8 May 1997 - No 4436



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 127, No. 4436: 8 May 1997<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

8 May 1997





University Health and
Safety
information


Return to Gazette
Home Page





<br /><br /><br /><title><br /> Oxford University Gazette, 8 May 1997: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this
issue



HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL


Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have
been restored to the Register of Congregation:

Altmann, S.L., MA, Brasenose

Argyle, J.M., MA, D.Sc., Wolfson

Ashton, J.F., MA, D.Litt, Wolfson

Atiyah, P.S., DCL, St JohnÕs

Aylmer, G.E., MA, D.Phil., St PeterÕs

Badawi, M.M., MA, St AntonyÕs

Bagguley, D.M.S., MA, D.Phil., Brasenose

Bailey, A.S., B.Sc., MA, D.Phil., St PeterÕs

Bailey, C.A., MA, D.Phil., Keble

Barber, G.G., B.Litt., MA, Linacre

Barton, J.L., BCL, MA, Merton

Beckett, P.H.T., MA, D.Phil., D.Sc., St Cross

Birch, M.C., MA, D.Phil., Lady Margaret Hall

Booker, G.R., MA, D.Phil., Wolfson

Booth, M.B., B.Litt., MA, St AnneÕs

Brink, D.M., MA, D.Phil., Balliol

Browning, D.G., MA, D.Phil., St Cross

Burden, D.H., MA, Trinity

Burn, E.H., BCL, MA, Christ Church

Caine, C.A., MA, D.Phil., St PeterÕs

Clarke, J.R., MA, D.Phil., Linacre

Cockshut, A.O.J., MA, Hertford

Coe, M.J., MA, St PeterÕs

Cohen, L.J., MA, D.Litt., QueenÕs

Cooper, T.C., MA, St HughÕs

Cowdrey, H.E.J., MA, St Edmund Hall

Cox, Sir D., MA, NufÞeld

Cuff, P.J., MA, D.Phil., Pembroke

Dalton, H.J.M., MA, QueenÕs

Davies, J.D., BCL, MA, St CatherineÕs

Dawson, R.S., MA, Wadham

Day, A.C., MA, D.Phil., University

Dickson, P.G.M., M.A., D.Phil., D.Litt., St
CatherineÕs

Dunbar, N.V., MA, Somerville

Dyson, A.P., MA, Lady Margaret Hall

Edwards, D.A., MA, D.Phil., Lincoln

Edwards, J.H., MA, Keble

Elliott, Sir R.J., MA, D.Phil., New College

Ellis Evans, D., MA, D.Phil., Jesus

Fillenz, M., MA, D.Phil., St AnneÕs

Foote, I.P., MA, QueenÕs

Foster, M.A., MA, D.Phil., QueenÕs

Franklin, R.E., MA, Worcester

Fuller, K.W., MA, Hertford

Gath, D.H., MA, DM, Wolfson

Gelder, M.G., MA, DM, Merton

Goldthorpe, R.E., MA, St AnneÕs

Gosling, J.C.B., B.Phil., MA, St Edmund Hall

Green, R.F., MA, D.Phil., Keble

Green, T.L., MA, M.Sc., Exeter

Groves, G.W., MA, D.Phil., Exeter

Guillery, R.W., MA, Hertford

Hainsworth, J.B., MA, New College

Halsall, T.G., MA, Linacre

Hampshire, G.I., B.Litt., MA, St HildaÕs

Hands, B.A., MA, M.Sc., St HildaÕs

HarrÄ, H.R., B.Phil., MA, Linacre

Harris, D.R., BCL, MA, Balliol

Harvey, B.F., B.Litt., MA, Somerville

Haskell, F.J.H., MA, Trinity

Hatton, J., MA, D.Phil., Exeter

Hawkes, S.E.C., MA, St Cross

Hide, R., MA, D.Phil., Jesus

Hodcroft, F.W., MA, St Cross

Hodgson, P.E., MA, Corpus Christi

Howatson, M.C., MA, D.Phil., St AnneÕs

Hubbard, M.E., MA, St AnneÕs

Inskeep, R.R., MA, Merton

Jacobs, M., B.Litt., MA, St HughÕs

James, I.M., MA, D.Phil., New College

Johnson, N., MA, NufÞeld

Kean, P.M., MA, Lady Margaret Hall

Kindersley, R.K., MA, St AntonyÕs

Kirk-Greene, A.H.M., MA, St AntonyÕs

Kitzinger, U., MA, M.Litt., NufÞeld

Knapp, W.F., MA, St CatherineÕs

Ledingham, J.G.G., DM, New College

Levi, P.C.T., MA, St CatherineÕs

Lucas, J.R., MA, Merton

Lucchesi, V., MA, Corpus Christi

Lund, P.G., MA, Christ Church

McConnell, J.D.C., MA, St HughÕs

McKay, G.W., MA, St PeterÕs

McKenzie, D.F., MA, D.Phil., Pembroke

Mackinnon, P.C.B., MA, St HildaÕs

Mango, C.A., MA, Exeter

Mann, A.McD., MA, Harris Manchester

Marriott, F.H.C., MA, Wolfson

Mason, R.A., BD, MA, RegentÕs Park

Matthews, G.M., B.Phil., MA, St AnneÕs

Matthews, P.B.C., MA, D.Sc., DM, Christ Church

Midgley, E.G., B.Litt., MA, St Edmund Hall

Millar, S., MA, St HughÕs

Millard, D.W., MA, Green College

Miller, B.D.H., B.Litt., MA, Brasenose

Milner, A., MA, Trinity

Minakovic, B., MA, D.Phil., Linacre

Mitchell, B.M., MA, St AnneÕs

Moffatt, J., MA, D.Phil., QueenÕs

Montagu, J.P.S., MA, Wadham

MonteÞore, A.C.R.G., MA, Balliol

Moorbath, S., MA, D.Phil., D.Sc., Linacre

Mulvey, J.H., MA, Wolfson

Neill, Sir F.P., BCL, MA, Hon. DCL, All Souls

Newbury, C.W., MA, Linacre

Newsholme, E.A., MA, D.Phil., D.Sc., Merton

Olliver, J.G., MA, D.Phil., St Cross

Ord, M.G., MA, D.Sc., Lady Margaret Hall

Owen, J., MA, D.Phil., Lincoln

Park, R., MA, University

Parker, R.A.C., MA, D.Phil., QueenÕs

Parry, W.E., MA, D.Phil., Oriel

Patterson, D., MA, St Cross

Pitt, H.G., MA, Worcester

Popham, M.R., MA, Linacre

Posner, R.R., MA, D.Phil., St HughÕs

Potts, D.C., MA, D.Phil., Keble

Prest, J.M., MA, Balliol

Pring-Mill, R.D.F., MA, D.Litt., St CatherineÕs

Pulzer, P.G.J., MA, All Souls

Raeburn, D.A., MA, Christ Church

Rayner, M.E., MA, D.Phil., St HildaÕs

Richards, B.A., B.Litt., MA, D.Phil., Brasenose

Robinson, G.B., MA, Hertford

Rosner, B.S., MA, Wolfson

Rushworth, G., M.A., DM, Jesus

Sanders, J.H., MA, D.Phil., Oriel

Sayce, O.L., MA, Somerville

Sharpe, L.J., MA, NufÞeld

Shaw, D.F., MA, D.Phil., Keble

Shorter, J.M.H., MA, Lincoln

Shotton, M.H., MA, St CatherineÕs

Simopoulos, J.C., B.Phil., MA, St CatherineÕs

Smart, E.A., BCL, MA, St HughÕs

Spencer Smith, D., MA, D.Phil., Jesus

Stockton, D.L., MA, Brasenose

Sykes, D.A., MA, D.Phil., MansÞeld

Taylor, A.G., BM, MA, St Edmund Hall

Taylor, E.G., B.Phil., MA, St AnneÕs

Todd, J.D., MA, D.Phil., St Edmund Hall

Tolley, B.R., MA, D.Phil., St CatherineÕs

Torrance, J.R., MA, Hertford

Torrance, R.W., B.Sc., BM, MA, St JohnÕs

Tregear, M., MA, St Cross

Treisman, M., MA, D.Phil., New College

Treitel, Sir G.H., DCL, All Souls

Trickett, M.R., MA, St HughÕs

Trowell, B.L., MA, Wadham

Turner, G.L., MA, Linacre

Tyler, G.J., MA, St Cross

Wall, S.de R., MA, Keble

Walsh, D., MA, D.Phil., Oriel

Walsh, J.D., MA, Jesus

Walton of Detchant, Rt Hon. Lord, MA, Green College

Ward, A., MA, Wadham

Watson, P.D., MA, D.Phil., Merton

Watson, W.L.R., MA, St PeterÕs

Whitton, D.F., B.Litt., MA, Lincoln

Wild, D.G., M.A., D.Phil., Corpus Christi

Wilks, J., MA, D.Phil., D.Sc., Pembroke

Williams, B.A.O., MA, Corpus Christi

Williams, P.H., MA, D.Phil., New College

Williams, W.S.C., MA, St Edmund Hall

Wilson, K.B., MA, University

Woodgate, G.K., MA, D.Phil., St PeterÕs

Zeeman, Sir E.C., MA, D.Phil., Hertford

Zeman, Z.A.B., MA, D.Phil., St Edmund Hall

Return to List of Contents of this
section



BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into
effect on 23 May, see `Examinations and Boards' below.




<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 8 May 1997: University Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • *
    Note on procedures in Congregation
  • *
    List of forthcoming Degree Days
  • *
    List of forthcoming Matriculation Ceremonies

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 8 May 1997: Notices<br />

    Notices


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
    previously published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue



    CIRCULATION OF THE
    GAZETTE TO RETIRED SENIOR MEMBERS OF THE
    UNIVERSITY

    It has been decided that any former member of
    Congregation over the age of seventy-five who is resident
    in Oxford may continue to receive the
    Gazette, if he or she so wishes, on
    application in writing to the Information Office,
    University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD.
    Such applications must be renewed at the beginning of
    each academic year.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ISIS INNOVATION LIMITED

    2 South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3UB

    Isis Innovation, a wholly-owned company of the
    University, was established in 1988. The company has been
    formed to exploit know-how arising out of research funded
    by the UK Government through the Research Councils and
    funded by other bodies where the rights are not tied. The
    function of the company is to ensure that the results of
    research bring rewards to Oxford, and to the inventors,
    who are given a financial incentive for exploitation.

    Isis seeks licensees willing to pay lump sums
    and/or royalties for the use of know-how arising out of
    research. Isis also exploits the intellectual property of
    the University by setting up individual companies using
    venture capital or development capital funds.

    Isis'
    services are also available to individuals who wish to
    exploit the results of research supported by non-Research
    Council sources, when there are no prior conditions on
    the handling of the intellectual property rights. Isis
    Innovation has at its disposal a small pre-seedcorn fund
    for paying the costs of protecting intellectual property
    rights and for taking work to a stage where its potential
    can be assessed.

    Isis finds industrial partners to ensure that new
    ideas can be developed for market requirements. The
    company has established the Oxford Innovation Society for
    major industrial companies, so that they can have a
    window on Oxford technology and an opportunity to license
    and invest where appropriate.

    A brochure explaining Isis' activities is
    available. Please contact the above address, or the
    telephone and fax numbers given below.

    Members of the University should contact the
    Managing Director if they wish to take advantage of the
    services that Isis provides. (Telephone: (2)72411; fax:
    (2)72412.)

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    CONCERT


    Oxford University Orchestra and
    Oxford University Philharmonia

    THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA and THE OXFORD UNIVERSITY
    PHILHARMONIA, with Anthony Marwood (violin), and
    conducted by Leon Gee, will perform the following at 8
    p.m. on Friday, 16 May, in the Sheldonian Theatre:
    Brahms, Violin Concerto; Sibelius, Symphony no. 5; Adams,
    Short ride in a fast machine. Tickets,
    costing £8 (concessions £4), may be obtained
    from Blackwell's Music Shop (telephone: 261384) or at the
    door.





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 8 May 1997: Lectures<br />

    Lectures


    Contents of this section:

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue



    INAUGURAL LECTURES


    Wykeham Professor of Ancient
    History

    PROFESSOR R.C.T. PARKER will deliver his inaugural
    lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 12 May in the Examination
    Schools.

    Subject: `Cleomenes on the Acropolis.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Harold Vyvyan Harmsworth
    Professor of American History

    PROFESSOR R.L. MIDDLEKAUFF will deliver his inaugural
    lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 13 May, in the Examination
    Schools.

    Subject: `Democracy in America before
    Tocqueville.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ROMANES LECTURE 1997

    HER EXCELLENCY MARY ROBINSON, DCL, President of Ireland,
    will deliver the Romanes Lecture for 1997 at 5.45 p.m. on
    Tuesday, 11 November, in the Sheldonian Theatre. The
    subject of the lecture will be announced later.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    CAMERON MACKINTOSH PROFESSOR OF
    CONTEMPORARY THEATRE

    PROFESSOR RICHARD EYRE will lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday,
    16 May, in the Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, St
    Catherine's College.

    Subject: `National theatre.'

    Further information is available from George Peck
    (telephone: 01993 812883).

    The Royal National Theatre Studio will also be organising
    a programme of specialist workshops throughout the term.
    Further information is available from Holly Kendrick
    (telephone: Oxford 791577).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    JAMES FORD SPECIAL LECTURE IN
    BRITISH HISTORY

    PROFESSOR J. CANNON, CBE, will deliver a James Ford
    Special Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 16 May, in the
    Examination Schools.

    Subject: ` "We have the power": the
    English Ascendancy 1707–
    1801.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    GAISFORD LECTURE 1997

    PROFESSOR C. CAREY, Royal Holloway College, London, will
    deliver the Gaisford Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 22
    May, in St John's College.

    Subject: `Dying in the theatre of Dionysos:
    clouds, comics, and sophists.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    JAMES P.R. LYELL LECTURES IN
    BIBLIOGRAPHY 1997

    Policing literature in eighteenth-century Paris

    PROFESSOR R. DARNTON will deliver the Lyell Lectures at 5
    p.m. on the following Tuesdays and Thursdays in the St
    Cross Building.

    8 May: `Censorship.'

    13 May: `Smuggling.'

    15 May: `Authors.'

    20 May: `Literature and the state.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    DASTURZADA DR JAL PAVRY MEMORIAL
    LECTURE 1997

    DR J. LIPNER, Cambridge, will deliver the Dasturzada Dr
    Jal Pavry
    Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 13 May, in the
    Examination
    Schools.

    Subject: `The shaping of religious identity:
    an overview with an
    Indian theme.'

    Seminars

    Dr Lipner will give the following seminars at 5 p.m. on
    Tuesdays in
    the Oriental Institute.

    20 May: `Religious identity and the
    dynamics of religious
    encounter.'


    27 May: `Religious identity: a vision
    for the future.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    THOMAS HARRIOT LECTURE 1997

    PROFESSOR J.D. NORTH, FBA, University of Gröningen,
    will deliver the 1997 Thomas Harriot Lecture at 5 p.m. on
    Thursday, 22 May, in the Champneys Room, Oriel College.

    Subject: `Stars and atoms.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    INTERDISCIPLINARY LECTURE
    SERIES


    History and Philosophy of
    Biology

    Lectures

    The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on
    Tuesdays in the Department of Physiology. The 20 May
    meeting will be chaired by Dr Paul Slack; the 3 June
    meeting by Dr Rom Harré.

