Oxford University Gazette: 10 October 2002

Oxford University Gazette, Vol. 133, No. 4634: 10 October 2002

The following supplements were published with this Gazette:

  • New University Statutes and Congregation Regulations (PDF file: 1.26 Mb)
  • Special Lecture List, Michaelmas Term (PDF file)

Note: due to the requirements of the Data Protection Act, some elements of the
printed Gazette are not reproduced in the Web Gazette.

University Acts

COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

1 Dates of Extended Terms 2002--4: Honour School of Natural Science (Chemistry, Part II)

Amendment

The dates of extended terms for 2002--4, including those for Part II candidates in Chemistry, were published in the Gazette of 17 January 2002 (Vol. 132, p. 638). Since then the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board has changed the relevant regulations in order to postpone the start of the extended Michaelmas Term for those candidates from the fifth to the third Thursday before Full Term (p. 1009). The amended dates for 2002--4 are set out below (only the dates for the start of the extended Michaelmas Term have been changed).

The same amendments are required in the lists of dates published at Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 1, and Oxford University Calendar, 2002--3, p. iv.

Part II candidates in Chemistry

MICHAELMAS TERM 2002
Thursday, 26 September – Tuesday, 24 December

HILARY TERM 2003
Tuesday, 7 January – Wednesday, 16 April

TRINITY TERM 2003
Monday, 28 April – Saturday, 28 June

MICHAELMAS TERM 2003
Thursday, 25 September – Tuesday, 23 December

HILARY TERM 2004
Tuesday, 6 January – Wednesday, 7 April

TRINITY TERM 2004
Monday, 19 April – Saturday, 26 June


2 Delegates of the University Press

Council has appointed the following as Delegates of the University Press from 1 October 2002:

For five years

PROFESSOR C.J. LEAVER, St John's

PROFESSOR H. LEE, New College

For four years

SIR PETER NORTH, Principal of Jesus

For two years

PROFESSOR A.E. MORPURGO DAVIES, Somerville


PLANNING AND RESOURCE ALLOCATION COMMITTEE OF COUNCIL

Changes in regulations

The Planning and Resource Allocation Committee of Council has made the following changes in regulations, to come into effect on 25 October.

Fees for D.Phil. candidates in the Doctoral Training Centre at the Life Sciences Interface

1 In Examination Regulations, 2002, p. 1040, l. 34, delete `.' and substitute `;'.

2 Ibid., after l. 34 insert:

`(c) the number of composition fees payable by candidates for the D.Phil. in the Doctoral Training Centre at the Life Sciences Interface shall not exceed twelve.'

[These changes, made on the recommendation of the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board, provide for up to twelve terms' fees to be payable by D.Phil. candidates working on a new four-year doctoral programme of training and research funded by the EPSRC for a total period of five years.]


CONGREGATION 8 October

1 Oration by the Vice-Chancellor

Mr Vice-Chancellor addressed the House.

¶ The text of the Oration will be published shortly as a Supplement to the Gazette.

2 Admission of Pro-Vice-Chancellors

The following persons were nominated by the Vice-Chancellor to be his deputies for the year 2002--3 and were admitted to office:

W.D. MACMILLAN, MA (B.SC., PH.D. Bristol), Fellow of Hertford College (Academic)

PROFESSOR P.A. SLACK, MA, D.PHIL., Principal of Linacre College (Academic Services and University Collections)

PROFESSOR S.D. IVERSEN, MA, D.PHIL., D.SC. (MA, PH.D., SC.D. Cambridge), Fellow of Magdalen College (Planning and Resource Allocation)

SIR PETER NORTH, CBE, QC, DCL, Principal of Jesus College

THE REVD E.W. NICHOLSON, DD (MA Dublin; PH.D. Glasgow; BD, DD Cambridge), Provost of Oriel College

R.C. REPP, MA, D.PHIL. (BA Williams College, Massachusetts), Master of St Cross College

R.G. SMETHURST, MA, Provost of Worcester College

PROFESSOR A.M. CAMERON, CBE, MA (PH.D. London), Warden of Keble College

DAME FIONA CALDICOTT, DBE, BM, B.CH., MA, Principal of Somerville College

DAME RUTH DEECH, MA (MA Brandeis), Principal of St Anne's College

3 Admission of Clerks of the Market

SIR ANTHONY KENNY, MA, D.PHIL., D.LITT., HON. DCL, Emeritus Fellow of St John's College, Honorary Fellow of Balliol and Harris Manchester Colleges, nominated by the Chancellor, and M.H. KEEN, MA, D.PHIL., Emeritus Fellow of Balliol College, nominated by the Vice-Chancellor, were admitted to office as Clerks of the Market for the year 2002--3.

¶ It is regretted that, through oversight, the Agenda for Congregation (Gazette, pp. 3, 64) incorrectly stated that Mr J.B. Bamborough was the Vice- Chancellor's nominee as Clerk of the Market for 2002–3. Mr Bamborough did not wish to continue, and the Vice-Chancellor had nominated Dr Keen to serve in his place.


COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of Congregation:

Atherton, M.D., MA, Faculty of English Language and Literature
Carwardine, R.J., MA, D.Phil., St Catherine's
Dilnot, A.W., MA, St Hugh's
Doornik, K., BA, M.Phil., University
Dutton, E., MA, Magdalen
Ellis, V.T., St Cross
Friedrichs, S., Hertford
Gauci, P.L., MA, D.Phil., Lincoln
Griffiths, J.E., MA, D.Phil., St Edmund Hall
Guyatt, H.L., Faculty of Clinical Medicine
Haour, A.C., Hertford
Hardie, P.R., MA, Corpus Christi
Heather, P.J., MA, D.Phil., Worcester
Jackson, M., BA, Nuffield
Lawes, R., MA, D.Phil., Greyfriars
Martin, J.M., MA, M.St., Lincoln
McGilchrist, I.K., MA, All Souls
Narlikar, A., M.Phil., D.Phil., St John's
Pretto, A., M.St., Brasenose
Tilley, J.R., BA, Nuffield
Uysal, Z., Faculty of Oriental Studies

University Agenda

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • CONGREGATION 15 October
    • Notice of cancellation
    • *1 Declaration of approval of Resolution approving expenditure from the Higher Studies Fund
    • *2 Declaration of approval of Resolution allocating space for the Oxford Centre for the Environment
    • *3 Declaration of approval of Statute
  • * Note on procedures in Congregation
  • * List of forthcoming Degree Days
  • * List of forthcoming Matriculation Ceremonies

 


CONGREGATION 15 October

Notice of cancellation

The meeting of Congregation is cancelled. The sole business comprises questions to which no opposition has been notified and in respect of which no request for adjournment has been received, and Mr Vice-Chancellor will accordingly declare the resolutions carried and the statute approved without a meeting under the provisions of section 7 of Statute IV (Supplement (1) to Gazette, No. 4633, 9 October 2002, p. 100).

Notices

UNIVERSITY PREACHERS

Michaelmas Term 2002

Thursday, 10 October, at 8 a.m. Holy Communion (Latin). At St Mary's.

Sunday, 13 October, at 10 a.m. THE REVD CANON JUNE OSBORNE, Residentiary Canon and Treasurer, Salisbury Cathedral. At St Mary's.

Tuesday, 15 October, at 10.15 a.m. THE REVD SIMON OLIVER, Chaplain of Hertford College. (Court Sermon). At The Cathedral. (Note: the congregation is asked to be seated by 10.10 a.m.)

Sunday, 20 October, at 10 a.m. THE REVD PROFESSOR JOHN BARTON, Oriel and Laing Professor of the Interpretation of the Holy Scripture, Fellow of Oriel College, Emeritus Fellow of St Cross College. At St Mary's.

Sunday, 27 October, at 10 a.m. THE VERY REVD WILLIAM TAYLOR, Vicar of St John's, Notting Hill. At St Mary's.

Sunday, 3 November, at 10 a.m. THE REVD DR ALAN MCCORMACK, Dean of Residence and Chaplain, Trinity College, Dublin. At Jesus College.

Sunday, 10 November, at 10 a.m. MR ALEXANDER MURRAY, Fellow of University College. (University Sermon (Remembrance Sunday).) At St Mary's.

Sunday, 17 November, at 10 a.m. MR KRISHNAN SRINIVASAN, Visiting Fellow, Wolfson College, Cambridge, formerly Commonwealth Deputy Secretary- General. (Ramsden Sermon.) At St Mary's.

Sunday, 24 November, at 10 a.m. DOM JEREMIAS SCHRÖDER, OSB, Archabbot of St Ottilien. (University Sermon on the Sin of Pride.) At St Mary's.

Sunday, 1 December, at 10 a.m. THE REVD OLIVER O'DONOVAN, Regius Professor of Moral and Pastoral Theology, Canon of Christ Church. (University Sermon (Advent Sunday).) At the Cathedral.


NUFFIELD PROFESSORSHIP OF PATHOLOGY

ANDREW OLIVER MUNGO WILKIE, BM, B.CH., MA, DM

(MA Cambridge), Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow in Clinical Science, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Honorary Consultant in Clinical Genetics, Department of Medical Genetics, Churchill Hospital and the Oxford Craniofacial Unit, Radcliffe Infirmary, and Professor of Genetics, University of Oxford, has been appointed to the professorship with effect from 1 May 2003.

Professor Wilkie will be a fellow of Pembroke College.


UNIVERSITY LIBRARY SERVICES

Deputy to the Director of University Library Services and Bodley's Librarian

RONALD R. MILNE (MA Edinburgh, MA London), FRSA, FCLIP, currently Director of the Joint Funding Councils' Research Support Libraries Programme, has been appointed as Deputy to the Director of University Library Services and Bodley's Librarian with effect from 1 November 2002.


ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM

Appointment of deputies

The Visitors of the Ashmolean Museum have approved the following deputising arrangements.

DR N.J. MAYHEW, Keeper of the Heberden Coin Room, as Acting Director from 1 October to 24 November 2002 during the tenure by the Director, Dr C.P.H. Brown, of a Visiting Professorship at the University of Amsterdam.

DR J.J.L. WHITELEY, Senior Assistant Keeper in the Department of Western Art, as Acting Keeper of Western Art from 1 April 2002 to 28 February 2003 during the leave of absence and dispensation from prescribed duties of the Keeper, Mr T.H. Wilson.

DR A.G. MACGREGOR, Assistant Keeper in the Department of Antiquities, as Acting Keeper of Antiquities from 1 October 2002 to 13 January 2003.


REVIEW OF LIBRARY INTEGRATION

The preamble to the Michaelmas Term 1999 legislation establishing the managerially integrated Oxford University Library Services stated that `Whilst the operation of the new arrangements will be subject to continuous evaluation (and minor amendment) in the light of experience, it is intended that a thoroughgoing review of the arrangements, with a formal report to the University about the practical consequences and possible future developments, will be conducted within three years of their introduction'.

Council has set up a panel chaired by Professor Sir Brian Follett to conduct this review. The other members are Mr Peter Fox, Librarian of Cambridge University (who served on the committee chaired by Sir Keith Thomas which led to the new structures), the Warden of Keble, and Professor Hugh Dickinson, Sherardian Professor of Botany, who has just completed a period as a Curator of the University Libraries.

The review has the following terms of reference.

`Bearing in mind the wider University organisational and financial contexts, to review the operation and cost-effectiveness of the managerially integrated library structure over its first three years as measured against the stated objects of achieving:

 

(a) the distribution of resources within the service to meet users' needs most effectively;

(b) the improvement of the capacity of the University's libraries to respond to the needs of their users in the University;

(c) the maintenance and development of, and provision of access to, Oxford's collections as an international research resource;

(d) the provision of University-wide services such as library automation and electronic media, preservation, and library staff development;

(e) the fostering of the qualities of responsiveness, and of flexibility in provision.'

The review panel, which will be meeting in late November, now invites submissions from users of the integrated library system. The panel may wish to pursue in discussion with individual respondents points raised in their written submissions. Submissions should be sent to the secretary of the review panel, Mr L.C.C. Reynolds, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (e-mail: laurence.reynolds@admin.ox.ac.uk) by 31 October.


REVIEW OF THE UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES

As part of the University's programme of regular departmental reviews, the University Archives will be reviewed during Michaelmas Term by a panel appointed by the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Academic Services and University Collections).

The panel's terms of reference are:

`To review the governance, management, staffing, accommodation, and other resources of the University Archives; its collections, conservation, and access policies; and its obligations to its users both internal and external; and to make recommendations, bearing in mind where there are financial implications the level of resources likely to be available within the University and possible alternative ways of raising funds to implement them.'

The panel will be chaired by Mr Lawrence Goldman, Faculty of Modern History (St Peter's College). Its other members are Mrs Janet Williams, Senior Assistant Registrar, University Offices; Dr Rosie Plummer, Administrator, Department of Materials; Mrs Mary Clapinson, Keeper of Special Collections and Western Manuscripts, Bodleian Library; and Mrs Lesley Richmond, Archivist, University of Glasgow.

Submission to the review panel are invited. They should be sent by 24 October to the panel's secretary, Dr Nigel Berry, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (e-mail: nigel.berry@admin.ox.ac.uk).


WOLFSON COLLEGE

Forthcoming exhibition

From West Penwith to Orkney (via West Wales), by H.L. Spencer (14 October–1 November)

Open daily 10 a.m.–4 p.m., subject to college commitments. Visitors are advised to telephone the college lodge (Oxford (2)74100) beforehand.

Lectures

ROMANES LECTURE

THE RT. HON. THE LORD BINGHAM OF CORNHILL, High Steward of the University, will deliver a Romanes Lecture at 5.45 p.m. on Tuesday, 15 October, in the Sheldonian Theatre.

Subject: `Personal freedom and the dilemma of democracies.'


SPEAKER'S LECTURES IN BIBLICAL STUDIES

Who speaks for God? The Bible, discernment, and contested truth

DR WALTER MOBERLY, Reader in Theology, University of Durham, will deliver the Speaker's Lectures at 11 a.m. on the following days in the Examination Schools.

Wed. 30 0ct.: `What is speech on God's behalf, and is it a meaningful and usable concept?'

Thur. 31 Oct.: `Searching for criteria of critical discernment: the voice of Jeremiah.'

Fri. 1 Nov.: `How might you recognise a true prophet? The story of Micaiah ben Imlah.'

Wed. 6 Nov.: `How might you recognise a true apostle? The testimony of Paul.'

Thur. 7 Nov.: `How does religious dogma open eyes, and how does it shut them?'

Fri. 8 Nov.: `Living dangerously: the demands of discernment.'

 

Dr Moberly will also give a seminar on `How appropriate is "monotheism" as a category for biblical interpretation' at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 30 October, in the Harris Seminar Room, Oriel College.


WILDE LECTURES IN NATURAL AND COMPARATIVE RELIGION

Indic religions until 1200 AD: a critical and anthropological approach

GEOFFREY SAMUEL, Professor of Anthropology, University of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia, will deliver the Wilde Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination Schools.

Mon. 11 Nov.: `Beginnings and foundations: introduction—tracing back Ganesha.'

Tue. 12 Nov.: `Beginnings and foundations: the limits of our knowledge.'

Mon. 18 Nov.: `Brahmanical religion and its competitors: the world of the Yakshas.'

Tue. 19 Nov.: `Brahmanical religion and its competitors: the origins of the ascetic orders.'

Mon. 25 Nov.: `The age of the Guptas: the growth of the transcendental.'

Tue. 26 Nov.: `The age of the Guptas: wild goddesses and demon devotees.'

Mon. 2 Dec.: `The high period of Tantra: ritual technologies and the state.'

Tue. 3 Dec.: `The high period of Tantra: the privatisation of Tantra.'


HERBERT SPENCER LECTURES 2002

The future of education

The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Examination Schools. The lectures are open to the public.

DR J.T. BRUER, Director, James S. McDonnell Foundation
18 Oct.: `Neuroscience, cognitive science, and the rational basis of education.'

PROFESSOR J. LEDOUX, Centre for Neural Science, New York University
25 Oct.: `How our brains learn to be who we are.'

PROFESSOR M. COLE, Department of Psychology, University of California at San Diego
1 Nov.: `Cross-cultural and historical perspectives on the consequences of education.'

PROFESSOR C. HOYLES, Professor of Mathematics Education, Institute of Education, London
8 Nov.: `Cognitive and epistemological research aspects of mathematical learning.'

PROFESSOR H. GIROUX, Waterbury Chair Professor
15 Nov.: `Reclaiming higher education as a democratic public sphere: towards a politics of educated hope.'

PROFESSOR Y. ENGESTRÖM, Director of the Centre for Activity Theory and Developmental Work Research, University of Helsinki
22 Nov.: To be announced.


JAMES FORD SPECIAL LECTURE IN BRITISH HISTORY

PROFESSOR IAN CHRISTIE, Birkbeck College, London, will deliver the James Ford Special Lecture in British History at 5 p.m. on Friday, 8 November, in the Examination Schools. The lecture will be preceded by a showing of the 1918 film The life story of David Lloyd George at 2 p.m.

Subject: `Patriotism and business: the issue of a national cinema in Britain, 1915–25.'


FORD'S LECTURES IN BRITISH HISTORY

PROFESSOR QUENTIN SKINNER, Cambridge, will deliver the Ford's Lectures in British History in Hilary Term 2003. The lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Examination Schools, commencing on 24 January and concluding on 28 February.


EUROPAEUM LECTURE

PROFESSOR CHARLES WYPLOSZ, Graduate Institute of International Studies, Geneva, will deliver the Europaeum Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 22 November, in the Main Hall, the Taylor Institution. Admission is by ticket, obtainable by telephoning (2)84482 (or e-mail: euroinfo@europaeum.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `Fiscal discipline in the monetary union: rules or institutions.'

On Saturday, 23 November, a round table discussion following the lecture will be held in Lecture Room 23, Balliol College, 10.30 a.m.–12 noon. The panel will include Professor Wyplosz, Professor Giorgio Basevi (University of Bologna), and Professor David Vines.


NEWTON-ABRAHAM LECTURE 2002–3

PROFESSOR M. GREENE, John Eckman Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, will deliver his Newton-Abraham Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Monday, 18 November, in the Medical Sciences Teaching Centre Lecture Theatre, the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology.

Subject: `The origin and reversal of cancer.'


JOHN LLOYD MEMORIAL LECTURE

DR H. PATTERSON and DR R. WITCHER, British School at Rome, will deliver the John Lloyd Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 18 October, in the Headley Lecture Theatre, the Ashmolean Museum. The lecture will be followed by a reception in the Institute of Archaeology.

Subject: `The latest result of the Tiber Valley Project.'


WEIDENFELD VISITING PROFESSOR IN EUROPEAN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE, MICHAELMAS TERM 2002

Love and death: Vienna, Wagner, and fin de siècle culture

DR NIKE WAGNER will lecture at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination Schools. Unless otherwise indicated, the lectures will be given on Tuesdays.

15 Oct.: `Historism in Vienna.'

Thur. 17 Oct.: `The political dreams of Theodor Herzl.'

22 Oct.: `The modernity of Richard Strauss.'

5 Nov.: `Artist and countess—the "ideal" couple.'

12 Nov.: `Schnitzler's "Casanova" and Hofmannsthal's "Marschalin" .'

19 Nov.: `Lulu and Lolita.'

26 Nov.: `The divided world of Winifred Wagner.'

3 Dec.: `Richard Wagner's posterity.'

 

Dr Wagner will also give seminars in November on dates to be arranged. The seminar topics will be:

 

1. `Thomas Mann and Richard Wagner.'

 

2. `Casanova and The Feldmarschallin.'

