Politics, to start in September 2004 or on an agreed date thereafter. The lecturership will be held in conjunction with a faculty fellowship at St Antony's College.

Applicants should have a doctorate or equivalent, a sound knowledge of the Japanese language, and a proven track record of research in Japanese politics. They should also have the ability to teach both undergraduate and graduate students, supervise doctoral students in Japanese politics, and design and deliver degree programmes.

Candidates will be considered on the basis of the selection criteria outlined in the further particulars which can be obtained by visiting http://www.ox.ac.uk/jobs, or by e-mailing (e- mail: secretary@nissan.ox.ac.uk), or by telephoning Oxford (2)74570. Candidates are asked to submit written or e-mail applications in the form of a letter which addresses the selection criteria accompanied by a full curriculum vitae, and to ask three referees to write or e-mail in support of their application to the Administrator, Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies, 27 Winchester Road, Oxford OX2 6NA. Applications must be received by noon on Friday, 6 February. It is expected that interviews will be held during the week beginning 1 March.


SAID BUSINESS SCHOOL

University Lecturerships in Management Studies (Strategic Management)

In association with St Hugh's College and Wolfson College

The Saïd Business School is seeking applications for two full-time faculty positions in Strategic Management to start in October 2004. Applicants should demonstrate excellence or potential excellence in research and teaching in any area of strategic management, broadly conceived. The School has a strong preference that one of the posts should be filled by a person who has an interest in the strategy of science- and technology-based firms. The interests of the research group are lively and diverse, including business history, comparative business, entrepreneurship, professional service firms, technology and innovation. Informal enquiries may be made to Professor Richard Whittington (e-mail: richard.whittington@sbs.ox.ac.uk).


University Lecturership in Management Studies (Operations Management with special reference to science- and technology-based firms)

In association with Green College

The Saïd Business School seeks applications for a full-time faculty position in Operations Management (with special reference to science- and technology-based firms), to start in October 2004. Applicants should demonstrate excellence or potential excellence in research and teaching in operations management. There is a strong preference for candidates who have an interest in operations management in science- or technology-based companies.

The research group favours a holistic, multidisciplinary approach to operations, drawing on sociology, philosophy, and other areas adjacent to management studies, while remaining close to the problems of contemporary organisations.

Informal enquiries may be made to Dr Steve New (e-mail: steve.new@sbs.ox.ac.uk) or Dr Roy Westbrook (e-mail: roy.westbrook@sbs.ox.ac.uk).

All candidates should have a doctorate from a major research university or be close to completing doctoral studies, and a strong publication record/potential. Successful candidates will be expected to contribute to the teaching of courses in the relevant area at both undergraduate and postgraduate level, and eventually should be able to offer an elective topic for the MBA programme.

Salaries would be according to age on the scale up to £42,900 per annum (under review). These posts are in an area currently designated by HEFCE as a shortage subject under its `Golden Hello' scheme. The appointee may therefore be eligible for a three-year salary supplement if he or she fulfils certain conditions and if funds are available in the limited budget for the scheme.

Further particulars can be found on http://www.sbs.ox.ac.uk or obtained from Jennifer Fielding, Saïd Business School, Park End Street, Oxford OX1 1HP (telephone: Oxford (2)88813, e-mail: acvacs@sbs.ox.ac.uk), to whom completed applications and references forwarded directly by the applicant's three referees should be sent by Friday, 13 February.


UNIVERSITY LECTURERSHIP/FELLOWSHIP IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (FLUIDS)

In association with University College

Applications are invited for the above post, tenable from 1 October 2004. Candidates should be able to teach a wide range of subjects in Mechanical Engineering within a four-year Engineering Science syllabus, and have substantial research expertise in fluid dynamics. The successful candidate will be offered a Tutorial Fellowship by University College, under arrangements described in the college further particulars. The combined university and college salary will be according to age on a scale (August 2002, under review) of up to £42,900 per annum. This post is in an area currently designated by HEFCE as a shortage subject under its `Golden Hello' scheme and may attract a salary supplement of £9,000 over three years under conditions described in the further particulars.

The further particulars, which include information about selection procedures and details of the duties and the full range of emoluments and allowances attached to both the university and college appointments, may be viewed at http://www.eng.ox.ac.uk/, where the department's Research Summary and information on the undergraduate courses may also be found.

Applications should be sent to the Professor R. Eatock Taylor, F.R.Eng, Department of Engineering Science, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PJ (fax: Oxford (2)83310, e-mail: head@eng.ox.ac.uk), including a statement of proposed research and the names and addresses of three referees, to arrive no later than 9 February.

The University and University College are equal opportunities employers.


DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES (DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY)

University Lecturership in Pharmacology

In association with Somerville College

The Department of Pharmacology and Somerville College wish to appoint a University Lecturer and Tutorial Fellow. The department provides excellent research and teaching facilities, and the successful candidate will be offered a Tutorial Fellowship at Somerville College. Following successful review after five years, the posts carry tenure. The department and college will make special provision to help the successful candidate move to Oxford and establish his or her research here: see the further particulars for details.

Applicants should have a competitive research programme ideally in an area of the pharmacology of systems of the body and should have carried out advanced research preferably in the pharmacology of whole organisms, organ systems (including the central nervous system), or tissues. Excellent applicants in associated fields of pharmacology will also be considered. The successful candidate will be expected to have appropriate teaching experience and an enthusiasm for teaching fundamental science to intelligent and enquiring medical students and postgraduates. In particular, the post will involve teaching in the area of systems pharmacology.

