6 May 1999 - No 4510

Oxford University Gazette

6 May 1999


 


University Health and Safety information

 


Return to Gazette Home Page


University Acts

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue


CONGREGATION 3 May

Degree by Special Resolution

No notice to the contrary having been received under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1997, p. 15), the following resolution is deemed to have been approved at noon on 3 May.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

LESLEY ELEANOR FORBES, St Cross College

Return to List of Contents of this section


HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL

1 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts under the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. v, cl. 1 (Statutes, 1997, p. 367) has been accorded to the following person who is qualified for membership of Congregation:

 

MARCELLINUS MARIA THEODORUS ANTONIUS BRUS, Lincoln College

Return to List of Contents of this section


2 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of Congregation:

Brus, M.M.T.A., MA status, Lincoln
Forbes, L., MA, St Cross

Return to List of Contents of this section


BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 21 May, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

Return to List of Contents of this section


University Agenda

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue


Notices

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue


GENERAL BOARD OF THE FACULTIES

The General Board of the Faculties has co-opted R.C.S. WALKER, B.PHIL., MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Magdalen College, to membership of the Board for the academic year 1999–2000.

Return to List of Contents of this section


DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS

Statistical Consulting Service

The Department of Statistics runs a consulting service available to members of the University. The consulting officer is Dr Mario Cortina Borja, who may be contacted at the department (telephone: Oxford (2)72597, fax: (2)72595, e-mail: cortina@stats.ox.ac.uk).

Return to List of Contents of this section


CIRCULATION OF FLYSHEETS

Ten or more members of Congregation may arrange to have a flysheet circulated with the Gazette (a) on matters before Congregation, or Convocation in regard to the election of the Professor of Poetry, or (b) relating to matters of general interest to the University, subject to the following general conditions:

(i) no flysheet will be circulated which in the opinion of the Vice-Chancellor and Proctors might be defamatory or otherwise illegal;

(ii) the right is reserved on behalf of the University and its employees, without prior consultation with the signatories, to publish an apology in respect of any statement in a flysheet which is complained of as defamatory or otherwise illegal (whether or not the statement can be shown to be true);

(iii) the signatories shall jointly and severally indemnify the University and its employees against any costs or damages payable in respect of their flysheet and, unless a Queen's Counsel (to be mutually agreed on by the signatories and the University) shall advise within four months of the making of any claim in respect of a flysheet that any proceedings could be contested with the probability of success, such damages shall include any sum paid by the University in settlement of any claim arising out of the flysheet;

(iv) the flysheet shall consist of one leaf only (though text may appear on both sides of the leaf); the text shall include the name and college or department of each of the signatories;

(v) a copy of the text of the flysheet shall be delivered to the Registrar before 10 a.m. on the Monday of the week in which circulation is desired; it shall be accompanied by an indemnity in accordance with condition (iii) above drawn up on a form obtainable from the Registrar and signed by each of the signatories of the flysheet; the Registrar shall be informed at the same time which of the signatories is to be notified whether the Vice-Chancellor and Proctors have authorised circulation;

(vi) the Registrar shall arrange for the production by the University Press of copies of a flysheet the circulation of which has been duly authorised.

Though every effort will be made to circulate on the day desired flysheets so received, it must be understood that this cannot be guaranteed.

(a) Matters before Congregation or Convocation

If the flysheet deals with a matter that is a formal agendum for Congregation, or for Convocation in regard to the election of the Professor of Poetry, or the subject of a report published in the Gazette, the production costs will be met from university funds.

(b) Matters of general interest to the University

If the flysheet deals with a matter that is not a formal agendum for Congregation or the subject of a report published in the Gazette, the Vice-Chancellor will decide whether it is of sufficient general interest to warrant circulation with the Gazette; the production costs for such a flysheet will be the responsibility of the signatories.

Oxford University Student Union

The Executive and the Graduate Committee of the Oxford University Student Union may have flysheets circulated with the Gazette under the arrangements and subject to the conditions set out above, provided that:

(1) the number of names to be included on the flysheet under condition (iv) shall be not less than a majority of the total number of members of the Executive or the Graduate Committee of OUSU, as the case may be, and each of the persons named shall sign the indemnity required under condition (v);

(2) the maximum number of flysheets to be circulated as of right, whether on matters before Congregation (to be paid for by the University) or on matters of general interest to the University (to be paid for by OUSU and to be subject to the Vice-Chancellor's decision as prescribed under (b) above) shall be three per term for each of these bodies, save that the Vice-Chancellor shall have discretion to permit further flysheets.

Subject to proviso (1) above, the Executive and the Graduate Committee of OUSU may also support flysheets signed by not less than ten members of Congregation.

Return to List of Contents of this section


ISIS INNOVATION LIMITED

2 South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3UB

Isis Innovation, a wholly-owned company of the University, was established in 1988. The company has been formed to exploit know-how arising out of research funded by the UK Government through the Research Councils and funded by other bodies where the rights are not tied. The function of the company is to ensure that the results of research bring rewards to Oxford, and to the inventors, who are given a financial incentive for exploitation.

Isis seeks licensees willing to pay lump sums and/or royalties for the use of know-how arising out of research. Isis also exploits the intellectual property of the University by setting up individual companies using venture capital or development capital funds.

Isis' services are also available to individuals who wish to exploit the results of research supported by non-Research Council sources, when there are no prior conditions on the handling of the intellectual property rights. Isis Innovation has at its disposal a small pre-seedcorn fund for paying the costs of protecting intellectual property rights and for taking work to a stage where its potential can be assessed.

Isis finds industrial partners to ensure that new ideas can be developed for market requirements. The company has established the Oxford Innovation Society for major industrial companies, so that they can have a window on Oxford technology and an opportunity to license and invest where appropriate.

A brochure explaining Isis' activities is available. Please contact the above address, or the telephone and fax numbers given below.

Members of the University should contact the Managing Director if they wish to take advantage of the services that Isis provides. (Telephone: (2)72411; fax: (2)72412.)

Return to List of Contents of this section


CONCERTS

Concerts by the Band of Instruments

THE BAND OF INSTRUMENTS, with the New Chamber Opera, will perform Mozart's early opera Bastien und Bastienne at 8.30 p.m. on Wednesday, 12 May, in the chapel, New College. Tickets, costing £6 (concessions £4), will be available at the door.

THE BAND OF INSTRUMENTS will perform `Music from Haydn's London', by J.C. Bach, Haydn, Storace, Linley, and Mozart, at 8.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 18 May, in the chapel, New College. Tickets, costing £10 (concessions £6), may be obtained from the Playhouse, Beaumont Street, or at the door.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Wolfson College

Pushkin in Music: Alexander Pushkin 1799–1837

The internationally acclaimed soloists VASSILY SAVENKO (bass- baritone) and BORIS BEREZOVSKY (piano) will perform Pushkin settings by Glinka, Dargomyzhsky, Borodin, Rimsky-Korsakov, Glazunov, Arensky, Medtner, and Rachmaninov, at 8.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 18 May, in Wolfson College. Admission costs £6 (concessions £3), including light refreshments. Proceeds go to the college charity, AMREF (the African Medical and Research Foundation).

Return to List of Contents of this section


Lectures

Contents of this section:

Return to Contents Page of this issue


INAUGURAL LECTURES

J.R.R. Tolkien Professor of English Literature and Language

PROFESSOR P. STROHM will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 13 May, in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `Chaucer's Troilus as temporal archive.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


Harold Vyvyan Harmsworth Professor of American History

PROFESSOR A. BRINKLEY will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 18 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Imagining the twentieth century: perspectives from two fins-de-siècle.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


Vinerian Professor of English Law

PROFESSOR A.J. ASHWORTH will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 20 May, in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `Is criminal law a lost cause?'

Return to List of Contents of this section


Drue Heinz Professor of American Literature

PROFESSOR R. BUSH will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 27 May, in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `American voice/American voices.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


NEWTON-ABRAHAM LECTURE 1999

PROFESSOR I. MELLMAN, Yale University School of Medicine, Newton- Abraham Visiting Professor 1998–9, will deliver the Newton- Abraham Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 11 May, in the Lecture Theatre, the Department for Continuing Education.

Subject: `The cellular basis of biological asymmetry.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


GAISFORD LECTURE

PROFESSOR M.S. SILK, Professor of Greek and Latin Language and Literature, King's College, London, will deliver the Gaisford Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 20 May, in the Garden Quad Auditorium, St John's College.