 

3. `Theodor Herzl's dreams.'

 

4. `The Jewish Question in Vienna: Schnitzler and Schoenberg.'


CLARENDON LAW LECTURES

Intellectual property: omnipotent, distracting, or irrelevant?

PROFESSOR W. CORNISH, QC, Herchel Smith Professor of Intellectual Property Law, Cambridge, will deliver the Clarendon Law Lectures at 5.30 p.m. on the following days in the St Cross Building.

Fri. 1 Nov.: `Inventing.'

Thur. 7 Nov.: `Creating.'

Fri. 8 Nov.: `Branding.'


CLARENDON LECTURES IN MANAGEMENT STUDIES

Information and organisation

PROFESSOR BRUNO LATOUR, Centre de Sociologie de l'Innovation, Ecole Normale Supérieure des Mines, Paris, will deliver the Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies at 5 p.m. on the days shown in the Saïd Business School. The lectures are open to the public, and admission is free of charge. Enquiries should be directed to Liz Buckle (e-mail: liz.buckle@sbs.ox.ac.uk) or Veronica Allen (e-mail: allenv@oup.co.uk).

Tue. 22 Oct.: `Four new uncertainties in the social sciences.'

Wed. 23 Oct.: `For a critique of pure reason.'

Thur. 24 Oct.: `The trouble with organisation.'


CLASSICS

Purity and pollution in the religions of the Mediterranean world in antiquity

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in New College.

Conveners: M.D. Goodman, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Jewish Studies, and R.C.T. Parker, MA, D.Phil., Wykeham Professor of Ancient History.

PROFESSOR M. DOUGLAS, UCL
15 Oct.: `New directions for purity and pollution.'

PROFESSOR PARKER
22 Oct.: `Purity, pollution, and religious authority in Greece.'

PROFESSOR H. MACCOBY, Leeds
29 Oct.: `Purity in the Bible and early rabbinic Judaism.'

PROFESSOR A. CHANIOTIS, Heidelberg
5 Nov.: `Purity of the mind in Greek sacred regulations.'

M. BROSHI, Jerusalem
12 Nov.: `Purity in Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls.'

DR A. BENDLIN, Frankfurt
19 Nov.: `Dirt, pollution, and guilt: religious and non-religious aspects of "purity" in Roman culture.'

DR T. MORGAN
26 Nov.: `Purity of heart in the New Testament and the primitive Church.'

DR E. BARDWELL
3 Dec.: ` "By his death he has purified us all": some fourth-century Christian perspectives on issues of purification.'


Classical Archaeology Seminar: the statute habit in ancient Greek society

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Lower Lecture Room, Lincoln College.

Conveners: J.T. Ma, BA, D.Phil., University Lecturer (CUF) in Ancient History, and R.R.R. Smith, MA, M.Phil., D.Phil., Lincoln Professor of Classical Archaeology and Art.

PROFESSOR SMITH
14 Oct.: `Statues and athletes in the fifth century BC.'

DR MA
21 Oct.: `Statue habit, epigraphic habit.'

PROFESSOR G.B. WAYWELL, London
28 Oct.: `Portrait statues of members of the Hecatomnid Dynasty, c. 380–30 BC: evidence for their appearance, setting, and function.'

PROFESSOR A. CHANIOTES, Heidelberg
4 Nov.: `No way to treat a statue: lives of statues in the epigraphic evidence.'

PROFESSOR F. QUEYREL, Paris
11 Nov.: `Hellenistic portraits in context: the case of Delos.'

DR J.J. COULTON
18 Nov.: `The meaning of statue bases.'

PROFESSOR M. BERGMANN, Göttingen
25 Nov.: `Youthful gods: the statue habit and statuettes of Christ in later antiquity.'

DR P.C.N. STEWART, London
2 Dec.: `Greek statues in imperial society.'


Archive of Performances of Greek and Roman Drama

WILLIAM K. ZEWADSKI, private collector of images and artefacts relating to Greek plays, will lecture at 2.15 p.m. on Wednesday, 23 October, in the Auditorium, Magdalen College. For further details, contact apgrd@classics.ox.ac.uk.

Subject: `Greek theatre in the cinema and television.'


ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

Romantic Realignments

The following seminars will be held at 5.30 p.m. on the days shown in the Goodhart Seminar Room, University College. Further information may be obtained from Luisa Cale, University College (e-mail: luisa.cale@univ.ox.ac.uk).

DR J. MEE
Thur. 24 Oct.: `Blake, nation, and circulation: politics, poetry, and physiology.'

PROFESSOR M. FAVRET, Indiana
Thur. 21 Nov.: `Reading and writing in wartime.'

PROFESSOR M. JACOBUS, Cambridge
Tue. 3 Dec.: `Wordsorth and Winnicott.'


ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE, MUSIC, THEOLOGY

The Bible in art, music, and literature

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Danson Room, Trinity College.

Conveners: C.C. Rowland, MA, D.Phil., Dean Ireland's Professor of Exegesis of Holy Scripture, and C.E. Joynes, MA, M.St., D.Phil., Bampton Fellow in Theology, Trinity College.

PROFESSOR ROWLAND
21 Oct.: `William Blake and Merkavah mysticism.'

DR D. BIRCH
4 Nov.: `Ruskin and the Bible.'

DR O. REES
18 Nov.: `The composer as exegete? Case studies from Seville.'

SR. MARY CHARLES MURRAY
2 Dec.: `The Bible and western art.'


LIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Biochemistry.

Convener: L.N. Johnson, MA, David Phillips Professor of Molecular Biophysics.

PROFESSOR A. WATTS
1 Nov.: `How solid state NMR structural studies on membrane proteins can help us understand function.'

DR M. NOBLE
8 Nov.: `Binding and signalling in adhesion: FAT and CD44.'

DR E. LOWE
15 Nov.: `The molecular basis of herbal anti-alcohol abuse compound.'

DR J. DIETRICH
22 Nov.: `Structure, mechanism, and regulation of the Neurospora plasma membrane H+-ATPase.'

PROFESSOR M. BUCK, Imperial College, London
29 Nov.: `Structural and functional studies on multisubunit RNA polymerases.'

PROFESSOR H. NEWELL, Newcastle
Mon. 2 Dec., 4 p.m.: `Strategies for the development of improved cancer therapies.' (Joint seminar with OUBS)

DR G. DAVIES, York
6 Dec.: `Structural enzymology of glycosyl transfer: the synthesis of (poly)saccharides.'


Department of Zoology

Unless otherwise stated, the following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Mondays in Lecture Theatre B, the Department of Zoology. Seminars are followed by a short wine reception with the speaker.

Conveners: Graham Taylor and Paul Barrett.

PROFESSOR RICHARD GARDNER
14 Oct.: `Early patterning in mammals: new findings and their implications for human assisted reproduction and embryo research.'

PROFESSOR E. THOMPSON, University of Washington, Seattle
21 Oct., 5 p.m., Lecture Theatre A: `Chromosome ancestry and genetic mapping in the era of genome data.' (Weldon Lecture)

DR D. ROBERT, Bristol
28 Oct.: `Do insects wiggle their ears? The how and why of active audition in flies.'

DR M. COHN, Reading
4 Nov.: `Fins, limbs, and genitalia: the evolution of vertebrate appendage development.'

PROFESSOR C. CURTIS, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
11 Nov.: `Comparison of old and new methods for control of malaria vectors.'

DR R. KILNER, Cambridge
18 Nov.: `Mother knows best: the evolution of nestling begging displays.'

DR T. BARRACLOUGH, Imperial College, Silwood Park
25 Nov.: `Bdelloids and beyond: speciation in sexual and asexual organisms.'

PROFESSOR STEVE JONES, University College, London
2 Dec., Lecture Theatre A: `Sunshine and shade: genetic variation and thermal ecology in patchy environments.'


What is the future of science-based conservation?

The following seminars will be given at 1 p.m. on Thursdays in the School of Geography and the Environment.

LORD ROBERT MAY
17 Oct.: `Sentiment and science in conservation planning.'

DR S. KNAPP
24 Oct.: `Collecting to conserve: not as paradoxical as it may seem.'

PROFESSOR W. SUTHERLAND, East Anglia
31 Oct.: `The need for evidence-based conservation.'

DR S. TRUDGHILL, Cambridge
7 Nov.: `A rational case for the emotions in a conservation ethic.'

DR K. MCKINNON, World Bank
14 Nov.: To be announced.

PROFESSOR A. DOBSON, Princeton
21 Nov.: `Emerging role of infectious diseases in biological conservation.'

PROFESSOR C. PERRINGS, York
28 Nov.: `Science and the precautionary principle.'

THE REVD MARTIN PALMER, ARC
5 Dec.: `Science—one of the great belief systems of the world—but only one.'


Biodiversity Research Group

BRADFORD A. HAWKINS, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Irvine, will lecture at 1 p.m. on Monday, 21 October, in the Senior Common Room, the School of Geography and the Environment.

Convener: R.J. Whittaker, MA, Reader in Biogeography.

 

Subject: `Productivity and history as predictors of the latitudinal diversity gradient of terrestrial birds.'


Department of Plant Sciences

The following research talks will be given at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in the Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Plant Sciences.

Convener: H.G. Dickinson, MA, Sherardian Professor of Botany.

PROFESSOR K. OPARKA, Scottish Crop Research Institute, Dundee
10 Oct.: `Plant functional genomics—a role for virus vectors.'

DR I. SMALL, INRA Plant Genome Research Centre, Evry, France
17 Oct.: `Application of high-throughput functional genomics approaches to the study of the PPR family, a huge novel family of proteins involved in organellar gene expression.'

DR T. SMIT, the Eden Project
24 Oct.: `Recreation of Eden?'

DR M. WILKINSON, Reading
31 Oct.: `Compiling a national scale risk profile for gene flow from genetically modified crops.'

DR G. LOAKE, Edinburgh
7 Nov.: `On the mechanisms of plant disease resistance.'

DR G. STROMPEN, Tübingen
14 Nov.: `HINKEL, a kinesin related protein involved in plant cytokinesis.'

DR A. PATON, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
21 Nov.: `Monographic studies in Plectranthus (Lamiaceae, basils, and allies).'

PROFESSOR C. FOYER, Institute of Arable Crops Research, Rothamsted
28 Nov.: `Vitamin C deficiency in plants and its consequences.'

DR B. JUNIPER
5 Dec.: `The origin of the apple.'


Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology

Ethnicity and Identity Seminar: the nation-state and religious identities

The following seminars will be held at 11 a.m. on Fridays in the ISCA, 61 Banbury Road.

Conveners: Shirley Ardener, Ian Fowler, and Lidia Sciama.

DR P. WALTERS, Head of Research, Keston Institute
18 Oct.: `Russia and its former East European states, and their relationship with religious identities.'

DR D. JOHNSON, Director, James Currey
25 Oct.: `Religion and citizenship in the Sudan.'

PROFESSOR V. SHUE
1 Nov.: `Chinese state/Chinese religion: collaboration/competition.'

DR P. CAREY
8 Nov.: `The religious dimension in nationalism in Indonesia and East Timor.'

DR E. OTTOLENGHI
15 Nov.: `Israel's religious status quo and the politics of accommodation.'

DR SCIAMA
22 Nov.: `Religious identities and the secular state in Italy.'

THE REVD DR E. CONDRY, Canon of Canterbury Cathedral
29 Nov.: `The state, the monarchy, and religious identities in the UK.'

DR N. GOOPTU
6 Dec.: `Religious identities and Indian statehood.'


LIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES, MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES, MEDICAL SCIENCES

Mathematical Genetics and Bioinformatics Group

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Peter Medawar Building for Pathogen Research, South Parks Road (entry through Zoology). Further information may be obtained from Gill McVean (e-mail: mcvean@stats.ox.ac.uk).

L. CHIKHI, University College, London
15 Oct.: `Palaeolithic v. Neolithic contributions to European ancestry.'

N. BARTON, Edinburgh
22 Oct.: `The effect of selection on genealogies.'

A. DRUMMOND
29 Oct.: `Statistical analysis of ancient DNA.'

G. COOP 5 Nov.: `Genetrees, diffusion, and selection.' R. FORSBERG
12 Nov.: `Modelling host-specific selection in viruses.'

T. WIEHE, BCB and FU Berlin
19 Nov.: `Hitch-hiking models for chromosome-wide variability surveys.'

C. DEANE
26 Nov.: `Quality assessment of protein interaction data.'

V. MACAULAY
3 Dec.: `Snipping at admixture.'


MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Oxford Physics Colloquia

The following colloquia will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Fridays in the Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon Laboratory.

Conveners: N.F. Johnson, MA, Professor of Physics, and J.I. Silk, MA, D.Phil., Savilian Professor of Astronomy.

PROFESSOR N. STRAUMANN, Zurich
25 Oct.: `The history and mystery of the cosmological constant.'

PROFESSOR K.W.D. LEDINGHAM, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, and William Penney Professor of Laser Induced Nuclear Physics (AWE PLC)
1 Nov.: `Laser induced nuclear physics and its applications.'

PROFESSOR T. GAISSER, Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware
15 Nov.: `Cosmic-ray physics and astrophysics.' (Leverhulme Lecture)

PROFESSOR W.D. PHILLIPS, NIST, USA; Distinguished University of Physics, University of Maryland, USA; George Eastman Visiting Professor and Nobel Laureate
22 Nov.: `Coherent atoms in optical lattices.'

PROFESSOR SIR GARETH ROBERTS
29 Nov.: `Leadership and management of scientific research.'


Inorganic Chemistry Colloquia

The following colloquia will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Lecture Theatre, the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory.

Convener: M.L.H. Green, MA, Professor of Inorganic Chemistry.

PROFESSOR L. GADE, Strasbourg
14 Oct.: `Strategies in homogeneous catalysis: going from mononuclear complexes to macromolecular dendrimer catalysts.'

PROFESSOR P. SHAPLEY, Indiana
21 Oct.: `Heterometallic complexes as selective oxidation catalysts.'

DR J. DAVIS
28 Oct.: `Molecular assemblies: metalloprotein and sensing nanotechnology.'

PROFESSOR M. DARENSBOURG, University of Texas A & M
4 Nov.: `Functioning catalysts inspired by active sites in bio- organometallic chemistry: the hydrogenases.'

PROFESSOR F.G. CLOKE, Sussex
11 Nov.: `Activation of dinitrogen by vanadium diamidoamine and uranium pentalene complexes.'

PROFESSOR N. HARRISON, Imperial College and Daresbury Laboratory
18 Nov.: `Predicting the stoichiometry, magnetic and electronic structure of transition metal oxide surfaces from first principles.'

DR P. TIMMS, Bristol
25 Nov.: `Making oxide replicas of organic nanostructures by chemical vapour deposition.'

PROFESOR S.T. BRAMWELL, University College, London
2 Dec.: `Hot spin ice: a new class of quantum magnet?'


Soft matter, biomaterials, and interfaces

This interdisciplinary seminar series will continue this term. Unless otherwise indicated, the seminars will be held at 4 p.m. on Tuesdays in the John Rowlinson Seminar Room, the Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory.

Convener: J. Klein, MA, D.Phil., Dr Lee's Professor of Chemistry.

PROFESSOR R. PASHLEY, Australian National University
15 Oct.: `Emulsion stability.'

DR W. HUCK, Cambridge
22 Oct.: `Manipulating polymers at the nanoscale.'

DR H. CHRISTENSON, Leeds
29 Oct.: `Experimental studies of capillary condensation from vapour and from liquid mixtures.'

PROFESSOR M. KLEIN, Pennsylvania
5 Nov., 11.15 a.m.: `Modelling biomolecules at soft interfaces: the continuing challenge of bridging length and time scales.'

DR J. YEOMANS
12 Nov.: `Simulating polymer hydrodynamics.'

PROFESSOR J. ISRAELACHVILI, California, Santa Barbara
19 Nov., 11.15 a.m.: `Differences in the interactions of colloids, biological molecules and surfaces.'

PROFESSOR H.-J. BUTT, Siegen
26 Nov.: `Contributions to microfluidics and chemistry.'

PROFESSOR R. EVANS, Bristol
3 Dec.: `Attraction out of repulsion: interfaces and entropic wetting in model colloid–polymer mixtures.'


Organic Chemistry Colloquia

Unless otherwise indicated, the following colloquia will be given at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in the Dyson Perrins Laboratory.

PROFESSOR T. HAYASHI, Kyoto University
Fri. 18 Oct.: `Rhodium-catalysed asymmetric 1,4- addition.'

PROFESSOR A.P. DAVIS, Bristol
24 Oct.: `Synthetic receptors for anions and carbohydrates.'

DR A. SPIVEY, Sheffield
31 Oct.: `Catalytic asymmetric acylation and studies towards the total asymmetric synthesis of Celastraceae sesquiterpenoids.'

DR A. GANGULY, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ
7 Nov.: `Drug discovery—a few case studies.'

PROFESSOR A.B. SMITH, Philadelphia
Wed. 13 Nov.: `Recent advances in complex molecule total synthesis.' (RSC Centenary Award Lecture)

DR M. SHIPMAN, University of Exeter
21 Nov.: `Heterocyclic chemistry: taking the strain.'

PROFESSOR D. O'HAGAN, St Andrews
28 Nov.: `Fluorometabolite biosynthesis in Streptomyces Cattyleya. The identification of a C–F bond forming enzyme.'

PROFESSOR J.S. CLARKE, Nottingham
5 Dec.: to be announced.


Theoretical Chemistry Group Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the John Rowlinson Seminar Room, 20.12 (opposite the Main Lecture Theatre).

Convener: M.S. Child, MA, Coulson Professor of Theoretical Chemistry.

DR G. WORTH, King's College, London
14 Oct.: `The role of conical intersections in molecular dynamics.'

T.F. MILLER, University College, London
28 Oct.: `Torsional path integral method for large molecules.'

PROFESSOR S. ELLIOTT, Cambridge
11 Nov.: `Disorder effects on vibrational excitations.'

DR M. WILSON, University College, London
2 Dec.: `Computer simulation of the formation of novel crystal structures in carbon nanotubes.'


Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory

The following departmental seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Mondays in the PTCL Lecture Theatre. No seminar will be held on 25 November (Part II Open Day).

DR F. SCHREIBER
14 Oct.: `Growth, structural phases, and applications of self- assembled monolayers.'

DR D. CARUANA, University College, London
21 Oct.: `Electrochemistry in flames.'

PROFESSOR D. CHANDLER, Sandia National Laboratory, USA
28 Oct.: `How molecules really rotate after a collision: the NO + Ar system.'

PROFESSOR M. KLEIN, LRSM, Pennyslvania, USA
4 Nov.: `First principles molecular dynamics studies of resonance: from salt water to superacids.'

PROFESSOR M. ROBB, King's College, London
11 Nov.: `Nuclear and electronic motion in concert: a theoretical approach to non-adiabatic chemistry with application to photochemistry and electron transfer.'

DR M. BRITTON, Cambridge
18 Nov.: `The exploration of waves and patterns in chemistry using nuclear magnetic resonance.'

PROFESSOR D. CLARY
2 Dec.: `Quantum reaction dynamics of polyatomic molecules.'


Geophysical and nonlinear fluid dynamics seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Dobson Lecture Room, Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Planetary Physics. The organisers are Dr Suzy Bingham (telephone: Oxford (2)72098, e-mail: bingham@atm.ox.ac.uk), and Dr Luca Montabone (telephone: Oxford (2)72902, e-mail: montabone@atm.ox.ac.uk).

The seminars on 15 October and 12 November also form part of the Mathematical Institute's `Applied Dynamical Systems' seminar series.