The salary will be on a combined university and college scale up to a maximum of £42,900 per annum (plus benefits).

Further particulars of this lecturership, and of the department and its current research, are posted at http://www.pharm.ox.ac.uk or may be obtained from the Administration Office, Department of Pharmacology, Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3QT (telephone: Oxford (2)81123). Further information about the college may be obtained from http://www.some.ox.ac.uk.

The closing date for applications is Thursday, 29 January.


UNIVERSITY LECTURERSHIP IN ZOOLOGY (ANIMAL DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY)

In association with Balliol College

Applications are invited for the above post, tenable from 1 October 2004 or as soon as possible thereafter. The successful candidate will be offered a Tutorial Fellowship at Balliol College. The combined college and university salary will be according to age on a scale up to £42,900 per annum (pay award pending).

The University and the college are seeking candidates with a proven record of scholarship and research in molecular developmental biology and a track record of attracting research funding. The lecturership is established in the broad field of animal development biology, as studied using molecular or genomic approaches. Individuals with research interests in comparative or evolutionary approaches to the subject are particularly encouraged to apply. The appointee will be required to engage in research which will contribute to the department's research reputation; to teach, supervise, and examine undergraduate and graduate students; and to contribute to administration in college and department.

Further particulars are available from http://www.zoo.ox.ac.uk or from Professor P. Harvey, FRS, Department of Zoology, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3BS (e-mail: paul.harvey@zoo.ox.ac.uk). Applications (electronic copies are not acceptable) including a curriculum vitae, a list of principal publications, and the names and contact details of three referees, (eight copies except from candidates overseas who need send only one), should be sent for receipt not later than 6 February. There is no application form, and separate application is not required for the college post. Interviews will be held on a date to be determined. Those interviewed will be requested to give a brief overview of their research interests and teaching expertise.


NUFFIELD DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY

Appointment of M.Sc. Course Administrator

An exciting opportunity has arisen as the course administrator of a new, full-time, taught M.Sc. course in Integrated Immunology at the University. This course starts in October 2004. The appointee will have an opportunity to work with the course organisers to establish this new course as a leader in the field. The duties include advertisement of the course, handling applications and interviews, as well as being responsible for the administration (including financial) of the course for each full year.

Candidates are expected to be computer literate (including database), have some experience of managing budgets, be able to communicate effectively with students, faculty members, and the university bodies, have some Web skills, and be able to work efficiently both as part of a team and independently. Details of the course are on the Web site http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/gsp/co urses/msc.shtml.

Available immediately, this full-time post is funded for five years in the first instance.

The salary will be in the range £16,658--£20,263 per annum.

Before applying, intending applicants should obtain the further particulars by contacting Oxford 221923 (e-mail: posts@nds.ox.ac.uk), quoting reference NDSA/157/03.

Applications, in the form of a detailed curriculum vitae and a covering letter setting out clearly how the applicant meets the selection criteria for the post (as listed in the further particulars), should include the names and contact details of two referees and should reach the Research Administrator, Nuffield Department of Surgery, Level 6, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford OX3 9DU, by not later than 26 January.

Applications should quote reference NDSA/157/03. The department will not accept applications by e-mail.


THE MUSEUM OF THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE

Appointment of Education Officer (half-time)

The Museum of the History of Science is a national and international centre of excellence for research and teaching in the material culture of science. It now seeks to appoint its first Education Officer, who will be responsible for setting up an education service for school students, life-long learners, and teachers. The education programme will support the Museum's focus on the history of science, with a strong emphasis on the history of scientific instruments.

The main tasks of the Education Officer will be to develop an education strategy for the Museum, to build up a resource of education materials, to initiate a programme of activities, and to organise and lead education sessions for school groups.

Essential requirements are a degree in the history of science (or a degree in either history or science with a proven interest in the history of science), an education qualification or significant relevant experience, good communication and team-working skills, an enthusiasm for the history of science, and a commitment to the educational function of museums.

This is a half-time post, funded for two years in the first instance, on the academic-related research staff grade IA scale (salary £18,265--£27,339, pro rata).

For further information about this post, contact Alicia Chiu (e-mail: alicia.chiu@mhs.ox.ac.uk). Applications should consist of a letter of application and a curriculum vitae to include the names of two referees and a short statement on what attracted you to the post and your vision of how it might be developed. Applications should be sent to Margaret Hauser, Administrator, Museum of the History of Science, Broad Street, Oxford OX1 3AZ (telephone: Oxford (2)77280, e-mail: alicia.chiu@mhs.ox.ac.uk), to arrive no later than Friday, 30 January.


PUBLIC RELATIONS OFFICE, UNIVERSITY OFFICES

Oxford University is world renowned for the quality and diversity of its teaching and research. The Public Relations Office (PRO) plays a significant role in presenting the University's activities to as wide an audience as possible. The Publications section is responsible for the production of university publications, including the University's alumni magazine Oxford Today, the Annual Review, as well as the University Gazette and Blueprint (the University's internal newsletter).

Appointment of Assistant Editor, University Gazette

Reporting to the Editor of the Gazette, the post-holder will be expected to be an integral member of the Publications team. He or she will be responsible for the organisation and preparation of the termly Lecture Lists (expected to be changed with effect from summer 2005 and eventually removed from this post); for the handling of the Gazette's Advertisements section; selling and administering the advertisements in Blueprint; and assisting in editorial work on the University Calendar, and other official publications. The post-holder will occasionally deputise for the Editor. He or she will be required to deal directly with a wide variety of people, including departments and faculties, academic and administrative staff, OUP (Oxuniprint) staff, and members of the public.