Subject: `Space and solitude in Aristophanes.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


CHERWELL-SIMON MEMORIAL LECTURE 1999

PROFESSOR CARL E. WIEMAN, University of Colorado, will deliver the Cherwell-Simon Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Friday, 11 June, in Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building, South Parks Road.

Subject: `Bose–Einstein condensation: revealing the quantum world using ultra-low temperatures.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


HALLEY LECTURE 1999

PROFESSOR ROBERT E. WILLIAMS, Distinguished Research Scholar, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Maryland, will deliver the Halley Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 18 May, in Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building, South Parks Road.

Subject: `Probing the universe with the Hubble Space Telescope.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


D.M. MCKENZIE LECTURE

PROFESSOR L. RAINEY will deliver the fourth annual D.M. McKenzie Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 26 May, in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `The cultural economy of modernism.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


MYRES MEMORIAL LECTURE

DR O. RACKHAM, Cambridge, will deliver the Myres Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 10 May, in the McGregor-Matthews Room, New College.

Subject: `Trees and timber in Greek history.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


CLARENDON LECTURES IN MANAGEMENT STUDIES

The determinants of corporate governance

PROFESSOR M. ROE, Milton Hawler Professor of Business Regulation, University of Columbia School of Law, will deliver the Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies at 5 p.m. on Monday, 10 May, Tuesday, 11 May, and Wednesday, 12 May, in the Examination Schools. The lectures will be open to the public, and admission is free.

Return to List of Contents of this section


SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES ANNUAL LECTURE

PROFESSOR L. ROSEN, Professor of Anthropology, Princeton University, will deliver the fifth Annual Lecture in Socio-Legal Studies at 5.30 p.m. on Friday, 14 May, in the Examination Schools. The lecture will be followed by a reception at 6.30 p.m.

Subject: `Defending culture: the cultural defence plea and judicial uses of the concept of culture.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


HUSSEY LECTURES ON THE CHURCH AND THE ARTS 1999

JOHN TAVENER, composer, will deliver the Hussey annual lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 11 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Hymn of entry.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


THOMAS HARRIOT LECTURE 1999

SCOTT MANDELBROTE, Cambridge, will deliver the Thomas Harriot Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 20 May, in the Champneys Room, Oriel College.

Subject: `The religion of Thomas Harriot.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

International Knowledge Partnership: Health and Environment

Sharing knowledge about malaria for greater impact (health and the environment: a multidisciplinary approach to knowledge management about malaria)

This meeting will be held from 2 p.m. on Wednesday, 19 May, in the E.P. Abraham Lecture Theatre, Green College. The meeting will end with a discussion panel of all the speakers, chaired by Dr Muri Gray, 5–5.30 p.m.

Admission is free; 100 places are avaiable, to be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. Application should be made to Miss Liz Pearce, Secretary to the Director, Oxford Forestry Institute, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RB (fax: Oxford (2)75074, e-mail: liz.pearce@plants.ox.ac.uk).

The meeting is organised in association with the University's Environmental Liaison Group, Action for Safe Motherhood, and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

DR C. PYPER, Honorary Chair, International Knowledge Partnership
2 p.m.: `Introduction—the International Knowledge Partnership.'

DR M. DOBSON, Wellcome Unit
2.05 p.m.: `Historical aspects—learning from past experience.'

PROFESSOR D. BRADLEY, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
2.20 p.m.: `Medical perspective—where is malaria today?'

PROFESSOR C. NEWBOLD
2.35 p.m.: `Immunological perspective—progress in developing a malaria vaccine.'

PROFESSOR J. BURLEY
2.50 p.m.: `Information systems—the Global Forest Information System (an example from natural resources and the environment).'

D.J. ROGERS and S. HAY
3.05 p.m.: `Climatic change—improving knowledge management of vector borne diseases: are we in a position to predict malaria epidemics?'

DR T. DOWNING
3.20 p.m.: `Climatic change—climate change, sustainable development, and health: the large trends and threats.'

DR G. BODEKER
3.50 p.m.: `Traditional antimalarials—endogenous and exogenous knowledge about malaria management.'

V. SMITH, Reading
4.05 p.m.: `Rural appraisal—gathering knowledge about rural resources.'

DR A.M. ALMEDOM, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
4.20 p.m.: `Maternal health and malaria—using participatory rural appraisal for improving maternal health.'

DR D. TURTON
4.35 p.m.: `Refugee aspects—sharing knowledge about the management of displaced persons.'

DR M. GRAY, Director, Institute of Health Sciences
4.50 p.m.: `The future—the quality of knowledge: interpretation; storage and dissemination.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


CLINICAL MEDICINE

Nuffield Department of Surgery: Immunology Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Seminar Room, Level 6, the Nuffield Department of Surgery, the John Radcliffe Hospital.

DR G. HALE
11 May: `Elimination of the immunogenicity of therapeutic antibodies.'

DR D. ROBINSON, National Heart and Lung Institute, London
18 May: `IL-5 in asthma and receptor regulation during eosinophil development.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


Nuffield Department of Surgery: Clinical Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Seminar Room, Level 6, the Nuffield Department of Surgery, the John Radcliffe Hospital.

MR T. HUSSEIN
25 May: `The results of phenol sympathectomy in peripheral vascular disease.'

MISS D. PHILLIPS
1 June: `Past, present, and future management of the claudicating patient.'

DR B. CASADEI
8 June: `Sympathectomy improves exercise performance and skeletal muscle bioenergenetics in patients with idiopathic hyperhidrosis.'

DR A. BOLIA, Leicester Royal Infirmary
15 June: `Subintimal angioplasty: methods and results.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


LITERAE HUMANIORES

Philosophy of Physics Seminars

The following seminars will take place at 4:15 p.m. on Fridays (unless otherwise specified) in the Lecture Room, Sub-Faculty of Philosophy, 10 Merton Street.

Conveners: G. Bacciagaluppi, J.N. Butterfield, H.R. Brown, S.W. Saunders.

DR H.R. BROWN
30 Apr.: `The Scope of Bell's Lorentzian Pedagogy in Spacetime Theory.'

DR C. HOEFER, LSE
7 May: `Enantiomorphy, Parity Violation, and Substantival Space.'

PROFESSOR M. DICKSON, Bloomington
14 May: `Abstract Algebra is Your Friend: Dirac's Derivation of the Quantum Lie Bracket and the Interpretation of Quantum Theory.'

PROFESSOR J. NORTON, Pittsburgh
21 May: `Einstein and the Canon of Mathematical Simplicity.'

PROFESSOR R. TORRETTI, Santiago
Wednesday, 26 May, 4.15 p.m.: `Gravity as Spacetime Curvature.'

PROFESSOR F. KRONZ, Austin
28 May: `Is There a Suitable Formal Framework for Bohm's Ontological Interpretation?'

DR C. BACCIAGALUPPI
4 June: `The Role of Decoherence in Quantum Theory' (to be confirmed).

DR J. CHRISTIAN
11 June: `Evenhanded Quantum Gravity v. the World as a Hologram.'

PROFESSOR D. BENDANIEL, Cornell
18 June: `The Definability of Fields: Linking Physics to Mathematical Foundations.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

Mathematical biology and ecology seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Fridays in the Higman Room, the Mathematical Institute.

Convener: P.K. Maini, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Mathematical Biology (telephone: Oxford (2)73553).

DR S. FEDOTOV, UMIST
7 May: `Travelling waves in reaction–diffusion system: generalised Fisher equation.'

DR A. FITT, Southampton
21 May: `Fluid flow in the anterior chamber of the eye.'

DR N. BURROUGHS, Warwick
11 June: `T-cell self-assessment: selection during an immune response.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


Oxford Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics

Differential Equations and Applications seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the common room, Dartington House. Details of the 20 May and 27 May seminars will be announced later. No seminar will be held on 10 June, as the Oxford/Cambridge Applied Mathematics Meeting will take place on that day.

The co-ordinators are J.R. Ockendon, S.D. Howison, and P.D. Howell (telephone: Oxford (2)70506).

PROFESSOR J.F. HARPER, VUW, New Zealand
6 May: `Why bubbles rise anomalously slowly in water with air present.'

DR A. SHARDLOW
13 May: `Stochastic partial differential equations with patterns.'

PROFESSOR M.J. WARD, UBC
3 June: `Summing logarithmic expansions for diffusion and low Reynolds number flow problems.'

DR S.P. DECENT, Birmingham
17 June: `The evolution of a liquid bridge.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

Goethe's voices—voices on Goethe

A Goethe day, to mark the 250th anniversary of the poet's birth, will be held on Saturday, 15 May. The morning session will take place in St Giles' House; the afternoon session will take place in the Mary Ogilvie Theatre, St Anne's College.