Conveners: P.L. Read, MA, Professor of Physics, and I.M. Moroz, MA, University Lecturer (CUF) in Mathematics.

DR D. ACHESON
15 Oct.: `Vortex motion; old and new.'

PROFESSOR P. KILLWORTH, Southampton Oceanography Centre
22 Oct.: `Rossby waves: the final word?'

PROFESSOR P. DAVIES, Dundee
29 Oct.: `Model studies of internal solitary waves in stratified fluids.'

DR P. THOMAS, Warwick
5 Nov.: `Laboratory simulations of gravity-driven coastal currents: small-scale v. large-scale experiments.'

DR A. FOWLER
12 Nov.: `Mathematical modelling of aeolian dune formation.'

DR G. MILLWARD, University College, London
19 Nov.: `Comparative modelling of planetary ionosphere–thermosphere systems.'

DR S. BELCHER, Reading
26 Nov.: `Dynamics of urban meterology.'

DR C. PASCOE, RAL
3 Dec.: `The quasi-biennial oscillation and the northern hemisphere polar stratospheric vortex.'


Department of Earth Sciences

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Mondays in the Lecture Theatre, the Department of Earth Sciences. Details of the 4 November seminar will be announced later.

DR R. WASHINGTON
21 Oct.: `Mineral dust in the atmosphere: source areas and transport pathways.'

PROFESSOR D. LEA, University of California
28 Oct.: `Climate impact of the Ice Age tropics.'

DR M. ALLEN, Cambridge Arctic Shelf Programme
11 Nov.: `The Arabia–Eurasia collision.'

PROFESSOR M. BRASIER
18 Nov.: `Turning up the heat on Earth's earliest life.'

PROFESSOR S. MOORBATH
25 Nov.: `Oldest rocks, impacts, life—many questions, fewer answers.'


Department of Materials

The following colloquia will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Thursdays in the Hume Rothery Lecture Theatre.

Convener: J.L. Hutchison, MA, Reader in Materials.

PROFESSOR R. SMITH, Imperial College, London
17 Oct.: `Railways and structural integrity: learning from failures.'

DR P. MUMMERY, UMIST
24 Oct.: `The use of X-ray tomography in materials science.'

DR H. VAN SWYGENHOVEN, Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland
31 Oct.: `Impact of nanosized grain boundaries on tensile deformation, fracture, nanoindentation, and irradiation: results from atomistic simulations.'

PROFESSOR C. PILLINGER, Open University
7 Nov: `Beagle 2—the search for life on Mars.'

DR R. MCGRATH, Liverpool
14 Nov.: `Quasicrystal surfaces—from Fibonacci to frying pan.'

PROFESSOR B. CARTER, Minnesota
21 Nov.: `Glass in and on ceramic oxides.'

DR J. JONES
28 Nov.: To be announced.

DR A. CROSSLEY
5 Dec.: `Applications of microscopy techniques in forensic science.'

 


MEDICAL SCIENCES

University Department of Psychiatry: guest lectures

 

The following guest lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the University Department of Psychiatry Seminar Room, the Warneford Hospital.

Convener: G.M. Goodwin, BM, MA, D.Phil., W.A. Handley Professor of Psychiatry.

DR M. CASANOVA
29 Oct.: `Cortical circuitry and psychiatric disorders.'

PROFESSOR P. LIDDLE, Department of Psychological Medicine, Nottingham Healthcare NHS Trust
19 Nov.: `Functional imaging and schizophrenia.'


Department of Experimental Psychology

The following seminars will be given at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Weiskrantz Room (C113), the Department of Experimental Psychology.

PROFESSOR L. COHEN, Texas at Austin
15 Oct.: `Constructing infant cognition.'

DR K. TRIGWELL
22 Oct.: `Evoked conceptions of learning at the University of Oxford.'

DR P. HAGGARD, UCL
29 Oct.: `Free will and conscious awareness.'

PROFESSOR T. YOUSRY, UCL
5 Nov.: `Cortical landmarks or how to identify the central region.' (MRC Co-operative Group in Heart and Brain Imaging Special Lecture)

PROFESSOR A. STEIN
12 Nov.: `The influence of maternal postnatal psychological disorder on child development.'

PROFESSOR F. VARGHA-KHADEM, UCL
19 Nov.: `Dissociations in cognitive memory: the syndrome of developmental amnesia.' (Supported by the McDonnell Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience)

PROFESSOR R. NICOLSON, Sheffield
26 Nov.: `Dyslexia: cognition, development, and the brain.'

PROFESSOR M. JARVIS, UCL
3 Dec.: `Cigarette smoking and health inequalities: interaction of social, individual, and biological factors.'


Oxford Imaging Symposium

The MRC Co-operative Group (Co-ordinator: Professor A. Noble) is holding a mini- symposium, highlighting University-wide research activities in the area of heart and brain imaging, on Thursday, 10 October, 4–7.30 p.m., in the Department of Experimental Psychology. The event will consist of a series of talks, followed by a poster session in which all are welcome to participate.


Sir William Dunn School of Pathology

Unless otherwise indicated, the following research seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the Medical Sciences Teaching Centre Lecture Theatre.

PROFESSOR J.M. WALPORT, Imperial College
17 Oct.: `Innate immunity and lupus—friend or foe?'

PROFESSOR M. TUITE, Kent
31 Oct.: `Prions and protein-based inheritance in yeast.'

PROFESSOR J. HOFFMANN, Strasbourg
7 Nov.: `Recognition of infectious non-self and intracellular signalling in the host defence of Drosophila.'

PROFESSOR R. SOUHAMI, Cancer Research UK
14 Nov.: `Biological treatments in randomised trails of cancer treatment.'

PROFESSOR M. GREEN, Pennsylvania; Newton–Abraham Visiting Professor 2002–3
Mon. 18 Nov.: `The origin and reversal of cancer.' (Newton–Abraham Lecture 2002\)

PROFESSOR A. MCMICHAEL
28 Nov.: `Immunodominance and vaccine design.'

DR C. BUCKLEY, Birmingham
12 Dec.: `Why does chronic inflammation joint disease persist?'


University Laboratory of Physiology

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 12 noon on Wednesdays in the Sherrington Room, the University Laboratory of Physiology. Two presentations will be given at the meeting on 4 December.

Convener: J.C. Ellory, MA, D.Sc., Professor of Physiology.

PROFESSOR S. LAUGHLIN, Cambridge
16 Oct.: `The role of metabolic energy in neural function.' (McDonnell–Pew Centre Seminar)

PROFESSOR D. BEECH, Leeds
23 Oct.: To be announced. (Sponsored by the Physiological Society)

DR L. PINTO, Northwestern University, USA
30 Oct.: `The M2 ion channel of influenza virus: its role in the virus life cycle and its mechanism for ion selectivity and activation.' (Sponsored by the Physiological Society)

PROFESSOR D. EISNER, Manchester
6 Nov.: `Intracellular calcium release, contraction and arrhythmias in the heart.' (Jenkinson Seminar)

PROFESSOR A. KACELNIK
13 Nov.: `Bird–brained economists—the psychophysics of decision-making in birds.' (McDonnell–Pew Centre Seminar)

DR P. SMITH, Nottingham
20 Nov.: To be announced. (Jenkinson Seminar)

DR S. WUERGER, Keele
27 Nov.: `The integration of auditory and visual motion signals.' (McDonnell–Pew Centre Seminar)

DR I. ZAHRADNIK, Slovak Academy of Sciences
4 Dec., 12 noon: `E–C coupling in heart as seen by the DHPR.' (Sponsored by the Physiological Society)

PROFESSOR K. PATEL, Nebraska
4 Dec., 2.30 p.m.: `Nitric oxide and central autonomic control.' (Sponsored by the Physiological Society)


Oxford Clinical Neuroscience Lectures

The following lectures will be given at 11.30 a.m. on Fridays in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

PROFESSOR J. ROTHWELL, Sobell Department of Neurophysiology, Institute of Neurology
11 Oct.: `Transcranial magnetic stimulation.'

PROFESSOR A. COMPSTON, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge
15 Nov.: `The basis for treatment in MS.'

PROFESSOR P. DE JONGHE, Antwerp
13 Dec.: `Interited neuropathies.'


Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics

The following research seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the Lecture Theatre, the Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics.

Convener: K.E. Davies, MA, D.Phil., Dr Lee's Professor of Anatomy.

DR P. BROWN, Edinburgh
18 Oct.: `Transcriptional regulation of pituitary gonadotrophin subunit genes.'

DR H. BAYLISS, Cambridge
25 Oct.: `Dissecting the functions of IPs mediated signalling using C. elegans.'

PROFESSOR D. SMITH
1 Nov.: `Alzheimer's disease: beyond the genes and towards prevention.'

DR L. SEYMOUR
8 Nov.: `Use of adenoviruses for gene therapy of cancer.'

PROFESSOR S. GRANT, Edinburgh
15 Nov.: `The molecular complexity of synapse signalling.'

DR R. COPLEY
22 Nov.: `Protein domains and exon duplication.'

DR I. TRACEY
29 Nov.: `Imaging pain in humans.'

DR C. HOLT, Cambridge
6 Dec.: `Growth cone guidance in the vertebrate visual system.' (Jenkinson seminar)


Seminars in public health and epidemiology

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Abraham Lecture Theatre, Green College.

PROFESSOR P. JONES, Cambridge
15 Oct.: `Who gets schizophrenia? Signposts from the general population.'

DR I. DOS SANTOS SILVA, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
22 Oct.: `Prenatal origins of breast cancer.'

PROFESSOR P. SMITH, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
29 Oct.: `Current status of the epidemics of BSE and CJD.'

PROFESSOR N. WALD, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine
5 Nov.: `A new strategy for the prevention of heart disease.'

DR G. WHITLOCK
12 Nov.: `Body weight or body mass index: which is a better predictor of heart disease risk?'

PROFESSOR C. BRAYNE, Cambridge
26 Nov.: `The prevention of dementia: an achievable goal?'

DR M. VICKERS, MRC General Practice Research Framework
3 Dec.: `Long-term trials of hormone replacement therapy.'


MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

Taylor Special Lecture: Luis Cernuda Centenary

CLAUDIO GUILLÉN, Professor Emeritus of Comparative Literature, Harvard University, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 14 October, in Room 2, the Taylor Institution.

Subject: `Exile shared: Luis Cernuda and Jorge Guillén.'


Public lecture

CLAUDIO GUILLÉN, Professor Emeritus of Comparative Literature, Harvard University, will deliver a public lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 15 October, in Room 3, the Taylor Institution.

Subject: `Literatura y conjetura: Borges.'


Graduate Seminar in Spanish Studies

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in Room 3, the Taylor Insitution. For details of lectures to be given in First Week by Professor Claudio Guillén, see above.

A presentation of graduate students' plans will be held at the meeting on 12 November.

Conveners: I.D.L. Michael, MA, King Alfonso XIII Professor of Spanish Studies, and J.D. Rutherford, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in Spanish.

SÁUL YURKIEVICH, Latin American poet and critic
22 Oct.: `Trilce de César Vallejo, o la contrarretórica contrita.'

DR C. GRIFFIN
5 Nov.: `Vargas Llosa's La fiesta del Chivo.'

PROFESSOR D. GAGEN, Swansea
19 Nov.: `Muerte y juicio: Rafael Alberti's poetry of (dis)belief.' (Public lecture: Rafael Alerti centenary)


Italian Graduate Seminar

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in Room 10B, the Taylor Institution.

Conveners: M.L. McLaughlin, MA, D.Phil., Fiat-Serena Professor of Italian Studies, and M. Zaccarello (Dott.Lett.), University Lecturer in Italian.

DR ZACCARELLO
22 Oct.: `Quale testo leggiamo? L'edizione critica dei classici italiani fra le nuove metodologie "all'inglese" e "alla francese".'

DR B. BUJIC
Wed. 6 Nov., Music Faculty: `Lionardo Salviati and the literary foundations of the early Florentine opera.' (Joint seminar with the Faculty of Music)

DR P. ZANOTTI, Bologna
19 Nov.: `Dove muovono le ombre: tendenze del fantastico nell'Italia contemporanea.'

DR O. INNOCENTI, Rome III
3 Dec.: `La metropoli infernale del Lager: Primo Levi tra testimonianza, narrazione, identità.'


MODERN HISTORY

Early Modern Europe Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Modern History Faculty Building.

Conveners: R.J.W. Evans, MA, D.Phil., Regius Professor of Modern History; D.A. Parrot, MA, D.Phil., and J. Pollmann, MA, University Lecturers (CUF) in Modern History,

PROFESSOR H. WATANABE-O'KELLY
15 Oct.: `Religion and the consort: two Electresses of Saxony and the Queens of Poland 1697–1733.'

MS C. DODDS
22 Oct.: `Flowers and songs of sorrow: death and the afterlife in Aztec society.'

D. PHELPS, King's College, London
29 Oct.: `An episode of postulation, contention, and tragedy: Saxony and the Archbishopric of Magdeburg 1626–31.'

MS T. WEIR
5 Nov.: ` "Les cardinauz ne sont pas des saints"—Mazarin and the Conclave of 1655.'

DR W. NAPHY, Aberdeen
12 Nov.: `Paedophilia and pederasty in Calvin's Geneva: attitudes of children, parents, magistrates, and the guilty.'

PROFESSOR B. KAPLAN, University College, London
19 Nov.: `Public rituals and religious riots in early modern Europe.'

DR E. TINGLE, University College, Northampton
26 Nov.: `Catholic piety and the early Counter-Reformation in Nantes during the Wars of Religion (1560–98).'

J. SPANGLER
3 Dec.: `Benefit or burden: a Princesse Widow in seventeenth- century France.'


Problems in the history of science and technology

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the History of Science and Technology Seminar Room, the Modern History Faculty Building.

Convener: R. Fox, MA, D.Phil., Professor of the History of Science.

DR J.R. MOORE, Open University
17 Oct.: `Revolution of the space invaders: Darwin and Wallace on the geography of life.'

PROFESSOR A.M. ROOS, Minnesota, Duluth
24 Oct.: `Chemical models of the tides in seventeenth-century England.'

DR O. GRANT
7 Nov.: `Science and entrepreneurship in the electricity industry in Britain, Germany, and the United States, 1880–1900.'

F. PAPANELOPOULOU
Mon. 18 Nov.: `The metaphysics of thermodynamics in the work of Adolphe Hirn.'

DR M. EDDY, Durham
28 Nov.: `The chemistry of mineralogical classification in the University of Edinburgh's Medical School, 1782–1800.'

PROFESSOR D. LIVINGSTONE, Belfast
5 Dec.: `Sir William Whitla and the editorial staging of Isaac Newton's work on biblical prophecy.'


Seminar in medieval history

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

Convener: R.R. Davies, MA, D.Phil., Chichele Professor of Medieval History.

G. MANN
14 Oct.: ` "Canones dicimus regulas quas sancti patres constituerunt": ends and means in Wulfstan's canon law collection.'

B. YORKE, King Alfred's College, Winchester
21 Oct.: `The saints of Anglo-Saxon Wessex.'

G. HARRISS, formerly of Magdalen College
28 Oct.: `The court of the Lancastrian kings.'

J. EVERARD, Cambridge
4 Nov.: `Plantagenet rule in Jersey in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries.'

E. LAGADEC
11 Nov.: `Career patterns and migrations from Oxford to Paris's Faculty of Theology, 1220–1350.'

R. BALZARETTI, Nottingham
18 Nov.: `Angelo Fumagalli and the History of Lombard Women.'

S. CUNNINGHAM, Public Records Office, London
25 Nov.: `To keep all Englishmen obedient through fear? Council, Chancery, and rule recognisance in the reign of Henry VII.'

R. GRIFFITHS, Swansea
2 Dec.: `Opening the Venetian archives to historians of medieval Britain.'


Commonwealth History Seminar: Islam and the British Empire

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Modern History Faculty.

Convener: J.G. Darwin, MA, D.Phil., Beit Lecturer in the History of the British Commonwealth.

D. BARCHARD
18 Oct.: `Britain and the Ottoman Muslims in the late nineteenth century: the case of Crete.'

DR F. NIZAMI
25 Oct.: `Resistance and accommodation: Indian ulama and British rule 1803–57.'

DR S. ANSARI, Royal Holloway College
1 Nov.: `Islam and the British in India: the case of the Pirs of Sind.'

PROFESSOR I. TALBOT, Coventry
8 Nov.: `Locality and partition: the Muslims of Amritsar and the 1947 partition of the Punjab.'

DR J. OLNEY, University of Exeter
15 Nov.: `Britain's Muslim political agents in the Middle East and India.'

DR J. PISCATORI
22 Nov.: To be announced.

PROFESSOR N. ETHERINGTON, Western Australia
29 Nov.: `Mapping South Africa.'


Modern German History Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in University College. Details of the 4 November seminar will be announced later.

Conveners: N.C. Ferguson, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Political and Financial History, and H.J.O. Pogge von Strandmann, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Modern History.

L. GOLDMAN
14 Oct.: `Civil society in nineteenth-century Britain and Germany: J.M. Ludlow, Lujo Brentano, and the Labour Question.'

P. BETTS, Sussex
21 Oct.: `The politics of post-Fascist aesthetics: the case of West and East German industrial design.'

C. CLARKE, Cambridge
28 Oct.: `Rethinking the impact of 1848.'

H. NEHRING
11 Nov.: `Peace movements in the Cold War? The British and West German protests against nuclear weapons, 1957–63.'

R. GERWARTH
18 Nov.: `Bismarck in Weimar: Germany's first democracy and the civil war of memories, 1918–33.'

M. UMBACH, Manchester
25 Nov.: `The longue durée of German federalism.'

T. WEBER
2 Dec.: To be announced.


MODERN HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCES

Seminar in Economic and Social History

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: R.C. Allen, MA, Professor of Economic History, K.J. Humphries, MA, Reader in Economic History, and A. Offer, MA, D.Phil., Chichele Professor of Economic History.

PROFESSOR P. O'BRIEN, LSE
15 Oct.: `Necessary and sufficient conditions for technological progress: macro inventions and macro inventors in the English cotton textile industry from John Kay to Edmund Cartwright.'

PROFESSOR T. GUINNANE, Yale and Cambridge
22 Oct.: `The influence of foundations: the case of uniform small loans in the United States 1900–40.'

DR C. MEISSNER, Cambridge
29 Oct.: `Committee structure and the success of connected lending in nineteenth-century New England banks.'

DR M. TURNER, Hull
5 Nov.: `Who was the English yeoman? Implications for their Revolution.'

E. ROTHSCHILD, Cambridge
12 Nov.: `The economic history of rationality.'

M. HICKS
19 Nov.: `British managerial recruitment 1930–2000: beyond the decline debate.'

PROFESSOR S. SUBRAHMANYAM
26 Nov.: `Slavery in Portuguese India and Brazil, 1500–1800: a comparison.'

DR O. GRANT
3 Dec.: `The first dotcom boom? Finance and the electrical industry in Britain and Germany, 1880–95.'


MODERN HISTORY, THEOLOGY

Science and religion in historical perspective

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Modern History Faculty Building.

 

Conveners: J.H. Brooke, MA, D.Phil., Andreas Idreos Professor of Science and Religion, and H.M.R.E. Mayr-Harting, MA, D.Phil., Regius Professor of Ecclesiastical History.

DR D. OBBINK
16 Oct.: `Religion and science in ancient Greece.'

PROFESSOR J. NORTH
23 Oct.: `Attitudes of Christian scientists to Jewish and Muslim science in the thirteenth century.'