Applicants should have a good eye for detail, and patience with detailed work.

Experience of copy-editing and proof-reading; knowledge of standard marks and methods in copy-editing and proof-reading; the ability to copy-edit and proof-read quickly but accurately, and to a professional standard, are also essential. An understanding of the concept of `house style' is needed---preferably experience of working within a style, together with a flexible attitude, willingness to deal with a variety of different kinds of work, and an ability to work well under pressure.

The post will be on the clerical grade 5 scale (salary £18,015--£21,469).

For a preliminary discussion of the post contact the Editor of the Gazette, Martin Harrington (telephone: Oxford (2)80549, e-mail: gazette@admin.ox.ac.uk).

Interviews are expected to be held on 9 February.


Appointment of Assistant Web Officer (fixed term of six months)

The University is looking for a highly motivated, enthusiastic person to support the work of the Web Officer in developing and maintaining Web-based communications for the University. Applicants should have at least six months' experience of HTML coding and CSS, and have the ability to structure information for the Web. Experience with graphics packages such as Photoshop and Illustrator would be an advantage. The post-holder will be expected to produce fast, accurate work under pressure, and have excellent general IT skills.

He or she will work closely with a wide range of individuals, and should have excellent interpersonal skills and a good standard of written English.

The post will be on the clerical grade 4 scale (salary £15,603--£18,015).

Interviews are expected to be held on 10 February.

Further particulars of both posts may be obtained at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/ or from Miss M. Holdak (telephone: Oxford (2)70128, e-mail: posts@admin.ox.ac.uk). Letters of application, with a full curriculum vitae and the names of two referees, together with a day-time telephone number, should be lodged by noon on 26 January with Mrs J.A. Pengelly, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD.


FACULTY OF ORIENTAL STUDIES

Appointment of Secretary at the Institute for Chinese Studies

Applications are invited for the above temporary secretarial post at the Institute for Chinese Studies to cover a maternity leave period commencing January 2004. In addition to excellent keyboard and word-processing skills, applicants should have good communication and organisation skills, and be able to work independently and as part of a team. Previous experience of general clerical or office work is desirable. Knowledge of Chinese language and culture would be useful, but not essential. Further details of the position should be obtained from the Assistant Administrator at the address below, or by telephoning Oxford (2)78225, or from the University Web site at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/.

The post will be on the clerical and library grade c3 (salary £13,547--£15,603).

Letters of application, including the names and contact details of two referees, and a curriculum vitae, should be sent to the Assistant Administrator, Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE, no later than Friday, 6 February.


ALL SOULS COLLEGE

Evans-Pritchard Lecturership 2004--5

Applications are invited for the Evans-Pritchard Lecturership during the academic year 2004--5.

The lecturer will deliver a series of four to six lectures in the course of at most one term, based on fieldwork or other indigenous primary materials concerning Africa, the Middle East, or the Mediterranean, and offering an empirical analysis of social relations.

Scholars in the field of social anthropology, classical studies, modern history, and oriental studies are eligible and, other things being equal, the electors will prefer a person at the beginning or middle of his or her career. It is hoped that the lectures will be published in book form.

The lecturer will be accommodated in All Souls, and will receive a stipend.

Candidates for election should send an outline of the proposed lectures, and a list of publications, to the Warden, All Souls College, Oxford OX1 4AL, by 31 January. They should also ask two referees to write directly to the Warden, from whom further particulars may be obtained.


BALLIOL COLLEGE

Oliver Smithies Lecturership and Visiting Research Fellowships 2004--5

Balliol College invites applications from scholars of outstanding distinction or promise to be Visiting Fellows of Balliol and Oliver Smithies Lecturers.

A Visiting Fellowship normally lasts for at least two, but not more than three terms.

Visiting Fellowships are intended primarily to give scholars from outside the United Kingdom an opportunity to pursue their own research as a member of the college. Fellows will normally be expected to reside in Oxford during terms. The college is regrettably unable to offer Visiting Fellows accommodation. However, Visiting Fellows will be entitled to full membership of the senior common room and to take all their meals in college free of charge.

The college will meet the cost of one return trip from the fellow's home institution. A Visiting Fellow must also be willing to take up the Oliver Smithies Lecturership, which carries with it a requirement to offer two or three University-wide lectures on a subject of the lecturer's choosing. An honorarium of £500 per lecture is offered. Other things being equal, preference will be given to candidates whose work is close to the academic interests of one or more fellows of the college.

Applicants who are unable to be in Oxford for as long as two terms may apply for the Oliver Smithies Lecturership on its own. In this case the lecturer would be expected to visit the college for a period of between one and four weeks, at a time to be mutually agreed by the college and the lecturer, to deliver his or her lectures. The lecturer will be entitled to free college accommodation and free meals for the period over which the lectures are to be given.

Travelling expenses will be met by the college, and the same honorarium is offered. The reverse arrangement---applying for the Visiting Fellowship, but not for the Smithies Lecturership---is not possible.

Applications, in the form of a letter, should include a statement of the research the applicant intends to carry out during his or her visit; details of the proposed lectures; a full curriculum vitae; and the names and addresses of two academic referees.

It is the responsibility of applicants to ensure that their references are sent directly to the college by the closing date. Applications should be sent to the Senior Tutor's Secretary, Balliol College, Oxford OX1 3BJ, and should reach the college by 27 February 2004. The college hopes to complete the elections by mid-March.