 

Conveners: T.J. Reed, MA, Taylor Professor of the German Language and Literature (morning session), and F.J. Lamport, MA, Faculty Lecturer in German.

 

Morning session: Goethe on sex and politics (two discussions introduced by short papers from visiting speakers)

PROFESSOR E. BOA, Nottingham, and DR M. BELL, King's College, London
9.15 a.m.: `Love and the sexes in Goethe.'

DR N. BOYLE, Cambridge, and DR J.R. WILLIAMS, St Andrews
11.15 a.m.: `Goethe and politics.'

Afternoon session (2.15–5 p.m.). `Stimmen von und über Goethe': an afternoon of dramatic and other readings.

 


 

Lieder-recital

UTA BUCHHEISTER (mezzo-soprano), winner of the 1997 Vienna Schubert Prize, will give a recital of settings of Goethe poems at 8 p.m. in the Jacqueline de Pré auditorium, St Hilda's College. Tickets are free to members of the University on application to the Modern Languages Faculty Office, 37 Wellington Square. Early application is recommended.

A public seminar on Goethe's poetry and other texts will be held in Michaelmas Term. Details will be announced later.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Italian graduate seminar

The following seminars and lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on the days shown.

Conveners: M.S. McLaughlin, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in Italian, and D. Zancani (Dott. Lett.), Faculty Lecturer in Italian.

PROFESSOR C. CIOCIOLA, Siena
Tue. 11 May, Room 2, Taylor Institution: `Jacopone da Todi e l'Arbor Amoris. Iconografia di una lauda, Iac. 78.' (Illustrated)

PROFESSOR F. SABATINI, Rome
Th. 20 May, Room 3, Taylor Institution: `L'italiano moderno dalla norma grammaticale alla testualità.' (Jointly with the Romance Linguistics Seminar)

DR D. SCARPA, Brussels
Tue. 1 June, Room 3, Taylor Institution: `Myth and universe in Calvino.'

DR N. TONELLI, Pisa
Tue. 8 June, Room S.7, 47 Wellington Square: `Petrarca, Properzio, e la struttura del Canzoniere.'

DR R. LOKAJ, Edinburgh
Tue. 15 June, Room S.7, 47 Wellington Square: `Petrarca, Familiares IV.1: un'ascesa francescana del Monte Ventoso.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


ORIENTAL STUDIES

DR T. HARPER, Leiden and SOAS, London, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 6 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Untameable Samurai: ten old men in the Great Vendetta of 1702.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Planetary Physics seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Thursdays in the Dobson Lecture Room, the Atmospheric Physics Laboratory. Because on rare occasions the arrangements need to be changed, anyone intending to come to Oxford specially to attend should check first by telephoning Oxford (2)72933.

PROFESSOR C.T. PILLINGER, Open University
6 May: `The Beagle 2 lander and the search for life on Mars.'

DR E. WOLFF, British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge
13 May: `Polar tropospheric chemistry past and present.'

DR R. CARLSON, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, CalTech
20 May: `The atmospheres of the Galilean satellites.'

DR M. JUCKES
27 May: `Linear baroclinic instability on various basic states.'

DR P. WOODWORTH, Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory, Bidston Observatory, Birkenhead
3 June: `Why we'd like to be able to measure the geoid from space with a gravity mission.'

DR D.L. SMITH,, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory
10 June: `Calibration of the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer for Envisat-1.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


Theoretical Particle Physics Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in the Nuclear and Astrophysics Lecture Theatre.

Conveners: Dr I. Kogan and Dr S. Sarkar.

PROFESSOR E. ALVAREZ, Univ. Autonoma, Madrid
7 May: `Confining strings.'

DR D.R.T. JONES, Liverpool
21 May: `Non-standard soft supersymmetry breaking.'

DR J. MAGUEIJO, Imperial College, London
4 June: `Cosmology with varying light speed.'

DR A. FARAGGI, Stanford
18 June: `The minimal superstring standard model.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


Physical Earth Science seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Fridays in the Earth Sciences coffee room.

Convener: Neil Mitchell.

C. CHAPMAN, Schlumberger Cambridge Research
7 May: `Will we ever be able to model seismic data? (An efficient method for calculating finite difference seismograms after model alterations.'

T. HENSTOCK, Southampton
21 May: `Long-term preservation of continental structure.'

A. GALY
4 June: `Tectonic and climate links in the Himalayas: the geochemical point of view.'

AGUSTIN UDIAS VALLINA, Universidad Complutense, Madrid
11 June: `Focal mechanism and tectonics of south Spain.'

G. ARMSTRONG
18 June: `Admitting to be coherent.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


SOCIAL STUDIES

Theories of Groups (Seminar)

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the New Seminar Room at St John's College.

Conveners: M. Bacharach, Professor of Economics, MA, D.Phil, D. Gambetta, Reader in Sociology, Ph.D., and G. Mackie, MA, JRF in Politics, St John's College.

R. BURT, University of Chicago and INSEAD (Paris)
29 Apr.: `The Network Structure of Reputation.'

S. GARROD, Glasgow
6 May: `Conversation, Coordination and Convention: The Role of Interaction in Forming Community-Wide Concepts.'

I. ERMAKOFF
13 May: `Collective Uncertainty and Group Alignment.'

C. BICCHIERI, Carnegie-Mellon University
20 May: `Social Learning, Informational Cascades, and the Dynamics of Norms.'

S. WILSON, State University of New York
27 May: `Gossip and other Forms of Talk as Group-Level Cognitive Adaptations.'

M. VAN VUGT, Southampton
3 June: `Community Identification in Scarce Resource Problems.'

D. SGROI
10 June: `Minority Groups: An Application of the Theory of Information Cascades.'

P. ABELL, London School of Economics
17 June: `Corporate Culture: A Balance between Competitive and Co-operative Relations.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


INTER-FACULTY COMMITTEE FOR AFRICAN STUDIES

African Studies Lecture 1999

THANDIKA MKANDAWIRE, Director, UNRISD, Geneva, will deliver the annual African Studies Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 13 May, in the Oakeshott Room, Lincoln College. The lecture will be followed by a reception in the senior common room, Nuffield College.

Subject: `Thinking about developmental states in Africa.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY

Rodney Porter Memorial Lecture

SIR JOHN GURDON, Chairman, Institute of Cancer and Developmental Biology, Cambridge, will deliver the second Rodney Porter Memorial Lecture at 4 p.m. on Thursday, 10 June, in the University/Pitt Rivers Museum. The lecture will be followed by a champagne reception. Further details may be obtained from Pauline Rudd (telephone: (2)75340), Fran Platt (telephone: (2)75725), or Kieran Clarke (telephone: (2)75255).

Subject: `From clones to signals: the redirection of cell fate.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


SAID BUSINESS SCHOOL

Conference on financial instability

This conference will be held on 9–10 July in Oxford. It is organised by the Oxford Financial Research Centre (the University's newly-established research centre in finance), the Oxford Review of Economic Policy, and the European Commission Training and Mobility of Researchers Network in Financial Markets.

Papers will be given on: the theory of financial crashes; credit risks; lessons from previous crises; links between financial markets and the real economy; international policy towards financial instability; the regulation of financial markets, and experience from different markets, including the Far East and Scandinavia.

A limited number of places is available. Those interested in attending should contact Elaine Durham, the Said Business School, 59 George Street, Oxford OX1 2BE (telephone: Oxford (2)88650, e-mail: elaine.durham@sbs.ox.ac.uk), by 28 May.

Return to List of Contents of this section


DEPARTMENT FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

Oxford Architectural History Seminar

LESLIE TOPP will give a seminar at 5.30 p.m. on Monday, 7 June, in the Vernon Harcourt Room, St Hilda's College.

Conveners: M.R. Airs, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Conservation and the Historic Environment, and G. Tyack, MA, M.Litt., Fellow, Kellogg College, and Director, Stanford University in Oxford.

 

Subject: `An inconspicuous building: Adolf Loos's Haus am Michaelerplatz in Vienna.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


RUSKIN SCHOOL OF DRAWING AND FINE ART, THEOLOGY

Art and the prophetic vision: art and theology on the eve of the millennium

The following will lecture in this series of meetings, to be held at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Examination Schools.