PROFESSOR I. MACLEAN
30 Oct.: `Assessment by doctors of prenatural events in the late Renaissance.'

THE REVD DR JANE SHAW
6 Nov.: `Miracle events in Enlightenment England.'

PROFESSOR C. SMITH
13 Nov.: ` "Imitations of God's own works": issues of religion and technology in the making of the ocean steamship, 1850–1900.'

PROFESSOR MAYR-HARTING
20 Nov.: `The tradition of religion and science in twelfth- and thirteenth-century England.'

PROFESSOR BROOKE
27 Nov.: `Science and religious dissent: overviews and underviews.'

PROFESSOR D. LIVINGSTONE
4 Dec.: `The fortunes of evolutionary theory in the Calvinist cultures of Scotland and Ulster.'


MUSIC

Graduate Students' Colloquia

DR TIA DE NORA, University of Exeter, will lecture at 5.15 p.m. on Wednesday, 16 October, in the Denis Arnold Hall, the Faculty of Music. The lecture will be open to the public.

Subject: `Is music a technology of "control"?'


ORIENTAL STUDIES

Seminar on Jewish history and literature in the Graeco-Roman period

The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in Wolfson College.

Convener: M.D. Goodman, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Jewish Studies.

PROFESSOR S. MASON, York University, Toronto
15 Oct.: `Barbarian with an attitude: T. Flavius Josephus among Easterners, Greeks, and Romans.'

B. GRIFFIN
22 Oct.: `The social history of the Jews of Oxyrhynchus and the transmission of the Septuagint.'

DR M. BROSHI, Jerusalem
29 Oct.: `Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls: the consensus and its opponents.'

PROFESSOR F. MILLAR
5 Nov.: `The Theodosian Empire (408–50 CE) and the Jews.'

DR J. DAVILA, St Andrews
12 Nov.: `Melchizedek, the "Youth", and Jesus.'

DR M. MCLAREN, Australian Catholic University
19 Nov.: `Coinage of the Jewish Revolt of 66–70 CE.'

DR E. MAIN, Jerusalem
26 Nov.: `Hellenism, hellenisation, and Jews.'

T. EDWARDS
3 Dec.: `Targum Tehillim, the New Testament, and early Christian interpretations of the Psalms.'


PHILOSOPHY

Philosophy of Science Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in the Old Library, All Souls College.

Conveners: H.R. Brown, MA, Reader in Philosophy, J.N. Butterfield, MA, Senior Research Fellow, All Souls College, and S. Saunders, MA, University Lecturer in the Philosophy of Science.

DR K. WILKES
17 Oct.: `Models and realism; the animal model in the brain and behavioural sciences.'

PROFESSOR N. JARDINE, Cambridge
24 Oct.: `Whigs and stories: Herbert Butterfield and the historiography of the sciences.'

PROFESSOR D. PAPINEAU, King's College, London
31 Oct.: `Decisions and many minds.'

PROFESSOR J. CAMPBELL
7 Nov.: `Causal v. epiphenomenal progressions.'

PROFESSOR T. WILLIAMSON
14 Nov.: `Evidential probability.'

PROFESSOR F. JACKSON, Australian National University
21 Nov.: `The how and why of narrow content.'

PROFESSOR R. HARRÉ, Georgetown
28 Nov.: `Science as model making: two roles for iconic representations.'

PROFESSOR N. CARTWRIGHT, LSE
5 Dec.: `Causes and probabilities.'


Philosophy of Mathematics Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Lecture Room, the Philosophy Centre.

Convener: D.R. Isaacson, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in the Philosophy of Mathematics.

PROFESSOR E. LANDRY, Calgary
15 Oct.: `Category theory as a framework for an in re interpretation of mathematical structuralism.'

PROFESSOR B. DAVIES, King's College, London
29 Oct.: `Empiricism in arithmetic and analysis.'


SOCIAL SCIENCES

PROFESSOR JOHN VICKERS, FBA, Drummond Professor of Political Economy, Fellow of All Souls College, and Director General of the Office of Fair Trading, will lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Thursday, 3 October, in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building. The lecture is being held to mark the commencement of phase two of the Social Sciences Building Development at Manor Road.

Subject: `Competition economics and policy.'


Relationships and child wellbeing

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Violet Butler Seminar Room, the Department of Social Policy and Social Work.

Convener: A.H. Buchanan, MA (D.Phil. Southampton), Reader in Social Work.

DR S. STEWART-BROWN
15 Oct.: `Parenting and its impact on physical health.'

PROFESSOR K. SYLVA
22 Oct.: `Helping parents improve their child's adjustment to primary school: results from a randomised control trial in an urban authority.'

M. MACLEAN
29 Oct.: `Conflicted contact: an international perspective.'

C. ROBERTS and DR A. WARMAN
5 Nov.: `Adoption and "looked after" children—lessons from abroad.'

DR E. FLOURI
12 Nov.: `Outcomes from father involvement in resident and non-resident families.'

J. HUNT
19 Nov.: `Kinship care.'

PROFESSOR J. LEWIS and E. WELSH
26 Nov.: `What do fathers do? Mothers', fathers', and children's views.'

DR BUCHANAN
3 Dec.: `Are there some key messages? Bringing the research together.'


African history and politics seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

Conveners: M.A. Vaughan, MA, Professor of Commonwealth Studies, and A.R. Mustapha, D.Phil., University Lecturer in African Studies.

K. COLLIER
14 Oct.: `Volunteers, aspirants, and politicians: adult education in British Togoland, 1947–65.'

F. BECKER, London
21 Oct.: `Indirect rule and its successors among a stateless people in Tanzania: decentralised despotism or a shadow theatre?'

H. BERNSTEIN, SOAS
28 Oct.: `A long history of land reform and some current African episodes.'

P. DALEY
4 Nov.: `Intra-state challenges to the Burundian state.'

G. AUSTIN, LSE
11 Nov.: `Pledging and politics: was there a "moral economy" in colonial Asante?'

K. NWAJIAKU
18 Nov.: `Researching Ijaw nationalism.'

FR. MATTHEW KUKAH
25 Nov.: `Religion, security, and authoritarianism in Nigeria.'

K. MEAGHER
2 Dec.: `From social to political capital: the Bakassi Boys Militia in south-eastern Nigeria.'


African Studies Seminar

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Fellows' Dining Room, St Antony's College. Further details may be obtained from Ulli Parkinson (telephone: Oxford (2)74477, e-mail: ulli.parkinson@sant.ox.ac.uk).

For details of the Evans-Pritchard Memorial Lectures, to be given on the subject of `Histories of the hanged: testimony from the Mau Mau Rebellion, 1952–60', see below under `All Souls College'. The lectures will be followed by a discussion at the North East Africa seminar on Friday, 15 November.

H.E. ANTONIO GUMENDE, Moçambican High Commissioner
10 Oct., 4.30 p.m.: `Moçambique: challenges for the new century.'

C. LOW
17 Oct.: `The ideas and practices of Khoisan healers in Namibia, past and present.' (Extended session—film and presentation.)

J. PARPART, Dalhousie
24 Oct.: `Discussing difference: discourses of social differentiation among the African elite in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, 1953–64.'

R. LEE
31 Oct.: `Management and meaning: generational mobility strategies among African women in apartheid Cape Town.'

B. MALWAL
7 Nov.: `Is Sudan a viable state in its current form?'

W. STOREY, Millsaps College, Mississippi
14 Nov.: `Black guns and white power: disarmament and British rule in South Africa, 1874–81.'

A. HURST
21 Nov.: `From the plantation to the village forest: Swedish aid to Tanzanian forestry.'

M. KUKAH, Nigerian Human Rights Commission
28 Nov.: `Reflections on the Truth Commission in Nigeria.'

K. MYHRE
5 Dec.: `Witchcraft as conservation, revolution, and representation—three readings of Evans-Pritchard on the Azande.'


Southern African texts and contexts

The following seminars will be held at 5.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in St Antony's College. Further details may be obtained from Ulli Parkinson (telephone: Oxford (2)74477, e-mail: ulli.parkinson@sant.ox.ac.uk).

Conveners: Professor William Beinart and Professor Elleke Boehmer.

A. VAN DER VLIES
15 Oct., Deakin Room: `Recasting the canon: Alan Paton, Alex la Guma, and the mar(k)ing of the literary.'

C. COETZEE, independent researcher
29 Oct., the Buttery: `Creating an audience: Pippa Skotnes's "Bushmen" projects.'

K. EASTON, Sussex
12 Nov., Deakin Room: `Letters from the Cape: Dorothea Fairbridge, Lady Lucie Duff Gordon, and Lady Anne Barnard.'

D. ATTRIDGE, York
26 Nov., Deakin Room: `J.M. Coetzee and the ethics of reading.'


THEOLOGY

Seminars in the study of religions

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in Lecture Room 2, Christ Church.

Conveners: The Revd Professor Keith Ward, B.Litt., MA, DD, Regius Professor of Divinity, and Peggy Morgan, MA, Lecturer in the Study of Religions, Mansfield College.

PROFESSOR D. MARTIN, LSE
22 Oct.: `Protestantism and politics in the developing world.'

PROFESSOR M. DOUGLAS, University College, London
5 Nov., Examination Schools: `Microcosm as theological thinking.'

DR M. KLEIN
19 Nov.: `The spirituality of childbirth: a Jewish perspective.'

DR M. JASCHOK
3 Dec.: `Women's mosques and female ahong: innovation or aberration.'


Old Testament Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Mondays in the Seminar Room, the Theology Faculty Centre.

For details of the Speaker's Lectures in Biblical Studies, see above.

Convener: J. Barton, MA, D.Phil., Oriel and Laing Professor of the Interpretation of Holy Scripture.

PROFESSOR P. DAVIES, Sheffield
14 Oct.: `Reading the Bible as an intellectual.'

PROFESSOR G. BROOKE, Manchester
21 Oct.: `Qumran and Temple.' (Temple and Worship series)

DR P. JOHNSTON
4 Nov.: `Ordeals and the Psalms.' (Temple and Worship series)

DR P. JOYCE
18 Nov.: `Temple and worship in Ezekiel 40–8.' (Temple and Worship series)

THE REVD B.A. MASTIN, Cambridge
2 Dec.: `Is there anything distinctive about the religion of pre- exilic Israel and Judah?' (In search of pre-Exilic Israel series)


Ian Ramsey Centre

Science and religion—irreconcilables?

The following seminars will be held at 8.15 for 8.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the Hood Room, St Cross College.

Conveners: Professor J.H. Brooke and Dr Margaret Yee.

PROFESSOR BROOKE
17 Oct.: `Science, religion, and the unification of nature.'

PROFESSOR R. HOMAN, Brighton
31 Oct.: `Fighting for life? Conflicts of religion and medicine.'

PROFESSOR G. CANTOR, Leeds
14 Nov.: `Evoking evolution: or how Jews and Quakers responded to Darwin.'

DR P. RUDD
28 Nov.: `Reflections on science, religion, and the search for meaning.'


THEOLOGY, ORIENTAL STUDIES

Eastern Christian Studies Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in St Gregory's House, 1 Canterbury Road.

Convener: S.P. Brock, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Syriac Studies.

N. NAHAS
23 Oct.: `Faith and reason according to St Ephrem.'

DR K.T. WARE
6 Nov.: `The Fifth Earl of Guilford: an eighteenth-century convert to the Orthodox Church.'

DR J. BAUN
20 Nov.: `Theological reflections on two Middle Byzantine heavens.'

L. OSINKINA
4 Dec.: `The mystery of Church Slavonic Ecclesiastes.'


INTER-FACULTY SEMINAR

Restoration to Reform: British political, literary, intellectual, and social history

The following seminars will be held at 5.15 p.m. on Mondays in the Wordsworth Room, St Hugh's College. Students of the period are welcome to attend.

Conveners: Dr Ros Ballaster (Mansfield College), Professor Marilyn Butler (Exeter College), Dr Faramerz Dabhoiwala (Exeter College), Dr Christine Gerrard (Lady Margaret Hall), Dr Thomas Keymer (St Anne's College), Dr James Raven (Mansfield College), Professor Isabel Rivers (St Hugh's College), Professor Kathryn Sutherland (St Anne's College), and Dr Abigail Williams (St Peter's College).

PROFESSOR C. RAWSON, Yale
14 Oct.: `Avatars of Alexander: Jonathan Wilde, Charles XII, and the Case of the Hoodlum Hero.'

PROFESSOR D. FAIRER, Leeds
28 Oct.: `Organic matters: Georgic and Gothic in eighteenth- century Britain.'

DR K. GLEADLE
11 Nov.: ` "Opinions deliver'd in conversation": gender, politics, and domestic conversation in late eighteenth-century Shrewsbury.'

DR I. MCBRIDE, King's College, London
25 Nov.: `The language of colonialism in Ireland, c. 1690–1720.'


INTERDISCIPLINARY SEMINAR

Genetics knowledge in Oxford—networks and opportunities?

The following lectures and panel discussions will be held at 5.30 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Saïd Business School. The lectures are intended to provide a background for the panel discussions where issues can be explored in greater depth. To be kept informed about this series send an e-mail to: majordomo@maillist.ox.ac.uk, with the message: subscribe geneticsforum.

Conveners: Cyril Chapman (Churchill Hospital), Sue Dopson (Saïd Business School), Helen Lawton Smith (Oxfordshire Economic Observatory), Kathy Liddell (Faculty of Law), Mike Parker (Ethox), Alison Shaw (Genetics Knowledge Park), Libby Prescott (Sir William Dunn School of Pathology), and Jane Kaye (Faculty of Law), in conjunction with the Genetics Forum.

SIR DAVID WEATHERALL
16 Oct.: `Genetics in Oxford—past and future directions.'

PROFESSOR ANDREW WILKIE, Genetics Knowledge Park; PROFESSOR KAY DAVIES, Oxford Centre for Gene Function; and DR ALAN COOPER (to be confirmed), Ancient DNA Centre
30 Oct.—panel discussion: `Creating knowledge—new initiatives in Oxford.'

DR ROBERT PITKETHLY, Saïd Business School; PROFESSOR STEVE RAYNER, Saïd Business School; and PROFESSOR STEVE WOOLGAR, Saïd Business School
6 Nov.—panel discussion: `Developing knowledge flows.'

DR MICHAEL SPENCE, Faculty of Law
13 Nov.: `An introduction to patents and biotechnology.'

PROFESSOR RAYMOND DWEK, Department of Biochemistry; DR TIM COOK, Isis Innovation; and DR MAX WILSON, Mirada
20 Nov.—panel discussion: `Tensions in the commercialistion of knowledge.'

PROFESSOR RICHARD GARDNER, Department of Zoology
27 Nov.: `Stem cell research and cloning: an historical view of practice and policy.'

PROFESSOR JULIAN SAVULESCU, Centre for Applied Ethics; DR LIZ FISHER, Faculty of Law; and DR MALCOLM CAMPBELL, Department of Plant Sciences
4 Dec.—panel discussion: `Applications of knowledge.'


INTERDISCIPLINARY SAWYER SEMINAR (IN ASSOCIATION WITH THE ANDREW W. MELLON FOUNDATION)

The theory and politics of civil society

The following seminars will be held from 1.45 p.m. to 4.15 p.m. on Mondays in the Rothermere American Institute. The series will continue in Hilary Term and Trinity Term. Papers will be precirculated to participants. Those wishing to attend the seminars should register their interest in good time. All enquiries should be directed to Paul Bou-Habib (telephone: (2)82718, e-mail: paul.bou-habib@socres.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR PHILIP PETTIT, Princeton
28 Oct.: `Deliberative democracy, the discursive dilemma, and republican theory.'

PROFESSOR HANS JOAS, Erfurt
18 Nov.: `Value pluralism and moral universalism.'

PROFESSOR ADAM SELIGMAN, Boston
25 Nov.: `Trust, confidence, and social boundaries.'


ROTHERMERE AMERICAN INSTITUTE

Film screening and seminar

Journeys with George, former NBC producer Alexandra Pelosi's video documentary of her year-and-a-half-long trip on the campaign trail with George W. Bush, will be shown at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 15 October, in the Auditorium, Magdalen College. A reception at the Rothermere American Institute will follow the screening.

A seminar with Ms Pelosi will take place at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, 16 October, in 13 Norham Gardens (Reuters Foundation Programme).


The 2002 Midterm elections: a symposium

Led by Professor James Thurber, from the American University, and former members of Congress, this symposium will discuss the forthcoming US midterm elections. It will be held on Thursday, 31 October, 4–5.30 p.m., in the Rothermere American Institute.


INSTITUTE OF ARCHAEOLOGY

Medieval Archaeology Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in the Lecture Room, the Institute of Archaeology.

Convener: H.F. Hamerow, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in European Archaeology (Early Medieval).

P. BUSBY, English Heritage
25 Oct.: `Anglo-Saxon settlement and burials at Whitby.'

S. FOREMAN, Oxford Archaeology
8 Nov.: `A mid-Saxon settlement at Lake End Road, Bucks.'

A. MORTON, Wessex Archaeology
22 Nov.: `New work at Hamwic: a cemetery at St Mary's Road and other finds.'

T. GREEN
6 Dec.: `The archaeology of British survival in East Lincolnshire.'


RESEARCH LABORATORY FOR ARCHAEOLOGY AND THE HISTORY OF ART

The following seminars will be held at 10.30 a.m. on Thursdays in the Seminar Room, the Research Laboratory for Archaeology and the History of Art. Details of the 21 November seminar will be announced later.

Convener: M.S. Tite, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Archaeological Science.

T. STUART, University College, London
24 Oct.: `Extinction of the Megafauna in Europe and N. Asia: the role of C14 dating.'

M. HOWLAND, Bristol
7 Nov.: `Experimental evidence on the isotopic fractionation between diet and body tissues: implications for ecological and palaeodietary studies.'

S. BLAU, Australian National University
5 Dec.: `Investigating Kurgans on the Ustiurt Plateau: an osteoarchaeological approach.'


ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM

The second Ashmolean Chinese Painting Colloquy: Chinese aesthetic theory, the avant-garde, and works of art in the past half-century

This meeting will be held on Wednesday, 16 October, in the Headley Lecture Theatre, the Ashmolean Museum. To reserve a place, contact Janet Partridge (e-mail: janet.partridge@ashmus.ox.ac.uk, fax: Oxford (2)78078). The meeting will end with a period of discussion at 4.30 p.m. A reception will be held in the Khoan and Michael Sullivan Gallery of Chinese Painting, 5–6.30 p.m.

Convener: S.J. Vainker (BA London), University Lecturer in Chinese Art.

MS VAINKER
1.30 p.m.: `Introduction: collecting the contemporary—an institutional viewpoint.'

N. BUNIN, Institute for Chinese Studies
1.50 p.m.: `Themes from contemporary Chinese aesthetics.'

QU LEILEI, artist
2.20 p.m.: `Reflecting on my time: the spirit of the "Stars".'

TAO TAO LIU, Institute for Chinese Studies
2.55 p.m.: `Modern Chinese literature and the avant- garde.'

CHANG TSONG-ZUNG, curator
3.25 p.m.: `The everyday use of art.'

PROFESSOR M. SULLIVAN
4 p.m.: `Chinese modernism reaches maturity: some recent paintings from the Sullivan Collection.'


CENTRE FOR BRAZILIAN STUDIES

PROFESSOR LESLIE BETHELL, Director, the Centre for Brazilian Studies, will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Friday, 18 October, in the Centre for Brazilian Studies, 92 Woodstock Road.

Subject: `The Brazilian elections, 2002.'


