Oxford University Gazette: 1 May 2003

Oxford University Gazette, Vol. 133, No. 4657: 1 May 2003

Note: due to the requirements of the Data Protection Act, some elements of the printed Gazette are not reproduced in the Web Gazette.

University Acts

COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

Changes in Regulations

Council has made the following changes in regulations, to come into effect on 16 May.

College Contributions

1 Delete Council Regulations 28 of 2002 (Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4629, 10 July 2002, p. 1450, as corrected by p. 1558) and substitute the following as Council Regulations 3 of 2003:

`Council Regulations 3 of 2003

REGULATIONS FOR COLLEGE CONTRIBUTIONS

Made by Council on 1 May 2003 1.

(1) These regulations are made under the provisions of Statute XV, and references to sections are to the sections of that statute unless otherwise stated.

(2) The definitions set out in section 1 apply to these regulations.

2. The sum payable by each college under section 5 shall be calculated as follows, the unit of statutory endowment income for a particular financial year being an amount decided by Council by regulation on the recommendation of the College Contributions Committee before the end of that year: Payment to be made in Hilary Term, based on accounts for the immediately preceding financial yearc

  2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
In respect of the first 8 units of
statutory endowment income
Nil Nil Nil Nil Nil Nil Nil Nil Nil  
In respect of the next unit 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0
In respect of the next unit 5.0 6.0 7.0 8.0 9.0 10.0 10.0 10.0 10.0
In respect of the remainder 7.5 9.0 10.5 12.0 13.5 15.0 15.0 15.0 15.0

Ascertaining the Statutory Endowment Income of a college

General

3. All receipts of the nature of income shall be included without any exclusions or deductions except as mentioned below.

Particular instances

4. Any income-tax recoverable by a college shall be included if it was paid or deducted in respect of income which was itself statutory endowment income.

5. Underwriting commissions earned by a college and royalties payable to a college in respect of any copyright shall be included.

6. The full amount of the rent (excluding any local taxes or related charges paid to the college for onward transmission to the local authority) payable to a college in respect of any tenancy shall be included subject to a deduction for any rent which may be irrecoverable but with no deduction for any rent which may be waived.

7. If a college retains agricultural land unlet and uses it for agriculture, a fair rent shall be notionally attributed to it, but the standard deduction under regulation 22 below shall be allowed.

8. If a college allows the head or a fellow of the college or a person employed by it to occupy a hereditament outside the curtilage of the college and owned or leased by the college, the gross value of such a hereditament for local taxation or related charging purposes shall be treated as the rent payable irrespective of any rent paid or reduction made in emoluments, but the standard deduction under regulation 22 below shall be allowed.

9. A quarter of the net proceeds of the sale of timber and a third of the gross proceeds of any minerals or mineral rights belonging to a college shall be treated as statutory endowment income.

10. Receipts which under the provisions of the Universities and College Estates Acts of 1925 and 1964 are required to be treated as capital moneys shall not be treated as statutory endowment income. 11. Income of funds established under section 29 of the Universities and College Estates Act, 1925 (as amended) and approved by the committee shall not be treated as statutory endowment income. 12. Income of any pension fund, whether existing at the time of the making of these regulations or created subsequently, conducted or contributed to by a college and approved by the College Contributions Committee shall not be treated as statutory endowment income. 13. Commissions payable to a college in respect of insurances effected by it on its own behalf shall not be included.

General exclusions

14. Statutory endowment income shall not include any money received by a college:

(1) which arises from carrying out its functions as an institution for education and research; or

(2) except as mentioned in regulation 16 below, which arises from the use or letting of land within the curtilage of the college or land used by the college directly in connection with those functions. 15. Under regulation 14 (1) above there shall be excluded from statutory endowment income all fees, dues, establishment charges, charges for meals paid to the college by its members, and such proportion (if any) of the rent paid to the college by student members for furnished accommodation outside the college as the College Contributions Committee may think reasonable. 16. Under regulation 14 (2) above there shall normally be excluded payments received by the college for the use of college buildings for conferences or for the use of its sports facilities by outsiders when not required by its own members; but there shall be included payments received by the college for the use of college buildings or of sports facilities under arrangements which in the opinion of the College Contributions Committee give the user virtually exclusive use for a substantial period.

Benefactions

17. Benefactions, whether of a single sum or recurring, shall not be treated as statutory endowment income, except that:

(1) any income resulting from the investment of such benefactions shall be so treated; and

(2) where a benefaction takes effect as a legal or equitable assignment of a right to income of an income-producing asset, the income so assigned shall be treated as statutory endowment income.

Income received by a college as sole trustee

18. All income of a trust of which a college is sole trustee shall (whether applied or retained or accumulated) be treated as statutory endowment income except as provided in regulation 21 below.

Payment or application of money by trustees of trusts other than trusts of which the

college is sole trustee 19. In the case of a payment by trustees to a college or the application by trustees of money for any purpose of a college the moneys paid or applied shall not be treated as statutory endowment income in so far as they are paid or applied out of moneys which are capital in the hands of the trustees. 20. Where the moneys are paid or applied out of moneys which are income in the hands of the trustees, then they shall be treated as statutory endowment income if (but only if) the college or some purpose of the college was the named or described beneficiary or (otherwise than solely as being a college of a university or of Oxford University) one of the named or described beneficiaries under the instrument or instruments creating the trust.

Income of trusts applicable for external purposes

21. If any income receivable by the college under the terms of any trust must under the trust be applied for some purpose wholly outside the objects of the college, then (whether the college is or is not the trustee of the trust) any income which must be so applied shall be disregarded in calculating statutory endowment income.

Permissible deductions

22. (1) Standard deductions. There shall be allowed a standard deduction of:

(a) 25 per cent in respect of the full amount of rents from agricultural land;

(b) 40 per cent in respect of the full amount of rents from non-agricultural land which is let on terms that the tenant is not responsible for any structural repairs;

(c) 10 per cent in respect of the full amount of rents from non-agricultural land let on other terms (including, at gross value for local taxation or related charging purposes, college houses outside the curtilage occupied by the head, fellows, or employees);

(d) 5 per cent in respect of the gross amount of interest and dividends.

(2) Deductions in respect of leaseholds. In the case of leasehold land held by a college there shall be deductible:

(a) any rent paid by the college; and

(b) any annual sum which is paid or applied by the college for the purpose of recouping the capital moneys applied by the college to the purchase of a lease.

(3) Any annual sum paid or applied under paragraph (2) (b) above shall not be greater than an amount calculated either on the 3.5 per cent table for the period which the lease has still to run from the year in which it was purchased by the college or, if the college so decides initially, on the premium on a leasehold redemption policy for that lease.

(4) Deduction of interest. Any interest paid by a college shall be deductible.

(5) Exceptional obligations. If a contributing college makes to the college Contributions Committee a written application on the ground that its endowment income or some part of that income is burdened by some charge or obligation of an exceptional nature in respect of which a deduction ought fairly to be made (whether imposed on the college or accepted voluntarily by the college for reasons which the committee considers reasonable having regard to the interest not necessarily only of the college but if appropriate also of the University and colleges as a whole), the committee shall consider that application and may in its discretion decide what deduction (if any) shall be allowed to the college in respect of that charge or obligation.


Annual statement of statutory endowment income and college contributions

23. At the same time as submitting its annual financial statements under section 8, each college shall also submit a statement, in the form set out in the Schedule to these regulations, giving details of its statutory endowment income for the financial year concerned and of the calculation of any contributions payable on that income. 24. A statement duly submitted under regulation 23 above shall satisfy the requirements of section 11, and of regulation 3 of the Regulations for the Accounts of the Colleges, and shall be certified by the auditors of the college's financial statements in accordance with the provisions of regulations 4--9 of those regulations (with any necessary substitutions).

SCHEDULE

Statutory Endowment Income and College Contribution

Year ended 31 July ...

GROSS ASSESSABLE INCOME
(Include under this head all amounts which fall to be brought into account under regulations 1--21 above)
£ £
Rent:    
Agricultural land ...  
Non-agricultural land:    
Let on terms that the tenant is responsible for any structural repairs ...  
Let on other terms ...  
Gross value for local taxation or related charging purposes of college houses outside the curtilage occupied by the head, fellows, or employees ... ...
  —— ——
Interest and Dividends   ...
Income from connected trusts which falls to be brought into account under regulations 18--20   ...
     
Other   ...
  —— ——
TOTAL GROSS ASSESSABLE INCOME   ...
  —— ——
PERMISSIBLE DEDUCTIONS
(Under regulations 21 and 22 above)
   
21.Income from connected trusts which must be applied solely for external purposes ...  
22.(1)Standard deductions:    
In respect of the full amount of rents from agricultural land, £... at 25% ...  
In respect of the full amount of rents from non-agricultural land let on terms that the tenant is not responsible for any structural repairs, £... at 40% ...  
In respect of the full amount of rents from non-agricultural land let on other terms, £... at 10% ...  
In respect of gross value for local taxation or related charging purposes of college houses outside the curtilage occupied by the head, fellows, or employees, £... at 10% ...  
In respect of the gross amount of interest and dividends, £... at 5% ...  
(2), (3) In respect of leaseholds:    
Rent payable ...  
Amortisation of lease premium ...  
(4) Interest ...  
(5) Allowances for exceptional obligations ... (...)
  —— ——
STATUTORY ENDOWMENT INCOME   £...
  ======== ========
     
CONTRIBUTION PAYABLE    
On £...   Nil
On £... at ...%   ...
On £... at ...%   ...
On £... at ...%   ...
—————— ———— ————
£...   £...'
====== ====== ======

2 These regulations shall first apply to the accounts for the financial year ending 31 July 2003. [These changes introduce new regulations for the calculation of contributions by colleges to the College Contributions Fund, which are needed because of the replacement of the old (`Franks') format of College Accounts with a new format for the current financial year. The new regulations do not, however, alter in any way the existing basis of the college Contributions Scheme.]


GENERAL PURPOSES COMMITTEE OF COUNCIL

Changes in Regulations

The General Purposes Committee of Council has made the following changes in regulations, to come into effect on 16 May.

Note: new wording is indicated by underlining.

(a) Information and Communications Technology Committee and Computing Services

1 In Council Regulations 15 of 2002, concerning the Information and Communications Technology Committee (Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4634, 16 October 2002, p. 235, as renumbered by the changes published on 31 October 2002, p. 352), delete regulations 3.47--3.48, substitute the following,[1] and renumber existing regulations 3.49--3.102 as regulations 3.54--3.107: `3.47. The committee shall be responsible for the following matters:

(1) the formulation and continued development of a strategy for information and communications technology in furtherance of the University's aims and objectives;

(2) co-ordinating strategic planning on ICT throughout the collegiate University, liaising with and where appropriate providing guidance and advice to Council and its committees, the academic divisions, the academic services sector, other university bodies, and colleges, societies, and Permanent Private Halls;

(3) the strategic planning of the University's IT and telecommunications networks;

(4) general policy with regard to the operation of the IT network in the collegiate University, including: (a) liaising with the academic divisions, the academic services sector, other university bodies, and colleges, societies, and Permanent Private Halls on any steps needed to ensure its effective operation for the collegiate University as a whole; and (b) advising Council on these matters as necessary;

(5) considering and advising Council and its committees, the academic divisions, the academic services sector, and other university bodies on all matters relating to information and communications technology, and co-ordinating on these matters with colleges, societies, and Permanent Private Halls;

(6) making, amending, and publishing regulations, subject to approval by Council, for the control, management, and security of the use of the University's ICT facilities;

(7) co-ordinating and approving, in so far as is necessary in the particular circumstances, applications in response to external funding opportunities for ICT developments. 3.48. The committee shall consider, and advise Council on, the strategic development of management information systems in the collegiate University in so far as they concern ICT, including the ICT components of management information projects and the relationship of such projects to the University's ICT strategy and ICT infrastructure. 3.49. The committee shall have authority to make such other arrangements by standing order as are necessary to fulfil its responsibilities. 3.50. The committee shall be responsible for the strategic oversight of the operations and budget of the Computing Services, which shall include:

(1) advising and instructing the Director of the Computing Services as required in order for the Director to fulfil the duties of his or her office; and

(2) subject to the provisions of any statute or regulation of general application, the appointment and determination of the duties and conditions of service of the Director of the Computing Services, and the determination of the terms and conditions of appointment and level of salary scales which shall be applied to staff of the Computing Services other than the Director. 3.51. The purpose of the Computing Services shall be to support the provision of ICT in the University both directly and indirectly. 3.52. The Computing Services may also provide services to organisations which are not part of the University, on conditions to be approved by the committee from time to time. 3.53. The Director of the Computing Services shall be first officer of the Computing Services, and in that capacity shall report to the committee in the performance of his or her duties.'

2 In Council Regulations 23 of 2002 (Statutes, 2000, p. 289, as redesignated as regulations by Decree (5) of 11 July 2002, and renumbered by Decree (1) of 16 May 2002, Gazette, Vol. 132, pp. 1190, 1461), delete Sect. XXVIII, concerning the Computing Services. [These changes, made on the recommendation of the ICT Committee, bring the regulations governing the ICT Committee into line with its operation under the governance structure, and provide new regulations governing OUCS in place of the former regulations which were set out separately in the Regulations for Other University Bodies.]


(b) Establishment of Christensen Fund Post-doctoral Fellowship in Chinese Painting

In Part 2 of Council Regulations 25 of 2002, concerning trusts (Statutes, 2000, p. 609, as redesignated as regulations by Decree (5) of 11 July 2002, and renumbered by the changes published on 14 November 2002, Gazette, Vol. 132, p. 1461; Vol. 133, p. 404), insert new § 48 as follows and renumber existing §§ 48--59 (pp. 609--16) as §§ 49--60:

`§ 48. Christensen Fund Post-doctoral Fellowship in Chinese Painting

1. The benefaction from the Christensen Fund which comprises a grant of US $404,800, together with any further donations for this purpose, shall be used to support a Christensen Fund Post-doctoral Fellowship in Chinese Painting at the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology (`the Fellowship').

2. The University shall retain all of the benefaction as permanent endowment and shall apply the net income of the endowment towards the maintenance of the Fellowship.

3. The administration of the fund and the application of its income shall be the responsibility of the Visitors of the Ashmolean Museum.

4. Regulation 3 above may be amended by Council.' [This change establishes the new fellowship with an extremely generous benefaction from the Christensen Fund, a Californian non-profit corporation.]


(c) Elizabeth Hannah Jenkinson Fund

In Part 2 of Council Regulations 25 of 2002, concerning trusts (Statutes, 2000, p. 663, as redesignated as regulations by Decree (5) of 11 July 2002, and renumbered by the changes published on 14 November 2002, Gazette, Vol. 132, p. 1461; Vol. 133, p. 404), delete § 182 and substitute:

`§ 182. Jenkinson Fund

1. The University shall retain all of the Elizabeth Hannah Jenkinson Fund (`the Fund') as permanent endowment, and shall apply the net income of the Fund to the encouragement of research work in Embryology.

2. Grants from the Fund shall be used to support research on normal and experimental Embryology of Animals undertaken by graduates of the University who have obtained Honours in Zoology in the Final Honour School of Natural Science, or in the Final Honour School of Pure and Applied Biology, or in the Final Honour School of Biological Sciences.

3. The administration of the Fund, and the application of its income, shall be the responsibility of the Linacre Professor of Zoology.

4. Regulations 2 and 3 above may be amended by Council. [This change, made on the recommendation of the Life and Environmental Sciences Board, extends eligibility for awards to graduates who have gained Honours in either the Final Honour School of Pure and Applied Biology or the Final Honour School of Biological Sciences. Both the Pure and Applied Biology and the Biological Sciences Final Honour Schools post-date the benefaction, and the change restores eligibility for awards to all students who have obtained Honours in subjects with a zoological content.]

(d) Winchester Award Fund

In Part 2 of Council Regulations 25 of 2002, concerning trusts (Statutes, 2000, p. 751, as redesignated as regulations by Decree (5) of 11 July 2002, and renumbered by Decree (3) of 7 June 2001, Decree (2) of 31 January 2002, and the changes in regulations published on 14 November 2002, Gazette, Vol. 131, p. 1114; Vol. 132, pp. 698, 1461; Vol. 133, p. 404), delete § 377 and substitute:

`§ 377. Winchester Award Fund

1. The moneys establishing the Bapsybanoo Marchiness of Winchester Award Fund (`the Fund') shall be retained by the University as permanent endowment, and the net income of the Fund shall be applied to the award to a student or students of the University who in research or study while pursuing graduate studies at the University has or have achieved distinction in the area of international relations, in particular as concerned with human rights and fundamental freedoms.

2. The administration of the Fund and the application of its income shall be the responsibility of the Department of Politics and International Relations which shall establish a board of management for the Fund.

3. One or more awards shall normally be given annually and shall be suitably advertised within the University.

4. The number and value of the awards shall be determined by the board of management.

5. Regulations 2--4 above may be amended by Council.' [This change, made on the recommendation of the Committee for the Cyril Foster and Related Funds, assigns responsibility for the Winchester Fund to the Department of Politics and International Relations and makes provision for more than one award to be made annually.]

(e) Pavry Memorial Fund

In Part 2 of Council Regulations 25 of 2002, concerning trusts (Statutes, 2000, p. 706, as redesignated as regulations by Decree (5) of 11 July 2002, and renumbered by the changes published on 14 November 2002, Gazette, Vol. 132, p. 1461; Vol. 133, p. 404), delete § 264 and substitute:

`§ 264. Pavry Memorial Fund

1. The moneys establishing the Dasturzada Dr Jal Pavry Memorial Fund (`the Fund') shall be retained, by the University as permanent endowment, and the net income of the Fund shall be applied to the award to a student or students of the University who in research or study while pursuing graduate studies at the University has or have achieved distinction in the area of international peace and understanding.

2. The administration of the Fund and the application of its income shall be the responsibility of the Department of Politics and International Relations which shall establish a board of management for the Fund.

3. One or more awards shall normally be given annually and shall be suitably advertised within the University.

4. The number and value of the awards shall be determined by the board of management.

5. Regulations 2--4 above may be amended by Council.' [This change, made on the recommendation of the Committee for the Cyril Foster and Related Funds, assigns responsibility for the Dasturzada Dr Jal Pavry Memorial Fund to the Department of Politics and International Relations and makes provision for more than one award to be made annually.]


CURATORS OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

Change in Regulations

The Curators of the University Libraries have made the following change in regulations, to come into effect on 16 May.

Note: new wording is indicated by underlining.

Regulations relating to the use of the facilities of the Oxford University Library Services

In Libraries Curators Regulations 1 of 2002, concerning the use of the facilities of the Oxford University Library Services (Supplement (2) to Gazette No. 4630, 24 July 2002, p. 1536), delete regulation 2 and substitute: `2. In these regulations `material' means any material, including electronic material, owned by or in the possession or custody of a library or library service.' [This change makes clear that the word `material' includes electronic material, and refers to the material of a library service as well as that of a library in the narrower sense.]


CONGREGATION 29 April

Declaration of approval of Resolutions approving the allocation of sites

(1) Blackwell's Scientific Offices

That the Blackwell's Scientific Offices building comprising about 3,250 sq.m. of floor space be allocated to the University Library Services.


(2) Christian Building, Begbroke

That about 940 sq.m. of floor space in the Christian Building be reallocated from the Department of Materials to the Directorate of the Oxford University Begbroke Science Park.


COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of Congregation: Burnet, P.W.J., Faculty of Clinical Medicine Cross, J.E., University Offices Deller, J.G., Sub-Department of Inorganic Chemistry Palmer, A.M., MA, St Catherine's Papadopoulos, M., Faculty of Music


DIVISIONAL BOARDS AND BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 16 May, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

University Agenda

CONGREGATION 20 May 2 p.m.

¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that written notice of any intention to vote against, or any proposed amendment to, the resolutions below, signed in each case by at least two members of Congregation, must be given to the Registrar by noon on Monday, 12 May (see the Guide to Procedures in Congregation cited in the note at the end of `University Agenda').

1 Voting on Resolution approving the conferment of a Degree by Diploma

Explanatory note

By longstanding tradition, the University has conferred by diploma upon the Chancellor-elect the Degree of Doctor of Civil Law (unless, of course, the Chancellor-elect already holds that degree, otherwise than honoris causa). Council is in no doubt that it would be appropriate to continue this tradition and accordingly seeks the approval of Congregation for the following resolution.

Text of Resolution

That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Civil Law by Diploma upon THE RT. HON. CHRISTOPHER FRANCIS PATTEN, CH, PC, MA, Honorary Fellow of Balliol College, Chancellor-elect of the University, be approved.

¶ If the resolution is approved, the degree will be conferred as part of the ceremony on 25 June to admit Mr Patten to the office of Chancellor.


2 Voting on Resolution approving the reallocation of space from Chemistry to the University Museum of Natural History

Explanatory note

As well as space in the Dyson Perrins Laboratory and 9 Parks Road, Chemistry is to release about 640 sq.m. of floor space in the University Museum and Inorganic Chemistry buildings when the Chemistry Research Laboratory is occupied. More space may be released later. The following resolution reallocates the 640 sq.m. of space to the University Museum of Natural History, part of the space being required for a joint University Museum and Pitt Rivers Museum visitor facility.

Text of Resolution

That approximately 640 sq.m. of floor space in the University Museum and Inorganic Chemistry buildings be reallocated from Chemistry to the University Museum of Natural History, part of the space to be used for a joint University Museum and Pitt Rivers Museum visitor facility, on occupation of the Chemistry Research Laboratory by the Department of Chemistry.


3 Voting on Resolution concerning the implementation for externally funded academic- related staff of the Fixed-Term Employees Regulations

Explanatory note

INTRODUCTION

Council has considered a report from the Personnel Committee on the implications for the University of the Fixed-Term Employees (Prevention of Less Favourable Treatment) Regulations 2002, which came into force on 1 October 2002. The Personnel Committee's recommendations were developed in consultation with the Oxford AUT and include a specific proposal to introduce a new open-ended, externally funded form of employment contract and associated arrangements for the termination of those contracts for reasons of redundancy. Council now invites Congregation to approve a resolution in connection with that proposal.

BACKGROUND

Fixed-Term Employees Regulations

New national legislation came into force on 1 October 2002, implementing an EU Directive and regulating the use of fixed-term contracts of employment. The legislation is relevant to some 3,500 university staff at Oxford, mainly in the academic-related research support grades, employed on outside-grant-funded, supernumerary, and other forms of fixed-term contract, and will limit the use of successive fixed-term contracts to four years, except where such use is objectively justified. The legislation is not retrospective and continuous service for the purpose of the regulations will be deemed to start on 10 July 2002. Where there is no objective justification for the use of fixed-term appointments, relevant staff with four years' continuous service may be deemed to have open-ended contracts from 10 July 2006 onwards. The Personnel Committee has consulted extensively with departments and divisions, and with the Oxford AUT and its national officers, and has reached agreement with them on the proposed approach to the implementation of the regulations within the University. This approach is consistent with the guidance developed by a national joint working group, which included representatives of the AUT and the higher educatino unions, and university employers, under the auspices of the Joint Negotiating Committee for Higher Education Staff (JNCHES).

Current university contractual arrangements

The University currently uses a range of types of contract of employment which are principally determined by the funding arrangements for the particular appointment. The University's Financial Regulations stipulate that a contract of employment may not be issued for a longer period than guaranteed funding is available. If the appointment is supported by sources which seem to represent long-term funding streams (e.g. the HEFCE block grant) an established contract may be issued. Appointments to posts funded by `soft money' are made on fixed-term contracts for the period for which funds are guaranteed and the contracts contain a clause explaining this. The new regulations will result in an increase in the number of staff employed on an open-ended basis because there will be situations where there will not be a clear-cut objective justification, as required under the new legislation, for limiting contracts to a fixed term. These situations will include, for example, staff employed using research-grant income which departments reasonably expect to continue for the foreseeable future, but which is not formally guaranteed. However, it would clearly be extremely imprudent for the University to increase its long-term commitment to such staff in these cases without its having a reliable provision to limit its financial exposure if external funding is in the event discontinued. There is no increase in university resources, nor in the University's likely income from external sources, to accompany the introduction of the new national legislation. It has been recognised by all the parties to the consultation referred to above that, if the University were to make more open-ended appointments for staff hitherto employed on a series of fixed-term contracts, it would need to have appropriate redundancy procedures available to ensure that the open-ended contracts could be terminated if the funding were to cease and, after due process, all attempts to redeploy the individual concerned to suitable alternative work had failed. It was also recognised that if agreement on redundancy arrangements could not be reached, the University would be ill-advised to enter into open-ended contracts, an alternative being that fixed-term appointments of over four years' duration which could not be renewed on objective grounds for a further fixed term would have to terminate on the expiry of the previous fixed term. The current redundancy procedures for academic and academic-related [1] staff are set out in Statute XII, Part B and require the initial approval of Congregation before any permanent member of academic or related staff can be considered for redundancy. Under the statute Congregation must decide `that it is desirable that there should be a reduction in the academic staff (a) of the University as a whole; or (b) of any faculty, school, department, or other similar area of the University by way of redundancy'. Where Congregation so decides, a Redundancy Committee is set up and is responsible for considering the selection of staff for dismissal on grounds of redundancy and making recommendations to Council.


Proposal to create a new type of open-ended contract for academic-related staff funded from external sources with appropriate termination procedures

The Personnel Committee has long recognised the issues surrounding uncertain career prospects for research staff employed on fixed-term contracts, and has supported a range of initiatives under the auspices of the Research Careers Initiative to address these concerns. The Personnel Committee's consultation exercise has established that departments wish in appropriate circumstances to have the facility to make initial appointments of some such staff on some form of open-ended contract, and to move some existing fixed-term staff to such contracts. The proposal would constitute another step towards enhancing job security for relevant members of this important staff group. The Oxford AUT has consulted its members employed on fixed-term contracts and established that they would also welcome a greater degree of employment security. However, all parties accept that, given that the funding for such staff will ultimately remain uncertain, a balance needs to be struck between increasing security of employment through the greater use of open-ended contracts and having available appropriate arrangements to terminate any such contract if the funding or the work required should cease or diminish and all avenues for redeployment or securing alternative funding had been exhausted. Thus it has been agreed that the introduction of the new form of open-ended, externally funded contract must be contingent upon the approval of appropriate redundancy procedures. The Personnel Committee has also reached agreement with the Oxford AUT on detailed procedures for the operation of a Redundancy Committee and has revised its guidance to departments and divisions on the arrangements for the redeployment of staff and the avoidance of redundancy. Council recognises that the Statutes require that Congregation be approached if there is a question of a `general' reduction in academic staffing, or a local, but structural, reduction: if Congregation accepts the need for such a reduction it is then the role of the Redundancy Committee to select individuals and recommend their redundancy to Council. This would of course be a very different proposition from the one which Council now puts to Congregation, which is that since the Fixed-Term Employees Regulations will increase the numbers of academic-related staff on open-ended contracts if such contracts are introduced, and since it is regrettably inevitable that additional external funding will not be forthcoming in every case to fund the new open-ended contracts, there will be an equally inevitable need to reduce the academic-related staff on such contracts (the number of which will be increased by the introduction of open-ended, externally funded appointments). Before introducing the proposed new open-ended contract, Council therefore seeks the approval of Congregation to establish a Redundancy Committee under Statute XII, Part B in the light of the changed circumstances caused by the new regulations. That committee would consider solely any cases that might arise in respect of academic-related staff employed on the new open-ended, externally funded contract whose appointments could not be sustained financially, and who could not be redeployed. Council is clear that it would be irresponsible of the University to increase the academic-related staff in this way without having appropriate arrangements to deal with the consequences, and that it is essential to have general arrangements in place before specific cases arise. It very much welcomes the contributions made by the Oxford AUT in developing this jointly agreed approach.

Text of Resolution

That this House endorse the introduction of the proposed new open-ended, externally funded contract of employment for certain academic-related staff, and associated redundancy procedures, and in particular agree that Council should appoint a Redundancy Committee in accordance with section 10 of Statute XII, Part B to deal with the termination of such contracts for reason of redundancy. [1] At Oxford University, Statute XII and its provisions on redundancy cover both academic and academic-related staff. The references to academic staff therefore include both staff groups.

Notices

PROFESSORSHIP OF COMPARATIVE LAW

STEFAN VOGENAUER, M.JUR., Research Fellow, Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Private Law, Hamburg, and Lecturer in Comparative Law, Bucerius Law School, Hamburg, has been appointed to the professorship with effect from 1 October 2003. Mr Vogenauer will be a fellow of Brasenose College.


PROFESSORSHIP OF CRIMINOLOGY

RICHARD VICTOR ERICSON (BA Guelph, MA Toronto, PH.D., D.LITT. Cambridge), Professor of Law and Professor of Sociology, and Principal of Green College, University of British Columbia, has been appointed to the professorship with effect from 1 January 2004. Professor Ericson will be a fellow of All Souls College.


DATA PROTECTION ISSUES CONCERNING CALLING LINE IDENTITY

The University is proposing an important change to the Calling Line Identity presented whenever extension users make telephone calls to numbers outside the University network. Members of the University are advised to read the following carefully, as it affects their rights regarding Data Protection. Until recently Oxford University Telecomms Network (OUTN) has sent out no `Calling Line Identity' (CLI) on outbound telephone calls. Legislation originally limited the University to sending out its main number, Oxford 270000, but this caused problems when someone who had been called from an OUTN extension dialled 1471 to find out who had called. If that person then called back the University's main number, the University's operator was unable to tell which extension had called. CLI has therefore been suppressed until now. The increasing use of `Anonymous Call Rejection' (ACR) requires the University to reconsider this policy. ACR is a feature offered by British Telecom to domestic telephone users, which prevents them receiving calls which do not have a CLI. Users choose this facility to avoid cold-selling calls or calls from people they do not know. Unfortunately it has also prevented such people receiving valid calls from the University, as it has not sent out a CLI. As an immediate measure to overcome this problem the University has decided to send out a generic number as a CLI on all calls, regardless of the extension the call is made from. When this number is rung back using 1471 it is answered by the recorded message `You have been called by an extension on the University of Oxford network'. This overcomes the problem of anonymous call rejection but does not provide very helpful information to the recipient of the call. The University is therefore proposing to present the actual DDI number of the extension making the call, so that, for example, recipients of calls from extension 88661, who dialled 1471, would be told that they had been rung by Oxford 288661, and could recall the number directly by dialling `3'. It is intended to implement this at the beginning of Michaelmas Term. However, there is a valid requirement for some staff to be able to withhold their extension number. Staff are already allowed to be ex-directory (see note below), and some people who work, for example, with animals, have taken up this option. It is regarded as essential that staff who have concerns about revealing their individual telephone numbers can also suppress information about themselves whenever they make an outbound call. It will therefore be possible to request Telecommunications to have the CLI suppressed when making outbound calls. The Telecommunications section is giving advance notice of this change to enable members of the University to consider its relevance to their telephone use. A further announcement will be made immediately before the change is implemented, expected to be in Michaelmas Term. Any concerns about this change in policy should be addressed to the Telecommunications Help Desk on 88888 or e-mailed to telecommunications@admin.ox.ac.uk.

Note: see Section 2, `Information', in the Internal Telephone Directory, or `How do I become ex-directory from the University's Internal Telephone Directory?' in the FAQ section of the Telecommunications Web site at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/telecom/.


ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM

Vivien Leigh Prize

A prize of £300 is offered by the Ashmolean Museum from the Vivien Leigh Fund for a two-dimensional work of art on paper, not exceeding 55 by 40 centimetres, by an undergraduate member of the University. The work will be chosen, if a work of sufficient merit is submitted, by the Keeper of Western Art in the Ashmolean Museum, from work submitted to the Print Room by Saturday, 14 June, or work exhibited at the annual degree show at the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art. It is a condition of the award that the winning work be given to the Ashmolean.


MAGDALEN COLLEGE

Forthcoming exhibition

`In Praise of Women': an exhibition of Shona stone sculpture, with work by and of Zimbabwean women. It comprises remarkable work by Zimbabwe's most renowned female artists, such as Agnes Nyanhongo and Colleen Madamombe. It also has contributions from world-class artists like Dominic Benhura and Lazarus Takawira, who have spent their lifetimes dedicated to the depiction of the female form. (At Magdalen College, Wednesday, 16 July–Saturday, 3 August, opening hours 12 noon–6 p.m. daily)


MUSICAL EVENTS

Queen's College

Organ recitals

The following organ recitals will be held at 1.10 p.m. on Wednesdays in the chapel, Queen's College. Admission is free (retiring collection). 7 May: Andrew Reid, Westminster Abbey 14 May: Christian Wilson, Christ Church 21 May: Daniel Turner, Queen's 28 May: Tim Hone, Salisbury Cathedral 4 June: Edward Whiting, All Saints, Northampton 11 June: Dana Marsh, Queen's 18 June: Katharine Pardee, Betts Lecturer in Organ Studies

Concert

The Chapel Choir of Queen's College will perform works by Palestrina, Lassus, Finzi, Leighton, and Harvey, followed by madrigals and part-songs in the Fellows' Garden, at 8.15 p.m. on Thursday, 12 June, in Queen's College. Programmes, costing £7 and £5, will be available at the door (price to include two glasses of wine). To reserve a programme telephone Oxford (2)79194, or e-mail: erica.parsons@queens.ox.ac.uk. Further details may be found on the college Web site, http://www.queens.ox.ac.uk.

Choral Services

Choral Services are held as follows during full term in the Chapel, Queen's College: Sunday 6.15 p.m.; Wednesday and Friday, 6.30 p.m. Further details may be found on the college Web site, http://www.queens.ox.ac.uk.

Lectures

INAUGURAL LECTURES

Philip Wetton Professor of Astrophysics

PROFESSOR R. DAVIES will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 7 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Telescopes, galaxies, and black holes.'


Professor of Taxation Law

PROFESSOR J. FREEDMAN will deliver her inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 12 May, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building.

Subject: To be announced.


Harmsworth Professor of American History

PROFESSOR M.P. LEFFLER will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 20 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `9/11 and the past and future of American foreign policy.'


Merton Professor of English Literature

PROFESSOR D.G.E. NORBROOK will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 20 May, in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `Women Lucretians: materialism, critique, and the canon.'


Professor of French Literature

PROFESSOR ALAIN VIALA will deliver his inaugural lecture, in French, at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 4 June, in the Taylor Institution.

Subject: `Réponse à Rousseau, ou: De La Modernité des Lettres.'


Camden Professor of Ancient History

PROFESSOR A.K. BOWMAN will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 13 June, in the Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's College.

Subject: `Outposts of empire.'


LYELL LECTURES IN BIBLIOGRAPHY

The world of books in Byzantium

NIGEL WILSON, James P.R. Lyell Reader in Bibliography, 2002–3, will deliver the Lyell Lectures at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building. 7 May: `The scriptorium.' 14 May: `An ill-paid profession.' 21 May: `Circulation.' 28 May: `Lenses and spectacles.'


PROFESSOR OF POETRY

PROFESSOR PAUL MULDOON will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 6 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `The end of the poem: "Poem of the End" by Marina Tsvetayeva.'


WEIDENFELD VISITING PROFESSOR IN EUROPEAN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 2002–3

ROBERT ALTER, Class of 1937 Professor of Hebrew and Comparative Literature, University of California, Berkeley, will lecture at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Main Lecture Hall, the Taylor Institution. Professor Alter will also give seminars at 4 p.m. on Wednesdays 28 May and 11 June in Lecture Room 1, St Anne's College. Thur. 15 May: `Flaubert: the demise of the spectator.' Mon. 19 May: `Flaubert: urban poetics.' Thur. 22 May: `Dickens: the realism of metaphor.' Thur. 29 May: `Dickens: intimations of Apocalypse.' Mon. 2 June: `Bely: phantasmatic city.' Thur. 5 June: `Woolf: urban pastoral.' Mon. 9 June: `Joyce: metropolitan shuttle.' Thur. 12 June: `Kafka: suspicion and the city.'


MYRES MEMORIAL LECTURE

PROFESSOR J.M. WAGSTAFF, Emeritus Professor of Geography, University of Southampton, will deliver the twenty-second Myres Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 6 May, in the McGregor Matthews Room, New College.

Subject: `The contribution of early travel narratives to the historical geography of Greece.'


CHERWELL–SIMON LECTURE 2003

PROFESSOR W.D. PHILLIPS, Distinguished Professor of the University of Maryland, and Nobel Laureate 1997, will deliver the Cherwell–Simon Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Friday, 16 May, in the Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon Laboratory.

Subject: `Time, Einstein, and the coldest stuff in the Universe.'


CLARENDON LECTURES IN ECONOMICS

Is Keynes dead? Reviving a sensible macroeconomics

PROFESSOR JOSEPH STIGLITZ, Columbia University, will deliver the Clarendon Lectures in Economics at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination Schools. Tue. 13 May: `Cycles in business cycle theory.' Wed. 14 May: `Foundations of a new macroeconomics.' Thur. 15 May: `Applications to economic policy.'


HALLEY LECTURE 2003

PROFESSOR PAUL CRUTZEN, Nobel Laureate, Max-Planck-Institut für Chemie, Mainz, and Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, will deliver the Halley Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 5 June, in the Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon Laboratory.

Subject: `The Antarctic "Ozone Hole": a human-caused chemical instability of the stratosphere. What should we learn from this?'


HICKS LECTURE 2003

PROFESSOR RICHARD SYLLA, Stern School of Business, New York University, will deliver the Hicks Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 16 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Trans-Atlantic capital market integration, 1790–1845.'


O'DONNELL LECTURE IN CELTIC STUDIES 2003

PROFESSOR ROBIN CHAPMAN STACEY, University of Washington, will deliver the O'Donnell Lecture in Celtic Studies at 5 p.m. on Friday, 16 May, in the Taylor Institution.

Subject: `Law and memory in early Ireland.'


CLASSICS

Dionysus recast: ancient drama in the modern world

Unless otherwise indicated, the following interdisciplinary graduate seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Hospitality Room, the Oxford Playhouse. Some papers will be accompanied by brief performances or readings by members of the Oxford University Classical Drama Society. Two presentations will be made at the meetings on 7 May, 14 May, 28 May, and 18 June. DR M. REYNOLDS
7 May: `Translation as tragedy in Browning's Agamemnon.' K. RILEY
7 May: `Herakles in fin-de-siècle Vienna: a reappraisal of the beginnings of Nervenkunst.' I. HURST
14 May: `A rancorous poisoned garment ... a life of deep anguish: George Eliot and Greek tragedy.' S. EVANGELISTA
14 May: `Apollo and the poetics of masochism in late Romantic literature.' H. STALLA
21 May, venue to be announced: `Virginia Woolf: knowing Greek.' DR P. BROWN
28 May: `Some musical versions of Greek tragedy.' A. WILLIS
28 May: `A new relevance: Trojan Women in the twentieth century.' PROFESSOR E. HALL, Durham
4 June: `Why Iphigenia in the third millennium?' DR S. HARRISON
11 June: `Modern versions of Senecan drama.' A. WRIGLEY
11 June: `Balliol Players.' L. HARDWICK, Open University
18 June, venue to be announced: `New polarities for old? The impact of translation for the stage on perceptions of Greek drama.' M.-L. CRAWLEY
18 June, venue to be announced: `The reincarnation of ancient drama: Dionysus at the Théâtre du Soleil.'


ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

Romantic realignments

Unless otherwise indicated, the following meetings will be held at 5.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the Goodhart Seminar Room, University College.

