7 May 1998 - No 4473



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 128, No. 4473: 7 May 1998<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

7 May 1998


The following supplement was published with this
Gazette:

Annual Report of the Museum of History
of Science 1996-7


University Health and
Safety
information


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Home Page





<br /><br /><br /><title><br /> Oxford University Gazette, 7 May 1998: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 4 May


Degree by Special Resolution

No notice to the contrary having been received under the
provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes,
1997, p. 15), the following resolution is deemed to have been
approved at noon on 4 May.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the
following:

RICHARD PEIRCE BRENT, St Hugh's College

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HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL


Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added
to the Register of Congregation:

Brent, R.P., MA, St Hugh's

Van der Veen, M., MA, Balliol

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BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on
22 May, see `Examinations and Boards' below.




<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 7 May 1998: University Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 7 May 1998: Notices<br />

Notices


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

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WILMA CROWTHER MEMORIAL PRIZE
1997

The Prize has been awarded jointly to MATTHEW C. BOYLE,
St John's College, and RAJESH VEDANTHAN, Magdalen
College.

An additional prize has been awarded to RUTH M. YOUNGER,
Mansfield College.

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SALARIES OF CLINICAL ACADEMIC
STAFF

Approval has been given for the implementation at Oxford
of an increase in clinical academic salaries in line with
the salary awards for 1998 decided by the Doctors and
Dentists Review Body. The new rates provide for a 2.35
per cent increase with effect from 1 April 1998 with a
further increase of 2.2 per cent on the pre-1 April base
for all salaries and salary scales with effect from 1
December 1998.

Payment with arrears will be made in May.

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CIRCULATION OF FLYSHEETS

Ten or more members of Congregation may arrange to have a
flysheet circulated with the Gazette
(a) on matters before Congregation, or
Convocation in regard to the election of the Professor of
Poetry, or (b) relating to matters of general
interest to the University, subject to the following
general conditions:

(i) no flysheet will be circulated which in the
opinion of the Vice-Chancellor and Proctors might be
defamatory or otherwise illegal;

(ii) the right is reserved on behalf of the
University and its employees, without prior consultation
with the signatories, to publish an apology in respect of
any statement in a flysheet which is complained of as
defamatory or otherwise illegal (whether or not the
statement can be shown to be true);

(iii) the signatories shall jointly and severally
indemnify the University and its employees against any
costs or damages payable in respect of their flysheet
and, unless a Queen's Counsel (to be mutually agreed on
by the signatories and the University) shall advise
within four months of the making of any claim in respect
of a flysheet that any proceedings could be contested
with the probability of success, such damages shall
include any sum paid by the University in settlement of
any claim arising out of the flysheet;

(iv) the flysheet shall consist of one leaf only
(though text may appear on both sides of the leaf); the
text shall include the name and college or department of
each of the signatories;

(v) a copy of the text of the flysheet shall be
delivered to the Registrar before 10 a.m. on the Monday
of the week in which circulation is desired; it shall be
accompanied by an indemnity in accordance with condition
(iii) above drawn up on a form obtainable from the
Registrar and signed by each of the signatories of the
flysheet; the Registrar shall be informed at the same
time which of the signatories is to be notified whether
the Vice-Chancellor and Proctors have authorised
circulation;

(vi) the Registrar shall arrange for the production
by the University Press of copies of a flysheet the
circulation of which has been duly authorised.

Though every effort will be made to circulate on
the day desired flysheets so received, it must be
understood that this cannot be guaranteed.

(a) Matters before Congregation or
Convocation

If the flysheet deals with a matter that is a formal
agendum for Congregation, or for Convocation in regard to
the election of the Professor of Poetry, or the subject
of a report published in the Gazette, the
production costs will be met from university funds.

(b) Matters of general interest to the
University

If the flysheet deals with a matter that is not a formal
agendum for Congregation or the subject of a report
published in the Gazette, the
Vice-Chancellor will decide whether it is of sufficient
general interest to warrant circulation with the
Gazette; the production costs for such a
flysheet will be the responsibility of the signatories.

Oxford University Student Union

The Executive and the Graduate Committee of the Oxford
University Student Union may have flysheets circulated
with the Gazette under the arrangements and
subject to the conditions set out above, provided that:

(1) the number of names to be included on the
flysheet under condition (iv) shall be not less than a
majority of the total number of members of the Executive
or the Graduate Committee of OUSU, as the case may be,
and each of the persons named shall sign the indemnity
required under condition (v);

(2) the maximum number of flysheets to be
circulated as of right, whether on matters before
Congregation (to be paid for by the University) or on
matters of general interest to the University (to be paid
for by OUSU and to be subject to the Vice-Chancellor's
decision as prescribed under (b) above) shall be
three per term for each of these bodies, save that the
Vice-Chancellor shall have discretion to permit further
flysheets.

Subject to proviso (1) above, the Executive and the
Graduate Committee of OUSU may also support flysheets
signed by not less than ten members of Congregation.

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EUROPEAN DOCUMENTATION CENTRE

In a departure from previous practice, the European
Documentation Centre is now being supplied with stocks of
leaflets and booklets on a variety of European topics to
give away to interested users. Although these
publications are mostly at an introductory level, they
can form a succinct introduction to a topic. Recent
titles include: `How is the European Union protecting our
environment?'; `How is the European Union meeting social
and regional needs?'; `When will the Euro be in our
pockets?'; `The European Union: key figures'.

There are also a few copies of an A3-size poster of
Euro notes and coins; and for `Europe Day' (9 May) the
EDC usually has a supply of posters and postcards for
distribution. The full range of these can be seen at the
EDC, which can supply any copies required.

The institutions of the European Union now have their
own Web sites, most of which are accessible via the main
server at http://europa.eu.int. The quality of
information available is generally very high, and
coverage comprehensive at various levels, from details of
research projects and partners, through Green and White
Papers, to recent full-text judgements from the Court of
Justice. Many European enquiries can now be answered
directly and fully from these Web sites. Readers are
welcome to explore on their own, but library staff will
always be prepared to give guided sessions covering
particular research interests.

The European Commission's Representation in London has
now decentralised its information activities, and
requests for information are now referred back to the
local information `relay'. There are now several relays
directed at different groups of users: EDCs for higher
education (see below); Public Information Relays in
public libraries for the general public; Euro Info
Centres for businesses, European Resource Centres for
schools and Further Education colleges; and Carrefours
for the rural community.

EDCs are extensive deposited collections of official
publications of the European Union on all subjects,
normally housed in academic libraries throughout the
Community, intended to support academic courses in
European integration. EDC status entitles the host
library to receive one copy free of charge of most
significant publications and documents of the EU. There
are forty-six EDCs in the United Kingdom; the Bodleian
Library has been a full EDC since 1963, and has extensive
archival collections in all subject areas. For further
information, see the Oxford EDC Web pages at:
http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/boris/guides/law/edc.htm.

Oxford University's European Documentation Centre is
situated within the Bodleian Law Library in the St Cross
Building, and is open 9 a.m.–10 p.m.,
Monday–Friday, during term-time, 9 a.m.–7 p.m.
during vacation, and 9 a.m.–1 p.m. on Saturdays.

Those wishing to discuss their European information
requirements should contact Elizabeth Martin (telephone:
(2)71463, fax: (2)71475, e-mail: edc@bodley.ox.ac.uk).

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GUIDELINES FOR LEAVE FOR
ACADEMIC STAFF

The General Board's regulations in respect of sabbatical
leave and dispensation from CUF lecturing obligations are
set out in Ch. VII, Sect. I

(Statutes,
1997, pp. 384–6). Provisions for other leave are set
out in the same section (pp. 382–3). The following
guidelines describe the General Board's policy and
practice in respect of applications for leave which do
not fall within the category of straightforward
sabbatical leave or dispensation, i.e. special leave.

Applications for leave to hold some public offices or
certain research awards

(a) Applications for leave to accept an
appointment in the public service of national importance
are normally granted by the General Board, provided that
the purpose of the leave can be shown to be compatible
with the academic interests of the faculty, the faculty
board lends its support to the application, and it is
clear that the individual intends to return to university
service after the period of leave. Leave for this purpose
for heads of departments or professors can, however, be
problematic, for obvious reasons.

(b) Applications to national bodies for
prestigious and competitive research awards (such as
British Academy Research Readerships and Senior Research
Fellowships, EPSRC Senior or Advanced Fellowships and
Nuffield Foundation Social Science Research Fellowships)
should be made to the General Board through the faculty
board. It is usual for such national bodies to specify
that applications should be made through the employing
institution, and in Oxford's case this involves routing
the application via the faculty board to the General
Board. The University will normally support such
applications for prestigious awards, but it is necessary
for the faculty board and the General Board to consider
carefully what replacement teaching arrangements will be
required if an application is successful.

Leave granted under (a) and (b)
does not count against sabbatical entitlement: indeed the
rules of some research awards specifically forbid this.
However, as in other cases of special leave, the period
of leave does not count as qualifying service for the
purpose of calculating future entitlement to sabbatical
leave, and sabbatical leave is not normally granted in
the period immediately preceding or following periods of
such leave, although some flexibility may be exercised in
respect of periods of special leave not exceeding one
year, especially in connection with the holding of
research awards.

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Applications for leave for other purposes

All other applications for leave are initially considered
in terms of application for sabbatical leave, until
entitlement to sabbatical leave is exhausted. In other
words, if an individual applies for leave under this
section for any term which he or she would be entitled to
take as sabbatical leave, any leave granted for that term
will be granted as sabbatical leave. Such leave may also
be granted as sabbatical leave in advance of entitlement:
in other words, sabbatical leave will be granted for a
term which the applicant would not normally be entitled
to take as sabbatical leave, and leave for the term in
question will then be deemed to be taken in a later term
(normally not more than six terms later). In this way the
leave will count against an individual's sabbatical
entitlement: taking the individual's service as a whole,
the leave will not be in addition to the standard
sabbatical entitlement. For sabbatical leave to be
granted in advance of entitlement, an academic case must
be made by the faculty board to the Appointments
Committee of the General Board.

When sabbatical leave entitlement had been
exhausted, an application has to be considered in whole
or in part as one for special leave. In such cases,
faculty boards are required, when making recommendations
to the Appointments Committee of the General Board, to
specify whether, and if so how, the grant of such leave
would be in the academic interests of the faculty. Where
there is no statement of academic interest, or this
statement is not persuasive, special leave will not be
granted.

Applications for special leave cover many kinds of
situation. One would be an unrepeatable opportunity to
pursue academic interests where the applicant is
ineligible for sabbatical leave. In such a case it would
be necessary for the faculty board to demonstrate the
academic advantage (to the University rather than to the
individual) of the individual being able to accept the
opportunity, and for an explanation to be given of why
such an opportunity could not be taken up at a later
period when the applicant would be entitled to sabbatical
leave. Another situation where special leave might be
applied for would be where there was a need for fieldwork
for a period exceeding one year, which could therefore
not be accommodated within the sabbatical provisions. In
such a case it would be expected, as usual, that as much
of the leave as possible would be taken as sabbatical or
sabbatical in advance of entitlement, and the faculty
board would again need to demonstrate the academic
advantage to the University of the application's being
granted.

Very occasionally applications are made for leave
to enable someone to accept an appointment in another
academic institution (other than a routine visiting
appointment held during sabbatical leave). In such
instances, the faculty board would need to make an
extremely convincing case as to desirability of the
individual being offered reversionary rights to his or
her university post for any application to be successful.
Factors taken into account would include all relevant
circumstances relating to the individual's role within
the faculty and the consequences for the faculty, in
terms of the refilling of the post, if leave were not to
be granted and the individual were therefore to resign.
On this latter point, it should be noted, of course, that
if leave is granted and the individual subsequently
resigns during the period of leave or at the end of it,
the uncertainty about the long-term filling of the post
will have been exacerbated. The longer the appointment in
the other institution the less likely it is that leave
will be granted; leave will not be granted save in the
most exceptional circumstances to enable someone to
decide whether to accept a permanent appointment
elsewhere.

In each of the situations outlined above,
applications are considered on their academic merits, but
it is emphasised that the nature of special leave is that
it is granted exceptionally rather than automatically.
Advice on the likelihood of success of any application
can be obtained from the Secretary of Faculties or the
secretary of the Appointments Committee of the General
Board.

The General Board takes the view that academic
staff are specifically appointed to undertake both
teaching and research, and (although the Board would
support arrangements whereby teaching in excess of a
contracted or reasonable stint was relieved) an extremely
good case needs to be made in support of an application
for special leave which would have the result of the
individual's teaching being conducted mainly or wholly by
someone else. This is a especially true given that the
sabbatical leave scheme has been preserved intact
throughout retrenchment, so providing the opportunity for
individuals to concentrate on research in one term out of
every seven. Willingness to forgo university stipend or
the ease with which funding for a replacement appointment
may be attracted will not be sufficient to guarantee in
any way the success of an application for special leave.

It is emphasised that any application for leave,
including any application for funding which might result
in the need for leave from university duties to be
granted, must be made to the General Board through the
faculty board (and head of department, in departmentally
organised faculties). In every case the academic
advantage to the institution will be the general
criterion by which applications will be considered: in
every case the General Board requires details of any
necessary substitute arrangements, including those
relating to examining and graduate supervision.

It is recognised that some offers are made to
individuals at short notice. Given the fact that all
members of the academic staff have clear obligations to
the University under the terms of their contracts,
however, no such offer should be accepted without the
explicit approval of the General Board under the
procedures set out above: for this reason any prospect of
such an offer, however indefinite, must be discussed (in
strict confidence) with Dr Whiteley, secretary to the
Appointments Committee of the General Board, at the very
earliest opportunity. Delay in bringing to the attention
of the University the possibility that an offer may be
made will mean that if applications and substitute
arrangements then have to be considered at short notice,
this might compromise the chance of leave being granted.