    Further details may be obtained from Dr T.J. Horder,
    Department of Human Anatomy (telephone: (2)72189).

    PROFESSOR R. PORTER, Wellcome Institute, London

    20 May: `Philosophies of science in pre-
    war Cambridge: evolving attitudes to science as
    defined through C.P. Snow's influence.'

    DR A. HOPE, Lecturer in Medical Ethics, Oxford Medical
    School

    3 June: `Dementia, identity, and advance
    directives: key philosophical issues exemplified in
    medical practice.'

    Debate: `The public must understand science'—but
    how?

    This round-table discussion on the aims, and the
    difficulties, involved in selling science to the public,
    with opportunities for questions from the audience, will
    be held at 5 p.m. on Monday, 26 May, in the University
    Museum. The panel will be Dr R. Dawkins, Professor S.
    Greenfield, and Professor C. Blakemore. The meeting will
    be chaired by Professor Sir Walter Bodmer.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    CLINICAL MEDICINE

    Institute of Molecular Medicine

    The following lectures will be given at 1 p.m. on
    Fridays. With the exception of he 23 May seminar, which
    will be held in Lecture Theatre 2, Academic Street, they
    will take place in the Seminar Room, the Institute of
    Molecular Medicine.

    PROFESSOR A. RICKINSON, Birmingham

    9 May: `T cell recognition of
    Epstein–Barr virus antigens.'

    DR G. GOODWIN

    16 May: to be announced.

    SIR ROBERT MAY

    23 May: `Foresight—Britain's future
    economy.'

    DR M. HIRST

    30 May: `The expanding role of triplet
    repeats in human genetic disease.'

    DR D. GLOVER

    6 June: `Regulation of the bipolarity of
    cell division.'

    DR A. COOKE, Cambridge

    13 June: `Strategies for preventing
    IDDM.'

    PROFESSOR K. DAVIES

    20 June: `Dystrophin related proteins in
    muscular dystrophy.'

    DR P. DOHERTY, St Jude Children's Research Hospital

    Fri. 27 June: `Immunity to a persistent y-
    Herpesvirus.'

    DR D. HO, Aaron Diamond Aids Research Centre, New York

    4 July: `Dynamics of HIV infection.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    MODERN HISTORY

    Seminar in Social and Cultural History, 1500–1800

    The following seminars will be given at 8.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in
    the Hovenden Room, All Souls College.

    Conveners: R. Briggs, MA, Special (non-CUF) Lecturer
    in Modern History, and F.N. Dabhoiwala, MA, D.Phil., Post-
    Doctoral Research Fellow, All Souls College.

    DR I. KRAUSMAN BEN-AMOS, Ben-Gurion University

    13 May: `Human bonding: parents and their
    offspring in early modern England.'

    DR M. BRADDICK, Sheffield

    20 May: `What happened to the state in early
    modern England?'

    DR A. ROWLANDS, Essex

    27 May: `A tale of two witches: society,
    culture, and belief in early modern Germany.'

    DR L. WARNER, Warwick

    3 June: `Widows and widowers in sixteenth-
    century France.'

    DR M. JENNER, York

    10 June: `Networks of water: London
    c.500–c.1725.'

    MS J. POLLMAN, Amsterdam

    17 June: `Past selves: the writing and reading
    of autobiographical texts from the sixteen and early
    seventeenth centuries.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    PHYSICAL SCIENCES

    Special Theoretical Physics Seminar

    PROFESSOR P. NOZIERES, ILL, France, will give a seminar at 2 p.m.
    on Monday,12 May, in the Townsend Lecture Theatre.

    Subject: `Questions concerning the Mott
    metal–insulator transition.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Oxford Centre for Advanced Materials and Composites

    The OCAMAC Industrial Lecture

    DR S. MILLER, Rolls-Royce PLC, will deliver the OCAMAC Industrial
    Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 16 May, in Lecture Room 1, the Thom
    Building, Department of Engineering Science.

    Subject: `Aeroengine integrity and reliability.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Department of Engineering Science: Maurice Lubbock Memorial
    Lecture

    DR J.R. FORREST, Chairman, Brewton Group Ltd., will deliver the
    twenty-third Maurice Lubbock Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on
    Friday, 30 May, in Lecture Theatre 1, the Department of
    Engineering Science.

    Subject: `Digital broadcasting overtakes rocket
    science.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    INSTITUTE OF ARCHAEOLOGY

    Medieval Archaeology Seminar

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the
    Lecture Room, the Institute of Archaeology.

    G. KEEVIL

    8 May: `Archaeology in an historic environment:
    reflections on recent work at the Tower of London.'

    J. MUNBY

    15 May: `Medieval technology and carpentry: the
    waggon and the origins of the coach.'

    B. COWIE and L. BLACKMORE

    5 June: `Middle Saxon London: 1996
    excavations.'

    J. COOK

    12 June: `Anglo-Saxon buckets: some unsolved
    questions.'

    G. HEY

    19 June: `An early medieval landscape at
    Yarnton, Oxon.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    RESEARCH LABORATORY FOR ARCHAEOLOGY AND
    THE HISTORY OF ART

    The following seminars will be given at 10.30 a.m. on Thursdays
    in the Library, the Research Laboratory for Archaeology.

    Convener: M.S. Tite, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
    Archaeological Science.

    N. WOOD, Royal College of Art

    8 May: `New discoveries in Chinese ceramic
    technology.'

    P. PETTITT

    22 May: `The morphometric properties of stone
    tools: what we can learn about Neanderthals through lithic
    analysis.'

    J. MITCHELL

    19 June: `An investigation and comparison of
    lithic use-wear traces by computer based image analysis.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    COMPUTING LABORATORY

    Numerical Analysis Group

    Differential equations, computational mathematics, and
    applications seminars

    Seminars will be held on Thursdays, as follows: the seminars on 8
    May and 15 May will be held at 2 p.m. in the Atlas Centre, the
    Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; the 19 June seminar will be held
    at 4 p.m. in the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; other seminars
    will be held at 4 p.m. in the Lecture Theatre, the Computing
    Laboratory.

    No seminar will be held on 12 June (Oxford and Cambridge Applied
    Mathematics Meeting).

    The series is co-ordinated by J.D.P. Donnelly (telephone: Oxford
    (2)73892), and J. Scott, RAL (telephone: 01235 445131).

    I. MAROS, Imperial College

    8 May: `On numerically exact implementation of
    the simplex method.'

    M. OSBORNE, Canberra

    15 May: `Wrap-around partitioning for narrow
    banded linear systems.'

    C. BAKER, Manchester

    22 May: `Retarded differential equations and
    some of the problems associated with delays.'

    S. HAMMARLING

    29 May: `ScaLAPACK.'

    Y. TOURIGNY, Bristol

    5 June: `Adaptation and local partial
    differential problems.'

    G. GOODSELL, Cambridge

    19 June: `A new iterative method for thin plate
    spline interpolation to scattered data.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

    Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women

    Gender and development: current research

    The following seminars will be given at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in
    the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House. For further
    information, telephone Oxford (2)73644.

    Conveners: Dr Rosemary Breger and Janette
    Davies.

    J. DAVIES

    8 May: `Gender, ageing, and caring:
    cross-cultural perspectives.'

    J. MABRO

    15 May: `Men's and women's social use of the
    Hammam (Turkish bath).'

    DR J.T. AGBASIERE, AMECEA Pastoral Institute, Kenya

    22 May: `The image of womanhood among the Igbo
    of Nigeria.'

    S. HENDERS

    29 May: `Exclusion under international
    agreements: the case of Hong Kong.'

    DR S. DIDUK

    5 June: ` "The only men left in the land
    are women"---rural women's protests in the Republic of
    Cameroon, 1990--6.'

    J. POWLES

    12 June: `Dominge: the personal narrative of a
    refugee woman from Angola.'

    M. YOMURA, International Christian University, Japan

    19 June: `Consumption patterns and their impact
    on women's lifestyle in Japan.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Kaberry Lecture

    PROFESSOR WENDY JAMES will deliver the Kaberry Lecture at 5 p.m.
    on Wednesday, 14 May, in the Taylor Institution.

    Subject: `Placing the unborn: on the social
    construction of new life.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES

    Annual Lecture in Socio-Legal Studies

    PROFESSOR GUNTHER TEUBNER, Law Department, London School of
    Economics, will
    deliver the third Annual Lecture in Socio-Legal Studies at 5.30
    p.m. on Friday, 9 May, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `Legal irritants: good faith in British law
    or how unifying law ends up in new differences.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    INSTITUTE OF VIROLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL
    MICROBIOLOGY

    The following seminars will be held at the times shown in the
    Seminar Room, the Institute of Virology and Environmental
    Microbiology.

    DR M. PAGEL

    Fri. 9 May, 4 p.m.: `Inferring evolutionary
    processes from phylogenies.'

    DR M. BEGON, Liverpool

    Wed. 21 May, 1 p.m.: `Modelling cuddlies.'
    (Provisional title)

    PROFESSOR C. GODFRAY, Imperial College at Silwood Park, Ascot

    Wed. 4 June, 1 p.m.: `NPVs and Nosema: modelling
    the population dynamics and population genetics of insect
    pathogens.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    GREEN COLLEGE


    Jan Brod Memorial Lecture 1997

    PROFESSOR SIR RICHARD DOLL will deliver the Jan Brod Memorial
    Lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 22 May, in the Witts Lecture
    Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

    Subject: `Tobacco: a medical history.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    KEBLE COLLEGE

    Eric Symes Abbott Lecture 1997

    THE RT. REVD LORD HABGOOD will deliver the Eric Symes Abbott
    Lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Friday, 16 May, in the chapel, Keble
    College. The lecture will be followed by a reception.

    Subject: `Waiting for God.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    LADY MARGARET HALL

    SUZELLE SMITH and DON HOWARTH, Senior Partners in Los Angeles law
    firm Howarth & Smith, will give a seminar at 5.15 p.m. on
    Wednesday, 14 May, in the Talbot Hall, Lady Margaret Hall. Simon
    Jenkins will lead the subsequent discussion. Those wishing to
    attend should contact Ruth Martin, Lady Margaret Hall (telephone:
    (2)74302, e-mail: ruth.martin@lmh.ox.ac.uk).

    Subject: `Media and the law.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Canada seminars

    EDWARD BROADBENT, former leader of the New Democratic Party of
    Canada, will lecture at 5.15 p.m. on Wednesday, 21 May, in Lady
    Margaret Hall. There will an opportunity to meet Mr Broadbent
    informally over drinks. Further information is available from
    Ruth Martin, Lady Margaret Hall (telephone: (2)74302, e-mail:
    ruth.martin@lmh.ox.ac.uk).

    Subject: `The 1995 Quebec Referendum—why Canada
    almost lost.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE


    Conference: Labour and difference in
    Africa, USA, and Britain (racialising class, classifying race...)

    This conference, organised by Dr Peter Alexander and Professor
    Terence Ranger, will be held in St Antony's College, 11–13
    July. There will be in all eleven panels of discussion, and many
    speakers. Full details, including abstracts, may be found at
    http://users.ox.ac.uk/~sant0425/. For specific information,
    contact Dr Alexander (e-mail: peter.alexander@sant.ox.ac.uk).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Richard Storry Memorial Lecture

    PROFESSOR CHUSHICHI TSUZUKI, International University of Tokyo,
    will deliver the Richard Storry Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on
    Thursday, 15 May, in the New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's
    College.

    Subject: `A benign future for Japan? Historical
    reflections.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    European Studies Centre

    The following meeting will be held in the European Studies
    Centre, St Antony's College, on Saturday, 10 May, 9.30
    a.m.–4.30 p.m.

    Conveners: D.B. Goldey, MA, D.Phil., University
    Lecturer (CUF) in Politics, and H.G. Martins, MA, University
    Lecturer in the Sociology of Latin America.

    PROFESSOR MANUEL V. CABRAL, Instituto de Ciencias Sociais,
    University of Lisbon

    9.30 a.m.: `Changing social attitudes in
    Portugal.'

    DR RUI FEIJO, Vereador, Camara Municipal do Oporto

    2 p.m.: `A moderate case for regionalisation:
    the recent history of the regionalisation debate in
    Portugal.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


    H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture 1997

    PROFESSOR A. DUFF will deliver the H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture
    at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 22 May, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `Law, language, and community: preconditions
    of criminal responsibility.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    WOLFSON COLLEGE

    Public lecture

    PROFESSOR DENIS GALLIGAN will lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Thursday,
    22 May, in the Haldane Room, Wolfson College. Tickets are not
    required for admission.

    Subject: `Civil rights at risk—judicial
    protection in the twenty-first century.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    JOURNAL CLUB IN HUMAN POPULATION
    GENETICS

    It is intended to start a journal club as a way of bringing
    together those in the university community with interests in
    human population genetics. The journal club will meet fortnightly
    during term. For the initial meetings one of the participants
    will lead a discussion on a particular paper from the literature.
    This mode of operation may evolve, depending on the preferences
    of the group.

    The first meeting will be held on Monday, 12 May (third week),
    1–2 p.m., in Room 209, the Department of Statistics, 1 South
    Parks Road. The paper for discussion is `The geographic
    distribution of human Y chromosome variation', Hammer et al.,
    Genetics, 145 (March 1997), 787–805.

    The conveners of the journal club are Professor P.J. Donnelly
    (Statistics), Dr D.B. Goldstein (Zoology), Dr R.M. Harding (IMM),
    and Professor R. Ward (Biological Anthropology).

    Anyone who is unable to attend the first meeting and would like
    to be kept informed of future meetings should e-mail
    donnelly@stats.ox.ac.uk.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    OXFORD IMMUNOLOGY GROUP

    DR ADA KRUISBEEK, Division of Immunology, Netherlands Cancer
    Institute, Amsterdam, will lecture at 6 p.m. on Monday, 12 May,
    in the Lecture Theatre, the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology.
    The meeting will be chaired by Professor Andrew McMichael.

    Subject: `Regulation of T cell tolerance.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    OXFORD MEDIEVAL SOCIETY

    PROFESSOR K. MORRISON, New Brunswick, New Jersey, will lecture at
    8.30 p.m. on Thursday, 15 May, in the Lee Building, Christ
    Church. Wine will be served from 8.15 p.m. New members are
    welcome.

    Subject: `The cult of me: the Wilton Diptych and
    Julian of Norwich' (with slides).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    FRIENDS OF THE PITT RIVERS MUSEUM


    Beatrice Blackwood Lecture 1997

    JOHN MACK, Keeper, Museum of Mankind, London, will deliver the
    Beatrice Blackwood Lecture at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, 14 May, in the
    Inorganic Chemistry Lecture Theatre, South Parks Road. For
    further information, telephone Oxford 554281.

    Subject: `Art, divination, and knowledge.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    TRANSLATION RESEARCH IN OXFORD

    Yves Bonnefoy, poet and translator, will attend meeting at St
    Hugh's College on Saturday, 21 June. Registration costs £15
    (students £3); lunch £7. Registration details may be
    obtained from Edith McMorran, St Hugh's College.

    YVES BONNEFOY

    10.30 a.m.: readings of his poems.

    12 noon: `La communauté des traducteurs.'