Junior Research Fellowships

Balliol College proposes to elect two non-stipendiary Junior Research Fellows, one in an arts or social science subject (excluding political science) and one in a science subject, from 1 October 2004. It is expected that the fellowships will be for three years, although the college may be willing to consider an extension of this period in certain circumstances. Applicants must have guaranteed funding for a minimum of three years and should normally be in possession of a doctorate. Prospective applicants for schemes such as the British Academy Post-Doctoral Fellowships Scheme, the ESRC Research Fellowships Scheme, and the Royal Society Fellowship Scheme, who wish to hold their fellowship in Oxford and would welcome a college attachment during the period of their award, are particularly encouraged to apply.

The fellow elected will be a Junior Research Fellow as defined in the college statutes. The main duty of the fellow will be to undertake research, but participation in the educational activities of the college through paid tutorial teaching would be welcomed. College accommodation is offered (or, if preferred, a housing allowance of £4,073 per annum), as well as free meals and an academic support allowance.

Further particulars may be obtained from the Master's Secretary, Balliol College, Oxford OX1 3BJ (e-mail: masters.secretary@balliol.ox.ac.uk).

Applications, in the form of a letter, a curriculum vitae, and a research proposal should be sent to the same address to arrive not later than noon on Friday, 13 February. Applicants should arrange for two references to be sent direct to the same address and by the same date. It is expected that interviews will be held in the week beginning 15 March.


Jowett Senior Scholarships

Balliol College proposes to elect two Jowett Senior Scholars. The scholarships, which will be awarded solely on the basis of academic merit, are open to graduates currently working in Oxford who are reading, or intend to read, for a D.Phil. Applicants will normally be in at least their first year and not later than their second year of graduate work at the time of application. The scholarships are tenable in any subject for which the college admits students.

The scholarships will be awarded for a maximum of two years. Scholars will take up their award on 1 October 2004.

The value of the scholarships is £1,750 a year. In addition, scholars will receive free meals, and they will be entitled to dine twice a week at high table. The scholars will be entitled to accommodation (for which they will be charged) until they have completed their university residence requirements. This accommodation will be in the Graduate Centre at Holywell Manor.

There will also be Jowett Exhibitions, up to the value of £1,250 each for candidates who are runners-up for the Jowett Senior Scholarships. These will be restricted to members of Balliol College. The exhibitions are tenable for one year only.

Application forms may be obtained from the Senior Tutor's Secretary, Balliol College, Oxford OX1 3BJ. They should be returned by Friday, 6 February (third week of Hilary Term). There is no separate application form required for the exhibitions. The college hopes to interview short-listed applicants during the week commencing Monday, 23 February (sixth week).


Phizackerley Senior Scholarship

Balliol College proposes to elect a Phizackerley Senior Scholar in the Medical Sciences. The scholarship, which will be awarded solely on the basis of academic merit, is open to graduates currently working in Oxford who are reading, or intend to read, for a D.Phil.

Applicants will normally be in at least their first year and not later than their second year of graduate work at the time of application.

The scholarship will be awarded for a maximum of two years. The scholar will take up the award on 1 October 2004.

The value of the scholarship is £1,750 a year. In addition, the scholar will receive free meals, and will be entitled to dine twice a week at high table. The scholar will be entitled to accommodation (for which a charge will be made) until completion of the university residence requirements. This accommodation will be in the Graduate Centre at Holywell Manor.

Application forms may be obtained from the Senior Tutor's Secretary, Balliol College, Oxford OX1 3BJ. They should be returned by Friday, 6 February (third week of Hilary Term). The college hopes to interview short-listed applicants during the week commencing Monday, 23 February (sixth week).


Appointment of Development Officer (Annual Fund and Legacies)

Balliol College is looking for a talented, highly motivated and professional colleague to join its well-established Development Office. The post-holder will be responsible for building on the success of the college's Annual Fund by planning and implementing several different campaigns each year, including direct mail and e-mail approaches, telephone campaigns, and volunteer-led `class giving'.

Applicants should have excellent interpersonal and IT skills, and be an outstanding communicators both in writing and in person. Creative ability, attention to detail, integrity, and a passion to help the college are essential. The post-holder will need to be a team player, highly organised, and used to working with complex databases. Educated to graduate level, applicants will ideally possess a recognised qualification in direct marketing or fund-raising.

This is a new post, at a senior level, reporting to the Development Director. Salary: c.£30,000.

To receive an application pack, contact Alastair James, Development Director, Balliol College (telephone: Oxford (2)77691, e-mail: alastair.james@balliol.ox.ac.uk).

The closing date for applications is 6 February. First stage interviews will be held in Oxford on 17 February.


Vaughan Memorial Travelling Scholarship

Balliol College intends to award for 2004 a Vaughan Memorial Travelling Scholarship, as established by the will of the late Mrs D.J. Vaughan, if a suitable candidate appears. It is a stipulation of the bequest that candidates must be current undergraduates of limited means who have had at least part of their previous education at Eton College. Preference will be given to members of Balliol College.

The award, of up to £4,000, will be conditional on the attainment of a II.1 degree or better. It must be used towards the cost of attending a foreign university for a postgraduate year, and following an approved course of study there which includes at least in part `a study of the social conditions of the common people'. Applications with one reference and with outline proposals for the year's study should be made to the Senior Tutor, Balliol College, Oxford OX1 3BJ, by fourth week of Hilary Term.

Balliol College is an equal opportunities employer and a charity which exists to promote excellence in education and research.