11 May: Mr Mark Cazelet and Mr Graham Howes.

18 May: Dr Janet Soskice and Mr Christopher le Brun, RA.

Return to List of Contents of this section


DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING SCIENCE

Maurice Lubbock Memorial Lecture 1999

PHILIP RUFFLES, F.ENG., FRS, Director, Engineering and Technology, Rolls-Royce PLC, will deliver the twenty-fifth Maurice Lubbock Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 7 May, in Lecture Room 1, the Department of Engineering Science.

Subject: `Advanced power systems.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

Refugee Studies Programme

Seminars on forced migration

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

Further information is available from Dominique Attala, Refugee Studies Programme, Queen Elizabeth House, 21 St Giles', Oxford OX1 2LA (telephone: Oxford (2)70722, fax: (2)70721, e-mail: rspedu@qeh.ox.ac.uk, Internet: http://www.qeh.ox.ac.uk/rsp/).

M.-A. DE MONTCLOS, Centre français dur la population et le développment, Paris
19 May: `The role of the Somali diaspora in the reconstruction of the homeland.'

H. GRIFFIN
26 May: `After the Gulf Crisis: the scourging of Iraq.'

S. SCHWALGIN, Hamburg
2 June: `The Armenians in Greece from the 1920s to the 1990s.'

N. JOHNSTON, Witwatersrand
9 June: `Former Mozambican refugees in the new South Africa: processes of integration and renewed return.'

W. CLARANCE, former UNHCR staff member
16 June: `Protective relief in conflict: reflections on field experience in Sri Lanka.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


Elizabeth Colson Lecture

PROFESSOR P. LOIZOS, LSE, will deliver the Elizabeth Colson Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 12 May, in Rhodes House.:

Subject: `Half-life of the Ottoman Empire: long-term studies of four communities, 1895–1995.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


Short courses and conferences

The following meetings will take place on the dates shown. For further information, see details above.

15–16 May: `The law of refugee status.' (Professor James C. Hathaway, University of Michigan)

5 June: `Cambodia: towards a better future.'

12–30 July: International Summer School.

9–11 Sept.: `Displacement, forced settlement, and conservation.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


OXFORD CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES

Visitors' seminar series

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies. For details of the Socio-Legal Studies Lecture (14 May), see above.

MS G. CENTINEO, Palermo
7 May: `A comparative study of Marriage and the Family Law Act 1996 and the Italian Family Law Reform of 1975, with specific reference to its affect on the role of the lawyer.'

MS C. SAWYER, Bristol
21 May: `Individualism, parentalism, and the legal processes: the identity of the child in family proceedings towards the millennium.'

DR M. VOGEL, Michigan
28 May: `A comparative/historical study of the role of law in the process of democratic state formation in England, France, and the United States.'

MR J. CORNWELL, Senior Partner, Dawson Cornwell & Co., London
4 June: `Pensions on divorce.'

PROFESSOR S. ZIFCAK, Deputy Chair, International Commission of Jurists (Australian Section), and Associate Professor, La Trobe University
11 June: `Globalism or imperialism: analysing the International Commission of Jurists' human rights mission to Indonesia.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


The globalisation challenge to transnational law?

The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on Mondays and Tuesdays in the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies.

DR O. ELIAS, United Nations Claims Commission
10 May: `International legal processes vis- à-vis transnational legal integration.'

PROFESSOR DR A. RILES, Northwestern
11 May: `Formalism and formality in the aesthetics of transnational legality.'

DR B. GARTH, American Bar Foundation
17 May: `The construction and transformation of the international human rights movement: from the Cold War to market-friendly governance.'

PROFESSOR DR S. HOBE, Cologne
18 May: `Globalisation: a challenge to the nation- state and to international law.'

DR C. MCCRUDDEN
24 May: `Transnational judicial "conversations" on human rights.'

PROFESSOR DR C. JOPPKE, European University Institute
25 May: `Sovereignty and citizenship in a world of migration.'

PROFESSOR D. TARULLO, Georgetown
31 May: `The emergence of hybrid law in international economic institutions.'

PROFESSOR EMERITUS J. ZIMAN, Bristol
1 June: `Specialisation and its discontents: is interdisciplinarity a problem or an opportunity.'

PROFESSOR DR M. GALANTER, Wisconsin-Madison
7 June: `Law's elusive problem: learning from Bhopal.'

PROFESSOR DR Y. DEZALAY, Centre de Recherches Interdisciplinaires de Vaucresson
8 June: `Constructing a new global hegemony: economists and the "Washington consensus".'

PROFESSOR L. FRIEDMAN, Stanford
14 June: `Sociology of transnational law revisited.'

PROFESSOR V. GESSNER, Bremen
15 June: `Sociology of global law.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy

Contemporary research in media law and policy

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies.

DR R. TSAGAROUSIANOU, University of Westminster
12 May: `Gone to the market? The development of Asian and Greek-Cypriot community media in Britain.'

K. BOEHRINGER, New South Wales
19 May: `Corporate responsibility in the communications field.'

H. THORGEIRSDOTTIR, Lund
26 May: `International law and freedom within the press.'

M. HEINS, Cambridge
2 June: `What's wrong with ratings and filters? An argument for minors' free expression rights.'

F. BURNETT, University of Westminster
9 June: `Journal publishing in the electronic era: copyright practices and the dissemination of scientific information.'

DR C. JONES, Oklahoma
16 June: `The evolution of media concentration in the US: pluralism and commercial broadcasting.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


VOLTAIRE FOUNDATION

Enlightenment Workshop

The following meetings will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Voltaire Foundation. Details of the 3 June meeting will be announced later.

K. RETFORD
12 May: `The Enlightenment and the family—mothers and children in Enlightenment England.' (Illustrated)

S. BURROWS
19 May: `The Enlightenment and the press—Grub Street revolutionaries: London's French libellistes 1770–90.'

C. BLAMIRES
26 May: `The Enlightenment and the Jesuits—the Enlightenment, the Jesuits, and Joseph de Maistre.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


Besterman Lecture 1999

J.-P. DE BEAUMARCHAIS, Rouen, will deliver the Besterman Lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 10 May, in the Taylor Institution. The Chancellor will preside.

Subject: `Les metamorphoses de Figaro.'

The lecture will be followed by a reception in the Voltaire Room, after which there will be a performance of Main droite, main gauche (a dialogue between Voltaire and Beaumarchais), by J.- P. de Beaumarchais, at 8 p.m. in the Maison Française.

Return to List of Contents of this section


ALL SOULS COLLEGE

Chichele Lectures 1999

The Chichele Lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Old Library, All Souls College.

 

Note: this replaces the notice published in the Trinity Term Special Lecture List, which gives incorrect dates for the first and final lectures in the series.

T. CLAYTON
21 May: `Clarke: father and son.'

R. WHITE
28 May: `Christopher Wren's architectural projects in Oxford.'

PROFESSOR R. HELMHOLZ, Ruth Wyatt Rosenson Professor of Law, Chicago; Visiting Fellow, All Souls, 1998
4 June: `Sir Daniel Dun: All Souls and the civil law.'

R. FRANKLIN, Fellow, All Souls
18 June: `Steward.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


BRASENOSE COLLEGE

Tanner Lectures on Human Values 1999

Representation: democratic theory and social surveys

PROFESSOR S. VERBA, Department of Government, Harvard University, will deliver the Tanner Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination Schools.
Mon. 10 May: : `Social theory and social science: two cultures?'

Tue. 11 May: `Citizens in democracies and democratic citizens.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


PEMBROKE COLLEGE

Blackstone Lecture

PROFESSOR P.B.A. BIRKS, Regius Professor of Civil Law, will deliver the twenty-third Blackstone Lecture at 11.30 a.m. on Saturday, 15 May, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `Rights, wrongs, and remedies.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

European Studies Centre

Balkan history and politics seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the seminar room, 70 Woodstock Road.

Convener: R. Clogg, MA, Senior Research Fellow, St Antony's College.

PROFESSOR S. PAVLOWITCH, Southampton
11 May: `Kosovo and after' (discussion session).

DR M. WHEELER, Derby
25 May: `Writing the history of the Special Operations Executive in Yugoslavia.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


ST CROSS COLLEGE

Visiting Fellow Lecture 1999

PROFESSOR DR H. RIKHOF, Catholic University of Utrecht, will deliver the Visiting Fellow Lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 10 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Changing perspectives: approaching the Trinity.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


TRINITY COLLEGE

Richard Hillary Memorial Lecture 1999

SEBASTIAN FAULKS will deliver the Richard Hillary Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 12 May, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `Something happened: how narrative helps tell the time.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


WOLFSON COLLEGE

Isaiah Berlin Lecture 1999

PROFESSOR C. ROSEN will deliver the Annual Isaiah Berlin Lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 20 May, in the Hall, Wolfson College. The lecture will be open to the public.