Convener: L. Calé, M.St., D.Phil., Arts Junior Research Fellow, University College (e-mail: luisa.cale@univ.ox.ac.uk). C. RIDING, Curator, Tate Britain
8 May: `Gericault's The Raft of the Medusa: the picture, the panorama, and the play.' DR J. WHALE, Leeds
15 May: `The language man: Richard Roberts Jones.' PROFESSOR J. PAGE, Florida
22 May: `British Romanticism and Judaism.' PROFESSOR P. HAMILTON, Queen Mary College, London
Tue. 27 May, 90 High Street Lecture Room, University College: `Poetic astonishment: a Romantic genealogy.'


ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE, MUSIC, THEOLOGY, HISTORY OF ART

The Bible in Art, Music, and Literature

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Danson Room, Trinity College. Those attending are asked to note that Dr Christine Joynes will speak in place of Dr Tess Knighton at the seminar on 5 May.

Conveners: C.C. Rowland, MA, D.Phil., Dean Ireland's Professor of Exegesis of Holy Scripture, and C.E. Joynes, MA, M.St., D.Phil., Bampton Fellow in Theology, Trinity College. DR JOYNES
5 May: `The journey of a text: Mark's Gospel in art, music, and literature.' PROFESSOR J. WEBSTER
19 May: `Karl Barth's Epistle to the Romans.' DR A. VOLFING
2 June: `Water into wine. John the Evangelist at the Wedding in Cana.' DR F. CAREY, British Museum
16 June: `The Apocalypse and the shape of things to come.'


LIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

PROFESSOR GLEN MACDONALD, UCLA, Astor Visiting Lecturer, will lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 13 May, in the Senior Common Room, the School of Geography and the Environment.

Conveners: R.J. Whittaker, MA, Reader in Biogeography, and K.J. Willis, MA, University Lecturer in Physical Geography.

Subject: `Eighteenth-century explorers, lost forests, and changing climates of the Canadian and Russian Arctic—a new look at circumpolar treeline dynamics and global climate change, past, present, and future.'


MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Oxford Physics Colloquia

The following seminars will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Fridays in the Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon Laboratory. For details of the Cherwell–Simon Lecture (16 May), see above.

Conveners: N.F. Johnson, MA, Professor of Physics, and J.I. Silk, MA, D.Phil., Savilian Professor of Astronomy. PROFESSOR SIR KEITH O'NIONS
9 May: `Science and a secure nation.' DR T. PALMER, European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts, Reading
30 May: `Predicting weather and climate: a risky business.' PROFESSOR J. STONE, Cambridge
6 June: `Numerical models of accretion flows around black holes.' DR D.A. WILLIAMS, Hitachi Cambridge Laboratory, Cambridge
13 June: `Nanotechnology for solid-state quantum information processing.'


Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Planetary Physics

The following seminars will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Thursdays in the Dobson Lecture Room, the Atmospheric Physics Laboratory. Because on rare occasions the arrangements need to be changed, anyone intending to come to Oxford specially to attend should check first by telephoning Oxford (2)72933. For details of the Halley Lecture (5 June), see above. DR J. AUSTIN, Meteorological Office
1 May: `QBO/solar cycle impacts on ozone.' DR M. WEBB, Meteorological Office
8 May: `Estimating uncertainty in the response to doubled CO2 using a large ensemble of GCM versions.' PROFESSOR T. CHOULARTON, UMIST
15 May: `The effects of aerosol on warm and mixed phase clouds.' DR N. HARRIS, Cambridge
22 May: `Ozone trends in the atmosphere.' DR C. PIANI
29 May: `Effects of the stochastic parameterisation of convectively generated gravity waves on the tropical stratosphere in the Unified Model.' PROFESSOR K. SHINE, Reading
12 June: `Kyoto and beyond: how can we compare the effects of emissions of different greenhouse gases?' DR C. JOHNSON, Meteorological Office
19 June: `Atmospheric chemistry and climate change.'


Theoretical Chemistry Group Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the John Rowlinson Seminar Room (20.12, opposite the Main Lecture Theatre), the Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory.

Convener: M.S. Child, MA, Coulson Professor of Theoretical Chemistry. DR S.C. CREAGH, Nottingham
5 May: `Tunnelling dynamics in a chaotic regime.' PROFESSOR D. BIRD, Bath
19 May: `Theory of chemicurrents.' PROFESSOR J.T. HYNES, Colorado and École Normale Supérieure, Paris
2 June: `How should we think about proton transfer reactions in solutions?'


Condensed Matter Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Thursdays in the Simon Room, the Clarendon Laboratory.

Conveners: R.J. Nicholas, MA, D.Phil., and J.T. Chalker, MA, D.Phil., Professors of Physics. PROFESSOR T. RASING, Nijmegen
1 May: `Probing ferromagnetism at small length and short time scales.' DR R. COLDEA
8 May: `Observation of spin fractionalisation in a 2D frustrated quantum magnet.' DR R. MOESSNER, École Normale Supérieure, Paris
15 May: `Frustrated ferromagnetism: spin-ice in a magnetic field.' DR A. ANDREEV, Surrey
29 May: `Theory of the electronic structure and optical properties of GaN-based quantum dots.' PROFESOR D.S. CITRIN, Georgia Insitute of Technology
5 June: `Optical properties of quantum wells in strong THz fields.' (To be confirmed) PROFESSOR N. GOLDENFELD, Illinois
12 June: `Pairing and critical phenomena in the cuprate superconductors.' PROFESSOR S. HAYDEN, Bristol
19 June: `Magnetism and superconductivity in ZrZn2.'


Theoretical Physics Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in the Dennis Sciama Lecture Theatre, the Department of Physics.

Conveners: I. Kogan, MA, and S. Sarkar, MA, Readers in Physics. PROFESSOR S. RANDJIBAR-DAEMI, ICTP, Trieste
2 May: `Towards model building in brane world scenarios.' PROFESSOR J. GAUNTLETT, Queen Mary and Westfield College, London
16 May: `Strings, branes, and quantum field theory.' PROFESSOR P. LEATH, Rutgers
30 May: `Phonons in random alloys.' PROFESSOR G. VOLOVIK, Helsinki University of Technology
13 June: `The universe in a helium droplet.'


Department of Earth Sciences

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Mondays in the Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Earth Sciences. DR P. KOKELAAR, Liverpool
12 May: `Anatomy of a crisis—Montserrat volcanic emergency 1995–9.' DR S. TUDHOPE, Edinburgh
19 May: `What controls variations in the El Niño Southern Oscillation ... evidence from annually banded massive corals.' DR S. KELLEY, Open University
2 June: `Meteorite impacts and mass extinctions—do they really correlate?'


Biophysical Chemistry Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Wednesdays in the John Rowlinson Seminar Room (20.12, opposite the Main Lecture Theatre), the Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory.

Convener: Dr L.C. Snoek. DR S. BALASUBRAMANIAN, Cambridge
7 May: `Fluorescence, FRETTING, and the application of single molecule fluorescence for the study of biomolecular structure and function.' DR L.J. SMITH
28 May: `Characterising non-native protein conformations.'


MEDICAL SCIENCES

Seminars in public health and epidemiology

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Abraham Lecture Theatre, Green College. DR T. KEY
6 May: `Fruit and vegetables and cancer.' DR P. PHAROAH, Cambridge
13 May: `Predicting the risk of breast cancer and BRCA1/2 mutation carrier probability in women with a family history.' DR A. MCLEAN
20 May: `Searching for immune correlates of viral dynamics in HIV infection.' DR R. WALTON,
27 May: `Tobacco addiction—can we blame our genes?' DR W. AITKEN, Cancer Research UK
3 June: `Smoking and colorectal polyps.' PROFESSOR D. KERR
10 June: `Colorectal cancer trials—links to pharmacogenetics.' DR A. CRAVIOTO, National University of Mexico
17 June: `A thirty-year analysis of diarrheal diseases in Mexican children.'


Department of Psychiatry and the Oxford Regional Committee for Postgraduate Medical Education and Training

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Seminar Room, the University Department of Psychiatry, the Warneford Hospital. PROFESSOR M. OWEN, University of Wales College of Medicine
13 May: `The genetics of schizophrenia: out of the graveyard.' DR R. PALMER, Leicester Warwick Medical School
20 May: `Why do we get into such a mess with anorexia nervosa?'


Pharmacology and anatomical pharmacology seminars

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Lecture Theatre, the Department of Pharmacology. DR R. BICKNELL
6 May: `Molecular basis for angiogenesis.' DR S. AKOULITCHEV
13 May: `TFIIH and the regulation of transcription initiation.' PROFESSOR D. COOPER, Cambridge
20 May: `Regulation of Ca2+ sensitive adenylyl cyclases by Ca2+.' DR V. CHAPMAN, Nottingham
27 May: `The pharmacology of nociceptive processing in models of acute and chronic pain.' DR S. BURGE
3 June: `Sticking together: the Darier disease story.' DR M. NASH, Leicester
10 June: `Visualising IP3 signalling in individual neurones.' DR B. CALLINGHAM, Cambridge
17 June: To be announced. (Paton Lecture) PROFESSOR J. BREITNER, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle
24 June: `Clues from epidemiology about the treatment and prevention of Alzheimer's disease.'


MEDICAL SCIENCES, SOCIAL SCIENCES

Genetics Forum

The following seminars will be held at 5.30 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Saïd Business School. Two presentations will be made at the meeting on 4 June. There has been a three-year moratorium on the licence to grow genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in the United Kingdom. In the summer the Government will decide whether to lift the moratorium. This series will discuss some of the issues involved. Further details may be obtained from Jennifer Swift (e-mail: jswift@onetel.net.uk), or Jane Kaye (e-mail: jane.kaye@ethox.ox.ac.uk). To subscribe to the Genetics Forum, send an e- mail with the message `subscribe' to: geneticsforum@maillist.ox.ac.uk. DR B. MARANTELLI, Agriculture Biotechnology Council, and LAWRENCE WOODWARD, Elm Farm Research Centre, Newbury
7 May, Lecture Theatre 5: `GM crops: good or bad for the environment?' H. WARWICK, independent researcher
14 May, Edmund Safra Lecture Theatre: `Seeds of doubt: experience of North American farmers growing GM crops.' DR M. ANTONIOU, King's College School of Medicine, London
21 May, Lecture Theatre 5: `The new genetics: implications for GM crops and human health.' PROFESSOR R. GROVE-WHITE, Lancaster; Chair, Greenpeace UK
28 May, Lecture Theatre 5: `The emerging politics of public values in GM regulation.' DR L. LEVIDOW, Open University
4 June, Edmund Safra Lecture Theatre: `Metaphors of pollution: GM and the cultural meaning of the countryside.' COLIN TUDGE, LSE
4 June, Edmund Safra Lecture Theatre: `Shall we reap: the future of agriculture.' DR H. SCHMIDT, Nuffield Council in Bioethics, and P. MULVANY, Intermediate Technology Development Group
11 June, Edmund Safra Lecture Theatre: `The role of GM crops in developing countries.'


MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

Italian graduate seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on the days shown in the Taylor Institution.

Conveners: M.L. McLaughlin, MA, D.Phil., Fiat–Serena Professor of Italian Studies, and M. Zaccarello (Dott. Lett.), University Lecturer in Italian. PROFESSOR L. LEONARDI, Università per Stranieri, Siena
Thur. 8 May, Room 3: `Le Rime di Dante: postille a una recente edizione.' (Paget Toynbee Lecture) PROFESSOR A. CORSARO, Florence
Tue. 13 May, Room 2: `The Golden Age as a paradox: Tasso and other texts of the late Renaissance.' PROFESSOR G.H. TUCKER, Reading
Wed. 28 May, Room 3: `Halcyon days? Pietro Alcionio (1485–?1528) v. Juan Ginés de Sepúlveda on translating Aristotle.' (EHRC joint meeting with graduate seminars in French, Spanish, and Portuguese)


Seminars on the work of Paul Celan (1920–70)

These seminars will recommence this term at 5.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Old Seminar Room, Wadham College. Topics for the seminars in weeks 4 and 5 will be announced later.

Conveners: R.C. Ockenden, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in German, and A. Phelan, MA, Faculty Lecturer in German. PROFESSOR B. BÖSCHENSTEIN, Geneva
6 May: `Celans Gespräche mit deutschen und französischen Dichtern.' PROFESSOR L. OLSCHNER, Queen Mary and Westfield College, London
13 May: ` "Herzzeit, Weltzeit": reading deposits of time in Celan's poetics and poetry.'


MODERN HISTORY

East and East–Central Europe Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in the MacGregor Room, Oriel College.

Conveners: R.J. Crampton, MA, Professor of East European History, and R.J.W. Evans, MA, D.Phil., Regius Professor of Modern History. A. DRACE-FRANCIS, School of Slavonic and East European Studies, London
2 May: `Books and social change in early modern eastern Europe. The Romanian case.' M. PITTAWAY, Open University
9 May: `Industrial workers and socialist dictatorship in Hungary, 1948–56.' J. SHERMAN
16 May: `Reforming through fiction: Ayzik-Meir Dik (1807–93) and the Yiddish bestseller.' J. FELLERER
23 May: `The Revolution of 1848 and the making of the Czech linguistic nation.' M. KVIETKAUSKAS
30 May: `The multicultural experience in fin-de- siècle Vilna: Yiddish literature and the politics of diasporism.' E. WEAVER
6 June: `Madonna crucified: post-Trianon irredentist imagery in Hungary, then and now.' M. CHISHOLM
13 June: `The Counter-Reformation decision in the Tyrol: 1562–5.'


PHILOSOPHY

Seminar in the Philosophy of Physics

The following seminars will be given at 4.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: H.R. Brown, MA, Reader in Philosophy, J.N. Butterfield, MA, Senior Research Fellow, All Souls College, and S. Saunders, MA, University Lecturer in the Philosophy of Science. DR O. POOLEY
1 May: `Descartes and Newton on place, space, and motion.' PROFESSOR B. VAN FRAASSEN, Princeton
15 May: `The ideal of a purely structural description of nature.' DR BROWN
22 May: `Spacetime structure from a dynamical perspective.' DR J. VAN LITH, Utrecht
29 May: `Models and idealisation in statistical physics.' DR D. CORFIELD
5 June: `How natural is our mathematics?' C. TIMPSON
12 June: `Information is physical? Reflections on foundational implications of quantum information.' PROFESSOR J. PONS, Barcelona and Imperial College
19 June: `Constrained systems and Dirac's conjecture.'


INTERDISCIPLINARY SAWYER SEMINAR (IN ASSOCIATION WITH THE ANDREW W. MELLON FOUNDATION)

The theory and politics of civil society

Except where otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held from 1.45 p.m. to 4.15 p.m. on Mondays in the Rothermere American Institute. Those wishing to attend the seminars should register their interest in good time. All enquiries should be directed to Paul Bou-Habib (telephone: (2)82718, e-mail: paul.bou-habib@socres.ox.ac.uk). PROFESSOR P. VAN PARIJS, Louvain
1 May: `Cultural diversity and economic solidarity.' PROFESSOR RICHARD RORTY, Stanford
8 May, Rhodes House: `Justice as a larger loyalty.' PROFESSOR LORD (RAYMOND) PLANT, King's College, London, PROFESSOR ADALBERT EVERS, Giessen, BLAKE BROMLEY, writer and activist, and others
15 May: final panel discussion.


RESEARCH LABORATORY FOR ARCHAEOLOGY AND THE HISTORY OF ART

The following seminars will be held at 10.30 a.m. on Thursdays in the Seminar Room, the Research Laboratory for Archaeology.

Convener: M.S. Tite, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Archaeological Science. N. BARTON, Oxford Brookes
1 May: `Bridge or barrier? Early human contacts across the Gibraltar Strait.' S. SCARRE, Cambridge
15 May: `Always in the process of becoming: temporality and intention in the Neolithic long mound of Prissé- la-Charrière.' N. MAGGETTI, Fribourg
29 May: `Swiss news: from where did Neolithic and faience potters obtain their raw materials?' B. OTTAWAY, Sheffield
12 June: To be announced.


SAID BUSINESS SCHOOL

Finance Seminars

Except where indicated otherwise, the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in Lecture Theatre 5, the Saïd Business School. Enquiries should be directed to Jos Van Bommel, the Saïd Business School. A Finance Symposium will be held in weeks seven and eight. For details of the Clarendon Lectures in Economics, see above. W. FERSON
1 May, Safra Lecture Theatre, 1 p.m.: `Evaluating fixed income fund performance with stochastic discount factors.' C. SPRATT
1 May (usual time and venue): `Equilibrium asset pricing under heterogeneous information.' P. REICHLIN
8 May: `Risk and intermediation in a dual financial market model.' A. SCHWARTZ
22 May: To be announced. H. HAU
29 May: `The role of transaction costs for financial volatility. Evidence from the Paris Bourse.' G. GIRAUD
5 June: `The limit-price exchange process.'


INSTITUTE FOR CHINESE STUDIES

China Research Seminar

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Institute for Chinese Studies. Further information can be obtained from Rana Mitter (telephone: Oxford (2)80385, e-mail: rana.mitter@chinese.ox.ac.uk). PROFESSOR G. DUDBRIDGE
1 May: `Towards a genetics of the Shuo fu blocks: a study of Bodleian Sinica 933 and 939.' MAYFAIR YANG, California, Santa Barbara
Tue. 6 May, 4.30 p.m.: `Goddess across the Taiwan Straits: matrifocal ritual space, nation-state, and satellite television footprints.' (Inaugural Seminar of the Leverhulme Project on Contemporary China; followed by a reception) LIU TS'UI-JUNG, Director, Institute of Taiwan History, Preparatory Office, Academic Sinica
15 May: `On concepts and institutions related to the environment in Chinese history.' R. STERCKX, Cambridge
22 May: `Sacrifice and self-cultivation in early China.' J. GOLDSTEIN, West Georgia
29 May: `China and Israel, 1911–2003.' A. HARDIE, Newcastle
5 June: ` "Massive structure" or "spacious naturalness"?: aesthetic choices in gardens of the Wang families in sixteenth- to seventeenth-century Taicang.' PROFESSOR A.C. BAYLY, Cambridge
Tue. 10 June: `The China–Burma–India Theatre in World War II: Rangoon 1940–8: the fall of a colonial city.' R. PHILLIPS, Auckland
19 June: `Manzhougo [Manchukuo] revisited: the last successful colony in Asia?' R. WELLER, Boston
26 June: `The modern invention of nature in China and Taiwan: globalisation, nature tourism, and rocks.'


COMPUTING LABORATORY

Numerical Analysis Group

Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminars

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the Lecture Theatre, the Computing Laboratory. The co-ordinators are L.N. Trefethen and J. Scott (RAL). Further information may be obtained from Shirley Day (telephone: Oxford (2)73885). DR D. RALPHS, Cambridge
1 May: `Modelling bilevel games in electricity.' DR S. FORTH, Shrivenham
8 May, RAL: `Elimination automatic differentiation for Jacobian calculation.' PROFESSOR N. NICHOLS, Reading
15 May: To be announced. PROFESSOR R. LEVEQUE, Washington
22 May: `Immersed interface methods for fluid dynamics problems.' PROFESSOR D. HIGHAM, Strathclyde
29 May: `Clustering, reordering, and random graphs.' DR A. MACK, University of Technology, Sydney
5 June: `A divergence-free element for finite element prediction of radar cross sections.' PROFESSOR G. STRANG, MIT
12 June: `Pascal matrices.' PROFESSOR P. TOINT, Namur
19 June, RAL: `A filter method for the nonlinear feasibility problem.'


WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE

Medicine and culture before 1800

Corrected notice

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Mondays in the Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine.

Note: this replaces the notice published in the Gazette of 24 April (p. 1098). The second seminar this term (the first in the list below) will take place in third week, on 12 May (not 3 May as stated previously). The fifth seminar will take place in seventh week, on 9 June (not 7 June, as stated previously).

