9 May 1996



<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 9 May 1996: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL 6 May


1 Decrees

Council has made the following decrees, to come into effect on 24
May.

List of the decrees:

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Decree (1)

Notwithstanding the provisions of Tit. X, Sect. I, proviso (
h) (Statutes, 1995, p. 74), Professor H.
Schermers may be appointed as Jacques Delors Visiting Professor in
European Community Law for 1996–7.

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Decree (2)

Notwithstanding the provisions of Ch. IX, Sect. I, § 44, cl. 2
(Statutes, 1995, p. 548), Mr G.J. Smith, St Anne's
College, may enter for the Chancellor's Latin Prizes in 1996, 1997,
and 1998.

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2 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts under
the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. vi, cl. 1 (Statutes,
1995, p. 345) has been accorded to the following persons who are
qualified for membership of Congregation:

HELEN LUND CALLAWAY, M.LITT., D.PHIL., Somerville College

STEPHEN JOHN GOULD, Department of Paediatrics

CATHERINE ANN MIDDLETON, Mansfield College

JUSTIN ALAN ROAKE, D.PHIL., Green College

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3 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added
to the Register of Congregation:

Ashworth, A., MA, Lincoln

Boys-Stones, G.R., MA, D.Phil., Corpus Christi

Callaway, H.L., MA status, M.Litt., D.Phil., Somerville

Crossley, A., MA, St John's

Darnton, R.C., MA, D.Phil., St John's

Forbes, D.A., MA, Mansfield

Gould, S.J., MA status, Department of Paediatrics

Herring, J.J.W., BCL, MA, Christ Church

Jephcoat, A.P., MA, Brasenose

Leunig, T.C., MA, Nuffield

McGuinness, P.R.A., MA, D.Phil., Jesus

Marston, N.J., MA, D.Phil., St Peter's

Middleton, C.A., MA status, Mansfield

Morgan, K.O., MA, D.Phil., D.Litt., Queen's

Roake, J.A., MA status, D.Phil., Green College

Townley, S.C., MA, D.Phil., Oriel




<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 9 May 1996: University Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 14 May


Notice

The meeting of Congregation is cancelled. The sole business comprises
questions to which no opposition has been notified and in respect of
which no request for an adjournment has been received, and Mr Vice-
Chancellor will accordingly declare the statutes approved and the
preambles adopted without a meeting under the provisions of Tit. II,
Sect. iii, cl. 11 (Statutes, 1995, p. 8).

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CONGREGATION 18 May 2.30 p.m.


Conferment of Honorary Degree

The Degree of Master of Arts, honoris causa, approved by
Special Resolution of Congregation on 19 March 1996, will be
conferred upon SIR ASHLEY PONSONBY, BT, KCVO, MC.

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CONGREGATION 28 May 2 p.m


1 Voting on General Resolution concerning
remuneration of ULNTFs

Explanatory note to General Resolution

1 In Hilary Term 1995 Council and the General Board
accepted a general resolution put to Congregation which instructed
them to set up a working party to consider the question of the
remuneration of non-clinical university lecturers without tutorial
fellowships (ULNTFs) and to make proposals by the end of Trinity Term
1995.

2 That working party was duly set up and
reported by the end of Trinity Term 1995. Its report was published in
the Gazette (Supplement (1) to No. 4370, 10 July 1995,
p. 1367). Council and the General Board informed Congregation that
neither body had endorsed the recommendations in the report but both
had accepted in principle that there was a serious problem of equity
in the salary position of ULNTFs. They had asked colleges for
comments on the proposals in the report (and for any alternative
proposals which colleges might have for the resolution of the
inequity) by 3 November 1995.

3 The working party has now considered the
comments made by colleges and has drawn up a second report, published
as

Supplement (1)
to Gazette No. 4399, 6 May 1996, p.
1073, which has been adopted by Council and the General Board with
one amendment. This is that, contrary to the proposals in para. 5 of
the report, ULNTFs at St Antony's should be included in the scheme,
on certain conditions. Proposals in respect of St Antony's are set
out below in para. 5 of this explanatory note. Council and the
General Board now seek the approval of Congregation for the following
general resolution to enable the scheme proposed by the working
party, as modified in respect of ULNTFs at St Antony's, to be
implemented.

4 The main points of the new scheme are as
follows.

(1) As with the original scheme, the objective is to enable
ULNTFs to reach the maximum point of the national senior lecturer
scale (para. 3 of the report). ULNTFs whose combined university and
college pensionable stipend already permits them to reach this
figure are not eligible (paras. 8 and 13).

(2) The original scheme proposed that the necessary additional
payments should be made by the colleges, funded in part by the
University. It is now proposed that, in return for taking on
additional contractual duties, eligible ULNTFs should be paid the
extra salary increments by the University (paras. 4, 15, and 16).
Legal advice has been taken on this and other aspects of the scheme
(paras. 11-14).

(3) A contribution to the cost of the scheme should be made from
the tutorial earnings of the ULNTFs, as under the original
proposals. Earnings for the tutorial teaching and for special
graduate tuition undertaken by eligible ULNTFs as the prime
additional duty should not be paid to the ULNTFs but should serve as
credits towards the cost of the additional pensionable
salary

(paras. 6 and 17). No other college contribution is,
however, proposed (para. 7). Arrangements will be made to cover
cases where individuals cannot undertake tutorial teaching or
special graduate tuition (see paras. 4, 11–13, and 16).

(4) Each eligible ULNTF now in post should decide whether to opt
in to the scheme in accordance with the proposals in para. 25 of the
report. The report discusses the effect of the Education Reform Act
1988 on those who were appointed to their present post before 20
November 1987 and opt in to the scheme

(paras. 9–10). The
scheme should be part of the normal conditions of employment for all
future ULNTF appointments.

(5) The scheme should be backdated to 1 October 1995 (see paras.
21–3) otherwise than for eligible ULNTFs at St Antony's as
explained in para. 5 below of this explanatory note.

(6) Special proposals are made, as in the original scheme, for
those who retired at 30 September 1995 and, in addition, in respect
of those who will retire on 30 September 1996 (see paras.
26–7).

(7) As Congregation has already been informed in the explanatory
note to the resolution on professorial salaries in Hilary Term 1996
(Gazette No. 4389, 1 February 1996, p. 709), funds have
already been set aside for adjusting the stipendiary arrangements
for ULNTFs. The sum available is £500K recurrent. The
estimated minimum cost of the new scheme is now approximately
£460K per annum (the estimate of £410K in para. 29 of the
report now having to be increased to take account of the inclusion
of ULNTFs at St Antony's).

(8) Although the scheme is still regarded as temporary, it is
recognised that it must continue until it is replaced by one at
least as beneficial to ULNTFs (para. 31).

5 Since the report was completed, approved by
Council and the General Board, and circulated to all interested
parties, St Antony's has been considering further its stipendiary
arrangements. Given its financial circumstances, it now proposes
(subject to the approval of its governing body on 8 May) to abandon
for all new ULNTFs the payment of a gradually increasing stipend
which, when added to the standard university lecturer salary, gives
the college's ULNTFs from approximately their mid-fifties a combined
stipend at (and eventually above) the national senior lecturer
maximum. Instead, from 1 October 1996, new ULNTFs would receive only
a modest housing allowance which did not vary according to age.
Existing ULTNFs at the college would be given a choice between
transferring to this scheme or staying in the existing St Antony's
scheme. Council and the General Board and the Working Party on ULNTFs
have agreed that those who do transfer to the new scheme will be
eligible to opt in to the University's new arrangements (if approved
by Congregation) on the understanding that there would be no question
of backdating any payments by the University in these circumstances.
ULNTFs at St Antony's who chose to leave its present stipendiary
scheme would be eligible for the university scheme only from 1
October 1996.

At the time of writing this explanatory note, the agreement of the
Governing Body of St Antony's to these proposals had not yet been
secured; as stated above, it was due to discuss them on 8 May.
Congregation will be informed of its decision in a note published in
the Gazette of 16 May.

Text of General Resolution

That this House endorse the proposals set out in the second report of
the Working Party on ULNTFs, subject to the inclusion of ULNTFs at St
Antony's on the conditions set out in para. 5 of the explanatory note
to this resolution, and instruct Council and the General Board to
implement them.

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2 Voting on Special Resolutions allocating
sites

Explanatory note to Special Resolution (1)

Following the approval by Congregation in Michaelmas Term 1991 of the
Three-Site Strategy (see Statutes, 1995, p. 704),
Council has adopted the recommendation of the Ashmolean/Taylorian
Site Working Party that a new library, to be called the Sackler
Library, should be built as the first phase of the proposed
Foundations of the Humanities development, and the recommendation of
the Buildings Committee that the site between the rear of 2–6 St
John Street and the west side of the Ashmolean Museum buildings be
now formally allocated for this purpose. The following special
resolution provides accordingly.

Text of Special Resolution (1)

That the site between 2–6 St John Street and the west end of the
Ashmolean Museum be allocated for the Sackler Library.

Explanatory note to Special Resolution (2)

Following the approval by Congregation in Michaelmas Term 1991 of the
Three-Site Strategy (see Statutes, 1995, p. 704),
Council has adopted the recommendation of the St Cross Site Working
Party that the Manor Road site currently leased to the Territorial
Army be developed to provide a centre for the Faculty of Social
Studies and also to provide additional space for the Faculties of
English and Law, and the recommendation of the Buildings Committee
that the site be now formally allocated for this purpose. Council has
also agreed that the funding now available should be used to
construct a first phase of this development. The following special
resolution provides accordingly.

Text of Special Resolution (2)

That the Manor Road site currently leased to the Territorial Army be
allocated for a centre for the Faculty of Social Studies and to
provide additional space for the Faculties of English and Law.

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3 Questions

J.R. LUCAS, MA, Fellow of Merton College, and PROFESSOR F.G.B.
MILLAR, MA, D.PHIL., D.LITT., Fellow of Brasenose College, to ask the
Hebdomadal Council:

(1) How much has the University spent on the Coopers &
Lybrand report?

(2) Of this how much was paid to Coopers & Lybrand as a fee?

(3) How much was spent on distributing copies of the report and
the précis to members of Congregation and other interested
parties?

The following answers to the above questions have been approved
by Council.

(1) The total cost of the Coopers & Lybrand report on the
University's governance was £94,499.28; this includes
consultancy fees, VAT, expenses, and the costs of printing and
distributing the report.

(2) The fee paid to Coopers & Lybrand was £65,000. The
fee attracted VAT of £11,375. In addition, the firm's expenses
totalling £2,987.45 were reimbursed by the University.

(3) The total costs to the University of printing and
distribution were £15,136.83.

These break down as follows. The cost of producing 600 copies of the
full report was £3,000, which was paid for by the University.
The cost of the covers of the summary report was shared between the
University and Coopers & Lybrand, the former paying two-thirds of
the cost (£1,667), and the latter one-third. Taking into account
VAT on these two items, the cost to the University amounted to
£5,483.73. Additional expenses involved in printing and
distributing the report totalled £9,653.10; this figure does not
include costs of distribution through the University Messenger
Service, which were absorbed within its general budget.

The Commission has decided that its final report will include, as did
the Franks Report, a statement of the full costs of the Commission's
inquiry.

¶ Under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. VII, cl. 3
(Statutes, 1995, p. 14; Examination
Decrees
, 1995, p. 1076), the above answers shall be read in
Congregation; no debate shall be permitted upon the answers, but at
the Chairman's discretion supplementary questions may be asked to
elucidate the answers given.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 9 May 1996: Notices<br />

Notices


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

  • *Notices of exhibitions, guided tours, etc.:

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    KING JOHN II PROFESSORSHIP OF PORTUGUESE
    STUDIES

    THOMAS FOSTER EARLE, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Linacre College and
    University Lecturer in Portuguese Studies, has been appointed to the
    professorship with effect from 1 October 1996.

    Dr Earle will be a fellow of St Peter's College.


    HEATHER GRIERSON VISITING PROFESSORSHIP IN
    EUROPEAN AND COMPARATIVE LAW

    OLE LANDO, LL.M., LL.D., DR OECON H.C., External Professor of
    International and Comparative Law, Copenhagen Business School, has
    been appointed to the visiting professorship for the academic year
    1996–7.

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    GLADSTONE MEMORIAL ESSAY PRIZE 1996

    The Prize has been awarded to NICHOLAS J.G. WRIGHT, Corpus Christi
    College.


    CURZON MEMORIAL PRIZE 1996

    The Prize has been awarded jointly to JAMES JOSEPH DREVER, Christ
    Church, and ASHRUFA MISHI FARUQEE, St Antony's College.

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    LANGUAGE CENTRE


    Weekend courses in Italian, German, Spanish,
    and French

    Weekend courses in these languages will be held on the following
    dates: Italian, 18–19 May; German and Spanish, 1–2 June;
    French, 8–9 June. The courses consist of eight hours of tuition
    with an emphasis on speaking and listening to the language.

    Various levels of competence will be catered for. Some of the
    material to be studied will be taken from satellite TV, radio, and
    newspaper articles. The maximum number of students per group will be
    fifteen.

    A fee of £15 will be charged to junior members of the
    University and other full-time students, £20 to members of
    Congregation and members of staff of the University, and £28 to
    non-members.

    For further information and booking forms contact Angela Pinkney
    on (2)83360.

    Residential French course in France

    There will be a one-week French course at Vannes (Brittany) this
    summer, 17–24 July.

    Various levels of ability are catered for, from near-beginners
    to advanced. Accommodation is in a university residence. The cost per
    week including tuition, accommodation, meals, and an excursion, is
    £395. Optional group travel from Plymouth is available at
    £73 return.

    For further information and booking forms, contact Glenn
    Archibald on (2)83361.

    The Language Centre is at 12 Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6HT
    (telephone: (2)83360).

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    McDONNELL–PEW CENTRE FOR COGNITIVE
    NEUROSCIENCE

    An award from the McDonnell–Pew Program in Cognitive
    Neuroscience, based in the United States of America, has funded the
    establishment of a Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience at the
    University. It started in 1990 and is currently funded until the end
    of 1997. The centre links work on many aspects of brain research
    relevant to human cognition in several departments at Oxford and
    other institutions.