Subject: `Tradition without convention: the impossible nineteenth-century project.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


REGENT'S COLLEGE

Centre for the Study of Christianity and Culture

The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on the days shown in Regent's Park College.

Further information may be obtained from Alan Kreider, Regent's Park College, Oxford OX1 2LB (telephone: Oxford (2)88140, fax: (2)88121, e-mail: alan.kreider@regents.ox.ac.uk).

CANON A.M. ALLCHIN, Bangor
Thur. 6 May: `Creating and resurrection in early Welsh and Irish texts.'

DR C. TREVETT, Cardiff
Wed. 12 May: `Creating and using the "heretical" woman: Firmilian's Word to the Church in Carthage.'

PROFESSOR J. MCCORMICK, Georgetown College, Kentucky
Tue. 18 May: `The reclassification of Ingres as a Romantic.' (McCandless Lecture 1999)

P. WARD, King's College, London
Wed. 19 May: `Alpha—the McDonaldisation of religion: further reflections.'

DR J.LIECHTY, Irish School of Ecumenics, Dublin
Wed. 26 May: `Varieties of sectarianism: the experience of Northern Ireland.'

THE REVD MARCOLM YARNELL
Wed. 2 June: `Historical eisegesis and Baptist "priesthood".'

Return to List of Contents of this section


FRIENDS OF THE PITT RIVERS MUSEUM

Lecture

E. FRANQUEMONT, Research Associate, Institute of Andean Studies, Berkeley, California, will lecture at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, 16 June, in the Pitt Rivers Research Building, 64 Banbury Road. Visitors are welcome and contributions appreciated.

Subject: `Genius and tradition: change in folk textile traditions of the Andes.'

Beatrice Blackwood Lecture

DR J. RAWSON will deliver the Beatrice Blackwood Lecture, the annual public lecture of the Friends of the Pitt Rivers Museum, at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, 12 May, in the Inorganic Chemistry Lecture Theatre, South Parks Road.

Subject: `Ancestral spirits and extraordinary deities: religious change in ancient China.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


OXFORD MEDIEVAL SOCIETY

DR C. CANNON will lecture at 8.30 p.m. on Thursday, 13 May, in the Kidd Room, Christ Church. Wine will be served from 8.15 p.m. New members are welcome.

Subject: `Malory's crime: chivalric identity and the evil will.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


ACTION GROUP AT OXFORD ON TEACHING AND LEARNING ENHANCED BY NEW TECHNOLOGY (OxTALENT)

Design and development of multimedia and the Web for teaching and learning

PROFESSOR D.J.B. ROBEY, Reading, member of HEFCE's Learning and Teaching Committee and of the Joint Funding Funding Councils' Learning and Teaching Support Network Advisory Group, will be the guest presenter at a meeting to be held at 11.30 a.m. on Friday, 14 May, in the Computing Laboratory, Wolfson Building.

Subject: `Future national teaching and learning policies: the role of IT.'

`How to...' series

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Language Centre, 12 Woodstock Road. The aim of the presentations is to demonstrate how information technology can be used to enhance aspects of learning and teaching.

J. DEMPSTER, Warwick
12 May: `How to enhance learning through technology: addressing the needs of a research-led university.'

D. WILKINSON, Oxford Brookes
19 May: `How to put lecture notes on the Web.'

B. KNURSHEED, Learning Technologist, TaLL
26 May: `How to develop an Internet-based course: the Department for Continuing Education's Certificate Course in Computing via the Internet.'

R. O'TOOLE, Information Technologist, TALL
2 June: `How to select and use Web-based tools for on-line learning.'

P. JOYCE, Learning Technologist, TALL
9 June: `How to manage on-line course development.'

K. HARRISON, Chemistry
16 June: `How to create and use on-line tests.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


OXFORD ITALIAN ASSOCIATION

Lectures

The following lectures will be held at 7.45 for 8 p.m. on the days shown. Admission is £1 for members, £2 for non-members (students free). For further information, telephone Oxford 377479.

DR J. WILKS
Tue. 18 May, Pauling Centre for Human Sciences, 58 Banbury Road: `Italian battlegrounds in the Alps during World War One.'

DR D. DAVIDSON
Wed. 26 May, Mary Ogilvie Theatre, St Anne's: `Patrons or parasites? The cultural history of Renaissance Venice.'

DR T. ROWLEY
Thur. 3 June, Mary Ogilvie Theatre, St Anne's: `The Normans in Sicily.'

Conversazione in italiano

6 May, 8 p.m., No. 48 Common Room, St Anne's: conversazione in italiano, `La Calabria' (admission free).

Return to List of Contents of this section


TRANSLATION RESEARCH IN OXFORD

Traduire la contrainte

This study-day will be held on Saturday, 19 June, in St Hugh's College. The registration fee is £15 (students £3), with lunch an additional £7. Cheques should be payable to TRIO. Bookings and enquiries should be addressed to Edith McMorran, St Hugh's College, Oxford OX2 6LE (telephone: Oxford (2)74996, e-mail: maison@sable.ox.ac.uk).

D. JOHNSTON, Swansea
10 a.m.: `The problems of translating Welsh cynghanedd.'

G. EDWARDS
10.45 a.m.: `Translating a literary architecture: the multiform poetic structure of Guillaume de Digulleville's Pelerin (fourteenth-century French).'

G. LECLERCQ, ESIT, Paris
12 noon: `Les grands rhétoriqueurs (XVe, XVIe siècles); la liberté dans la contrainte.'

J. BAETENS, Louvain
2.15 p.m.: `Problèmes théoretiques: notions de contrainte, "fautes" de traduction.'

D. HAWKES
3 p.m.: `On translating Chinese poetry.'

S. TAKIGUSHI
4.15 p.m.: `Prelude to HAIKU 2000: can the spirit of Haiku be translated?'

Return to List of Contents of this section


HUMAN POPULATION GENETICS JOURNAL CLUB

An interdisciplinary journal club in the area of human population genetics is held every second Monday in term, in weeks 2, 4, 6, and 8, in the seminar room, ground floor, Department of Statistics, 1 South Parks Road. Anyone interested is welcome.

Notices of the papers for discussion are sent in advance by email. To have yourself added to the email list, send a request to rachel.whiteley@zoology.oxford.ac.uk.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Grants and Research Funding

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue


Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue


FACULTY BOARD ELECTIONS: ELECTIONS TO BOARD OF FACULTY OF THEOLOGY

During Hilary Term 1999, a change in the composition of the Theology Board was approved by the University. With effect from the elections due to be held during Trinity Term, the number of ordinary members of the board will be increased from eight to ten members, and the number of official members will be reduced, from eight to six members. In order to facilitate this change in membership, separate arrangements will be necessary with regard to the elections to the board to be held during the current year. The following information regarding nominations therefore replaces that which appeared in the Gazette on 22 April:

Ordinary members: six vacancies (five for two year appointments and one for a single year).

Official members: six vacancies (three for two year appointments and three for single year appointments).

Return to List of Contents of this section


CHAIRMEN OF EXAMINERS

TRINITY TERM 1999

Preliminary Examinations

Physiological Sciences: DR R.J. WILKINS, MA, D.PHIL., Christ Church (address: Department of Physiology)

Philosophy, Politics, and Economics: DR C.A. GREENHALGH, MA, Fellow of St Peter's


Honour Moderations

Modern History and Economics: DR J.H. HOWARTH, Fellow of St Hilda's

Modern History and English: DR J.C. ROBERTSON, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Hugh's

Physics and Philosophy: MR B.B. RUNDLE, B.PHIL., MA, Fellow of Trinity


Honour School

Modern History and Economics: DR A.W. BEGGS, MA, M.PHIL., D.PHIL., Fellow of Wadham


Second BM

Year 3: MR N.E. DUDLEY, MA status (address: Department of Surgery, John Radcliffe Hospital)


Master of Philosophy

Celtic Studies: PROFESSOR M.T.O. CHARLES-EDWARDS, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Jesus


Master of Studies

Celtic Studies: PROFESSOR T.M.O. CHARLES-EDWARDS, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Jesus

Women's Studies: DR R.M. BALLASTER, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Mansfield

World Archaeology: DR C.H. GOSDEN, MA, Fellow of St Cross (address: Pitt Rivers Museum)


Master of Theology

THE REVD D.G. MOSS, MA, Tutor at St Stephen's House


Prize

Violet Vaughan Morgan: DR P.E. MCCULLOUGH, MA, Fellow of Lincoln


Foundation Certificates

English Language and Literature: DR P.J. THOMPSON, MA, Regent's Park

Modern History: DR C.A. JACKSON, Department for Continuing Education

Social and Political Science: DR N.J. HORSEWOOD, M.PHIL., Pembroke


Diploma

Postgraduate Diploma in European Studies: PROFESSOR P.G.J. PULZER, MA, Fellow of All Souls

Return to List of Contents of this section


CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties and the Joint Committee for Human Sciences will come into effect on 21 May.