Convener: M.H. Pelling, MA, M.Litt., Reader in the Social History of Medicine. DR M. SATCHELL, Cambridge
12 May: `The medieval hospitals GIS project.' DR J. LANDERS
19 May: `Gunpowder, energy, and the costs of war: the enigma of English exceptionalism.' DR A. CUNNINGHAM, Cambridge
2 June: `The curse of John Hunter's museum.' DR R. SERJEANTSON, Cambridge
9 June: `Medicine in the New Atlantis.' DR L. BROCKLISS
16 June: `Medical correspondence in eighteenth-century France: the case of Esprit Calvet and his colleagues in the Midi.'


OXFORD INTERNET INSTITUTE

Public lecture

DR THOMAS A. FINHOLT, School of Information, University of Michigan, will deliver a public lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 1 May, in the Saïd Business School. Further information may be found at http://www.oii.ox.ac.uk.

Subject: `If we build it will they come? The challenges of cyberinfrastructure development.'


OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC STUDIES

DR J. THOMPSON, Ashmolean Museum, will present a seminar at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 7 May, in the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, George Street.

Subject: `Intention, inchoherence, and fantasy: carpet patterns and their symbolic content.'


NISSAN INSTITUTE OF JAPANESE STUDIES

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Lecture Theatre, the Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. MR JOJI KIJIMA, SOAS, London
2 May: `The Japanese and Chiang Kai-shek: a genealogy of "Returning Virtue for Malice".' PROFESSOR R. KELLER KIMBROUGH, Colby College, USA, and Sainsbury Institute, University of London
9 May: `Exemplary poets and cautionary tales: Heian women authors in the literature of medieval Japan.' MR KAZUHIKO TOGO, formerly Japanese Ambassador to the Netherlands
16 May: `Japan and Russia: past failures and future prospects.' DR C. AARON, Nathan Associates, Washington DC
23 May: `Japanese trade, ODA, and overseas investment—how things have changed.' PROFESSOR J.A.A. STOCKWIN
30 May: `Why Japan still matters?' (Valedictory lecture)


INSTITUTO CAMOES CENTRE FOR PORTUGUESE LANGUAGE

Lectures

The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Instituto Camoes Centre, Littlegate House, St Ebbe's.

Convener: Dr Maria Joao Branco, Director of the Centre. PROFESSOR A. DUGGAN, King's College, London
8 May: `The cult of St Thomas of Canterbury in Portugal: an aspect of Anglo-Papal relations in the twelfth century.' DR O. REES
15 May: `English adventures of a Portuguese music print: Duarte Lobo's Liber primus missarum and musical antiquarianism, 1650–1860.'

Other events

The following will take place in the Instituto Camoes Centre.

Fri. 2 May, 6 p.m.: opening of exhibition of paintings by Miguel Machado. (Until 7 June) Fri. 9 May, 8.30 p.m.: showing of film Manha submersa, by Lauro António, preceded by the short film O Gato e la Lua, by Pedro Serrazina.


QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

Economic development Seminar: Povery and power

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House. Because the arrangements are subject to change, those wishing to attend are advised to check at http://www2.qeh.ox.ac.uk/teaching/seminars.html.

Conveners: F.J. Stewart, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Development Economics, and T.R. Thorp, MA, Reader in Economics. L. WHITEHEAD
1 May: `Civil society in Latin America.' PROFESSOR STEWART and M. WANG
8 May: `Do PRSPs empower poor countries and disempower the World Bank, or is it the other way round?' DR M. WOOLCOCK, World Bank
Wed. 14 May: `Governance in the gullies: political networks, leadership, and the delivery of basic services to Delhi's urban poor.' F. CLEAVER, Bradford
22 May: `The inequality of social capital: agency, association, and the reproduction of chronic poverty.' MS THORP
29 May: `Group formation as an anti-poverty strategy.' D. HULME, Institute of Development Policy Research, Manchester
5 June: To be announced. A. MARR, Greenwich
12 June: To be announced. PROFESSOR M. NUSSBAUM, University of Chicago Law School
19 June, Taylor Institution: `Beyond the social contract: capabilities and global justice.' (Olof Palme Memorial Lecture)


International Gender Studies Centre

Kaberry Lecture

PROFESSOR KARIN BARBER, Centre of West African Studies, Birmingham, will deliver the Kaberry Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 7 May, in the Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's.

Subject: `How texts transcend gender in African oral and popular cultures.'


TRANSPORT STUDIES UNIT

ESRC Seminar Series 2002–3: Transport investment and the economy

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in Lecture Room 1, St Anne's College. Those wishing to attend are asked to inform Sylvia Boyce (e-mail: sylvia.boyce@tsu.ox.ac.uk).

Convener: J.M. Preston, MA, Director of the Unit and Reader in Transport Studies. PROFESSOR A. MAY, Leeds
22 May: `Determining levels of local transport investment.' PROFESSOR D. BEGG, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen
19 June: `Delivering transport investment: socio- economic issues.'


ALL SOULS COLLEGE

PROFESSOR ROGER LOUIS, Kerr Professor in English History and Culture, University of Texas at Austin, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 23 May, in the Old Library, All Souls College.

Subject: `Sir Keith Hancock and the British Empire: the Pax Britannica and the Pax Americana.'


Chichele Lectures 2003

All Souls in the era of the Second Founding, .1865–1914

DR SIMON GREEN, Fellow of the college, will deliver the Chichele Lectures at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Old Library, All Souls College. The lectures are open to the public. 30 May: `The years of the Constituent Assembly.' 6 June: `The impact of Anson.' 13 June: `The golden age of the Prize Fellows.' 20 June: `Chichele's professoriate and its peculiar purposes.'


BRASENOSE COLLEGE

Tanner Lectures on Human Values 2003

Dilemmas of difference in democratic society

PROFESSOR DAVID KENNEDY, Donald J. McLachlan Professor of History, Stanford University, will deliver the Tanner Lectures on Human Values at 5 p.m. on the following days in Rhodes House. Mon. 12 May: `The case of women.' Tue. 13 May: `The case of race.'


CHRIST CHURCH

Churchill and Roosevelt: the Atlantic Alliance

This conference, the second in the Christ Church series, will take place between 31 August and 5 September. The distinguished speaker list includes Professor Sir Michael Howard, Dr Geoffrey Best, Professor Warren Kimball, and Professor Richard Aldrich. A comprehensive programme is available from the Conference Administrator, Christ Church. The college is making available a number of scholarship places for scholars whose academic work relates to the conference theme, but who may not be fully funded for an event of this kind. Applications will be welcomed and may be sent to the Programme Director via the Conference Administrator, Steward's Office, Christ Church, Oxford OX1 1DP (e-mail: churchill@chch.ox.ac.uk).


JESUS COLLEGE

Don Fowler Lecture

PROFESSOR ELLEN OLIENSIS, Associate Professor of Classics, University of California at Berkeley, will deliver the Don Fowler Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 15 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `What Scylla wants: Freudian questions in Ovid's Metamorphoses.'


KEBLE COLLEGE

Eric Symes Abbott Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR DUNCAN FORRESTER, Edinburgh, will deliver the Eric Symes Abbott Memorial Lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Friday, 9 May, in the chapel, Keble College.

Subject: `Racism and sectarianism.'


MAGDALEN COLLEGE

Waynflete Lectures

Blake and the Terror: toward a biography of William Blake in Lambeth during the anti-Jacobin Terror in Britain, 1792--3

MICHAEL PHILLIPS, Centre for Eighteenth-century Studies, University of York, and guest curator of the William Blake exhibition at Tate Britain, 2000, will deliver the Waynflete Lectures at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Auditorium, Magdalen College.
14 May:` "A whole house to range in": recovering no. 13 Hercules Buildings, Lambeth, Blake's studios, method of "Illuminated Printing", and the production of "A Song of Liberty" .' 21 May: ` "GOD save the PEOPLE!!": Lambeth's manufactories, asylum, lying-in hospital, and workhouse, and the creation of Songs of Experience.' 28 May: ` "From the commencement of ALARM": Thomas Paine and Charles Ross, the Lambeth Association for the Preservation of Liberty and Property against Republicans and Levellers, "Our End is Come", and the prospect of Newgate.' 4 June: ` "The several Works now published and on Sale at Mr. Blake's": the Prospectus of 10 October 1793, meeting of the Society of Loyal Britons, Mount Row, Lambeth, America a Prophecy, and the politics of colour.'


Rowe Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR J.R. WOODHOUSE, FBA, Emeritus Fiat–Serena Professor of Italian, will deliver the Dorothy Rowe Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 30 May, in the Auditorium, Magdalen College.

Subject: `The Travels of Marco Polo.'


ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

Asian Studies Centre

Islam in Asia

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Dahrendorf Room, Founder's Building, St Antony's College. Enquiries: telephone Oxford (2)74559, or e-mail: asian@sant.ox.ac.uk.

Convener: R.H. Barnes, B.Litt., MA, D.Phil., Professor of Social Anthropology. DR N. GREEN
13 May: `Sufism in south Asia: between texts, territories, and the transcendent.' PROFESSOR W.G. CLARENCE-SMITH, SOAS, London
20 May: `Historical roots of fundamentalism in south-east Asia.' S. ANDREYEV, Institute for Ismaili Studies, London
27 May: `The shaping of the Ismaili community in central Asia.' PROFESSOR M. TALIB
3 June: `The Sufis and society.' PROFESSOR D. PARKIN
10 June: To be announced. A. GALLOP, British Library
17 June: `Illuminating the word: the art of the Islamic book in south-east Asia.'


South Asian History Seminar

Except where otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Dahrendorf Room, Founder's Building, St Antony's College. Enquiries: telephone Oxford (2)74559, or e-mail: asian@sant.ox.ac.uk.

Convener: D.A. Washbrook, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Modern South Asian History. DR S. BEHERA, Diplomatic Service, Government of India
6 May: `Revisiting the Jagannath cult: legend, rituals, and identity.' DR S. KUMAR, Delhi
Mon. 19 May, Deakin Room, St Antony's: `The woman in the accounts (hisab) of men: Sultana Raziyya and early Sultanate society.' DR M. KREPON, President Emeritus, Henry Stimson Centre, Washington DC
20 May: `Nuclear deterrence in south Asia: does the stability–instability paradox apply to India and Pakistan?' DR R. ROY-CHAUDHURY, King's College, London, and DR Z. CHEEMA
27 May: `Nuclear weapons and the use of force in south Asia.' (Panel discussion)


The balance sheet of democratisation in Taiwan

This meeting will be held from 10 a.m. on Friday, 16 May, in the Dahrendorf Room, the Founder's Building, St Antony's College. Enquiries should be directed to Jennifer Griffiths (telephone: Oxford (2)74559, e-mail: asian@sant.ox.ac.uk).

Convener: S.Y.-S. Tsang, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Politics. TUN-JEN CHENG, College of William and Mary
10.10 a.m. Session 1, Party Politics: `How have democratic politics impacted upon the effectiveness and function of political parties in Taiwan?' (Moderator: Dr Tsang; discussant: Edward Friedman, Wisconsin) S. RIGGER, Davidson College
11.50 a.m. Session 2, Electoral Politics and Political Culture: `How has electoral politics affected the ordinary people's attitude towards politics?' (Moderator: Laurence Whitehead; discussant: Chu-cheng Ming, National Taiwan University) J.-P. CABESTAN, French Centre for Contemporary China
2.20 p.m. Session 3, Political accountability and governance: `What impact has democratisation had on government accountability, and the quality of governance?' (Moderator: Joyce Juo-yu Lin, Tamkang and Brookings; discussant: to be announced) CHIEN-MIN CHAO, National Cheng-chi University
3.30 p.m. Session 4, Corruption: `How is the politics of hejin related to democratisation?' (Moderator: Bob Ash, SOAS; discussant: Gary Rawnsley, Nottingham) FRANÇOISE MENGIN, Centre d'Études et de Recherches Internationales
5 p.m. Session 5, Sub-ethnic politics: `How has democratisation affected sub-ethnic cleavages and the forging of a national identity in Taiwan?' (Moderator: Chris Hughes, LSE; discussant: Hong-yuan Chu, Academica Sinica, Modern History)


ST HUGH'S COLLEGE

Aung San Suu Kyi Lecture 2003

H.E. JUDGE RICHARD MAY will deliver the Aung San Suu Kyi Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 15 May, in the Maplethorpe Building, St Hugh's College.

Subject: `Upholding human rights through international law.'


SOMERVILLE COLLEGE

Glaxo SmithKline Lecture

PROFESSOR J. MARTIN, Melbourne, will deliver the Glaxo SmithKline Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 13 May, in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary. The lecture will be followed by a reception in Somerville College.

Subject: `The skeletal complications of cancer.'


TRINITY COLLEGE

Margaret Howard Lecture

P.D. JAMES will deliver the Margaret Howard Lecture at 5.45 p.m. on Thursday, 15 May, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building. Admission is free. The lecture will be followed by a reception.

Subject: `Manners and murder: women detective writers as social historians.'


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture

RICHARD A. EPSTEIN, Distinguished Service Professor of Law, University of Chicago, and Senior Fellow, the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, will deliver the H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 6 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `The not so minimum content of natural law.'


WOLFSON COLLEGE

Isaiah Berlin Lecture

PROFESSOR AVISHAI MARGALIT, Schulman Professor of Philosophy, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, will deliver the annual Isaiah Berlin Lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 22 May, in the Hall, Wolfson College. The lecture will be open to the public.

Subject: `Compromise and appeasement: between peace and justice.'


FRIENDS OF THE PITT RIVERS MUSEUM

Beatrice Blackwood Lecture

STEPHEN HUGH-JONES, Cambridge, will deliver the Beatrice Blackwood Lecture at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, 14 May, in the Inorganic Chemistry Lecture Theatre, South Parks Road. For enquiries, telephone 01491 873276.

Subject: `Pandora's box: body and cosmos in Amazonia.'


OED FORUM

The following meetings will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in Rewley House. MICHAEL RUNDLE
8 May: ` "Where do lexicographers come from?"—training lexicographers in the twenty-first century.' PROFESSOR ROGER LASS, Cape Town
22 May: `The narrative responsibilities of etymology: phonology, morphology, and spelling in a historical atlas.' FIONA DOUGLAS, Glasgow
12 June: `The Scottish Corpus of Texts and Speech (SCOTS): a new corpus for the languages of Scotland.'

Grants and Research Funding

RESEARCH SERVICES OFFICE

The Oxford University Research Services Office (RSO) is based in the University Offices, Wellington Square (with satellite offices in the Medical School Offices of the John Radcliffe Hospital and at 9 Parks Road). The RSO is part of the Finance Division of the University's central administration. In connection with the acceptance of research awards and signature of research-related contracts, the University's Statutes, section 14 of Statute XVI (Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4633, 9 October 2002, pp. 131--2), provide that `(1)...no officer of the University, or any other person employed by the University or working in or in connection with any department or body within or under the control of the University, shall have authority to make any representations on behalf of the University or to enter into any contract on behalf of the University, except with the express consent of Council. (2) No such consent given by Council shall be operative until a copy of the resolution of Council, certified by the Registrar, has been delivered to such officer or other person.' The RSO is authorised to process all applications to outside bodies for research grants and to sign research-related agreements on behalf of the University. It can also provide advice for those seeking external research funding or requiring information about specific initiatives (e.g. LINK, EU research programmes, etc.). Research-related contracts with industry and other external sponsors are negotiated through the RSO. Such contracts include agreements covering the sponsorship of research, collaborative research, clinical trials, services to industry, intellectual property issues, confidentiality issues, material transfer, and consultancy. Information about the RSO, its publications and administrative processes is available at: http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/.

Research Funding Information

The RSO produces a weekly Web-based bulletin of funding opportunities with forthcoming deadlines for applications, electronic Research Funding News (eRFN), which is available to members of the University via the internet at: http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/erfn/. Non-funding research-related information is publicised via the RSO's Web-based Bulletin Board. To receive regular e-mails summarising the contents of both these publications, please contact Ellen McAteer (see contact details below). The University also has access to various online research funding databases and other sources of research-related information, available from the Web site at: http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/information/.


Research-related information

If you would like to receive a weekly e-mail reminder summarising the contents of electronic Research Funding News, and also those of the Bulletin Board, which carries research-related news other than funding opportunities, please e-mail ellen.mcateer@admin.ox.ac.uk with the subject line `join eRFN mailing list. Please note that this service is only available to members of the University with an `ox.ac.uk' e-mail account. Ellen McAteer (telephone: (2)70082) is also the first point of contact for all research funding information queries.


Research Grant Applications

All applications for external research funding must be endorsed by the University before they are despatched to the sponsor, whether or not this is required by the funding body. In order to do this, the University requires all applications made to funding bodies (such as the research councils, government departments, UK and overseas charities and foundations, and industry) to be checked and endorsed by the RSO on behalf of the University. The reasons for this are to ensure that: —the funds requested are sufficient to cover the research being undertaken (e.g. that correct and up-to-date salary scales have been used); —the costing rules of the University have been applied correctly (e.g. that the appropriate level of indirect costs have been applied); —the guidelines of the funding body have been followed correctly (e.g. that the funds requested may be used for the purpose proposed); and that —the University would be in a position to accept the grant should the application be successful (e.g. that appropriate facilities are available to house the project, or that the proposed research does not contravene University policy). In addition, the RSO can: —advise on the factors which should be taken into consideration when costing research projects; —provide information on funding body guidelines; and —advise on the completion of the necessary application and internal forms prior to submission to the RSO's Research Grants Office (RGO). The administrative arrangements for submitting research funding applications are available from the RSO's Web site at: http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/grants/. In summary, these are as follows: applicants should submit the original plus one copy of their application, together with a completed copy of the University's Outside Grants (OG) form, to the Research Services Office, or, in the case of certain clinical departments, to the RSO satellite office at the Medical School Offices of the John Radcliffe Hospital, leaving three clear working days for it to be processed.


Application administration

Enquiries relating to the day-to-day processing of research grant applications should be addressed to the RSO's Research Grants Office (telephone: (2)70146), or, in the case of certain clinical departments, to the RSO satellite office, the Medical School Offices, Level 3, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington (telephone: (2)22544). A list of grants administrators for each department is available on the Web at: http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/oxonly/grants/deptlist.shtml.


Research Contracts

The RSO's Research Contracts Office (RCO) is responsible for negotiating and approving the terms on behalf of the University of all research-related agreements, including those governing: —sponsored or commissioned research; —collaborative research; —clinical trials; —confidentiality and non-disclosure of information; —transfer of materials; —research-related services to industry; —personal consultancy. In addition, the contracts team takes lead responsibility within the RSO for: —checking intellectual property rights and preparing the assignment of new technologies to Isis Innovation for exploitation, through licences or spin-out companies; —authorising royalty payments to inventors; —advice on matters connected with research-related contracts. The administrative arrangements for University research-related agreements are available from the RSO's Web site at: http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/contracts/.


Research-related contracts

Enquiries relating to research-related contracts should be addressed to the RSO's Research Contracts Office (telephone: (2)70039).


General enquiries

General enquiries to the RSO may be addressed, in the first instance, to Ms Sarah-Jayne Beedall (telephone: (2)70143, e-mail: sarah.beedall@admin.ox.ac.uk), who will be pleased to direct queries to the appropriate member of staff.


Information on Research Funding

The University's Research Services Office (RSO) offers the following Web-based resources for those looking for external research funding:

electronic Research Funding News (eRFN) (http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/erfn/)

This is a Web-based bulletin, updated weekly, of current research funding opportunities across all subject areas with forthcoming deadlines for applications. It includes an at-a-glance guide to deadlines and a searchable archive of previous issues. If you would like to receive a weekly e-mail reminder summarising the contents of the bulletin, please e-mail ellen.mcateer@admin.ox.ac.uk with the subject line `join eRFN mailing list'. This service is only avaiable to members of the University with an `ox.ac.uk' e-mail account. Subscribers also receive monthly updates about the contents of the RSO Bulletin Board (http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/oxonly/bboard.htm) which lists non-funding research-related information, such as details of conferences, training opportunities and changes in the policy of major research funding bodies.