    The McDonnell–Pew Centre encourages work in all areas of
    cognitive neuroscience across all relevant disciplines and embraces
    research on experimental, theoretical, and clinical studies of
    perceptual analysis, memory, language, and motor control, including
    philosophical approaches to cognition.

    The centre offers several forms of support:

    • Research fellowships and graduate studentships, which are
      separately advertised from time time;
    • Visiting fellowships, to contribute to the costs of short-term
      visits from distinguished researchers from overseas;
    • Seminar programme;
    • Workshops, for the planning of collaborative research;
    • Network grants, to cover the costs of exchange visits for
      collaboration with laboratories elsewhere in the world, especially in
      Europe and North America;
    • Research support fund, providing small grants for pilot projects,
      etc.;
    • Travel fund, especially for costs of visits to other laboratories
      or to training courses to learn new techniques.

    Anyone wishing to join the mailing list of the centre should
    contact Lesley Court, Administrative Secretary, McDonnell–Pew
    Secretariat, University Laboratory of Physiology, Parks Road, Oxford
    OX1 3PT (telephone: Oxford (2)72497).

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    EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES CENTRE


    Audiovisual Equipment for Sale

    As a result of a change in policy which was approved last term by the
    relevant IT committees, the ETRC will no longer be providing Overhead
    Projectors, Slide Projectors or Monitors as part of its Loan/Hire
    Service, although we shall still retain one or two OHPs and Slide
    Projectors to provide an emergency backup service.

    Accordingly, the ETRC plans to dispose of the following equipment
    after the end of Trinity Term:

    • Overhead Projectors
    • 35mm Slide Projectors
    • 35m slide Carousels
    • 20-inch monitors (video only)
    • 27-inch monitors (video only)
    • 27-inch monitors (data only)

    Any departments or other institutions interested in purchasing any
    of this equipment should contact Catherine Long as soon as possible,
    and no later than Friday of fifth week (24 May). either in writing
    (ETRC, 37–41 Wellington Square), by fax ((2)70527), or by e-mail
    (etrc@etrc.ox.ac.uk).

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    GUIDELINES FOR LEAVE FOR ACADEMIC STAFF

    The General Board's regulations in respect of sabbatical leave and
    dispensation from CUF lecturing obligations are set out in Ch. VII,
    Sect. I (Statutes, 1995, pp. 362–4). Provisions
    for other leave are set out in the same section (pp. 360–1). The
    following guidelines describe the General Board's policy and practice
    in respect of applications for leave which do not fall within the
    category of straightforward sabbatical leave or dispensation, i.e.
    special leave.

    Applications for leave to hold some public offices or certain
    research awards

    (a) Applications for leave to accept an appointment in
    the public service of national importance are normally granted by the
    General Board, provided that the purpose of the leave can be shown to
    be compatible with the academic interests of the faculty, the faculty
    board lends its support to the application, and it is clear that the
    individual intends to return to university service after the period
    of leave. Leave for this purpose for heads of departments or
    professors can, however, be problematic, for obvious reasons.

    (b) Applications to national bodies for prestigious and
    competitive research awards (such as British Academy Research
    Readerships and Senior Research Fellowships, EPSRC Senior or Advanced
    Fellowships and Nuffield Foundation Social Science Research
    Fellowships) should be made to the General Board through the faculty
    board. It is usual for such national bodies to specify that
    applications should be made through the employing institution, and in
    Oxford's case this involves routing the application via the faculty
    board to the General Board. The University will normally support such
    applications for prestigious awards, but it is necessary for the
    faculty board and the General Board to consider carefully what
    replacement teaching arrangements will be required if an application
    is successful.

    Leave granted under (a) and (b) does not
    count against sabbatical entitlement: indeed the rules of some
    research awards specifically forbid this. However, as in other cases
    of special leave, the period of leave does not count as qualifying
    service for the purpose of calculating future entitlement to
    sabbatical leave, and sabbatical leave is not normally granted in the
    period immediately preceding or following periods of such leave,
    although some flexibility may be exercised in respect of periods of
    special leave not exceeding one year, especially in connection with
    the holding of research awards.

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    Applications for leave for other purposes

    All other applications for leave are initially considered in terms of
    application for sabbatical leave, until entitlement to sabbatical
    leave is exhausted. In other words, if an individual applies for
    leave under this section for any term which he or she would be
    entitled to take as sabbatical leave, any leave granted for that term
    will be granted as sabbatical leave. Such leave may also be granted
    as sabbatical leave in advance of entitlement: in other words,
    sabbatical leave will be granted for a term which the applicant would
    not normally be entitled to take as sabbatical leave, and leave for
    the term in question will then be deemed to be taken in a later term
    (normally not more than six terms later). In this way the leave will
    count against an individual's sabbatical entitlement: taking the
    individual's service as a whole, the leave will not be in addition to
    the standard sabbatical entitlement. For sabbatical leave to be
    granted in advance of entitlement, an academic case must be made by
    the faculty board to the Appointments Committee of the General Board.

    When sabbatical leave entitlement had been exhausted, an
    application has to be considered in whole or in part as one for
    special leave. In such cases, faculty boards are required, when
    making recommendations to the Appointments Committee of the General
    Board, to specify whether, and if so how, the grant of such leave
    would be in the academic interests of the faculty. Where there is no
    statement of academic interest, or this statement is not persuasive,
    special leave will not be granted.

    Applications for special leave cover many kinds of situation.
    One would be an unrepeatable opportunity to pursue academic interests
    where the applicant is ineligible for sabbatical leave. In such a
    case it would be necessary for the faculty board to demonstrate the
    academic advantage (to the University rather than to the individual)
    of the individual being able to accept the opportunity, and for an
    explanation to be given of why such an opportunity could not be taken
    up at a later period when the applicant would be entitled to
    sabbatical leave. Another situation where special leave might be
    applied for would be where there was a need for fieldwork for a
    period exceeding one year, which could therefore not be accommodated
    within the sabbatical provisions. In such a case it would be
    expected, as usual, that as much of the leave as possible would be
    taken as sabbatical or sabbatical in advance of entitlement, and the
    faculty board would again need to demonstrate the academic advantage
    to the University of the application's being granted.

    Very occasionally applications are made for leave to enable
    someone to accept an appointment in another academic institution
    (other than a routine visiting appointment held during sabbatical
    leave). In such instances, the faculty board would need to make an
    extremely convincing case as to desirability of the individual being
    offered reversionary rights to his or her university post for any
    application to be successful. Factors taken into account would
    include all relevant circumstances relating to the individual's role
    within the faculty and the consequences for the faculty, in terms of
    the refilling of the post, if leave were not to be granted and the
    individual were therefore to resign. On this latter point, it should
    be noted, of course, that if leave is granted and the individual
    subsequently resigns during the period of leave or at the end of it,
    the uncertainty about the long-term filling of the post will have
    been exacerbated. The longer the appointment in the other institution
    the less likely it is that leave will be granted; leave will not be
    granted save in the most exceptional circumstances to enable someone
    to decide whether to accept a permanent appointment elsewhere.

    In each of the situations outlined above, applications are
    considered on their academic merits, but it is emphasised that the
    nature of special leave is that it is granted exceptionally rather
    than automatically. Advice on the likelihood of success of any
    application can be obtained from the Secretary of Faculties or the
    secretary of the Appointments Committee of the General Board.

    The General Board takes the view that academic staff are
    specifically appointed to undertake both teaching and research, and
    (although the Board would support arrangements whereby teaching in
    excess of a contracted or reasonable stint was relieved) an extremely
    good case needs to be made in support of an application for special
    leave which would have the result of the individual's teaching being
    conducted mainly or wholly by someone else. This is a especially true
    given that the sabbatical leave scheme has been preserved intact
    throughout retrenchment, so providing the opportunity for individuals
    to concentrate on research in one term out of every seven.
    Willingness to forgo university stipend or the ease with which
    funding for a replacement appointment may be attracted will not be
    sufficient to guarantee in any way the success of an application for
    special leave.

    It is emphasised that any application for leave, including any
    application for funding which might result in the need for leave from
    university duties to be granted, must be made to the General Board
    through the faculty board (and head of department, in departmentally
    organised faculties). In every case the academic advantage to the
    institution will be the general criterion by which applications will
    be considered: in every case the General Board requires details of
    any necessary substitute arrangements, including those relating to
    examining and graduate supervision.

    It is recognised that some offers are made to individuals at
    short notice. Given the fact that all members of the academic staff
    have clear obligations to the University under the terms of their
    contracts, however, no such offer should be accepted without the
    explicit approval of the General Board under the procedures set out
    above: for this reason any prospect of such an offer, however
    indefinite, must be discussed (in strict confidence) with Dr
    Whiteley, secretary to the Appointments Committee of the General
    Board, at the very earliest opportunity. Delay in bringing to the
    attention of the University the possibility that an offer may be made
    will mean that if applications and substitute arrangements then have
    to be considered at short notice, this might compromise the chance of
    leave being granted.

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    Stipendiary arrangements

    Leave granted under the above arrangements is normally without
    university stipend, but the precise implications for payment can
    vary. In some cases the leave is clearly unpaid, such as when
    appointments in the public service are held. In other cases, such as
    the holding of prestigious research awards, the University is
    expected to continue paying the individual, while the grant-giving
    body provides support for the University to employ a replacement: or
    the grant-giving body supplies a sum of money which is equivalent to
    that paid by the University under normal circumstances to the
    individual. Although this is technically special leave without
    university stipend, the University will continue to pay the stipend
    to the individual through the payroll mechanism, being reimbursed by
    the award-giving body. Special leave under any other arrangement will
    mean the University will cease to make payments of stipend and
    national insurance and superannuation contributions. In general,
    except where the rules of grant-giving bodies in respect of major
    competitive awards specify otherwise, it is expected that the normal
    result of the granting of an application for special leave will be
    the release to the University of the full salary and on-costs of the
    substantive university appointment, which may be available, with the
    agreement of the General Board, to the faculty board for the making
    of any necessary replacement appointment. This is particularly
    important given the University's practice of advertising temporary
    university lecturerships, for example, without cash-limited salary
    scales.

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    UNIVERSITY CLUB


    Forthcoming exhibitions

    People of our time: linocuts by Heinke Jenkins (17 May–28
    June)

    Edifice and order: prints by Gabrielle Oliver (17 May–28
    June)

    These exhibitions will be held at the University Club, 6 South Parks
    Road; open Monday–Friday (except Bank Holiday), 10 a.m.–5
    p.m.

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    CONCERT


    St John's College and Colin Carr

    THE BORROMEO STRING QUARTET and COLIN CARR will give a concert of
    works by Beethoven and Schubert at 8.30 p.m. on Friday, 17 May, in
    the Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's College. The programme
    will include the Schubert Quintet. Admission is free, by ticket,
    available from the Porters' Lodge.

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    BODLEIAN LIBRARY


    Revision of regulations on admission
    charges

    The Curators of the Library have reviewed the charging arrangements
    made for the issuing of cards to certain categories of readers. This
    followed representations from the Higher Education Funding Council
    for England (HEFCE), on behalf of bona-fide researchers employed in
    HEFCE-funded institutions, and in connection with the non-formula
    funding which HEFCE have agreed to for the Bodleian as a copyright
    deposit library. These and other exemptions came into effect on 1
    January 1996.

    (a) Staff and graduate students of, and academic visitors
    attached to, educational institutions funded by the Higher Education
    Funding Councils for England, Scotland and Wales, or by the
    Department of Education for Northern Ireland, and similar
    institutions in the Republic of Ireland;

    (b) academic staff, research students, and academic
    visitors currently attached to the institutions listed in the
    1995–6 editions of either the University Calendar or the
    University Diary as `not part of the University but having some
    association with it';

    (c) matriculated members of the University, no longer in
    residence, who have never obtained an Oxford degree;

    (d) holders of Degrees, Diplomas, and Certificates
    awarded in the name of the University on completion of courses which
    did not require matriculation.

    For categories (a) and (b), evidence of this status
    and its future duration should accompany the form or letter of
    recommendation presented on initial application for a card, and will
    also be required in order to obtain exemption from payment on
    renewal.

    The charges made for the issuing of cards to other categories of
    users are currently under review by the Curators of the Bodleian
    Library.

    Return to List of Contents of this section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 9 May 1996: Lectures<br />

    Lectures


    Contents of this section:

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    VALEDICTORY LECTURE

    PROFESSOR P.C.J. PULZER will deliver his valedictory lecture at 5
    p.m. on Monday, 13 May, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `On living in the twentieth century.'

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    CLARENDON LECTURES IN ENGLISH

    Penpoints, gunpoints, and dreams: performance of literature and
    power in post-colonial Africa

    PROFESSOR NGUGI WA THIONG'O, New York University, will deliver the
    Clarendon Lectures in English at 5 p.m. on the following days in
    Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building.

    Fri. 10 May: `Art war with the state: writers and
    guardians of a post-colonial society.'

    Mon. 13 May: `Enactments of power: the politics of
    performance space.'

    Wed. 15 May: `The allegory of the cave: language,
    democracy, and a New World Order.'

    Fri. 17 May: `Oral power and literary glory: orature
    and literature in the academy.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    GRINFIELD LECTURES ON THE SEPTUAGINT

    The Septuagint as a cultural document (second series)

    DR TESSA RAJAK, Head of the Department of Classics, University of
    Reading, will deliver the second series of her Grinfield Lectures at
    5 p.m. on Mondays in the Collier Room, Regent's Park College.