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Stipendiary arrangements

Leave granted under the above arrangements is normally
without university stipend, but the precise implications
for payment can vary. In some cases the leave is clearly
unpaid, such as when appointments in the public service
are held. In other cases, such as the holding of
prestigious research awards, the University is expected
to continue paying the individual, while the grant-giving
body provides support for the University to employ a
replacement: or the grant-giving body supplies a sum of
money which is equivalent to that paid by the University
under normal circumstances to the individual. Although
this is technically special leave without university
stipend, the University will continue to pay the stipend
to the individual through the payroll mechanism, being
reimbursed by the award-giving body. Special leave under
any other arrangement will mean the University will cease
to make payments of stipend and national insurance and
superannuation contributions. In general, except where
the rules of grant-giving bodies in respect of major
competitive awards specify otherwise, it is expected that
the normal result of the granting of an application for
special leave will be the release to the University of
the full salary and on-costs of the substantive
university appointment, which may be available, with the
agreement of the General Board, to the faculty board for
the making of any necessary replacement appointment. This
is particularly important given the University's practice
of advertising temporary university lecturerships, for
example, without cash-limited salary scales.

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TAYLOR INSTITUTION LIBRARY

To accompany the special lectures being given during
1997--8 to celebrate the sesquicentenary of the Taylor
Institution (see `Lectures' below), there will be a
rolling exhibition in the Voltaire Room during Hilary and
Trinity Terms of materials relating broadly to the theme
of each lecture and to the history of European language
and literature studies at Oxford.

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CONCERTS


Music Faculty

THE ALLEGRI STRING QUARTET (with Dominique Wong-Min,
piano) will perform Haydn's Quartet in F minor, op. 20,
no. 5, and Dvorák's Piano Quintet in A major, op.
81, at 1 p.m. on Friday, 15 May, in the Holywell Music
Room. Tickets, costing £5 (concessions £2.50)
are available from Blackwell's Music Shop, or at the
door.

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St Anne's College

1998 Mrs Robert Balfour Concert XIV

JULIET ALLEN will give a piano recital to include sonatas
by Beethoven and Tippett, and Brahms' Variations on a
Theme of Handel, at 8 p.m. on Saturday, 16 May, in the
Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, St Anne's College. Tickets
(free of charge) are available on application to the
College Secretary.

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St John's College

COLIN CARR will perform Bach's suites 4, 5, and 6 for
unaccompanied cello at 8.30 p.m. on Thursday, 11 June, in
the Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's College.
Admission will be by programme, available free from the
Porters' Lodge a week before the concert.

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Trinity College

THE DUKE STRING QUARTET, the resident quartet at Trinity
College, will perform works by Kevin Volans, Peter Koene,
and Bartók at 8.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 12 May, in the
chapel, Trinity College. Admission is free.

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UNIVERSITY CLUB


Wine-tastings

Wine-tastings will be held at 5.45 p.m. on the following
Wednesdays in the University Club (6 South Parks Road).
All members and their guests are welcome, the fee being
£2 per person.

13 May: Burgundies.

17 June: Wines for summer drinking.





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 7 May 1998: Lectures<br />

Lectures


Contents of this section:

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issue



INAUGURAL LECTURES


Regius Professor of Modern
History

PROFESSOR R.J.W. EVANS will deliver his inaugural lecture
at 5 p.m. on Monday, 11 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `The language of history and the
history of language.'

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Harold Vyvyan Harmsworth
Professor of American History

PROFESSOR ERNEST R. MAY will deliver his inaugural
lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 12 May, in the Examination
Schools.

Subject: `Shaping forces in American foreign
policy.'

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CAMERON MACKINTOSH PROFESSOR OF
CONTEMPORARY THEATRE

PROFESSOR THELMA HOLT, CBE, will introduce the following
lectures, which will be held at 5 p.m. on the days shown
in the Bernard Sunley Theatre, St Catherine's College.
Admission is free.

Professor Holt will also hold informal meetings on
Saturday mornings in which undergraduates can discuss
specific areas of the theatre in which they are involved.
Further information is available from Holly Kendrick,
University Drama Officer (telephone: Oxford 791577).

FRANK MCGUINNESS, playwright

Thur. 7 May: `Ibsen today---contemporary
adaptation of the Norwegian classic plays.'

THE RT. HON. PETER MANDELSON, MP, Minister Without
Portfolio

Thur. 14 May: `Beyond the Dome.'

S. MENDES, Artistic Director, Donmar Warehouse, and S.
RUSSELL-BEALE, actor

Fri. 15 May: `Thersites, Richard III,
Ariel, Iago---creating a Shakespearian character on
stage.'

S. DALDRY, Director, Royal Court Theatre

Thur. 4 June: `Running a theatre---the
opportunity to flourish.'

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CHERWELL--SIMON LECTURE 1998

SIR MARTIN WOOD, OBE, FRS, Deputy Chairman, Oxford
Instruments PLC, will deliver the Cherwell-Simon Lecture
at 4.30 p.m. on Friday, 8 May, in Lecture Theatre A,
Zoology/Psychology Building, South Parks Road.

Subject: `Superconductivity, eighty-seven
years on—where's it going?'

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BESTERMAN LECTURE 1998

PROFESSOR ROBERT DARNTON will deliver the inaugural
Besterman Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 28 May, in the
Hall, the Taylor Institution.

Subject: `Policing poetry in Paris, 1749.'

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HALLEY LECTURE 1998

PROFESSOR VERA C. RUBIN, Carnegie Institution of
Washington, will deliver the Halley Lecture at 5 p.m. on
Tuesday, 19 May, in the Lecture Theatre, the University
Museum.

Subject: `What Halley didn't know about the
universe.'

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RADHAKRISHNAN MEMORIAL LECTURES
1997–8

India's Raj: indigenous components and the imperial
construction of India

PROFESSOR ROBERT FRYKENBERG will deliver the
Radhakrishnan Memorial Lectures at 5 p.m. on the
following days in the Examination Schools.

Wed. 29 Apr.: `Baniyas, Chettiars, and
Dubashis: mercantile contributions to India's
construction.'

Mon. 4 May: `Sepoys, Naukars, and Sawars:
military contributions to India's conquest.'

Mon. 11 May: `Nayakas, Rayats, and
Zamindars: political contributions to India's
constitution.'

Mon. 18 May: `Munshis, Pandits, and Vakils:
cultural contributions to India's consolidation.'

Wed. 20 May: `Mandalas, Mamul, and Namak:
ideological contributions to India's consensus.'

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PROFESSOR OF POETRY

Three poets: D.H. Lawrence, Robert Lowell, Ted Hughes

PROFESSOR JAMES FENTON will lecture at 5 p.m. on
Thursdays in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building.

14 May: `D.H. Lawrence.'

21 May: `Robert Lowell.'

28 May: `Ted Hughes.'

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DAVID LEWIS LECTURE

PROFESSOR P. BRIANT, Toulouse, will deliver the third
annual David Lewis Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 20
May, in the Garden Quad Auditorium, St John's College.

Subject: `Greek epigraphy and Achaemenid
history: from Sardis to Xanthos.'

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THOMAS HARRIOT LECTURE 1998

DR J. ROCHE, Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies,
Oxford, will deliver the Thomas Harriot Lecture at 5 p.m.
on Thursday, 14 May, in the Champneys Room, Oriel
College.

Subject: `Harriot, Oxford, and twentieth-
century historiography.'

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RODNEY PORTER MEMORIAL LECTURE

DR J. WALKER, Head of the Dunn School of Nutrition,
Cambridge, will deliver the first Rodney Porter Memorial
Lecture at 4 p.m. on Monday, 1 June, in the
University/Pitt Rivers Museum. The lecture will be
followed by a champagne reception. Further details may be
obtained from Pauline Rudd (telephone: Oxford (2)75340),
Fran Platt (telephone: (2)75725), or Kieran Clarke
(telephone: (2)75255).

Subject: `The rotary mechanism of ATP
synthesis.'

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ASTOR VISITING LECTURER

Special colloquia

PROFESSOR A.J. LEGGETT, University of Illinois at
Urbana–Champaign and Institute of Theoretical
Physics, UCSB, Astor Visiting Lecturer 1998, will hold
the following colloquia at 4.15 p.m. on the days shown in
the Lindemann Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon
Laboratory.

Mon. 1 June: `The current state of play in
high-temperature superconductivity.'

Tue. 2 June: `Does quantum mechanics really
describe the everyday world?'

Wed. 3 June: `The Bose–Einstein
condensed alkali gases: historical context and new
vistas.'

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INTER-FACULTY COMMITTEE FOR
AFRICAN STUDIES


African Studies Lecture 1998

DR PETER NYOT KOK, visiting professor at the Max Planck
Institute, Hamburg, will deliver the African Studies
Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 14 May, in the Oakeshott
Room, Lincoln College.

Subject: `Islam and the nation state in
Africa.'

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BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES,
PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

History and philosophy of biology

The following lectures, which are intended to be of wide
interest, will be held at the times shown in the
Sherrington Room, the Department of Physiology. Graduates
and undergraduates are welcome to attend. Further details
may be obtained from Dr T.J. Horder, Department of Human
Anatomy (telephone: (2)72189).

PROFESSOR P. SINGER, Monash

Thur. 14 May, 4 p.m.: `Ethics and the
treatment of animals.'

DR H. KAMMINGA, Cambridge

Tue. 19 May, 5 p.m.: `Medical models of
causation: the case of the discovery of vitamin
deficiency diseases.'

PROFESSOR J. DURANT, Imperial College, London

Tue. 26 May, 5 p.m.: `Public
participation in science policy making: the case of
the new genetics.'

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CLINICAL MEDICINE

Nuffield Department of Surgery

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on
Tuesdays in the Seminar Room, the Nuffield Department of
Surgery, Level 6, the John Radcliffe Hospital.

J. PHILLIPS-HUGHES

12 May: `Bedside insertion of tunnelled
central venous catheters.'

H. CHEN

19 May: `Control of neuroendocrine
differentiation in medullary thyroid and small cell
lung tumours.'

DR A. MCKENZIE, Cambridge

26 May: `Interleukin-13 in Th2 cell
responses.'

G. SADLER

2 June: `What's new in endocrine
surgery.'

R. CORNALL

9 June: `Signalling in B cell tolerance
induction.'

A. MOWAT, Glasgow

16 June: `Antigen presentation and the
induction of oral tolerance.'

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Imperial Cancer Research Fund: Seminars in Public
Health and Epidemiology

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Tuesdays
in the Abraham Lecture Theatre, Green College.

DR D. KUH, M. RICHARDS, and R. HARDY, University College,
London

12 May: `A life-course approach to
women's health.'

PROFESSOR J. CUSZICK, ICRF, London

19 May: to be announced.

DR R. CLARKE, CTSU, Oxford

26 May: `Homocysteine and cardiovascular
disease—a meta-analysis of the observational
studies.'

DR J. DANESH, CTSU, Oxford

2 June: `Is Helicobacter pylori a cause
of gastric neoplasia?'

DR L. YOUNGMAN, CTSU, Oxford

9 June: `Large-scale clinical and
epidemiological studies—novel laboratory
solutions.'

PROFESSOR J. BELL

16 June: `The genetics of common
diseases.'

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section



LAW

The following seminar will be held at 5.30 p.m. on
Friday, 15 May, in the Mary Sunley Lecture Theatre, St
Catherine's College. The meeting will be chaired by Lord
Plant. Speakers will include Suzelle Smith and Don
Howarth, Senior Partners in Los Angeles law firm Howarth
& Smith, Bill Vaughn of the University of California
School of Law, and Lord Williams of Mostyn, Parliamentary
Under-Secretary of State, the Home Office.

Subject: `Law and the media.'

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section



LITERAE HUMANIORES

Seminar and lecture

DR MARGOT SCHMIDT, formerly Deputy Director,
Antikenmuseum, Basle, and formerly Professor, University
of Basle, will give the following seminar and lecture in
the Headley Lecture Theatre, the Ashmolean Museum. The
seminar and lecture are given under the auspices of the
Beazley Archive and the Archive for Performances of Greek
and Roman Drama.

Conveners: D.C. Kurtz, MA, D.Phil., Reader in
Archaeology and Beazley Archivist, and O.P. Taplin, MA, D.Phil.,
Professor of Classical Languages and Literature.

Mon. 25 May, 2.30 p.m., seminar: `Some
problematic "readings" of Attic vase
paintings.'

Tue. 26 May, 5 p.m.: `Staying or not staying
down in the Underworld: Apulian vase paintings of
Hades.'

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section


Gareth Evans Memorial Lecture 1998

PROFESSOR W. KUENNE, Hamburg, will deliver the Gareth
Evans Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 26 May, in
the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `Simple truth and alethic realism.'

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section



MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

Applied analysis and mechanics seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays
in Room L2, the Mathematical Institute. Details of the 25
May seminar will be announced later.

T. IWANIEC, Syracuse

11 May: `New perspectives on rank-one
convexity.'

R.L. PEGO, Maryland

18 May: `Instability in the Lifshitz-
Slyozov-Wagner theory of domain coarsening.'

J. CARR, Heriot-Watt

1 June: to be announced.

G. ALBERTI, Pisa

8 June: `Calibrations for the Mumford-
Shah functional and a conjecture by De Giorgi.'

M. SILHAVY, Prague

15 June: `On rotationally invariant rank
1 convex functions.'

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section


Probability, Statistics, and Operations Research
Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on
Thursdays in the
Department of Statistics. There will be an additional
seminar on Thursday, 21 May, at 4 p.m.

Conveners: P. Clifford, MA, Reader in
Mathematical Statistics, and A.M. Etheridge, MA, D.Phil.,
CUF Lecturer in Mathematics.