    2.15 p.m.: `Traduire Yeats.'

    M. EDWARDS

    3.15 p.m.: `Bonnefoy in English.'

    YVES BONNEFOY

    4.30 p.m.: `Traduire Shakespeare, The
    Tempest
    .'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    EUROPEAN AFFAIRS SOCIETY

    The following lectures will be given at 8.30 p.m. on the days
    shown. Further lectures may be arranged, of which details will be
    announced later. Admission is free to members of the society,
    £2 for non-members, £4 for non-University members. For
    further information, telephone Matthew Robinson (telephone: 0958
    362544).

    G. KOLODKO, former Deputy Prime Minister, Poland

    Fri. 9 May, Harris Building, Oriel College:
    `Post-Communism: from "shock therapy" to therapy
    without shock.'

    E. GUYON, Director, École Normal Supérieure

    Fri. 23 May, Saskatchewan Room, Exeter College:
    `French higher education: Grandes Ecoles for Europe?'

    K. HABSBURG, MEP, President, Paneuropa Movement

    Tue. 27 May, Harris Building, Oriel College: `A
    pan-European vision of Europe.'

    LORD DAHRENDORF

    Wed. 4 June, Nissan Institute Lecture Theatre, St
    Antony's
    : `Money, politics, and Europe.'

    THE RT. HON. TRISTAN GAREL-JONES, former UK Minister for Europe

    Mon. 16 June, Harris Building, Oriel College:
    `British Conservatism: any European future?'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    INTERNATIONAL LAW ASSOCIATION (BRITISH
    BRANCH)

    Oxford Speakers Series: corrigendum

    SIR FRANKLIN BERMAN, Legal Adviser, Foreign and Commonwealth
    Office, will lecture at 8.30 p.m. on Wednesday, 14 May, and not
    on 17 May, as stated in the Gazette of 24 April. The
    lecture will be given in the Habakkuk Room, Jesus College.
    Further information is available from Dr Michael Byers, Jesus
    College (telephone: (2)79680, fax: (2)79687, e-mail:
    michael.byers@jesus.ox.ac.uk).

    Subject: `Reservations to treaties.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 8 May 1997: Grants and Funding<br />

    Grants and Research Funding


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
    previously published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue



    PAVRY AND WINCHESTER THESIS
    PRIZES 1997

    The Board of the Faculty of Social Studies proposes to
    award two prizes in Michaelmas Term 1997, provided that
    there are candidates of sufficient merit. Both of these
    prizes are awarded for successful theses (M.Phil.,
    M.Litt., or D.Phil.) in the faculties of Social Studies,
    Law, or Modern History.

    The Dasturzada Dr Jal Pavry Memorial
    Prize
    (£500) is for a thesis on a subject
    in the area of international peace and understanding.

    The Bapsybanoo Marchioness of Winchester
    Prize
    (£500) is for a thesis on
    international relations, with particular reference to the
    area of human rights and fundamental freedoms.

    Candidates should apply in writing to Mrs Marga Lyall,
    Secretary to the Managers of the Cyril Foster and Related
    Funds, Centre for International Studies, Social Studies
    Faculty Centre, George Street, Oxford OX1 2RL, not later
    than 12 noon on Friday, 25 July. Applications must
    include a copy of the thesis, together with a short
    abstract, and a letter supplying (a) the
    candidate's name, college and degree; (b) the
    names of the candidate's examiners and supervisor(s) (not
    applicable to M.Phil. candidates); (c) a clear
    indication of which one of the two prizes is sought;
    (d) an address for communication should the
    candidate not be returning to the University in
    Michaelmas Term.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    CYRIL FOSTER AND RELATED FUNDS
    FOR INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

    1 The Managers of the Cyril Foster and
    Related Funds will consider requests from members of the
    University (principally M.Litt. and D.Phil. students, and
    senior members) undertaking research in international
    relations for modest grants towards travel and related
    research expenses, and, exceptionally, for other
    purposes. The main funds are:

    (a) The Cyril Foster Fund:
    this is intended for `the promotion of international
    peace and the prevention of future wars'.

    (b) The Alastair Buchan
    Fund
    : this fund, which is strictly limited, is
    intended for `the promotion of research in international
    relations'.

    (c) The Oxford Project for Peace Studies
    Fund: this fund, which is strictly limited, is intended
    for `the study of the nature of peace and of the methods
    by which peace can be developed and extended'.

    Applications for grants under these funds are not
    normally entertained from visiting scholars, from
    students with probationary status, from students for the
    M.Sc. or M.Phil. degree, or from undergraduates. Requests
    should be made before the expenses are incurred.
    Attendance at an international conference will not in
    itself normally be accepted as a sufficient reason for a
    grant.

    2 Graduate students (including
    M.Sc. or M.Phil.) can also apply for the annual Maurice
    Latey Award `to assist travel for research by
    postgraduate students in the fields of politics or
    international relations working on aspects of democracy,
    freedom and religion'. Suitable applications for grants
    under 1 above will automatically be considered for this
    award. Additional applications for small research grants
    are also invited from postgraduate students at British or
    overseas universities wishing to use the Latey Archive in
    the Bodleian Library.

    3 Applications for grants under 1
    and/or 2 above should be made on a form available from
    the Secretary to the Managers (address below), and should
    be submitted by the end of the fifth week of each Oxford
    term. Consideration of applications submitted after that
    date will normally be deferred until the latter part of
    the following term. Candidates are asked to state the
    name of the fund/s to which they are applying, and to
    clarify the relevance of their project to the purpose of
    the particular fund. Graduate students applying for
    research grants are also asked to name one referee,
    normally their supervisor, who should be requested to
    send a reference directly to the Secretary to the
    Managers.

    4 Applications are also invited for
    the annual Royal Bank of Canada Research Scholarship.
    This award, of a value of £1,000, is available to
    any graduate student of the University (including M.Sc.
    or M.Phil.) to cover costs of research outside the UK on
    `international relations with special reference to
    Canada'. Letters of application should be submitted by
    the end of fifth week of Trinity Term. There is no
    application form, but candidates should state college,
    course, and supervisor, and they should give a brief
    outline of their thesis topic and proposed research.

    5 All requests for application
    forms, correspondence, and references should be addressed
    directly to Mrs Marga Lyall, Secretary to the Managers of
    the Cyril Foster and Related Funds, Centre for
    International Studies, Social Studies Faculty Centre,
    George Street, Oxford OX1 2RL.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    SIR JOHN HICKS FUND

    The Committee for the Sir John Hicks Fund invites
    applications from members of the University for grants
    towards the costs of research in economic history.
    Applications will be considered from undergraduates,
    graduate students, and members of academic staff, and may
    related to research into the economic history of any
    period or country.

    Applicants should (a) provide sufficient
    information about the general nature of their research to
    establish that it falls within the field of economic
    history; and (b) specify the precise nature and
    cost of the expenditure for which a grant is requested.
    They should also give the name of one referee who might
    be consulted by the committee.

    It is intended by the committee that grants should
    normally be made for sums of up to £250, though this
    may on occasion be exceeded. Retrospective grants will be
    made only in exceptional circumstances.

    The committee will consider applications twice in each
    year. The closing date for the first round is Monday of
    the third week of Hilary Term, and for the second round
    Monday of the third week of Trinity Term. Applications
    should be sent to Mrs E.A. Macallister, Secretary of the
    Committee for the Sir John Hicks Fund, University
    Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section





    <br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 8 May 1997: Examinations and Boards<br />

    Examinations and Boards


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MEDIEVAL AND
    MODERN LANGUAGES

    Optional Subjects in the Honour School
    of Modern Languages and the related joint honour schools

    Return to Examinations and
    Boards
    section,
    Gazette 8 May 1997

    The Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages gives
    notice, under the provisions of the regulations in
    Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 425, ll. 40–2,
    that the following Optional Subjects will be available in the
    examination in Trinity Term 1999:

    101 The comparative descriptive linguistics of modern European
    languages. Candidates will be expected to have a detailed
    knowledge of any two of the following languages and to have made
    a comparative study of their present–day phonetics,
    phonology, morphology, syntax, and vocabulary: English, French,
    German, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Russian, Greek.

    102 Semantics. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with
    the principal theories in this field since 1900.

    103 [1]
    General Linguistics. Candidates should be familiar with
    the terminology, methodology, and main theoretical standpoints
    of modern linguistics. They should be able to discuss, with
    reference to phonetics, phonology, grammar, and semantics, some
    of the following topics: linguistic units and relations;
    linguistic universals; communicational functions of language;
    language acquisition; linguistic variation and linguistic change;
    linguistic relativism. Opportunity will be provided for
    candidates to show proficiency in phonological, grammatical, and
    other types of analysis of given samples of linguistic
    material.

    104 [2]
    Modern Literary Theory. Candidates will be expected to
    be familiar with major theories in this field since 1918.

    105 European Cinema and Literary Movements from 1920 to the
    present. Candidates will be expected: (a) to show
    evidence of having worked on film study and analysis, using D.
    Bordwell and K. Thompson, Film Art, 3rd edition (McGraw Hill,
    London, 1990); P. Cook, The Cinema Book (BFI, London, 1985); M.
    Liehm, Passion and Defiance (University of California Press,
    Berkeley–Los Angeles, 1984); (b) to have studied
    two of the following, up to four of which will be available in
    the examination: Expressionism and the Early Avant-garde;
    Realism, Socialist-Realism, Neo-Realism; Auteurism; Filmic
    Adaptations of Literary Texts/Literary Authors writing for the
    screen; Totalitarianism in Literature and Film; Surrealism;
    Representations of Gender and Sexuality; The New Avant-garde and
    Post-modern Film.

    A list of the topics listed in (b) which will be
    available in the examination can be obtained from the Modern
    Languages Faculty Secretarial Office in 37 Wellington Square at
    the beginning of Michaelmas Full Term 1997.

    200 Romance Philology and Linguistics. Candidates will be
    expected to show a detailed knowledge of the methods of
    Comparative Romance Philology and to illustrate their answers
    with examples from more than one Romance language. A section on
    `Vulgar Latin' will be set, including passages for linguistic
    comment from one or more of the following: Early Glosses,
    Appendix Probi, Aetheriae Peregrinatio ad Loca Sancta. The
    section will be compulsory for candidates offering Modern
    Languages Paper IV in any two Romance languages, and optional for
    all other candidates, with the exception of those offering the
    Classics and Modern Languages paper in Late Latin Philology, who
    will be precluded from answering it.

    201 Anglo-Norman Language and Literature.

    202 Old Provençal. Prescribed text: F.R. Hamlin, P.T.
    Ricketts, J. Hathaway, Introduction à l'étude de
    l'ancien provençal, Geneva 1967 and 1985, with particular
    reference to nos. 2, 3, 4, 8, 10, 12, 14, 15, 17, 18, 20, 25, 26,
    27, 28, 31, 33, 34, 36, 39, 40, 42, 44, 46, 48, 49, 53, 54, 56,
    57, 59, 65, 67, 70, from which passages will be set for
    translation. In addition, candidates may answer questions on
    either literary or linguistic topics or both.

    203 The twelfth- and thirteenth-century Grail Romances.

    204 French historical writing up to 1515.

    205 French poetry of the mid-sixteenth century.

    206 Dramatic theory and practice in France from 1605 to 1660,
    with special reference to Corneille.

    207 French grammarians and linguistic theory of the seventeenth
    and eighteenth centuries.

    208 [3]
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau.

    209 Honoré de Balzac.

    210 French Poetry 1870 to 1918.

    211 French literature and the First World War.

    212 [4]
    Marcel Proust.

    213 Surrealism.

    214 The `Nouveau Roman', with special reference to the work of
    Robbe-Grillet, Nathalie Sarraute and Butor.

    215 Literature and the visual arts from Diderot to Zola.

    216 French women writers.

    217 Advanced French Translation: Theory and Practice.

    300 Old Norse. Candidates will be expected to have made a special
    study of F. Ranke and D. Hofmann, Altnordisches Elementarbuch
    (Sammlung Göschen No. 1115), pp. 80–135. Candidates
    will also be expected to have read the Völsungasaga and
    related material from the Poetic Edda.

    301 Old High German, with either Gothic or Old Saxon or Old
    English. Prescribed texts: Gothic, Gospel according to St Mark,
    chapters 1–9; Old Saxon, Heliand, ll. 4025–5038; Old
    English, Beowulf, ll. 1–1049.

    302 The German Minnesang. Candidates will be expected to have
    made a special study of Friedrich von Hausen, Lieder (ed.
    Schweikle) (Reclam); Reinmar, Lieder (ed. Schweikle) (Reclam);
    Heinrich von Morungen, Lieder (ed. Tervooren) (Reclam).

    303 Wolfram von Eschenbach.

    304 Martin Luther.

    305 German poetry and drama of the seventeenth century.

    306 Eighteenth-century German aesthetics from Baumgarten to
    Schiller.

    307 Hölderlin, Hyperion, Empedokles (ed. M. B. Benn,
    Clarendon German Series) and the poetry written after 1797.

    308 The Bildungsroman from Wieland to Keller.

    309 German political thought from 1780 to 1830. Candidates will
    be expected to have read: Kant, Idee zu einer allgemeinen
    Geschichte in weltbürgerlicher Absicht, 1784; Zum ewigen
    Frieden, 1795; Humboldt, Ideen zu einem Versuch, die Grenzen der
    Wirksamkeit des Staates zu bestimmen, 1792; Novalis, Die
    Christenheit oder Europa, 1799; Fichte, Reden an die deutsche
    Nation, 1808; Hegel, Vorlesungen über die Philosophie der
    Geschichte, Einleitung (ed. Th. Litt, Reclam); Grundlinien der
    Philosophie des Rechts, Vorrede, 1821.

    310 Johann Nestroy and the Wiener Volkstheater.

    311 The poetry of Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Stefan George, and
    Rainer Maria Rilke. Candidates will be examined on the poetry of
    two of these authors and will be expected to have read the works
    listed in any two of the sections below.

    (a) Hofmannsthal: Gedichte und Lyrische Dramen, ed.
    Steiner (Fischer Verlag, 1952), pp. 7–136, 467–529.

    (b) George: Hymnen, Pilgerfahrten, Algabal; Das Jahr
    der Seele; Der Teppich des Lebens und die Lieder von Traum und
    Tod mit einem Vorspiel; the sections `Zeitgedichte',
    `Gestalten', `Gezeiten', and `Maximin' from Der siebente Ring;
    Das neue Reich omitting the section `Sprüche'.

    (c) Rilke: Das Stunden–Buch; Neue Gedichte (both
    parts); Requiem für eine Freundin; Requiem für Wolf
    Graf von Kalckreuth; Die Sonette an Orpheus; Duineser
    Elegien.

    312 `Expressionist' poetry. Candidates will be expected to have
    a detailed knowledge of poetry included in Lyrik des
    Expressionismus ed. Silvio Vietta (Deutsche Texte no. 37,
    published by Niemeyer).

    314 German Poetry since 1945. Candidates will be expected to have
    a general knowledge of the field, and a detailed knowledge of
    works written in or after 1945 by three of the following authors:
    Bachmann, Benn, Biermann, Bobrowski, Volker Braun, Brecht, Celan
    (the collections of poetry from Mohn und Gedächtnis to
    Atemwende inclusive), Enzensberger, Grass, Huchel, Sarah Kirsch,
    Kunert, Sachs.