    13 May: `Greek as a Jewish language: translation and
    literature.'

    20 May: `The Greek Bible and the language of
    power.'

    27 May: `In and out of the Bible: Greek additions to
    the biblical text.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    JAMES FORD SPECIAL LECTURE IN BRITISH
    HISTORY

    DR M. ASTON, FBA, FSA, F.R.HIST.S., will deliver a James Ford Special
    Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 10 May, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `Obliteration and memory in the English
    Reformation.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    O'DONNELL LECTURE IN CELTIC STUDIES
    1995–6

    PROFESSOR DONATIEN LAURENT, Directeur de recherche, CNRS, and
    Directeur du Centre de recherche bretonne et celtique,
    Université de Bretagne occidentale, will deliver the O'Donnell
    Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 30 May, in Room 2, the Taylor
    Institution.

    Subject: `Ronan's eyes: duality tamed in Breton folk
    culture.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    HUSSEY LECTURE ON THE CHURCH AND THE ARTS

    PROFESSOR PETER S. HAWKINS, Professor of Religion and Literature,
    Yale University, will deliver the eighth annual Hussey Lecture at 5
    p.m. on Monday, 13 May, in the Lecture Hall, the Taylor Institution.

    Subject: ` "Take it and read": an invitation to
    the Divine Comedy.'

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    BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

    J.W. Jenkinson Memorial Lecture

    DR S.K., MCCONNELL, Stanford, will deliver a Jenkinson Memorial
    Lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 13 May, in Lecture Theatre A, the
    Zoology/Psychology Building.

    Subject: `Asymmetric divisions and mammalian
    neurogenesis.'

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    CLINICAL MEDICINE

    DR J.L. CUNNINGHAM, Bristol, will give a seminar at 4 p.m. on Monday,
    13 May, in the Lecture Theatre, the Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre.

    Conveners: J. Kenwright, BM, MA, Nuffield Professor of
    Orthopaedic Surgery, and M.J.O. Francis, MA, D.Phil., University
    Lecturer in Orthopaedic Surgery.

    Subject: `Post-traumatic and disuse osteoporosis—can
    this be avoided?'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Nuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

    The following lectures will be given on Thursday, 9 May, in the Anne
    Anderson Lecture Theatre, Level 3, the Women's Centre, the John
    Radcliffe Hospital.

    MR J. THORNTON, Leeds

    2 p.m.: `The genetics of pre-eclampsia.'

    MR G. TREW, Hammersmith Hospital, London

    3 p.m.: `Tubal micro-surgery: What? When?
    How?—and Why?'

    MR C. SUTTON, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford

    4 p.m.: `Does laser laparoscopy really work?'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    University Department of Clinical Pharmacology

    The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Thursdays. With
    the exception of the first seminar, which will be held in the Lecture
    Theatre, Green College, they will take place in the Cairns Seminar
    Suite, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

    DR N.N. OSBORNE

    16 May: `Flupertine protects against necrotic and
    apoptotic injury in the retina.'

    DR H.G. SERIES, Fiennes Centre, Banbury

    30 May: `Neurotoxic amphetamines: anatomical and
    functional effects.'

    DR N.M. BARNES, Birmingham

    6 June: `The central 5-HT 4 receptor:
    still basking in the sun?'

    DR G. FOSTER, Cardiff

    13 June: `Development and survival of a
    conditionally immortalised serotonergic cell line.'

    DR S. BRIDDON

    20 June: `Desensitisation of human transfected 5-HT
    2A and 5-HT 2C receptors.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    MODERN HISTORY AND INSTITUTE FOR AMERICAN
    STUDIES

    THE HON. SHIRLEY HUFSTEDLER, formerly Judge of the US Court of
    Appeal, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 14 May, in the Examination
    Schools.

    Subject: `The American Presidency and the courts.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    SOCIAL STUDIES

    DR ELAINE C. KAMARCK, Chief Policy Analyst, Office of the Vice-
    President, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 16 May, in the Large
    Lecture Room, Nuffield College.

    Convener: B.E. Shafer, MA, Mellon Professor of American
    Government.

    Subject: `Running for President from the White House.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE UNIT

    Special seminar

    PROFESSOR WILLETT KEMPTON, Assistant Professor, College of Marine
    Studies, University of Delaware, will speak at a special seminar to
    be held at 2.15 p.m. on Monday, 20 May, in the Main Lecture Theatre,
    the School of Geography.

    Subject: `Cultural models of the environment.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE


    Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women

    Richards Lecture

    DR HENRIETTA L. MOORE, Reader in Anthropology and Director of the
    Gender Institute, London School of Economics, will deliver the
    Richards Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 15 May, in the Taylor
    Institution.

    The Richards Lecture is given in honour of Dr Audrey Richards
    (1899–1984), formerly President of the Royal Anthropological
    Institute and of the African Studies Association.

    Subject: `Symbolism, sex, and psychoanalysis.'

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    CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES

    The role of intellectual property law in society

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on the days shown in
    the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Wolfson College. With the
    exception of the first seminar, to be held on Wednesday, 22 May, they
    will be held on Mondays.

    Convener: D.J. Galligan, BCL, MA, Professor of Socio-
    Legal Studies and Director of the Centre.

    PROFESSOR C. TAPPER

    22 May: `Intellectual property in an age of
    information technology.'

    W. SCHWARTZ, Partner, Morrison & Foerester, San Francisco

    27 May: `Territorial laws in a world of borderless
    technology.'

    DR M. SPENCE

    3 June: `Is it ever wrong to reap without sowing?
    The development of a tort of misappropriation.'

    PROFESSOR N. NETANEL, Texas

    10 June: `Copyright and a democratic civil
    society.'

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    BALLIOL COLLEGE


    Vaughan Lecture

    PROFESSOR B. EICHENGREEN, University of California at Berkeley, will
    deliver the annual Vaughan Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 14 May, in
    the Hall, Balliol College.

    Subject: `The relation between monetary and political
    union in Europe.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    GREEN COLLEGE


    Reuter Foundation Programme

    Iain Walker Memorial Lecture 1996

    URSULA OWEN, Index on Censorship, will deliver the
    annual Iain Walker Memorial Lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Wednesday, 15
    May, in Rhodes House.

    Subject: `Hate speech—a suitable case for
    censorship.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    MANSFIELD COLLEGE


    Oxford Centre for the Environment, Ethics,
    and Society

    DR R.G. WILLIAMSON, Professor of Anthropology, University of
    Saskatchewan, will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 14 May, in
    the Council Room, Mansfield College.

    Further details may be obtained from Ms Nina Booth-Clibborn
    (telephone: (2)70886, e-mail: ocees@mansfield.oxford.ac.uk).

    Subject: `Human rights, animal rights, and the fur trade:
    a circumpolar perspective.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    PEMBROKE COLLEGE


    Blackstone Lecture

    THE RT. HON. SIR RICHARD SCOTT, V.-C., will deliver the twentieth
    Blackstone Lecture at 11.30 a.m. on Saturday, 11 May, in the
    Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building.

    Subject: `Ministerial accountability.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ST HUGH'S COLLEGE


    Henry Rowlatt Bickley Memorial Lecture

    PROFESSOR LUCA CAVALLI-SFORZA, Member of the Royal Society, will
    deliver the fifteenth Henry Rowlatt Bickley Memorial Lecture at 5.30
    p.m. on Tuesday, 14 May, in the Mordan Hall, St Hugh's College.

    Subject: `Genetic dissection of Europe and its use for
    historical reconstruction.'

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    WOLFSON COLLEGE


    Isaiah Berlin Lecture

    DR CONOR CRUISE O'BRIEN will deliver the annual Isaiah Berlin Lecture
    at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 16 May, in the hall, Wolfson College. The
    lecture is open to the public.

    Subject: `Edmund Burke and Thomas Jefferson: mutually
    antipathetic minds.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARY
    FORUM

    DR C. STRAY, Swansea, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 27 May, in
    Rewley House. All are welcome to attend.

    Subject: `Idiosyncrasy and idiolexis in Victorian
    England: the Mushri–English Dictionary.

    Return to List of Contents of this section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 9 May 1996: Grants and Funding<br />

    Grants and Research Funding


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue





    <br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 9 May 1996: Examinations and Boards<br />

    Examinations and Boards


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    CHAIRMAN OF EXAMINERS

    The Vice-Chancellor desires to call the attention of all
    examiners to the provisions of Ch. VI, Sect. ii.c, § 1,
    clauses 1–3 (Examination Decrees, 1994, pp.
    928–9), which require examiners in all university
    examinations to appoint one of their number to act as Chairman,
    to notify the appointment to the Vice-Chancellor, and to publish
    it in the University Gazette.

    He desires that these appointments shall be notified to the
    Clerk of the Schools who will himself inform the Vice-Chancellor
    and see that notice of them is duly published in the
    University Gazette.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    EXAMINATION SCHOOLS


    Accommodation for Lectures

    Michaelmas Term 1996

    The Chairman of the Curators of the Schools would be grateful if
    Professors, Readers, and University Lecturers who wish to lecture
    at the Schools in Michaelmas Term 1996 could inform the Clerk of
    the Schools at the end of the present term. It is necessary to
    know whether a room suitable for an audience of more than one
    hundred persons is required; only the three large writing-schools
    will accommodate more than that number.

    Afternoon lectures should normally finish by 6 p.m.

    Attention is drawn to the fact that overhead projection equipment
    and 35-mm projectors are available. When these facilities are
    required the Clerk of the Schools should be notified in advance.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MEDIEVAL AND
    MODERN LANGUAGES


    Optional Subjects in the Honour School
    of Modern Languages and the related joint honour schools

    The Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages gives
    notice, under the provisions of the regulations in
    Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 425, ll. 40–2,
    that the following Optional Subjects will be available in the
    examination in Trinity Term 1998:

    101 The comparative descriptive linguistics of modern European
    languages. Candidates will be expected to have a detailed
    knowledge of any two of the following languages and to have made
    a comparative study of their present–day phonetics,
    phonology, morphology, syntax, and vocabulary: English, French,
    German, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Russian, Greek.

    102 Semantics. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with
    the principal theories in this field since 1900.

    103 [1]
    General Linguistics. Candidates should be familiar with
    the terminology, methodology, and main theoretical standpoints
    of modern linguistics. They should be able to discuss, with
    reference to phonetics, phonology, grammar, and semantics, some
    of the following topics: linguistic units and relations;
    linguistic universals; communicational functions of language;
    language acquisition; linguistic variation and linguistic change;
    linguistic relativism. Opportunity will be provided for
    candidates to show proficiency in phonological, grammatical, and
    other types of analysis of given samples of linguistic
    material.

    104 [2]
    Modern Literary Theory. Candidates will be expected to
    be familiar with major theories in this field since 1918.

    105 European Cinema and Literary Movements from 1920 to the
    present. Candidates will be expected: (a) to show
    evidence of having worked on film study and analysis, using D.
    Bordwell and K. Thompson, Film Art, 3rd edition (McGraw Hill,
    London, 1990); P. Cook, The Cinema Book (BFI, London, 1985); M.
    Liehm, Passion and Defiance (University of California Press,
    Berkeley–Los Angeles, 1984); (b) to have studied
    two of the following, up to four of which will be available in
    the examination: Expressionism and the Early Avant-garde;
    Realism, Socialist-Realism, Neo-Realism; Auteurism; Filmic
    Adaptations of Literary Texts/Literary Authors writing for the
    screen; Totalitarianism in Literature and Film; Surrealism;
    Representations of Gender and Sexuality; The New Avant-garde and
    Post-modern Film.

    A list of the topics listed in (b) which will be
    available in the examination can be obtained from the Modern
    Languages Faculty Secretarial Office in 37 Wellington Square at
    the beginning of Michaelmas Full Term 1996.

    200 Romance Philology and Linguistics. Candidates will be
    expected to show a detailed knowledge of the methods of
    Comparative Romance Philology and to illustrate their answers
    with examples from more than one Romance language. A section on
    `Vulgar Latin' will be set, including passages for linguistic
    comment from one or more of the following: Early Glosses,
    Appendix Probi, Aetheriae Peregrinatio ad Loca Sancta. The
    section will be compulsory for candidates offering Modern
    Languages Paper IV in any two Romance languages, and optional for
    all other candidates, with the exception of those offering the
    Classics and Modern Languages paper in Late Latin Philology, who
    will be precluded from answering it.

    201 Anglo-Norman Language and Literature.

    202 Old Provençal. Prescribed text: F.R. Hamlin, P.T.
    Ricketts, J. Hathaway, Introduction à l'étude de
    l'ancien provençal, Geneva 1967 and 1985, with particular
    reference to nos. 2, 3, 4, 8, 10, 12, 14, 15, 17, 18, 20, 25, 26,
    27, 28, 31, 33, 34, 36, 39, 40, 42, 44, 46, 48, 49, 53, 54, 56,
    57, 59, 65, 67, 70, from which passages will be set for
    translation. In addition, candidates may answer questions on
    either literary or linguistic topics or both.

    203 The twelfth- and thirteenth-century Grail Romances.

    204 French historical writing up to 1515.

    205 French poetry of the mid-sixteenth century.

    206 Dramatic theory and practice in France from 1605 to 1660,
    with special reference to Corneille.

    207 French grammarians and linguistic theory of the seventeenth
    and eighteenth centuries.

    208 [3]
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau.

    209 Honoré de Balzac.

    210 French Poetry 1870 to 1918.

    211 French literature and the First World War.

    212 [4]
    Marcel Proust.

    213 Surrealism.

    214 The `Nouveau Roman', with special reference to the work of
    Robbe-Grillet, Nathalie Sarraute and Butor.

    215 Literature and the visual arts from Diderot to Zola.

    216 French women writers.

    217 Advanced French Translation: Theory and Practice.

    300 Old Norse. Candidates will be expected to have made a special
    study of F. Ranke and D. Hofmann, Altnordisches Elementarbuch
    (Sammlung Göschen No. 1115), pp. 80–135. Candidates
    will also be expected to have read the Völsungasaga and
    related material from the Poetic Edda.

    301 Old High German, with either Gothic or Old Saxon or Old
    English. Prescribed texts: Gothic, Gospel according to St Mark,
    chapters 1–9; Old Saxon, Heliand, ll. 4025–5038; Old
    English, Beowulf, ll. 1–1049.