Community of Science (http://fundingopps.cos.com/)

The University subscribes to the `Funding Opportunities' service offered by the Community of Science (COS). This is a fully searchable database of grant-making organisations world-wide, providing information about research funding across all subject areas. Despite the misleading title, this source of information about funding opportunities also covers the social sciences and humanities. This service may be accessed by any member of the University with an `ox.ac.uk' e-mail account.

Online research funding and information resources (http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/information/)

This page on the RSO Web site collects together links to COS and other online databases and information services to which the University has access. These services provide information about current research funding opportunities and sponsors. If you would like more information about these or any other services provided via the RSO, please visit its Web site at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/, or contact Ellen McAteer, Research Funding Information Officer (telephone: (2)70082. e- mail: ellen.mcateer@admin.ox.ac.uk).


SIR JOHN HICKS FUND

The Committee for the Sir John Hicks Fund invites applications from members of the University for grants towards the costs of research in economic history. Applications will be considered from undergraduates, graduate students, and members of the academic staff, and may relate to research into the economic history of any period or country. Applicants should (a) provide sufficient information about the general nature of their research to establish that it falls within the field of economic history; and (b) specify the precise nature and cost of the expenditure for which a grant is requested. They should also give the name of one referee who might be consulted by the committee. It is intended by the committee that grants should normally be made for sums of up to £250, though this may on occasion be exceeded. Retrospective grants will be made only in exceptional circumstances. The committee will consider applications twice each year. The closing date for the first round is Monday of the third week of Hilary Term, and for the second round Monday of the third week of Trinity Term. Applications should be sent to the Secretary of the Committee for the Sir John Hicks Fund, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford.


OXFORD ITALIAN ASSOCIATION

Grants to promote Italian culture

The Oxford Italian Association is offering modest top-up grants, not normally of more than £100 in order to assist graduate students and others to promote aspects of Italian culture in Oxford. Such grants may be used, for instance, to help stage an Italian play, to contribute to research expenses (including travel in Italy), and other activities which the committee judge to be of value in this area. Applications, with a brief account of the project and if possible a supporting note from a tutor, should be sent by 31 May to Professor J.R. Woodhouse, Magdalen College, Oxford OX1 4AU. Applications received after that date may be considered for future grants.

Examinations and Boards

ELECTIONS TO DIVISIONAL BOARDS 5 June

  Vacancies Period from MT 2003
Humanities Board Two from among the members of the Faculty of English  
  (retiring member: Professor Hudson) 4 years
  (retiring member: Dr Birch) 2 years
  One from among the members of the Faculty of Classics (retiring member: Professor Morpurgo Davies) 4 years
  One from among the members of the Faculty of Music (retiring member: Dr Franklin) 4 years
  One from among the members of the Faculty of Theology (retiring member: Canon Williams) 4 years
  One from among the members of the Faculty of Philosophy (retiring member: Dr Child) 2 years
Life and Environmental Sciences Board One from among the members of the School of Anthropology (retiring member: Dr Boyce) 4 Years
  One from among the members of a faculty or sub- faculty working in the Department of Plant Sciences (retiring member: Professor Leaver) 4 years
  Two from among the members of the sub-faculty of Geography  
  (retiring member: Dr Pallot) 2 years
  (retiring member: Professor Goudie) 1 year
Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board Two from among the members of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences working in the Computing Laboratory
  (retiring member: Professor Bird) 4 years
  (retiring member: Professor Trefethen) 3 years
  One from among the members of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences working in the Mathematical Institute (retiring member: Professor Hitchin) 4 years
  One from among the members of the Sub-faculty of Chemistry (retiring member: Dr Brown) 4 years
  One from among the members of the Sub-faculty of Materials (retiring member: Professor Smith) 4 years
  One from among the members of the Sub-faculty of Physics (retiring member: Professor Burnett) 4 years
Medical Sciences Board One from among the members of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine (retiring member: Professor Barlow) 4 years
  Four from among the members of the Faculty of Physiological Sciences and the Sub-faculty of Psychology  
  (retiring members: Professor Davies and Professor Smith) 4 years
  (retiring member: Professor Gordon) 2 years
  (retiring member: Professor Ellory) 1 year
Social Sciences Board Two from among the members of the Faculty of Law  
  (retiring member: Ms Kennedy) 4 years
  (retiring member: Dr Whittaker) 1 year
  One from among the members of the Faculty of Social Studies (retiring member: Professor Hendry) 4 years
  Two from among the members of the academic staff holding established posts in the Department of Educational Studies  
  (retiring member: Professor Sylva) 4 years
  (retiring member: Professor Pring) 3 years
  One from among certain postholders and senior member affiliated to Queen Elizabeth House (retiring member: Professor Stewart) 1 year

Where it is specified in the above list that the candidates must be from among certain persons "working in" a department or other institution, both the candidates and the electors must be persons so working at the time of the election. Nominations in writing for the elections on 5 June, by two members (other than the candidate) of the electorate for each vacancy, which is the same as the persons from among whom the vacancy will be filled (as specified above), will be received by the Head Clerk at the University Offices, Wellington Square, up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 12 May, and similar nominations by six members of the electorate other than the candidate, up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 19 May. Council has decided that nominations should show for each signatory the name and faculty, sub-faculty, or department (indicative of the relevant electorate) in block capitals. Any names which are not so shown may not be published. At least one nomination in respect of each candidate must be made on an official nomination form. Copies of the form are obtainable from Bekki Gibbs in the General Office (telephone: (2)80179; e-mail: Rebecca.Gibbs@admin.ox.ac.uk). In the event of a contested election, a brief biographical notice of each candidate will be published in the Gazettedated 29 May, and voters may wish to wait until they have read these notes before returning their ballot papers (which will be sent out to members of the electorate as soon as possible after the closing date for nominations, and which, after completion, must be received by the Head Clerk not later than 4 p.m. on 5 June).


NOMINATIONS

The following nominations have been duly received:

Humanities Board

From among the members of the Faculty of English L.G. BLACK, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Oriel

Nominated by: M.R. Godden, Pembroke
H. O'Donoghue, Linacre

From among the members of the Faculty of Classics C.B.R. PELLING, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of University

Nominated by: P.G.M. Brown, Trinity
O.P. Taplin, Magdalen

From among the members of the Faculty of Music P.R. FRANKLIN, MA, Fellow of St Catherine's

Nominated by: O.L. Rees, Queen's
R.L.A. Saxton, Worcester

From among the members of the Faculty of Philosophy R.L. JUDSON, MA, D.PHIL., Student of Christ Church

Nominated by: J.R. Broome, Corpus Christi
H.R. Brown, Wolfson

From among the members of the Faculty of Theology THE REVD. J.B. MUDDIMAN, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Mansfield

Nominated by: R.A. Cross, Oriel
C.M. Jones, St Peter's
P.M. Joyce, St Peter's
D.N.J. MacCulloch, St Cross
P.J.M. Southwell, Queen's
Revd Canon T.S.M. Williams, Trinity
Medical Sciences Board


Life and Environmental Sciences Board

From among the members of the School of Anthropology D.J. PARKIN, MA, Fellow of All Souls

Nominated by: M.J. Banks, Wolfson
C.E. Harris, Magdalen

From among the members of a faculty or sub-faculty working in the Department of Plant Sciences C.J. LEAVER, CBE, MA, Fellow of St John's

Nominated by: N.J. Kruger, St Cross
J.A.C. Smith, Magdalen

From among the members of the sub-faculty of Geography H.A. VILES, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Worcester

Nominated by: R. Bailey, Geography
M.C. Bourke, Geography
A.S. Goudie, Hertford
M.G. New, Geography
S. Stokes, St Catherine's
L.S. Wild, St Hilda's


Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board

From among the members of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences working in the Computing Laboratory

1. M.B. GILES, MA, Fellow of St Hugh's
2. A.W. ROSCOE, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of University

Nominated by: R.S. Bird, Lincoln
L.N. Trefethen, Balliol

From among the members of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences working in the Mathematical Institute J.M. BALL, MA, Fellow of Queen's

Nominated by: N.J. Hitchin, New College
N.M.J. Woodhouse, Wadham

From among the members of the Sub-faculty of Chemistry J. KLEIN, MA, Fellow of Exeter

Nominated by: R.G. Compton, St John's

W.G. Richards, Brasenose

From among the members of the Sub-faculty of Materials G.D.W. SMITH, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Trinity

Nominated by: A. Cerezo, Wolfson
A.K. Petford-Long, Corpus Christi

From among the members of the Sub-faculty of Physics K. BURNETT, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St John's

Nominated by: S. Cooper, St Catherine's
G.B. Dalton, Worcester
R.C.E. Devenish, Hertford
C.J. Foot, St Peter's
A.M. Steane, Exeter
R.A. Taylor, Queen's


Medical Sciences Board

From among the members of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine D.H. BARLOW, MA, Fellow of Oriel

Nominated by: J.I. Bell, Magdalen
P.F. Chamberlain, Merton
S.T. Kehoe, St Peter's
S.H. Kennedy, Green College
I.Z. Mackenzie, St Hugh's
H.J. Mardon, St Catherine's From among the members of the Faculty of Physiological Sciences and the Sub-faculty of Psychology 1. J.F. MORRIS, MA, Fellow of St Hugh's

Nominated by: J.I. Bell, Magdalen
Dame Fiona Caldicott, Principal of Somerville
H.M. Charlton, Linacre
K.E. Davies, Hertford
J.C. Ellory, Corpus Christi
S. Gordon, Exeter
S.J. Goss, Wadham
A.D. Smith, Magdalen 2. A. J. PARKER, MA, Fellow of St John's

Nominated by: C.C. Ashley, Corpus Christi
C.B. Blakemore, Magdalen
K.L. Dorrington, University
J.C. Ellory, Corpus Christi
T. Powell, New College
P.A. Robbins, Queen's 3. A.D. SMITH, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall

Nominated by: A.F. Brading, Lady Margaret Hall
N.J. Emptage, Lincoln
A. Galione, Exeter
J. Parrington, Worcester
E. Sim, St Peter's
D.A. Terrar, Worcester 4. H. WALDMANN, MA, Fellow of Lincoln

Nominated by: P.R. Cook, Lincoln
S. Gordon, Exeter


Social Sciences Board

From among the members of the Faculty of Law 1. A.S. KENNEDY, MA, Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall

Nominated by: K.O. Hawkins, Oriel
M.R.T. MacNair, St Hugh's
M.J. Spence, St Catherine's
R.H. Stevens, Lady Margaret Hall
R.H.S. Tur, Oriel
D. Vaver, St Peter's 2. R.H. STEVENS, BCL, MA, Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall

Nominated by: A.J. Ashworth, All Souls
M. Chen-Wishart, Merton
A.C.L. Davies, Brasenose
E.C. Fisher, Corpus Christi
J.A. Freedman, Worcester
M.J. Spence, St Catherine's From among the members of the academic staff holding established posts in the Department of Educational Studies

1. J. FURLONG, Fellow of Green College

Nominated by: G.J. Corney, St Anne's
C.W.R. Davies, Kellogg
H.R. Hagger, Kellogg
T.A. Mutton, Educational Studies
A.E. Pendry, St Cross
G. Walford, Green College

2. K.D. SYLVA, MA, Fellow of Jesus

Nominated by: A.C. Childs, Lady Margaret Hall
C.W.R. Davies, Kellogg
J. Furlong, Green College
E. Macaro, Worcester
D.G. Phillips, St Edmund Hall
G. Walford, Green College

From among certain postholders and senior members affiliated to Queen Elizabeth House T.R. THORP, MA, Fellow of St Antony's

Nominated by: E.V.K. Fitzgerald, St Antony's
F.J. Stewart, Somerville


There having been no nominations, the following vacancies have lapsed to the Vice-Chancellor and Proctors:
Humanities Board One from among the members of the Faculty of English
(retiring member: Dr Birch)
2 years
Life and Environmental Sciences Board One from among the members of the Sub-faculty of Geography
(retiring member: Professor Goudie)
1 year
Social Sciences Board One from among the members of the Faculty of Social Studies
(retiring member: Professor Hendry)
4 years

 


ELECTIONS TO FACULTY BOARDS 5 June

Faculty Board Vacancies Retiring Members Period from MT 2003
Classics      
From among the members of the Sub-faculty of Ancient History One Dr A.K. Bowman 2 years
From among the members of the Sub- faculty of Classical Languages and Literature One Professor O.P. Taplin 2 years
English Language and Literature      
Official members Four Dr R.L. Bush, Dr S.C. Gill, Dr A.M. Hudson, Dr K. Sutherland 2 years
Ordinary members Six Dr D.L. Birch, Dr C.D. Brewer, Dr T.E. Keymer, Dr R.A. McCabe, Mr J.B. O'Donoghue, Dr A. Pasternak Slater 2 years
Law      
Official members Four Professor D.J. Galligan, Professor A.V. Lowe, Professor D. Vaver, Professor S.R. Weatherill 2 years
Ordinary members Seven A. Briggs, Dr K.D. Grevling, R.H. Stevens, W.J. Swadling, Dr R.P. Young, Dr L.H. Zedner, A.A.S. Zuckerman 2 years
  One Dr S.J. Whittaker 1 year
Management      
From among the members of the Faculty of Management Two R. Undy, Dr R. Whittington 2 years
Modern History      
Elected members Nine W.J. Blair, Dr R.J.A.I. Catto, Professor R. Fox, Dr E.T. Garnett, Dr K.J. Humphries, Professor H.F.A. Strachan, Professor J.M. Brown, Dr M. Whittow, Dr J.M. Wormald 2 years
Music      
Ordinary members Three Dr B. Bujic, Dr O.L. Rees, Dr S.L.F. Wollenberg 2 years
Oriental Studies      
Official members Four Dr J.R. Baines, Professor M.D. Goodman, Dr C.D. Holes, Dr G.J.H. van Gelder 2 years
Ordinary members Six Dr J.W. Benson, L. Forbes, Dr R.J. Goodman, Dr P.T. Harries, Dr J. Johns, C.J. Kerslake 2 years
Philosophy      
From among the members of the Faculty of Philosophy Three Professor J.R. Broome, Dr T.W. Child, Dr R.S. Crisp 2 years
  One Dr E.M. Fricker 1 year
Theology      
Official Members Three Dr O.M.T. O'Donovan, Dr C.C. Rowland, Professor J.H. Brooke 2 years
Ordinary members Five Dr J. Day, Dr P.S. Fiddes, Dr J.B. Muddiman, Dr T.G. Weinandy, T.S.M. Williams 2 years

Qualification for official and ordinary membership of Faculty Board is set out in Regulation 7 of Council Regulations 19 of 2002 (26 June 2002, www.admin.ox.ac.uk/statutes). Those entitled to vote in these elections are:

(a) for official members, all the members of the faculty concerned, and

(b) for ordinary members, the membership of the faculty concerned, exclusive of those qualified to be official members of the faculty board. Nominations in writing by two electors will be received by the Head Clerk, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD up to 4 p.m. on Monday 12 May, and by six electors up to 4 p.m. on Monday 19 May. There is no special form but, in addition to the signatures of nominators, nominations must state, in block capitals, the name and initials, and college (or, if no college, the department) of (1) each person nominated, and

(2) each nominator.

Note: Under the provisions of Regulation 14 of Council Regulations 19 of 2002 (26 June 2002, www.admin.ox.ac.uk/statutes), the electors of ordinary members of the following boards of faculties have directed by by-law that no ordinary member shall be eligible to serve for more than three successive periods of two years: English Language and Literature, Law, Oriental Studies.


NOMINATIONS

The following nominations have been duly received:

Classics

From among the members of the Sub-faculty of Ancient History A.K. BOWMAN, MA, Fellow of Brasenose

Nominated by: E.H. Bispham, Brasenose
N. Purcell, St John's

From among the members of the Sub-faculty of Classical Languages and Literature C.B.R. PELLING, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of University

Nominated by: P.G.M. Brown, Trinity
G.O. Hutchinson, Exeter


English Language and Literature

Official members

1. P.D. GILES, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Linacre

2. H. LEE, MA, M.PHIL., Fellow of New College

3. D. NORBROOK, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Merton

4. K. SUTHERLAND, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Anne's

Nominated by: M.R. Godden, Pembroke
S. Mapstone, St Hilda's

Ordinary members

1. R.A. McCABE, MA, Fellow of Merton

2. E.A.I. PASTERNAK-SLATER, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Anne's

Nominated by: S.L. Mapstone, St Hilda's
J.B. O'Donoghue, Wadham

3. E.J. SMITH, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Hertford

Nominated by: C.D. Brewer, Hertford
S.A. Eltis, Brasenose


Law

Official members

1. D.J. GALLIGAN, MA, BCL, DCL, Fellow of Wolfson

2. D. VAVER, MA, Fellow of St Peter's

3. S.R. WEATHERILL, MA, Fellow of Somerville

Ordinary members

1. G.I. LAMOND, MA, BCL, D.PHIL., Fellow of Balliol

2. L. LAZARUS, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Anne's

3. J.C. McCRUDDEN, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Lincoln

4. W.E. PEEL, BCL, MA, Fellow of Keble

5. R.H. STEVENS, BCL, MA, Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall

6. W.J. SWADLING, MA, Fellow of Brasenose

7. R.P. YOUNG, MA, Fellow of Pembroke

8. A.A.S. ZUCKERMAN, MA, Fellow of University

Nominated by: J.M. Eekelaar, Pembroke
D.D. Prentice, Pembroke


Management

1. I.J. KESSLER, MA, Fellow of Templeton

 

2. D.P. TSOMOCOS, MA, Fellow of St Edmund Hall

Nominated by: A.G. Hopwood, Christ Church
T.J. Jenkinson, Keble
S.J. New, Hertford
M. Sako, Templeton
V.F.P. Seidel, Trinity
T. Suzuki, Hertford
J.W. Taylor, St Cross


Modern History

Elected members 1. L.J. ABRAMS, MA, Fellow of Balliol

Nominated by: J.I. Catto, Oriel
G.J. Ellis, Hertford
E.J. Garnett, Wadham
M.J. Kemp, Trinity
M.G.A. Vale, St John's
J.L. Watts, Corpus Christi 2. J.M. BROWN, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Balliol

Nominated by: P.B.R. Carey, Trinity
J.G. Darwin, Nuffield

3. N.S. DAVIDSON, MA, Fellow of St Edmund Hall

Nominated by: C.C.L. Andreyev, Christ Church
T.C. Barnard, Hertford
S.E. Brigden, Lincoln
G.J. Ellis, Hertford
R.F. Foster, Hertford
C.J. Tyerman, Hertford

4. R. FOX, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Linacre

Nominated by: R. Briggs, All Souls
M.H. Pelling, Linacre

5. E.J. GARNETT, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Wadham

6. J.F. HARRIS, MA, Fellow of St Catherine's

Nominated by: P.R. Ghosh, St Anne's
J.M. Innes, Somerville 7. M.G.A. VALE, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St John's

Nominated by: J.I. Catto, Oriel
G.J. Ellis, Hertford
E.J. Garnett, Wadham
G.A. Johnson, History of Art
M.J. Kemp, Trinity
J.L. Watts, Corpus Christi
8. M. WHITTOW, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Peter's

Nominated by: J.I. Catto, Oriel
G.J. Ellis, Hertford
E.J. Garnett, Wadham
M.J. Kemp, Trinity
M.G.A. Vale, St John's
J.L. Watts, Corpus Christi