HERTFORD COLLEGE

Senior Scholarships

Hertford College proposes to elect up to four senior scholarships, tenable from 1 October 2004, for two years, with the possibility of extension to a third year in exceptional circumstances. They are intended to be supplementary awards, open to men and women graduates of any university (including any college at Oxford) who are about to begin working for a higher degree or diploma at Oxford. Candidates graduating this summer are eligible for election. They are also open to graduate students at Hertford College who have already begun working for their higher degrees. Baring Scholarships have no restriction on subject studied. Carreras Scholarships are for support of studies in natural sciences. Drapers scholarships are for support of studies in the arts or humanities. Certain dining rights are associated with all scholarships. All scholarships carry a value of £500 per annum.

Applications (three copies, specifying scholarship) should reach the Academic Administrator, Hertford College, Oxford OX1 3BW, by Monday 9 February, including a statement of the candidate's qualifications and intentions. Two referees should be asked to send references to the academic administrator by the closing date. There is no application form.


KEBLE COLLEGE

Stipendiary Lecturership in French

Keble College invites applications for a Stipendiary Lecturership in French for the academic year 2004--5. The starting date will be 1 October 2004. The successful candidate will be expected to teach French language and literature for an average of nine hours per week.

The lecturer will be required to teach language classes at all levels, literature tutorials for the Preliminary Examination, and tutorials in post-1800 literature for the Final Honour School. In addition to teaching duties, the lecturer will be expected to set and mark college examinations, to participate in admissions and in the routine administration of French, and to assist in the pastoral care of undergraduates reading French.

The post might suit someone who is about to complete or has recently completed a doctoral thesis. There is no age limit for applicants. The salary is on the scale £13,379--£16,389. The lecturer will be offered certain dining rights and a teaching room.

Further particulars are available from the Senior Tutor, Keble College, Oxford OX1 3PG. Letters of application should include a statement of the candidate's research interests and teaching experience and an indication of those parts of the syllabus the candidate would be willing and able to teach, as well as a curriculum vitae and the names of two referees. Candidates should ask their referees to write directly to the Senior Tutor.

Letters of application and references should reach the Senior Tutor of Keble College by Friday, 20 February.


LINACRE COLLEGE

Junior Research Fellowships

Linacre College proposes to make elections to not more than three Junior Research Fellowships, tenable for one year in the first instance from 1 October 2004 and renewable for a second year. Junior Research Fellows will receive a book allowance of £250 per annum and enjoy dining rights in college. The fellowships are open to men and women graduates of any university; there is no restriction of subject, but candidates should be intending to engage in research at postdoctoral level.

Applicants will normally be expected to have submitted for a higher research degree before taking up a Junior Research Fellowship, and to be assured of adequate funding for the duration of a Junior Research Fellowship.


EPA Cephalosporin Junior Research Fellowships

Linacre College proposes to make elections to not more than three EPA Cephalosporin Junior Research Fellowships, tenable for one year in the first instance from 1 October 2004 and renewable for a second year. Junior Research Fellows will receive a book allowance of £250 per annum and enjoy dining rights in college. The fellowships are open to men and women graduates of any university, but candidates should be intending to engage in research at postdoctoral level in the fields of the medical, biological, or chemical sciences.

Applicants will normally be expected to have submitted for a higher research degree before taking up a Junior Research Fellowship, and to be assured of adequate funding for the duration of a Junior Research Fellowship.

Application for either of the Junior Research Fellowships detailed above, on a form available from the Principal's Secretary or electronically
(http://www.linacre.ox.ac .uk/college/scholarships/jrfsapp.doc), should be made to the Senior Tutor, Linacre College, Oxford OX1 3JA, giving details of the applicant's academic record and proposed course of research. Nine copies of the full application (UK applicants only) should be submitted by the closing date and applicants should request two referees to write directly to the Senior Tutor. Closing date for applications and references: 31 January 2004.


Domus Research Studentships

Linacre College proposes to elect to not more than four Domus Studentships, tenable in the first instance for one year from 1 October 2004, with the possibility of election for a second or third year subject to satisfactory work and progress. The value of these studentships will be £250 per year. They will not normally be tenable after the students' liability for university and college fees has ended.

Holders of Domus Studentships will be given priority in the allocation of college accommodation. Candidates for these studentships will be either students who intend to begin reading for a higher degree or diploma at the University in October 2004, or current students of Linacre College in their first or second years. There is no restriction of subject.

Candidates for these awards should submit an account of their previous academic work and a brief description of their proposed topic of research to the Senior Tutor, Linacre College, Oxford OX1 3JA, by 31 January, and should ask two academic referees to write directly to the Senior Tutor about them by that date.


Canadian National Scholarship

Linacre College proposes to elect to a Canadian National Scholarship, generously funded by Canadian National, which operates Canada's largest railroad system. The scholarship will be of a value of £4,000, and will be tenable for one year from 1 October 2004. It is open to a suitably qualified student of Canadian nationality reading or intending to read for a postgraduate degree. At the time of taking up the scholarship, the scholar must have been admitted as a postgraduate student by a relevant faculty of the University, and must be, or become, a member of Linacre College.

Application forms may be obtained from the College Secretary, Linacre College, Oxford OX1 3JA, or electronically at http://w ww.linacre.ox.ac.uk/college/scholarships/canadianscholarshipapp.doc. The closing dated for applications is 31 March.