    Note: The paper will include a compulsory section
    containing general questions and commentary passages taken from
    the authors being offered; candidates will thus be required to
    attempt either a general essay or a commentary. Brecht's poetry
    from 1945 to 1956 may be offered as one of the three authors
    selected for detailed knowledge in this paper by candidates
    offering Brecht as a prescribed author in paper X.

    315 The German novel since 1945. Candidates will be expected to
    have a general knowledge of the field, and to have read
    German–language novels relating to the topics listed below.
    The paper will consist of a number of general questions, and a
    number of questions on each of the following topics (candidates
    will be precluded from answering more than two questions on any
    one topic): Narrative Voice; `Vergangenheitsbewältigung';
    Politics and Society; Identity and Gender.

    400 Italian lyric poetry of the thirteenth century.

    401 Dante's minor works.

    402 `Questione della lingua.' Candidates will be expected to have
    read: Dante, De Vulgari Eloquentia; Bembo, Prose della volgar
    lingua; Manzoni, Scritti sulla lingua.

    403 Vico.

    404 The aesthetics and literary criticism of Croce. Candidates
    will be expected to be familiar with Part I of the Estetica,
    Croce's principal theoretical additions to it, and a broad sample
    of his criticism of Italian literature.

    405 The Works of Carlo Emilio Gadda.

    406 Sicilian literature 1950–1990.

    407 Italian Women Writers 1950–1990

    500 [5]
    The Civilisation of Muslim Spain.

    503 The Spanish Erasmians. Candidates will be expected to have
    read: Erasmus, El Enquiridión (ed. Dámaso Alonso,
    Madrid, 1932); Coloquios de Erasmo (Nueva Biblioteca de Autores
    Españoles, vol. xxi, pp. 149–202, 227–49);
    Alfonso de Valdés, Diálogo de las cosas ocurridas
    en Roma (ed. José F. Montesinos, Clásicos
    castellanos); Juan de Valdés, Diálogo de doctrina
    christiana y el psalterio (ed. Domingo Ricart, Mexico, 1964, pp.
    1–130); Juan Luis Vives, Concordia y discordia en el linaje
    humano [De concordia et discordia in humano genere], Bk. IV
    (Obras completas, trans. L. Riber, Aguilar, Madrid, 1947–8,
    ii, 195–253); Cristóbal de Villalón (attr.),
    Viaje de Turquía (Part I); F. de la Torre,
    Institución de un rey christiano (ed. R. W. Truman, Exeter
    Hispanic Texts, 1979)(passages for commentary will not be set
    from this text).

    504 The Discovery and Conquest of Mexico and the Antilles.
    Candidates will be expected to have read: Cristóbal
    Colón, Los cuatro viajes del almirante y su testamento
    (ed. Austral); Hernán Cortés, Cartas de
    relación de la conquista de Méjico (ed. M.
    Alcalá, Porrúa, Mexico) and A. R. Pagden,
    Hernán Cortés: Letters from Mexico (Oxford
    University Press, London, 1972), Letters two and three; Bernal
    Díaz del Castillo, Historia de la Conquista de la Nueva
    España (Porrúa, Mexico, 1960), vol. i, pp.
    174–501 and vol. ii, pp. 1–60; Bartolomé de las
    Casas, Brevísima relación de la destrucción
    de las Indias (EUDEBA, Buenos Aires, 1966); Toribio de Motolinia,
    Historia de los Indios de la Nueva España (Porrúa,
    Mexico, 1969), pp. 77–109; Bernardino de Sahagún,
    Historia general de la Nueva España (Porrúa,
    Mexico, 1956), Libros 3, 7, and 8. Candidates will also be
    expected to have read Pedro Mártir de Anglería,
    Décadas del Nuevo Mundo (ed. J. Torres Asensio), omitting
    Décadas 2, 3, and 6.

    505 Spanish devotional and mystical writing 1577–1588.
    Candidates will be expected to have read: Santa Teresa de
    Jesús, Moradas del castillo interior; Fray Luis de
    Granada, Introducción del símbolo de la fe (ed.
    José María Balcells, Madrid, Cátedra, 1989),
    pp. 125–231; Fray Luis de León, Rey de Dios, Esposo,
    and Jesús, from De los nombres de Cristo; San Juan de la
    Cruz, Llama de amor viva (candidates will also be expected to
    have read the poem), Malón de Chaide, La conversión
    de la Magdalena (3 vols., ed. Félix García,
    Clásicos Castellanos, Madrid, 1958), III, 83–178,
    190–219.

    507 Twentieth-century Catalan literature. Candidates will be
    expected to have a general knowledge of the field and a detailed
    knowledge of works by at least three authors. Passages for
    comment, which will not be compulsory, will be set from the
    authors currently prescribed. Details of the authors and works
    prescribed for detailed knowledge will be available in the Modern
    Languages Administration and Faculty Office, 37 Wellington
    Square, at the beginning of the Michaelmas Full Term of the
    academic year of the examination.

    508 Galician literature and culture after Francoism. Candidates
    will be expected to have a general knowledge of the field and a
    detailed knowledge of works by at least three authors. Passages
    for comment, which will not be compulsory, will be set from
    authors currently prescribed. Details of the authors and works
    prescribed for detailed knowledge will be available in the Modern
    Languages Faculty Office, 37 Wellington Square, at the beginning
    of the Michaelmas Full Term of the academic year of the
    examination.

    530 The Work of Alfonso the Wise as author and patron of
    literature and learning. Passages for commentary will be set from
    Primera crónica general (ed. R. Menéndez Pidal,
    Madrid, 1955), caps. 814–967; Las siete partidas (ed. Real
    Academia de la Historia, Madrid, 1807), I (Prólogo and
    i–both versions), ii; II (i, iii–v, ix–xi, xv,
    xviii, xxi–xxii, xxiv, xxxi); III (xix–xx); Cantigas
    de Santa Maria (ed. Jesús Montoya, Letras
    hispánicas, 293, Madrid, Cátedra).

    531 Spanish and Portuguese Prose Romances of the Fifteenth and
    Sixteenth Centuries. Candidates will be expected to have a
    knowledge of the field and to have made a special study of at
    least one romance from each of the following groups, from which
    passages for literary commentary will be set: (a)
    sentimental, (b) chivalric, and (c)
    pastoral.

    (a) Diego de San Pedro, Cárcel de amor (ed.
    Whinnom); Juan de Flores, Grimalte y Gradissa (ed. Waley);
    Bernardim Ribeiro, Menina e moça;

    (b) Spanish Grail Fragments (ed. Pietsch);
    Amadís de Gaula, Part I (ed. Place); Palmeirim de
    Inglaterra (ed. Rodrigues Lapa); Tirant lo Blanch, Book I;

    (c) Jorge de Montemayor, Los siete libros de la Diana
    (ed. López Estrada); Gil Polo, Diana enamorada (ed.
    Ferreres); Samuel Usque, Consolaç o às
    tribulaç es de Israel vol. i.

    532 Latin American Fiction from 1940. Candidates will be expected
    to show a detailed knowledge of the novels/short stories of at
    least two of the following authors: Jorge Luis Borges, Alejo
    Carpentier, Julio Cortázar, Fernando del Paso, Carlos
    Fuentes, Gabriel García Márquez, Jo o Guimar es
    Rosa, Osman Lins, Clarice Lispector, Mario Vargas Llosa.

    560 The Galician-Portuguese Cancioneiros.

    561 The Chronicles of the Portuguese Expansion in Asia.
    Candidates will be expected to have read: the texts in Portuguese
    contained in T.F. Earle and John Villiers, Albuquerque, Caesar
    of the East (Aris and Phillips, 1990); Jo o de Barros,
    Décadas, ed. António Bai o, vol. I (Sá da
    Costa, 1945) (candidates are advised to consult also the
    electronic edition of the Décadas published by the Centre
    for the Study of the Portuguese Discoveries); Diogo do Couto, O
    soldado prático, ed. Rodrigues Lapa (Sá da Costa,
    1954); Fern o Mendes Pinto, Peregrinaç o, chaps. 1,
    36–104, 203–26.

    562 Camoes. Candidates will be expected to have read Os
    Lusíadas (ed. F. Pierce)(passages for translation will be
    set from Cantos I, V, IX) and Líricas (ed. Rodrigues Lapa,
    1970 or later).

    563 The Brazilian Novel of the North-East 1880–1960.

    600 [6]
    Old Church Slavonic in relation to Common Slavonic and
    Russian.

    601 Comparative Slavonic Philology, with special reference to
    Russian and any one of the following languages: Bulgarian, Czech,
    Macedonian, Polish, Serbo-Croat, Slovak, Slovene, Sorbian,
    Ukrainian, White Russian.

    602 [7]
    The structure and history of one of the following
    languages: Bulgarian, Czech, Macedonian, Polish, Serbo-Croat,
    Slovak, Slovene, Sorbian, Ukrainian, White Russian.

    603 Language and style in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century
    Russian literature.

    604 Russian thought from 1825 to 1905. Candidates will be
    expected to have read the works of Belinsky, Herzen, the
    Slavophiles, Chernyshevsky, Mikhaylovsky, Plekhanov, Lenin.

    605 Russian narrative fiction from 1917. Questions will be set
    predominantly on the following authors: Babel', Bulgakov,
    Erenburg, Leonov, Olesha, Pasternak, Sholokhov, Solzhenitsyn,
    Zamyatin.

    606 Modern Russian poetry, with special reference to the works
    of Akhmatova, Mandel'shtam, Pasternak, Tsvetaeva.

    607 Russian religious philosophy in the late nineteenth and early
    twentieth centuries, with special reference to the works of
    Fedorov, Solov'ev, Berdyaev, Florensky and S. Bulgakov.

    608 Czech and Slovak fiction since 1945, with reference to the
    works of Hrabal, Páral, Kundera, Bednár, Johanides,
    and others.

    609 Modern Russian poetry, with special reference to the works of
    Akhmatova, Mandl'shtam, Paternak, Tsvetaeva.

    701 The School of the Ionian Islands 1797–1912, with special
    reference to the works of Solomos, Kalvos, Laskaratos, Matesis,
    Valaoritis, and Mavilis.

    702 The New Athenian School of Poetry 1880–1912, with
    special reference to the works of Palamas, Drosinis, Gryparis,
    Krystallis, Malakasis, and Hadzopoulos.

    703 The Greek novel 1918–40, with special reference to the
    works of K. Theotokis, G. Theotokas, Karagatsis, Myrivilis,
    Venezis, K. Politis, and G. N. Abbot.

    704 Greek Women Writers.

    801 [8]
    Medieval Welsh tales and romances.

    802 [8]The poets of the
    Welsh princes.

    803 [8]The poetry of Dafydd
    ap Gwilym.

    804 The Ulster Cycle of tales.

    805 The classical Irish bardic tradition.

    806 The structure and history of the Welsh language.

    807 The structure and history of the Irish language.

    900 Hebrew poetry and prose of Medieval Spain and Provence. In
    addition to the literary texts, candidates will be expected to
    show knowledge of the historical background of Spain and Provence
    from the eleventh to the fourteenth centuries, in particular the
    transition from an Islamic to a Christian environment and the
    Jewish response to it. Candidates will be expected to have read
    selected works by the following writers: Moses Ibn Ezra; Abraham
    Ibn Ezra; Joseph Ibn Zabara; Judah al-Harizi; Meshullam da Piera;
    Shem Tob Falaquera; Todros Abulafia; Isaac Hagorni. All texts
    will be selected from J. Schirmann, Hashirah ha'ivrit besefarad
    uveprovans.

    901 Early twentieth-century Hebrew literature. Candidates will
    be expected to show knowledge of the work of Central and East
    European Hebrew writers (some of whom settled in Jewish Palestine
    in the early decades of this century) and in particular of their
    literary development in the environment of Austrian, Russian, and
    Polish literature, and their influence in shaping contemporary
    Hebrew literature. Candidates will be expected to have read
    stories by Y. H. Brenner and by M. Berdyczewski; David Vogel's
    novel, Hayei nisu'im; a selection of poetry by H. N. Bialik, Saul
    Tschernichovsky, Leah Goldberg, Nathan Alterman, and Abraham
    Shlonski. Texts will be selected from the following works: Y. H.
    Brenner, Kovetz sippurim (Sifrei Mofet); Y. Lichtenbaum (ed.),
    Sofreinu (Ahiasaf); T. Carmi (ed.), The Penguin Book of Hebrew
    Verse.

    902 The literature of the State of Israel. Candidates will be
    expected to show knowledge of modern Israel's literary history
    and the development of its literature in the light of twentieth-
    century Western European influences. Candidates will be expected
    to have read stories by S. Y. Agnon, Aharon Meged, and Aharon
    Appelfeld; a selection of poetry by Nathan Zach, Yehuda Amichai,
    Dan Pagis, and Meir Wieseltier; and two plays by Yehoshua Sobol.
    Texts will be selected from the following works: S. Y. Agnon,
    Sefer Ha–ma'asim (Schocken Books, 1948); Aharon Appelfeld,
    Shanim vesha'ot (Hakibbutz Hameuchad, 1975); T. Carmi (ed.), The
    Penguin Book of Hebrew Verse; Yehoshua Sobol, Nefesh yehudi and
    Ghetto.

    903 Yiddish Linguistics. Candidates will be expected to show
    knowledge of the methods and findings of Yiddish linguistic
    research with respect to any three of the following five topics:
    (i) origins and history of Yiddish; (ii)interrelationships with
    German dialects and standard German; (iii) the Semitic component
    in Yiddish; (iv) Yiddish dialectology; (v) Yiddish
    sociolinguistics. Required readings for each of these topics will
    be in Yiddish, English, and German.

    904 Modern Yiddish Literature. Candidates will be expected to
    have read:

    Sholem Aleichem, Kasrílevker progrés (in his Fun
    Kasrílevke, NY 1919, pp. 11–84); Ber Borokhov, Di
    úfgabn fun der yídisher filológye (in
    Shprákhforshung un literatúr geshíkhte, ed.
    N. Mayzl, Tel Aviv 1966, pp. 53–75); Sh. An–ski
    (Shloyme–Zanvl Rapoport), Der díbek (in Di
    yídishe dráme fun tsvántsikstn
    yorhúndert, NY 1977, vol. ii, pp. 7–60); Selections
    from the poetry of R. Ayzland, A. M. Dilon, M. L. Halpern, Z.
    Landoy, M. Leyb, H. Leyvik, Y. Y. Shvarts, A. N. Stencl, M.
    Vintshevski (in Músterverk fun der yídisher
    literatúr, ed. Rozhanski, vol. lxxvi, pp. 40–53,
    61–6, 91–100, 112–34; vol. lxxviii, pp. 211,
    234–8); Isaac Bashevis Singer, A tógbukh fun a nisht
    gebóyrenem and Der yid fun bovl (in his Der sótn
    in goráy un ándere dertséylungen, Jerusalem
    1972, pp. 251–70, 307–19).

    Notes on mutual exclusions and other restrictions

    [1]
    Candidates offering the Optional Subject `General
    Linguistics' may not offer paper XIII from the Honour School of
    Modern Languages.

    No candidate in the Honour School of English and Modern Languages
    may offer both the Optional Subject `General Linguistics' and the
    paper `Linguistic Theory' from the Honour School of English
    Language and Literature.