    302 The German Minnesang. Candidates will be expected to have
    made a special study of Friedrich von Hausen, Lieder (ed.
    Schweikle) (Reclam); Reinmar, Lieder (ed. Schweikle) (Reclam);
    Heinrich von Morungen, Lieder (ed. Tervooren) (Reclam).

    303 Wolfram von Eschenbach.

    304 Martin Luther.

    305 German poetry and drama of the seventeenth century.

    306 Eighteenth-century German aesthetics from Baumgarten to
    Schiller.

    307 Hölderlin, Hyperion, Empedokles (ed. M. B. Benn,
    Clarendon German Series) and the poetry written after 1797.

    308 The Bildungsroman from Wieland to Keller.

    309 German political thought from 1780 to 1830. Candidates will
    be expected to have read: Kant, Idee zu einer allgemeinen
    Geschichte in weltbürgerlicher Absicht, 1784; Zum ewigen
    Frieden, 1795; Humboldt, Ideen zu einem Versuch, die Grenzen der
    Wirksamkeit des Staates zu bestimmen, 1792; Novalis, Die
    Christenheit oder Europa, 1799; Fichte, Reden an die deutsche
    Nation, 1808; Hegel, Vorlesungen über die Philosophie der
    Geschichte, Einleitung (ed. Th. Litt, Reclam); Grundlinien der
    Philosophie des Rechts, Vorrede, 1821.

    310 Johann Nestroy and the Wiener Volkstheater.

    311 The poetry of Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Stefan George, and
    Rainer Maria Rilke. Candidates will be examined on the poetry of
    two of these authors and will be expected to have read the works
    listed in any two of the sections below.

    (a) Hofmannsthal: Gedichte und Lyrische Dramen, ed.
    Steiner (Fischer Verlag, 1952), pp. 7–136, 467–529.

    (b) George: Hymnen, Pilgerfahrten, Algabal; Das Jahr
    der Seele; Der Teppich des Lebens und die Lieder von Traum und
    Tod mit einem Vorspiel; the sections `Zeitgedichte',
    `Gestalten', `Gezeiten', and `Maximin' from Der siebente Ring;
    Das neue Reich omitting the section `Sprüche'.

    (c) Rilke: Das Stunden–Buch; Neue Gedichte (both
    parts); Requiem für eine Freundin; Requiem für Wolf
    Graf von Kalckreuth; Die Sonette an Orpheus; Duineser
    Elegien.

    312 `Expressionist' poetry. Candidates will be expected to have
    a detailed knowledge of poetry included in Lyrik des
    Expressionismus ed. Silvio Vietta (Deutsche Texte no. 37,
    published by Niemeyer).

    314 German Poetry since 1945. Candidates will be expected to have
    a general knowledge of the field, and a detailed knowledge of
    works written in or after 1945 by three of the following authors:
    Bachmann, Benn, Biermann, Bobrowski, Volker Braun, Brecht, Celan
    (the collections of poetry from Mohn und Gedächtnis to
    Atemwende inclusive), Enzensberger, Grass, Huchel, Sarah Kirsch,
    Kunert, Sachs.

    Note: The paper will include a compulsory section
    containing general questions and commentary passages taken from
    the authors being offered; candidates will thus be required to
    attempt either a general essay or a commentary. Brecht's poetry
    from 1945 to 1956 may be offered as one of the three authors
    selected for detailed knowledge in this paper by candidates
    offering Brecht as a prescribed author in paper X.

    315 The German novel since 1945. Candidates will be expected to
    have a general knowledge of the field, and to have read
    German–language novels relating to the topics listed below.
    The paper will consist of a number of general questions, and a
    number of questions on each of the following topics (candidates
    will be precluded from answering more than two questions on any
    one topic): Narrative Voice; `Vergangenheitsbewältigung';
    Politics and Society; Identity and Gender.

    400 Italian lyric poetry of the thirteenth century.

    401 Dante's minor works.

    402 `Questione della lingua.' Candidates will be expected to have
    read: Dante, De Vulgari Eloquentia; Bembo, Prose della volgar
    lingua; Manzoni, Scritti sulla lingua.

    403 Vico.

    404 The aesthetics and literary criticism of Croce. Candidates
    will be expected to be familiar with Part I of the Estetica,
    Croce's principal theoretical additions to it, and a broad sample
    of his criticism of Italian literature.

    405 The Works of Carlo Emilio Gadda.

    406 Sicilian literature 1950–1990.

    407 Italian Women Writers 1950–1990

    500 [5]
    The Civilisation of Muslim Spain.

    503 The Spanish Erasmians. Candidates will be expected to have
    read: Erasmus, El Enquiridión (ed. Dámaso Alonso,
    Madrid, 1932); Coloquios de Erasmo (Nueva Biblioteca de Autores
    Españoles, vol. xxi, pp. 149–202, 227–49);
    Alfonso de Valdés, Diálogo de las cosas ocurridas
    en Roma (ed. José F. Montesinos, Clásicos
    castellanos); Juan de Valdés, Diálogo de doctrina
    christiana y el psalterio (ed. Domingo Ricart, Mexico, 1964, pp.
    1–130); Juan Luis Vives, Concordia y discordia en el linaje
    humano [De concordia et discordia in humano genere], Bk. IV
    (Obras completas, trans. L. Riber, Aguilar, Madrid, 1947–8,
    ii, 195–253); Cristóbal de Villalón (attr.),
    Viaje de Turquía (Part I); F. de la Torre,
    Institución de un rey christiano (ed. R. W. Truman, Exeter
    Hispanic Texts, 1979)(passages for commentary will not be set
    from this text).

    504 The Discovery and Conquest of Mexico and the Antilles.
    Candidates will be expected to have read: Cristóbal
    Colón, Los cuatro viajes del almirante y su testamento
    (ed. Austral); Hernán Cortés, Cartas de
    relación de la conquista de Méjico (ed. M.
    Alcalá, Porrúa, Mexico) and A. R. Pagden,
    Hernán Cortés: Letters from Mexico (Oxford
    University Press, London, 1972), Letters two and three; Bernal
    Díaz del Castillo, Historia de la Conquista de la Nueva
    España (Porrúa, Mexico, 1960), vol. i, pp.
    174–501 and vol. ii, pp. 1–60; Bartolomé de las
    Casas, Brevísima relación de la destrucción
    de las Indias (EUDEBA, Buenos Aires, 1966); Toribio de Motolinia,
    Historia de los Indios de la Nueva España (Porrúa,
    Mexico, 1969), pp. 77–109; Bernardino de Sahagún,
    Historia general de la Nueva España (Porrúa,
    Mexico, 1956), Libros 3, 7, and 8. Candidates will also be
    expected to have read Pedro Mártir de Anglería,
    Décadas del Nuevo Mundo (ed. J. Torres Asensio), omitting
    Décadas 2, 3, and 6.

    505 Spanish devotional and mystical writing 1577–1588.
    Candidates will be expected to have read: Santa Teresa de
    Jesús, Moradas del castillo interior; Fray Luis de
    Granada, Introducción del símbolo de la fe (ed.
    José María Balcells, Madrid, Cátedra, 1989),
    pp. 125–231; Fray Luis de León, Rey de Dios, Esposo,
    and Jesús, from De los nombres de Cristo; San Juan de la
    Cruz, Llama de amor viva (candidates will also be expected to
    have read the poem), Malón de Chaide, La conversión
    de la Magdalena (3 vols., ed. Félix García,
    Clásicos Castellanos, Madrid, 1958), III, 83–178,
    190–219.

    507 Twentieth-century Catalan literature. Candidates will be
    expected to have a general knowledge of the field and a detailed
    knowledge of works by at least three authors. Passages for
    comment, which will not be compulsory, will be set from the
    authors currently prescribed. Details of the authors and works
    prescribed for detailed knowledge will be available in the Modern
    Languages Administration and Faculty Office, 37 Wellington
    Square, at the beginning of the Michaelmas Full Term of the
    academic year of the examination.

    508 Galician literature and culture after Francoism. Candidates
    will be expected to have a general knowledge of the field and a
    detailed knowledge of works by at least three authors. Passages
    for comment, which will not be compulsory, will be set from
    authors currently prescribed. Details of the authors and works
    prescribed for detailed knowledge will be available in the Modern
    Languages Faculty Office, 37 Wellington Square, at the beginning
    of the Michaelmas Full Term of the academic year of the
    examination.

    530 The Work of Alfonso the Wise as author and patron of
    literature and learning. Passages for commentary will be set from
    Primera crónica general (ed. R. Menéndez Pidal,
    Madrid, 1955), caps. 814–967; Las siete partidas (ed. Real
    Academia de la Historia, Madrid, 1807), I (Prólogo and
    i–both versions), ii; II (i, iii–v, ix–xi, xv,
    xviii, xxi–xxii, xxiv, xxxi); III (xix–xx); Cantigas
    de Santa Maria (ed. Jesús Montoya, Letras
    hispánicas, 293, Madrid, Cátedra).

    531 Spanish and Portuguese Prose Romances of the Fifteenth and
    Sixteenth Centuries. Candidates will be expected to have a
    knowledge of the field and to have made a special study of at
    least one romance from each of the following groups, from which
    passages for literary commentary will be set: (a)
    sentimental, (b) chivalric, and (c)
    pastoral.

    (a) Diego de San Pedro, Cárcel de amor (ed.
    Whinnom); Juan de Flores, Grimalte y Gradissa (ed. Waley);
    Bernardim Ribeiro, Menina e moça;

    (b) Spanish Grail Fragments (ed. Pietsch);
    Amadís de Gaula, Part I (ed. Place); Palmeirim de
    Inglaterra (ed. Rodrigues Lapa); Tirant lo Blanch, Book I;

    (c) Jorge de Montemayor, Los siete libros de la Diana
    (ed. López Estrada); Gil Polo, Diana enamorada (ed.
    Ferreres); Samuel Usque, Consolaç o às
    tribulaç es de Israel vol. i.

    532 Latin American Fiction from 1940. Candidates will be expected
    to show a detailed knowledge of the novels/short stories of at
    least two of the following authors: Jorge Luis Borges, Alejo
    Carpentier, Julio Cortázar, Fernando del Paso, Carlos
    Fuentes, Gabriel García Márquez, Jo o Guimar es
    Rosa, Osman Lins, Clarice Lispector, Mario Vargas Llosa.

    560 The Galician-Portuguese Cancioneiros.

    561 The Chronicles of the Portuguese Expansion in Asia.
    Candidates will be expected to have read: the texts in Portuguese
    contained in T.F. Earle and John Villiers, Albuquerque, Caesar
    of the East (Aris and Phillips, 1990); Jo o de Barros,
    Décadas, ed. António Bai o, vol. I (Sá da
    Costa, 1945) (candidates are advised to consult also the
    electronic edition of the Décadas published by the Centre
    for the Study of the Portuguese Discoveries); Diogo do Couto, O
    soldado prático, ed. Rodrigues Lapa (Sá da Costa,
    1954); Fern o Mendes Pinto, Peregrinaç o, chaps. 1,
    36–104, 203–26.

    562 Camoes. Candidates will be expected to have read Os
    Lusíadas (ed. F. Pierce)(passages for translation will be
    set from Cantos I, V, IX) and Líricas (ed. Rodrigues Lapa,
    1970 or later).

    563 The Brazilian Novel of the North-East 1880–1960.

    600 [6]
    Old Church Slavonic in relation to Common Slavonic and
    Russian.

    601 Comparative Slavonic Philology, with special reference to
    Russian and any one of the following languages: Bulgarian, Czech,
    Macedonian, Polish, Serbo-Croat, Slovak, Slovene, Sorbian,
    Ukrainian, White Russian.

    602 [7]
    The structure and history of one of the following
    languages: Bulgarian, Czech, Macedonian, Polish, Serbo-Croat,
    Slovak, Slovene, Sorbian, Ukrainian, White Russian.

    603 Language and style in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century
    Russian literature.

    604 Russian thought from 1825 to 1905. Candidates will be
    expected to have read the works of Belinsky, Herzen, the
    Slavophiles, Chernyshevsky, Mikhaylovsky, Plekhanov, Lenin.

    605 Russian narrative fiction from 1917. Questions will be set
    predominantly on the following authors: Babel', Bulgakov,
    Erenburg, Leonov, Olesha, Pasternak, Sholokhov, Solzhenitsyn,
    Zamyatin.

    606 Modern Russian poetry, with special reference to the works
    of Akhmatova, Mandel'shtam, Pasternak, Tsvetaeva.

    607 Russian religious philosophy in the late nineteenth and early
    twentieth centuries, with special reference to the works of
    Fedorov, Solov'ev, Berdyaev, Florensky and S. Bulgakov.

    608 Czech and Slovak fiction since 1945, with reference to the
    works of Hrabal, Páral, Kundera, Bednár, Johanides,
    and others.

    701 The School of the Ionian Islands 1797–1912, with special
    reference to the works of Solomos, Kalvos, Laskaratos, Matesis,
    Valaoritis, and Mavilis.

    702 The New Athenian School of Poetry 1880–1912, with
    special reference to the works of Palamas, Drosinis, Gryparis,
    Krystallis, Malakasis, and Hadzopoulos.

    703 The Greek novel 1918–40, with special reference to the
    works of K. Theotokis, G. Theotokas, Karagatsis, Myrivilis,
    Venezis, K. Politis, and G. N. Abbot.

    704 Greek Women Writers.

    801 [8]
    Medieval Welsh tales and romances.

    802 [8]The poets of the
    Welsh princes.

    803 [8]The poetry of Dafydd
    ap Gwilym.

    804 The Ulster Cycle of tales.

    805 The classical Irish bardic tradition.

    806 The structure and history of the Welsh language.

    807 The structure and history of the Irish language.

    900 Hebrew poetry and prose of Medieval Spain and Provence. In
    addition to the literary texts, candidates will be expected to
    show knowledge of the historical background of Spain and Provence
    from the eleventh to the fourteenth centuries, in particular the
    transition from an Islamic to a Christian environment and the
    Jewish response to it. Candidates will be expected to have read
    selected works by the following writers: Moses Ibn Ezra; Abraham
    Ibn Ezra; Joseph Ibn Zabara; Judah al-Harizi; Meshullam da Piera;
    Shem Tob Falaquera; Todros Abulafia; Isaac Hagorni. All texts
    will be selected from J. Schirmann, Hashirah ha'ivrit besefarad
    uveprovans.