MANSFIELD COLLEGE

Tutorial Fellowship and University Lecturership (CUF) in Modern History

Mansfield College and the University invite applications from suitably qualified candidates for the above post, starting from 1 October 2004. Applicants should have a research interest in British history in the period circa 1685--1830, and an ability to teach some European History between 1715--1856 would be an advantage. Candidates will be considered for the post on the basis of the selection criteria outlined in the further particulars.

The salary will be according to age, on the CUF scale, currently up to £42,900 per annum. Additional college allowances are payable.

The further particulars may be obtained from the Academic Administrator, Mansfield College, Oxford OX1 3TF (telephone: Oxford (2)70982, fax: (2)82910, e-mail: linda.given@mansfield.ox.ac.uk), and at http://www.mansfield.ox.ac.uk/about/j obs.htm. The closing date for applications is 5 February.

Mansfield College and the University are equal opportunities employers.


NEW COLLEGE

Appointment of Admissions/Graduates' Secretary

New College wishes to appoint a suitably qualified person to this senior secretarial post as soon as possible. The post will be full-time. The person appointed will be part of the secretarial team under the supervision of the College Secretary, with particular responsibilities for undergraduate admissions, graduate students (including admissions), and the Dean, and will also provide supplementary secretarial assistance for the fellows.

Applicants should have a good standard of education, college/university experience, a very competent knowledge of databases, spreadsheets, and word-processing (the college uses ADMIT, Accurate Solutions, Access, Excel, and Word), and efficient secretarial and administrative skills. Salary within the university clerical grade 5 scale, pro rata (currently £18,015--£21,469); leave of thirty days per annum; OUSPS pension scheme; flexible working hours; free lunches; free parking.

Further details may be obtained from from the College Secretary, New College, Oxford OX1 3BN (telephone: Oxford (2)79548, e-mail: barbara.vardag@new.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for applications is 23 January.


QUEEN'S COLLEGE

Lecturership in French

Queen's College proposes to elect a Lecturer in French for three years from 1 October 2004: depending on circumstances, it may be possible to extend the appointment beyond three years. The lecturer will be required to teach twelve hours per week and the basic stipend will be £17,246 per annum (under review), together with certain allowances. Applications are invited from candidates with research interests in some area of French literature after 1715.

Further particulars and application forms may be obtained from the Academic Administrator, Queen's College, Oxford OX1 4AW or at http://www.queens.ox.ac.uk/vacancies. The closing date for applications is Friday, 6 February.


Randall-MacIver Studentship in Archaeology

Queen's College proposes to elect to a Randall-MacIver Studentship in Archaeology tenable from 1 October 2004. The studentship, whose value, unless the student is in receipt of other emoluments, will be £14,090 (under review) per annum, is open to members of the University who have obtained first- or second-class honours at any university in the United Kingdom or a degree of equivalent standing at a university elsewhere, and is intended for research relating to the material civilisation of any country or period (before AD 1500), excluding the archaeology of the American Continent and Greek and Roman archaeology.

Italy before 300 BC is however a legitimate subject.

Further particulars may be obtained from the Academic Administrator, Queen's College, Oxford OX1 4AW (e-mail: academic.administrator@queens.ox.a c.uk). The closing date for applications is Friday, 13 February.


ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

Appointment of Accommodation and Conference Co-ordinator

Reporting to the Domestic Bursar, the successful applicant for this key post will be responsible for the administration of the college's accommodation and seminar/conference rooms, servicing both college members and external clients. Maximising income from these sources is a major priority for the college.

Suitable applicants will: probably have a hotel/catering professional qualification to HND or HCIMA; have at least two years' experience in either another college or a hotel's conference and banqueting department; be familiar with the organisational needs of conferences and group events; be able to communicate in all media and to all grades of personnel; be computer-literate and numerate; and work well without the need for continuous supervision.

The college offers generous terms and conditions of employment. The salary will be on grade 5 (£18,015--£24,951).

To obtain a detailed job description interested applicants should contact the Domestic Bursar, St Antony's College, Oxford OX2 6JF (e-mail: graham.daniels@sant.ox.ac.uk), subsequently submitting a letter of application, enclosing a current curriculum vitae, to the Domestic Bursar. The closing date for applications is 30 January.


Appointment of Secretary to the Domestic Bursar

The successful applicant will be required to provide full secretarial support to the Domestic Bursar. Audiotyping and use of the usual office IT equipment will form part of the duties of this post. A good level of written and verbal communication skill is required. The hours of work are 17.5 hours per week, the specific hours and days to be agreed.

The post is on the clerical grade 3 scale (salary £13,547--£18,015, pro rata). In addition the college offers generous holiday entitlement and terms and conditions of employment.

A full job description is available to interested applicants who should contact the Domestic Bursar, St Antony's College, Oxford OX2 0JF (e-mail: graham.daniels@sant.ox.ac.uk), subsequently submitting a letter of application, including the names and addresses of at least two referees, to the Domestic Bursar. The closing date for applications is 30 January.

St Antony's College is committed to equal opportunities in employment.


ST CATHERINE'S COLLEGE

Tutorial Fellowship in Medieval and Renaissance English Literature and CUF Lecturership in the Faculty of English Language and Literature

In association with the Board of the Faculty of English Language and Literature

St Catherine's College and the Board of the Faculty of English Language and Literature propose to elect and appoint a Tutorial Fellow and CUF Lecturer in Medieval and Renaissance English Literature, with effect from 1 October 2004 or as soon as possible thereafter. The salary will be on an age-related scale from £24,467 to £42,900 per annum (under review), with a housing allowance of £4,514 per annum. The successful applicant will be required to take tutorial responsibility and teach for the college, lecture and supervise graduates for the Faculty of English Language and Literature, and undertake research.