Music

Ordinary members

1. S.E. CLARK, MA, Fellow of Merton

2. O.L. REES, MA, Fellow of Queen's

3. S.L.F. WOLLENBERG, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall

Nominated by: B. Bujic, Magdalen
R.L.A. Saxton, Worcester


Oriental Studies

Official members

1. J.R. BAINES, MA, D.PHIL, Fellow of Queen's

2. S. SUBRAHMANYAM, MA, Fellow of St Cross

3. G.J.H. VAN GELDER, MA, Fellow of St John's

4. T.M. VAN LINT, Fellow of Pembroke

Ordinary members

1. J.A. BLACK, B.PHIL, MA, D.PHIL, Fellow of Wolfson

2. R.L. CHARD, MA, Fellow of St Anne's

3. L.E. FORBES, MA, Fellow of St Cross

4. B.M. FRELLESVIG, MA, Fellow of Hertford

5. J. JOHNS, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Wolfson

6. C.J. KERSLAKE, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Antony's

Nominated by: P.T. Harries, Queen's College
C. F. Robinson, Wolfson


Philosophy

From among the members of the Faculty of Philosophy For two years from Michaelmas Term 2003: 1. S.J. HOEKSTRA, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Balliol 2. S.J. MULHALL, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of New College 3. J. SAVULESCU, MA, Fellow of St Cross For one year from Michaelmas Term 2003: 4. W.H. NEWTON-SMITH, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Balliol

Nominated by: J.R. Broome, Corpus Christi
H.R. Brown, Wolfson
M. Frede, Keble
D.R. Isaacson, Wolfson
A.W. Moore, St Hugh's
T. Williamson, New College


Theology

Official members

1. J.H. BROOKE, MA, Fellow of Harris Manchester

Nominated by: T.J. Mawson, St Peter's
H.M.R.E. Mayr-Harting, Christ Church

2. O.M.T. O'DONOVAN, MA, D.PHIL., Canon of Christ Church

Nominated by: C.M. Jones, St Peter's
J.S.K. Ward, Christ Church

3. C.C. ROWLAND, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Queen's

Nominated by: P.M. Joyce, St Peter's
J.B. Webster, Christ Church

Ordinary members

1. J. DAY, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall

Nominated by: R.A. Cross, Oriel
P.M. Joyce, St Peter's

2. M.J. EDWARDS, MA, D.PHIL., Student of Christ Church

Nominated by: C.M. Jones, St Peter's
P.J.M. Southwell, Wycliffe Hall

3. J.B. MUDDIMAN, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Mansfield

Nominated by: R.C. Morgan, Linacre
C.M. Tuckett, Pembroke

4. T.G. WEINANDY, MA, Warden of Greyfriars

Nominated by: C.M. Jones, St Peter's
P.J.M. Southwell, Wycliffe Hall

5. T.S.M. WILLIAMS, MA, Fellow of Trinity

Nominated by: C.M. Jones
R.A. Cross


There having been no nominations, the following vacancies have lapsed to the Vice-Chancellor and Proctors:
Faculty Board Vacancies Period from MT 2003
English Three (Ordinary members) 2 years
Law One (Official member) 2 years
Modern History One (Official member) 2 years

CHAIRMEN OF EXAMINERS

EASTER VACATION

Bachelor and Certificate Examinations in Theology

THE REVD E. DOWLER, MA, Tutor and Director, St Stephen's House


TRINITY TERM

Preliminary Examination

Engineering Science: C.P. BUCKLEY, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Balliol


Final Honour Schools

Ancient and Modern History: R. FOWLER, Oriel Economics and Management: A.S. COURAKIS, MA, Fellow of Brasenose Engineering Science Parts I and II: S.J. SHEARD, MA, Fellow of Trinity Engineering and Computing Science Parts I and II: P.J. PROBERT SMITH, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall Engineering, Economics, and Management Parts I and II: R.W. DANIEL, MA (PH.D.), Fellow of Brasenose Engineering and Materials Parts I and II E.P. RAYNES, MA, Fellow of St Cross English and Modern Languages: T. KEYMER, MA, Fellow of St Anne's English Language and Literature, Course II: V.D. CUNNINGHAM, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Corpus Christi Geography: P.A. BULL, MA, Fellow of Hertford Literae Humaniores: R.L. JUDSON, MA, D.PHIL., Student of Christ Church Materials, Economics, and Management Part I: A.K. PETFORD-LONG, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Corpus Christi Materials, Economics, and Management Part II: J.T. CZERNUSZKA, MA (PH.D.), Fellow of Trinity Mathematics, four-year course, Part II: L. MASON, MA, D.PHIL., St Peter's Mathematics and Philosophy Part II: J. LOGUE, B.PHIL., MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Somerville Modern History and Economics: R.G. KELLER, MA, M.SC., D.PHIL., Fellow of Hertford Modern History and English: J.M. INNES, MA, Fellow of Somerville Modern History and Modern Languages (three- and four-year courses): C.A. HOLMES, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall Modern History and Politics: M.D. DEAS, OBE, MA, Faculty Fellow of St Antony's Modern Languages (three- and four-year courses): N.F. PALMER, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Edmund Hall Natural Science Biological Sciences: P.S. SAVILL, MA (PH.D.), Fellow of Linacre Chemistry Part I: J.H. JONES, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Balliol Chemistry Part II: A.F. ORCHARD, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of University Earth Sciences Part A (Geology): D.J. WATERS, MA, D.PHIL, Fellow of St Cross Earth Sciences Part B (four-year options): D.J. WATERS, Fellow of St Cross Metallurgy and Science of Materials Part I: A.K. PETFORD-LONG, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Corpus Christi Metallurgy and Science of Materials Part II: J.T. CZERNUSZKA, MA (PH.D.), Fellow of Trinity Physiological Sciences: C.A.R. BOYD, B.SC., MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Brasenose Oriental Studies: M.J. SMITH, Fellow of University Philosophy and Modern Languages: J.C. SMITH, MA, Fellow of St Catherine's Philosophy and Theology: R.A. CROSS, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Oriel Physics (Part A) (three- and four-year courses), and Part B (four-year course): E.J. WILLIAMSON, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Cross Physics and Philosophy (Part B): H.R. BROWN, MA, Fellow of Wolfson Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology: B.J. ROGERS, MA, Lecturer status, Pembroke Theology: R.A. CROSS, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Oriel


Bachelor of Medicine

Year 3: R.V. THAKKER, MA, MD, Fellow of Somerville


Master of Philosophy

Eastern Christian Studies: S.P. BROCK, MA, D.PHIL., Wolfson College English Studies, Courses (i) and (ii): A.M. HUDSON, MA, D.PHIL.., Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography: P.K. DRESCH, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St John's Modern European History (Years 1 and 2): R.J.W. EVANS, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Oriel Social Anthropology: P.K. DRESCH, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St John's


Master of Science

Biology (Integrative Bioscience): P.W.H. HOLLAND, MA (PH.D.), Fellow of Merton Environmental Change and Management: J. BOARDMAN (PH.D.), Research Fellow of Green College Forced Migration: D. CHATTY (BA, D.PHIL. UCLA), Fellow of St Cross Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography: P.K. DRESCH, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St John's Medical Anthropology: P.K. DRESCH, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St John's Social Anthropology: P.K. DRESCH, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St John's


Master of Studies

Music (Musicology): P.R. FRANLIN, MA, Fellow of St Catherine's

Colleges, Halls, and Societies

OBITUARIES

Christ Church

WILLIAM BASIL HILLS, 19 March 2003; commoner 1934. Aged 86. BARRINGTON MILNER, 28 March 2003; commoner 1957. Aged 63.

Corrigendum

Due to a misunderstanding, an obituary notice for Mr Cecil Grattan de Courcy-Wheeler was published in the Gazette of 13 February (p. 792). The notice incorrectly stated that Mr de Courcy-Wheeler had died on 18 March 2001. The college apologises to Mr de Courcy-Wheeler for this most regrettable error.


Lady Margaret Hall

MRS MARY ISABEL LUSK (née Forrester-Paton), 29 March 2003; History 1942–5. Aged 79.

Advertisements

Global Retreat Centre

Through the Brain Barrier–a conversation on the mysteries of the mind, with Prof. Colin Blakemore, Dadi Janki and Dr Peter Fenwick, interwoven with music by harpist Gwyneth Wentink. 7 May, 7.30 p.m.–9.30 p.m., Sheldonian Theatre, Broad St. Free event. Admission by ticket only. Tickets can be obtained in person from The Sheldonian Theatre, Mon.,–Fri., 10 a.m.–12 noon, or from The Global Retreat Centre, Nuneham Park, Nuneham Courtenay, Mon.,–Sun., 9 a.m.–8 p.m. Tel.: 01865 343551. Proof of identity required, maximum 2 tickets per person.


Society for Graduates

Trinity Term 2003: meetings are held on Fridays at 8 p.m. in Wadham College, Parks Road. Visitors are welcome. Graduates of any university and of all ages are eligible for membership.President, Anita Segar, 01865 730574. Subscriptions: Members £5 per term, Visitors £1.50 per meeting.2 May, A Year at Batsford Arboretum, Sue Burn, Education Officer, Batsford Arboretum; 9 May, RAF Falcons Parachute Display Team, Graham Liggins, Manager RAF Sports Parachute Association, RAF Weston-on-the-Green; 16 May, Sailing up the River Gambia, Eleanor Tims, Ocean Yachtmaster; 23 May, Operating with the RAF–with some personal reminiscences, Air Cdre LGP Martin CBE; 30 May, A home for Valier: some impressions of Nagora Karabakh (Caucasus), Philip Clayton; 6 June, Homage to Varanasi–a pilgrimage to Benares, Pratima Mitchell; 13 June, Bugworld, George McGavin, Acting Curator of Entomology, OU Museum of Natural History; 20 June, AGM & Social, tba.


St Giles Thursday Lunchime Talks

Burning Issues: 8 May, The Qualities of Conflict, Frances Stewart, Professor of Development Economics/Director QEH; 15 May, Cultural Conflict and Political Instability, Dr ahmed Al-Shahi, St Antony's; 22 May, Christianity's Current Predicament, Rev'd Dr Philip Kennedy, Mansfield College; 29 May, Growth Problems in Oxfordshire, Lord Bradshaw, Wolfson College. The talks will be held in St Giles' Church, 12.30 p.m. Everyone is welcome. In order to help us with our costs, a small donation would be appreciated. Web site: www.st-giles-church.org.


Oxford University Research Staff Society

The Research Staff Society (RSS) membership consists of Post- doctoral/Junior Research Fellows and Research Assistants who work for the University of Oxford. As most Research Staff are not attached to a college and may be new to Oxford our social events provide a unique opportunity to meet researchers outside your group or department. We aim to provide an interesting and varying social setting in which to mix and to become a voice for research staff within the University. We run social events each month to suit all tastes. Please visit our Web site http://users.ox.ac.uk/~rss/, which provides information on how to join the society as well as details on events which we will be running in the near future. We hope you will decide to join us and very much look forward to meeting you at one of our events this year.


Oxford University Newcomers' Club

The Club welcomes the wives and partners of visiting scholars, graduate students, and members of the University who are new to Oxford. It aims to offer help, advice, information, andthe opportunity to meet each other socially. Informal coffee mornings are held at 13, Norham Gardens every Wed., 10.30–12 noon. Other activities in the club room include the Craft Group, Book Group, and informal Conversation Group. Newcomers with children (0--4 years) meet every Fri. in term, 10.15 a.m.--12 noon. We organise tours of colleges and museums, visits to places of interest, country walks, and outings to gardens and antique shops. Secondhand items can be bought on Wed. mornings from the basement. Visit our Web site on www.ox.ac.uk/staff.


Antiques Bought and Sold

Antiques and decorative objects bought and sold: desks and library furniture always wanted, also garden stonework. Please call: Greenway Antiques, 90 Corn Street, Witney, Oxon. Open Mon.,–Fri., 9.30 a.m.–5 p.m., Sat., 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Tel.: 01993 705026, mobile: 07831 585014.


Restoration and Conservation of Antique Furniture

John Hulme undertakes all aspects of restoration: 30 years experience; collection and delivery. For free advice, telephone or write to: The Workshop, 11A High Street, Chipping Norton, Oxon. OX7 5AD. Tel.: 01608 641692.


Periodicals Bought and Sold

Back-issues of scholarly periodicals and journals bought and sold. Graham Jeffrey, Periodicals (est. 1967), 29 Cuddesdon Road, Horspath, Oxford, OX33 1JD. Tel.: 01865 872528, fax: 776398. E-mail: gjeffreysatu@aol.com.


Services Offered

Spring pruning and planting of shrubs and perennials for the four seasons. Jeanne Bliss landscape designer and lecturer, Oxford and California. Leaflet tel.: 01865 515379, e-mail: jeannebliss@yahoo.com.

Homeopathy: experienced, well-qualified homeopath offers help in both chronic and acute conditions, mental and physical. Home and workplace visits available. Special service for travellers–including e-mail support. Spanish, French and Urdu spoken. Contact Karima Brooke on 01865 201438.

Indexing: Oxford Academic Services; indexing, project management, history research projects. Details of all services: judith@history.u-net.com, or Judith Loades, P.O.Box 323, Burford, Oxon. OX18 4XN.

Big or small, we ship it all, plus free pick up anywhere in Oxford. Also 24-hour photocopying, private mailing addresses (24-hour access, and mail forwarding world-wide), binding, fax bureau, colour photocopying, mailing services, and much more. Contact or visit Mail Boxes Etc., 266 Banbury Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 514655, fax: 514656, e-mail: summertown@020.mbe.uk.com, also at: 94 London Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 741729, fax: 01865 742431, e-mail: staff@mbeheadington.co.uk.

Town and Country Trees: arboricultural contractors; modern arboricultural techniques; local authority approved; safeguarded by full Public Liability insurance. Free advice and quotations. Tel.: 0845 458 2980 or 07976 261850 (mobile).


Domestic Services

Blue House, a small, intimate nursery for children 2–5 years, established 10 years. Open Mon.–Fri., 8.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m., full or half-days. NNEB staff. All pre-school activities inc. numeracy and literacy skills to prepare children for school entry. Short-term vacancies for visiting academics. Call Kimberley for further information, or come to visit. Tel.: 01865 247877.

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: 01865 726983 or 01235 555533.


Academic Study and Travel

Short Study Tour of the Welsh Marches, 22-24 Aug. £185 p.p. Day schools on Enigma and the Intelligence War at Bletchley Park, 11 Oct., and 22 Nov. For further details of these and other events contact Academic Study and Travel, 14 Walton Grange, Bath Road, Swindon SN1 4AH.


Tuition Offered

Painting Workshop in Florence: spend an exciting month painting and drawing in an air-conditioned studio with internationally acclaimed artist, Philippa Blair. 4–22 Aug., 2003. Combining Plein aire and Studio Painting, places still available. Tuition: US $1,800/£1,139. Accommodation starting at $750/£500 per person. Contact August Program Director, Dan Welden. E-mail: solarplate@aol.com. Web site: www.fionline.it/santareparata/welden.html.


Situations Vacant

Christ Church Cathedral School (www.cccs.org.uk): Registrar, required from June 2003. This is an historic boys' preparatory school which has experienced sustained growth and the new Registrar will play an important role in continuing the success. We are seeking a candidate with excellent personal and administrative skills, as well as an understanding of education, and clear market awareness. The post is full time for 40 weeks p.a. (including school terms). Applications with CV and contact details of 2 referees should be sent by 9 May to: The Headmaster, CCCS, 3 Brewer Street, Oxford OX1 1QW. Tel.: 01865 242561 (e-mail: schooloffice@cccs.org.uk) from whom further details are available. Interviews are likely to be on Tuesday 20 May.

The Examination Schools: Temporary Room and Office Assistants. We are looking for a team of people to work full time (8.30 a.m.–6.30 p.m.), incl. some Sats., for a 6 week period in Trinity Term to cover the exam season (19 May–27 June), with a possible extension to 11 July 2003. Office assistants will be required to deal with all aspects of office administration. Room assistants will be required to work either at the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford or at Ewert House Examination Hall, Summertown, Oxford. If you have a preference please state this clearly in your covering letter. The duties include setting up examination rooms, tidying up between sessions, laying out script booklets and exam materials, and delivering packages in central Oxford. If you would like to apply please send a C.V. and covering letter to the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG. For further information phone the Deputy Clerk (Building) on 01865 276905.

The Examination Schools: Invigilators. We are looking for reliable individuals to add to our Register of Invigilators. Work is on a temporary basis during the main exam period which starts this year on 19 May and finishes on 27 June. There are openings to work on either a session basis, where you invigilate individual exam sessions based on your availability, or on a block booking basis. A block (half-days) booking option requires a commitment to work one of the following: full time for the 6 week exam period; specific weeks during the exam period; specific days in the week during the exam period. These options can be discussed in more details with the Deputy Clerk of Schools (Exams). The work involves laying out of question papers, completing relevant paperwork and invigilating during the examination session. The majority of exam papers are 3 hours duration which require an invigilation session of approximately 4 hours (morning session: 9.00 to 13.00, afternoon session: 14.00 to 18.00). The payment details for a standard invigilator working a 4 hour sessions are as follows: 4 hr session (for 3 hr papers) £27. There are opportunities for suitable invigilators to act as the senior invigilator at a higher rate of pay. If you are interested please send a C.V. and covering letter to the Deputy Clerk of Schools (Exams), Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG.


Summer Let

Delightful Victorian 3-bedroom house in central north Oxford conservation area; fully furnished and renovated; sunny garden; private parking; 2 receptions;kitchen diner; all mod cons. Close to city centre and university. No smokers. £450 p.w. June–Sept.(negotiable). Tel.: 01865 554743. E-mail: kay.millar@virgin.net.


Houses to Let

Superb, furnished 3-bedroom detached house in nearer Headington, available mid-Aug.,–mid-April. Spacious floor plan with living room, dining room, family room, fully fitted kitchen with washer and drier; charming secluded garden with greenhouse and shed; off-street parking. Walk to John Radcliffe hospital, shops, country walks, with easy access to city and colleges. £1,100 p.c.m. Tel.: 01865 741 024.

St Clements townhouse: fully furnished and equipped 3-storey house with superb views of University Parks and river; living room; fully fitted kitchen with dining area; 3 equal sized bedrooms; bathroom (with shower);parking. Excellent location for city centre. Available May, £1,240 p.c.m. For more information please contact Anna Turner at Finders Keepers, 27 St Clements, Oxford OX1 4AB. Tel.: 01865 200012 or e- mail: annat@finders.co.uk, or visit our Web site: www.finders.co.uk.

St Stephen's House (adjacent) Marston St., between Iffley Road and Cowley Road. Spacious, unfurnished, modern family house in attractive terrace: 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, playroom, double garage, garden. Available short let from May. suit academic with family. £1,750 p.m. E-mail: jeremy.sheehy@theology.ox.ac.uk or tel.: 01865 432302.

1 Dec.,2003–2 Jan., 2004: 7-bedroom house in North Oxford, suitable for a family. Well-appointed kitchen and facilities; 2 bathrooms and an additional separate toilet. Large garden and off-road parking. close to the Cherwell River and water meadows; 5 minute bus ride to the city centre, or a 15 minute walk across University Parks. Tel.: 01865 514568, e-mail: paul@kenelm.fsnet.co.uk.

Temple Cowley: newly renovated house to let, 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, completely refurbished throughout, quiet location. £775 p.c.m. Tel.: 01865 711415.

Attractive 4 bedroom, 18th-century house to rent in the pretty small town of Charlbury, 15 miles from Oxford but trains are frequent. Journey takes 15 minutes. Available for 1 year from early July 2003. Rent £800 p.c.m. Furniture negotiable. Suitable for family or couple wanting access to countryside and the Cotswolds. Phone 01608 811398 or e-mail: markgregory@gn.apc.org.