    Return to text

    [2]
    No candidate in the Honour School of English and Modern
    Languages may offer both the Optional Subject `Modern Literary
    Theory' and the paper `The History and Theory of Criticism' from
    the Honour School of English Language and Literature.

    Return to text

    [3]
    No candidate in the Honour School of Modern History and
    Modern Languages my offer both the Optional Subject `Jean-Jacques
    Rousseau' and the Modern History Political and Social Thought
    paper.

    Return to text

    [4]
    No candidate in the Honour School of Modern History and
    Modern Languages may offer both the Optional Subject `Marcel
    Proust' and Further Subject in General History, `Literature,
    Politics, and Society in France 1870–1914'.

    Return to text

    [5]
    Candidates will be given an opportunity to show knowledge
    of Arabic, but will not be required to show such knowledge.
    Candidates offering this paper must have the approval of the
    Joint Committee on Arabic and Spanish. Applications should be
    sent to the Faculty Secretary, Oriental Institute, not later than
    the Monday of second week of Michaelmas Term in the academic year
    in which the candidate proposes to take the examination.

    Return to text

    [6]
    No candidate in the Honour School of Modern Languages or
    in a joint Honour School involving Modern Languages may offer
    both the Optional Subject `Old Church Slavonic in relation to
    Common Slavonic and Russian' and option (1) (`The Old Church
    Slavonic Language') in the Linguistic Studies Paper II in Russian
    (Russian Paper V from the Honour School of Modern Languages).

    Return to text

    [7]
    Candidates offering Czech (with Slovak) will not be
    permitted to offer either of those languages in the Optional
    Subject on the structure and history of one of certain specified
    languages.


    Return to text

    [8]
    No candidate in the Honour School of English and Modern
    Languages may offer the paper `Medieval Welsh' from the Honour
    School of English Language and Literature with any of the
    Optional Subjects `Medieval Welsh tales and romances', `The poets
    of the Welsh princes', and `The poetry of Dafydd ap Gwilym'.

    Return to text



    CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

    With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in
    regulations made by boards of faculties will come into effect on 23
    May.


    1 Board of the Faculty of English Language
    and Literature

    Honour School of English Language and Literature

    With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 211,
    delete ll. 27–9 and substitute:

    `(e) Every extended essay must be the work of the
    candidate alone, and he or she must not discuss with any tutor either
    his or her choice of theme or the method of handling it.'

    2 Ibid., p. 213, ll. 7–8 and 9–10,
    delete `(as specified for Moderations in English Language and
    Literature).'

    3 Ibid., p. 217, delete ll. 36–7 and
    substitute:

    `11. The Archaeology of Anglo-Saxon England, seventh to ninth
    centuries ad (one paper)

    Questions will be set on such topics as the archaeology of kingship;
    Celtic influence on Anglo-Saxon material culture; rural settlement
    and landscape; the archaeology of the Conversion; the emergence of
    towns; and the `Golden Age' of Northumbria. The identification,
    description and discussion of artefacts will be compulsory.'

    4 Ibid., p. 218, l. 47, delete `They' and
    substitute:

    `There will be a compulsory question requiring literary and
    linguistic commentary on passages from these texts, of which
    candidates must answer one. Translation will not be required.
    Candidates
    '.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    2 Boards of the Faculties of English
    Language and Literature and Medieval and Modern Languages

    Honour School of English and Modern Languages

    With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

    In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 205, ll. 22–3 and
    26–7, delete `(as specified for Moderations in English Language
    and Literature).'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    3 Board of the Faculty of Law

    Honour School of Jurisprudence

    With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 249,
    delete ll. 32–5 and substitute:

    `1. European Community Social, Environmental and Consumer Law
    (Special Subject)

    (a) The growth of EC competence in environmental law; the
    principle of subsidiarity; the relationship between trade and the
    environment in EC law.

    (b) The Environmental Impact Assessment Directive and its
    implementation in the UK; general issues relating to the
    implementation and enforcement of EC environmental law.

    (c) The growth of EC competence in consumer law; case
    study of tobacco regulation, including tobacco labelling legislation
    and the proposal to ban tobacco advertising.

    (d) Citizenship of the European Union; locus standi and
    the legal remedies available to the individual to enforce EC law; the
    role of the citizen in the enforcement of EC
    environmental and consumer law.

    The subject will be examined by means of a two-hour written
    examination in which candidates will be required to answer two
    questions.

    2. European Community Competition Law (Special Subject)

    (a) The law relating to cartels and Article 85 of the EC
    Treaty.

    (b) The law concerning abuse of a dominant position dealt
    with in Article 86 of the EC Treaty.

    (c) Enforcement of competition law by the Commission and
    in national courts.

    (d) The law relating to state aids covered by Articles
    92–4 of the Treaty.

    The subject will be examined by means of a two-hour written
    examination in which candidates will be required to answer two
    questions.

    3. Introduction to the Law of Copyright and Moral Rights (Special
    Subject)

    (a) The justification and development of copyright and
    moral rights.

    (b) The UK law of copyright and moral rights.

    (c) Issues in the harmonisation of European copyright and
    moral rights.

    (d) Issues in the protection of computer software.

    The subject will be examined by means of a two-hour written
    examination in which candidates will be required to answer two
    questions.

    4. Lawyers' Ethics (Special Subject) comprises four topics as
    follows:

    A. Ethics, Applied Ethics, and Professional Ethics; together with

    B. Two or one of the following substantive topics:

    (1) Confidentiality.

    (2) Conflict of interest.

    (3) Costs and charging practices.

    (4) Citizenship.

    (5) Competence.

    (6) Commitment (e.g. Christianity, Marxism, Feminism, Liberalism);

    together with:

    C. One or two of the following areas of legal endeavour:

    (1) Criminal justice.

    (2) Family lawyering.

    (3) Commercial practice.

    (4) Constitutional law and civil liberties.

    (5) Environmental regulation.

    The subject will be examined by means of a two-hour written
    examination in which candidates will be required to answer two
    questions.

    5. Historical Foundations of the Law of Unjust Enrichment
    (Special Subject)

    (1) The Roman Law relating to claims in respect of payments and
    other performances not due, made on a basis which fails, made on a
    basis which is unlawful or immoral, or made without any basis at all,
    to be studied in relation to the relevant texts of the Corpus Iuris
    Civilis.

    (2) The Roman classification of obligations and its later
    evolution.

    (3) The influence of Roman law in the development of
    the modern law of unjust enrichment, particularly in
    Germany, France, and England.

    This subject will be examined by means of a two-hour written
    examination in which candidates will be required to answer two
    questions.

    6. Money, Goods, and other Personal Property (Special Subject)

    (1) The taxonomy of personal property.

    (2) Original and derivative acquisition of title to personalty at
    law and in equity.

    (3) The principle Nemo dat quod non habet and the
    exceptions to that principle.

    (4) The protection of property in personalty, with comparative
    reference to civilian jurisdictions.

    This subject will be examined by means of a two-hour examination in
    which candidates will be required to
    answer two questions. It shall not be offered by any candidate who is
    also offering the standard subject Principles of Commercial Law.'

    2 Ibid., p. 252, after l. 30 insert:

    `The above subject shall not be offered by any candidate who is
    also offering the special subject Money, Goods, and Other Personal
    Property.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    4 Board of the Faculty of Literae
    Humaniores

    Honour School of Literae Humaniores

    With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 265,
    delete ll. 4–10 and substitute:

    `and R. Meiggs and D. Lewis (eds.), A Selection of Greek
    Historical Inscriptions to the End of the Fifth Century bc (revised
    edition, 1988) nos. 28–95 and 67 bis at p. 312 of 1988 reprint,
    Supplementum Epigraphicum Graecum XXXI 985, Inscriptiones Graecae 1
    (ed. 3) 1454, Historia Einzelschrift 74 (1992),
    Hesperia 22 (1953), extracts from pp. 252, 254, 263, 271, 288.

    Translated in C.W. Fornara, Translated Documents of Greece and Rome
    1: Archaic Times to the End of the Peloponnesian War (Cambridge,
    1983) nos. 15B, 54, 63, 64, 66, 68, 70, 77, 78, 80, 81, 89, 90B, 91,
    93, 97–101, 103, 112–15, 118B, 119–21, 124–6,
    128, 129, 132–6, 138–40, 142–4, 146, 147D,
    149–50, 152–5, 160–3, 165, 166 and in a dossier
    obtainable from the Classics Office, 37 Wellington Square.'

    2 Ibid., delete ll. 22–31 and substitute:

    `and M.N. Tod, A Selection of Greek Historical Inscriptions, vol.
    2 (Oxford, 1948) nos. 97, 101–3, 106–9, 111–18,
    120–4, 126–7, 129–33, 136–9, 141–7,
    150–8, 160–5, 167–72, 174–9, Supplementum
    Epigraphicum Graecum XII 87, XXVII 942, XXIX 86, XXXIV 155, XXXV 480,
    Sylloge Inscriptionum
    Graecarum ed. 3 (ed. W. Dittenberger) nos. 963, 986, 1004,
    Inscriptiones Graecae XII 8.4 and Hesperia 43 (1974) 157ff.

    Translated in P. Harding, Translated Documents of Greece and Rome 2:
    From the End of the Peloponnesian War to the Battle of Ipsus
    (Cambridge, 1985) nos. 2, 5, 12D, 14A, 16, 17, 20, 21, 24, 26, 27,
    29, 31, 34, 35, 37, 38, 40–3, 45, 46, 51–9, 63–6,
    68–70, 74, 79, 81–4, 88, 94, 97, 99A, 100, 101, and in a
    dossier obtainable from the Classics Office, 37 Wellington Square.'

    3 Ibid., delete l. 44 and substitute:

    `and Inscriptiones Creticae III 4; IG (= Inscriptiones Graecae)
    IX2 2.241; Justin 30.2.8, 31.1.2, Valerius Maximus 6.6.1, M.H.
    Crawford, Roman Republican Coinage I (1974), no. 419/2; R.K. Sherk,
    Roman Documents from the Greek East (= RDGE) 33; Die Inscriften von
    Lampsakos (ed. P. Frisch) 4; IG XII 9.931, SEG (Supplementum
    Epigraphicum Graecum) XXII 214, SIG3 (= Sylloge Inscriptionum
    Graecarum3 (ed. W. Dittenberger) 592, IG XII 9.233 (cf. Addenda, p.
    177), SIG3 616, SEG XXIII 412, SEG XXII 266.13–14; SIG3 595
    A–B; RDGE 34; IG XI 4.712; IG XI 4.756; SEG XV 254; RDGE 37;
    SIG3 606; RDGE 35; RDGE 1; RDGE 38; SEG XXV 445; SEF XVIII
    570.62–79; Fouilles de Delphes III 4.75; RDGE 3; RDGE 2; SEG XVI
    255; SEG XXV 118; Inscriptiones Latinae Liberae Rei Publicae (ed. A.
    Degrassi) 323; Orientis Graecae Inscriptiones Selectae (ed. W.
    Dittenberger) 762; SIG3 656; P. Fraser, Samothrace 28a, 30, 32; RDGE
    5; C.B. Welles, Royal Correspondence in the Hellenistic Period, no.
    61; Inscriptiones Antiquae Ora e Septentrionalis Ponti Euxini Graecae
    et
    Latinae (ed. B. Latyschev) I2 402; SEG IX 7; RDGE 6B, SIG3 693; RDGE
    7; Pausanias 7.16.7–10; Bulletin de correspondence
    hellénique 98 (1974), 814; RDGE 44; RDGE 9.
    Translated in R.K. Sherk, Rome and the Greek East to the Death of
    Augustus (Translated Documents of Greece and Rome 4), nos.
    1–38.'

    4 Ibid., p. 266, after l. 7 insert:

    `and M.H. Crawford (ed.), Roman Statutes (London 1996) I, nos. 1,
    2, 7, 12, 13, 15, 19; Journal of Roman Studies 73 (1983), 33, which
    contain texts and translations.'

    5 Ibid., delete ll. 31–2 and substitute:

    `and V. Ehrenberg and A.H.M. Jones (eds.), Documents illustrating
    the Reigns of Augustus and Tiberius, 2nd ed. 1976 (= EJ2) 300; 301;
    10; 329; 365; 21; 197; 355; 224; 366; 98; 357; 311; 312; 315; 69;
    231; 379, part 1; 102; 379, part 2; L'AnnÄe Epigraphique (= AE)
    1978, 145, Zeitschrift fŸr Papyrologie und epigraphik (= ZPE) 55,
    (1984), 55–110, with EJ2 94a; W. Eck et al. (eds.), Vestigia 48
    (1996); Journal of Roman Studies (= JRS) 66 (1976), 107–9; EJ2
    53; 158; E.M. Smallwood (ed.) Documents
    illustrating the Principates of Gaius, Claudius and Nero (1967), 254,
    367, 368, 370, 365, 369, 380, 407, 44, 295, 197.

    Translated in R.K. Sherk (ed.), Translated Documents of Greece and
    Rome vol. 4 = Rome and the Greek East to the Death of Augustus (1984,
    = TDGR 4), 85; 86; D.C. Braund, Augustus to Nero:
    A Source Book on Roman History 31 bc–ad 68 (1985, = Braund),
    645; TDGR 4, 95; Braund 423; 360; 669; 438; R.K. Sherk (ed.)
    Translated Documents of Greece and Rome vol. 6 = The Roman Empire:
    Augustus to Hadrian (1988, = TDGR 6), 12; TDGR 4, 101; Braund 720;
    TDGR 4, 102; 103; 105; TDGR 6, 19; 22; TDGR 4, 11; Braund 127; TDGR
    6, 34A, 35; 36A and B; 40A; 178D; Braund 458; 568; TDGR 6, 53; 44;
    Braund 711; TDGR 6, 55; Braund 586; TDGR 6, 50; Braund 214; TDGR 6,
    58; Braund 627; for EJ2 10 and the SC de Cn. Pisone patre a dossier
    is available from the Classics Office, 37 Wellington Square.'

    6 Ibid., delete ll. 50–1 and substitute:

    `E.M. Smallwood (ed.), Documents illustrating the Principates of
    Gaius, Claudius and, Nero, (1967, Sm.) 297; 386; 261; 259; 391; 392;
    M.H. Crawford (ed.), Roman Statutes vol. 1 (1996), no. 39; M. McCrum
    and A.G. Woodhead (eds.), Select Documents of the Principates of the
    Flavian Emperors (1961, = MW), 61; 128; 461; Madrider Mitteilungen 1
    (1960), 148–9; R.G. Collingwood and R.P. Wright (eds.), Roman
    Inscriptions of Britain 1, 662–3; Journal of Roman Studies (=
    JRS) 76, (1986), 147–243; MW 462; 58; 466; 61; 464; 458; 369;
    66; E.M. Smallwood (ed.) Documents illustrating the Principates of
    Nerva, Trajan, and Hadrian (1966, = Sm. NTH), 30; Corpus
    Inscriptionum Latinarum (= CIL) 16, 42; Sm. NTH 435; JRS 60, (1970),
    142–53; Sm. NTH 479; 230; 109; 268; MW 320; JRS 63 (1973), 80f.
    Sm. NTH 47; 378a, b; 463; 464; 281; 462; 423; JRS 74 (1984),
    157–80.