SAID BUSINESS SCHOOL

Deutsche Bank Lecture Series: European financial integration

PROFESSOR XAVIER FREIXAS will deliver the Deutsche Bank Lecture Series at 2 p.m. on Wednesdays in Michaelmas Term in the Saïd Business School.


Finance Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 12.30 p.m. on Fridays in the Saïd Business School. A sandwich lunch will be provided at 12 noon in Meeting Room 14 (except on 1 November: Seminar Room B).

18 Oct.: DAVID HOBSON, Bath.

25 Oct.: CHRISTIAN LAUX, LSE.

1 Nov.: HENRY WYNN, Warwick.

8 Nov.: MARK SALMON, City University.

15 Nov.: STEPHEN TAYLOR, Lancaster.

22 Nov.: ERNST-LUDWIG VON THADDEN, Lausanne.

29 Nov.: FRANK GERHARD, Nuffield College.

6 Dec.: LUCIO SARNO, Warwick.


COMPUTING LABORATORY

Numerical Analysis Group

Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminars

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the Lecture Theatre, the Computing Laboratory. Further information may be obtained from Shirley Day (telephone: (2)73885). Co-ordinators: L.H. Trefethen and J. Scott (RAL).

PROFESSOR B. PARLETT, Berkeley
10 Oct.: `Real symmetric matrices with multiple eigenvalues.'

PROFESSOR N. HIGHAM, Manchester
17 Oct.: `Recent results on accuracy and stability of numerical algorithms.'

PROFESSOR E. SÜLI
24 Oct.: `Sobolev index estimation for hp-adaptive finite element methods.'

DR A. KUIJLAARS, Leuven
31 Oct.: `Superlinear convergence of conjugate gradients.'

DR J. MACKENZIE, Strathclyde
7 Nov.: `On the solution of moving boundary value problems using adaptive moving meshes.'

DR A. CLIFFE, Serco
14 Nov., RAL: `Computation of periodic orbits for the Navier- Stokes equations.'

PROFESSOR N. MACKEY, Michigan and Manchester
21 Nov.: `Spectral effects with quaternions.'

DR C. CARTIS, Cambridge
28 Nov.: To be announced.

PROFESSOR M.J.D. POWELL, Cambridge, and others
5 Dec.: Special Alan Curtis event (details to be announced).


RUSKIN SCHOOL OF DRAWING AND FINE ART

Joseph Beuys Lectures 2002

CHRISTOPHER MITCHELL will lecture at 3 p.m. on Monday, 21 October, in the Auditorium, Magdalen College.

Subject: `Overseas interests.'

Over the afternoon, illustrated with extracts from his films for the BBC, ITV, and Channel 4, Mr Mitchell will reflect on the making of documentaries about foreign affairs, and will consider the possibility of making films which do not follow the current news agenda.


DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL STUDIES

Research seminars

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in Teaching Room 1, the Department of Educational Studies.

A Research Poster Conference and Display will be held on Monday, 14 October, in Lecture Room 1, Lecture Room 2, and the Common Room, at 3 p.m.

DR B. JAWORSKI
21 Oct.: `Developing a pedagogic discourse in the teaching of undergraduate mathematics.'

PROFESSOR M. COLE
Thur. 31 Oct., 1 p.m., Room C221 (Clerici Building), Psychology Department, Oxford Brookes University: `Designing and sustaining educational innovations: the case of the fifth dimension.' (Jointly with Oxford Brookes University)

PROFESSOR I. SIRAJ-BLATCHFORD, Institute of Education, London
4 Nov.: `Researching effective pedagogy in the early years.'

PROFESSOR J. HARKIN, Oxford Brookes
11 Nov.: `Recollected in tranquillity? Experienced teachers' perceptions of their initial training.'

PROFESSOR C. DAY, Nottingham
18 Nov.: To be announced.

PROFESSOR G. WALFORD
25 Nov.: `Are separate schools for religious minorities a good thing?'

PROFESSOR P. BROWN, Cardiff
2 Dec.: `The opportunity trap: education and jobs in a global economy.'


OXFORD CENTRE FOR HEBREW AND JEWISH STUDIES

David Patterson Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 8 p.m. on Wednesdays in the OCHJS, Yarnton Manor. The OCHJS minibus will depart from the Playhouse, Beaumont Street, at 6.40 p.m. and 7.30 p.m., and leave Yarnton Manor at 9.45 p.m. Single fare: £1.50 (students £1.10).

Convener: G. Abramson, MA (Ph.D. Rand), Fellow of the Centre.

PROFESSOR I. PELEG, Lafayette College, Pennsylvania
16 Oct.: `Israel between democratic universalism and particularistic Judaism.'

PROFESSOR Y. LOSHITZKY, Hebrew University
23 Oct.: `Identity politics in Israeli cinema.'

PROFESSOR S. DELLAPERGOLA, Hebrew University
30 Oct.: `Demography and the Israel/Palestine conflict: challenges and options.'

PROFESSOR O. SCHWARZWALD, Bar Ilan University
6 Nov.: `The lexicon of the Ladino Haggadoth.'

M. BROSHI, Israel Museum
13 Nov.: `Critical junctions in early Jewish history.'

PROFESSOR G. CORNI, Trento
20 Nov.: `The East European ghettos in the context of the extermination of the Jews.'

DR Z. WAXMAN
27 Nov.: `Writing to remember: the role of the Holocaust witness.'

MRS H. PINHAS-COHEN, Hebrew writer, Jerusalem
4 Dec.: `The neo-religious Hebrew poetry.'


WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE

Metropolis, periphery, and nation: medicine and colonialism

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Mondays in the Wellcome Unit, 47 Banbury Road. All are welcome to attend.

Convener: M. Harrison, MA, D.Phil., Senior Research Fellow, Wellcome Unit.

S. LANG, Anglia Polytechnic University
14 Oct.: `Drop the demaon dai: maternal mortality and the state in Victorian India.'

N.S. MANTE, Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine, UCL
21 Oct.: `Robert Boyle and the early modern racial body.'

A. CROZIER, Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine, UCL
Fri. 1 Nov.: `Sensationalising Africa: some British medical impressions of sub-Saharan Africa, 1890–1939.'

DR HARRISON
4 Nov.: `Quarantine, yellow fever, and anti-slavery: the Eclair and Boa Vista scandals of 1845–6.'

M. JONES
11 Nov.: `The state and indigenous medicine in colonial Ceylon: pluralism or hegemony.'

D. GILFOYLE
18 Nov.: `Innovation at the periphery: the establishment of an experimental basis for veterinary science in South Africa, c. 1880–1910.'

S. ALAVI, Jawaharlal Nehru University and Cambridge
25 Nov.: `A "national" medicine in colonial India? The Muslim physicians and the Takmil-ut Tibb College at Lucknow.'

K.T. SILVA, Peradeniya University, Sri Lanka and Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine, UCL
2 Dec.: `Malaria and ayurveda in British Ceylon.'


OXFORD INTERNET INSTITUTE

The following seminars will take place this term. The seminar on 23 October will be held in the Saïd Business School, at a time to be announced. Times and venues of the 31 October and 12 November seminars will also be announced later.

DR J. WEBSTER and PROFESSOR U. MARTIN
Wed. 23 Oct.: `Women and work in IT.'

PROFESSOR J. COLE, UCLA
Thur. 31 Oct.: To be announced.

PROFESSOR B. WELLMAN, Toronto
Tue. 12 Nov.: To be announced.


OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC STUDIES

H.E. THE RT. HON. DONAL MCKINNON, Secretary General of the Commonwealth, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 23 October, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Multilateralism and multiculturalism—the Commonwealth in the twenty-first century.'

Seminars

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, George Street.

DR GARY SICK, Columbia University
Tue. 15 Oct., Examination Schools: `Must the US war on terrorism be a war on Islam?'

M. BISHARA, American University of Paris
30 Oct.: `Palestine, Hamas, and the Israelisation of the war on terror.'

DR A. ANSARI, Durham
6 Nov.: `Iran, Islam, and democracy.'

DR S. ISMAIL, University of Exeter
13 Nov.: `Islamism and identity politics.'

F. NOOR, International Institute for the Study of Islam in the Modern World, Leiden
20 Nov.: `The prospects for progressive Islam today, with special reference to south-east Asia.'

DR F. BURGAT, Centre Français d'Archéologie et de Sciences Sociales de Sanaa
27 Nov.: `Face to face with political Islam: the case of Yemen.'

DR B. KODMANI, Ford Foundation, Cairo
4 Dec.: `Political authority, religious authority in the Middle East: alliance and competition.'


MAISON FRANÇAISE

Early Modern French Seminars

The following seminars will be given at 5.15 p.m. on Thursdays in the Maison Française.

J. MANDER, Cambridge
17 Oct.: `Gender, genre, ethnicity in the eighteenth century.'

T. CHESTERS
31 Oct.: `Adrien de Montalembert and the ghost of Soeur Alis: a ghost story from 1528.'

D. MASKELL
14 Nov.: `Orientalism in Racine's Bérénice and Bajazet.'

C. NÉDÉLEC, Université de Paris III
28 Nov.: `Le burlesque et l'idée d'agrément.'


Other lectures

The following lectures will be given at 5.15 p.m. on the days shown in the Maison Française.

Y. GUILCHER, Celtic dance and music specialist
Mon. 14 Oct.: `La danse traditionelle, entre permanence et mutation.'

O. TODD, journalist and writer
Fri. 18 Oct.: `André Malraux, l'homme derrière l'oeuvre.'

P. RILEY, Harvard
Mon. 21 Oct.: `Rousseau on "transformative", "denaturing" civic education.'

G. SABATIER, Université de Grenoble II
Wed. 30 Oct.: `Le mécénat royal en France sous l'Ancien Régime.'

M. SADLER, Institut Britannique de Paris
Fri. 1 Nov.: `Translating oneself.'

F. CLAUDON, Université de Paris XII
Mon. 11 Nov.: `Le dernier Hugo.' (Followed at 7.30 p.m. by a reading of Ruy Blas (Act V, Scene 3), organised by Nicole Gore)

J.-M. LE BRETON, President, Association France–Grande-Bretagne
Fri. 15 Nov.: `Destin de l'Europe orientale et devenir de l'Union européenne.'

R. WEIS, University College, London
Wed. 27 Nov.: `Food, faith, and sex in medieval Occitania.'

J.-Y. TADIÉ, Université de Paris IV
Fri. 29 Nov.: `Histoire et création dans l'oeuvre d'Alexandre Dumas.'


Other meetings

The following meetings will be held as shown in the Maison Française.

Sat. 12 Oct., 9 a.m.–6 p.m. (conference): `Formes et stratégies du discours rapporté: approches linguistiques et littéraires des genres de discours'.

Fri. 25 Oct., 10 a.m.–4 p.m. (Association for the Study of Modern and Contemporary France study-day): `La réduction du temps de travail en France: du principe à l'application' (advance booking required: tel. (2)74220, e-mail: maison@herald.ox.ac.uk).

Fri. 25 Oct., 8 p.m. (European Movement open meeting): `The European Union under pressure?', with Ian Taylor, MP, Chairman of the European Movement (UK).

Fri. 8 Nov.–Sat. 9 Nov. (colloquium): `Transmission and understanding of the sciences in the early modern period' (Fri. 3.30–6.45 p.m.; Sat. 9.30 a.m.–6.45 p.m.).

Sat. 16 Nov., 11 a.m.–4.30 p.m. (study-day): `Durkheim'.

Fri. 22 Nov., 10 a.m.–4 p.m. (Association for the Study of Modern and Contemporary France study-day): `La guerre d'Algérie quarante ans après' (advance booking required: tel. (2)74220, e-mail: maison@herald.ox.ac.uk).

Sat. 30 Nov.–Sun. 1 Dec. (colloquium): `Evans-Pritchard's anthropology: English contexts, French perspectives, African realities' (Sat. 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 9.30 a.m.–6 p.m.).

Thur. 5 Dec., 5.15 p.m.: open forum with JEAN ECHENOZ, writer (Prix Goncourt 1999).

Sat. 14 Dec., 10 a.m.–5 p.m. (study-day): `Symposium on discourse analysis.'


QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

Contemporary South Asia Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Fridays in the Blackhall Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

Those attending are asked to note that the seminar will now meet on Fridays, and not as formerly on Thursdays.

Conveners: A.N. Gooptu, MA, University Lecturer in South Asian Studies, and B. Harriss-White, MA, Professor of Development Studies.

J. SHARMA, Cambridge
18 Oct.: `Coolies, opium eaters, and respectable folk: labour and identity in colonial Assam.'

P. JEFFERY, Edinburgh
25 Oct.: `Islamisation, gentrification, and domestication: an "Islamic course for girls" and rural Muslims in Bijnor, UP.'

P.V. SANSO, Goldsmiths' College, London
1 Nov.: `Ageing and inter-generational relations in urban and rural South India.'

RAJESWARI SUNDER RAJAN
8 Nov.: `Outlaw woman: the Indian state and the politics of Phoolan Devi's surrender.'

D. SEDDON, Norwich
15 Nov.: `Maoist politics in Nepal.' (Provisional title)

K. GILL, Cambridge
22 Nov.: `The political economy of plastic waste recycling in Delhi.'

J. HARRISS, LSE
29 Nov.: `On trust, and trust in Indian business.'

J. PARRY, LSE
6 Dec.: `Some ethnographic notes on violence and suicide in two Bhilai neighbourhoods.'


Refugee Studies Centre

Seminars on forced migration

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House. Those attending are asked to check the RSC Web site for details of any late changes to the arrangements.

PROFESSOR S. CASTLES
16 Oct.: `The new global politics and the emerging forced migration regime.'

PROFESSOR M. DUFFIELD, Leeds
23 Oct.: `Global governance and the new wars.'

PROFESSOR F. STEWART
30 Oct.: `Global economic influence on conflict.'

A. GUELKE, Belfast
6 Nov.: `The politics of imitation in deeply divided societies: the Irish, Middle East, and South African peace processes.'

H. SLIM, Oxford Brookes
13 Nov.: `Revitalising the humanitarian aid regime.'

P. FEENEY, UNESCO
20 Nov.: `Multinationals, power, and social responsibility.'

P. VAN KRIEKEN, Webster University, Leiden, and St Louis
4 Dec.: `Terrorism, global governance, and forced migration.'


Harrell-Bond Lecture

PROFESSOR V. MUNTARBHORN, Faculty of Law, Chulalongkorn University, will deliver the Harrell-Bond Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 27 November, in Rhodes House.

Subject: `Human trafficking and smuggling: implications for the refugee protection system.'


International Gender Studies Centre

The girl child living in difficult circumstances: a cross-cultural perspective

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

The International Gender Studies Centre incorporates the Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women.

Conveners: Dr Paula Heinonen, Dr Janette Davies, and Dr Adeze Igboemeka.

DR J. LA FONTAINE, LSE
17 Oct.: `Talking to children: some interviews with children believed to have been satanically abused.'

DR A. LAERKE, SOAS
24 Oct.: `Discipline and socialisation: children and their adults in an English village.'

DR E. COAST, LSE
31 Oct.: `Of girls and men: Masai girlhood in Kenya and Tanzania.'

M. OUATTARA, Anti-Slavery International
7 Nov.: `Early, forced marriage and the human rights of the girl child in Burkina Faso.'

DR HEINONEN
14 Nov.: `The gendered aspect of the home and street life of the street children of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.'

DR NOORUL AINUR MOHD NUR
21 Nov.: `Children of the migrant workforce in Malaysia: a threat to the indigenous culture.'

DR C. HARDMAN, Newcastle
28 Nov.: `Children in the new religious movements.'

DR J. BOYDEN
5 Dec.: `Girls on the front line: conceptualisations of gender and generation in the aftermath of war.'


QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE INSTITUTE

Integrating development and the environment: emerging issues and new developments

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Mondays in the Blackhall Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

B. STOCKING, Chief Executive, Oxfam
14 Oct.: `Is growth with equity possible?'

Speaker of the Grand Council of the Crees
21 Oct.: `Dreams of yesterday and tomorrow: economic and community development for the Cree Nation.'

DR E. ROBINSON
28 Oct.: `The bushmeat trade: environmental crisis or economic commodity?'

DR E. CASTRO
4 Nov.: `Governance for development? Some reflections on the governance of urban water systems.'

DR C. TOULMIN, International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED)
11 Nov.: `Changing rights to land in West Africa—implications for environment, equity, and efficiency.'

DR V. FITZGERALD
18 Nov.: `Regulating large international firms.'

DR J. PAAVOLA, East Anglia
25 Nov.: `Environmental governance for environment and development: conceptual, historical, and contemporary lessons.'

PROFESSOR J. PRETTY, Essex
2 Dec.: `Agri-Culture: reconnecting people, land, and nature.'


CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES

International Human Rights Seminar

THE HON. HUGO CHAVEZ FRIAS, President, the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, will lecture at 3.30 p.m. on Thursday, 17 October, in the Examination Schools. The audience must be seated by 3.15 p.m.

Individual numbered tickets for members of the University only can be obtained by e-mailing to ihrs@herald.ox.ac.uk. All other requests should be directed to Dr P. Ferguson, IHRS, 17 Plantation Road, Oxford OX2 6JD, with a stamped, self-addressed envelope enclosed. All tickets will be issued on a first-come, first-served basis. Last requests for tickets must be received by midday on Tuesday, 15 October. For further details, see http://www.oxfordunivhumanrightsseminar.

Convener: Dr William F. Pepper.

Subject: `Globalisation and poverty.'


ALL SOULS COLLEGE

The neo-Darwinian theory of sociocultural evolution

Seminars on this subject will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Hovenden Room, All Souls College.

Convener: W.G. Runciman, Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, and President, the British Academy.

15 Oct.: `The application of the neo-Darwinian paradigm to sociology.'

22 Oct.: `The transition from cultural to social selection in the pre- Neolithic.'

29 Oct.: `The diffusion of Christianity in the Eastern Roman Empire.'

5 Nov.: `Roman slavery and manumission in the Republic and Principate and in Hispanic America.'


Evans-Pritchard Lectures 2002–3

Histories of the hanged: testimony from the Mau Mau Rebellion, 1952–60

DR D.M. ANDERSON, School of Oriental and African Studies, London, will deliver the Evans-Pritchard Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Old Library, All Souls College.

Tue. 29 Oct.: ` "Parasites in Paradise": race, violence, and Mau Mau.'

Wed. 30 Oct.: `Death at Lari: the story of an African massacre.'

Tue. 5 Nov.: `Struggles in the city: Mau Mau in Nairobi, 1952–6.'

Wed. 6 Nov.: `General China's war: freedom fighters in the forest.'

Tue. 12 Nov.: `Rebels and informers: interrogation, torture, and the state.'

Wed. 13 Nov.: ` "War is not porridge": memorialising Mau Mau.'


HERTFORD COLLEGE

Tyndale Lecture 2002

PROFESSOR GERALD HAMMOND, Professor of English, University of Manchester, will deliver the Tyndale Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 17 October, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Tyndale's other Hebrew translations.'


LADY MARGARET HALL

Save the Children Eglantyne Jebb Seminar:
Child poverty: a scar on the soul—UK and global responses

This seminar will be held at 6.15 p.m. on Tuesday, 29 October, in Lady Margaret Hall. Tickets, costing £8.50 (students £5), may be obtained from Julie Haynes (telephone: 0121-558 0111, e-mail: j.haynes@scfuk.org.uk).


ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

David Nicholls Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR ANTHONY MAINGOT, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Florida, will deliver the fourth David Nicholls Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 17 October in St Antony's College.

Subject: `Class, colour, and pluralism in David Nicholls' Caribbean.'