Further particulars may be obtained from http://www.stcatz.ox.ac.uk/bu rsarial_matters/vacancies or from the Master's Secretary, St Catherine's College, Oxford OX1 3UJ (e-mail: margaret.lavercombe@stcatz.ox.ac.uk ). The closing date for applications is Wednesday, 18 February.

The college and the University are equal opportunities employers.


ST HILDA'S COLLEGE

CUF Lecturership and Tutorial Fellowship in Classics

In association with the Faculty of Classics

St Hilda's College proposes to elect an Official Fellow and Tutor in Classics, to take up post from 1 October 2004. This appointment will be made in collaboration with the Faculty of Classics in the University, and the successful candidate will simultaneously be appointed to a CUF Lecturership in Classical Languages and Literature. Only women are eligible to hold fellowships at St Hilda's College. This is a provision of the college statutes made under the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923, and remains lawful by virtue of section 5 (3) of the Employment Act 1989. This is intended to be a permanent appointment.

Applications are invited from women with enthusiasm for the subject, who are able to direct the studies of undergraduates, to undertake advanced research, and to offer teaching in any area of Latin or Greek languages and literature. There is no preferred specialism.

Further particulars and an application cover sheet should be obtained from the Web site, http://www.sthildas.ox.ac.ak, or from the Academic Office, St Hilda's College, Oxford OX4 1DY (telephone: Oxford (2)76815, fax: (2)76816, e-mail: college.office@st-hildas.oxford.ac.uk).

The closing date for the receipt of applications and references is 22 January.


CHRIST'S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE

College Lectureship and Fellowship in Law

Applications are invited for a College Lectureship in Law, associated with a fellowship of Christ's College.

The college lectureship will be tenable from 1 October 2004 and will be for four years with the possibility of renewal. The successful candidate will be expected to reside in Cambridge, to undertake six hours of teaching per week for the college during Full Term, to act as college Director of Studies in Law, and to undertake research. Candidates should normally be able to teach at least two subjects forming part of the Cambridge Law Tripos, at least one of which should be a foundation subject. The basic stipend for this post, which is linked to the national academic university lecturers' scale, is likely to be in the range £20,000-- £25,000 (reviewed annually in line with the national scale), at a starting point depending on age and experience. The stipend is subject to a small deduction if the fellow is resident in college. The basic stipend may be supplemented by additional teaching, which will be paid for at the normal hourly rates for college supervision.

Further particulars are available on the college Web site at http://www.christs.cam.ac.uk, or may be requested in writing from the Master's Assistant. Letters of application (no forms) should be sent to the Master's Assistant, Christ's College, Cambridge CB2 3BU, to arrive by Monday, 2 February. These should include details of qualifications, publications, and experience, and the names and addresses of two persons who have agreed to act as academic referees.

Candidates should arrange for their referees to write directly to the Master's Assistant so that references are received by the closing date of Monday, 2 February.


CLARE HALL, CAMBRIDGE

Betty Behrens Research Fellowship

The governing body of Clare Hall proposes to elect one Betty Behrens Research Fellow for a period of three years, beginning 1 October 2004. The fellowship was funded to encourage research into the causes of, and/or the ways of mitigating, those forms of anti-social behaviour (including such as result from personality defects and disorders) which cause severe unhappiness to, and/or frustrate the talents or capacities of, those who suffer with them.

There is no restriction on age, sex, or previous standing, except that candidates may not already have held a Research Fellowship at a Cambridge college. Some preference may be given to candidates who are at an early stage of research in their career. The stipend will be £13,114 in the first instance, plus rent-free accommodation in the college or a living-out allowance, a meals allowance, and optional membership of the Universities' Superannuation Scheme. The fellowship is not renewable.

Application forms and further details, including the precise terms of the benefaction, may be obtained from the College Secretary, Clare Hall, Herschel Road, Cambridge CB3 9AL (written requests only, with a stamped, self-addressed envelope). The closing date for receipt of applications is Friday, 9 April. Candidates are responsible for ensuring that three referees write directly to the college by that date.

Friday 16 January

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Chinese seals', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50.

Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Saturday 17 January

COLIN CARR performs Bach suites for cello: no. 1 in G major, no. 3 in C major, and no. 5 in C minor, the Hall, St John's, 8.30 p.m. (admission by free programme, available from the porters' lodge, St John's).


Sunday 18 January

HILARY FULL TERM begins.

PROFESSOR FREDERICK J. WILLIAMS: Latin Litany and Sermon, St Mary's, 10 a.m.


Monday 19 January

E. LEONG: `Recipe collection and the transmission of lay medical knowledge: how medical remedies circulated in early modern England' (seminar series: `Surgery, physic, and culture'), Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 2.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR ALAN RYAN: `How high, how much, and for whom? Some trans-Atlantic contrasts' (Green College Lectures: `The future of higher education'), Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 6 p.m.


Tuesday 20 January

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The Fisherman of Aphrodisias', 1.15 p.m.

(Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

PROFESSOR M. GORDON: `Automated reasoning and formal verification' (Strachey Lecture), Lecture Theatre, Computing Laboratory, 4.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR PAUL MULDOON (Professor of Poetry): `The end of the poem: "Homage to Clio" by W.H. Auden', Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR H. GLENNERSTER: `Can we afford our future?' (seminar series: `Current issues in social policy'), Violet Butler Seminar Room, Barnett House, 5 p.m.