PROFESSOR P. GRAMBSCH, Minneapolis

14 May: `Luteinizing hormone pulsatility
in depressed women: comparison of data analysis
methods.'

PROFESSOR L.N. TREFETHEN

21 May: `Eigenvalues and card shuffling:
the cutoff phenomenon in Markov chains.'

PROFESSOR E.B. HOOK, Berkeley

21 May: 4 p.m: `Applications of capture-
-recapture analysis to epidemiology.'

PROFESSOR M. KIMMEL, Rice

28 May: ` Population dynamics coded in
DNA: history of growth and migrations of modern
humans.'

PROFESSOR E. DE ALBA, ITAM

4 June: `A Bayesian model for multiple
trend breaks and unit roots'

PROFESSOR R. HARTLEY, Keele

11 June: `Modelling the demand for
lottery tickets.'

DR D. CRISSAN, ICSTM

18 June: to be announced.

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section



MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

Taylor Institution Sesquicentennial Lectures,
1997–8: languages and literatures of Europe

The following lectures, which are given to mark the 150th
anniversary of the founding of the Taylor Institution,
will take place at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Lecture
Hall, the Taylor Institution.

ACADEMICIAN M.L. GASPAROV, Academy Institute of the
Russian Language, Moscow

13 May: `Analysis v. interpretation: two
poems by Osip Mandelstam about Gothic cathedrals' (in
English).

PROFESSOR G. SIFAKIS, Thessaloniki and New York

27 May: `Folk songs of the Cretan
mountains: a semiotic reading' (in English).

PROFESSOR W. EMMERICH, Bremen: `

3 June: `Versungen und vertan?:
Rückblicke auf 40 Jahre DDR-Literatur.'

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section


III Forum for Iberian studies: insights into 1898

The Forum will be held on Saturday, 23 May, in Queen's
College.

Conveners: I.D.L. Michael, MA, King Alfonso
XIII Professor of Spanish Studies, and J.D. Rutherford,
MA, D.Phil., Faculty Lecturer in Spanish and Director of
the Centre for Galician Studies.

DR RUTHERFORD

10.30 a.m.: presentation.

C. PATTERSON

10.45 a.m.: `Landscape, philosophy,
identity: a Galician response to the legacy of
1898.'

DR J.P. RUBIÉS, Reading

11.15 a.m.: `The impact of 1898 in
Catalonia: the search for a new empire.'

DR C. REDKNAPP, Cardiff

12.15 p.m.: `Language policy and
linguistic awareness in the Basque country: an
appraisal.'

PROFESSOR J. BUTT, King's College, London

12.45 p.m.: `En torno al
casticismo
and the development of Unamuno's
ideas.'

PROFESSOR MICHAEL (chairman)

2.45 p.m.: round table.

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section


Lecture

DR REGINE OTTO, Stiftung Weimarer Klassik, will talk
about the history and work of the Weimar research
institutions at 8.30 p.m. on Monday, 11 May, in Worcester
College.

Convener: T.J. Reed, MA, Taylor Professor of
the German Language and Literature.

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section


French literature from the Renaissance to the
Enlightenment

The following seminars will be held at 5.15 p.m. on
Thursdays in the Quickswood Room, Keble College.

Conveners: Dr G.J. Mallinson, Dr M.N.
Hawcroft, and Dr R. Goulbourne.

N. SCHAPIRA, Paris I, and M. BOMBART, Paris III

14 May: `L'étrange Monsieur de
Balzac (Jean-Louis Guez de) et l'histoire.'

J. CAMPBELL, Glasgow

28 May: `Andromaque and the
Augustinian inheritance.'

A. MOSS, Durham

11 June: `Renaissance truth and the
Latin linguistic turn.'

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section



MODERN HISTORY

Seminar in Social and Cultural History,
1500–1800

The following seminars will be held at 8.30 p.m. on
Tuesdays in the Hovenden Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: R. Briggs, MA, Special Lecturer in
Modern History, and F. Dabhoiwala, MA, D.Phil., Post-
Doctoral Research Fellow, All Souls College.

PROFESSOR J. DE VRIES, Berkeley

12 May: `Did a consumer culture emerge
before the Industrial Revolution?'

PROFESSOR R. DARNTON, Princeton

19 May: `Policing poetry in Paris,
1749.'

DR G. HUDSON, Wellcome Institute, London

26 May: `The body and the state in early
modern England.'

MS A. SHEPHARD

2 June: `Manhood, patriarchy, and
economic status in early modern England.'

DR N. KENNY, Cambridge

9 June: `Curiositas in German university
disserations, 1652--1714.'

R. WALINSKI-KIEHL, Portsmouth

16 June: `Men as witches and male
witch-hunting in early modern Germany.'

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section



MUSIC

Public lecture

PROFESSOR R. STEVENSON will lecture at 5.15 p.m. on
Wednesday, 20 May, in the Denis Arnold Hall, the Music
Faculty. The lecture will be open to the public.

Subject: `Recent researches in Portuguese and
Brazilian music history.'

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section


Master-class

ROSALYN TURECK will give a series of master-classes for
pianists and harpsichordists on Tuesdays of first to
fifth weeks, and seventh week, of Trinity Term, 2–4
p.m., in the Denis Arnold Hall, the Faculty of Music.

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section



ORIENTAL STUDIES

Lectures in Korean Studies 1998

DR K. WELLS, Professor of Korean History, Australian
National University, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday,
12 May, in the New Lecture Theatre, the Nissan Institute,
St Antony's College.

Convener: J.B. Lewis, MA, Korea Foundation
University Lecturer in Korean.

Subject: `Providence and power: Korean
Protestant responses to Japanese colonialism.'

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section



PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Materials Modelling Laboratory Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 1.15 p.m. on
Fridays in Lecture Room 7, the Engineering and Technology
Building.

Conveners: D.G. Pettifor, MA, Isaac Wolfson
Professor of Metallurgy, and P.S. Grant, D.Phil.,
Research Fellow, Department of Materials.

DR A.H. HARKER, University College, London

8 May: `Modelling surfaces and
interfaces in ceramics.'

PROFESSOR A. COCKS, Leicester

15 May: `Strategies for the modelling of
microstructure evolution in engineering
materials.'

DR A. SHERRY, AEA Technology

22 May: `The modelling of failure
mechanisms for structural integrity assessment.'

PROFESSOR P. LITTLEWOOD, Cambridge

29 May: `Modelling the magnetoresistance
of manganese oxides and other metallic
ferromagnets.'

PROFESSOR M. BROWN, Cambridge

5 June: `Modelling cyclic plasticity and
the fatigue strength of metals.' (In
association with OCIAM
)

DR J. MELROSE, Cambridge

12 June: `The shear flow of particle
colloids, jamming, thickening, and the influence of
polymers.' (Interdepartmental Polymer
Seminar
)

DR R. REED, Cambridge

19 June: `The status of processing
modelling at the University of Cambridge/Rolls-Royce
UTC.'

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section


Interdepartmental Polymer Seminars

The following seminars will be given as indicated.

Convener: P. Buckley, MA, D.Phil., University
Lecturer in Engineering Science.

PROFESSOR D. BATCHELOR, Leeds

Thur. 7 May, 2.15 p.m., Hume Rothery Lecture
Theatre, Department of Materials
: `Raman
microscopy of polymers: confocal, direct imaging, and
scanning near field.'

PROFESSOR B.W. BROOKS, Loughborough

Tue. 26 May, 4.15 p.m., Lecture Room 6, Thom
Building
: `Drop behaviour in suspension
polymerisation of vinyl monomers.'

DR J. MELROSE, Cambridge

Fri. 12 June, 1.15 p.m., Lecture Room 7,
Engineering and Technology Building
: `The shear
flow of particle colloids, jamming, thickening, and
the influence of polymers.'

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section


Civil Engineering Colloquia

The following colloquia will be held on Fridays in the
Engineering and Technology Building. Unless otherwise
indicated, they will take place at 2 p.m. in Lecture Room
8.

Details of the 29 May meeting will be announced later.

Visitors from outside Oxford are advised to telephone
Oxford (2)73162 prior to travelling to confirm that there
have been no late changes and to book parking permits if
required.

Convener: G.T. Houlsby, MA, Professor of
Civil Engineering.

PROFESSOR R.K. ROWE, Western Ontario

15 May: `Geosynthetics and the migration
through barrier systems beneath solid waste.'

PROFESSOR J.C.I. DOOGE

22 May, Lecture Room 1, 5 p.m.: `Future
management of the water environment.' (Lubbock
Lecture
)

PROFESSOR A.N. SCHOFIELD, Cambridge

5 June: `Taylor's interlocking, and
"false" cohesion.'

PROFESSOR R. PARK, Canterbury, New Zealand

12 June: `The capacity design of
reinforced concrete moment resisting frames for
earthquake resistance.'

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section


Oxford Centre for Advanced Materials and Composites

The OCAMAC Industrial Lecture

PROFESSOR B. EYRE, formerly Deputy Chairman, AE
Technology, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 15 May, in
Lecture Room 1, the Thom Building, the Department of
Engineering Science.

Subject: `Sustainable energy—a role for
nuclear?'

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section



SOCIAL STUDIES

PROFESSOR A.E. DICK HOWARD, School of Law, University of
Virginia, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 14 May, in
the Clay Room, Nuffield College.

Convener: B.E. Shafer, MA, Mellon Professor
of American Government.

Subject: `The Rehnquist Court comes of age.'

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section



SOCIAL STUDIES, GREEN COLLEGE

PROFESSOR STEIN RINGEN will lecture at 6 p.m. on
Thursday, 14 May, in the E.P. Abraham Lecture Theatre,
Green College. All are welcome to attend.

Subject: `Precariousness, social assistance,
and social work.'

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section



RESEARCH LABORATORY FOR
ARCHAEOLOGY AND THE HISTORY OF ART

The following seminars will be held at 10.30 a.m. on
Thursdays in the Library, the Research Laboratory for
Archaeology.

Convener: M.S. Tite, MA, D.Phil., Professor
of Archaeological Science.

A. JONES, Glasgow

7 May: `Pots and people: the analysis of
artefacts and the construction of a biography of
things.'

P. DOLUKHANOV, Newcastle

21 May: `C14 chronologies for eastern
Europe: the present state, problems, and
perspectives.'

I. FREESTONE, British Museum

4 June: `Glassmaking in the early
medieval period.'

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section



ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM

PROFESSOR J. RUSSELL, British Columbia, will lecture at
5.30 p.m. on Monday, 11 May, in the Lecture Theatre, the
Ashmolean Museum. The lecture is one of the Alan Hall
Memorial Lectures sponsored by the British Institute of
Archaeology, Ankara.

Subject: `Chasing Roman soldiers.'

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section



COMPUTING LABORATORY

Departmental seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4.15 p.m. on
Tuesdays in the OUCL Lecture Theatre.

The co-ordinators are Professor W.F. McColl (telephone:
(2)73829), and Professor L.N. Trefethen (telephone:
(2)73886).

PROFESSOR O. HAUGEN, Oslo

12 May: `TIMe for dialectic software
development.'

SIR ROGER PENROSE

2 June: `Mathematics, computation, and
the mind.'

PROFESSOR J. DONGARRA, Tennessee

9 June: `High-performance computing,
numerical libraries, and trends.'

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section



DEPARTMENT FOR CONTINUING
EDUCATION

The following events for the interested layperson, and
open to all, will be held as shown. Further information
is available from Mrs Hazel Richards, Administrator, Day
and Weekend Schools, the Department for Continuing
Education, Rewley House (telephone: Oxford (2)70380, e-
mail: Hazel.Richards@Conted.ox.ac.uk).

Sat. 30 May, from 10 a.m., John Radcliffe Hospital:
Multiple Sclerosis. Fee £30.50 with lunch, £24
without lunch.

Sat. 13 June, from 9.20 a.m., John Radcliffe Hospital:
Depression. Fee £31.50 with lunch, £25 without
lunch.

Sat. 20 June–Sun. 21 June, from 10.45 a.m., Rewley
House: Evolution. Fees from £32.

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section



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL
STUDIES

Research seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays
in Lecture Room 1, the Department of Educational Studies,
15 Norham Gardens.

PROFESSOR C. HOYLES and PROFESSOR R. NOSS, Institute of
Education, University of London

11 May: `Rebuilding mathematical
meanings in practice.'

PROFESSOR S. BROWN, Pro-Vice-Chancellor and Professor of
Education, Stirling University

25 May: `Accessing how staff in special
schools make sense of what they do.'

DR J. TOOLEY, School of Education, University of
Manchester

1 June: `A critique of educational
research.'

MS L. SAUNDERS, National Foundation of Educational
Research

8 June: `Who or what is school
"self"-evaluation for?'

A. HIGGINS, Chief Executive, UCAS

15 June: `Access to higher education:
will it ever be the same again?'

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section



EUROPEAN HUMANITIES RESEARCH
CENTRE

Archive of performances of Greek and Roman drama

Corrigendum

PROFESSOR DR H. FLASHAR, Professor Emeritus of Greek, the
University of Munich, will lecture at 5 p.m. on
Wednesday, 10 June, in the Headley Lecture Theatre, the
Ashmolean Museum.

This notice replaces that published in the
Gazette of 30 April, p. 1132, which
incorrectly stated that Dr Flashar's lecture would be
given in the EHRC.

Conveners: O.P. Taplin, MA, D.Phil., Reader
in Greek Literature, and E.M. Hall, MA, D.Phil.,
University Lecturer (CUF) in Classical Languages.

Subject: `Sophocles and Mendelssohn—the
Antigone of 1841' (with visual and
musical illustrations
).

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section



OXFORD CENTRE FOR HEBREW AND
JEWISH STUDIES

The following public lectures will be held at 8.15 p.m.
on Wednesdays in the Common Room, Yarnton Manor.