    Translated in D.C. Braund, Augustus to Nero, a Source Book on Roman
    History 31 bc–ad 68 (1985, = Braund) 533, 595, 465, 461, 600,
    601, M.H. Crawford (ed.) Roman Statutes Vol. 1, (1996), 39; Braund
    401; B. Levick, The Government of the Roman Empire (1985), 122; R.K.
    Sherk (ed.), Translated Documents of Greece and Rome, vol. 6 = The
    Roman Empire: Augustus to Hadrian (1988), 86; 92; S. Ireland, Roman
    Britain, a sourcebook (1986), 108; JRS 76, 91986), 147–243; TDGR
    6, 96; TDGR 6, 95; 107; 84 and 108; 85; 110B; TDGR 6, 111; N. Lewis
    and M. Reinhold, Roman Civilization, Sourcebook 2, The Empire, ed. 2
    (1966), p. 346–7; TDGR 6, 117; 122; 200; 125; 116; 112C; A.E.
    Gordon, Illustrated Introduction to Latin Epigraphy (1983), 57; D.
    Kehoe, The Economics of Agriculture on Roman Imperial Estates in
    North Africa (1988), 33–7; 58f; TDGR 6, 156; 157; JRS 74 (1984),
    157–80; for MW 58; 61; Sm. NTH 30; MW 320; Sm. NTH 47; 281, a
    dossier is available from the Classics Office, 37 Wellington Square.'

    7 Ibid., p. 271, delete l. 31.

    8 Ibid., p. 273, l. 23, after `Aristophanes,'
    insert `Clouds,'.

    9 Ibid., p. 280, l. 44, delete `Sommerstein (Aris
    and Phillips)' and substitute `MacDowell.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    5 Board of the Faculty of Modern History

    Honour School of Modern History

    With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 314,
    delete ll. 18–19 and substitute:

    `History is offered, then two periods of General History must be
    offered, from two of the three different groups listed below.'

    2 Ibid., l. 21, delete `(xiii) 1914–1945;'.

    3 Ibid., l. 22, delete `(vi) 1273–1409;'.

    4 Ibid., l. 23, delete `1815;' and substitute
    `1815.'.

    5 Ibid., delete l. 24 and substitute:

    `Group C: (vi) 1273–1409; (xiii) 1914–1945; (xvii)
    Europe and the Wider World 1815–1914.'

    6 Ibid., p. 316, delete l. 6.

    7 Ibid., renumber existing Special Subjects
    6–22 as 5–21.

    8 Ibid., p. 341, delete ll. 17–46 and the
    footnote.

    9 Ibid., p. 342, delete ll. 1–9.

    10 Ibid., pp. 342–64, renumber existing
    Special Subjects 6–22 as
    5–21.

    11 Ibid., p. 357, delete l. 36 and substitute:

    `1909, vol. xxxvii:

    Royal Commission on the Poor Laws, minority report,
    pp. 1195–1201, 1229–1238.'

    12 Ibid., delete l. 49, and substitute:

    `Influences and Conclusions (1902). Part II.'

    13 Ibid., p. 358, l. 2, after `(1914),' insert
    `Part I (Housing)'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    6 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
    History and English Language and Literature

    Honour School of Modern History and English

    With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

    As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 5 above).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    7 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
    History and Literae Humaniores

    Honour School of Ancient and Modern History

    With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

    As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 5 above).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    8 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
    History and Modern Languages

    Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

    With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

    As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 5 above).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    9 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
    History and Social Studies

    Honour School of Modern History and Economics

    With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

    As for the Honour School of Modern Hisory (see 5 above).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    10 Board of the Faculty of Theology

    Bachelor of Theology

    With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 943,
    l. 44, after `BIBLICAL STUDIES' insert `á' and new footnote:

    `[dagger sign] The English version used will be the
    Revised Standard Version, and in paper I. 3 parallel texts will be
    taken from K. Aland, Synopsis of the Four Gospels (United Bible
    Societies, 1982). The Greek text used will be that of the United
    Bible Societies, 4th edn., and in paper I. 3 parallel texts will be
    taken from K. Aland, Synopsis Quattuor Evangelium (13th edn.,
    Stuttgart, 1985). The Hebrew text used will be the Biblia Hebraica
    Stuttgartensia (Stuttgart, 1977).
    '

    2 Ibid., p. 944, delete ll. 12–20 and
    substitute:

    `Candidates must have studied at least two of the following texts
    in English, from each of which will be set passages for theological
    comment: Matthew, John, Acts. Opportunity will be given to comment in
    detail on Matthew 5–9 and parallels. Candidates may choose to
    translate and comment on passages from Matthew 5–9 and parallels
    in Greek. Candidates must demonstrate in essay questions some
    knowledge of (a) the theology of the evangelists, and
    (b) other issues including a critical understanding of the
    historical Jesus, an evaluation of his life and teaching, and
    familiarity with different approaches to gospel study.
    [Until the end of the examinations in 1999.
    Candidates who commenced study before Michaelmas Term 1997 may
    take the
    examination according to the regulations governing this paper then in
    force.
    ].'

    3 Ibid., delete ll. 23–9, and substitute:

    `Candidates must have studied at least two of the following texts
    in English, from each of which one passage for theological comment
    will be set: Romans, 1 Corinthians, Hebrews. Special exegetical
    attention must be given to
    Romans 3–8, 1 Corinthians 10–12 and Hebrews 7–10.
    Candidates may choose to translate and comment on passages from
    Romans 5–8 in Greek. The essay questions and further short
    passages for comment will give candidates the opportunity to
    demonstrate also their knowledge of other New Testament Epistles and
    the Apocalypse, as well as wider issues of New Testament Theology and
    Ethics. [Until the end of the examinations in 1999.
    Candidates who commenced study before Michaelmas Term 1997 may
    take the examination according to the regulations governing this
    paper then in force.
    ].'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF
    PHILOSOPHY

    The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice
    of oral examination of their candidates as
    follows:

    Anthropology and Geography

    M. ECONOMOU, Linacre: `The application of interactive multimedia in
    museums and archaeology: design and evaluation of the Euesperides
    program'.

    Institute of Archaeology, Tuesday, 22 May, 11 a.m.


    Examiners: G.R. Lock, P. McManus.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Biological Sciences

    WEN-TSAN CHANG, Linacre: `Molecular studies of signal transduction
    and development'.

    Sir William Dunn School of Pharmaology, Friday, 23 May,

    10 a.m.


    Examiners: J. Errington, J. Williams.

    YI-JU CHEN, Linacre: `Structural and functional studies of rat brain
    oligosaccharides'.

    Department of Biochemistry, Friday, 16 May, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: R.A.J. McIlhinney, M.A.J. Ferguson.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Clinical Medicine

    R. LOCHLIN, Worcester: `Biochemistry of bone cell depreciation'.

    Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Tuesday, 13 May, 9 a.m.


    Examiners: A.H.R.W. Simpson, A. El Haj.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Literae Humaniores

    J. TA-CHIANG MA, All Souls: `Antiochus III and the cities of western
    Asia Minor'.

    Wadham, Friday, 30 May, 3 p.m.


    Examiners: P.S. Derow, M.M. Austin.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Mathematical Sciences

    L.T. MALCOLM, Somerville: `Multiphase flow in porous media at low
    interfacial tension'.

    Dartington House, Tuesday, 13 May, 10 a.m.


    Examiners: H. Ockendon, S. O'Brien.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Psychological Studies

    M. COOMBS, Linacre: `Hearing voices: individual psychological
    factors'.

    Department of Experimental Psychology, Wednesday, 21 May, 2.15 p.m.


    Examiners: R. Benthall, J.M. Argyle.

    Social Studies

    J. NAGL, St Antony's: `British and American army counter insurgency
    learning during the Malayan Emergency and the Vietnam War'.

    St Edmund Hall, Saturday, 10 May, 2.20 p.m.


    Examiners: J.P.D. Dunbabin, W. Murray.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 8 May 1997: Colleges<br />

    Colleges, Halls, and Societies


    Contents of this section:

  • NOTICES:

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue



    OBITUARIES


    Lincoln College

    DAVID JOHN BERRY, November 1996; commoner 1956–9.
    Aged 61.

    T.D.F. GRIFFITHS, 1984; commoner 1932–5.

    MAJOR THOMAS IAN HARDIE, January 1997; graduate
    commoner 1961–2. Aged 72.

    SEISHI KUWABARA, 24 April 1996; graduate commoner
    1964–9. Aged 69.

    THOMAS BROOKING SNELL, 1996; commoner 1930–7.
    Aged 85.

    ROBERT PHILIP SOLBE, 31 March 1997; commoner
    1959–62. Aged 58.

    JOHN ROBIN NEALE THOMPSON, 1996; commoner
    1955–8. Aged 61.

    ROBERT JOHN SPAULS THOMPSON, 30 March 1997; commoner
    1928–32. Aged 87.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    St Anne's College

    MRS ADELINE WHITEHEAD (née Rumball);
    member of the Society of Oxford Home-Students
    1929–32. Aged 89.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    St Edmund Hall

    DR CHRISTOPHER JOHN HELPS STAREY, FRCGP, 5 February 1997;
    commoner
    1938–44. Aged 77.

    THE REVD ROBERT GUY PUSEY, MA, 3 April 1997; commoner
    1933–6. Aged 88.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    St Hilda's College

    MRS DOROTHY JUNE GILLESPIE (née Morley),
    MA, 24 March 1997; commoner 1936–9. Aged 78.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ELECTIONS


    Hertford College

    To Honorary Fellowships:

    PROFESSOR MAX COWAN, MD, PH.D., FRS

    SIR BRUCE PATTULLO, CBE, KT.

    BARONESS MARY WARNOCK, DBE

    GENERAL SIR ROGER WHEELER, CGB, CBE, ADC

    To Emeritus Fellowships:

    PROFESSOR RAINER W. GUILLERY, FRS

    DR E. ANNE HOLMES

    DR GARTH BARTON ROBINSON

    MR JOHN ROBERT TORRANCE

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Linacre College

    To an Honorary Fellowship (from 1 April 1997):

    FRENE GINWALA, D.PHIL., Speaker of the National Assembly,
    Parliament of the Republic of South Africa

    To EPA Cephalosporin Junior Research Fellowships
    (from 1 October 1997):

    M.T. O'LEARY (B.SC., BVMS, PH.D., DIP.R.C.PATH.), MRCVS

    A.L.R. THOMAS, MA (PH.D. London)

    S.J. WARD, D.PHIL. (B.SC. London)

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    To Junior Research Fellowships (from 1 October
    1997):

    G. BRYANT (M.PHIL. Cambridge)

    E.A. GAFFNEY (BA, PH.D. Cambridge)

    B. MEHLIG (PH.D. Max Planck Institute)

    T.P. ROBINSON, BA (PH.D. Reading)

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Lincoln College

    To Senior Scholarships:

    COLIN ANTHONY MARSH, Merton College

    JEREMY RICHARD OSBORN, Lincoln College

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Merton College

    To Visiting Research Fellowships:

    PROFESSOR VLADIMIR NADOLINNY, Institute of Inorganic
    Chemistry, Novosobirsk, Russia (HT 1998)

    DR GEOFFREY WHITTLE, Victoria University of Wellington,
    New Zealand (MT 1998)

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    To Postmasterships:

    J.R. ARNOLD, formerly of Winchester College

    P.W. LONG, formerly of Worth School

    J.B. MILLS, formerly of Winchester College

    R.H. WALTERS, formerly of Weston Favell Upper School,
    Northampton

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    To an Exhibition:

    G.A. MCGREGOR, formerly of
    Lady Lumley's School, Pickering

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    St Catherine's College

    To a David Blank Scholarship:

    DEEPSHIKA GUPTA,
    formerly of the United World College of South East Asia,
    Singapore

    To a College Scholarship:

    SIMON LYONS, formerly
    of the City of London School

    To an Exhibition:

    KEVIN LORIMER, formerly of
    Barton Peveril College, Eastleigh

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Trinity College

    To a Fellowship by Special Election (with effect from
    1 August 1997) and the Estates Bursarship (with effect
    from 1 October 1997):

    JOHN REID MARTYN (BA Exeter),
    Group Finance Director, Dalgety PLC

    To the James and George Whitehead Travelling
    Studentship:

    RICHARD ANDREW PAWLOWSKI, formerly of
    Bristol Grammar School

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Worcester College

    To an Official Tutorial Fellowship in French Language
    and Literature (with effect from 1 October 1997):

    KATE ELIZABETH TUNSTALL (MA, M.PHIL. Cambridge)

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    PRIZES


    Trinity College

    Lady Astbury Memorial Prize:

    XANTHE LAURA CRADDOCK

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Richard Hillary Prize:

    JENNIFER LEIGH LAND

    ROYCE BANDARA MAHAWATTE

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    NOTICES


    Balliol College


    Six-hour Lecturership in Inorganic
    Chemistry

    The college proposes, if a suitable candidate applies, to
    appoint a six-hour Lecturer in Inorganic Chemistry for Michaelmas
    Term 1997 and Hilary Term 1998. Ability to teach the range of
    subjects required for the Final Honours papers Inorganic Chemistry 1
    and 2 and Advanced Inorganic Chemistry is essential.
    The lecturer will be expected to teach up to six hours a week and
    will receive, in addition to the normal rates for tuition, a retainer
    and certain common room rights.

    Applicants should provide a curriculum vitae and should
    indicate which options they would be willing to teach. They should
    give the names of two referees whom they should ask to write directly
    to the Senior Tutor. Applications and references must reach the
    Senior Tutor, Balliol College, Oxford OX1 3BJ by Saturday, 7 June.

    Balliol College is an equal opportunities employer.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Brasenose College


    Michael Woods Senior Scholarship in
    Philosophy

    The college proposes to offer one Michael Woods Scholarship in
    Philosophy from October 1997. The scholarship is offered for one
    year, renewable for a period of one further year. The value of the
    scholarship is currently £1,400 per annum, with limited dining
    rights at high table and college accommodation in the new graduate
    annexe at St Cross for the first year of the scholarship.

    Candidates must be under the age of twenty-seven and graduates of a
    university or other institution of equivalent standing, or to be
    expected to graduate by 1 October 1997. Candidates must be registered
    for a B.Phil. or D.Phil. in Philosophy at Oxford University, or
    undertake so to register.

    Application forms and further details can be obtained from the Tutor
    for Graduates, Brasenose College, Oxford OX1 4AJ (telephone: Oxford
    (2)77823). The closing date for applications is Friday, 6 June

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Exeter College


    Appointment of Junior Dean

    Exeter College proposes to appoint a Junior Dean for a
    period of one year, from 1 October 1997, with the possibility of
    renewal for a second year. The Junior Dean will be
    required to reside in college, free of charge, and will also receive
    free meals at high table and a stipend (under
    review) of £1,277 per annum, which will be additional to any
    other income which the appointee may receive. The Junior Dean will
    assist the Sub-Rector and other college officers in the smooth
    running of the college. The person appointed will be required to
    undertake disciplinary and pastoral duties under the direction of the
    Sub-Rector. He or she will have particular responsibiblity for these
    aspects of college life in the evenings, at weekends, and at other
    times when the Sub-Rector is absent. The Junior Dean is expected to
    assist the Sub-Rector when cases arise involving medical or legal
    authorities. The work involves liaison with officers of the middle
    and junior common rooms, and attendance at those college committees
    which are most involved in relations with junior members.