1 Board of the Faculty of English Language and Literature

Honour School of English Language and Literature

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 201, after l. 20 insert:

`() Any one of the following Course II options; )h

i. Linguistic Theory (one paper; as specified for Course II paper B4)

ii. Medieval and Renaissance Romance (extended essay; as specified for Course II paper 7a)

iii. Scottish Literature pre-1600 (extended essay; as specified for Course II paper 7b)

iv. Old Norse (one paper, as specified in Course II paper B15)

v. Medieval French Literature 1100-1300 or Medieval French Literature 1300–1500 (one paper, as specified for Course II papers B20 and B21)

vi. Medieval Welsh Language and Literature I or Medieval Welsh Language and Literature II (one paper, as specified for Course II papers B21 and B22)

vii. Medieval Latin (one paper, as specified for Course II paper B24)

viii. Classical Literature (extended essay, as specified for Course II paper B26)'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 21–4 and substitute:

`(i) Any one of the Special Topics from the list for the year concerned, which will be published in the University Gazette by the beginning of the fifth week of the Trinity Term one year before the examination.'

3 Ibid., delete from l. 26 on p. 201 to `examination' on p. 202, l. 1. and substitute:

 

`Each candidate shall offer the five subjects of List A below, and three subjects chosen from List B, subject to the restrictions set out below. Candidates may not offer more than two papers as extended essays.

Extended essays

(a) The following subjects will be assessed by extended essay only: B5 Old English Special Authors, B6 Medieval and Renaissance Special Authors, B7 Special Topics, B17 Old Norse-Icelandic Literature, and B26 Classical Literature.

(b) The following subjects will be assessed by extended essay or examination: B1 Old English Philology, B2 Middle English Dialectology, B3 Modern English Philology. Candidates will be required to specify their chosen mode of examination for these papers on their registration form and may not revert from this choice.

(c) An extended essay for subjects B5, B6, B7, B17, and B26 shall not exceed 6,000 words and shall be on a theme chosen from a list circulated by the examiners. Subjects B1, B2, and B3 will require two essays, each not exceeding 3,000 words, and shall be on a theme chosen from a list circulated by the examiners.

(d) The list of themes for B1, B3, B5, and B6 shall be circulated on Friday of the Fifth Week of Michaelmas Term next before the examination. The list of themes for B2, B7, B17, and B26 shall be circulated on Friday of the Sixth Week of Hilary Term next before the examination.'

4 Ibid., p. 202, delete ll. 6–10 and substitute:

`(d) Two typed copies of each essay for B1, B3, B5, and B6 must be delivered to the Chairman of Examiners, Honour School of English Language and Literature (Course II), Examination Schools, Oxford, by noon on Friday of the eighth week of Michaelmas Term; and those for B2, B7, B17, and B26 by noon on Friday of the ninth week after the commencement of Hilary Full Term.'

5 Ibid., delete from l. 18 on p. 202 to l. 20 on p. 203 and substitute:

`1. English Literature 600–1100 (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of a wide range of Old English literature and should show an awareness of the historical and cultural contexts of the period.

2. English Literature 1100–1530 (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of a wide range of Middle English literature, and should show an awareness of the historical and cultural contexts of the literature of the period. Candidates should not answer on this paper on works by Chaucer on which they intend to answer on paper A3(a); candidates should not write on this paper on Langland and/or Gower if they are answering on those authors on paper A3(b).

3. Chaucer, Langland, and Gower (two papers)

Candidates will be required to take two papers as follows:

(a) A three-hour paper of questions on Chaucer. Questions will be set that require a wide knowledge of Chaucer's writings. Candidates will be required to answer two questions.

(b) A two-hour paper of questions on Langland and Gower and on comparative studies of the three authors. Candidates will be required to write one essay.

4. Old and Middle English Texts (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to have made a detailed study of Exodus (rev. edn. ed. P. Lucas, 1994), Aelfric, Homilies 14, 20, and 21, ll. 1–291, 494–676 (ed. J.C. Pope, 1968), Ancrene Wisse, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (ed. J.R.R. Tolkien, E.V. Gordon, rev. N. Davis, 1967). Question 1, which will be compulsory, will consist of passages for translation and commentary from three of the set texts; passages from Ancrene Wisse will be taken from the edition of books 6 and 7, ed. G. Shepherd (1985). Candidates must answer two further essay questions. Essay questions will require answers on issues of genre, sources, textual history, interpretative difficulties, manuscript dissemination.

5. The Development of Standard Literary English to c.1750 (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to show an understanding of the development of the written language from the earliest records to c.1750, with particular attention to the emergence of a standard form. Candidates will be required to answer question 1 and two other questions, and to demonstrate a knowledge of Old, Middle, and early Modern English in their answers. Question 1 will require comment on the language of either (a) passages of biblical translation or (b) other representative texts (four passages of each will be set of which candidates must comment on two). Questions on lexicography will include Johnson's Dictionary.

List B: English Language and Literature and Subsidiary Languages (optional subjects)

Candidates are required to note that the availability of options is subject to the provision of teaching in the year in question.

1. Old English Philology (extended essay or one paper)

Candidates should have made a study of the Old English language in its various dialects up to c.1100, paying particular attention to the evidence available from primary materials; they will be expected to have such awareness of Germanic philology as is necessary for an understanding of the background to Old English. All aspects of the language are included: its orthography, phonology, morphology, syntax, lexis. No texts are prescribed, but those in Sweet's Anglo-Saxon Reader (rev. Whitelock, 1967), nos. ii, vi–viii, xiv, xvi, xxxii–xxxviii, indicate the range of dialects to be covered. In the three-hour paper the first question (which will be compulsory) will require comment on passages set from texts in these dialects. Candidates taking the paper by extended essay will be required to write two extended essays, each a maximum of 3,000 words in length, on topics from a list to be circulated by the examiners in the fifth week of Michaelmas Term next preceding the examination.

2. Middle English Dialectology (extended essay or one paper)

Candidates will be expected to have made a study of a wide range of Middle English and Middle Scots dialects from c.1100 to c.1500, paying particular attention to the evidence available from primary materials. All aspects of the language are included: its orthography, phonology, morphology, syntax, lexis. No texts are prescribed, but those in Burrow and Turville-Petre (eds.), A Book of Middle English, nos. 2–4, 8–9, 11, 14, and Sisam (ed.), Fourteenth- Century Verse and Prose no. 10, indicate the range of dialects to be covered. In the three-hour paper the first question, which will be compulsory, will require comment on passages set from texts in these dialects.

Candidates taking the paper by extended essay will be required to write two extended essays, each a maximum of 3,000 words in length, on topics from a list to be circulated by the examiners in sixth week of Hilary Term preceding the examination.

3. Modern English Philology (extended essay or one paper)

Candidates will be expected to show an understanding of developments in the written and spoken language with reference to the period from c.1500 to the present day, paying particular attention to the evidence available from primary materials. The paper involves the consideration of all aspects of the language, including orthography, phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexis.

There are no prescribed texts, but candidates are expected to read a range of writings in the language in this period. Candidates must answer questions from both Section A, texts for comment and transcription, and Section B, questions on the history and development of the language in the period in question.

Candidates taking the paper by extended essay will be required to write two extended essays, each a maximum of 3,000 words in length, on topics from a list to be circulated by the examiners in the fifth week of Michaelmas Term preceding the examination.'

6 Ibid., p. 203, delete from `Candidates' in l. 22 to `language' in l. 24 and substitute:

 

`Candidates will be expected to show a general knowledge of theoretical linguistics with special reference to phonology, phonetics, grammar, lexis, semantics, and discourse structure and pragmatics.'

7 Ibid., delete ll. 26–37 and substitute:

`5. Old English Special Authors (extended essay)

Candidates must answer on any one of the Beowulf poet, Alfred, or Aelfric. Candidates answering substantially on any of these writers in paper A1, English Literature 600–1100, may not offer the same writer in this paper. Candidates answering on Aelfric on paper A4 should not discuss the same texts in detail in this paper.