DR A. ARIELI-HOROWITZ, Tel Aviv, P. COCKBURN, The
Independent
, DR E. HOROWITZ, Bar-Ilan, and
PROFESSOR A. SHLAIM

13 May: `Israel's next fifty years: a
symposium.'

R. NETTLER, OCHJS, and DR S. TAJI-FAROUKI, Durham

20 May: `Intellectual traditions and
modern politics.' (Book launch:
Muslim–Jewish Encounters)

DR C. BERLIN, Harvard University Library

27 May: `Hebrew and Yiddish collections
in the Harvard College Library.'

DR N. DE LANGE, Cambridge

3 June: `The life and thought of Ignaz
Maybaum.' (Louis Jacobs Lecture
Series
)

PROFESSOR H. SOLOVEITCHIK, Yeshiva University

10 June: `Responsa as an historical
source.'

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section



QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

Economic Development Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on
Thursdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen
Elizabeth House.

D. MCNEILL, Centre for Development and the Environment,
Oslo

7 May: `Interdisciplinary research on
environment and development.'

V. FITZGERALD, Finance and Trade Policy Research Centre

14 May: `The multilateral agreement on
investment: threat or opportunity for developing
countries?'

F. STEWART

28 May: `The economic and social causes
of conflict: findings of the WIDER project.'

J. KNIGHT

4 June: `Labour market reform and
poverty.'

M. RAO, Massachusetts

11 June: `Development in the time of
globalisation.'

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section


Special Lecture

CLARE SHORT, MP, Secretary of State for International
Development, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 21 May,
in Keble College.

Subject: `The White Paper on the Government's
new approach to international development.'

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section


Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women

Barbara E. Ward Commemorative Lecture

DR M. JASCHOK, Monash University, will deliver the
Barbara E. Ward Commemorative Lecture at 5 p.m. on
Wednesday, 20 May, in the Taylor Institution. Further
details may be obtained from the Centre (telephone:
Oxford (2)73644, fax: (2)736707, e-mail:
ccrw@qeh.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `A mosque of one's own—Chinese
women, Islam, and sexual equality (nan-nu
pingdeng
).'

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section



BRASENOSE COLLEGE


Tanner Lectures on Human Values
1998

What money can't buy: the moral limits of markets

MICHAEL SANDEL, Harvard, will deliver the Tanner Lectures
on Human Values at 5 p.m. on the following days in the
Examination Schools.


Mon. 11 May: `Commodification,
commercialisation, and privatisation.'

Tue. 12 May: `Markets, morals, and the
public sphere.'

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section



GREEN COLLEGE


Alan Emery Lecture

PROFESSOR V. DUBOWITZ, Emeritus Professor of Paediatrics,
University of London, will deliver the Alan Emery Lecture
at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, 20 May, in the Witts Lecture
Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

Subject: `The floppy infant: from the cradle
to the genes.'

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section



HARRIS MANCHESTER COLLEGE


Idreos Lectures in Science and
Religion

PROFESSOR W.B. DREES, University of Twente and Vrije
Universiteit, Amsterdam, will deliver the Idreos Lectures
at 5 p.m. on the following days in Harris Manchester
College.


Wed. 13 May: `From nothing until now:
faith in the natural history of our universe.'

Thur. 14 May: `Spirituality or superstition?
Criteria for quality in science, religion, and
popular culture.'

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section



PEMBROKE COLLEGE


Blackstone Lecture

LORD NOLAN will deliver the twenty-second Blackstone
Lecture at 11.30 a.m. on Saturday, 16 May, in the
Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `Government, ethics, and the law.'

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section



ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE


Latin American Centre

Religion and politics in nineteenth- and twentieth-
century Mexico

This workshop will be held on Tuesday, 19 May, in 1
Church Walk.

PROFESSOR E. VAN YOUNG, UCSD and Center for
US–Mexican Studies

10 a.m.: `Religion and popular protest
in the Mexican Insurgency, 1810–21.'

PROFESSOR D. BRADING, Cambridge

11.30 a.m.: `Guadalupanismo in late
nineteenth-century Mexico.'

PROFESSOR A. BANTJES, Wyoming

2.15 p.m.: `Revolutionary iconoclasm and
anticlericalism in 1930s Mexico.'

K. BOYLAN

3 p.m.: `Catholic women's mobilisation
in 1930s Mexico.'

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section



Middle East Centre

Hamid Enayat Lecture

PROFESSOR NASSER PAKDAMMAN, Professor of Economics,
University of Paris, will deliver the fifteenth Hamid
Enayat Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 21 May, in the New
Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

Subject: `History, tapes, and memory—the
class of 1950 at Dar ol-Fonoun.'

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section



Elliott Lecture

JOHN BROWNE, Group Chief Executive, BP, will deliver the
annual Elliott Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 4 June, in
the New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

Subject: `International relations—the
new agenda for business.'

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section



ST HUGH'S COLLEGE


Henry Rowlatt Bickley Memorial
Lecture

PROFESSOR QUENTIN SKINNER, Regius Professor of Modern
History, Cambridge, will deliver the sixteenth Henry
Rowlatt Bickley Memorial Lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Tuesday,
19 May, in the Mordan Hall, St Hugh's College.

Subject: `The imagery of government in the
Italian Renaissance.'

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section



TRINITY COLLEGE


Richard Hillary Memorial
Lecture

P.D. JAMES will deliver the Richard Hillary Memorial
Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 13 May, in the St Cross
Building.

Subject: `Mystery and mayhem: the craft of
the detective story.'

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section



FRIENDS OF THE PITT RIVERS
MUSEUM


Beatrice Blackwood Lecture

DR SCHUYLER JONES, formerly Director, the Pitt Rivers
Museum, will deliver the Beatrice Blackwood Lecture at 7
p.m. on Wednesday, 20 May, in the Inorganic Chemistry
Lecture Theatre, South Parks Road. The lecture is open to
the public. Enquiries may be made to 01491 873276, or
Oxford 794617.

Subject: `Beatrice Blackwood: curator,
fieldworker, teacher, friend.'

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section



RUSKIN COLLEGE

Politics Forum

The following lectures, which are open to the public,
will be held as shown in the Raphael Samuel Hall, Ruskin
College. Admission is free.

PROFESSOR I. MCLEAN

Thur. 7 May, 7.30 p.m.: `Prospects for
devolution.'

DR S. HOWE, Tutor in Politics, Ruskin College

Mon. 11 May, 2 p.m.: `The 1798 Irish
Revolution and its bicentenary: politics, memory, and
history.'

M. SOUTHCOTT, Labour Campaign for Electoral Reform

Thur. 14 May, 7.30 p.m.: `Labour and
electoral reform.'

P. HUDIS, News and Letter, USA

Mon. 18 May, 2 p.m.: `The philosophy of
Marxist-humanism.'

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section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 7 May 1998: Grants and Funding<br />

Grants and Research Funding


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



GERALD AVERAY WAINWRIGHT RESEARCH
FELLOWSHIP IN NEAR EASTERN ARCHAEOLOGY

The Board of Management of the Gerald Averay Wainwright Near
Eastern Archaeological Fund proposes to appoint from 1 October
1998 or 1 January 1999 a Postdoctoral Research Fellow to carry
out research into the non-classical archaeology of any country
or countries of North Africa and the Near East (from Morocco to
Afghanistan). The stipend of the post will be £15,159, with
an additional allowance for research expenses (currently of up
to £2,352). These rates are subject to annual review. A
fellow may be appointed for up to three years.

Further particulars may be obtained from Miss E.L. Wilson, the
Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE (e-mail:
Emma.Wilson@orinst.ox.ac.uk), to whom applications (nine copies,
or two from candidates abroad), should be submitted by 29 May.
Applications should include the names of two referees, who should
be asked to write direct to Miss Wilson by the closing date.
Interviews will be held on 23 June (subject to confirmation).

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section





<br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 7 May 1998: Examinations and Boards<br />

Examinations and Boards


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MATHEMATICAL
SCIENCES


Honour School of Mathematical Sciences
1999

The Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences has
approved the following list of papers for examination in Section o of
the Honour School of Mathematical Sciences 1999 (see
Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 280, regulation
3(e)).

Paper o3: Functional Programming and Algorithm
Design (as specified for Section 4 of the Regulations for Honour
Moderations in Mathematics and Computation). This course involves
practical work. All candidates will be
assessed as to their practical ability under the provisions laid down
in the Regulations for Section 4 of Honour
Moderations in Mathematics and Computation. Practical weight:
one sixth. Paper of 2 hours 30 minutes. [This option is not available
to candidates who have taken Honour Moderations in Mathematics and
Computation.
]

Paper o4: Imperative Programming (as specified
for Paper I.1 of the Honour School of Computation). This course
involves practical work according to provisions laid down in the
Regulations for the Honour School of Computation. Practical
weight: one sixth. Paper of 2 hours 30 minutes
.

Paper o5: Algorithms and Complexity (as specified
for Paper I.5 of the Honour School of Computation). No
practical. Paper of 3 hours
.

Paper o6: History of Philosophy from Descartes to
Kant (Paper 101 of the Regulations for Philosophy in Some of the
Honour Schools). No candidate will be permitted this
option who is not offering Paper b1
.

Paper o7: Metaphysics and Theory of Knowledge
(Paper 102 of the Regulations for Philosophy in Some of the
Honour Schools). No candidate will be permitted this option who
is not offering Paper b1
.

Paper o8: Philosophy of Mathematics (Paper 122 of
the Regulations for Philosophy in Some of the Honour Schools).
No candidate will be permitted this option who is not offering
Paper b1
.

Paper o9: Astronomy (as specified for Subject 9
of the Regulations of the Preliminary Examinations in Physical
Sciences). There is no requirement for practical work with this
course
.

Paper o10: Mathematics and Finance

This paper will consist of three parts: Part I, Part II, and Part
III. Candidates will be expected to show a knowledge of two of the
three parts. In the examination four essay questions and two
calculation questions will be set on Part I, four questions will be
set on Part II and four questions on Part III
.

Part I: Corporate Finance

Discounted cash flow and capital project appraisal methods. Portfolio
theory, models of financial market equilibrium and implications for
the cost of capital and divisional
performance measurement. Financial market efficiency, methods of
company finance, capital structure, with further implications for the
cost of capital.

Part II: Mathematical Models of Financial Derivatives

Introduction to markets, assets, interest rates and present value;
arbitrage and the law of one price; European call and options, payoff
diagrams; other option strategies; Wiener processes as models for
asset price movements; informal treatment of Ito's lemma; hedging and
the Black-Scholes analysis, leading to the Black-Scholes partial
differential equation for a derivative price-reduction to the heat
equation; review of theory for the heat equation, explicit solution
for call and put options; extensions to dividends paid on the asset,
time-varying parameters;
forward and future contracts, options on them; American options as
free boundary problems and linear complementarity problems; weakly
path-dependent options
including lookbacks and asians. Simple treatment of stochastic
interest rates and their derivatives.

Part III: Decision Mathematics

The theme is decision-making under conditions of uncertainty, when
typically more than one decision has to
be taken, later decisions depending on the outcome of
earlier decisions. This will be explored in the contexts
of, for example, investment decisions, insurance, choosing a job,
searching for a hidden object, and planning
industrial research.

The main mathematical tools are stochastic dynamic programming,
allocation indices, and utility theory.
Dynamic programming centres on a recurrence equation which expresses
the fact that the first decision should be one which is optimal given
that all later decisions are
optimal. Allocation indices express priorities for different ways of
allocating resources, and sometimes simplify the calculation of how
to do so in an optimal way. Utility is a map onto a scale in terms of
which (unlike a monetary scale) preferences between uncertain
outcomes are
measured by the expectation operator.

Paper 011: Mathematical Modelling and Applications

This paper will consist of Part I followed by an application course,
Part II. Part I will provide a broad base of common techniques and
simple applications and the applications courses will go into a
particular area of application in more depth. The examination
will have four questions on Part I and four questions on the course
in Part II
.

Part I: Introduction to Mathematical Modelling

The aim of the course is to develop and extend some of the
theoretical ideas developed in the mainstream mathematics course and
to show how they can be applied in
simple modelling situations. The methods and models will be fully
integrated so that each technique will be illustrated with at least
one application.

Methods to be covered:

Modelling, nondimensionalisation, dimensional analysis, similarity
solutions.

Asymptotic methods of solution for ordinary differential
equations, regular and singular expansions, bifurcations, stability.

First order quasi-linear partial differential equations,
travelling wave solutions, shocks.

Classification of second-order quasi-linear partial differential
equations, well-posedness, linear and nonlinear
diffusion equations, travelling waves, solutions with
compact support, moving boundary problems.

Part II: Mathematics and the Environment

Applications of mathematics to environmental problems involving the
use of models with ordinary differential equations, first order
partial differential equations, and nonlinear diffusion equations.
Examples to be considered will be taken from the following:
(i) river flow; (ii) climate dynamics and ice ages; (iii)
geomagnetic reversals of the earth's magnetic field; (iv) soil
consolidation and groundwater flow; (v) snow melt run-off; (vi)
surging ice sheets; (vii) glacier outburst floods (JÜkulhlaups).

Paper o12: Mathematics Education

This course is a study of processes and practices in learning and
teaching mathematics and of associated issues. It will develop
awareness of processes and issue in mathematical learning and
understanding beneficial to the learning of mathematics, and will
also service as an introduction to mathematics education as a
discipline. It will have three strands: doing, thinking, and
understanding mathematics; teaching mathematics and its relationship
to issues in learning; wider issues in the learning and teaching of
mathematics.

Mathematical Thinking: The nature of mathematics;
The processes of mathematics; Conjecturing; Convincing and proving;
Advanced mathematical thinking. Some issues in learning
mathematics
: Mathematics and language; Visualisation and
imagery; Children and number; Strategies and errors.
Psychology of Learning Mathematics: Types of
understanding; Understanding, learning and knowing; Constructions of
learning. Some issues in teaching mathematics:
Teaching styles and interactive strategies; Constructions of
teaching; Use of technology in teaching; Assessment.
Sociology of Mathematics Teaching: The role of
mathematics education in society; Gender, culture and social class.
Oganisation of Mathematics Teaching and Learning:
School curricula; Classroom learning.