Asian Studies Centre

Special Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Buttery, Hilda Besse Building, St Antony's College. Enquiries should be directed to the Asian Studies Centre (telephone: Oxford (2)74559, e-mail: asian@sant.ox.ac.uk).

Convener: S.Y.-S. Tsang, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Politics.

DR B. GILL, Center for Strategic and International Studies, Washington, DC
15 Oct.: `Does China matter as a regional power?'

PROFESSOR QUANGSHENG ZHAO, American University, Washington, DC
22 Oct.: `Chinese foreign policy—modernisation, nationalism, and regionalism.'

DR HUNG-MAO TIEN, Representative at the Taipei Representative Office, UK
12 Nov.: `Implications of the CCP Sixteenth Party Congress for relations across the Taiwan Strait.'


South Asian Studies Programme: comparative seminar on Africa and South Asia

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Deakin Room, Founder's Building, St Antony's College. Enquiries should be directed to the Asian Studies Centre (telephone: Oxford (2)74559, e-mail: asian@sant.ox.ac.uk).

Convener: A.N. Gooptu, MA, University Lecturer in South Asian Studies

R. ALLEN, Framlingham State College, Massachusetts
22 Oct.: Carrying away the unfortunate: the exportation of slaves from India during the late eighteenth century.' (Discussant: S. Subrahmanyam)

PROFESSOR B. HARRISS-WHITE
29 Oct., Dahrendorf Room, Founder's Building: `Indian corruption: the tip of the iceberg.' (Discussant: R. Mustapha)

D. WASHBROOK
5 Nov.: `Culture and colonialism: Europe, Eurasia, and Africa.'

PROFESSOR W. BEINART
12 Nov.: `Experts and expertise in colonial Africa revisited: is there scope for a neo-modernist analysis?' (Discussant: D. Hardiman, Warwick)

Z. HIRJI
19 Nov.: ` "We came in dhows": the historiography of Asians in East Africa.' (Discussant: S. Subrahmanyam)

S. KAPILA
26 Nov.: `Cultures of mind: colonial psychiatry and anthropology, India 1880–1930 (to be confirmed). (Discussant (to be confirmed): D. Anderson)

A.-M. MISRA
3 Dec.: `Princely India: a case of indirect rule?' (Discussant: G. Williams)


Conference: the changing Japanese family in comparative perspective

This conference, jointly organised with the Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies, will be held on Friday, 15 November, in the Dahrendorf Room, Founder's Building, St Antony's College (except where otherwise indicated), and Saturday, 16 November, in the Deakin Room, Founder's Building, St Antony's College.

The organisers are Mark Rebick, Nissan Institute and St Antony's, and Ayumi Takenaka, Bryn Mawr College, Pennsylvania. Registration and other enquiries should be directed to Jennifer Griffiths (telephone: Oxford (2)74559, e-mail: asian@sant.ox.ac.uk).

Friday, 15 November

DR S. TSANG
9 a.m.: Welcome from the Director of the Asian Studies Centre.

MARK REBICK and AYUMI TAKENAKA
9.05 a.m.: Introduction to the conference.

AYUMI SASAGAWA, Oxford Brookes
9.15 a.m.: `Life choices: university-educated mothers in a Japanese suburb.'

AYAMI NAKATANI, Okayama University
10.15 a.m.: `The emergence of "nurturing males" in Japan: changing perceptions and practice of fatherhood.'

T. CARROLL, Stirling
11.30 a.m.: `Changing language, gender and family relations in Japan.'

NOBUKO NAGASE, Ochanomizu University
2.30 p.m.: `Labour practices, youth employment, and their impact on marriage in Japan.'

F. BETTIO, Siena
3.30 p.m.: `Women, marriage, and the Italian labour market.'

NAOHIRO OGAWA, Nihon University
5 p.m.: `Japan's population problem.' (Joint session with the Nissan Institute)

Saturday, 16 November

R. GOODMAN
9.15 a.m.: `The new policing of the Japanese family.'

MISA IZUHARA, Bristol
10.15 a.m.: `Changing the state–family relationship in ageing Japanese society.'

L. SCIAMA
11.30 a.m.: `Changes and turning points in Italian attitudes to authority, family, women's education, and employment from 1945 to the present.'

NOBUE SUZUKI, University of Hawaii at Manoa
2 p.m.: `Why Filipinas?: Filipina–Japanese intermarriages and male desires in contemporary Japan.'

YOSHIMI UMEDA, LSE
3 p.m.: `Intermarriage in rural Japan: some old and new aspects of the Japanese family.'


European Studies Centre

The following meetings will be held in weeks 1–8 in the European Studies Centre, 70 Woodstock Road.

PROFESSOR R. CLOGG
Tue., 5 p.m.: Greek Studies Seminar. (See further details below)

PROFESSOR R. CRAMPTON
Thur., 2.15–4.30 p.m.: `The Balkan crises of the 1990s.' (M.Phil. class)

DR K. NICOLAÏDOS
Fri., 10 a.m.–1 p.m.: `International political economy.' (Open class)

DR D. HINE and PROFESSOR F. BETTIO
Fri., 5 p.m.: `New dimensions in Italian public policy.' (Seminar; see further details below)


Greek Studies Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Seminar Room, the European Studies Centre, 70 Woodstock Road.

Convener: R.R.M. Clogg, MA, Senior Research Fellow, St Antony's College.

N. KALOGERAKOS
22 Oct.: `US–Greek relations and the 1964 Cyprus crisis: deconstructing the foreign interference myth.'

M. POTTS
12 Nov.: `Suliotes: myth and reality.'

K. LAGOS
19 Nov.: `Press, censorship, and media depictions of the Jews during the Metaxas dictatorship.'

DR D. LIVANIOS, Birkbeck College, London
26 Nov.: ` "In the beginning was the Word": the ecumenical patriarchate and the question of the translation of the Bible into modern Greek in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.'


New dimensions in Italian public policy

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Seminar Room, the European Studies Centre, 70 Woodstock Road.

Conveners: D.J. Hine, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer (CUF) in Politics, and F. Bettio (Ph.D. Cambridge), Fondazione Monte dei Paschi di Siena Visiting Fellow in Modern Italian Studies, St Antony's College.

PROFESSOR V. VISCO, Università di Roma, Tor Vergata; Minister of Finance 1996–2001; Member of the Chamber of Deputies
18 Oct.: `Tax reduction and budgetary consolidation.' (Discussant (to be confirmed): Professor C. Allsopp, MPC)

ON. R. BINDI, Minister of Health 1996–2000; Member of the Chamber of Deputies
25 Oct.: `Health care reform.'

PROFESSOR C. DELL'ARINGA, Presidente dell'Istituto per lo Sviluppo e la Formazione dei Lavoratori (ISFOL)
1 Nov.: `Labour market deregulation.'

DOTT. G. CAROSIO, Head of Banking Supervision, Banca d'Italia
8 Nov.: `Italy, Europe, and financial market regulation.' (Discussant: D. Green, UK Financial Services Authority)

DT.SSA. P. MANACORDA, Communications Regulatory Authority
15 Nov.: `Media and telecommunications.' (Discussant: M. Thatcher, LSE)

SENATOR S. PASSIGLI, author of numerous parliamentary bills on conflict of interest regulation
22 Nov.: `The politics and legislation on conflicts of interest.' (Discussant: Dr Hine)

PROFESSOR F. BARCA, Ministry of Finance and the Economy
29 Nov.: `Regional policy: the south.' (Discussant: P. Le Galès, CEVIPOF, Paris)


The German General Election: a post-mortem (European Studies Centre Evening)

PROFESSOR DR DIETER ROTH, Chairman, Forschungsgruppe Wahlen, Mannheim, will speak at this meeting, to be held at 8.30 p.m. on Thursday, 7 November, in the European Studies Centre, 70 Woodstock Road.


Russian and East European Centre

Social exclusion in transition

The following seminars, jointly sponsored by the Graduate Programme in Russian and East European Studies, will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

Conveners: C.S. Leonard, MA, University Lecturer in Regional Studies in Post-Communist States, and J. Pallot, MA, Universit Lecturer in the Geography of the USSR.

DR S. LOVELL, King's College
14 Oct.: `Age and exclusion: old people in Soviet and post- Soviet Russia.'

DR B. BEUMERS, Bristol
21 Oct.: `Back or forth: young people between old and new in recent Kazakh and Kirgyz cinema.'

DR A. SMITH, Southampton
28 Oct.: `Households in the Russian transition.'

DR E. IVANOVA, Conversion and Women, Moscow
4 Nov.: `Women in the Russian military industry: the last decade.'

PROFESSOR J. SHAPIRO, New Economic School, Moscow
11 Nov.: `The Roma: why the transition to the market has been particularly difficult for them!'

DR N. ODING, Leontieff Centre, St Petersburg
18 Nov.: `Social protection in Russia.'

DR D. HEALEY, Swansea
25 Nov.: `Duma gay sex wars: the chaotic politics of Russia's laws on homosexuality.'

DR A. WHITE, Bath, and DR F. PICKUP, LSE
2 Dec.: `Urals identity and livelihoods in the big city and the small town: the case of Sverdlovsk Region in the year 2000.'


ST EDMUND HALL

Philip Geddes Memorial Lecture

ROGER ALTON, Editor, the Observer, will deliver the Philip Geddes Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 1 November, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Is there a future for print journalism?'


 

A.B. Emden Lecture

PROFESSOR B. WORDEN will deliver the A.B. Emden Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 5 November, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Theatre and politics: the Globe, Shakespeare, and the Earl of Essex's rising of 1601.'


ST JOHN'S COLLEGE

Lecture

ARNOLD RÜÜTEL, President of Estonia, will lecture on current political issues relating to Estonia at 5.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 12 November, in the Auditorium, St John's College. The lecture will be followed by a reception in the Garden Quadrangle.


SOMERVILLE COLLEGE

Monica Fooks Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR KEITH HAWTON, Director, the Centre for Suicide Research, Department of Psychiatry, and Consultant Psychiatrist, the Warneford Hospital, will deliver the inaugural Monica Fooks Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 15 October, in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

Subject: `By their own hand: the problem of youth suicide.'


TRINITY COLLEGE

Chatham Lecture

THE RT. HON. MICHAEL PORTILLO, MP, will deliver the fifth Chatham Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 15 November, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `How might the Right right itself?'


WOLFSON COLLEGE

Ronald Syme Lecture

PROFESSOR E. GRUEN, Berkeley, will deliver the annual Ronald Syme Lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 7 November, in the Hall, Wolfson College. The lecture will be open to the public.

Subject: `Tacitus and the Jews.'


CAMPION HALL

D'Arcy Memorial Lectures

The Resurrection of Jesus

PROFESSOR GERALD O'COLLINS, SJ, will deliver the D'Arcy Memorial Lectures at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Examination Schools.

16 Oct.: `Are background theories decisive?'

23 Oct.: `What counts—historical evidence or personal testimony?'

30 Oct.: `What could establish Easter faith?'

6 Nov.: `Does the empty tomb matter?'

13 Nov.: `How could the resurrection redeem human beings and their world?'


FRIENDS OF THE BODLEIAN

ALAN BELL will lecture at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, 13 November, in the Cecil Jackson Room, the Sheldonian Theatre.

All are invited. (Those attending are asked to enter the Sheldonian Quadrangle by the Broad Street gate.)

Wine and sandwiches will be served after the lecture at a cost of £3 per person, for which bookings should be made in advance with Mrs P.M. Sturgis, Membership Secretary, Friends of the Bodleian, Bodleian Library, Oxford OX1 3BG (telephone: Oxford (2)77234, e-mail: pms@bodley.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `Sir Edmund Craster, a great Bodley's Librarian.'


OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARY FORUM

The following meetings will be held at 5 p.m. on the days shown in Rewley House.

DR M. CORRIE, University College, London
Fri. 18 Oct.: `Free will and the vocabulary of fortune in Malory's Le Morte D'Arthur.'

DR J. GRIFFITHS
Mon. 11 Nov.: `The matter of invention: coinage and semantic change in early Renaissance England.'


OXFORD ITALIAN ASSOCIATION

Lectures

The following lectures will be given at 7.45 for 8 p.m. on Thursdays in the Mary Ogilvie Theatre, St Anne's College. Admission costs £1 for members and £3 for non- members (students under thirty free).

For further information about the Association or any of the events listed below, telephone the Hon. Secretary (Oxford 377479), or e-mail: pmilner@clara.net.

CLAUDIA RODEN
17 Oct.: `Food in Italy: a reflection of culture and history.'

DR JOHN WHITELEY, Ashmolean Museum
7 Nov.: `Ingres in Rome 1806–20.'

PHIL HILLS
19 Nov.: `Florence: its art and the Second World War.'

 

Other events

Mon., 21 Oct., 8 p.m., the Theatre, Rewley House: showing of film La Stanza del Figlio (no subtitles). Admission free.

Wed., 13 Nov., 7.45 for 8 p.m., 48 Common Room, St Anne's: conversazione in italiano. Admission free.

Grants and Research Funding

MICHAEL AND LOUISA VON CLEMM FOUNDATION INC., CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE, AND HARVARD UNIVERSITY

Michael von Clemm Fellowship 2003--4

Applications are invited for a Michael von Clemm Fellowship for study at Harvard University during the academic year 2003--4. The fellowship is in memory of Michael von Clemm (1935--97), who was a graduate of Harvard and a graduate student (and subsequently Honorary Fellow) of Corpus Christi College. It is open to undergraduates at the University of Oxford who will be entering their final year in October 2002 and also to those who graduated in June 2002. It is intended to attract applicants of very high academic calibre and who have the personal qualities likely to conduce to success in a non-academic career. The holder will also be perceived (however informally) as an `ambassadorial' representative of Oxford at Harvard, and should be content with and capable of that role.

The successful applicant will spend a year at the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences as a Special Student following a course of study or research of his or her choice (subject to the availability of tuition or supervision at Harvard); he/she must apply to and be registered at that School and no other. The fellowship is not intended for those wishing to study vocational subjects, such as Business Administration or Law. Potential applicants are advised to look at the School Web site (www.gsas.harvard.edu), and should if possible list in their application the specific courses there which they hope to take.

The fellowship will meet the costs of all tuition at Harvard as well as travel between Boston and the UK and will provide an allowance sufficient to cover the costs of living at Harvard.

Those wishing to be considered should write to the College Secretary, Corpus Christi College, Oxford OX1 4JF, asking for further particulars and an application form, together with a copy of the information for referees. It is the responsibility of applicants to ask three referees to write directly to the same address. Completed application forms and references must reach the College Secretary not later than 25 October. Late or incomplete applications will not be considered.

It is expected that interviews will be held on 28 November.

Examinations and Boards

APPOINTMENTS, REAPPOINTMENT, AND CONFERMENT OF TITLE

With the approval of the relevant divisional board, the following appointments and reappointment have been made and title conferred for the periods stated.

HUMANITIES DIVISION

Appointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURER

Medieval and Modern Languages

REIDAR ANDREAS DUE (m.litt. Copenhagen, m.phil., d.phil. Oslo). In European Cinema.
Fellow-elect of Magdalen College. From 1 October 2002 to 31 September 2007. 

FIXED-TERM JUNIOR LECTURER

Philosophy

DAVID CORFIELD (ba Cambridge, m.sc., ph.d. London). In the Philosophy of Science.
From 1 October 2002 to 30 September 2003. 

Comparative Philology and General Linguistics

DAVID J. PATTERSON (ma, m.sc., ph.d. Edinburgh). In Phonetics and Phonology. From
1 October 2002 to 30 September 2003. 

INSTRUCTOR

Oriental Studies

DOMINIC PARVIZ BROOKSHAW, ba. In Persian. From 1 October 2002 to 30 September
2005. 

FIXED-TERM INSTRUCTOR

Oriental Studies

YOUNG-HAE CHI (ba Hankok, ma Seol), m.phil. In Korean. From 1 August 2002 to 30
September 2004.

Conferment of title

TOBIAS REINHARDT, d.phil. In Classics. Fellow-elect of Somerville College. From 1
October 2002 to 30 September 2007.

Reappointment

UNIVERSITY LECTURER (CUF)

Modern History

A.M. GREGORY (ma, ph.d. Cambridge). In Modern History. Fellow of Pembroke College.
From 1 October 2002 to retiring age.

SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION

Appointments

UNIVERSITY LECTURER

Sociology

COLIN MILLS (b.sc., m.sc. London). In Sociology. Fellow-elect of Nuffield College. From
1 January 2003 to 31 December 2007. 

UNIVERSITY LECTURER (CUF)

Law

C. DAVID FREEDMAN (ll.b. York, Canada). In Law. Fellow of St Peter's College. From
1 October 2002 to 30 September 2005. Held title of CUF Lecturer from 1 October 2000.

ALISON YOUNG, bcl, d.phil. (ll.b. Birmingham), In Law. Fellow of Hertford College.
From 1 October 2002 to 30 September 2005. Held title of CUF Lecturer from 1 October
2000.

DONAL PETER NOLAN, bcl, ba. In Law. Fellow of Worcester College. From 1 October 2002 to 30 September 2005. Held title of CUF Lecturer from 1 October 2000.

LIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES BOARD

M.Sc. in Biology (Integrative Bioscience) 2002–3

Essays and project dissertations should be submitted to the Examination Schools by noon on the following dates:

Molecular Biology essay: Friday, 3 January 2003
Second essay: Friday, 14 March 2003

First research project dissertation: Friday, 25 April 2003

Students undertaking external summer research projects: third and fourth essays: Friday, 30 May 2003

Students undertaking Oxford-based summer research projects: third essay: Friday, 27 June 2003; fourth essay: Friday, 25 July 2003

Second research project dissertation: Friday, 29 August 2003


MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES BOARD

M.Sc. in Mathematics and the Foundations of Computer Science

The Supervisory Committee has approved the following additional courses for 2002–3.

Section B

Schedule I

Concurrency

Schedule II

Nonstandard programming

Colleges, Halls, and Societies

OBITUARIES

St Anne's College

MRS JANET CAMPBELL (née Newman); member of the St Anne's Society 1943-6.

MRS NANNETTE PHILLIPS (née Webb); commoner 1952–5.


St Cross College

ALISTAIR CAMPBELL ROSS DEAN, MA, D.PHIL., D.SC. (B.SC. Glasgow), 29 September 2002; ICI Fellow 1951–5, Fellow 1965–86; University Lecturer in Physical Chemistry 1955–86. Aged 83.


MEMORIAL SERVICE

Christ Church

A Memorial Service for PROFESSOR MICHAEL BACHARACH, formerly Research Fellow of Nuffield College (1965–7), Fellow of Balliol College (1968–9), and Official Student of Christ Church (1969–2002), will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 9 November, in Christ Church Cathedral.

Advertisements

ACEM Meditation

Why wait for stress to set in? Acem Meditation is an easy, yet powerful method with no religious or ideological beliefs. It is meant for people leading an active life with commitments to work, studies and friends. Beginners' course start on 12 Oct., 2 Nov., and 16 Nov., from 9.30 a.m.–3.30 p.m. at the Boyd Room, Hertford College. (Students: £25; Others: £50). Call 07814 550382 or e-mail: acem.uk@acem.com. Web site: acem.com/oxford.


Pusey House St Giles' Oxford

John Betjeman and Oxford: A Poetic Journey in Words and Music. The Chapel of Pusey House, Oxford is the venue for a special performance of John Betjeman and Oxford, with Paul Vaughan abetted by David Harrison (organ) and members of The Oxford University John Betjeman Society, on Fri., 18 Oct., at 7.30 p.m. Tickets: £5 on the door or in advance from The Bouverie Room, Pusey House, St Giles'.