6. Medieval and Renaissance Special Authors (extended essay)

As defined in Course I Subject 7(a) and (b) for the year concerned, except that candidates may not answer on any author made the focus of an answer elsewhere in the examination.

7. Special Topics (extended essay)

In all special topics, candidates will be expected to show such historical and/or contextual knowledge as is necessary for the profitable study of the periods, genres, or authors concerned. Candidates should show knowledge of more than one writer except where otherwise specified. The list of themes for subjects (c) to () will be the same as those set for Course I Subjects 8 (b) to (g) and (i). )h

(a) Medieval and Renaissance Romance

(b) Scottish Literature pre-1600

(c) The English Drama

(d) English Prose

(e) The History and Theory of Criticism

(f) Women's Writing

(g) The Genres of English Poetry

()h) Any one of the Special Topics for the year concerned, as published in the University Gazette by the beginning of the fifth week of the Trinity Term one year before the examination.'

8 Ibid., l. 38, delete `7' and substitute `8'.

9 Ibid., ll. 40–1, delete `on whom they offer an optional subject.' and substitute `on whom they have answered questions in paper A2, or on whom they offer an optional subject.'

10 Ibid., l. 44, delete `8' and substitute `9'.

11 Ibid., delete from p. 203, l. 49 to p. 204, l. 27.

12 Ibid., p. 204, l. 28 delete `11' and substitute `10'.

13 Ibid., delete from l. 34 on p. 204 to l. 10 on p. 206 and substitute:

`11. Gothic (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to show a knowledge of the elements of Gothic phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicology, and to show special knowledge of the Gospels in Gothic. Three questions must be answered, including a compulsory translation set from passages from the surviving parts of the translation of St Mark's gospel and of II Timothy, as printed in J. Wright, Grammar of the Gothic Language (2nd edn. rev. O.L. Sayce, 1954); linguistic commentary may be required.

12. Old Saxon (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to show a knowledge of the elements of Old Saxon phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicology. They will be expected to have made special study of the language of the Heliand, and to show detailed knowledge of its text from l. 3516 to the end (l. 5983) as edited by O. Behagel (9th edn. rev. B. Taeger, 1984), and of the Genesis fragments, as edited by A.N. Doane (1991). Three questions must be answered, including a compulsory translation and comment question.

13. Old High German (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to show a detailed knowledge of the elements of Old High German phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicology, and to have made a special study of the texts set for Paper V (i): German in the Honour School of Modern Languages.

Passages for translation and linguistic commentary, general linguistic questions, and literary questions on these texts will be set. Three questions must be answered, including a compulsory translation and commentary question.

14. Middle High German (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to study the texts prescribed for Paper IX: German, of the Honour School of Modern Languages, and to show detailed knowledge of three of them.

Passages for translation and literary commentary, and general literary questions on these texts will be set. Three questions must be answered, including a compulsory translation and commentary question.

15. Old Norse (one paper)

Three questions must be answered, including one compulsory translation and commentary question from passages from Islendingabòk; Hrafnkels saga Freysgoda; Skírnismál; Hamdismál; Snorri's Edda (ed. Faulkes, Oxford, 1982); Gylfaginning, ch. 43 to end. Literary questions on these texts will be set and candidates will also be given an opportunity to show a knowledge of the elements of Old Norse phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicology.

16. Old Norse Texts (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to have made a special study of the following: Audunar páttr; Víga Glúms saga; Vöaut;lundarkvida; Atlakvida. They will be expected to have read but not to have studied in detail, Fóstbroedra saga; Gísla saga Súrssonar; Hervarar saga; Gylfaginning; Vöaut;luspá; Hávamál. Three questions must be answered, including one compulsory translation and commentary question from passages from the texts set for special study. Literary questions will be set on all the set texts.

This subject may be offered only by candidates who also offer Subject B15.

17. Old Norse–Icelandic Literature (extended essay)

Candidates will be expected to have read widely, especially in Old Icelandic prose. This subject may be offered only by candidates who also offer either Subject B15 or Subjects B15 and B16.

18. Old French Language 1150–1250 (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to show a knowledge of the elements of Old French (including Anglo-Norman) orthography, morphology, phonology, syntax, and lexicology, paying particular attention to the evidence available from primary materials. Three questions must be answered, including one compulsory translation and commentary question on passages set from La Vie de S. Alexis, ed. C. Storey; La Chanson de Roland, ll. 1–660, ed. F. Whitehead; Piramus et Tisbé, ed. C. de Boer; La folie Tristan d'Oxford, ed. E. Hoepffner (2nd edn.), Aucassin et Nicolette, ed. M. Roques; La Seinte Resureccion (ANTS 4).

19. Medieval French Literature 1100–1300 (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to have made a special study of at least two of the following: La Chanson de Roland, Chrétien de Troyes, Yvain; La Mort le roi Artu; Le Roman de la Rose, ll. 1–4058. Candidates will also be expected to have read, but not to have studied in detail, either Le Roman de La Rose, ll. 4059–21780 or at least three of the following: Béroul, Tristan; Marie de France; Charroi de Nömes; Aucassin et Nicolette; Jean Renart, Le Lai de l'ombre; Wace, Roman de Brut, 9005–13298; Jean Bodel, Le Jeu de Saint Nicolas, and Villehardouin, La ConquÉte de Constantinople, Le Roman de Renart, ed. M. Roques, ll. 3733–4796. Three questions must be answered, including one requiring literary and linguistic commentary on passages from the set texts, of which candidates must answer one. Translation will not be required.

20. Medieval French Literature 1300–1500 (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to have made a special study of the following: Guillaume de Machaut, Le Jugement du roy de Behaigne; Christine de Pisan, Epistre au dieu d'amours; Franìois Villon, Le Testament. Candidates will also be expected to have read, but not to have studied in detail at least three of the following: Machaut, La Fonteine amoureuse, Machaut, Le Livre du Voir-Dit; Alain Chartier, La Belle Dame sans Mercy; Alain Chartier, La Quadrilogue invectif, Charles d'OrlÄans, Ballades et rondeaux; Les Quinze Joies de mariage. Three questions must be answered, including one requiring literary and linguistic commentary on passages from the set texts, of which candidates must answer one. Translation will not be required.

21. Medieval Welsh Language and Literature I (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to show a knowledge of the elements of Medieval Welsh phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicology. Opportunities will be provided to discuss the literary qualities of texts. Three questions must be answered, including one compulsory translation and commentary question from passages from Pwyll Pendeuic Dyuet, ed. R.L. Thomson (1957, repr. 1972), Branwen Uerch Lyr, ed. D.S. Thompson (1961, repr. 1968), Poems of the Cywyddwyr, ed. E.I. Rowlands (1976) nos. 1, 2, 4, 7, 13, 19, 21–4, Gwaith Dafydd ap Gwilym, ed. T. Parry (1979), nos. 2, 23, 26, 27, 42, 48, 84, 87, 114, 117, 122, 124. This paper may not be taken by candidates offering B22 Medieval Welsh Language and Literature II.

22. Medieval Welsh Language and Literature II (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to show a knowledge of the elements of Old and Middle Welsh phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicology. Opportunities will be provided to discuss the literary qualities of the prescribed texts. Three questions must be answered, including one compulsory translation and commentary question from passages from Pedeir Keinc y Mabinogi, ed. I. Williams (1930), Culhwch and Olwen, ed. R. Bromwich and D.S. Evans (1992), `The Juvencus Poems', ed. I. Williams, The Beginnings of Welsh Poetry (1980, 1990), Gwaith Llywelyn Fardd I ac Eraill of Feirdd y Ddeuddegfed Ganrif, ed. M.E. Owen et al (1994), nos. 6–15, 18–21, Poems of the Cywyddwyr, ed. E.I. Rowlands (1976), nos. 1, 2, 4, 7, 13, 19, 21–4, Gwaith Dfydd ap Gwilym, ed. T. Parry (1979), nos 2, 13, 23, 26, 27, 28, 42, 48, 84, 87, 114, 117, 122, 124. They will be expected to have read but not to have studied in detail Breudwyt Ronabwy, ed. M. Richards (1948), Peredur, ed. G. Goetinck (1976), Gwaith Iolo Goch, ed. D.R. Johnston (1988). This paper may not be taken by candidates offering B21 Medieval Welsh Language and Literature I.'