Assessment

Assessment will take the form of a three-hour examination consisting
of three essay-type questions each relating to one of the strands of
the course. Preparation for two of these questions will be done in
advance. All questions will be unseen. Graphical calculators may be
used in the exam.

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in
regulations made by boards of faculties and the Standing Committee
for Engineering and Materials will come into effect on 22 May.

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1 Board of the Faculty of Literae
Humaniores

Philosophy in some of the Honour Schools

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 463,
ll.1–2, delete `REGULATIONS FOR PHILOSOPHY IN SOME OF THE HONOUR
SCHOOLS' and substitute `REGULATIONS FOR PHILOSOPHY IN ALL HONOUR
SCHOOLS INCLUDING PHILOSOPHY'.

2 Ibid, delete ll. 3–8.

3 Ibid, p. 463, l. 9, delete `Candidates offering
Philosophy in any of these honour schools' and substitute `Candidates
offering Philosophy papers* in any honour school'. Then insert a
footnote:

`* The paper `History and Philosophy of Science', which is set as
a
supplementary subject in the Honour School of Natural Science, is not
here counted as a Philosophy paper, since it is a joint paper in both
History and Philosophy.'

4 Ibid, p. 463, l. 10, delete `for their
particular school' and substitute `for their particular school, as
specified elsewhere'.

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2 Boards of the Faculties of Literae
Humaniores and Medieval and Modern Languages

(a) Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 154, l. 40, delete from
`some', and substitute `all Honour Schools including Philosophy '.

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(b) Honour School of Philosophy and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 475, l. 20, delete from
`some', and substitute `all Honour Schools including Philosophy'.

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3 Board of the Faculty of Law

Honour School of Jurisprudence

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 243, ll. 7 and 8,
delete `Some', and substitute `all'.

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4 Board of the Faculty of Literae
Humaniores

Honour School of Literae Humaniores

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 266,
l. 6, delete from `some', and substitute `all Honour Schools
including Philosophy'.

2 Ibid, p. 275, l. 4, delete from `some', and
substitute `all Honour Schools including Philosophy'.

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5 Boards of the Faculties of Literae
Humaniores and Mathematical Sciences

(a) Honour School of Mathematics and Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 304,
ll. 6–7, 20, and 45, delete from `some', and substitute `all
Honour Schools
including Philosophy'.

2 Ibid, p.306, ll. 23 and 46 delete from `some',
and substitute `all Honour Schools including Philosophy'.

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(b) Pass School of Mathematics and Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 307, l. 11, delete from
`some', and substitute `all Honour Schools including Philosophy'.

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6 Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies

Honour School of Oriental Studies

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 443,
l. 11, delete from `some', and substitute `all Honour Schools
including Philosophy'.

2 Ibid, p. 457. l. 45, delete from `some', and
substitute `all Honour Schools including Philosophy'.

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7 Board of the Faculty of Social Studies

Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 478,
ll. 3, 11, 28, and 36, delete from `some', and substitute `all Honour
Schools including Philosophy'.

2 Ibid, p. 480, l. 13, delete from `some', and
substitute `all Honour Schools including Philosophy'.

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8 Boards of the Faculties of Literae
Humaniores and Theology

Honour School of Philosophy and Theology

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 493, l. 38, delete from
`some', and substitute `all Honour Schools including Philosophy'.

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9 Boards of the Faculties of Literae
Humaniores and Physical Sciences

(a) Honour School of Physics and Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 498, ll. 41 and 44,
delete from `some', and substitute `all Honour Schools including
Philosophy'.

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(b) Pass School of Physics and Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 499, ll. 24 and 32,
delete from `some', and substitute `all Honour Schools including
Philosophy'.

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10 Board of the Faculty of Psychological
Studies

(a) Honour School of Psychology, Philosophy, and
Physiology

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 502,
l. 15, delete from `some', and substitute `all Honour Schools
including Philo-sophy '.

2 Ibid, p. 503, l. 49, delete from `some', and
substitute `all Honour Schools including Philosophy'.

(b) Honour School of Experimental Psychology

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 221, l. 28, delete from
`some', and substitute `all Honour Schools including Philosophy'.

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11 Board of the Faculty of Theology

Honour School of Theology

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 520,
delete ll. 10–13 and substitute:

`(9) The History and Theology of the Western Church
1050–1350

The paper will consist of questions on the thought of the leading
theologians (especially Anselm, Peter Abelard, Aquinas, Duns Scotus,
and William of Ockham), and of questions on the main developments in
the western church. It will be so set that any period of 150 years,
with its theological writers, will prove sufficient coverage.'

2 Ibid., p. 527, after l. 15, insert:

`(33) English church and Mission 597–754

Candidates will be expected to study the main lines of the
history of the English Church in this period, and some aspects of its
theology. There will also be an opportunity to study works of art.
Candidates will be expected to have studied the texts in Group I, on
which alone gobbets will be set, and in at least one of sections
(a), (b), (c) in Group II.

Group I

Bede Ecclesiastical History of the English People, Preface, Bks I,
23–4; II; III; IV; V, 9–10, 19 (trans. L. Sherley-Price,
revised R.E. Latham, with introduction and notes by D.H. Farmer,
Penguin Classics, 1990) pp. 41–3, 72–265, 278–82,
300–06.

Bede's Letter to Egbert, trans. D.H. Farmer, ibid., pp.
337–51.
Bede: On the Temple, trans. S. Connolly, in J. O'Reilly (Liverpool
University Press: Translated Texts for Historians 21, 1995), Prologue
and Book I to I, 8.4, pp. 1–33; Book II, 18.8 to 20.9, pp.
76–100.

Eddius Stephanus, Life of Wilfrid in The Age of Bede (ed. D.H.
Farmer, trans. J. Webb, Penguin Classics 1988), pp. 105–82.

`The Dream of the Rood', in A Choice of Anglo-Saxon Verse, ed. and
trans. R. Hamer (Faber 1970), pp. 161–71.

Group II

(a) Adomnan of Iona, Life of St Columba, ed. and trans.
R. Sharpe (Penguin Classics, 1995).

(b) Bede, Life of Cuthbert in The Age of Bede (Penguin
Classics, 1988), pp. 41–102.

Bede, Lives of the Abbots of Wearmouth and Jarrow, ibid., pp.
185–208.

Bede's Homily on the Gospel for the Feast of St Benedict Biscop,
in Bede, Homilies on the Gospels, trans. L.T. Martin and D. Hurst,
Preface by B. Ward (Cistercian Studies Series, 110, 1991), pp.
125–32.

Letters of Aldhelm, in Aldhelm, The Prose Works, trans. M. Lapidge
and M. Herren (Boydell and Brewer, 1979), pp. 152–70.

(c) Willibald's Life of St Boniface and The
Correspondence of
St Boniface, in C.H. Talbot, The Anglo-Saxon Missionaries in
Germany (Stead and Ward, 1954), pp. 25–62, 65–149.'

3 Ibid., l. 16, renumber existing (33) as (34).

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12 Standing Committee for Engineering and
Materials

Honour School of Engineering and Materials

(i) With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first Part I
examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 191,
after l. 17 insert:

`In the assessment of paper A6 the examiners shall take into
consideration failure of a candidate to complete the practical work
to a level prescribed from time to time by the Sub-faculty of
Engineering Science.'

2 Ibid., l. 19, delete `papers A6 and'.

3 Ibid., ll. 19–20, delete `Practical work
reports taken . . . written paper.'.

4 Ibid., ll. 20–4, delete from `Practical
work . . .' to `. . . takes place.' and substitute:

`Such reports should be submitted to the Chairman of Examiners in
the Honour School of Engineering and
Materials, c/o Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High
Street, Oxford by 5 p.m. on the Friday of the seventh week of the
Trinity Full Term in which the Part I examination takes place.'

5 Ibid., l. 35, delete `, A6' and after line 43 insert:

`A6: Engineering Practical Work: as specified in the
Honour School of Engineering Science omitting control and computer
architecture [From 1 October 1999 for first Part I examination in
2000: materials]'.

(ii) With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first Part II
examination in 1999)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, delete p. 192, ll.
13–15 and substitute:

`SME1 Materials Processing

SME2 Advanced Structural Materials

SME3 Design and Performance'.

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DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF LETTERS

The Board of the Faculty of English Language and Literature has
granted leave to

A. THWAITE, St Hilda's, to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of
Letters.

A list of the evidence submitted by the candidate is available at
the University Offices.

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF
PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice
of oral examination of their candidates as
follows:

Biological Sciences

P. VICKERMAN, Lady Margaret Hall: `A mathematical framework for
melding the intra and inter host dynamics of visceral
leishmaniasis'.

Department of Zoology, Tuesday, 2 June, 2 p.m.


Examiners: M.A. Nowak, G.F. Medley.

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Law

K. MAGLIVERAS, Exeter: `Exclusion from participation
in international organisations: the theory and practice
behind member states' expulsion and suspension of
membership'.

Wolfson, Wednesday, 10 June, 2.30 p.m.


Examiners: G.S. Goodwin-Gill, N.D. White.

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Modern History

J.D. MUSTON, Brasenose: `The end of exceptionalism
in the foreign affairs debate? The resistance to inter-
nationalism in the United States Senate, 1944–52'.

Nuffield, Friday, 15 May, 2.15 p.m.


Examiners: S.M.Gillon, J. Thompson.

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Physical Sciences

XIANHUA WAN, St Catherine's: `Dendritic growth'.

Department of Materials, Thursday, 14 May, 11 a.m.


Examiners: K.A.Q. O'Reilly, D.G. McCartney.

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Social Studies

L. SONG, Wolfson: `Rural–urban labour migration in China: the
institutional framework, incentives, determinants, and
processes'.

St Antony's, Friday, 22 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: C.Z. Lin, S. Feuchtwang.

M.T. TJIRONGO, St Antony's: `Exchange rate policy options for
Namibia'.

Institute of Economics and Statistics, Friday, 8 May,
2.30 p.m.


Examiners: D. Fielding, L. Harris.

R. YEP, Nuffield: `The rise of rural entrepreneurs and the changing
state–society relationship in post-Mao China'.

Institute for Chinese Studies,Thursday, 14 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: F.N. Pieke, D.S. Goodman.

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EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF
LETTERS

The examiners appointed by the following faculty board give notice of
oral examination of their candidate as
follows:

Modern History

A. CRISP, Worcester: `The owner-occupied working-class house of the
1930s'.

Worcester, Wednesday, 13 May, 2.15 p.m.


Examiners: J. Stevenson, P. Scott.

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section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 7 May 1998: Colleges<br />

Colleges, Halls, and Societies


Contents of this section:

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issue



OBITUARIES


St Hugh's College

HELEN STELLA ALEXANDER (née Tucker), MA,
21 April 1998; commoner 1930–3. Aged 85.

ANNE HOLDEN, MA, 16 October 1997; commoner 1971–4.
Aged 44.

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section



MEMORIAL SERVICE


New College

A Memorial Service for ROGER GILBERT OPIE, MA, M.PHIL.,
Fellow of New College 1961–92, Emeritus Fellow
1992–8, will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 23
May, in the chapel, New College.

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section



COMMEMORATIVE SERVICE


Christ Church

A Service in Commemoration of WILLIAM EWART GLADSTONE (29
December 1809–19 May 1898), DCL honoris
causa
, Honorary Student of Christ Church, Honorary
Fellow of All Souls College, will be held at 6 p.m. on
Monday, 18 May, in the University Church of St Mary the
Virgin, in the presence of the Chancellor, the Rt. Revd
and Rt. Hon. the Lord Runcie preaching, the Vice-
Chancellor reading the lesson, the Vicar of the
University Church and the Dean of Christ Church
officiating, with the Cathedral Choir of Christ Church
directed by Stephen Darlington.

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section



ELECTIONS


Christ Church

To a Lecturership in Philosophy (TT 1998):

TIMOTHY J. MAWSON, M.PHIL.

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section



St Hilda's College

To an Official Fellowship and Tutorship in Ancient
History (with effect from 1 October 1998):

KATHERINE
JANE CLARKE, BA, D.PHIL.

To an Official Fellowship and Tutorship in Politics
(with effect from 1 October 1998):

PETRA SCHLEITER,
M.PHIL. (B.SC. LSE)

To an Honorary Fellowship (with immediate
effect):

PROFESSOR HERMIONE LEE, B.PHIL., MA

To a Supernumerary Fellowship (with immediate
effect):

LORNA JOYCE SMITH, MA, D.PHIL.

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section



NOTICES


Corpus Christi College


Appointment of IT Systems Manager

Corpus Christi College proposes to appoint a Computing Officer
(subject to an initial probationary period of six months),
commencing as soon as possible and to be responsible for the
maintenance and development of the college's computing
facilities. He or she would work with the existing part-time
Computing Officer and, amongst other things, take part in the
training of staff, senior members, and students in the use of IT
facilities. The appointment is full-time and the salary will be
based on the Oxford University RS1A or RS2 scale (currently
£15,129–£22,785 and £21,016–£27,985
respectively) with the point of entry based on age and
experience. A formal IT qualification is not a requirement. The
sucessful applicant would be expected to have experience of the
installation and running of local area networks and of PC
hardware and software support and maintenance.

Further particulars may be obtained from the Bursar's
secretary, Corpus Christi College, Oxford OX1 4JF, or at
the following Web site: http://www.ccc.ox.ac.uk/vacancy/
itsysmgr.html. Applications, including a full curriculum
vitae
, together with the names of two referees, should be
received by Friday, 15 May.