Volunteers Wanted

You and your body: How do you feel about your body? Are you satisfied or not? Either way, if you are female and over 18, you may be eligible to participate in body-image research at the department of Psychiatry, Oxford University. Contacting us does not oblige you to participate and all information is confidential. For more information, please contact Michelle Lee (Research Psychologist) on 01865 223903 or e-mail: michell.lee@psych.ox.ac.uk. (Ethics committee no.O02.029).


Ashmolean Museum Voluntary Guides

The Ashmolean Education Service has a small number of vacancies for volunteers who are good communicators with a proven ability to master new material and convey it to people of all ages in an interesting and effective way. We are looking for enthusiastic people who enjoy working flexibly within a group and who can make a long-term commitment. We would require at least two half-days per week. Training begins in October. Please ring Kathie Booth Stevens, Clore Education Office, 01865 288181.


Restoration and Conservation of Antique Furniture

John Hulme undertakes all aspects of restoration: 30 years experience; collection and delivery. For free advice, telephone or write to: The Workshop, 11A High Street, Chipping Norton, Oxon. OX7 5AD. Tel.: 01608 641692.

 


Oxford University Newcomers' Club

The Club welcomes the wives and partners of visiting scholars, graduate students and members of the University who are new to Oxford. It aims to offer help, advice, information and the opportunity to meet each other socially. Informal coffee mornings are held at 13, Norham Gardens every Wed., 10.30–12 noon. Other activities in the club room include the Craft Group, Book Group and informal Conversation Group. Newcomers with Children (0–4 years) meet every Fri. in term, 10.15 a.m.–12 noon. We organise tours of colleges and museums, visits to places of interest, country walks and outings to gardens and antique shops. Secondhand items can be bought on Wed., mornings from the basement. Visit our Web site on www.ox.ac.uk/staff.


Antiques Bought and Sold

Antiques and decorative objects bought and sold: desks and library furniture always wanted, also garden stonework. Please call: Greenway Antiques, 90 Corn Street, Witney, Oxon. Open Mon.,–Fri., 9.30 a.m.–5 p.m., Sat., 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Tel.: 01993 705026, mobile: 07831 585014.


Oxford University Research Staff Society

The Research Staff Society (RSS) membership consists of Post- doctoral/Junior Research Fellows and Research Assistants who work for the University of Oxford. As most Research Staff are not attached to a college and may be new to Oxford our social events provide a unique opportunity to meet researchers outside your group or department. We aim to provide an interesting and varying social setting in which to mix and to become a voice for research staff within the University. We run social events each month to suit all tastes. Please visit our Web site http://users.ox.ac.uk/~rss/, which provides information on how to join the society as well as details on events which we will be running in the near future. We hope you will decide to join us and very much look forward to meeting you at one of our events this year.


Popham Hairdressing

Our proposition is simple, to provide a design, cutting, and colouring service, which combines classic standards with modernist thinking. One North Parade, Oxford. For appointments call: 01865 517040, or e-mail us through our Web site: www.davidpopham.com.


Services Offered

Patricia Popiel, Event Co-ordinator: lead a busy life? Then let me help you organise: weddings; parties for every occasion; business functions. Tel.: 01327 353735, mobile: 07801 861366.

Experienced, reliable and cheerful secretary available to work from home, own computer. Either short or long term assignments welcomed. Also available to work full- time during term time. (Many years experience working in Oxford colleges). Tel.: 01865 741982 or e-mail: pkedwards@ukoxford1999.freeserve.co.uk.

Specialist tax advisers to academics: Colin Coates & Partners offer expertise in tax, financial and business matters to academics. Tel.: 01934 844133, e-mail: info@ccptax.com, Web site: www.ccptax.com.

Horological services for your ailing apparatus. Thirty years of expertise in all types of clocks and barometers, of which many of these have been restored for the University over the years. Quotations are free. All work is fully guaranteed. Please phone Paul Carroll, Oxford Longcase Clocks on 01865 779660.

Big or small, we ship it all, plus free pick up anywhere in Oxford. Also 24-hour photocopying, private mailing addresses (24-hour access, and mail forwarding world-wide), binding, fax bureau, colour photocopying, mailing services, and much more. Contact or visit Mail Boxes Etc., 266 Banbury Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 514655, fax: 514656, e-mail: summertown@020.mbe.uk.com, also at: 94 London Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 741729, fax: 01865 742431, e-mail: staff@mbeheadington.co.uk.

Town and Country Trees: arboricultural contractors; modern arboricultural techniques; local authority approved; safeguarded by full Public Liability insurance. Free advice and quotations. Tel.: 0845 458 2980 or 07976 261850 (mobile).


Domestic Services

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: 01865 726983 or 01235 555533.

Blue House, a small, intimate nursery for children 2–5 years, established 10 years. Open Mon.–Fri., 8.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m., full or half-days. NNEB staff. All pre-school activities inc. numeracy and literacy skills to prepare children for school entry. Short-term vacancies for visiting academics. Call Kimberley for further information, or come to visit. Tel.: 01865 247877.


Tuition Offered

Piano lessons: experienced teacher; adults and children; all grades. Beginners welcome. contact Miss P. Read BA (Hons) L.R.A.M., near Kidlington. Tel.: 01865 331147.

Piano lessons and accompanying, all ages and levels welcome. Contact Ana Mladenovic, experienced pianist and piano teacher. Tel.: 01865 778248 or 07779 580235, e-mail: pujsana@hotmail.com.


Part-time employment sought

Cheerful, motivated lady retiring from full-time administrative assistant role at end of Sept., seeks fullfilling part-time post that involves dealing with people. Tel.: Jeannette Hudson-Pudwell on 01865 762187 or e-mail: jeannette@jwhp.fsnet.co.uk.


Situations Vacant

Wanted: part-time secretary for a busy retired Professor. Two days per week or equivalent (flexible). Good organisational and communication skills would be an advantage. Work will involve diary management, travel arrangements and all aspects of office administration. Salary £14536–£16826 pro rata based on experience. Applications with names and addresses of 2 referees to Professor Sir Roy Goode, St John's College, Oxford OX1 3JP.

Green College is seeking to appoint a Head Porter for the College Lodge due to the retirement of the present postholder. The position is ideally suited to someone with experience in a college or similar environment and with good organising skills. Please apply in writing, inc. a curriculum vitae, to the Domestic Bursar, Green College, Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6HG.

Secretarial help sought: retired blind lady in north Oxford needs help to open, read and reply to correspondence, and undertake other secretarial tasks; 2 hours, twice a week (£10–£12 depending on experience). Tel.: 01865 558131.

Academic Director for US overseas study program. Oxford graduate (advanced degree) around 30 years preferred with some administration experience, ability to meet deadlines and to plan ahead. Salary £30–£40k depending. Hours could be flexible. Send CV to Dr Richardson, 8 Tennyson Lodge, Paradise Square, OX1 1UD.


Houses to Let

Three bedroom semi-detached house for rent as of 1 Dec. Located in Marston close to shops and pubs, 10 minutes from central Oxford: includes microwave, washing machine, c.h. Rent £750 p.c.m. Property is managed by QB Management. For more information contact: Suzana Straus, tel: 275270 (day), 751623 (eves.) or e-mail: suzana.straus@bioch.ox.ac.uk.

Two-bedroom cottage with bathroom, kitchen and sitting room to rent. Rural situation but only 12 miles south west of Oxford. Available immediately. Rent £530 p.m. Would suit mature person/quiet couple. Call on 01865 821768/07976 246279.

Lifestyle Letting & Management, 1 North Parade Avenue: Benson Place, central north Oxford–£1,000 p.c.m. Light and airy 3 double bedroom unfurnished house with garage, close to University Parks. Suit family or professional sharers (no students); Victoria Road, Summertown–£1,295 p.c.m. Spacious furnished 3 bedroom family home in highly desirable residential location. Available 18 Nov. Professional sharers considered, no students. Please call 01865 554577, fax: 01865 554578, e-mail: lifestyle- lettings@dial.pipex.com, Web site: www.letitbetter.co.uk.

One-bedroom fully fitted period cottage with mature garden in Milton village, 10 miles from Oxford. Excellent connections via bus, road (A34) and rail (Didcot station, 45 minutes to London). Available now for 2002/3 academic year. £625 p.m. Call 01235 847855 or e-mail: toria.leitch@btopenworld.com.

Witney; charming, quiet 2-bedroom, 2 reception Victorian home to let for 9–12 months from Oct. Well-equipped new kitchen; gas c.h.; garden with off- street parking. £720 p.c.m. Tel.: 01608 811428.

Summertown: attractive terrace house to let, close to shops and buses; 1 double and 1 single bedroom; bathroom has power shower; sitting room has open fireplace; fully equipped kitchen; French windows to small garden. Available now for minimum 6 months. £850 p.c.m. (Short lets considered). Tel.: 01865 559966.

Beautiful, quiet, unusual, open plan, fully furnished house with stunning views to open countryside. Well within the ring road in north Oxford, off-street parking, small patio garden and near convenient bus route. Suit visiting academic or professional couple. Regret no children, pets or smokers. Available from 1 Nov. £950 p.m. plus expenses. Tel.: 01865 515085 or e-mail: trishaboyd@hotmail.com.

A bay fronted Victorian terrace house in St Clements, walking/cycling distance from the city centre; large sitting room (24 x 12 ft), 2 double bedrooms, kitchen/breakfast room, bathroom, separate toilet, 50 ft east-facing garden; furnished, dishwsher and washing machine. Available to rent from early Nov., for 12–14 months. Rent £750 p.c.m. excl. tax and utilities. No smoking, no pets. Tel.: 01865 724444.

Two-bedroom modern terrace house with small garden: fully furnished and fitted, gas c.h., washer/drier. Situated in a quiet cul-de-sac next to Said Business School between Oxford city centre and the railway station, with own parking space. Available mid- Oct., for 6 months minimum. £880 p.c.m., 2 months deposit required. Ian and Josephine Macdonald, tel.: 01865 516615, fax: 01865 516616, or e-mail: macdonaldreynell@aol.com.

Charming Victorian 2-bedroom terrace cottage in East Oxford, 10 minutes walk from city centre (or 5 minutes by regular bus), wooden floors, open fire, gas c.h., cellar and garden. Fully furnished. Ideal for non-smoking professional couple. Available immediately for 1 year. Rent £800 p.m. Tel.: 01865 512928, mobile: 079 470 794 35.

North Oxford , Wentworth Road, OX2 7TH: furnished spacious 3- bedroom semi-detached house; newly decorated, very good condition; 2 reception rooms, front and back gardens, luxury fitted kitchen, double glazing, gas c.h., washing machine and drier; separate bath and toilet. Off-road parking. Sky and cable TVs connected. Within excellent schools catchment area, frequent bus services, 10 minutes walk to Summertown local banks and shops. Available now for 1 year, renewable. £1,150 p.c.m. plus bills. Non-smoking professional families by reference. No pets. Tel.: 01865 454729 (eve.), 01276 66549 (eve.), 01865 850104 (day). E-mail: zhangsuqing@yahoo.com.

Three-bedroom period cottage with mature garden in small hamlet just north of Banbury (7 miles); 5 minutes M40 (J12), 30 minutes drive to Oxford, or regular train service from Banbury. Available now for 2002/3 academic year. £695 p.m. plus utility bills. Call David Barnes, 01295 670693 or 020 785 1192. E-mail: davidbarnes65@hotmail.com.

An Englishman's home is his castle---so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or e-mail us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: 01865 764533, fax: 764777, e-mail: info@qbman.co.uk.

Make finding accommodation easy. Finders Keepers have a dedicated approach to helping you find the right property. Browse through our Web site for up-to-date detailed information on properties available and make use of our interactive database, priority reservation service (credit cards accepted), personal service and professional advice. For further information please contact Finders Keepers at 226, Banbury Rd., Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: 01865 311011. Fax: Oxford 556993. E-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk. Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

 


Flats to Let

Summertown: private courtyard, purpose built, 1 double bedroom, self-contained apartment, fully furnished, fitted kitchen with washer/drier,bathroom with shower. Secure parking space. £685 p.c.m. exclusive. Tel.: 07866 887495 (available after 21 Oct.).

Flat to let from end Oct., 2-bedroom, fully furnished, with garage in heart of Summertown. £850 p.c.m. E-mail: ek@scuklao.org.

Paris studio: small but charming studio in the historic and very central Marais (4th arrondissement) available for short lets. Attractively furnished and fully equipped with television, phone, CD, kitchenette. Linens and weekly maid provided. £38 per night or £250 p.w. to members of the University; non-university £45 per night and £290 weekly. Contact joe.chamberlain@ukgateway.net or ring 07957 588448.

Flat on top floor of Folly Bridge Court overlooking the river and close to the city centre available from the beginning of Oct. The flat has 2 bedrooms, 25' living room, kitchen and bathroom. It is well furnished and equipped, with c.h. £750 p.c.m. Contact Clive Newton on 0207 9361530.

Central north Oxford: 10 minutes' walk from city centre, all main university buildings and parks, and very close to the river. Available now for short/long let. Completely newly refurbished ground-floor flat to very high standard, new bathroom, new John Lewis kitchen with washer, dishwasher, dryer, etc., in extremely quiet, civilised, large Victorian house in this exclusive, leafy residential suburb, with large, light airy rooms. Double bedroom, single bedroom, drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom. Available Dec., a second-floor flat for short/long let with large double bedroom, large drawing room, kitchen , bathroom. Off-street parking, large secluded garden. Tel./fax: 01865 552400.


Serviced Accommodation

Finally! the luxurious and economical alternative to 5-star luxury hotels, in central Oxford. Ambassador's Oxford offers clients short-stay 2-bedroom, 2 bathroom–1 en suite–5-star apartments in the centre of Oxford with allocated parking. Only 3 minutes' walk from the railway station and the Saïd Business School. Furnished to a very high standard to include well-equipped kitchen and lounge, computer, printer, internet access, and weekly Maid Service. From less than £100 per apartment per night, to accommodate up to 4/5 guests. Contact: www.ambassadorsoxford.co.uk, or tel.: 07876 203378.


Accommodation Offered

Suitable for post-doctoral student or professional: double bedroom in quiet non-smoking household with 2 other young professionals, Oxford Road, Temple Cowley. £240 p.c.m. includes rates, excludes gas and electricity. Shared living room, kitchen and spare room. Contact James or Pat, eves., 01865 430595 or e-mail: james.sandham@socres.ox.ac.uk.

Room offered in shared house (1/2 other people) in West Oxford, to non-smoker. Large garden and parking in drive. Own room and bathroom, shared kitchen and lounge. £75 p.w. plus ahre of bills. Deposit required. Tel.: 01865 247282.

Double room (en suite) to rent; big beautiful room with views of fields, in quiet but friendly, lovely non-smoking home. In tranquil rural setting. Accessible Oxford/Abingdon by car. Six months let preferred. Single occupancy £100 p.w.; double occupancy £125 p.w. Tel.: 01865 321825.

Paying guests, visiting academics, welcomed for short or long stays in the comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple, in exclusive, quiet, leafy central north Oxford, within walking distance of all main university buildings, town centre, parks, river, good shops, and restaurants. All rooms have colour TV, tea-/coffee-making facilities, microwave, and refrigerator and/or deep-freeze availability, c.h., and independent heating. Breakfast included in the very moderate terms. Tel./fax: 01865 557879.

Finders Keepers is celebrating its 30th year as Oxfordshire's leading letting agent, providing a specialist service to both landlords and tenants throughout the Oxfordshire and the surrounding counties. With experienced letting and management teams Finders Keepers provide a high standard of service to all our clients. If you would like more information about Finders Keepers' services please contact us at our Head Office at 226 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford, OX2 7BY, tel.: (00 44) 1865 311011, or visit the Finders Keepers Web site at www.finders.co.uk.

Available by the week for visitors to Oxford: self-contained, fully-furnished studio flat, centrally located in Kingston Road. en suiteshower, toilet and washbasin, and fully-equipped kitchen area. Sleeps 2. £300 p.w. all inc. British Tourist Board approved 3 Stars. For further information tel.: 01865 516913 or visit: http://www.oxfordcity.co.uk/accom/studioflat.


Accommodation Sought

Canadian academics on sabbatical, family of 4 (10 year old twin daughters), seek quite furnished accommodation in north central Oxford, Summertown, or in easy reach of Headington School. Responsible. Jan.,–July 2003. Contact Dr Anne Gorsuch, History, University of British Columbia, tel.: 001 604 739 1921. E-mail: gorsuch@interchange.ubc.ca.

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us: 01865 764533, fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk. Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.


Accommodation Sought to Rent or Exchange

House exchange sought: we are looking to exchange a modern 4- bedroom, colonial house on 1.75 acres of wooded land in Boonton Township, New Jersey, for a house in or near Oxford for 6-8 months between Jan., and Aug., 2003. Start and end dates are flexible. Our house is on a secluded cul-de-sac in a rural section of North Central NJ, has all modern conveniences and 2 cars. It is a 10 minute drive to Routes 80 and 287 giving easy access to the entire tri-state area. For details please contact Jim and Elizabeth Tepper. E-mail: tepper@axon.rutgers.edu; tel.: 001 973 299 0967; fax.: 001 973 299 0912.


Holiday Lets

Dordogne/Gironde: thinking off season or Christmas then read on. Delightful restored farmhouse in rural hamlet. Fully and comfortably furnished with French antiques plus all mod cons. Private with stunning views and walks to farmland, woods and vineyards. Few minutes drive to village shop and church. Study/library and sitting room with open-plan kitchen/dining room, fireplace with woodburning stove; equipped with fridge/freezer, cooker and washing machine. Pigeon loft with 2 large bedrooms, 1 can be divided. Huge veranda for dining and games. Concierge oppositie maintains the house and grounds. Private meadows and lawned garden with fruit trees and pool. For wine lovers there are Ste Emilion and Monbazillac, local vineyards, co-operatives. Nearby there is walking, tennis, riding, and Chateau Vigiers, a world class golf club with sports facilities for day members, plus good restaurants and table d'hote, markets, bastide towns, chateaux, cities like Bergerac and Bordeaux. Low season: Jan.–June, Sept.,–Nov.: £450. High season: July, Aug., Dec.: £700. Phone: 01993 881408.

Southwest France, near Toulouse/Albi/Cordes, stone farmhouse on edge of village, iwth 6 acres and swimming pool. Three bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2 living rooms and large kitchen; sleeps 7–8. Centrally heated with wood-burning stoves. Several airports within easy reach, available all year round. Call 01865 54150 or e-mail: barry@oxfordmedia.co.uk for details, or see: www.oxfordmedia.co.uk/batut.htm for photos, availability and rates.

Greek Island rentals: Skopelos, Alonissos and Skiathos: local villa specialist offers lovely villas, island houses and apartments available for rent. Town, country and seaside locations. Accommodation for 2–16 persons. Prices from GBP 100 p.p.p.w. For information see: www.holidayislands.com. E-mail: thalpos@otenet.gr, fax: 0030 4240 23057.

Tuscany: enjoy a luxurious stay in a beautifully restored stone villa with spacious rooms and inspiring views of lake, and mountains; 5 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, heated pool. Web site: www.casasinerna.com, or e-mail: info@casasingerna.com. Tel.: +39 0575 791166. Now booking for Christmas and summer 2003.


Houses for Sale

Pretty 1-bedroom period house in pleasant area of Headington: living room, kitchen, conservatory, bedroom, bathroom with shower; c.h., and d.g. Beautifully maintained and updated. Small garden. Excellent location close to shops, hospitals and Brookes University. £155,000. Phone Karen on 01865 308188 (home) or 01865 270053 (work).