    901 Early twentieth-century Hebrew literature. Candidates will
    be expected to show knowledge of the work of Central and East
    European Hebrew writers (some of whom settled in Jewish Palestine
    in the early decades of this century) and in particular of their
    literary development in the environment of Austrian, Russian, and
    Polish literature, and their influence in shaping contemporary
    Hebrew literature. Candidates will be expected to have read
    stories by Y. H. Brenner and by M. Berdyczewski; David Vogel's
    novel, Hayei nisu'im; a selection of poetry by H. N. Bialik, Saul
    Tschernichovsky, Leah Goldberg, Nathan Alterman, and Abraham
    Shlonski. Texts will be selected from the following works: Y. H.
    Brenner, Kovetz sippurim (Sifrei Mofet); Y. Lichtenbaum (ed.),
    Sofreinu (Ahiasaf); T. Carmi (ed.), The Penguin Book of Hebrew
    Verse.

    902 The literature of the State of Israel. Candidates will be
    expected to show knowledge of modern Israel's literary history
    and the development of its literature in the light of twentieth-
    century Western European influences. Candidates will be expected
    to have read stories by S. Y. Agnon, Aharon Meged, and Aharon
    Appelfeld; a selection of poetry by Nathan Zach, Yehuda Amichai,
    Dan Pagis, and Meir Wieseltier; and two plays by Yehoshua Sobol.
    Texts will be selected from the following works: S. Y. Agnon,
    Sefer Ha–ma'asim (Schocken Books, 1948); Aharon Appelfeld,
    Shanim vesha'ot (Hakibbutz Hameuchad, 1975); T. Carmi (ed.), The
    Penguin Book of Hebrew Verse; Yehoshua Sobol, Nefesh yehudi and
    Ghetto.

    903 Yiddish Linguistics. Candidates will be expected to show
    knowledge of the methods and findings of Yiddish linguistic
    research with respect to any three of the following five topics:
    (i) origins and history of Yiddish; (ii)interrelationships with
    German dialects and standard German; (iii) the Semitic component
    in Yiddish; (iv) Yiddish dialectology; (v) Yiddish
    sociolinguistics. Required readings for each of these topics will
    be in Yiddish, English, and German.

    904 Modern Yiddish Literature. Candidates will be expected to
    have read:

    Sholem Aleichem, Kasrílevker progrés (in his Fun
    Kasrílevke, NY 1919, pp. 11–84); Ber Borokhov, Di
    úfgabn fun der yídisher filológye (in
    Shprákhforshung un literatúr geshíkhte, ed.
    N. Mayzl, Tel Aviv 1966, pp. 53–75); Sh. An–ski
    (Shloyme–Zanvl Rapoport), Der díbek (in Di
    yídishe dráme fun tsvántsikstn
    yorhúndert, NY 1977, vol. ii, pp. 7–60); Selections
    from the poetry of R. Ayzland, A. M. Dilon, M. L. Halpern, Z.
    Landoy, M. Leyb, H. Leyvik, Y. Y. Shvarts, A. N. Stencl, M.
    Vintshevski (in Músterverk fun der yídisher
    literatúr, ed. Rozhanski, vol. lxxvi, pp. 40–53,
    61–6, 91–100, 112–34; vol. lxxviii, pp. 211,
    234–8); Isaac Bashevis Singer, A tógbukh fun a nisht
    gebóyrenem and Der yid fun bovl (in his Der sótn
    in goráy un ándere dertséylungen, Jerusalem
    1972, pp. 251–70, 307–19).

    Notes on mutual exclusions and other restrictions

    [1]
    Candidates offering the Optional Subject `General
    Linguistics' may not offer paper XIII from the Honour School of
    Modern Languages.

    No candidate in the Honour School of English and Modern Languages
    may offer both the Optional Subject `General Linguistics' and the
    paper `Linguistic Theory' from the Honour School of English
    Language and Literature.

    Return to text

    [2]
    No candidate in the Honour School of English and Modern
    Languages may offer both the Optional Subject `Modern Literary
    Theory' and the paper `The History and Theory of Criticism' from
    the Honour School of English Language and Literature.

    Return to text

    [3]
    No candidate in the Honour School of Modern History and
    Modern Languages my offer both the Optional Subject `Jean-Jacques
    Rousseau' and the Modern History Political and Social Thought
    paper.

    Return to text

    [4]
    No candidate in the Honour School of Modern History and
    Modern Languages may offer both the Optional Subject `Marcel
    Proust' and Further Subject in General History, `Literature,
    Politics, and Society in France 1870–1914'.

    Return to text

    [5]
    Candidates will be given an opportunity to show knowledge
    of Arabic, but will not be required to show such knowledge.
    Candidates offering this paper must have the approval of the
    Joint Committee on Arabic and Spanish. Applications should be
    sent to the Faculty Secretary, Oriental Institute, not later than
    the Monday of second week of Michaelmas Term in the academic year
    in which the candidate proposes to take the examination.

    Return to text

    [6]
    No candidate in the Honour School of Modern Languages or
    in a joint Honour School involving Modern Languages may offer
    both the Optional Subject `Old Church Slavonic in relation to
    Common Slavonic and Russian' and option (1) (`The Old Church
    Slavonic Language') in the Linguistic Studies Paper II in Russian
    (Russian Paper V from the Honour School of Modern Languages).

    Return to text

    [7]
    Candidates offering Czech (with Slovak) will not be
    permitted to offer either of those languages in the Optional
    Subject on the structure and history of one of certain specified
    languages.


    Return to text

    [8]
    No candidate in the Honour School of English and Modern
    Languages may offer the paper `Medieval Welsh' from the Honour
    School of English Language and Literature with any of the
    Optional Subjects `Medieval Welsh tales and romances', `The poets
    of the Welsh princes', and `The poetry of Dafydd ap Gwilym'.

    Return to text

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF
    PHILOSOPHY

    The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice
    of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

    Biological Sciences

    M. RODRIGUES, Linacre: `Breeding strategies of the chiffchaff'.

    Department of Zoology, Thursday, 16 May, 2 p.m.

    Examiners: J.K. Blakey, R. Prys-Jones.

    Clinical Medicine

    S.J. BRIDDON, Linacre: `Desensitisation of human 5- HT2A and 5-HT2c
    receptors expressed in a human neuroblastoma cell line'.

    Department of Pharmacology, Wednesday, 22 May, 2 p.m.

    Examiners: S. Hill, R.A.J. McIlhinney.

    K.A. RIMES, Somerville: `Cognitive and behavioural processes in
    health anxiety'.

    Department of Psychiatry, Thursday, 30 May, 1.30 p.m.

    Examiners: A. Ehlers, M. Johnston.

    English Language and Literature

    R.G.D. WILKINSON, St John's: `In search of a dwelling-place: the
    treatment of home in the work of four Northern Irish Protestant
    poets'.

    Wadham, Wednesday, 22 May, 3 p.m.

    Examiners: J.B. O'Donoghue, R. Schuchard.

    Law

    J. DE LACY, Pembroke: `Principles of corporate security interest
    registration systems'.

    Examination Schools, Friday, 5 July, 2.30 p.m.

    Examiners: R.J. Smith, H. Rajak.

    Literae Humaniores

    R. CHRISLEY, New College: `Non-conceptual psychological explanation:
    content and computation'.

    St Catherine's, Tuesday, 1 October, 2.30 p.m.

    Examiners: M.W. Brewer, T. Crane.

    Medieval and Modern Languages

    S.P. HENIGHAN, Wadham: `Assuming the light: the constitution of
    cultural identity in the Parisian literary apprenticeships of Miguel
    Angel Asturias and Alejo Carpenter'.

    Trinity, Saturday, 1 June, 2.30 p.m.

    Examiners: M.I. Millington, C.H. Griffin.

    Modern History

    G. MURDOCK, Brasenose: `International Calvinism and the reformed
    church of Hungary and Transylvania 1613–58'.

    St Anne's, Saturday, 25 May, 11 a.m.

    Examiners: R.G. Lewis, K. Peter.

    R. TAKEYH, St Antony's: `United States and radical Arab nationalism
    1953–7'.

    Nuffield, Thursday, 30 May, 2.15 p.m.

    Examiners: J.G. Darwin, W. Scott Lucas.

    Oriental Studies

    B.-S. QUTBUDDIN, Hertford: `The political history of the
    Fatimid-Tayyibi Da'wa in Yemen c.524–832/1130–1429'.

    Oriental Institute, Thursday, 16 May, 2.15 p.m.

    Examiners: P. Dresch, G.R. Smith.

    Social Studies

    M.A.H. KACHINGWE, Nuffield: `Organisational design and
    incentives'.

    Nuffield, Wednesday, 15 May, 10.30 a.m.

    Examiners: P.M. Aghion, I. Jewitt.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 9 May 1996: Colleges<br />

    Colleges, Halls, and Societies


    Contents of this section:

    • OBITUARIES


    • ELECTIONS

      Return to Contents Page of this issue



      OBITUARIES


      Christ Church

      THE REVD CANON PATRICK THOMAS ASHTON, LVO, MA, 2 May 1994; commoner
      1935–8.

      HIS GRACE THE DUKE OF ATHOLL, DL, MA, February 1996; commoner
      1949–52. Aged 64.

      HAROLD WEBBER FREEMAN, MA, 1996; scholar 1918–22.

      THE REVD ALFRED T.P. HARRISON, MA, 3 August 1995; Westminster
      Scholar 1939–41 and 1946–7.

      JOHN EDWARD GODFREY HARWOOD, MA, 7 February 1996; commoner
      1919–21.

      THE REVD BRYAN R.S. HOUGHTON, MA, 1996; exhibitioner 1930–3.

      SHERIFF ROBERT ALEXANDER INGLIS, MA, 1996; commoner 1936–9.

      PROFESSOR IVOR CHRISTOPHER BANFIELD KEYS, CBE, MA, 7 July 1995;
      Organ Scholar 1938–40 and 1946. Aged 76.

      JI WHAN KIM, October 1995; commoner 1989–90. Aged 24.

      NORMAN LITTELL, MA, 1996; commoner 1921–4.

      KENNETH L. MACASSEY, MA, 1996; commoner 1925–9.

      ANDREW JAMES MACDONALD, BA 17 May 1995; commoner 1926–7 and
      1928–9.

      PAUL MAY, CBE, MA, 19 February 1996; Westminster Scholar
      1926–30.

      BRIAN MULVANY, MA, 1996; commoner 1930–4.

      WILLIAM HENRY PARKER, MA, D.PHIL., 18 February 1996; Lecturer
      1964–75, Official Student and Tutor in Geography 1975–9.
      Aged 83.

      THE REVD ROBERT LYAL RICHARDS, MA, 1 August 1995; exhibitioner
      1930–3.

      BASIL PETER SEYMOUR, BA, 1996; commoner 1950–3.

      TERENCE ROWLAND FRAZER SKEMP, CB, QC, MA, 15 March 1996; commoner
      1933–6. Aged 81.

      VALIERI JOHN GEORGE STAVRIDI, MA, 4 December 1995; commoner
      1924–7.

      CHARLES AUSTIN STEER, MA, 1996; commoner 1923–4 and
      1925–7.

      LT.-COL. RICHARD I.G. TAYLOR, DSO, MC, DL, 1996; commoner
      1930–1.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Queen's College

      PETER LAMONT MILLER, MA, D.PHIL. (MA, PH.D. Cambridge), 24 March
      1996; Fellow and Tutor in Zoology 1964–94, Emeritus Fellow
      1994–6. Aged 64.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      St John's College

      OSWALD FRANCIS ENGLEFIELD CHARLETON, MA, 21 January 1996; commoner
      1935–8. Aged 79.

      BRIAN COOPER, BA, 27 January 1996; Open Exhibitioner 1950–3.
      Aged 64.

      JOHN ROBERT DOWNIE, MA, December 1995; Sir Thomas White Scholar
      1938–HT 1940 and 1945–6. Aged 76.

      KENNETH HENRY SUTHERLAND EDWARDS, MA, 20 December 1995; Sir
      Thomas White Scholar and Goldsmiths' Company's Exhibitioner
      1923–7. Aged 91.

      BLAIR VINCENT EWING, MA, December 1995; Rhodes Scholar
      1949–51. Aged 67.

      WILLIAM GEORGE FOX, TD, JP, DL, MA, 11 March 1996; commoner
      1924–7. Aged 90.

      JOSEPH GERALD GODSOE, QC, MA, 13 April 1996; Rhodes Scholar
      1963–5. Aged 54.

      ERIC HOLMES, BA, March 1995; commoner 1934–7. Aged 81.

      PAUL GODFREY ALLEN JOHNSTONE, BA, 22 April 1996; commoner
      1952–5. Aged 65.

      EDWARD FRANCIS LE FEUVRE, MA, 6 March 1996; commoner 1931–5.
      Aged 83.

      MERVYN LYSTER LONGBURST, CBE, BA, 30 January 1996; commoner
      1925–8. Aged 88.

      LAWRENCE EDWARD NEAL, 6 January 1996; Open Scholar 1914–16.
      Aged 100.

      THOMAS PHILIP STROUD POWELL, FRS, FRCS, MA (MD Edinburgh), 8
      February 1996; Lecturer 1955–63, Fellow, Tutor, and Lecturer
      1963–90, Emeritus Fellow 1990–6. Aged 72.

      HARRY CHARLES SEIGAL, TD, MA, 5 March 1995; Open Exhibitioner
      1932–5. Aged 82.

      DAVID MCINTOSH TURNBULL, MA, 26 December 1995; Rhodes Scholar
      1928–31. Aged 89.