The college exists to promote excellence in research and is
actively committed to the principle of equality of opportunity
for all suitably qualified candidates.

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section



Oriel College


The Eugene Lee-Hamilton Prize 1998

The Provost and Fellows of Oriel College offer a prize of
£60 for the best Petrarchan Sonnet in English submitted by
an undergraduate of Oxford or Cambridge, on a subject to be
chosen by the candidate. Enjambment between the eighth and ninth
lines will be permitted.

No candidate may submit more than one sonnet, nor may the prize
be awarded more than once to the same person. The competing
sonnets should be sent to the Provost, Oriel College, Oxford OX1
4EW, not later than Monday,
1 June. Each sonnet must be accompanied by a
certificate from the Head or a Fellow of the candidate's college,
stating that the candidate is an undergraduate.

The winner will have been deemed to have given permission to
publish his/her sonnet in the Oriel Record.

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section



St Cross College


Knoop Junior Research Fellowship

St Cross College proposes to make an election to this
Junior Research Fellowship, tenable from 1 October 1998 (or
another date by agreement) for one year in the first instance.
The fellowship is to be held in conjunction with a position in
the Department of Ophthalmology, involving research work in the
general area of the biochemistry of the lens; it will be suitable
for graduates in biochemistry, physiology, and allied subjects.
Experience of the lens and/or glycation or molecular chaperone
is desirable but not essential. The fellowship is open to men and
women and carries a stipend of £15,159 per annum, together
with common table rights (five lunches a week).

Applicants should have submitted their doctoral dissertations
by the date of taking up the appointment or have obtained the
D.Phil./Ph.D. or equivalent within the last five years, but the
college will exercise flexibility in the case of applicants whose
academic careers have been
interrupted.

Applications (marked Knoop JRF) should include a full
curriculum vitae and the names of two referees, and
should be addressed to the Master, St Cross College, Oxford OX1
3LZ. The closing date for applications is 1 June. Applicants
should ask their referees to send references to the Master by
that date. Further details about scientific aspects can be
obtained from Professor John J. Harding, Nuffield Laboratory of
Ophthalmology, Walton Street, Oxford OX2 6AW (telephone: Oxford
248996).
The college exists to promote excellence in education and
research, and is an equal opportunities employer.

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section



St Peter's College


Apppointment of Adviser to Women
Students and Welfare Officer

Applications are invited for the post of Adviser to Women
Students and Welfare Officer from 1 October 1998. The appointment
will be for one year in the first instance. Applicants should be
engaged in graduate studies. The post carries with it free board
and lodging, an honorarium, and membership of the senior common
room.

Applications, with a full curriculum vitae, should
be sent by Friday, 29 May, to the College Secretary, St Peter's
College, Oxford OX1 2DL, from whom further particulars may be
obtained. Candidates are asked to request two
referees to send references direct to the College by the
same date.

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section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 7 May 1998: Advertisements<br />

Advertisements


Contents of this section:



How to
advertise in the Gazette

"../../../stdg/conds.htm">

Terms and conditions of
acceptance of advertisements

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issue



Museums Week 16--24 May

Conservation events in Oxfordshire: for
full programme of open conservation studios and tours,
conservation exhibitions, and lectures, see Web site:
http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk.boris/conservation/oxuniv/musw
eek.htm.

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section



Tuition Offered

Intensive language weekend courses are
being held at Oxford Brookes University: French and
Spanish (weekend 20--21 June); Italian (weekend 11--12
July). Fees: £40 for full-time students/£50 for
non-students, to include 8 hours' tuition and all
teaching materials. For further information and enrolment
forms contact: Jackie Brumwell, Oxford Brookes Language
Service, Oxford Brookes University, Gipsy Lane Campus,
Headington, Oxford OX3 0BP. Tel.: Oxford 483692, e-mail:
Jackie@sol.brookes.ac.uk.

Summer Arts Course for 10 to 14
year-olds; range of media inc. photography, ceramics,
painting, drawing, computer graphics. Suitable for all
levels---beginner to advanced. Small groups and
experienced tutors. d'Overbroek's College, 1 Park Town,
Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 310000.

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section



Services Offered

Bespoke Garden and Landscape Design:
`one off' consultancy visits, or sketch and scaled
layouts, planting schemes, construction details, and site
supervision, as desired. Nationwide service from
Oxford/Gloucestershire base. Chelsea Gold Medal 1996 and
1997. Jacquie Gordon BA Dip LA (Glos) ALI. Tel./fax:
01531 822743.

Oxford University Newcomers' Club. The
club exists to welcome to Oxford the partners and
families of academic visitors and graduate students. Come
along to the Club rooms at 13 Norham Gardens, and sample
our programme of events and outings. We are open each
Wednesday morning, 10.30--12 noon, from the week before
term starts to the week after term, also throughout the
summer vacation.

Long established Oxford builder (25
years). Property maintenance, renovations, extensions.
Every aspect of the building trade covered. Free
estimates. Academic references available. Richard
Edwards, tel.: Oxford 343562.

Tax advice: ex-KPMG Chartered Accountant
specialised in assisting academics and other
professionals with their tax affairs, inc.
self-assessment. Convenient North Oxford premises. Tel.:
Oxford 513381, fax: 558064, e-mail:
100430.145@compuserve.com.

Wise Owl Educational Software: the only
UK children's shareware library, est. 1991. Specialising
in educational programs and games (DOS, Windows 3.1 and
95) for all PCs (XTs to Pentiums). 800+ titles for ages
2--16+. 3½" and 5¼" media. Free newsletter and
advice. Tel.: 01235 529808 (Mon.--Fri., 9 a.m.--5 p.m.),
e-mail wiseowlsw@aol.com (Web site
http://members.aol.com/wiseowlsw/index.html).

Simple Kitchens and Furniture: kitchens,
free-standing and fitted furniture made to suit you.
Using traditional furniture-making techniques and the
finest materials, our work is built to last. Our
friendly, personal service is second to none. Contact
Thomas Heidkamp, tel.: 01844 353338, for a no-obligation
consultation.

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section



Situations Vacant

Assistant librarian required for St
Clare's, Oxford. This is a full-time post in the Academic
Resources Centre (35,000 books, IT, and audio-visual
resources), to assist and deputise for the centre
manager. St Clare's offers courses at pre-university and
university levels, and in English language to around 300
students of over 40 nationalities. Experience of library
work and strong IT skills are essential; a librarianship
qualification is desirable. Thirty-five hours per week,
inc. some evenings and weekends. Starting salary
£12,000--£14,000, to be linked to an
established scale; contributory pension and other
benefits. Further details from Maria Andrews, Office
Manager, St Clare's, Oxford OX2 7AL, tel.: Oxford 552031,
fax: 310002. Closing date for applications: 30 May.

Group 4 in association with Jesus
College, Oxford is looking to recruit 2 full-time
security officers to work nights and Sundays. £5 per
hour for 48 hours p.w. You will display excellent
communication skills and a professional manner. Reception
skills an advantage. You must also be aged 21--64 and
have a 10 year checkable work record. To apply, please
contact Katherine Jones, tel.: Oxford 244999.

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section



Houses to Let

North Oxford : 3-bedroom detached house
in secluded drive; washing-machine, drier, garage,
maintained garden backing onto playing fields. Convenient
for shops and schools. Available Sept.–Jan.; shorter
or longer periods considered. Suitable for visiting
academics. £925 p.c.m. inc. of council tax. Tel.:
Oxford 722630.

Town house available to cat-loving
couple, June--Aug. Situated in quiet, architect-designed
development in North Oxford, about 2.5 miles from the
Bodleian Library, on good bus service. Garage and small
garden. Dates and rent negotiable. Tel.: Oxford
557448.

Quiet, modernised, terrace house, fully
furnished, central North Oxford. Two bedrooms, c.h.,
garden. Suit visiting academics. Available to let to 1 or
2 persons only, from mid-Aug. 1998, for academic year.
For further details, tel.: Oxford 512747.

Juxon Street, Jericho. We have an
excellent, newly-renovated, detached Victorian house with
4 double bedrooms, courtyard garden, and 2 parking
spaces. The house is tastefully furnished with 2
reception rooms, super bathroom, and impressive kitchen.
Available now. £1,300 p.c.m. Call us now to view!
Finders Keepers, tel.: Oxford 311011, e-mail:
oxford@finders.co.uk.

Short-term/holiday lets in Witney, 12
miles Oxford, on good bus service. Fully-furnished and
well-equipped cottages. Tel.: 01993 703035, fax:
771014.

East Oxford: furnished 2-bedroom terrace
house; gas c.h. and garden; in very quiet street,
convenient for local shops and bus routes; walk (20--25
minutes) to Bodleian and city centre. Available 1
Jan.--(around) 31 May 1999. £600 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford
240384, e-mail: david.norbrook@magd.ox.ac.uk.

Summertown, North Oxford, 1.5 miles from
city centre, on quiet side street. Furnished house with 3
bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms, 2 studies, large living-room,
large eat-in kitchen, walled garden, gas c.h., and all
key appliances. Available mid-Aug.--late Dec. 1998.
Tel./fax: Oxford 552217.

An Englishman's home is his castle---so
the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many
castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental
accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be
able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost
letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics,
medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to
offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford.
Visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view
details of all the properties that we have currently
available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or
e-mail us with details of your requirements and we will
do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: Oxford
764533, fax: 764777, e-mail: info@qbman.co.uk.

Luxury, unusual, spacious modern house
in quiet road in North Oxford within ring road, close to
bus route. Stunning views to open countryside. Open plan
design with separate double bedroom and 2 bathrooms.
Small patio garden; off-street parking. Suit visiting
academic or professional couple; regret no children,
pets, or smokers. £895 p.m., inc. Council Tax.
Available June 1998. Tel.: Oxford 515085.

House available for rent next academic
year. Large sitting-room, dining-room, modern kitchen, 2
double bedrooms, 2 studies, 1.5 bathrooms, walled garden,
c.h., washer-drier, dishwasher, fridge, china, linen,
etc. Bottom of Headington Hill, 15--20 minutes' walk from
Bodleian. Available late Aug. 1998--late May 1999.
£900 p.m. Contact Prof. Grundy, 11 Cherwell St,
Oxford OX4 1BG. Tel.: Oxford 242966, e-mail
isobel.grundy@ualberta.ca.

Oxford Waterside, Jericho: brand new
house on prestigious development. Two bedrooms, 1 en
suite shower room, family bathroom, living/dining-room,
beautifully-fitted kitchen with ceramic tiled floor,
downstairs cloakroom. Furnished to high standard. Small
garden; views over Port Meadow. Allocated off-street
parking. Ten minutes' walk to Radcliffe Infirmary and
many University departments, also shops, theatres, etc.
Available for weekly lets or longer as required,
sometimes at short notice. Tel.: Oxford 311124, fax:
311125, e-mail: anae0002@nda.ox.ac.uk.

Central Oxford, Rewley Park, near rail
station (London--Paddington 52 minutes), bus station
(Heathrow 70 minutes), and city centre. Brand new
5-bedroom town house, built to high specification; 3
bathrooms (2 en-suite), 2 reception rooms, modern
kitchen, downstairs w.c., conservatory, small garden,
parking, river/canal view. Available from June.
£2,000 p.c.m. Tel.: 01844 208315, fax: 201511,
e-mail: 100574.451@compuserve.com.

Furnished central North Oxford house to
let for one year or less from 15 Sept. Walk to colleges,
rail and bus station; near Port Meadow; c.h.; recently
redecorated; desks, filing cabinets, several large
closets; secluded garden; 2½ bathrooms,
washing-machine, drier, telephone, linen, dishes, 2
bicycles. Suitable for visiting academics. 2 bedrooms,
£950 p.m.; 3 bedrooms, £1,250 p.m. (inc. bedsit
with separate entrance). Contact: J. Mackrell, Oxford
775567 (27 May--1 June: 553679); or A. Gaston, Canada:
tel. 613 745 1368, fax: 613 745 0299, e-mail:
Tony.Gaston@EC.GC.CA.

Central North Oxford:
attractively-furnished, four storey Victorian house in
quiet street, 15 minutes' walk from city centre, quarter
of a mile from river Thames and Port Meadow. Two double
bedrooms and 1 single; 2 bathrooms, 1 with new shower,
both with w.c.; double reception room with wood floor,
oriental rugs, desk; modern pine kitchen/diner with large
table. Dishwasher, fridge, freezer, gas c.h., washing
machine, drier; TV, video, stereo, fax, 3 phones. Garden
with picnic table, chairs, hammock; 4 bicycles. Free
street parking. £950 p.c.m., inc. utilities and
Council Tax. Available 3 Aug.--5 Sept. Dr Josephine
Reynell, tel.: Oxford 513933.

Make finding accommodation a pleasure,
not a chore. Finders Keepers is dedicated to making it
easy for visitors to Oxford to find the right property.
Browse through our Web site for up-to-date detailed
information on properties available and make use of our
interactive database, priority reservation service
(credit cards accepted), welcome food pack, personal
service, and much more. Call us and you will not need to
go elsewhere. For further information contact Finders
Keepers, 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE. Tel.: Oxford
311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk;
Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

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section



Flats to Let

North and central North Oxford: one- and
two-bedroom apartments, fully furnished to a high
standard, good security, off-street parking; variety of
size and available dates; £575–£720 p.c.m.
Best suited to professionals or visiting academics. Tel.:
Oxford 516144.

Two-bedroom flat, Headington hill.
Spacious, furnished, and well-equipped top-floor flat in
quiet location, close to hospitals and both universities,
with splendid southerly outlook over parkland. Bathroom,
shower room (en suite), 2 w.c.s., gas c.h.,
entry phone, storage space, garage, communal gardens.
£700 p.c.m. Available 1 June 1998. Tel.: Oxford
515089 or 792382.