Modern 3-bedroom semi-detached house in quiet neighbourhood c. 100 metres from Florence Park, Cowley; ground floor: large living room, dining room, kitchen, entrance and toilet; first floor: 3 bedrooms, bathroom. Gas c.h., double glazing throughout, optional fireplace, garage with loads of storage space, 30 ft garden. Proximity to pub, shops and local park. Built 1997. £210,000. Ready to move in to. E-mail: paul.ganter@physiol.ox.ac.uk.

Lovely large North Oxford family home in quiet cul-de-sac; 2½ miles city centre; 10 minutes schools, hospitals; close to bus route; sitting room with fireplace, study, large dining/music room, 21x16 ft living room, 24ft kitchen/breakfast room, utility room, garage; 5 bedrooms (1 with en suitebathroom), dressing room/sixth bedroom, and family bathroom. Large boarded loft. Cavity wall insulation, gas c.h. with efficiency condensing boiler. Well-maintained secluded south-facing half-acre garden to rear, having patios, raised beds, pond, flowerbeds, mature trees, lawns accommodation tennis court, vegetable and soft fruit gardens, greenhouse and shed. £675,000 freehold. Tel.: 01865 557466.


Flat for Sale

Very light `sunny all round' ground-floor apartment: lovely position, very close to University Parks. Large bay windowed sitting room; dining room with fireplace and bookshelves; large bay windowed bedroom with en suitebathroom; second bedroom with good fitted cupboards; kitchen; hall with cloakroom. Parking for 2 cars within gated large communal garden. Freehold £475,000. Please tel.: 01865 557747/516025, or Gloucestershire 01453 872138.


Car for Sale

Bright yellow Fiat Cinquecento Sporting (3-door, 1108cc, with red seat belts) in very good condition for sale; great fun to drive, perfect size for Oxford, only 32,500 miles on the clock, N Registration, driven by 2 members of a family since purchased new. Fully maintained and professionally serviced each year (most recent service and MOT in Sept., 2002), with 6 months road tax licence. £2,500 or offer. Please tel.: Alastair James on 01865 750914 (weekday eves., until 9.30 p.m., or weekends).

Appointments

VOLTAIRE FOUNDATION

Appointment of General Editor, Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century

The Voltaire Foundation seeks an energetic and organised scholar, active in the field of the European (especially French) Enlightenment, to lead an international editorial board and to attract high-quality submissions in both the English and French languages.

For further details, visit http://www.voltaire.ox.ac.uk, then click on `jobs'.


CHRIST CHURCH, MERTON COLLEGE, AND ST JOHN'S COLLEGE

Junior Research Fellowships

The governing bodies of the three colleges propose to elect in co-operation twelve Junior Research Fellows, in Arts and Sciences, according to an agreed allocation of subjects between the colleges. The fellowships are open to men and women and are tenable from 1 October 2003.

The fellowships are normally awarded to those who are approaching the end of their doctoral research or who have begun postdoctoral study. Fellows must engage in original research and may, with the permission of the appropriate governing body, undertake a limited amount of teaching. The current salary is £15,605 (with increase pending).

Application forms, together with further particulars, and details of the allocation of subjects, may be obtained from the Warden's Secretary, Merton College, Oxford OX1 4JD (e-mail: wardensoffice@admin.merton.ox.ac.uk ). The closing date is 20 December.

The policy and practice of the University of Oxford require that all staff are afforded equal opportunities within employment and that entry into employment with the University and progression within employment will be determined only by personal merit and the application of criteria which are related to the duties of each particular post and the relevant salary structure. In all cases, ability to perform the job will be the primary consideration. Subject to statutory provisions, no applicant or member of staff will be treated less favourably than another because of his or her sex, marital status, sexual orientation, racial group, or disability.


CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE

Corpus Christi Visiting Fellowship(s) 2003–4

The college proposes, if suitable candidates offer themselves, to elect to a Corpus Christi Visiting Fellowship for each term in the academic year 2003–4. The fellowship is intended for persons of high academic distinction, either from abroad or from the UK, who wish to pursue academic study and research as a member of the college. It is tenable for one, two, or three terms during the year. Preference will be given to candidates whose work is close to the academic interests of one or more fellows of the college.

A Visiting Fellow is entitled to free lunch and dinner and to full membership of the senior common room. The college will provide the fellow with shared study accommodation and will provide practical aid in finding accommodation in Oxford.

Applicants should write to the President's Secretary, Corpus Christi College, Oxford OX1 4JF, before Friday, 22 November, enclosing a curriculum vitae, a list of publications, a programme of work, and the names of three referees. It is their responsibility to ask their referees to send their references direct by the same date.

The college exists to promote excellence in education and research and is actively committed to the principle of equality of opportunity for all suitable qualified candidates.


MANSFIELD COLLEGE

Appointment of Graduate Assistant (Oxford Further Education Access Initiative)

Applications are invited for the post of part-time Graduate Assistant for the Oxford Further Education Access Initiative. Seven Oxford colleges are working together with the aim of encouraging applications to the University from the Further Education (FE) sector. The programme as a whole has proved highly successful and is managed by a full-time Recruitment Officer. Funding has now been obtained from the Atlantic Philanthropies for a part-time Graduate Assistant who will provide administrative support and play a crucial role in maximising the potential of the project. Duties will include assisting with day-to-day administration, helping with the organisation of events necessary in establishing and nurturing contacts between Oxford and the FE sector, managing the contact database, helping with the development and management of future projects, and visiting colleges in the Further Education sector (if appropriate).

Familiarity with the FE sector and Oxford University admissions procedures would be an advantage. IT skills (including database management) are desirable. Salary will be on the clerical and library C4 scale, £14,536–£16,826 per annum (pro rata), based on a flexible eighteen-hour working week.

Further particulars may be obtained from Linda Given, Academic Administrator, Mansfield College, Oxford OX1 3TF (telephone: Oxford (2)70982, e-mail: admissions@mansfield.ox.ac.uk).

Application should be made by letter and curriculum vitae (five copies) to the Academic Administrator at Mansfield by 4 November. Applicants should also give the names of two referees whom they should ask to write directly to the Academic Administrator by the same date. Interviews will be held on Friday, 22 November.

Previous applicants need not reapply.

Mansfield College is an equal opportunities employer.


ST ANNE'S COLLEGE

Stipendiary Junior Research Fellowships

St Anne's College invites applications for the following Junior Research Fellowships, open to women and men and tenable for one or two years from 1 October 2003. The posts are open to graduates in their second or subsequent year of research.

The Drapers' Company Junior Research Fellowship: this year offered in biological sciences, physiology, biochemistry, molecular biophysics.

The Kathleen Bourne Junior Research Fellowship in French language, literature, or humanities.

Further particulars can be found at http://www.stannes.ox.ac.uk. Those unable to access the WWW can obtain further particulars from the Tutor for Junior Research Fellowships' Secretary (telephone: Oxford (2)74825, e-mail: heather.law@st-annes.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for applications is 18 October.

St Anne's College is an equal opportunities employer.


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

Appointment of Head Porter

University College seeks to appoint a resident Head Porter from January 2003. The Head Porter is responsible for the day-to-day operational management of the Lodge and the organisation and supervision of the Lodge team. This includes reception duties, mailroom, security monitoring, issue of keys, and a wide variety of tasks in support of the college's objectives of excellence in academic research and teaching.

The college seeks a mature person with excellent communication skills, impeccable work experience (not necessarily gained in a college or university department) with some understanding of basic IT, and a flexible approach to work.

The college offers excellent terms and conditions, including private health insurance, free meals while on duty, and a final-salary pension scheme. A small self-contained cottage suitable for a couple will be made available rent free, in recognition of on-call responsibilities. Salary on the university scale, £15,873–£17,326 (review pending). Please apply in writing with a full curriculum vitae to the Domestic Bursar, University College, Oxford OX1 4BH (e-mail: elizabeth.crawford@univ.ox.ac.uk). Or telephone to discuss the role informally with Mrs Elizabeth Crawford on Oxford (2)76619.

Closing date: 15 October.


WOLFSON COLLEGE

Non-stipendiary Junior Research Fellowships 2003 in Clinical and Non-Clinical Sciences

Wolfson College proposes to elect up to six non-stipendiary Junior Research Fellows in Clinical and Non-Clinical Sciences, if candidates of sufficient merit present themselves, without limitation of subject, for two years in the first instance from 1 January 2003. These fellowships carry common table rights (up to £30 a week for meals in Hall) and are open to both men and women. Preference will be given to candidates who have not already held a junior research fellowship at another college.

Non-clinical science candidates. In the non-clinical sciences, candidates must hold a doctorate by the commencement of the fellowship (1 January 2003) and no more than three years should have elapsed since receipt of a doctorate.

Exceptions will be made only for candidates whose postdoctoral academic career has been interrupted by, for example, childbirth, family commitments, illness, or compulsory military service. A statement giving reasons why an exception should be considered in their case must be included with the application.

Clinically qualified science candidates. Clinically qualified science candidates should have completed no more than four years' full-time research by 1 January 2003. Renewal. Junior Research Fellows may apply for renewal of their fellowship for a further final two years. Renewal, which is not automatic and is subject to approval by the governing body, is considered on the basis of satisfactory progress in your research, normally submission of a doctoral (or equivalent) thesis by those not holding a doctorate at the time of election, evidence of adequate funding for the further term, and, of course, the fellow's good standing in the college.

Funding. The positions are non-stipendiary, and candidates are asked to demonstrate their financial independence by reference to evidence of their funding. Where funds are applied for but not confirmed, any offer will be conditional on provision of proof of funding before taking up the post.

Applications. Applications, typed or clearly printed, including a completed application form (see below), a curriculum vitae, and the names of three referees, should be sent to the President's Secretary, Wolfson College, Oxford OX2 6UD, by the closing date of Monday, 4 November (5 p.m.). Candidates should also include details of the research they will be doing in Oxford. The college reserves the right not to accept applications received after the closing date.

References. Candidates should themselves write directly to their referees asking them without further request to send a confidential reference to the President's Secretary by the closing date (Monday, 4 November). References may be faxed direct to the President's Secretary on Oxford (2)74136.

Junior Research Fellows are not ipso facto members of the governing body of the college, but they are eligible to sit on nearly all college committees, and may be elected as representative members of the governing body.

For an application form, send a self-addressed envelope to the President's Secretary, Wolfson College, Oxford OX2 6UD.

Non-stipendiary Arts/Humanities Junior Research Fellowships will be advertised in January 2003 for commencement in October 2003.


JESUS COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE

Research Fellowship

Applications are invited for a Research Fellowship to be held in science. Applications are also welcome from candidates undertaking scientific studies in the fields of geography and archaeology and anthropology. The fellowship is tenable for three years, ordinarily from 1 October 2003. However, the successful candidate may start the fellowship on any date between 1 April and 1 October 2003. The fellowship is open to graduates of, or research students in, universities in the United Kingdom. It is hoped to elect a man or woman who, on 1 October 2002 will, in the college's view, have completed not more than four years of research. Any application from a person who completed the course for his or her first degree before 1 June 1998 should, therefore, be accompanied by a statement of his or her occupation or employment since completing that course.

A Research Fellow may be invited to undertake a small amount of undergraduate teaching during term, but will not be permitted to undertake other paid work or to hold other offices and awards except by permission of the college council.

A Research Fellow is entitled to the privileges of a fellow, including rooms and some meals. Some privileges will be available immediately after election, in April 2003, before admission to the fellowship. Remuneration for a Research Fellow is set at the UGSS scales, step 3 (£14,617) to step 5 (£16,624) over the three years of the fellowship, which will incorporate a cap at the year 2 level of step 4 (£15,604), if a Ph.D. has not been awarded by the end of that second year. The remuneration is subject to a deduction if the fellow is resident in college. A Research Fellow not resident in college receives a `living-out' allowance, currently of £1,180 per annum. Children's allowances are also payable. A candidate who holds another award may expect to receive a supplementary payment from the college, provided this is allowed by the award-giving body.

Further details of the fellowship and application forms may be obtained from the Research Fellowships Secretary, Jesus College, Cambridge CB5 8BL (by e-mail: research-fellowships@jesus.cam.ac.uk, or from the college Web site, http://www.jesus.cam.ac.uk).

The completed application form, together in each case with a statement of not more than 1,000 words outlining the applicant's present and proposed research, must be received in the college by 13 December. Candidates must also arrange that testimonials are sent directly to the college, to be received not later than this same date, by two referees familiar with their work.

On 14 January 2003, short-listed candidates will be asked to submit two copies of written work up to a maximum of 40,000 words by 20 January 2003. Candidates should therefore ensure that they can be easily contacted at this time. If this work is not received by the deadline, the candidate will be deemed to have withdrawn from the competition. The submitted work need not be in its final form but must provide evidence of outstanding originality and promise. Candidates will not normally be called for interview.

Diary

Institute for the Advancement of University Learning Seminars: places should be booked in advance through the IAUL (telephone: (2)86808, e-mail: services@learning.ox.ac.uk, Internet: http://www.learning.ox.ac.uk).


Friday 11 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Venetian painting', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)


Saturday 12 October

MAISON FRANÇAISE conference: `Formes et stratégies du discours rapporté: approches linguistiques et littéraires des genres de discours', Maison Française, 9 a.m–6 p.m.

THE OXFORD PRO MUSICA SINGERS (conductor Michael Smedley): choral concert, including works by Schutz and Schnittke, University Church, 8 p.m. (tickets £8/£5).


Sunday 13 October

MICHAELMAS FULL TERM begins.

THE REVD CANON JUNE OSBORNE preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.


Monday 14 October

CODRINGTON LIBRARY, All Souls College, reopens (term opening hours: 9.30 a.m.–6.30 p.m., Monday–Friday).

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Pre- retirement programme', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

S. LANG: `Drop the daemon dai: maternal mortality and the state in Victorian India' (seminar series: `Metropolis, periphery, and nation: medicine and colonialism'), Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 2.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR C. GUILLÉN: `Exile shared: Luis Cernuda and Jorge Guillén' (Taylor Special Lecture: Luis Cernuda Centenary), Room 2, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

Y. GUILCHER: `La danse traditionelle, entre permanence et mutation' (lecture), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.


Tuesday 15 October

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Dealing with harassment' (day 1), 10 a.m., and `Writing at work' (week 1), 3.30 p.m. (see information above).

THE REVD SIMON OLIVER preaches the Court Sermon, Cathedral, 10.15 a.m. (congregation to be seated by 10.10 a.m.).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Modern Chinese paintings from the Sullivan Collection, Part 2', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

DR NIKE WAGNER (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor in European Comparative Literature): `Historism in Vienna' (lecture series: `Love and death: Vienna, Wagner, and fin de siècle culture'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR C. GUILLÉN: `Literatura y conjetura: Borges' (public lecture), Room 3, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

DR S. STEWART-BROWN: `Parenting and its impact on physical health' (Department of Social Policy and Social Work seminars: `Relationships and child wellbeing'), Violet Butler Seminar Room, Department of Social Policy and Social Work, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR KEITH HAWTON: `By their own hand: the problem of youth suicide' (Monica Fooks Memorial Lecture), Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 5 p.m.

LORD BINGHAM OF CORNHILL (High Steward of the University): `Personal freedom and the dilemma of democracies' (Romanes Lecture), Sheldonian, 5.45 p.m.


Wednesday 16 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM introductory gallery talk: `Greek pots', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

PROFESSOR S. CASTLES: `The new global politics and the emerging forced migration regime' (Seminars on Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR GERALD O'COLLINS, SJ: `Are background theories decisive?' (D'Arcy Memorial Lectures: `The Resurrection of Jesus'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR I. PELEG: `Israel between democratic universalism and particularistic Judaism' (David Patterson Seminars), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor, 8 p.m.


Thursday 17 October

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Minutes and agendas—an introductory programme', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

LORD (ROBERT) MAY: `Sentiment and science in conservation planning' (seminar series: `What is the future of science-based conservation?'), School of Geography and the Environment, 1 p.m.

DR J. LA FONTAINE: `Talking to children: some interviews with children believed to have been satanically abused' (International Gender Studies Centre seminars: `The girl child living in difficult circumstances: a cross-cultural perspective'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

CHRIST CHURCH PICTURE GALLERY guided tour: `Baroque paintings', 2.15 p.m. (booking not required).

THE HON. HUGO CHAVEZ FRIAS (President of Venezuela): `Globalisation and poverty' (International Human Rights Seminar), Schools, 3.30 p.m. (audience to be seated by 3.15 p.m.) (admission by tickets, available to members of the University from ihrs@herald.ox.ac.uk).

DR NIKE WAGNER (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor in European Comparative Literature): `The political dreams of Theodor Herzl' (lecture series: `Love and death: Vienna, Wagner, and fin de siècle culture'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR GERALD HAMMOND: `Tyndale's other Hebrew translations' (Tyndale Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

J. MANDER: `Gender, genre, ethnicity in the eighteenth century' (Early Modern French Seminar), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

SIR JOHN KREBS: `Food safety: science and policy' (Radcliffe Lecture), Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 6 p.m.


Friday 18 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Costume in art', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

DR P. WALTERS: `Russia and its former East European states, and their relationship with religious identities' (Ethnicity and Identity Seminars: `The nation-state and religious identities'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

DR J.T. BRUER: `Neuroscience, cognitive science, and the rational basis of education' (Herbert Spencer Lectures: `The future of education'), Schools, 5 p.m. (open to the public).

DR M. CORRIE: `Free will and the vocabulary of fortune in Malory's Le Morte D'Arthur' (OED Forum), Rewley House, 5 p.m.

O. TODD: `André Malraux, l'homme derrière l'oeuvre' (lecture), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.


Saturday 19 October

COLIN CARR (cello) and THOMAS SAUER (piano) perform chamber works by Beethoven, Britten, and Brahms, Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's, 8.30 p.m. (admission by free programme, available from the Porters' Lodge; reserved for college members until about ten days before the event).


Sunday 20 October

THE REVD PROFESSOR JOHN BARTON preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.


Monday 21 October

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Pre- retirement programme', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

N.S. MANTE: `Robert Boyle and the early modern racial body' (seminar series: `Metropolis, periphery, and nation: medicine and colonialism'), Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 2.15 p.m.

CHRISTOPHER MITCHELL: `Overseas interests' (Joseph Beuys Lectures), Auditorium, Magdalen, 3 p.m.

PROFESSOR ELIZABETH THOMPSON: `Chromosome ancestry and genetic mapping in the era of genome data' (lecture), Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building, 5 p.m.

P. RILEY: `Rousseau on "transformative", "denaturing" civic education' (lecture), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.


Tuesday 22 October

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Hals and Manet: travelling companions' (special exhibition), 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Writing at work' (week 2), 3.30 p.m. (see information above).

DR NIKE WAGNER (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor in European Comparative Literature): `The modernity of Richard Strauss' (lecture series: `Love and death: Vienna, Wagner, and fin de siècle culture'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR B. LATOUR: `Four new uncertainties in the social sciences' (Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies: `Information and organisation'), Saïd Business School, 5 p.m. (open to the public).

PROFESSOR D. MARTIN: `Protestantism and politics in the developing world' (Seminars in the study of religions), Lecture Room 2, Christ Church, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR K. SYLVA: `Helping parents improve their child's adjustment to primary school: results from a randomised control trial in an urban authority' (Department of Social Policy and Social Work seminars: `Relationships and child wellbeing'), Violet Butler Seminar Room, Department of Social Policy and Social Work, 5 p.m.