      HENRY ERNEST WILLIAM TURNER, MA, DD, 14 December 1995; Open
      Scholar 1925–30. Aged 88.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Trinity College

      DOUGLAS GEORGE ATTWOOD, 27 August 1995; commoner 1971. Aged 58.

      FOSTER TRENCHARD COX, 1996; commoner 1919. Aged 95.

      MICHAEL ARTHUR FREDERICK HIRTZEL, 20 November 1995; scholar 1923.
      Aged 100.

      GEORGE RUCK KEENE, 17 February 1996; commoner 1935. Aged 78.

      LIONAL ALFRED KILBEY STAVELEY, 8 February 1996; scholar 1932.
      Aged 81.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      ELECTIONS


      Christ Church

      To a Dr Lee Visiting Fellowship (from 1 September 1997):

      PROFESSOR M.H. ALEXANDER

      To Junior Research Fellowships (from 1 October 1996):

      DR P.D. HOWELL

      R. PROUT

      T. REM

      J.W.H. SCHUPP

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Lady Margaret Hall

      To Scholarships:

      CELIA DINWIDDY, formerly of Ashbury College, Ottawa

      PETER LOVE, formerly of Kimbolton School, Huntingdon

      OLIVIA MCMONIGALL, formerly of Abbey School, Reading

      CLARE O'BRIEN, formerly of Wimbledon High School

      MARK RICHARDSON, formerly of Bristol Grammar School

      SIMON SMITH, formerly of St Benedict's School, Ealing

      CATHERINE THOMAS, formerly of Tring School

      CATHERINE UNDERWOOD, formerly of The Old Palace School, Croydon

      Return to List of Contents of this section


      To an Exhibition:

      LAURA PARKES, formerly of Holmes Chapel
      Comprehensive School, Holmes Chapel, Cheshire

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Mansfield College

      To Nathan Whitley Scholarships:

      PHILIP BORROUGHS, formerly of Plymouth Polytechnic

      TIFFANY-ALICE PERSCHKE, formerly of Godalming College

      ALICE PITT-PITTS, formerly of Queen Anne's School, Caversham

      Return to List of Contents of this section


      To Proctor Scholarships:

      JANET BANFIELD, formerly of Portsmouth High School

      DANIEL BRATCHER, formerly of Leighton Park School, Reading

      JOHN DU BOIS, formerly of Hackney Technical College

      WILLIAM FORD, formerly of the University of Durham

      JOSEE SANSOUCY-BRISCOE, formerly of Lasalle College, Montreal

      KUMIKO TATENO, formerly of Cranleigh School

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Merton College

      To Postmasterships:

      MISS A.J. FIELD, formerly of Northampton High School

      J. MCMANUS, formerly of Tonbridge School

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Oriel College

      To an Exhibition:

      STUART KINGSLEY-DUBOCK, formerly of
      Kimbolton School, Huntingdon

      Return to List of Contents of this section





      <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 9 May 1996: Advertisements<br />

      Advertisements


      Contents of this section:



      How to advertise in the
      Gazette


      Terms and
      conditions
      of acceptance of advertisements

      Return to Contents Page of this issue



      Sir Peter Hall in conversation

      Sir Peter Hall in conversation with Michael
      Billington, of the
      Guardian. The man who founded the RSC and established
      the National
      Theatre discusses his life's work: Sunday, 12 May, 5 p.m., St John's
      College
      (Garden Quadrangle Auditorium). Admission free, all welcome.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Royal Shakespeare Company

      The RSC's Oxford office is organising return coach trips to Stratford
      evening
      performances. Each £25 ticket includes transport and a free
      upgrade to
      best stalls or circle seat. Coaches depart St Giles' at 5.45 p.m. for
      Macbethon Mon., 13 May, and for As You Like
      It
      on
      Thur., 17 May. Tel. for bookings (RSC Oxford): Oxford 511434.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Tuition Offered

      The Alexander Technique. Jan Steele, BA, and Janet
      Sherbourne, MA. Members of the Society of Teachers of the Alexander
      Technique.
      Phone for free fact-sheet and brochure. A number of concessionary
      places for
      students, etc., are available. Tel.: Oxford 770272.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Services Offered

      Jim Crockatt offers you a range of fitted or
      free-standing
      bookcases which are elegant in design, robust in construction,
      decorative in
      paint, or resplendent in wood—and economical in price. For
      enquiries,
      tel.: 01734 744728.

      Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press—the
      University
      Printers: specialising in booklet and publicity material,
      typesetting,
      printing, and finishing; Output Bureau provides high-quality output
      from disk
      from all major DTP programs onto paper, bromide, colour- separated
      positive or
      negative film; high-quality specialist colour copier service. For
      service,
      quality, and competitive prices contact Oxuniprint, Oxford University
      Press,
      Walton Street, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 514691, fax: 514010.

      Restoration and conservation of antique furniture by
      John
      Hulme. Twenty-five years' experience. All aspects of repair,
      carcass-work,
      veneer, inlay, polishing, stain removal, upholstery, cane/rush
      seating.
      Furniture-making and copying. Collection and delivery. 11a High
      Street,
      Chipping Norton. Tel./fax: 01608 641692.

      Jeanne Bliss, landscape designer. A two-hour initial
      visit:
      £30. Garden plans. A two-year phased programme. Garden design
      with colour
      slides. Tel.: Oxford 515379.

      Tax advice and accountancy. We specialise in
      assisting
      professionals and small businesses with all tax and accounting
      matters. Fast,
      personal service at competitive rates. Contact Dr Charles McCreery.
      Tassano &
      Co., 118 Banbury Road, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 513381.

      Furniture: individual pieces and fitted furniture
      designed
      and made by Piers Roberts from workshops in Thame. From tables,
      chairs,
      cabinets, desks to fitted bedrooms, kitchens, studies. For the home,
      office,
      or garden. Tel.: 01844 218929 or 201325.

      Finders Keepers à La Carte—a new
      concept: a
      selection of services available to tenants of Finders Keepers rental
      properties, designed to enhance comfort, convenience, and enjoyment
      whilst
      renting Finders Keepers' properties. Call us for your menu. Finders
      Keepers
      Ltd., 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE (tel.: Oxford 311011, fax:
      56993, e-
      mail: oxford@finders.co.uk); also 27 St Clement's, Oxford OX4 1DJ
      (tel.:
      Oxford 200012, fax: 204844, e-mail: stclements@finders.co.uk).

      Stella Campion, gold and silversmith; Goldsmiths'
      Crafts
      Council first prize winner 1994. I can design a unique hand-made
      piece for
      your anniversary, gifts, or awards. A friendly and efficient service.
      Gold
      work and repousséa speciality. Tel.: Oxford
      790867.

      Frederick and Sudabeh Hine. Persian carpet dealers.
      We
      specialise in large and extra-large hand-knotted oriental carpets and
      runners
      and our list includes over 100 such pieces from Iran, Turkey,
      Afghanistan, and
      China; we can search other importers' stocks for hard-to-find items
      if
      necessary. We also keep quantities of traditional hand-made nomadic
      and
      village rugs and kelims at warehouse prices. Business hours: 10
      a.m.–6
      p.m., Mon.–Sat. Old Squash Court, 16 Linton Road, Oxford.
      Tel./fax:
      Oxford 59396.

      Gardens creatively designed, planted, and
      maintained.
      Portfolio available on request. Colin Broad. Tel.: Oxford 882711.


      Domestic Services

      Housekeeper, part-time, Park Town, June: min. of 4
      mornings
      and 2 afternoons/early evenings per week plus more at times.
      Flexibility
      useful. Job includes kids' care (8 and 11 years), driving, cook a
      bit, shop,
      clean, etc. Tel.: Oxford 515292.

      Au pair: French second-year university student
      wishing to
      come to Oxford area, June–Sept. Also long-term placements
      available. The
      Oxford Au Pair Agency. Telephone Mary. Tel.: 01235 834030.

      Mother's help: cheerful 18-year-old boarding-school
      leaver
      seeks work in Aug. and Sept. as mother's help in the Oxford area.
      Experienced
      with young children (references provided). Likes sport, art, music,
      and
      cooking—willing extra pair of hands. Tel.: 01993 891237.

      Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters,
      your
      local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic,
      commercial,
      college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy
      cleaning,
      flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and
      friendly
      advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford 726983 or Abingdon 555533.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Situations Vacant

      Oxford English Dictionary: applications are invited
      from
      those interested in undertaking part-time freelance pre-editorial
      work to
      assist in the preparation of the third edition of the Oxford English
      Dictionary. A good knowledge either of Middle English or more
      generally of
      historical philology is essential. A certain amount of experience in
      the use
      of computers would also be greatly advantageous. The work will be
      undertaken
      in-house, but with some degree of flexibility as to the hours worked.
      Candidates, who may be asked to take a brief aptitude test, are
      invited to
      apply by sending a full c.v. and handwritten letter of application
      (referring
      clearly to this advertisement) before Monday, 20 May, to Dr Philip
      Durkin.
      Oxford English Dictionary, Oxford University Press, Walton Street,
      Oxford OX2
      6DP.

      Sub-editor for Past and Present:
      applications
      are invited for the post of part-time Sub-Editor of Past and
      Present
      , a journal of historical studies based in North
      Oxford.
      Applicants should have a degree (preferably in history), previous
      experience
      of copy-editing and proof-reading, and a knowledge of
      word-processing. Salary
      will be £10,032 per year (for 26.5 hours p.w.). The salary is
      derived
      from a university research grade and will automatically attract any
      increases
      that result from reviews. Generous holidays. Further particulars can
      be
      obtained from the Editors, Past and Present, 175
      Banbury Road,
      Oxford OX2 7AW, and applications, with c.v. and the names of two
      referees,
      are to be received by Wed., 22 May. Tel.: Oxford 512318, fax:
      310080.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Houses to Let

      Wheatley, Oxford, 6 miles east of city centre, near
      M40
      (junction 8): fully-furnished annexe cottage beside listed building;
      large
      sitting-room with inglenook fireplace, large double bedroom,
      bathroom,
      kitchenette. Telephone. To let from the middle of May. No pets,
      sorry. Prefer
      professional person(s). Tel.: Oxford 873464.

      Terrace house, east Oxford, to let Jan.–Mar.
      1997: city
      centre 1 mile; 3 bedrooms, 2 repcetion, kitchen/diner; all mod.
      cons.; garden
      and patio; open aspect to rear; 2 good bikes available. Shops nearby.
      £550 p.c.m. plus utilities. Tel.: Oxford 247343.

      Paris, XX, Aug. 1996–July 1997: 4-room
      apartment (81 sq.
      mtrs.) in pleasant modern building; balcony; garage. FF 5,000 p.c.m.
      G.
      Godefroy, 39–41 rue Saint-Fargeau, 75020 Paris. Tel.: 00 33 1
      43.61.84.28; or, for more information, Richard Haydon: Oxford
      (2)77838.

      Three-bedroom detached house with garage in secluded
      drive in
      North Oxford available Sept.–end of June, for visiting academics
      only.
      £925 p.c.m. inc. of council tax. Tel.: Oxford 722630.

      Very peaceful, sunny, detached Cotswold stone
      cottage (Oxford
      20 minutes) on ancient farm in Windrush valley. Wonderful views and
      walks.
      Furnished/unfurnished; 2 bedrooms, study, oil-fired c.h., insulation,
      log
      stove, shed, garage, tennis. Six months min. £600 p.c.m. Tel.:
      01993
      822152.

      17 June–8 July: 4-bed, 2-bath detached house in
      North
      Oxford cul- de-sac ending Cutteslowe Park; large lounge overlooking
      lovely
      garden; large kitchen; washing-machine, drier. Close to buses.
      Utilities inc.
      £200 p.w. Tel.: Oxford 515119.

      Headington area: house available, professionals
      only, from
      July for 6 months; all modern conveniences; off-road parking; very
      large
      garden overlooking golf course. £700 p.m. inc. of bills except
      telephone.
      Tel.: Oxford 69609.

      Furnished central North Oxford house to let from 1
      Oct.; walk
      to colleges, train station and bus station; near Port Meadow; c.h.,
      recently
      redecorated, 3 desks, filing cabinets, several large closets,
      secluded garden,
      garden furniture, terrace, 3 bedrooms, 1½ bathrooms,
      washing-machine,
      drier, telephone, linen, dishes, 2 bicycles. Suitable for visiting
      academics.
      £870 p.m. Tel. (J. Mackrell): Oxford 775567 (evenings), or (A.
      Gaston,
      Canada): 613 7451368, fax: 613 7450299, e-mail:
      gastont@nwrc.cws.doe.ca.

      Berkeley, California, USA, Sept. 1996–May 1997:
      house
      with garage and small yard, 10 minutes' drive from the University of
      California; 1½ blocks from bus line; 2 bedrooms, living-room,
      dining-
      room, 1 bath, washer-drier, porch; fully furnished in quiet,
      tree-lined
      neighourhood in walking distance of shops, stores, bookstores,
      restaurants.
      Weather moderate all year round. No pets or smokers. Rent $1,300 p.m.
      Lynn
      Rhodes, 726 Neilson Street, Berkeley, CA 94707. Tel.: 510 525
      2643.

      Only the best is good enough for Finders Keepers'
      clients and
      tenants. We aim for 100 per cent in everything we do; on call 24
      hours a day,
      365 days of the year to offer a caring, comprehensive service. We are
      an
      `Investor in People' and National Winners of the Best Letting and
      Management
      Company Award for the second consecutive year—call us to find
      out why the
      best is not the most expensive. Finders Keepers Ltd., 73 Banbury
      Road, Oxford
      OX2 6PE (tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 56993, e-mail:
      oxford@finders.co.uk); also
      27 St Clement's, Oxford OX4 1DJ (tel.: Oxford 200012, fax: 204844,
      e-mail:
      stclements@finders.co.uk).

      Modern 3-bedroom detached house, 2 miles city
      centre;
      kitchen/family room, dining-room, lounge; fully furnished; cat in
      residence;
      secluded garden, off-road parking. Available 22 July–4 Sept.
      Non-smokers.
      £250 p.w. Tel.: Oxford 744232.