Central North Oxford, 10 minutes' walk
from city centre, available mid-May for short/long let:
exceptionally well-furnished second-floor flat in quiet,
civilised Victorian family house with large, light, airy
rooms. Double bedroom, drawing room, kitchen, bathroom.
Off-street parking, large secluded garden. Regret no
children or pets. Tel./fax: Oxford 552400.

Upper Wolvercote: spacious 2-bedroom
flat with lovely rural views in quiet location yet on
regular bus route to city centre. Fully furnished, with
well-equipped kitchen, c.h., garage, etc. Non-smokers
preferred. Available 1 June for long-term let. £650
p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 559802.

Central North Oxford: spacious 1-bedroom
flat in quiet road. Shared garden. Suit postdoc. couple
or similar. Available now. Tel.: 0171-794 8965.

Park Town, available mid-July:
semi-basement, comfortably furnished; double bedroom,
sitting room, kitchenette with electric cooker and
fridge, tiled bathroom with shower; c.h. throughout;
telephone available. Very quiet house. Prime location, 1
mile from Carfax. Tel. for appointment: Oxford
557400.

\North Oxford: available 1 Sept. 1998--31 May 1999,
£550 p.m., fully-equipped ground-floor flat suitable
for 2 adults; dining-room/study; living-room/study,
double bedroom, shower-room, kitchen; dish-washer,
washing/drying machine, electric stove; c.h., car-port,
small garden. Stone, 266 Moore Street, Princeton, NJ
08540, USA. Tel.: 609 921 2717.

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section



Summer Lets

Peaceful and comfortable fully-furnished
apartment, close to Oxford station. Bedroom with double
bed, bathroom, kitchen with washing machine, bright
living-room/study with small balcony overlooking meadows
and river; posible use of undercover parking and cycle.
Suit visiting academic/s. 1 Aug.--30 Sept. £450
p.c.m. (negotiable), plus bills. Tel.: Oxford 246239,
e-mail: clsaf@csv.warwick.ac.uk.

Sunny Victorian terrace house, Iffley
Fields: 2 reception (period fireplaces), modern kitchen,
bathroom, second w.c., large double bedroom,
bedroom/study (double sofa-bed), utilities cellar,
antiques, stripped bannisters, sanded floors, nice
garden. Mid-June--Oct., £725 p.m. inc. council tax.
Tel.: Oxford 798069 or 01873 810982; e-mail:
ayers@wadham.ox.ac.uk.

City centre house with view of Thames
available for 4 months, June--Sept. Fully equipped, 3
bedrooms (2 double, 1 single), 2 bathrooms, gas c.h.,
garden, garage. £975 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 250462.

Very attractive semi-detached house in
north Summertown; 3 bedrooms, 2 studies, 2 living-rooms
plus kitchen and large conservatory; generous garden with
play equipment. Easily sleeps 5. Ideal for children. Easy
access to Summertown shops and central Oxford. Use of 2
adult and 2 child bicycles. All modern conveniences.
Available 18 Aug.--2 Sept.; some flexibility over dates.
£325 p.w. inc. utilities. Tel.: Oxford 556655.

Summer let in Oxford, live in comfort
near the Thames; c.h.; 4 bedrooms; large split-level
living-room, south-facing garden, dining-room,
fully-equipped kitchen; bathroom with bidet and w.c.;
shower-room with w.c. Available 6 weeks, 22 July--2 Sept.
Price negotiable. Tel.: Oxford 725193.

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Accommodation Offered

Bed-and-breakfast available in the warm
comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple in
exclusive leafy central North Oxford; within easy walking
distance of the city centre and all main university
buildings; a stone's throw from the river, parks,
excellent pubs and restaurants and a 9--9 corner shop.All rooms have colour TV, microwave, tea- and
coffee-making facilities, c.h., and independent
heating.
Refrigerators available. Very moderate terms. Tel./fax:
Oxford 557879, mobile: 0374 434489.

Very spacious west-facing room with
balcony, Woodstock Road. Ideal for city centre, Radcliffe
Infirmary, and University. Non-smoker. Available now
until 30 June 1998. £80 p.w. Tel./fax: Oxford
513688.

Superb new hotel, 1.5 miles from city
centre. 16 en suite bedrooms; telephone, TV with Sky,
fridge, kitchenette, mini-bar. Parking. Tourist
Board---highly commended; RAC---highly acclaimed; AA---4
Qs. Single £59.50, double/twin £69.50, per room
per night. Discounts for long-stay guests. Marlborough
House Hotel, 321 Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 7NY, tel.:
Oxford 311321, fax: 515329, e-mail:
enquiries@marlbhouse.win-uk.net, Web site:
http://www.oxlink.co.uk/oxford/hotels/marlborough.html.

>

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Accommodation Sought

Senior visiting fellow at Wadham seeks 1
or 2-bedroom flat for Michaelmas Term 1998. Oxford
contact: W.E.S. Thomas, tel.: Oxford 557972, e-mail:
tball@polisci.umn.edu.

Visiting US Anthropology professor,
spouse, and well-behaved son (18)---tidy, quiet,
responsible, non-smoking and non-drinking family---seek
furnished accommodation to rent from 15 Aug. (or 1
Sept.)--31 Dec. 1998. Preferably near central Oxford, but
Summertown, Headington, and Botley readily considered.
Need 2 bedrooms, study area, and kitchen. Dates can be
flexible. Local contact: Mr Paul Kerry, St John's
College, tel.: Oxford 559288, e-mail:
paul.kerry@st-johns.oxford.ac.uk.

Going abroad? Or just thinking of
letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's
foremost letting agents and property managers. We
specialise in lettings to both academic and professional
individuals and their families, and have a constant flow
of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property
in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our
services, or if you simply need some informal help and
advice without obligation, telephone us: Oxford 764533,
fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk.
Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site
at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be
marketing your property.

Cottage wanted by female Oxford Academic
for 2--4 weeks, end June/early July. Preferably in Brill,
or village south-east of Oxford. Please e-mail:
lucycarp@enter.uu.imul.com.

Three-bedroom furnished flat or house
sought by academic couple with 2 children (11 and 9),
visiting Wolfson College; early Aug.--mid Jan. 1999.
Preferably North Oxford. Reply to Prof. David Wood, Law
Faculty, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria
3052, Australia. Tel.: +61 3 9344 6192, fax: 9347 2392,
e-mail: d.wood@law.unimelb.edu.au.

Visiting academic seeks 2-bedroom
furnished flat to rent, 22 June--5 Aug., preferably close
to Pembroke/St Peter's. Wife and child (3 years) visiting
part time. Non-smokers, local references available. James
Basker, Columbia University, tel.: 212 531 3732, fax: 663
9169, e-mail: oxbadmin@interport.com.

Academic couple with 2 young children
planning a 1 year sabbatical in Oxford from November 1998
seeks furnished 3-bedroom house with garden, preferably
in North-central Oxford, but other locations considered.
Monthly rental up to £800. Local references
available. Contact Dr Quentin Sattentau, 9 Traverse des
Zephyrs, 13007 Marseille, France, tel./fax: +33 491 26
9494, e-mail: sattenta@ciml.univ-mrs.fr.

Finders Keepers specialises in managing
your home or investment. We have celebrated 25 years in
Oxford letting and managing properties---try us first!
Many of our landlords have remained with us since we
opened and are delighted with our service---why not pop
in and read their comments? Contact Finders Keepers, 73
Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE. Tel.: Oxfordd 311011, fax:
556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk, Internet site:
http://www.finders.co.uk.

American visiting fellow, spouse, and
boys 12 and 14 seek fully-furnished 3- or 4-bedroom house
in Oxford or environs, from 19 June through 20 Aug. 1998.
Children will be present for 3 weeks only. Please contact
in USA: D. Matthews, 6514 Kalama Road, Kapaa, Hawaii
96746, tel.: 808 821 0479, fax: 808 821 1193, e-mail:
dbm@aloha.net.

Mallams Residential Letting is well
placed to help with your letting and management
requirements. Based in Summertown, we offer a
professional service tailored to your individual
requirements. If you are thinking of letting your
property, please call us. Tel.: Oxford 311006, fax:
311977.

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section



Accommodation Exchange

Summer, Paris: flat exchange for a
family. History/French teacher offers large,
well-situated flat in Paris 14 (inc. parking) for
exchange with house (with garden, if possible) in Oxford,
27 June--17 Jul. Mme Zographos, tel.: 00 33 1 45 40 72 66
(eve.).

House exchange,
UK--California/Mediterranean. Two-week period between
late July and late Aug. Traditional, well-renovated house
(main part is 18th-c.) in centre of Eynsham village, 6
miles to Oxford with excellent bus service. Four
bedrooms, sitting-room, dining-room. We (academic couple,
14 year-old daughter, 2 year-old son) seek suitably-sized
house not too far from the sea. Tel.: 00 44 865 880142
(home), 483951 (work), fax: 483937 (FAO: Jeremy
MacClancy), e-mail: jmacclancy@brookes.ac.uk.

Vancouver family (Univ. of British
Columbia professor, wife, and 5-year-old daughter) seeks
to trade houses with another (non-smoking) family for
approx. 3-month period, Apr.--Aug. 1999. We have a
lovely, spacious California-style house, 5 minutes from
UBC, 15 minutes from the downtown, 20 minutes from
Vancouver International Airport, and a short block to a
beautiful sandy beach (Spanish Banks) and other
recreational amenities. We would need a house or large
flat, in Oxford or close by, with reasonably good access
to public transport. Dr T.A. Hutton, 4554 Belmont Avenue,
Vancouver, V6R 1C4, British Columbia, Canada. Tel.: 604
228 9592, fax: 604 822 6164.

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section



Accommodation Sought to Rent or
Exchange

Visiting academic (with children 9 and
13) seeks 2/3-bedroom furnished house or flat, inside
ring road, central preferred. Sept. 1998--Mar. 1999. Can
exchange 4(+)-bedroom luxury home with large private pool
and amenities in Phoenix, Arizona. Fax: 0101 602 5436004,
e-mail john.corrigan@asu.edu.

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section



Holiday Lets

French Massif Central: beautiful big
family house to rent; sleeps 8. Five bedrooms,
living-room with fireplace, playing room wtih piano, 2
bathrooms, kitchen, fully equipped and furnished,
telephone, no TV. In a wonderful area, views, hamlet 5
minutes' drive to La Bourboule, 1 hour drive to Clermont
Ferrand airport. 4,000 francs p.w. July, Aug. Mme.
Zographos, tel.: 00 33 1 45 40 72 66 (eve.).

Flat in central St Petersburg, 10
minutes' walk from the Hermitage, could take 3 people.
Available after mid-July. £100 p.w. For further
information (and about cheap flights) contact Derek
Parfit, All Souls College. Tel.: Oxford (2)79282
(afternoon/eve.), e-mail:
derek.parfit@all-souls.ox.ac.uk.

South-west France (Tarn et Garonne):
traditionally-restored farmhouse and outbuildings in
peaceful hilltop hamlet with fine views over unspoilt
countryside, close to medieval market town on river
Aveyron. Sleeps 8+. Small pool; large south-facing garden
with some shade. Available Aug. Tel.: 0118 987 3095.

Enjoy a holiday in a charming villa or
cottage on the islands of Skopelos, Skiathos, and
Alonissos. Many with enclosed yards and close to the sea.
Weekly prices start from £76 per person in May. For
brochure, tel.: 0030 424 22947, fax: 424 23057, e-mail:
thalpos@otenet.gr.

Burgundy (Morvan National Park): 19th-c.
stone cottage in quiet hamlet. Sleeps 5+. Enclosed front
and rear gardens backing onto own large meadow with
streams. Spacious sitting-room, 2 double bedrooms, study,
bathroom, fully-equipped kitchen, washing machine, c.h.,
telephone, log fires. Ideal for peace and quiet, walking,
swimming in nearby lakes, wine-tasting and sight-seeing
in Burgundy (half hour from Vézelay and Avallon).
Available 9 Aug.--3 Sept. £250 p.w. Tel.: Oxford
556626.

Fisherman's cottage on the saewall at
Newport, Pembrokeshire. A family holiday home, child- and
dog-friendly; the front door opens onto the coastal path
and beach with wonderful views across the estuary. Good
for sailing, walking, and golf. Electric heaters and open
fires. Sleeps 6. Good local shops and restuarants. Rates
(inc. electricity) from £115--£290 p.w. or
£25 per night off-season. Tel.: Oxford 714943.

Umbria, Italy: luxury flat in tranquil
rural setting. Sleeps 2--4. Large terrace, private
garden, stunning views. Perugia 15 minutes, Assisi 30
minutes, Florence and Siena 2 hours. Tel.: 01252 877155
(eve.).

Provencal fortified farmhouse in tiny
rural village surrounded by lavender fields offers B&B or
half-board. There is also a 3-bedroom apartment with
kitchenette and sitting-room---ideal for writer/artist or
academic on sabatical leave; short or long stays
possible. Contact Karolyn Kauntze, Montsalier, 04150
Banon, France. Tel./fax: 00 33 4 92 73 23 61.

Verona outskirts: in exceptionally
beautiful 15th-c. villa, self-contained ground-floor
flat; large double bed-sitting, kitchen/dining and bath
rooms; garden area; parking; frequent buses from door to
city centre. £300 p.w., inc. services and weekly
cleaning. Available from 1 May, except Aug. Tel.: 00 39
452 6499, or (Moore) 01844 238247.

Fethiye, Turkey: new apartments 5
minutes to beach sleeping max. 4; pool, bar/restaurant,
entertainments; English/Turkish owners. From only
£140 p.w. per apartment. Tel./fax: 01202 737202.