    Applicants must be graduates, and it is expected that they will be
    pursuing advanced study or research.
    Applications, including a full curriculum vitae and an
    outline of the academic work which the applicant proposes to
    undertake, should reach the Rector, Exeter College, Oxford OX1 3DP,
    by Monday, 19 May. Applicants should inform the Rector of the names,
    addresses, and telephone numbers of three referees, and arrange for
    their referees to write direct to the Rector by 19 May.

    Interviews will be held on Wednesday, 21 May. If the
    applicant is a registered graduate student, one of the
    referees must be the applicant's university supervisor.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    St Edmund Hall


    Official Tutorial Fellowship in English

    The college proposes to appoint, with effect from 1 October 1997, or
    such later date as may be agreed, to an Official Tutorial Fellowship
    in English. The appointment is tenable in conjunction with a
    University Lecturership (CUF) associated with a Times Lecturership in
    the English Language. Applications are invited from men or women
    specialising in Medieval and Renaissance Literature. A note of futher
    particulars may be obtained from the Principal's Secretary, St Edmund
    Hall, Oxford OX1 4AR, to whom completed applications should be sent
    by 2 June.

    St Edmund Hall is an equal opportunities employer.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    St Hilda's College


    Stipendiary Lecturership in Engineering

    The college proposes to appoint a Stipendiary Lecturer to teach up to
    six hours a week in Engineering for one year from 1 October 1997.
    Applicants should be able to teach
    a range of subjects for Part I of the Final Honour School
    of Engineering. The principal need is for teaching in at least two of
    the following areas: Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics, Mechanical
    and Electrical Properties of
    Materials, Control and Digital Systems, Electricity, and Mathematics.

    In addition, the lecturer will be required to take charge of the
    Engineering School at St Hilda's, including participating in the
    admissions process, and the pastoral care of undergraduates.

    The person appointed will be paid on the Stipendiary Lecturers'
    scale, at present beween £7,137 and £8,803 per annum for a
    six-hour lecturership. The post, which is open to both men and women,
    would be suitable for a postdoctoral applicant.

    Further particulars should be obtained from the College Office, St
    Hilda's College, Oxford OX4 1DY (telephone:
    Oxford (2)76815); six copies of a curriculum vitae, and
    a letter of application indicating which subjects candidates would be
    willing to teach, should then be sent to the College Secretary by 27
    May.

    Applicants should also ask two referees to write directly to the
    Principal of St Hilda's by this date.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Appointment of College Officers' Secretary

    Clerical and Library Grade 4 Scale: Salary
    £12,240–£14,169

    The college is seeking to appoint an Administrative Secretary from 1
    July 1997 (or earlier if possible). This is a permanent post, open to
    men or women, and is pensionable. It entails a thirty-five hour
    working week, and thirty-three days holiday per year, to include
    public holidays. Lunch will be provided free of charge. No smoking
    environment; free parking available.

    This is an interesting and demanding post, with a very varied work
    load, and would be suitable for anyone wishing to make a career in
    academic administration. Applicants must have well-developed
    organisational skills, and be prepared to show initiative and
    responsibility. Good A levels or their equivalent are absolutely
    essential; a degree might be a relevant advantage, but applicants
    without this qualification will equally be considered. An excellent
    command of English, professional clerical and typing skills, and
    knowledge of general office procedures are also required, and
    experience of Oxford college or university work is desirable.

    Applicants must have good knowledge of Word for Windows, and a
    working knowledge of Access database would be useful.

    The person appointed will work in the Academic Office and provide
    full secretarial support and administrative
    assistance for the College Officers. In particular he or she will
    work for the Tutor for Admissions, Dean of Graduates, the Dean,
    Senior Tutor, Vice-Principal, and the Dean of
    Degrees.

    Further details should be obtained from the College Office, St
    Hilda's College, Oxford OX4 1DY (telephone:
    Oxford (2)76815). A handwritten letter of application should then be
    sent to the College Secretary, enclosing a curriculum
    vitae
    and giving the names and addresses of two referees. The
    closing date for applications is Thursday,
    15 May; interviews will probably be held in the
    week of
    26 May.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Appointment of Bursar's Secretary

    The college has a vacancy for a Bursar's Secretary. The successful
    candidate will be a mature individual who can support the Bursar in
    his day-to-day work, including opening the post, liaising with other
    managers and staff in the Busary and the college as a whole, sending
    out agendas and accompanying papers, taking minutes at meetings,
    maintaining the filing system, and maintaining the personnel
    database. Experience of an Oxford college, Word 6 for Windows, and
    Access database would be an advantage. Benefits include free parking,
    free lunches, and pension scheme.
    Applicants should apply in writing, enclosing a full
    curriculum vitae with details of two referees (one of
    whom should be the applicant's current/last employer) to Mrs C.
    Bunce, St Hilda's College, Cowley Place, Oxford OX4 1DY. Further
    particulars are available—telephone Oxford (2)76809 and leave
    your name and address. The closing date is 16 May.

    The college is an equal opportunities employer.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    St John's College


    Appointment of Academic Administrator and
    College Secretary

    The post of Academic Administrator and College Secretary is
    newly-created with the intention of addressing the increasing needs
    of the teaching and research activities of the college. The
    responsibiblities of the Administrator will include the supervision
    of the College Office staff, a wide range of academic administration
    related to senior and junior members and total involvement in the
    undergraduate admissions procedures and the induction of new
    students.

    Applicants should have a university degree, have proven experience
    and qualifications in high-level administrative and secretarial
    areas, together with office management, organisational, and social
    skills.
    Salary will be on the academic-related scale D31,
    £15,159–£22,785 (discretionary to £25,552).
    Annual holiday entitlement is thirty days, plus non-term-time bank
    holidays.

    Further details are available from the Acting College Secretary, St
    John's College, Oxford OX1 3JP, to whom applications, including a
    full curriculum vitae and the names of three referees,
    should be sent by the closing date, 2 June.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Appointment of Library Cataloguer

    Applications are invited for a two-year (in the first instance)
    cataloguing post. The successful candidate will convert the college
    library's post-1800 holdings on to OLIS and is expected to work
    accurately and in an organised manner. The candidate will have
    experience of AACR2/MARC,
    Library of Congress Subject Headings, downloading and matching
    records (training in Geac Advance can be
    arranged). The library includes collections in modern
    languages and classical literature. The post will be on the clerical
    and library grade C4 scale (salary £12,240–£15,467 per
    annum).

    Applications, with a curriculum vitae and the names and
    addresses of two referees, should be sent to Dr P.M.S. Hacker, St
    John's College, Oxford OX1 3JP, by 31 May.
    St John's College is an equal opportunities employer.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    University College


    The Mastership

    The Fellows are proceeding towards electing a successor (male or
    female) to Professor W.J. Albery, FRS, who demits office on 30
    September 1997.

    Anyone who might wish to be considered, or to make
    a suggestion or nomination, is invited to write in confidence to the
    Senior Fellow (Dr G.R. Screaton), University College, Oxford OX1 4BH,
    preferably by 20 May.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 8 May 1997: Advertisements<br />

    Advertisements


    Contents of this section:



    How to
    advertise in the Gazette

    "../../../stdg/conds.htm">

    Terms and conditions of
    acceptance of advertisements

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue



    Exhibition

    Eugen Gomringer and Robert Lox: an
    exhibition of concrete poems on fabric (editions
    Francesco Conz), Vaughn Exhibition Room, Somerville
    College, 7–16 May, 2–4 p.m. In association with
    De Montfort University, under the curatorship of Nicholas
    Zurbrugg.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Lecture

    Professor Dr Theodor Abt will lecture on
    `The roots of alchemy', 11 a.m.--5 p.m. on Sat., 31 May,
    in the Lecture Room, the Ashmolean Museum. Dr Abt is
    professor of agronomy and economic planning at the
    Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich. He
    trained as an analytical psychologist at the C.G. Jung
    Institute in Zurich where he became a training analyst
    and a member of the Curatorium. He also trained with Dr
    Marie-Louise von Franz. In this day-long lecture he will
    explore, from a Jungian perspective, a series of
    alchemical pictures from Egyptian manuscripts. Attendance
    costs £35 inc. tea and coffee; £25 students.
    Bookings: Carmen Reynal, Keyneton Hayes, Upper Slaughter,
    Glos. GL54 2JG. Tel.: 01451 821 947.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Oxford University Newcomers'
    Club

    The Oxford University Newcomers' Club
    welcomes partners of visiting academics, of
    newly-appointed academics, of graduate students, and of
    undergraduate students. Open 10.30 a.m.--12 noon at 13
    Norham Gardens, to meet for coffee and to find out about
    the term's programmes of events. We meet every Wednesday
    for the 8 weeks of Full Term (plus the week before and
    the week after) and through the summer vacation.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    United Oxford and Cambridge
    University Club

    The London club for all University
    members. Special rates for those with college or
    University appointments or University residence.
    Modernised and reasonable bedroom accommodation.
    Excellent library facilities. Restaurant and squash
    courts. Full service at weekends. Reciprocal
    arrangements with over 125 clubs world-wide. Further
    details from Derek Conran, Hertford College, or
    Membership Secretary, 71 Pall Mall, London SW1Y 5HD.
    Tel.: 0171-930 5151, fax: 0171-930 9490.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Tuition Offered

    Piano tuition: experienced teacher of
    adults and children. All grades. Beginners welcome. Miss
    P. Read, BA (Hons.), LRAM. Jericho. Tel.: Oxford
    510904.

    English language. Academic writing,
    grammar, pronunciation, etc., flexible timetables
    including evenings, Saturdays. Conversation hour,
    Cambridge exams., general English are best value in
    Oxford. Writing up? Private tuition available with
    experienced tutors. Free test/advice from the Director of
    Studies Mon.--Fri. 1--5 p.m. Oxford Language Training, 9
    Blue Boar Street (off St Aldate's by Christ Church),
    Oxford. Tel. Oxford 205077, e-mail:
    OLT@dial.pipex.com.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Services Offered

    Furniture restoration and cabinet-
    making: professional workshop undertakes antiques
    restoration, design and make, and replica production.
    Estimates/proposals, with no obligation, are given prior
    to any work starting. Forman Fine Furniture, 26 High
    Street, Brill, Bucks. Tel./fax: 01844 238389.

    Frederick and Sudabeh Hine sell, buy,
    and exchange all types and sizes of oriental carpets,
    rugs, and runners. Also expert conservation repairs and
    specialist cleaning. Visit our gallery/warehouse without
    notice in business hours, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.,
    Mon.–Sat. Old Squash Court, 16 Linton Road, Oxford.
    Tel./fax: Oxford 559396.

    Mallams Book Auctions. Regular
    specialist sales of books and prints including
    antiquarian literature, science and natural history,
    atlases and maps, fine bindings, first editions,
    engravings, and related items. Mallams, Bocardo House, St
    Michael's Street, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 241358.

    Tax advice. Ex-KPMG chartered
    accountant specialises in assisting academics and other
    professionals with their tax affairs, including
    self-assessment. Convenient North Oxford premises. Tel.:
    Oxford 513381, fax: 558064, e-mail:
    100430.145@compuserve.com.

    Town and Country Trees: professional
    tree surgery, orchard and shrub pruning, planting, and
    hedges. Quality work at competitive prices. Fully
    insured. Locally based. For a free quotation, please call
    Paul Hodkinson. Tel.: 01993 811115.

    Gardens creatively designed,
    constructed, planted, and maintained. Knowledgeable
    service with 25 years' experience. Portfolio available.
    Colin Broad. Tel./fax: Oxford 882711.

    Oxuniprint, Oxford University
    Press---the University Printers: specialising in booklet
    and publicity material, typesetting, printing, and
    finishing; Output Bureau provides high-quality output
    from disk from all major DTP programs onto paper,
    bromide, colour-separated positive or negative film;
    high-quality specialist colour copier service. For
    service, quality, and competitive prices contact
    Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press, Great Clarendon
    Street, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 514691, fax: 514010.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Situations Vacant

    Magdalen College School requires, for
    Michaelmas Term 1997 to cover sabbatical leave, a full-
    time graduate teacher to teach physics throughout the
    school and science to junior classes. Applications, with
    full c.v. and the names, addresses, and telephone numbers
    of two referees, should be made to the Master, Magdalen
    College School, Oxford OX4 1DZ, from whom further details
    may be obtained. Closing date for applications: 16 May.
    Tel.: Oxford 242191.

    The Centre for Medieval and Renaissance
    Studies seeks an experienced PA/Secretary to provide full
    administrative and secretarial support for the Vice-
    Principal in the supervision of the academic programme,
    care of students, and management of the building.
    Applicants should have attained a good standard of
    education, and have excellent organisational, word-
    processing, and communication skills. Familiarity with
    Apple Mac computers and the Internet is essential. The
    successful candidate will be a person who can manage a
    varied and sometimes heavy workload, supervise a small
    domestic staff, and work when necessary without direct
    supervision. Salary according to experience and
    qualifications in range £16,000–£18,000.
    Applications in writing only, with a c.v. and the names
    of two referees, to Mrs Lynne Morgan, CMRS, St Michael's
    Hall, Shoe Lane, Oxford OX1 2DP, by Fri. 16 May. For
    further particulars, write, or fax: Oxford 243740, or e-
    mail: lynne@cmrs.org.uk.

    The Centre for Medieval and Renaissance
    Studies seeks a Secretary/Library Assistant to provide
    support for the Librarian, staff, and students. His/her
    primary task is to assist the Librarian in maintaining a
    Library of about 20,000 volumes; ordering and accessing
    new titles, cataloguing books, issuing and monitoring
    book loans, library security. Training will be provided.
    Other responsibilities inc. telephone answering in the
    mornings. Experience in dealing with the public, an
    excellent telephone manner, and clear handwriting are
    essential requirements. Applicants should have received a
    good secretarial and word-processing training, and
    familiarity with Apple Mac computers and the Internet
    would be an advantage. Salary according to experience
    and qualifications in range
    £11,000–£13,000. Applications in writing
    only, with a c.v. and the names of two referees, to Mrs
    Lynne Morgan, CMRS, St Michael's Hall, Shoe Lane, Oxford
    OX1 2DP, by Fri. 16 May. For further particulars, write,
    or fax: Oxford 243740, or e-mail: lynne@cmrs.org.uk.

    College messenger: a vacancy has arisen
    for a member of the College Messenger Service. The
    messenger will be employed by Worcester College and will
    provide a service for Corpus Christi, Pembroke, St
    Antony's, St John's, Somerville, University, and
    Worcester Colleges. Further details from the Secretary to
    the Bursar, Worcester College. Tel.: Oxford (2)78335.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Houses to Let

    Attractive family accommodation, central
    North Oxford, available July onwards. Victorian house.
    Sleeps 6–7. Well equipped; quiet; street-parking
    permit; excellent schools; 15 minutes' walk to city
    centre, 5 minutes to countryside. Photographs available.
    £210 p.w. exc. bills. Apply: 123 South Avenue,
    Abingdon, Oxon.