Make finding accommodation easy. Finders Keepers have a dedicated approach to helping you find the right property. Browse through our Web site for up-to-date detailed information on properties available and make use of our interactive database, priority reservation service (credit cards accepted), personal service and professional advice. For further information please contact Finders Keepers at 226, Banbury Rd., Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: 01865 311011. Fax: Oxford 556993. E-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk. Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

An Englishman's home is his castle---so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or e-mail us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: 01865 764533, fax: 764777, e-mail: info@qbman.co.uk.


Flats to Let

Headington: overlooking golf course; fully-furnished, 2-bedroom flat with garage to let to non-smoking tenants for up to 1 year, available from early July. Would suit visiting academic family. £700 p.c.m., plus tax and utility charges. Tel.: 01865 279182 or 279180, or e-mail: christine.peters@queens.ox.ac.uk.

Fully furnished self-catering accommodation available in North Oxford, 15 minutes from Oxford city centre. Ground-floor apartment, bedroom with twin beds, living room, kitchen, bathroom. Quiet gardens. Tel.: 07870 234 725. E-mail: info@weeklymansion.co.uk. Web site: http://www.weeklymansion.co.uk.

North Oxford : fully furnished 2-bedroom flat from 1 July. Ground- floor flat in quiet road off the Woodstock Road, very close to shopping facilities and restaurants. Lounge/dining room, and fully equipped kitchen, with cooker, oven and washing machine; bathroom with bath and shower; 2 south-facing bedrooms; linen supplied. Lovely quiet shared south-facing garden and garage. Available from 1 July. Phone 01865 513688 or e-mail: dianecw25@hotmail.com.

Studio flat at token rent in Old Rectory in exchange for regular dog walking and occasional house-sitting. Five miles from Oxford centre in Old Kidlington. Suit graduate student. Available 1 May. On No.2/2a bus route (every 15 mins) and walking distance to shops and amenities. References essential. Tel.: 01865 513816 office hours and 01865 842103 eves and weekends.

Park Town–off Banbury Road, easy walk from Science Area. Modern furnished s/c flatlet in quiet non-smoking family home. Shared front door/staircase to own entrance/lobby. Available now, single post-doc or academic visitor preferred. £410 p.c.m. No extras. E-mail: peter@crossfell.co.uk or tel.: 01736 731933.

Self-contained 1-bedroom flat overlooking Port Meadow, with mod cons on top floor of old family house in pretty location in Upper Wolvercote. Convenient for university and Oxford city, with rural surroundings. Bedroom with en suite shower/toilet; kitchen/dining/living room. Parking, cycling and/or bus ride 15 minutes to city centre. Suit academic/other professional. £725 p.c.m. excl. tel. Available late May 2003. References required. E-mail: wrldco@aol.com.

Central North Oxford: 10 minutes' walk from city centre, all main university buildings and parks, also very close to the river: 4 flats available for short/long lets in extremely quiet, civilised, large Victorian house in this exclusive, leafy, residential Victorian suburb with large light airy rooms. Available now, first-floor flat: double bedroom, drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom. Available end-June: 2 ground-floor flats, each with double and single bedrooms, drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom. Available July: second-floor flat, double bedroom, drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom. Off-street parking, large secluded garden. Tel.:/fax: 01865 552400.


Serviced Accommodation

Finally! the luxurious and economical alternative to 5-star luxury hotels, in central Oxford. Ambassador's Oxford offers clients short-stay 2-bedroom, 2 bathroom–1 en suite–5-star apartments in the centre of Oxford with allocated parking. Only 3 minutes' walk from the railway station and the Saïd Business School. Furnished to a very high standard to include well-equipped kitchen and lounge, computer, printer, internet access, and weekly Maid Service. From £118 per apartment per night, to accommodate up to 4/5 guests. Contact: www.ambassadorsoxford.co.uk, or tel.: 07876 203378.


Accommodation Offered

North Oxford : L-shaped bedsitting room, kitchen one end. Almost sole use of bathroom. Rather beautiful family home and garden. £75 p.w. Must be dog lover. Tel.: 01865 559543.

Oxford B & B. A home from home. £55 double/£40 single. Tel.: 01865 770 501, e-mail: open@europe.com.

Paying guests, visiting academics, welcomed for short or long stays in the comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple, in exclusive, quiet, leafy central north Oxford, within walking distance of all main university buildings, town centre, parks, river, good shops, and restaurants. All rooms have colour TV, tea-/coffee-making facilities, microwave, and refrigerator and/or deep-freeze availability, c.h., and independent heating. Breakfast included in the very moderate terms. Tel./fax: 01865 557879.

Delightful rooms in North Oxford available now. £55 p.w. Book by telephone or fax: 01865 511657 or e-mail: coulsonm@btconnect.com.

Available by the week for visitors to Oxford: self-contained, fully-furnished studio flat, centrally located in Kingston Road. En suite shower, toilet and washbasin, and fully-equipped kitchen area. Sleeps 2. £315 p.w. all inc. British Tourist Board approved 3 Stars. For further information tel.: 01865 516913 or visit: http://www.oxfordcity.co.uk/accom/studioflat.

Finders Keepers is celebrating its 30th year as Oxfordshire's leading letting agent, providing a specialist service to both landlords and tenants throughout the Oxfordshire and the surrounding counties. With experienced letting and management teams Finders Keepers provide a high standard of service to all our clients. If you would like more information about Finders Keepers' services please contact us at our Head Office at 226 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford, OX2 7BY, tel.: (00 44) 1865 311011, or visit the Finders Keepers Web site at www.finders.co.uk.


Accommodation Sought to Exchange

House exchange for academic year 2003/4: 17th-century, 5-bedroom furnished house in historic village short distance from Oxford in exchange for 3+ bedroom house in Cambridge. For details tel.: 01865 341150.

House exchange: 5-bedroom Victorian house on 0.75 acres of wooded land in Newton, Massachusetts, USA for a house in or near Oxford for 9–12 months between Aug.,2003 and July 2004. Situated on a secluded cul-de-sac, large garden, all modern conveniences and 1 car; 20-30 minute drive to Longwood Medical Area, Cambridge and downtown Boston. Easy access to the train. Non-smokers preferred. Contact Colin and/or Gill Sieff. Tel.: 001 617 632 3531 (work) or 001 617 527 1417, e-mail: colin_sieff@dfci.harvard.edu.


Accommodation Sought

Accommodation wanted for female visiting academic from 7 May–30 June, preferably in North Oxford. Please telephone the Secretary, African Studies, St Antony's College, 01865 274477 or e-mail: ulli.parkinson@sant.ox.ac.uk.

Visiting academic couple from Austria, with 1 child (a year old), would like to rent furnished accommodation (1-2 bedroom) in central Oxford from 17 June until 14 Sept. Please contact Liz Mitchell, Dept. of Biochemistry. E-mail: elizabeth.mitchell@bioch.ox.ac.uk. Tel.: 01865 (2)75268.

Non-smoking academic, Faculty Director for a Study Abroad program at Oxford, seeks a furnished 2-bedroom flat, central heating, bright rooms, conveniently located (walking distance from the centre), washing machine, if possible from mid- Aug.,–mid-Dec. Please contact Dr Toni Travis, Department of Public and International Affairs, 3F4, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA. E-mail:ttravis@gmu.edu. Fax: 001 703 993 1399, tel.: 001 703 993 1453.

Academic couple, with 2 children (ages 4 and 7), seeking accommodation in Paris from from 28 June to 19 July. Also seeking accommodation in the country in France (with 4 bedrooms) from 20 July to 15 Aug. Please contact Dr Peter Holbrook, School of English, University of Queensland, Australia. E-mail: P.Holbrook@mailbox.uq.edu.au.

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us: 01865 764533, fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk. Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.


Holiday Lets

France in Tarn and Garonne–one hour north of Toulouse–beautiful old Quercy coutnry house in 2 acres. Quiet and peaceful, at end of own private road surrounded by trees in hilly countryside. Moliere 10 minutes, and Caussade 20 minutes. Cahors and St Antonin 1 hour. Five bedrooms (sleeps 10), swimming pool. Available from July. £1,500 p.w. Please contact Dr J. H. Chamberlain , e-mail: joe.chamberlain@ukgateway.net or phone on 07957 588 448.

Bordeaux–Medoc: a modern villa with 5 bedrooms, sleeps up to 13. Quiet but only 3 minutes to shops, restaurants, facilities, and sandy lake beach; close to lake water-sports, Atlantic surfing coast, heathland for walking, and dedicated cycle tracks. One hour to airport, Arcachon and world's finest chateaux and vineyards. £750–£1,150 p.w. Tel.: 01865 (4)32302 (day) or eves., and weekends on 01865 202765. Web site: www.villadays.co.uk.

Charente/Dordogne border: a 3-bedroom detached cottage between St Severin and Aubeterre sur Dronne. Easy driving distance to Angouleme, Bordeaux and Perigeux. Available all year with oil fired c.h. Gardens and ample parking. Long or short lets from £200-£350 per week. Tel./fax 00 33 545 984 092.

To rent Marbella/Aloha, Spain: privately owned 2-bedroom, 2 bathroom apartment overlooking golf course in small established community; communal gardens; large pool, tennis, squash; parking. Five minutes to Puerto Banus/beach. For more information tel./fax: 01865 712431 or e-mail: annabellep@onetel.net.uk.

Deepest SW France. Relax in our fabulous farmhouse in a stunning rural area and enjoy luxurious and en suite accommodation sleeping 6-10; generous facilities including satellite TV and large grounds with good views. Suitable for superb summer holidays, half-terms or longer stays for writers and researchers. Contact Marion on 01865 554122 or 00 33 5 63 02 11 98 or e-mail: marion@hidden-sw-france.

Venice: large flat in the heart of Venice, near Palazzo Grassi, in the heart of Venice, with large traditional sitting-room, and separate dining room, well-appointed kitchen, 1 double bedroom with en suite bathroom, second bedroom with twin beds, third bedroom with 1 bed (+ 1), and a second bathroom. The flat is ideal for a family, in pristine condition, and available for short periods on a weekly basis at £600 per week. Tel.: + 39 0423 723582, e-mail: tagariello@libero.it.

Estoril Coast, Portugal: lovely, large, fully-furnished duplex; 3 bedrooms, 2 living rooms, with garden and barbecue. Sleeps 6. All mod cons; TV with Cable. Close to delightful beaches; 20/30 minutes by car to Lisbon and the Sintra-Cascais Natural Park. £300–£450 p.w. Tel.: 01865 769328, e-mail: julian@jdgross.fsworld.co.uk.

Tuscan Farmhouse, 16th-century: charming private country home, beautifully appointed, between Siena and Arezzo. Four bedrooms (sleeps 7); 2 sitting-rooms, piano, library. Private lake 5 minutes away. Riding and 13th-century spa nearby. E-mail: mellerma@brandeis.edu. Web site: www.ilvallone.com.

Edinburgh: lovely light spacious Victorian flat, in quiet cul de sac in central Edinburgh (Bruntsfield). Walk across Bruntsfield Links and the Meadows to the Royal Mile, Festival Theatre etc. Just off Bruntsfield Place with its excellent restaurants and food shops. Three bedrooms (2 double), sleeps up to 6. Unrestricted parking, garden. Available from 24 Apr. E-mail: doreen@mcbarnet.fsnet.co.uk.

Cornwall, near Sennen Cove: converted barn, sleeps 4/5. Comfortable, well-equipped, sea view, small garden. £155-£350 p.w., incl. of electricity and linen. Currently booked from 26 July–23 Aug. Visit www.hayloftcottage.co.uk, or tel.: 01865 557713.

Gardens of Cornwall B & B: if you are visiting the gardens of Cornwall this year why not stay at Colgare House B & B, strategically placed on the Lanhydrock Estate near Bodmin, surrounded by woodlands and pasture Colgare is a tranquil Victorian house offering 2 double and 2 single bedrooms for guests all of which have magnificent views to the south. From this central point, with access to the A30 and A38 it is only 20 minutes to The Eden Project and 35 minutes to the Lost Gardens of Heligan as well as either of Cornwall's North or South coasts. Well behaved dogs are welcome. B & B from £28–£35 per person per night. Phone Colgare House 01208 269 605. E-mail: colgarehouse@onetel.net.uk.

Tuscany: "Corzano & Paterno", a top award winning family run wine and cheese producing farm, half-hour south of Florence (Chianti), offers faithfully restored farmhouses and apartments for rent. Swimming pool. Contact Sibilla Gelpke (Wadham '01) at: corzpaterno@libero.it.

South of France: 18th-century stone farmhouse in Languedoc/Aveyron hills. Easy drives to Gorges du Tarn, Albi, Montpellier and Mediterranean. Two living areas, magnificent kitchen, 6 bedrooms (sleeping 12), full of character. Utility room; barn; roof terrace; orchard garden. Stunning views. River bathing. Excellent restaurants. Beautiful unspoilt area. Available up to 19th July and from Sept. £250–£500 p.w. Tel.: 01865 244619.

Crete. A traditional Cretan house in old town Rethimno, superbly renovated to provide space and comfort in beautifully furnished surroundings. Elevated, vine- covered, sitting area with brick barbecue—perfect for alfresco dining. It is in a quiet area, and close to long, sandy beach, taverns, shops, and the many interesting sights in and around this historic area. Sleeps 4 (1 double, 1 twin). Available all year round. All linen, electricity and cleaning inc. 2002 rates on request. Tel./fax: Nikolaos Glinias, 0030 831 56525, e-mail: nglynias@ret.forthnet.gr.


Houses for Sale

Lovely 1-bedroom period house, Lime Walk, Headington: living room; kitchen; conservatory; bedroom; bathroom (with bath and shower). Double glazed, small secluded garden. Very well maintained. Within 1 mile radius of shops, Oxford Brookes University and local hospitals. The vendors would like to move during Sept. Asking price £149,950. Contact Karen Akroyd 01865 308188 or 01865 270053. E-mail: karen.akroyd@admin.ox.ac.uk or k.akroyd@tesco.net.

Central Oxford–Grandpont: walking distance of city centre; 3- bedroom, stylishly restored Victorian house. Period features, open fireplaces, sash windows. Fully equipped kitchen. First-floor bathroom. Gas c.h. West facing garden. £299,950. Tel.: 01865 469005, e-mail: ameasham@hotmail.com, or 07919336452.

Marston/Headington: first-floor maisonette with own garden. Well presented throughout. Re-fitted kitchen, d.g., and gas c.h. Good access to JR and number 10 and 13 buses. £135,000. contact Buckell and Ballard 01865 760 881.

Three-bedroom house on quiet 1930's estate. Walking distance of Iffley Lock and of Cowley shops. Well-maintained and decorated. Lovely south-facing garden. Brick-built garage plus off-road parking. Asking price £215,000. Will accept reduction for quick sale. E-mail: judith.secker@admin.ox.ac.uk. Tel.: 01865 777015.


Retirement Flat Offered

Secure Retirement Co-ownership Ltd, Ritchie Court, a cooperative housing association for independent retired people. Small flat now available. Resident Wardens, 24-hour emergency cover. Restaurant providing lunch daily. Large, attractive gardens, and roof garden. Guest rooms. Laundry room. Convenient for shops, library and buses to Oxford. For details tel.: 01865 510334, Mrs D. Archer, Administrator.

Appointments

PROFESSORSHIP OF CLINICAL GERATOLOGY

Applications are invited for the above post, tenable from as early a date as may be arranged. The successful candidate will provide academic leadership for the discipline through high-calibre research and other academic activities, including teaching and training. The professor must be medically qualified and a practising clinician, on the specialist register in one of the following: geriatric medicine, internal medicine, psychiatry of old age, or a like specialty. Three fields of research have been identified as especially suitable for this post, and for development by the appointee, in Oxford: the promotion of clinical trials relating to elderly people, stroke medicine (in the elderly), or dementia.

A non-stipendiary fellowship at Green College is attached to the professorship. Further particulars, including details of how to apply, are available from http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/fp/ or from the Registrar, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: Oxford (2)70200). The closing date for applications is Monday, 23 June.


APPOINTMENT OF HEAD OF ALUMNI RELATIONS AND SECRETARY TO THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY SOCIETY

The University is looking for an innovative and self-motivating person to develop further the University's alumni relations and to sustain and encourage a worldwide network of branches of Oxford alumni, as well as developing affinities such as faculty and sporting links. The post-holder will also lead a small team of full-time staff, located in Oxford, whose work embraces the recruitment of active members, close liaison with colleges, the promotion of the Society through the University magazine Oxford Today and the Web, the provision of visiting speakers for branches, and organisation of central events at Oxford.

Ideally the post-holder will have experience of alumni relations work (and will need the ability to develop university strategy in this area), and good interpersonal, management, and communication skills, together with tact and diplomacy to be able to meet the challenges of this job.

The post is on the ALC4 scale (salary £30,660–£36,712, with a discretionary range to £41,876). More information about the role, the organisation of alumni relations at Oxford, and details of how to apply are available in the further particulars obtainable from Mrs J. Pengelly (telephone: Oxford (2)70128, e-mail: posts@ admin.ox.ac.uk), or from http://www.ox.ac.uk/jobs.

Letters of application stating how the applicant meets the specification of the post, together with a detailed curriculum vitae and the names and contact details of two referees, should reach Ms J.M. Williams, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD, by no later than noon on 21 May.


UK CLIMATE IMPACTS PROGRAMME (ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE UNIT)

Appointment of Project Manager

The UK Climate Impacts Programme (UKCIP), part of the Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford, was established in April 1997. The Programme is funded by the Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs, currently until March 2005.ukCIP supports a stakeholder-led, integrated impacts assessment and works with organisations to prepare adaptation strategies for climate change. This is an opportunity to join a high profile organisation handling one of the critical issues of our time. The post of Project Manager is required to: act as UKCIP contact for several sub-UK and regional climate change impact partnerships; represent UKCIP on the steering committees for these partnerships and provide ongoing advice and support to their research and project management teams; monitor progress of studies and review study outputs where appropriate; contribute materially to the development of the integrating framework of the EPSRC/ UKCIP `Building Knowledge for a Changing Climate' portfolio of projects; disseminate information about UKCIP to a wide range of audiences; and assist with the development of UKCIP's capacity building network within the business community.

The post-holder will need a postgraduate degree with relevant work experience, along with excellent project management and communication skills. Knowledge of climate change and its impacts would be an advantage. The appointment is initially for a fixed term to 31 March 2005. The salary will be on the RS1A scale, commensurate with experience, within the range £18,265–£27,339 per annum.

Copies of the job description may be obtained from Sally Jeffery (telephone: Oxford 432076), or from the Web site http://www.ukcip.org.uk. Applicants are required to send a covering letter and a curriculum vitae to the Administrator, UKCIP, Union House, 12–16 St Michael's Street, Oxford OX1 2DU, or e-mail: sally.jeffery@ukcip.org.uk.

The closing date for all applications is 23 May. Interviews will take place in the week commencing 2 June.


CENTRE FOR BRAZILIAN STUDIES

Appointment of Administrator

Applications are invited for this key post in a small, very dynamic department. The post is full-time or part-time, to be negotiated with the successful applicant. The Administrator is responsible to the Centre's Director for the overall administration of the department, including financial, personnel, and building management. The post requires proven administrative and interpersonal skills, excellent organisational abilities, and the capability of producing accurate, detailed work to strict deadlines. The successful applicant will be highly numerate and computer literate. A knowledge of Portuguese is desirable. Salary £20,755–£24,121 per annum (pro rata).

Further particulars can be obtained from the Centre's Web site
(http://www.brazil.ox.ac.uk), or upon request from Mrs D. Preston (telephone: Oxford (2)80646, e-mail: dawn.preston@admin.ox.ac.uk). Applicants should send four copies of their curriculum vitae, together with the names and addresses of two referees and a letter outlining how their previous experience and skills match the selection criteria, to Ms Betsy Smith, Social Sciences Division, 34 St Giles', Oxford OX1 3LH. The closing date for applications is 12 May.