      Pleasant furnished house in Risinghurst; 1 single
      and 2
      double bedrooms, lounge-cum-diner, study, gas c.h., appliances; good
      decorative order; small secluded garden; off-street parking.
      £595 p.c.m.
      Dr Basu. Tel.: 01734 860630 or 01734 875123, ext. 4344.

      Osney: 3-bedroom terrace house in excellent
      condition 10
      minutes' walk from central Oxford in secluded district by the river.
      Fully
      furnished and equipped, gas c.h., fitted kitchen, washing-machine,
      freezer,
      fridge, phone, TV, garden with patio and seats. Available July for 1
      year.
      Only visiting academics considered. £700 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford
      862347.

      Headington, close to hospitals, shops, schools, and
      buses: 3-
      bedroom bungalow; 1 master bedroom with en-suite shower and w.c., 1
      single
      bedroom, other bedroom/study, family bathroom, gas c.h., attached
      garage,
      telephone, security system, sun-lounge, modern fitted kitchen with
      automatic
      washing-machine and drier, waste disposal unit. From 1 Aug.,
      £625 p.c.m.
      Fully furnished. Unsuitable for sharers. Tel.: O1993 881667 or 01993
      704858.

      Premier offer a fine selection of property for long
      or short
      let. Similar properties always required. Competitive fees and the
      friendliest
      service in the city. Call Jan Bartlett at Premier, 207 Cowley Road.
      Tel.:
      Oxford 792299, fax: Oxford 798087.

      An Englishman's home is his castle—so the
      saying goes.
      We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you
      are
      seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding
      area we may
      be able to help. QB management is one of Oxford's foremost letting
      agents,
      specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other
      professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful
      service in
      Oxford. Please telephone or fax us with details of your requirements
      and we
      will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 64533, fax:
      64777.

      4-bedroom house is available to rent 1 year from
      July.
      Excellent condition, all mod. cons., fully furnished. Approx 1 mile
      universities/hospitals. Ideal family home. Tel.: Oxford 240017.
      n

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Flats to Let

      Spacious North London garden flat, for Aug. (Maida
      Vale/Kilburn.) Suit professional couple or small family. Double
      bedroom,
      single, kitchen, bathroom, sitting-room; free parking; excellent
      situation for
      all London connections and 1-hour drive to Oxford. Tel.: 0171-624
      0147.

      Spacious 1-bedroom flat in Summertown residential
      street; own
      bathroom; kitchenette. Considerate non-smoker preferred. References
      required.
      Rent plus bill share. Available immediately. Tel.: Oxford 53939 or
      0860
      539985.

      Wytham Abbey, Oxford: spacious 3-bedroom 2-bathroom
      apartment
      on 2 floors, part of listed manor house situated 3 miles from city
      centre and
      lying in 3,000 acres of countryside. Fully equipped and luxuriously
      appointed.
      Available from 1 Sept. Tel.: Oxford 247200, fax: 724762.

      Spacious well-equipped 2-bedroom modern furnished
      flat, with
      garage, etc., to let; North Oxford, near Cutteslowe Park and buses to
      city
      centre. Available from late Sept. £600 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 53100,
      e-mail:
      gittins@stats.ox.ac.uk.

      Central North Oxford: 2-bedroom apartment with 2
      bathrooms,
      lounge, kitchen-diner, well placed for the academic and business
      centre; best
      suited to professionals and mature academics. £675 p.c.m.
      Available 20
      May. Tel.: Oxford 516144.

      North Oxford : 1 Sept. 1996–30 June 1997,
      £520
      p.m., fully- furnished ground-floor flat; dining-room/study, hall,
      living-
      room/study, bedroom, shower-room, kitchen; dish-washer, washing-
      drying
      machine, electric stove, etc.; c.h.; car-port; garden. Stone, 266
      Moore
      Street, Princeton, NJ 08540.

      Central North Oxford, 10 minutes from city centre:
      delightful
      and very comfortable flat available in quiet, civilised family house:
      large
      double bedroom, single bedroom, drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom.
      Off-street
      parking, garden. Regret no children or pets. Tel.: Oxford 52400.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Summer Lets

      Wolsey Road: 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, living-room and
      kitchen,
      front and back garden, car place, heating, dress-washer, TV and
      video.
      May–Sept., £700 p.m. Tel. (Dr N. Cannata): 00 39 6 8080711,
      or (Dr
      F. Medioli): 01734 316502.

      Jericho, to rent for all of June, £1,200
      o.n.o.:
      comfortable family house; 3/4 bedrooms, study. Tel.: Oxford 56147.

      Detached-linked 3/4-bedroom house at the bottom of
      Rose Hill
      for rent second week in July–end of Aug. Inc. mod. cons.,
      garage, garden.
      £250 p.w. Ms S. Richards. Tel.: Oxford 773003.

      Delightful 2-bedroom Victorian terrace cottage in
      North
      Oxford. Newly redecorated. Fully equipped with pretty gardens and
      patio.
      Available mid-May–mid-June or longer. Tel.: 0181-846 6515 (day),
      or
      Oxford 54157/54184 (evenings); e-mail: mary.mcmenamin

      Islip: lovely spacious period cottage in beautiful
      village
      (conservation area), 5 miles from central Oxford, available Sat. 27
      July–Sat. 31 Aug. In very quiet lane with easy access to city by
      bus,
      train, or car. Sitting-room, dining-hall, large
      conservatory/playroom, very
      large kitchen/dining-room (Aga, electric hob and oven, microwave,
      dish-washer,
      fridge, freezers, cooler), laundry-room (washing-machine and drying
      area), 4
      bedrooms (sleeps 7), 2 bathrooms, dressing-room and shower-room;
      large and
      pretty garden with terrace; garage. £350 p.w. inc. some
      housekeeping.
      Tel.: Oxford 841759, fax: 371939.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Accommodation Offered

      Large bedsit to let in east Oxford: c.h., own
      cooking
      facilities and fridge, shared bathroom, optional telephone line;
      central
      Oxford 10 minutes; suit non-smoking female with references. Available
      1 June,
      £260 p.m. inc. Second bedsit also available. Tel.: Oxford
      242075.

      Central North Oxford: Victorian house available July
      for 6
      months plus; comfortable family accommodation; sleeps 6; £200
      p.w. Also
      central North Oxford, studio flat; suit couple or single person;
      available
      shortly, for 6 months plus. £100 p.w. Apply: 123 South Avenue,
      Abingdon,
      Oxon.

      Alternative medicine centre. Space available.
      Therapy and
      treatment rooms. Consulting and counselling rooms. Every facility.
      Very
      moderate rates. Central North Oxford. Tel. for further details:
      Oxford 511111
      (9 a.m.–12 noon).

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Accommodation Sought

      New Zealand Nuffield Fellow and family (husband and
      2
      children) seek house to rent from early Aug. for at least 2 months,
      but all
      longer periods considered. Preferably in North Oxford. Dr Patricia
      Priest, 34
      Edgars Road, Westmere, Auckland, New Zealand.. Tel: 64 9 378 0664,
      fax: 64 9
      376 2403, e-mail: patricip

      Feel confident letting your property in Oxfordshire
      with
      Brooks, one of Oxford's longest-established Property Management
      Companies.
      Formerly the property management department of E.J. Brooks and Son.
      Tel.:
      Oxford 728597, fax: 794606.

      Month of Aug.: my visiting Italian family are
      looking for a
      3-bedroom house with reasonable access to the centre. North of Oxford
      preferred but somewhere in the country towards Woodstock would be
      fine. Cats
      no problem. Michael. Tel.: O1993 898620.

      Visiting Canadian professor needs accommodation in
      Oxford for
      3 months (Sept.–Nov.). Large bedsit or shared flat/house with
      other
      female academics preferred. Dr Diane Poulin-Dubois, Montréal.
      Tel.: 514
      848 2219, fax: 514 848 2815, e-mail: dpoulin@vax2.concordia.ca.

      Premier have a fine selection of short lets for
      overseas
      visitors. We also require substantial executive style detached
      furnished/unfurnished in any area, rent level £2,000 p.c.m.,
      2/3-year
      let, for US visiting lady. Call Jan Bartlett at Premier. Tel.: Oxford
      792299.

      Visiting American academic seeks 1–2-bedroom
      furnished
      flat with kitchen facilities or house in the Oxford area, 1
      July–15 Aug.
      Tel. (Dr Bruce Hindmarsh): Oxford 62637, or fax (Dr Frank A. James,
      USA): 407
      875 0879.

      Last week in Aug.: parents (University of Glasgow),
      bride
      (Brasenose), and bridesmaids need accommodation in Oxford to prepare
      for
      wedding. Min. of 3 bedrooms required; meticulous care taken. Contact
      John or
      Stella Money. Tel.: 0141-334 3813 (h), or 0141-330 6719 (univ.).

      Visiting American professor with family (sister,
      brother-in-
      law) seeks to rent 2/3-bedroom furnished house/flat in Oxford (within
      walking/cycling distance of Queen's College), for 5 weeks, 24
      June– 29
      July. Dr Albert Koppes. Tel.: 001 310 338 7301, fax: 001 310 338
      1976, e-mail:
      akoppes@lmumail.lmu.edu.

      Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your
      property? QB
      Management are one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property
      managers.
      We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional
      individuals and
      their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from
      good-quality
      tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like
      details of our
      services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without
      obligation, telephone us. Tel.: Oxford 64533, or fax: 64777.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Accommodation Sought to Rent or Exchange

      Sydney: family on UK sabbatical Jan.–June 1997
      seeks
      house-swap or rent. We offer lovely detached house on quiet street; 2
      large
      beds, 2 small beds/study, kitchen/family/dining area, double
      living-room, 2
      baths; best appliances f & f; large garden; pool. Lovely inner
      harbourside
      suburb, close shops, schools, bus, ferry, 10 minutes drive/bus
      downtown. We
      require well-equipped 2–3-bed/study house in Oxford/area, close
      to shops,
      primary school, rail station. Douglas Tomkin. Fax: 00 612 330 8877,
      e-mail:
      douglas.tomkin@uts.edu.au.

      Visiting professor, wife and son seek quiet,
      three-bedroom
      house in North Oxford or surrounding area, Aug.–Jan. Off-street
      parking
      and washer-drier preferred. Non-smokers. No pets. British, now based
      in US.
      Looking to rent or exchange our well-appointed house in quiet
      neighbourhood 30
      minutes north of New York City. Will take good care of your home.
      Tel: 1-(914)
      365-6631, e-mail: kottie_christieblick@socsd.lhric.org.

      Jerusalem: academic family seeks house-swap or rent
      July/Aug., for 6–12 months; we offer lovely fully-equipped
      apartment to
      sleep 5; huge balconies; views; heating; close to shopping,
      transport,
      schools, health centre; 5 minutes' drive to university, 10 minutes to
      centre
      and sight-seeing. Car-swap possible. We seek 4-bedroom furnished
      accommodation, North Oxford, Headington, Kidlington, etc. Dr B.
      Czaczkes. Fax:
      00 972 2 881341, e-mail: msbc @pluto.huji.ac.il.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Holiday Lets

      Portugal, Obidos: attractive self-contained
      house/apartment
      in lovely, quiet, unspoilt rural area 90 kms north of Lisbon
      overlooking
      lagoon and 2 miles from sea; ideal for bird-watching, walking,
      horse-riding.
      Rent c.£50 per person per week. Tel.: 00 351 62 979534, or
      0171-352
      3144.

      Dordogne, near Bergerac: holidays for 2 in artist's
      secluded
      converted pool-side barn. Brochure. £200 p.w. Tel.: 00 33
      53.61.25.73.

      France: Pyrenees foothills, Rousillon. Beautiful old
      village
      farmhouse in peaceul, unspoilt area. Forest, mountains, castles,
      sea—much
      to to . Terrace, garden, sleeps 4–7. Fully equipped. Available
      May–late July, and Sept. onwards. Tel.: 0171-624 0147.

      France, Lot: spacious 18th-c. stone house in
      medieval village
      wit breathtaking views of Célé Valley; 5 kms from
      historic town
      of Figeac; canoeing, riding, walking; 3 double bedrooms, all
      en-suite.
      Available first 3 weeks in Aug., £300 p.w. Dr G. Lawrence. Tel.:
      00 33
      65.40.08.24.

      Charente-Poitou: beautiful newly-restored stone
      cottage in
      the peaceful village of Charras, 20 miles from Angouleme; 5 minutes'
      walk to
      local bakery; 2 double bedrooms, 1 single, bathroom with electric
      shower;
      downstairs lounge with bed-settee, dining-room, fitted kitchen;
      french doors
      lead to secluded terrace overlooking rolling woodland; lovely
      sunsets;
      sporting activities avaialable; artists' paradise.
      £120–£250
      p.w. Tel. (English owners): 00 33 45.23.05.09.

      Provence—Mormoiron: period farmhouses to let on
      English-
      run vineyard. Beautiful countryside. Avignon 10 minutes. 2–8
      people.
      Tel.: 33 90.61.88.78, fax: 33 90.61.98.05.

      French Alps: beautiful family flat to rent; sleeps
      6–8;
      3 bedrooms, living-room with fireplace, kitchen, bathroom, separate
      w.c.,
      fully equipped and furnished; every room accesses beautiful terrace
      (80 sq.
      yds.); telephone, TV, view, indoor garage; in Morzine-Avoriaz, 1
      hour's drive
      to Geneva airport, 1/2-hour's drive to Thonon-Evian; all mountain
      sports
      available; tennis; Olympic swimming-pool; ice-rink. FF 4,500 p.w.,
      May–Nov. Mrs Rovet. Tel.: 33 1 30.82.26.13, fax: 33 1
      30.82.23.39; e-
      mail: jrovet@world-net.fr.

      Paris: edge of Latin Quarter, room in quiet
      comfortable flat,
      available May–end of Aug. FF 4,000 per fortnight, less if
      long-term. Mrs
      Rovet. Tel.: 33 1 30.82.26.13, fax: 33 1 30.82.23.39; e-mail:
      jrovet@world-
      net.fr.