    North Oxford house in quiet street close
    to city centre and Port Meadow; 3 bedrooms, 1
    study/bedroom (sleeps 7), 2 bathrooms; superb large
    modern kitchen, washer-drier, dish-washer, c.h.; garden
    with patio, furniture, hammock, and bicycles. Weekly
    cleaner. Free parking. Available 4–25 Aug. £295
    p.w. inc. Tel.: Oxford 513933.

    Charming cottage on edge of village 14
    miles north-west of Oxford. Double bedroom plus spare
    bedroom/study. Furnished and equipped to a very high
    standard. Beams, inglenook fire. South-facing. Very
    private walled patio garden. Suit caring non-smoking
    couple. Available from Aug./Sept. Tel.: Oxford 510542.

    Sutton Courtenay village, 8 miles from
    Oxford, ideal for European School, Culham; convenient for
    Harwell, JET, Culham, and Rutherford Appleton
    Laboratories and Didcot Station. Warm, comfortable,
    modern architect-designed family home; 3/4 bedrooms, gas
    c.h., fully furnished, labour-saving modern kitchen,
    bathroom and utility/shower-room with second w.c. Very
    spacious, sunny open-plan ground floor. Integral garage.
    Sheltered south-west facing garden with sun-terrace.
    Fruit trees, lawn, grape vines. Available end of May,
    £700 p.c.m. Tel.: Abingdon (01235) 847329.

    Charming central North Oxford house, one
    street from St Giles', Radcliffe Infirmary, and St
    Antony's College. Just modernised, extended and
    refurbished to the highest standards. Two bedrooms, plus
    study or guest room; basement study/bedroom; living room
    leading to large, light conservatory dining-room and
    kitchen. Bathroom with shower and w.c., plus separate
    w.c. Luxuriously furnished and fully carpeted. Fully
    equipped kitchen with washing-machine, drier, dish-
    washer. Burglar alarm system linked to station. Gas c.h.
    Three telephones. Beautiful garden, with parking space at
    rear. Rent includes various services. Viewing highly
    recommended. £1,500 p.m. Available from June. Tel.:
    Oxford 559614.

    Luxurious, well-lit, newly refurbished
    accommodation on two floors in central North Oxford. Near
    Port Meadow; convenient for University, schools, shops.
    Three bedrooms (2 double, 1 single); sitting-room;
    dining-room; modern kitchen; 2 bathrooms (inc. separate
    shower); own small paved, well-stocked garden.
    Beautifully furnished and decorated, with new carpets
    throughout. Gas c.h., washing machine, drier,
    dish-washer, 2 telephones, TV points. £1,400 p.m.
    Families only. Available Sept. onwards. Tel.: Oxford
    559614.

    Osney: 3-bedroom terrace house in
    excellent condition, 10 minutes' walk from central
    Oxford, in secluded district by the river. Fully
    furnished and equipped, gas c.h., fitted kitchen,
    washing-machine, freezer, fridge, phone, TV, garden with
    patio and seats. Available July for 1 year or longer.
    Only visiting academics considered. £750 p.c.m.
    Tel.: Oxford 862347.

    An Englishman's home is his castle---so
    the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many
    castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental
    accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be
    able to help. QB management is one of Oxford's foremost
    letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics,
    medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to
    offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford.
    Please telephone or fax us with details of your
    requirements and we will do whatever we can without
    obligation. Tel.: Oxford 764533, fax: 764777.

    all of TT 97]

    Mallams is a long-established
    independent company offering a letting service tailored
    to the needs of the discerning landlord. If you would
    like further details or professional advice on any aspect
    of the letting market please call our Summertown office.
    Tel.: Oxford 311006, fax: 311977.

    Make finding accommodation a pleasure,
    not a chore. Finders Keepers is dedicated to making it
    easy for visitors to Oxford to find the right property.
    Browse through our Web site for up-to-date detailed
    information on properties available and make use of our
    interactive database, priority reservation service
    (credit cards accepted), welcome food pack, personal
    service, and much more. Call us and you will not need to
    go elsewhere. For further information contact Finders
    Keepers, 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE. Tel.: Oxford
    311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk;
    Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Flats to Let

    Wytham Abbey, Oxford: spacious 3- and 4-
    bed apartments, with use of walled garden. Part of grade
    1 listed manor house, situated 3 miles from city centre
    and set in 3,000 acres of park and woodland. Fully
    equipped and luxuriously appointed. Available from Sept.
    Tel.: Oxford 247200, fax: 724762.

    Bardwell Road: attractive ground-floor
    flat in Victorian house in prime North Oxford location.
    Double bedroom plus study/spare bedroom. Well equipped
    (dish-washer, etc., linen provided) and attractively
    furnished. South-facing onto pretty communal gardens.
    Off-street parking. Suit couple. From Sept. Tel./fax:
    Oxford 510542.

    North Oxford : 1 Oct. 1997 to 30 June
    1998, £530 p.m.; fully equipped ground-floor flat
    suitable for 2 adults; dining-room/study,
    living-room/study, double bedroom, shower-room, kitchen
    with dish-washer, washing/drying machine, electric stove;
    c.h., carport, small garden. Stone, 266 Moore Street,
    Princeton, NJ 08540, USA.

    Recently refurbished, luxurious
    ground-floor flat in central North Oxford. Near Port
    Meadow, convenient for shops, schools, University;
    separate dining and sitting rooms with oak flooring; one
    large carpeted bedroom; basement; fully fitted kitchen
    with dish-washer, washing-machine, and drier. Bathroom
    with separate shower. Gas c.h. Telephone. TV point. Own
    entrance and charming paved gardens front and back.
    £850 p.m. Available from Oct. Tel.: Oxford
    559614.

    Small self-contained flat for 1 person;
    bedroom, sitting-room, bathroom; in Islip, useful for the
    John Radcliffe; 2 minutes station to Oxford; also bus
    service. £65 p.w. inc. utilities. References
    required. Tel.: Oxford 372876.

    Pleasant self-contained, furnished
    ground-floor flat in quiet area of Old Marston. Very
    convenient for John Radcliffe Hospital and Science Area.
    Suit non-smoking academic couple. Double bedroom, living-
    room, bathroom, kitchen/dining-room, covered patio. Own
    entrance, car space, phone, washing-machine, etc. Use of
    garden. £100 p.w. inc. c.h. Available now until
    summer 1998. Tel.: Oxford 241224 (7–10 p.m.).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Summer Lets

    Delightful house, short walk from
    centre, to let for up to 10 weeks, July–early Oct.
    Suit visiting academic couple or family. Three bedrooms,
    2 reception; sunny patio, lovely garden, off-street
    parking; handy for supermarket and coach-stop to London.
    Academic owner, excellent references from past tenants.
    References required. Tel.: 0171-586 1481, fax: 0171-586
    9016.

    Islip: lovely spacious period cottage in
    beautiful village (conservation area), 5 miles from
    central Oxford, available 25 July--31 Aug.; in very quiet
    lane with easy access to city by bus, train, or car;
    sitting-room, dining hall, large conservatory/playroom,
    very large kitchen/dining-room (Aga, electric hob and
    oven, microwave, dish-washer, fridge, freezers, and
    cooler), laundry room (washing machine and drying area),
    4 bedrooms (sleeps 7), 2 bathrooms, dressing room and
    shower room. Large and pretty garden with terrace.
    Garage. £350 p.w. to inc. some housekeeping. Tel.:
    Oxford 841759, fax: 371939.

    Summer let in Oxford, 5 minutes from
    city centre: live in comfort near the Thames. Centrally
    heated, 4-bedroom Victorian house. Large split-level
    living-room; bathroom, bidet, and w.c.; shower-room,
    power-shower, and w.c.; fully-equipped kitchen;
    south-facing garden. Available for 6 weeks, 18 July--31
    Aug. Price negotiable. Tel./fax: Oxford 725193, e-mail:
    JXT18@dial.pipex.com.

    Summer let in Headington. Large family
    house, 2 reception rooms, playroom, 3 spacious bedrooms,
    study/bedroom, large kitchen/dining- room. Beautiful
    garden veranda, barbecue, hammock. Available 25
    July–22 Aug. £250 p.w. We could also let an
    adjoining one-bedroom self-contained flatlet. Tel.:
    Oxford 275238 or 69328.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Accommodation Offered

    Premier: apartments and houses. Long or
    short lets. From £600 p.c.m. North Oxford,
    Headington, and rural locations. Tel.: Oxford 792299,
    fax: 798087.

    Rooms to let in Grandpont. A quiet
    house, within walking distance from the city centre.
    Shared kitchen and sitting-room. Available from Sept.
    onwards for long-term occupancy. Would suit professionals
    or postdoctoral academics. Non-smokers only. Tel.: Oxford
    727826 (evenings), e-mail:
    spanu@trans.plants.ox.ac.uk.

    Bed-and-breakfast available in the home
    of a semi-retired academic couple. Warm, comfortable
    house in exclusive central North Oxford within easy
    walking distance of city centre, all main university
    buildings, parks, river, shops, pubs, and restaurants.
    Every room has tea- and coffee-making facilities,
    microwave, and colour television. Very moderate terms.
    Tel. and fax: Oxford 557879.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Accommodation Sought

    French neuropsychologist university
    professor and family seek a completely furnished 4-
    bedroom house, with garden if possible, in Oxford or
    area, to rent for 2 weeks, 15–31 July. Tel. (contact
    in London): 0171-935 9150; or in France: 00 33 491
    77.55.48.

    Visiting American professor and wife
    seeking furnished house or flat to rent in central Oxford
    for a.y. 1997--8 (1 Oct.--30 June). Local references
    furnished on request. Contact Charles Shaw, Assistant
    Registrar, University Offices, Wellington Square. Tel.:
    Oxford (2)70036, e-mail: Charles.Shaw@admin.ox.ac.uk.

    Going abroad? Or just thinking of
    letting your property? QB Management are one of Oxford's
    foremost letting agents and property managers. We
    specialise in lettings to both academic and professional
    individuals and their families, and have a constant flow
    of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property
    in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our
    services, or if you simply need some informal help and
    advice without obligation, telephone us. Tel.: Oxford
    764533, or fax: 764777.

    97]

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Accommodation Sought to Rent or
    Exchange

    American cardiology/psychology
    professors who previously lived in Oxford seek 4+ bedroom
    house to rent late Aug. 1997--late Aug. 1998. Would
    consider exchange for 4-bedroom Seattle home or 4-bedroom
    beachfront island home. Home tel.: 206 285 4005; fax: 206
    764 2257, e-mail: jrs@u.washington.edu (Dr John
    Stratton); e-mail: cws@u.washington.edu (Dr Carolyn
    Webster-Stratton).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Accommodation Offered to Rent
    or Exchange

    University widow seeks to exchange
    fully-furnished modern completely equipped house, good
    garden, in central North Oxford on bus route, near shops,
    schools, etc., for a flat/house in London or Israel.
    Would consider suggestions of exchange in any other
    university centre with easily accessible adult Jewish
    education. Would consider rental. Available autumn 1997
    or later. Min. 6 months. Contact Lewis. Tel.: Oxford
    515440, fax: 511568.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Holiday Lets

    Central North Oxford, 15 minutes' walk
    from centre, 5 minutes from water meadows: family holiday
    accommodation for 6–7, in well-equipped attractive
    Victorian house. Sat. to Sat., £300 p.w. exc. bills.
    Position as above: studio flat for 2, £180 p.w. exc.
    bills. Apply: 123 South Avenue, Abingdon, Oxon.

    Derbyshire Peak District: bed-and-
    breakfast in Victorian home offers a warm welcome.
    Tranquillity, fresh air, birdsong, stunning scenery,
    Chatsworth nearby, an abundance of activities—and
    then relax in comfort at the end of the day. One double-
    bed room and 1 twin-bed room from £20 p.p. per
    night. Yvonne Wright. Tel.: 01246 582488 or 01246
    583323.

    Villa and garden with wonderful views,
    40 minutes from Florence; all mod. cons.; swimming and
    sports facilities nearby; sleeps 8; available
    mid-July--mid-Sept. £350 p.w. Lukes. Tel. (Italy):
    00 39 55 8428317.

    Greek islands: charming villas, many
    with enclosed courtyards, on the islands of Skiathos,
    Skopelos, and Alanissos, from £59 p.p. p.w. Also
    available: walking and cooking holidays in unspoilt
    surroundings. Tel. for brochure: 00 30 424 22947 (24
    hours); fax: 00 30 424 23057.

    Verona outskirts: in exceptionally beautiful 15th-c.
    villa, self-contained ground-floor flat; large double
    bed-sitting room, kitchen/dining room, bathroom; garden
    area, parking, frequent buses from door to city centre;
    £300 p.w. inc. services and weekly cleaning.
    Available 7--21 June and 28 June--18 July. Tel. Contessa
    da Sacco: 00 39 452 6499; or Moore: 01844 238247.

    Duras, south-west France, 1 hour
    Bordeaux airport: 300-year-old farmhouse, set amidst
    vineyards, with beautiful views; sleeps 6; 2 bedrooms
    en-suite. Lovely garden and terrace. Brand new 15m
    swimming-pool with jacuzzi. Available from 1 June.
    £500 p.w. Tel.: Oxford 553685.

    SW France (Tarn-et-Garonne),
    traditionally restored farmhouse and outbuildings in
    hilltop hamlet with fine views over unspoilt countryside,
    close to medieval market town on River Aveyron. Sleeps
    8+, small pool, semi-circular garden facing south with
    trees and some shade. Tel.: 0118 987 3095.

    Northumberland, between the Cheviots and
    the sea: a stone-built cottage in a small unspoilt
    village, with 3 bedrooms; sleeps a min. of 6;
    sitting-room, kitchen, bathroom; 5 miles to Alnwick
    Castle, in easy reach of many more and miles of beautiful
    sea-shore. Tel.: 01665 579 292.

    Andalucia, Gaucin: house or part to let.
    Magical medieval white village. Panoramic views from
    house towards Morocco. Stunning landscape, wonderful
    butterflies and birds. Walking, golf, fishing and
    wind-surfing. Visit Ronda, Cordoba, Seville, Granada,
    Cadiz, Jerez, Morocco. From £95 p.w. Brochure and
    photos from Dr Campbell. Tel. and fax: Oxford 513935,
    e-mail: l.lustgarten@soton.ac.uk.

    North Pembs. coast, cottage to let;
    ideal 2/3 but can sleep more. Stove, books, walks,
    peaceful surroundings. Reasonable rates. Tel.: 01348
    872080.

    Charming terrace house for short or long
    lets in conservation area of unspoiled Southwold
    (Suffolk), seconds from sea. Sleeps 4+. Marvellous area
    for walking, cycling (2 bikes available), church
    visiting, bird-watching, or pub-hopping. Tel.: Oxford
    513464 (evenings).

    Holiday in Umbria. Ideal for lovers of
    tranquillity, superb scenery, good food. Perfect for
    visiting Renaissance art treasures. Newly converted flat
    for two, large shaded terrace, magnificent view. Perugia
    9 kms, Assisi 20 kms. For information telephone Willliam
    Urquhart. Tel.: 01252 877155.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    House for Sale

    Smart semi-detached house in a popular
    road in Jericho; first floor: three bedrooms, bathroom;
    downstairs benefits from a 19 ft 5 ins living-room and
    separate w.c. Paved courtyard garden and garage with off-
    street parking. Easy access to centre. In good decorative
    order. Gas c.h. Tel.: Oxford 552956.
    n

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section