CHRIST CHURCH

Millard and Lee Alexander Postdoctoral Fellowship

Christ Church invites applications for the Millard and Lee Alexander Fellowship, to be taken up at the beginning of the academic year 2003–4. The fellowship is intended to give college affiliation to a postdoctoral research worker from outside Oxford. It is non-stipendiary, but includes membership of the senior common room, subsidised lunches, and free dinners, and a housing allowance or, if available, college accommodation. Applicants must have carried out their doctoral research at a university other than Oxford, and must have been appointed to a salaried post in the research group of a member of staff in one of the laboratories or departments of the Oxford University Mathematical and Physical Sciences Division with a tenure of at least twelve months from the date of taking up the fellowship. The initial period of the fellowship is for one year, but it may be renewed for up to a further year while the departmental appointment continues.

Application forms and further particulars can be obtained from the Dean's Secretary, Christ Church, Oxford OX1 1DP (fax: Oxford (2)76238); further particulars also appear on http://www.chch.ox.ac.uk/jobs. Applications should include the names and addresses of three referees, who should be asked to write directly to the Dean's Secretary. One reference should be a statement of support from the staff member responsible for the departmental appointment to be held by the applicant. Applications should also include a full curriculum vitae, together with an account of the applicant's proposed research and its significance. This should not exceed 1,000 words, and be written in non-technical language. The deadline for applications and the receipt of references is Friday, 30 May.


Appointment of Cathedral Registrar

The Dean and Canons of Christ Church wish to appoint a Cathedral Registrar, to work in a unique and historic situation at the heart of a university college.

The post requires someone with proven financial and administrative experience and competence; a commitment to high standards; computer literacy to a high level; a readiness to participate in the life and worship of the Cathedral; a warm and welcoming approach; and the ability to work collaboratively with a wide range of colleagues, both paid and voluntary.

Christ Church is a dual foundation, both a college within the University of Oxford and the Cathedral of the Diocese of Oxford. The Registrar is primarily responsible for the efficient administration of the Cathedral and its finances. He or she is Clerk to the Cathedral Chapter.

The salary is on the academic-related scale C51, grade 2 (£21,125–£33,679 per annum).

Christ Church is an equal opportunities employer. (This post might, for example, suit someone towards the end of his or her working career.)

Details and application forms may be obtained by writing to the Sub-Dean, Christ Church, Oxford OX1 1DP. The closing date for applications is 13 May.


HERTFORD COLLEGE

Mortimer May Scholarship

A fully-funded Graduate Studentship in Geography

Hertford College, through the Trustees of the Mortimer May Fund, intends to award a Senior Scholarship in Geography. The scholarship will be tenable from October 2003 for three years, and is equal to an ESRC/NERC studentship.

Support will range from payment of fees and maintenance costs to top-up funding if the successful student is already in receipt of a graduate award. Admission will be subject to the approval of the Life and Environmental Sciences Division. Preference may be given to a candidate wishing to study one of the following topics: forensic sedimentology (with Dr P.A. Bull); agent-based modelling (with Dr W.D. Macmillan); geography and geographers of Russia (with Dr P. Coones).

Further information can be obtained from the Academic Administrator, Hertford College, Oxford OX1 3BW (telephone: Oxford (2)79423). Letters of application (three copies) should be sent to the Academic Administrator, Hertford College, by 16 May, and should include a statement of the candidate's qualifications and intentions. Two referees should be asked to send letters of reference separately to the Academic Administrator also by 16 May.


ORIEL COLLEGE

Seton-Watson Senior Scholarship

Oriel College proposes to elect a Seton-Watson Senior Scholar for a period of two years from 1 October 2003.

The scholarship is open to graduates of any university who are currently reading, or have been accepted to read, for a higher degree at the University. Although the scholarship was founded for the study of Italian History or Politics, applications are also encouraged from students in International Relations generally.

The scholar will be a member of the senior common room and will be entitled to free lunches and dinners at the common table and, if unmarried, to rooms in college. If married, the scholar will be allowed a study room free of charge in college and paid a housing allowance, and may also receive a sum not exceeding £600 for each year of the tenure of the scholarship.

Applicants should write to the Academic Registrar, Mrs Yvonne Scott, enclosing a curriculum vitae and an outline of proposed research (eight copies of each) together with the names of three referees. Candidates are asked to request their referees to send references direct to the Academic Registrar before Friday, 23 May.

The closing date for applications is Friday, 23 May, and references should reach the Academic Registrar, Oriel College, Oxford OX1 4EW, by this date. References may also be either faxed to Oxford 791823 or e-mailed Mrs Scott (e-mail: yvonne.scott@oriel.ox.ac.uk).


ST CROSS COLLEGE

Knoop Junior Research Fellowship 2003

St Cross College proposes to make an election to this Junior Research Fellowship, tenable from 1 October 2003 (or another date by agreement), for one year in the first instance. The fellowship is to be held in conjunction with a position in the Department of Ophthalmology, involving research work in the general area of the composition and properties of tears and their interaction with the ocular surface. The aim is to study the contributions of these properties in normal functions of the external eye, and in relation to dry-eye disorders. The fellowship will be particularly suitable for graduates in physiology, biochemistry, or optometry and candidates with an interest in biophysics or surface chemistry are especially encouraged to apply. The fellowship is open to men and women and carries a stipend of £18,265 per annum, together with common table rights (five lunches a week).

Applicants should have submitted their doctoral dissertations by the date of taking up the appointment or have obtained the D.Phil./Ph.D. or equivalent within the last five years, but the college will exercise flexibility in the case of applicants whose academic careers have been interrupted.

Applications (marked Knoop JRF) should include a full curriculum vitae and the names of two referees and should be addressed to the Master, St Cross College, Oxford OX1 3LZ. The closing date for applications is 14 May.

Applicants should ask their referees to send references direct to the Master by that date. It is expected that interviews will be held on 28 May. Further details about scientific aspects can be obtained from Dr J.M. Tiffany, Nuffield Department of Ophthalmology, Walton Street, Oxford OX2 6AW (telephone: Oxford 248996, e-mail: john.tiffany@eye.ox.ac.uk).

The college exists to promote excellence in education and research, and is an equal opportunities employer.


ST PETER'S COLLEGE

Stipendiary Lecturership in Mathematics

Applications are invited for a Stipendiary Lecturership in Pure Mathematics, for one year starting on 1 October 2003. There is the possibility of renewal for a further one or two years subject to satisfactory performance and to the Fellowship in Pure Mathematics at St Peter's College remaining unfilled. The successful candidate will be expected to undertake eight hours per week of undergraduate tutorial and class teaching in Pure Mathematics, to participate in admissions, and generally to assist with the administration of undergraduate Mathematics in the college.

Remuneration will be on the college's scale for stipendiary lecturers, within the range £11,497–£14,083 per annum. The lecturer will have senior common room rights.

Applications, including a curriculum vitae and the names and addresses of two referees (six copies, or one only from candidates overseas), should be sent to the College Secretary, St Peter's College, Oxford OX1 2DL, by Friday, 23 May (telephone: Oxford (2)78864, e-mail: olivia.henley@spc.ox.ac.uk).

Applicants should state the topics from Moderations and Section a of the Oxford Mathematics syllabus that they are able to teach (the syllabus can be found at http://www.maths.ox.ac.uk/cou rse-materials/synopses). Applicants should also ask their referees to send references to the College Secretary by the closing date.

Questions concerning this appointment may be directed to Lionel Mason (e-mail: lmason@maths.ox.ac.uk).


CLARE HALL, CAMBRIDGE

Appointment of Bursar and Development Director

Applications are invited for the post of Bursar and Development Director of Clare Hall, a graduate college in the University of Cambridge. The Bursar is the principal financial officer of the college, with responsibility for the management of its finances, property, and investments, and for its fund-raising functions.

Applicants should be of outstanding ability, with established managerial, leadership, and financial experience at a senior level, and with excellent communication skills. The ability to absorb and respond sympathetically to the ethos of a self-governing residential college, and to participate enthusiastically in its corporate life, will be very important. The appointment will be for five years in the first instance and thereafter with eligibility for reappointment every five years to the age of sixty-seven. The successful candidate will be elected a fellow of the college.

Further particulars may be obtained from the College Secretary, Clare Hall, Cambridge CB3 9AL (telephone: 01223 332360, e-mail: college.secretary@clarehall.cam. ac.uk). Applications, comprising a curriculum vitae and the names of three referees, should be submitted to the President of the college not later than Friday, 16 May. Interviews will take place in the week beginning 2 June.


KING'S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE

Appointment of Chaplain

King's College, Cambridge, requires a Chaplain in Anglican orders, to start on 1 September 2003. The post combines pastoral and liturgical responsibilities, and offers an opportunity for involvement in a challenging and varied community.

Full details may be obtained from the Chapel Secretary, King's College, Cambridge CB2 1ST, or from http://www.kings.cam.ac.uk/vac ancies/chaplain.html.

The closing date for applications is Wednesday, 14 May. Interviews will be held in late May.

Diary

Institute for the Advancement of University Learning Seminars: places should be booked in advance through the IAUL (telephone: (2)86808, e-mail: services@learning.ox.ac.uk, Internet: http://www.learning.ox.ac.uk).


Friday 2 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Mesopotamia and India', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

PROFESSOR PHILIP HARDIE (Corpus Christi Professor of Latin): `Contrasts' (inaugural lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. MCKITTERICK: `History and memory in the early Middle Ages' (Modern History Faculty: Special Faculty Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. WEBBER: `Making sense of the past: reflections on Jewish historical consciousness' (Marett Memorial Lecture), Saskatchewan Lecture Room, Exeter, 5 p.m.

MAISON FRANÇAISE: French Politics and Society seminar, 5.15 p.m.


Sunday 4 May

THE REVD OLIVER O'DONOVAN: `Judgement in institution: legitimate authority (Hymn 379: "In the cross of Christ I glory")' (Bampton Lectures: `The ways of judgement: action and institution'), St Mary's, 10 a.m.


Tuesday 6 May

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Minutes and agendas—an introductory programme', 9.30 a.m.; `Contract research staff—briefings for research supervisors', 12.30 p.m.; `Assertiveness' (day 1), 2 p.m. (see information above).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `A bird-watcher's guide to the Ashmolean', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

PROFESSOR PAUL MULDOON (Professor of Poetry): `The end of the poem: "Poem of the End", by Marina Tsvetayeva', Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R.A. EPSTEIN: `The not so minimum content of natural law' (H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. BOWKER: `The appeal to value' (Hensley Henson Lectures: `The appeal to history as an integral part of Christian apologetics: did Henson waste his money?'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J.M. WAGSTAFF: `The contribution of early travel narratives to the historical geography of Greece' (Myres Memorial Lecture), McGregor Matthews Room, New College, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR S. JAMISON: `Lions and tigers ... and bulls' (Radhakrishnan Memorial Lectures: `Between the lines: oblique angles on power and authority in ancient India'), Schools, 5 p.m.

MAISON FRANÇAISE: open forum with SYLVIE GERMAIN, novelist, Prix Fémina 1989, 5.15 p.m.

B. ADAMS: ` "Doth Burn ere It Transform": Roman Catholicism, decadence, and Elgar's The Dream of Gerontius' (Graduate Colloquia), Denis Arnold Hall, Faculty of Music, 5.15 p.m.


Wednesday 7 May

ORGAN RECITAL: Andrew Reid, the chapel, Queen's, 1.10 p.m. (admission free; retiring collection).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM introductory gallery talk: `Glass', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Telephone skills', 2 p.m., and `Introductory statistical modelling for research—linear models', 3 p.m. (see information above).

OXFORD PHILOMUSICA RESIDENCY—Leading a Workshop with Kate Coberti, 2--5 p.m., Denis Arnold Hall, Faculty of Music (open to university students and staff only; further information: (2)76125).

PROFESSOR ROGER DAVIES (Philip Wetton Professor of Astrophysics): `Telescopes, galaxies, and black holes' (inaugural lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. BOWKER: `The appeal to coherence' (Hensley Henson Lectures: `The appeal to history as an integral part of Christian apologetics: did Henson waste his money?'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR K. BARBER: `How texts transcend gender in African oral and popular cultures' (Kaberry Lecture), Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR RICHARD RORTY: `Analytic philosophy and narrative philosophy' (Oliver Smithies Lectures: `Philosophy's role in culture'), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR E. PROTACIO-DECASTRO: `Young people's notions of well-being in the context of armed conflict in the Philippines' (Refugee Studies Centre Public Seminars: `Adolescents, armed conflict, and forced migration'), Thatcher Conference Centre, Somerville, 5 p.m.

NIGEL WILSON: `The scriptorium' (Lyell Lectures in Bibliography: `The world of books in Byzantium'), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR T. LEVY: `Texts, maps, and archaeology: recent Iron Age explorations in southern Jordan' (David Patterson Seminars), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor, 8 p.m. (minibus from the Playhouse, Beaumont Street, 6.40 p.m. and 7.30 p.m.).


Thursday 8 May

MAISON FRANÇAISE exhibition opens: `Market day in Provence'—photographs by Fred Jarvis (open Monday–Friday 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.–1 p.m., until 24 May; closed 17 May).

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Listening skills' (day 2), 9.30 a.m., and `Writing at work' (week 2), 3.30 p.m. (see information above).

PROFESSOR RICHARD RORTY: `Justice as a larger loyalty'(Interdisciplinary Sawyer Seminar: `The theory and politics of civil society'), Rothermere American Institute, 1.45 p.m.

DR U. EREL: `Transmitting and transforming ethnicity: migrant mothers from Turkey and their children' (International Gender Studies Centre seminars: `Gender in transnational and transforming families: stretching boundaries and social conventions'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

CONWAY VOCAL MASTERCLASS with Teresa Cahill, 2--5 p.m., Denis Arnold Hall, Faculty of Music (free of charge. Telephone for further information: (2)76125).

CHRIST CHURCH PICTURE GALLERY guided tour: `Portraits', 2.15 p.m. (booking not required).

SCOTT MANDELBROTE: `Printing and publishing the text of the Septuagint' (Grinfield Lectures on the Septuagint: `The study of the Septuagint in early modern Europe'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR L. LEONARDI: `Le Rime di Dante: postille a una recente edizione' (Paget Toynbee Lecture), Room 3, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR N. RODGER: `Horatio Nelson' (DNB seminars on biography: `Icons and celebrity'), Rainolds Room, Corpus Christi, 5 p.m.

M. RUNDLE: ` "Where do lexicographers come from?"—training lexicographers in the twenty-first century' (OED Forum), Rewley House, 5 p.m.


Friday 9 May

BETTS ORGAN MASTERCLASS with Stephen Bicknell: exploring some Important Organs in Oxford, 10 a.m., Holywell Music Room. Free of charge and open to the public (booking not required; (telephone for further information: (2)76125).

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Appraisal skills', 11 a.m. (see information above).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The Edward Lane Exhibition', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

MAISON FRANÇAISE: French Politics and Society seminar, 5.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. FORRESTER: `Racism and sectarianism' (Eric Symes Abbott Memorial Lecture), the chapel, Keble, 5.30 p.m.

RETROSPECTIVE CONCERT: music by John Caldwell, 1958–2003, with the Aldate Quartet, Ben Linton, Will Tallon, and Guy Newbury, Holywell Music Room, 8 p.m.


Saturday 10 May

DR S. CRETNEY delivers the Blackstone Lecture, Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 11.30 a.m.


Sunday 11 May

THE REVD OLIVER O'DONOVAN: `Judgement in institution: sovereign judgement (Hymn 361: "Forth in the peace of Christ we go")' (Bampton Lectures: `The ways of judgement: action and institution'), St Mary's, 10 a.m.


Monday 12 May

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminar: `Pre- retirement programme', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

DR M. SATCHELL: `The medieval hospitals GIS project' (seminar series: `Medicine and culture before 1800'), Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 2.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. FREEDMAN (Professor of Taxation Law): inaugural lecture, Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. KENNEDY: `Dilemmas of difference in democratic society: the case of women' (Tanner Lectures on Human Values), Rhodes House, 5 p.m. (open to the public).

DR L. BRAKE: ` "Daily Calendars of Roguery and Woe": the politics of print in nineteenth-century Britain' (D.J. McKenzie Lecture), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.


Tuesday 13 May

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Opendoor: an introduction', 9.30 a.m., and induction seminar for new contract researchers, 12.30 p.m. (see information above).

MRS M. CLAPINSON: `E.W.B. Nicholson, Bodley's first professional librarian' (Friends of the Bodleian thirty-minute lecture), Cecil Jackson Room, Sheldonian, 1 p.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Hindu images', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

PROFESSOR JOSEPH STIGLITZ: `Cycles in business cycle theory' (Clarendon Lectures in Economics: `Is Keynes dead? Reviving a sensible macroeconomics'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. KENNEDY: `Dilemmas of difference in democratic society: the case of race' (Tanner Lectures on Human Values), Rhodes House, 5 p.m. (open to the public).

R. CROCKATT: `No common ground? Islam, America, and anti-Americanism' (seminar series: `Americanisation and anti-Americanism: global views of the USA'), Rothermere American Institute, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR S. JAMISON: `Sorcerer (or) king' (Radhakrishnan Memorial Lectures: `Between the lines: oblique angles on power and authority in ancient India'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. MARTIN: `The skeletal complications of cancer' (Glaxo SmithKline Lecture), Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 5 p.m.

S. CLARK: `Analysing Schubert's songs: harmony and hermeneutics' (Graduate Colloquia), Denis Arnold Hall, Faculty of Music, 5.15 p.m.


Wednesday 14 May

ORGAN RECITAL: Christian Wilson, the chapel, Queen's, 1.10 p.m. (admission free; retiring collection).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk in series `The Curator and the Collection': `Introduction to Indian coins' (Shailendra Bhandare), 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., or e-mail: education.service@ashmus.ox.ac.uk.)

INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY LEARNING seminars: `Presentation skills practice', 9.30 a.m., `Proof reading', 2 p.m., and `Introductory statistical modelling for research—linear models: model checking', 3 p.m. (see information above).

S. O'BRIEN: `Translating Aristophanes' Birds for performance' (Archive of Performances of Greek and Roman Drama lecture), Headley Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean, 2.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR JOSEPH STIGLITZ: `Foundations of a new macroeconomics' (Clarendon Lectures in Economics: `Is Keynes dead? Reviving a sensible macroeconomics'), Schools, 5 p.m.

MICHAEL PHILLIPS: ` "A whole house to range in": recovering no. 13 Hercules Buildings, Lambeth, Blake's studios, method of "Illuminated Printing", and the production of "A Song of Liberty" ' (Waynflete Lectures: `Blake and the Terror: toward a biography of William Blake in Lambeth during the anti-Jacobin Terror in Britain, 1792–3', the Auditorium, Magdalen, 5 p.m.

C. TALBOT: `Education in conflict, emergency, and reconstruction' (Refugee Studies Centre Public Seminars: `Adolescents, armed conflict, and forced migration'), Thatcher Conference Centre, Somerville, 5 p.m.

NIGEL WILSON: `An ill-paid profession' (Lyell Lectures in Bibliography: `The world of books in Byzantium'), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

HENRI QUÉRÉ: `Que fait la fiction?' (lecture), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

STEPHEN HUGH-JONES: `Pandora's box: body and cosmos in Amazonia' (Friends of the Pitt Rivers Museum: Beatrice Blackwood Lecture), Inorganic Chemistry Lecture Theatre, South Parks Road, 7 p.m.

DR D. RYNHOLD: `Maimonides on divine attributes and human perfection (or how to imitate someone about whom you know nothing)' (David Patterson Seminars), Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor, 8 p.m. (minibus from the Playhouse, Beaumont Street, 6.40 p.m. and 7.30 p.m.).