Wednesday 21 January

OXFORD E-SCIENCE CENTRE: `Will e-science change the University?' (e-science open day), Saïd Business School, 9.30 a.m.–4 p.m. (registration and details: miranda.turner@oucs.ox.ac.uk).

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `proof-reading', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

DR R. ADAMS: `Dizzy's women—the private life behind the public success' (Friends of the Bodleian thirty-minute lecture), Cecil Jackson Room, Sheldonian, 1 p.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Introduction to Japanese ceramics', 1.15 p.m.

(Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

PROFESSOR C. CLUNAS: `Time, space, and agency in Ming visual and material culture' (Slade Lectures: `Empire of Great Brightness: visual and material cultures of Ming China, 1368--1644'), Nelson Mandela Lecture Theatre, Saïd Business School, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR M. LAST: `Resolving the scholar's dilemma over piety or power: the Sokoto Caliphate 1804--1903' (Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies seminars: `Islamic political thought'), Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR A. GOLDMAN: `The Prophet's Wife: Milton Steinberg's unfinished masterpiece' (David Patterson Seminars), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor, 8 p.m.


Thursday 22 January

PROFESSOR B. DAVIES: `How well did the reforms succeed?' (seminar series: `Health and social care for ageing populations'), Lecture Theatre, Department of Sociology, 1 p.m.

PEGGY MORGAN: `Understanding Hindus as an educational exercise in understanding self and other' (Centre for Christianity and Culture lecture series: `Relating to the "Other": Hindu and Christian perspectives'), Regent's Park, 5 p.m.

P. WALLER: `Novelists and the reading public, 1880–1914' (Oxford Bibliographical Society lecture), Seminar Room 3, Taylor Institution, 5.15 p.m. (open to the public).

BENJAMIN WOOLLEY talks about his book The Queen's Conjuror: the Life and Magic of Dr Dee, Museum of the History of Science, 7 p.m. (admission free).


Friday 23 January

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Career review and planning for contract research staff', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The Founders', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50.

Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

DR D. STASAVAGE: `Globalisation and transparency in economic policy-making' (seminar series: `Making globalisation work for developing countries'), Goodhart Seminar Room, University, 2 p.m.

DR J. MADDICOTT: `Genesis: "The witan of the English people", c.900–1066' (James Ford Lectures in British History: `The origins of the English Parliament, c.900–1327'), Schools, 5 p.m.

pDAVID BUTLER: `The strategy of the Conservative Party' (seminar series: `British government and politics'), Lecture Room XI, Brasenose, 5 p.m.

DR U. HERBERT: `Stalinist and Nazi rule: possibilities and limits of comparison' (lecture in series `Historical concepts between Western and Eastern Europe'), European Studies Centre, 70 Woodstock Road, 5 p.m.


Saturday 24 January

COLIN CARR performs Bach suites for cello: no. 2 in D minor, no. 4 in E flat major, and no. 6 in D major, the Hall, St John's, 8.30 p.m. (admission by free programme, available from the porters' lodge, St John's).


Sunday 25 January

THE REVD DR JOHN MUDDIMAN preaches the Macbride Sermon, Hertford, 10 a.m.


Monday 26 January

R. RALLEY, Cambridge: `The "comminalte" of London physicians and surgeons, 1423–4' (seminar series: `Surgery, physic, and culture'), Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 2.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR SIR DAVID WATSON: `A new university world? National and international perspectives on change in higher education' (Green College Lectures: `The future of higher education'), Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 6 p.m.

PAT SYMONDS: `Success in competition: the application of science or just sheer luck?' (Formula 1 Motorsport Evening), Begbroke Science Park, 7 p.m. (admission free, but e-mail reservation necessary: elen.humphreys@begbroke.ox.ac.uk or rebecca.lingwood@begbroke.ox.ac.uk).


Tuesday 27 January

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Presentation skills'—day 2, 9.30 a.m., and `Small group teaching'—humanities and social sciences, first meeting, 12.15 p.m. (see information above).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The Bull of Minos', 1.15 p.m.

(Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

DR T. BURCHARDT: ` "One man's rags are another man's riches": identifying adaptive preferences using panel data' (seminar series: `Current issues in social policy'), Violet Butler Seminar Room, Barnett House, 5 p.m.

HUGH WHITEMORE (News International Visiting Professor of Broadcast Media): `Learning the lingo: how television drama evolved' (News International Broadcast Media Lectures), Exeter, 5.30 p.m.


Wednesday 28 January

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Induction seminar for heads of department and chairmen of boards', 9.30 a.m.; `Presentation skills'—day 2, 9.30 a.m.; and `Small group teaching'—sciences and medical sciences, first meeting, 12.15 p.m. (see information above).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Nineteenth-century French paintings', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

DR A. WYGANT: `Medean alchemy' (Archive of Performances of Greek and Roman Drama lecture), Headley Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean, 2.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR C. CLUNAS: `Sitting and roaming: visual and material cultures of direction and movement' (Slade Lectures: `Empire of Great Brightness: visual and material cultures of Ming China, 1368--1644'), Nelson Mandela Lecture Theatre, Saïd Business School, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR T.F. KENNEDY: `Early opera as icon and method' (D'Arcy Memorial Lectures: `Early Jesuit music'—with video and audio illustrations), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR B. MILTON-EDWARDS: `The concept of Hudna (ceasefires) in Islamic political thought' (Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies seminars: `Islamic political thought'), Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR B. NEUBERGER: `Education and democracy in Israel—dilemmas and constraints' (David Patterson Seminars), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor, 8 p.m.