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section



Houses for Sale

Pembrokeshire Coast National Park. One
half share offered in beautiful holiday chalet on quiet
managed countryside site at Roch near Newgale and St
Davids. Miles of golden beaches, abundant wildlife, clear
seas, and lovely villages. Tenby, Pembroke, and
Haverfordwest within easy reach. Two bedrooms, lounge,
kitchenette, bathroom. Fully equipped. Freehold. Unique
opportunity. £7,550. Contact Dr Ian Brown, tel.:
Oxford 798379 or 01978 821090.

Luxury 2-bedroom apartment at the top of
a Victorian house in Summertown, affording splendid views
of Wytham woods. First-quality workmanship and original
features, inc. spacious sitting-room, dining-room,
kitchen, bathroom, and cloakroom. Offers above
£180,000. Tel.: Oxford 510362.

Three-bedroom Victorian terrace house in
East Oxford, close to city centre and near bus route.
Sitting-room, kitchen-diner, large cellar and roof space.
Gas c.h. with new boiler. Good decorative condition.
£110,000. Tel.: 01404 841591 (eve.).

Cottage for sale in France: Montsoreau,
near Saumur. Superb view over the Loire in an attractive
small village near shops. Downstairs: large
living-room/kitchen, bedroom, washroom/toilet, shower,
workroom/storage space. Upstairs: large bedroom with
study area, en suite bathroom/shower/toilet. Attic (could
be developed); double cellar cut into hillside. Vacant
possession. £30,000 o.n.o. Contact Prof. and Mrs B.
P. Reardon, 6 Impasse des Jonquilles, 14780 Lion-sur-Mer.
Tel./fax: +33 2 31 36 08 56, e-mail:
bryan.reardon@wanadoo.fr.

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section



Properties for sale at Oxford
Waterside

Central North Oxford/Jericho.
Classically styled homes built by nationally renowned
quality house-builders, Berkeley Homes. Properties
available include: 2-bedroom apartments from
£118,500; 3-bedroom, 2-bathroom houses from
£169,500; 4-bedroom, 3-storey houses with garages
from £275,000. Marketing suite and show homes open
daily, 10 a.m.--5 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 311449, or
726000/515000 (joint selling agents, Savills and Thomas
Merrifield).

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section






<br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette: Diary, 8 May<br /> - 19 May

Diary


Contents of this section:

Academic Staff
Development Seminars
: places should be booked in advance through
the Staff Development Office, University Offices,
Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

For the full list of courses, see the HREF="http://admin.ox.ac.uk/training/">Staff Development
ProgrammeWeb site.

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Contents Page of this issue



Friday 8 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM study-day: `Exploring the Baroque: the
Weldon Gallery redesigned', 9.30 a.m.--4 p.m. (Cost:
£16. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--12.30
p.m.)

PROFESSOR J. VISCOMI: `Making Blake's books, The
Marriage of Heaven and Hell
, and the WWW Blake
archive' (seminar, related to McKenzie Lecture), Seminar
Room C, St John's, 12 noon.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `A birdwatcher's guide
to the Ashmolean', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for
bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--1 p.m.)

DR G. TER HAAR: `The African religious diaspora in
Europe: migration and identity' (seminar series:
`Transnational communities, diasporas, and
globalisation'), Lecture Room, Christ Church, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR M. ALBROW: `Frames and transformations in
transnational studies' (ESRC Research Programme in
Transnational Communities: `Conceiving transnational
activity'), Upper Lecture Theatre, School of Geography, 2
p.m.

SIR MARTIN WOOD: `Superconductivity, eighty-seven
years on—where's it going?' (Cherwell–Simon
Lecture), Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building,
4.30 p.m.

CANON ERIC JAMES: `Spirituality, Shakespeare, and
royalty: has the monarchy a future?' (Eric Symes Abbott
Memorial Lecture), the chapel, Keble, 5.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. WEISBERG: `Vichy law and the Holocaust in
France' (Socio-Legal Studies Annual Lecture), Room 6,
Examination Schools, 5.30 p.m.

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Sunday 10 May

DR JANET MARTIN SOSKICE preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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Monday 11 May

DR S. HOWE: `The 1798 Irish Revolution and its
bicentenary: politics, memory, and history' (Ruskin
College Politics Forum---public lectures), Raphael Samuel
Hall, Ruskin College, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR R.J.W. EVANS (Regius Professor of Modern
History): `The language of history and the history of
language' (inaugural lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR J. ASHTON: `Paul the possessed' (Wilde Lectures:
`The religion of the apostle Paul'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR M. SANDEL: `Commodification,
commercialisation, and privatisation' (Tanner Lectures on
Human Values: `What money can't buy: the moral limits of
markets'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. FRYKENBERG: `Nayakas, Rayats, and
Zamindars: political contributions to India's
constitution' (Radhakrishnan Memorial Lectures: `India's
Raj: indigenous components and the imperial construction
of India'), Schools, 5 p.m.

R. RASHED: `Arab science and classical modernity'
(lecture), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

STEVEN ISSERLIS and
wThomas Ades perform works for cello and piano by Bach,
Suk, Janacek, Kodaly, and Barber, Garden Quadrangle
Auditorium, St John's, 8.30 p.m. (admission by free
programme, available from the Porters' Lodge, St John's).

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Tuesday 12 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Illustrators of the
1860s' (special exhibition), 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50.
Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--1 p.m.)

PROFESSOR E.R. MAY (Harmsworth Professor of American
History): `Shaping forces in American foreign policy'
(inaugural lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR M. SANDEL: `Markets, morals, and the public
sphere' (Tanner Lectures on Human Values: `What money
can't buy: the moral limits of markets'), Schools, 5 p.m.

R. ATTFIELD: `Environmental sensitivity and the
critiques of stewardship' (Oxford Centre for the
Environment, Ethics, and Society seminars: second of
three seminars on Ecology and Theology), Council Room,
Mansfield, 5 p.m.

R. RASHED: `Descartes entre al-Khayam et Newton'
(lecture), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR F. LENGER: `Unwelcome traditions: the debate
about the "Völkish" roots of social history in
Germany' (public lecture), New Lecture Theatre, St
Antony's, 8.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. DE VRIES: `Did a consumer culture emerge
before the Industrial Revolution?' (Seminar in Social and
Cultural History, 1500--1800), Hovenden Room, All Souls,
8.30 p.m.

THE DUKE STRING QUARTET perform works by Kevin Volans,
Peter Koene, and Bartók, the chapel, Trinity
College, 8.30 p.m. (admission free).

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Wednesday 13 May

C. FRANKLIN: `The Bowdlers and their family Shakespeare'
(Friends of the Bodleian thirty-minute lecture), Cecil
Jackson Room, Sheldonian, 1 p.m.

P.D. JAMES: `Mystery and mayhem: the craft of the
detective story' (Richard Hillary Memorial Lecture), St
Cross Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR L. SKLAR: `Idealisation and representation'
(John Locke Lectures: `Philosophy within science'),
Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR W.B. DREES: `From nothing until now: faith
in the natural history of our universe' (Idreos Lectures
in Science and Religion), Harris Manchester, 5 p.m.

DR M. CERNEA: `Economics, the private sector, and
human rights: open issues in population resettlement'
(Refugee Studies Programme: Elizabeth Colson Lecture),
Rhodes House, 5 p.m.

DR I. ZWEINIGER-BARGIELOWSKA: `The citizen housewife:
women under austerity in the 1940s' (interdisciplinary
seminars: `Gender and the public/private divide'),
Seminar Room, Nuffield, 5 p.m.

DR S. MUELLER-WILLE: `Collectors, system-builders and
world-wide commerce: the epistemic functions of
collection in Linnaean botany' (seminar series:
`Collection and comparison in the sciences'), Museum of
the History of Science, 5 p.m.

D. RIBARD and
A. Viala: `Fontenelle au carrefour: histoire,
philosophie, sciences et littérature' (first of
three meetings: `Histoire et littérature:
France—Ancien Régime'), Maison
Française, 5 p.m.

ACADEMICIAN M.L. GASPAROV: `Analysis v. interpretation: two poems
by Osip Mandelstam about Gothic cathedrals' (in English) (Taylor
Institution Sesquicentennial Lectures: `Languages and literatures
of Europe'), Lecture Hall, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

UNIVERSITY CLUB wine-tasting: Burgundies, 5.45 p.m. (admission
£2).

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Thursday 14 May

CHRIST CHURCH Picture Gallery exhibition opens: `The Key to
the Door', by Oxford Printmakers (exhibition for Oxford Artweek;
until 11 June).

PROFESSOR J. FENTON (Professor of Poetry): `D.H. Lawrence'
(lecture series: `Three Poets: D.H. Lawrence, Robert Lowell, Ted
Hughes'), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 2 p.m.

DR C. CONNAL: `The Devi and the Bandit Queen: a cross-
disciplinary approach to the question of women's roles' (Centre
for Cross-Cultural Research on Women seminars), Queen Elizabeth
House, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. SINGER: `Ethics and the treatment of animals'
(lecture series in the history and philosophy of biology),
Sherrington Room, Department of Physiology, 4 p.m.

THE REVD DR ALAN TORRANCE: `The body of Christ and the
reconciled mind' (Hensley Henson Lectures in Theology: `The
Christ of history and the open society'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR W.B. DREES: `Spirituality or superstition? Criteria
for quality in science, religion, and popular culture' (Idreos
Lectures in Science and Religion), Harris Manchester, 5 p.m.

N. SHAPIRA and
M. Bombart: `L'étrange Balzac (Jean-Louis Guez de) et
l'histoire' (second of three meetings: `Histoire et
littérature: France—Ancien Régime'), Keble, 5
p.m.

DR J. ROCHE: `Harriot, Oxford, and twentieth-century
historiography' (Thomas Harriot Lecture), Champneys Room, Oriel,
5 p.m.

THE RT. HON. PETER MANDELSON, MP: `Beyond the Dome'
(introduced by the Cameron Mackintosh Professor, Thelma Holt,
CBE), Bernard Sunley Lecture, St Catherine's, 5 p.m.

MRS H. BROWN: ` "Vom ertrunkenen Mädchen" /
"The drowned girl" in Baal and the
Hauspostille' (The Brecht Centenary in
Oxford—Streit und Gelächter: a seminar on
Brecht's poetry), Lecture Room 6, New College, 5.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR STEIN RINGEN: `Precariousness, social assistance,
and social work' (lecture), E.P. Abraham Lecture Theatre, Green
College, 6 p.m.

M. SOUTHCOTT: `Labour and electoral reform' (Ruskin College
Politics Forum---public lectures), Raphael Samuel Hall, Ruskin
College, 7.30 p.m.

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Friday 15 May

ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Dealing with the media—advanced
(television and crisis management)', 9.30 a.m. ( HREF="#seminars">see information above).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Still life painting', 1.15
p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--1
p.m.)

THE ALLEGRI STRING QUARTET (with Dominique Wong-Min, piano)
perform works by Haydn and Dvorák, Holywell Music Room, 1
p.m. (tickets £5/£2.50 from Blackwell's Music Shop or
at the door).

RABBI DR NORMAN SOLOMON: `The dialectic of universal and
particular in modern Judaism' (seminar series: `Transnational
communities, diasporas, and globalisation'), Lecture Room, Christ
Church, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR K. ROBINS: `Spaces of global media' (ESRC Research
Programme in Transnational Communities: `Conceiving transnational
activity'), Upper Lecture Theatre, School of Geography, 2 p.m.

C. JOUHAUD and
D. Blocker: `History and literature: prospects' (third of
three meetings: `Histoire et littérature:
France—Ancien Régime'), Wadham, 5 p.m.

S. MENDES and

S. Russell-Beale: `Thersites, Richard III, Ariel,
Iago---creating a Shakespearian character on stage' (introduced
by the Cameron Mackintosh Professor, Thelma Holt, CBE), Bernard
Sunley Lecture, St Catherine's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J.-C. COLLIARD: `Les quarante ans de la
Cinquième République—La Cohabitation: trois
expériences' (lecture), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

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Saturday 16 May

FRANCO-BRITISH colloquium (various speakers): `Révolution:
arts, sciences, politique', Maison Française, 9.30
a.m.–6 p.m. (continues tomorrow).

LORD NOLAN: `Government, ethics, and the law' (Blackstone
Lecture), Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 11.30
a.m.

JULIET ALLEN performs piano works by Beethoven, Tippett, and
Brahms, Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, St Anne's, 8 p.m. (free
tickets available on application to College Secretary).

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Sunday 17 May

THE REVD DR SUSAN DURBER preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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Monday 18 May

P. HUDIS: `The philosophy of Marxist-humanism' (Ruskin College
Politics Forum---public lectures), Raphael Samuel Hall, Ruskin
College, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. FRYKENBERG: `Munshis, Pandits, and Vakils:
cultural contributions to India's consolidation' (Radhakrishnan
Memorial Lectures: `India's Raj: indigenous components and the
imperial construction of India'), Schools, 5 p.m.

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Tuesday 19 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Aspects of conservation', 1.15
p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--1
p.m.)

CONGREGATION meeting, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR VERA C. RUBIN: `What Halley didn't know about the
universe' (Halley Lecture), Lecture Theatre, University Museum, 5
p.m.

DR H. KAMMINGA: `Medical models of causation: the case of the
discovery of vitamin deficiency diseases' (lecture series in the
history and philosophy of biology), Sherrington Room, Department
of Physiology, 5 p.m.

I. BRADLEY: `God is Green—or is He? Thoughts on
Christianity, the churches, and the environment' (Oxford Centre
for the Environment, Ethics, and Society seminars: last of three
seminars on Ecology and Theology), Council Room, Mansfield, 5
p.m.

PROFESSOR QUENTIN SKINNER: `The imagery of government in the
Italian Renaissance' (Henry Rowlatt Bickley Memorial Lecture),
Mordan Hall, St Hugh's, 5.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. DARNTON: `Policing a poem in Paris, 1749'
(Seminar in Social and Cultural History, 1500--1800), Hovenden
Room, All Souls, 8.30 p.m.

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