      Casa Quintino: old Tuscan farmhouse in peaceful
      countryside
      with distant views of ancient Etruscan town of Volterra; 20 minutes
      from San
      Gimignano, 1 hour Florence, Siena, Pisa; 3 bedrooms (sleeps 7
      comfortably);
      fully equipped kitchen. Available from 15 June, £250–
      £450 p.w.
      Tel.: Oxford 727394 (evenings).

      Holiday family accommodation, central North Oxford:
      charming
      Victorian house, sleeps 6, £280 p.w. Also studio flat for
      couple,
      £170 p.w. Both residences centrally heated, washer/driers,
      microwaves
      plus conventional cookers, fridge/freezers, colour TVs, linen;
      telephones
      optional. Tel.: Oxford 59911.

      Italy, outskirts Verona, charming ground-floor flat
      in fine
      15th-c. villa: own entrance, large bed-sitting room, ditto kitchen
      dining
      room, secure parking, use of garden area. £250 p.w. inc. all
      services and
      weekly cleaning. Vacancies June, July, Aug. Tel. (Moore): 01844
      238247, or, in
      Verona, Contessa Da Sacco: 00 45 526 499.

      Peloponnese: unique, recently reconstructed house in
      the
      Byzantine Castro of Monemvasia; sleeps 4 (1 double, 2 singles), fully
      equipped
      kitchen and bathroom, verandah with views of Cape Malea; under-floor
      c.h.;
      open fire. £400 p.w.. Adjacent apartment sleeps 4 also
      available,
      £300 p.w. For brochure, tel.: 0181-977 3490 (evenings), or send
      postcard
      to: Kate Rendall, Monemvasia 23070, Lakonia, Greece.

      Czech Republic, for a holiday full of pleasant
      surprises;
      fairy- tale woodland cottage available May–Oct.; 30 minutes
      Prague;
      sleeps 4+; wood fires, lake, views, walks, mushrooms, castles,
      sunshine;
      abundant food and wine; low prices; English-speaking owner. From
      £225
      p.w. Tel.: 0171-373 0667.

      Villa with garden and wonderful views, 40 minutes
      from
      Florence; all mod. cons.; swimming and sports facilities nearby;
      sleeps 8;
      available late July–mid-Sept. £325 p.w. Lukes. Tel.
      (Italy): 00 39
      55 8428317.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Houses for Sale

      Portland Road, Summertown: attractive 1930s family
      house with
      south-facing garden, in very popular area close to excellent schools,
      bus
      route to town, and local shops; large sitting-room, dining-room, big
      kitchen,
      4 bedrooms with built-in wardrobes, bathroom, study in large
      insulated wooden
      cabin in garden with own radiator, phone, etc.; period features; gas
      c.h.;
      also workshop in garden which is well planted, with a mature walnut
      tree,
      pond, flower-beds, lawn, terrace. Possibility of extension.
      £220,000.
      Tel.: Oxford 54058, or 226490 (day).

      Fyfield, 15 minutes from Oxford: 3-bedroom end-of
      terrace
      Victorian cottage with wood-burning stove and period features
      throughout.
      South-facing garden and scope for extension. Offers in excess of
      £83,000.
      Tel.: Oxford 390285.

      Bladon: charming 18th-c. cottage with inglenook,
      beams, and
      many period features; 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2 reception and pretty
      south-
      facing garden. £195,000. Tel.: 01993 811256 (evenings).

      Return to List of Contents of this section






      <br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette: Diary, 10 May<br /> - 20 May

      Diary


      Contents of this section:

      Academic Staff Seminars: places
      should be booked in advance through the Staff Development Office,
      University Offices, Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

      For the full list of courses, see the HREF="../../supps/3_4373.htm">Staff Development Programme
      supplement.

      Return to Contents Page of this
      issue



      Friday 10 May

      CONFERENCE: `Hong Kong in transition', Modern History Faculty, 10
      a.m.

      ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Tibet', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
      £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

      SIR REX HUNT: `The Falklands, past, present, and future'
      (lecture), Rhodes House, 1.30 p.m.

      FRANCO-BRITISH SEMINAR: `Electoral behaviour in Britain and
      France—the extreme right-wing in Britain and France', Maison
      Française, 2 p.m. (places to be booked one week in advance).

      DR M. ASTON: `Obliteration and memory in the English Reformation'
      (James Ford Special Lecture in British History), Schools, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR NGUGI WA THIONG'O: `Art war with the state: writers and
      guardians of a post-colonial society' (Clarendon Lectures in English:
      `Penpoints, gunpoints, and dreams: performance of literature and
      power in post-colonial Africa'), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross
      Building, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR P. GIGNOUX: `Problems of identity and conversion in
      Zoroastrianism' (Ratanbai Katrak Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

      S. GERMAIN: `Famille et legs de mémoire', Maison
      Française, 5.15 p.m. (admission free, but places to be booked
      one week in advance).

      PROFESSOR M. PRICE: `Space, place, race, face: post-global media
      law' (Annual Lecture in Socio-Legal Studies), Schools, 5.30 p.m.

      DAVID HARE: `When shall we live?' (Eric Abbott Memorial Lecture),
      the chapel, Keble, 5.30 p.m.

      U. VON LERBER plays piano works by Mozart, Beethoven, Chopin, and
      Rachmaninov, Maison Française, 8.15 p.m. (tel. for
      reservations one week in advance: (2)74220).

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      Saturday 11 May

      SIR RICHARD SCOTT: `Ministerial accountability' (Blackstone Lecture),
      Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 11.30 a.m.

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      Sunday 12 May

      PROFESSOR URSULA KING: `Seeing Christ in all things: the spirit of
      Christ as a spirit of renewal and transformation for our planet'
      (eighth Bampton Lecture), St Mary's, 10 a.m.

      PAUL LEWIS plays piano works by Beethoven and Schumann, the hall,
      Balliol, 9 p.m.

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      Monday 13 May

      ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Information overload—beat the bumph',
      9.15 a.m. (see information above).

      CONGREGATION elections (23 May): nominations by six members of
      Congregation to be received at the University Offices by 4 p.m.

      PROFESSOR M.A. NUSSBAUM (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor): `The
      Romantic ascent II: Mahler' (lecture series: `Ascents of love: desire
      and the good in the Western philosophical/literary tradition'),
      Schools, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR P.C.J. PULZER: `On living in the twentieth century'
      (valedictory lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR P.S. HAWKINS: ` "Take it and read": an invitation to the
      Divine Comedy' (Hussey Lecture), Lecture Hall, Taylor
      Institution, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR NGUGI WA THIONG'O: `Enactments of power: the politics of
      performance space' (Clarendon Lectures in English: `Penpoints,
      gunpoints, and dreams: performance of literature and power in post-
      colonial Africa'), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

      DR TESSA RAJAK: `Greek as a Jewish language: translation and
      literature' (Grinfield Lectures—second series: `The Septuagint
      as a cultural document'), Collier Room, Regent's Park College, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR R. RÜRUP: `Jewish history in Berlin—Berlin in
      Jewish history, 1750–1933' (public lecture), St Antony's (70
      Woodstock Road), 8.30 p.m.

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      Tuesday 14 May

      THE MEETING of Congregation, due to take place today, is cancelled.

      THE ALLEGRI STRING QUARTET (with Robert Sherlaw Johnson, piano),
      plays works by Arnold, Gershwin, and Milhaud, Holywell Music Room,
      1.10 p.m. (tickets £5.50/£4, from Blackwell's Music Shop;
      student tickets £2.50, from Blackwell's or the Music Faculty).

      ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Impressionism: painting from Corot
      to Sickert', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings:
      (2)78015.)

      CLINICAL MEDICINE Faculty Board annual elections (7 June):
      nominations by two electors to be received at the University Offices
      by 4 p.m.

      PROFESSOR A. BARAV: `The European Court: redefinition of
      constitutional principles and judicial remedies' (lecture),
      Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 4 p.m.

      DR P. BEAL: `In praise of scribes' (James P.R. Lyell Lectures in
      Bibliography: `In praise of scribes: manuscripts and their makers in
      seventeenth-century England'), St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

      MR P. SHORE, MP,
      LORD KINGSLAND, and
      MR G. RADICE, MP: `Europe and the UK: time to call a halt to ever-
      closer union?' (lecture series: `The state of the Union: issues in
      contemporary British democracy'), St Antony's, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR B. EICHENGREEN: `The relation between monetary and
      political union in Europe' (Vaughan Lecture), the Hall, Balliol, 5
      p.m.

      PROFESSOR J. MAYNARD SMITH: `Information theory and the history of
      genetics' (Oxford History and Philosophy of Biology Programme),
      Sherrington Room, Department of Physiology, 5 p.m.

      THE HON. SHIRLEY HUFSTEDLER: `The American Presidency and the
      courts' (lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

      J. HAWKINS: `Feminist visions—the Church of the future' (Centre
      for the Study of Christianity and Culture public lecture), Regent's
      Park College, 5 p.m.

      DR R.G. WILLIAMSON: `Human rights, animal rights, and the fur
      trade: a circumpolar perspective' (Oxford Centre for the Environment,
      Ethics, and Society seminar), Council Room, Mansfield, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR L. CAVALLI-SFORZA: `Genetic dissection of Europe and its
      use for historical reconstructions' (Bickley Memorial Lecture),
      Mordan Hall, St Hugh's, 5.30 p.m.

      PROFESSOR W. SAVAGE: `Antenatal interventions' (Women's Studies
      Committee seminars: `Policy, practice, and power: issues in human
      female reproduction'), Wolfson Hall, Somerville, 8.30 p.m.

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      Wednesday 15 May

      PROFESSOR NGUGI WA THIONG'O: `The allegory of the cave: language,
      democracy, and a New World Order' (Clarendon Lectures in English:
      `Penpoints, gunpoints, and dreams: performance of literature and
      power in post-colonial Africa'), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross
      Building, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR D. DANIELL: `Magdalen, William Tyndale, and Renaissance
      English prose' (Waynflete and related lectures: `Oxford and England
      during the Renaissance and Reformation'), Schools, 5 p.m.

      DR H.L. MOORE: `Symbolism, sex, and psychoanalysis' (Centre for
      Cross-Cultural Research on Women: Richards Lecture), Taylor
      Institution, 5 p.m.

      B. CLARKE and
      J. ABBOTT: `Affirming the comprehensive ideal:
      effective learning', Department of Educational Studies, 5 p.m.

      DR J. LEWIS: `Women and welfare regimes' (Nuffield Women's Group
      seminars: `Women, poverty, and social policy'), Seminar Room,
      Nuffield, 5 p.m.

      U. OWEN: `Hate speech—a suitable case for censorship' (Iain
      Walker Memorial Lecture), Rhodes House, 5.30 p.m.

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      Thursday 16 May

      DR D. SUTTON: `Myths of matriarchy, memories cast in stone: tales of
      power on a Greek island' (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women
      seminars: `Gender and development—protest and politics'),
      Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

      DR P. BEAL: ` "It shall not therefore kill itself; that is, not
      bury itself": Donne's Biathanatos and its text' (James
      P.R. Lyell Lectures in Bibliography: `In praise of scribes:
      manuscripts and their makers in seventeenth-century England'), St
      Cross Building, 5 p.m.

      PROFESSOR D. DANIELL: `Laurence Thomson and the influence of his
      Revised Geneva New Testament' (Waynflete and related lectures:
      `Oxford and England during the Renaissance and Reformation'),
      Schools, 5 p.m.

      DR CONOR CRUISE O'BRIEN: `Edmund Burke and Thomas Jefferson:
      mutually antipathetic minds' (annual Isaiah Berlin Lecture), the
      hall, Wolfson, 6 p.m.

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      Friday 17 May

      UNIVERSITY CLUB exhibitions open: `People of our time'—linocuts
      by Heinke Jenkins, and `Edifice and order'—prints by Gabrielle
      Oliver (until 28 June).

      ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The decorative watch', 1.15 p.m.
      (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

      FRANCO-BRITISH SEMINAR: `Electoral behaviour in Britain and
      France—the Green Parties in France and Britain', Maison
      Française, 2 p.m. (places to be booked one week in advance).

      PROFESSOR NGUGI WA THIONG'O: `Oral power and literary glory:
      orature and literature in the academy' (Clarendon Lectures in
      English: `Penpoints, gunpoints, and dreams: performance of literature
      and power in post-colonial Africa'), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross
      Building, 5 p.m.

      S. ZELTZER (soprano) and
      F. HOLLER (piano) perform works by Schumann, Chopin, Brahms,
      Duparc, Dubugnon, and Satie, Maison Française, 8.15 p.m. (tel.
      for reservations one week in advance: (2)74220).

      THE BORROMEO STRING QUARTET and
      COLIN CARR perform works by Beethoven and Schubert, Garden
      Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's, 8.30 p.m. (free tickets from
      Porters' Lodge after 6 May).

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      Saturday 18 May

      DEGREE conferments, Sheldonian, 11.30 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.

      PITT RIVERS MUSEUM exhibition opens: `Native American
      photographs—nineteenth-century images from the collections'
      (until 28 September).

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      Sunday 19 May

      THE RT REVD DAVID CONNER preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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      Monday 20 May

      PROFESSOR W. KEMPTON: `Cultural models of the environment'
      (Environmental Change Unit: special seminar), Main Lecture Theatre,
      School of Geography, 2.15 p.m.

      PROFESSOR M.A. NUSSBAUM (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor):
      `Democratic desire: Walt Whitman' (lecture series: `Ascents of love:
      desire and the good in the Western philosophical/literary
      tradition'), Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, St Anne's, 5 p.m.

      DR TESSA RAJAK: `The Greek Bible and the language of power'
      (Grinfield Lectures—second series: `The Septuagint as a cultural
      document'), Collier Room, Regent's Park College, 5 p.m.

      M.-C. SMOUTS: `La mondialisation et les crises de
      régulation', Maison Française, 5.15 p.m. (admission
      free, but places to be booked one week in advance).

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