23. Old and Early Middle Irish Language and Literature (one paper)

Candidates will be expected to show a knowledge of the elements of Old Irish phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicology. They will be given an opportunity to comment on the literary qualities of the prescribed texts. Three questions must be answered, including one compulsory translation and commentary question from passages from Stories from the Táin, ed. J. Strachan and O. Bergin (1944), Sécla Mucce Meic Dathó, ed. R. Thurneysen (1951), Longes mac nUislenn, ed. V. Hull (1949), Early Irish Lyrics, ed. G. Murphy (1956), nos. 1–3, 5.'

14 Ibid., p. 206, l. 11 delete `12' and substitute `24'.

15 Ibid., delete l. 13 and substitute:

`13. The Latin Literature of the British Isles before the Norman Conquest of England'.

16 Ibid., delete ll. 31–2 and substitute:

`26. Classical Literature (extended essay)'.

Return to List of Contents of this section


2 Boards of the Faculties of English Language and Literature and Literae Humaniores

Honour School of Classics and English

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 138, l. 34, after ()h) insert `(ii) and (iii), (i)'.

2 Ibid., delete from l. 36 on p. 138 to l. 9 on p. 139 and substitute:

`(f) The Development of Standard Literary English to c.1750 (Course II, A.5)

(g) English Literature, 600–1100 (Course II, A1)

()h) Old English Philology (Course II, B1)

(i) Middle English Dialectology (Course II, B2)

(j) Modern English Philology (Course II, B3)

(k) Linguistic Theory (Course II, B4)

(l) The Archaeology of Anglo-Saxon England, seventh to ninth centuries ad (Course II, B10)

(m) Gothic (Course II, B11)

(n) Old Saxon (Course II, B12)

(o) Old High German (Course II, B13)

(p) Middle High German (Course II, B14)

(q) Old Norse (Course II, B15)

(r) Old Norse Texts (Course II, B16)

(s) Old French Language 1150–1250 (Course II, B18)

(t) Medieval French Literature 1100–1300 (Course II, B19) or Medieval French Literature 1300–1500 (Course II, B20)

(u) Medieval Welsh Language and Literature I (Course II, B21) or Medieval Welsh Language and Literature II (Course II, B22)

(v) The Latin Literature of the British Isles before the Norman conquest of England (Course II, B25)

(w) Medieval and Renaissance Romance (Course II, B7(a))

(x) Scottish Literature pre-1600 (Course II, B7(b))'.

Return to List of Contents of this section


3 Boards of the Faculties of English Language and Literature and Medieval and Modern Languages

Honour School of English and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 192, delete ll. 18–19 and substitute:

`5. English Literature 1100–1530 (one paper) [Honour School of English Language and Literature, Course II, Subject A2]'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 20–6 and substitute:

`6, 7. Two papers chosen from the Honour School of English Language and Literature Course II, Subjects A: 1, 3–5, B: 1–4, 7, provided that a candidate who has not taken paper 3(c) in part 2 of the Preliminary Examination must offer Subject A1. Subject B7 will be examined by extended essay.'

3 Ibid., delete ll. 31–8 and substitute:

`(b) One subject chosen from English Course II Subjects B6, 8–9, 15, 21 or 2, 23–5, provided that no candidate may offer (i) both B15 and Modern Languages Paper XII Special Subject `Old Norse', or (ii) both B21 or 22 and Modern Languages Paper XII Special Subject `Medieval Welsh Tales and Romances, the Poets of the Welsh Princes and the Poetry of Dafydd ap Gwilym'. Subject B6 will be examined by extended essay (as specified in the regulations for the Honour School of English Language and Literature).'

4 Ibid., delete ll. 45–6 and substitute:

`(ii) English Course II Subject B16, provided that this paper may only be offered by a candidate who also offers English Course II Subject B15.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


4 Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores

Honour Moderations in Classics [Course 1B]

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 35, l. 33, delete `R.G. Ussher (Aris & Phillips 1990)' and substitute `H. Lloyd-Jones (Loeb)'.

Return to List of Contents of this section


5 Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages

Honour School of Modern Languages

(i) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 382, delete ll. 32–6.

2 Ibid., p. 395, l. 13, delete `The top copy' and substitute `Two copies'.

3 Ibid., l. 14, delete `second' and substitute `third'.

4 Ibid., l. 16, delete `top copy' and substitute `two copies'.

Return to List of Contents of this section


(ii) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 377, l. 47, and p. 378, l. 13, in each case after `XII' insert: `, Special Subject (Paper XII) Modern Catalan (for candidates offering Spanish), Special Subject (Paper XII) Modern Galician (for candidates offering Spanish)'.

2 Ibid., p. 379, l. 17, after `offered' insert `, except that candidates offering Spanish may offer two Special Subjects

(Paper XII) provided one is either Modern Catalan or Modern Galician'.

3 Ibid., p. 389, l. 10, delete `Medny vsadnik' and substitute `Povesti Belkina'.

4 Ibid., p. 391, after l. 42, insert:

`(4) Federico García Lorca, with a special study of Amor de Don Perlimplin con Belisa en su jardín, Así que pasen cinco anos, Bodas de sangre, Canciones, Divan del Tamarit, Llanto por Ignacio Sánchez Mejías, Mariana Pineda, Poeta en Nueva York (ed. Millán), El público, La zapatera prodigiosa.'

5 Ibid., ll. 43 and 50, delete `4' and `5' respectively and substitute `5' and `6'.

Return to List of Contents of this section


6 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and English Language and Literature

Honour School of English and Modern Languages

(i) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 5(a) above).

Return to List of Contents of this section


(ii) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 5(b) above).

Return to List of Contents of this section


7 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Literae Humaniores

(a) Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages

(b) Honour School of Philosophy and Modern Languages

(i) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 5(a) above).

Return to List of Contents of this section


(ii) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 5(b) above).

Return to List of Contents of this section


8 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Modern History

Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

(i) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 5(a) above).

Return to List of Contents of this section


(ii) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 5(b) above).

Return to List of Contents of this section


9 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Oriental Studies

Honour School of European and Middle Eastern Languages

(i) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 5(a) above).

(ii) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 5(b) above).

Return to List of Contents of this section


10 Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies

Honour School of Oriental Studies

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, delete from l. 25 on p. 455 to l. 8 on p. 456 and substitute:

`Biblical texts (lists of texts are available from the Oriental Institute)

3. Prepared texts II: Biblical and Mishnaic texts (lists of texts are available from the Oriental Institute) Papers 2 and 3 may contain general and grammatical questions.

(b) Medieval Hebrew

1. Unprepared translation

2. Prepared texts I (lists of texts are available from the Oriental Institute)

3. Prepared texts II (lists of texts are available from the Oriental Institute) Papers 2 and 3 may contain general and grammatical questions.

(c) Modern Hebrew

1. Prose composition and unprepared translation

2. Prepared texts I (lists of texts are available from the Oriental Institute)

3. Prepared texts II (lists of texts are available from the Oriental Institute) Papers 2 and 3 may contain general and grammatical questions.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


11 Board of the Faculty of Psychological Studies

Honour School of Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 498, l. 29, before `Candidates' insert:

`Candidates may take at most five subjects in Psychology.'

2 Ibid., delete `more' and substitute `five'.

3 Ibid., p. 217, delete ll. 27–32 and substitute:

`D5. Any one of the papers set in the written part of the examination for Physiological Sciences in the Honour School of Natural Science, except paper (13) Physiological Sciences. (Candidates may not take the dissertation in Physiology.) Or any one subject from subjects 101, 102, 104, or 105 as prescribed in the Regulations for Honour Schools including Philosophy. D6. As for D5.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


12 Joint Committee for Human Sciences

(a) Preliminary Examination in Human Sciences

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, delete from l. 32 on p. 82 to l. 6 on p. 83 and substitute:

`Subject 3. Society, Culture, and Environment

Social and Cultural Anthropology: the comparative study of the world's civilisations and peoples, including cross-cultural, power-based, and gender perspectives upon social practice and theories of human life. Specific topics will include production and consumption; transactions and modes of exchange; elementary aspects of kinship and marriage; belief systems and social control; politi- cal and social organisation; classification; technology and social change; the impact of colonialism; space, place and culture; enviroment and cultural landscapes in transition; land and property rights. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with appropriate ethnographic monographs. Human Geography: Physical and human factors affecting the growth and distribution of world population; international migration and its consequences for ethnic diversity; historical and contemporary patterns of urbanisation; urban spatial segregation on social, cultural, and ethnic criteria; the behavioural consequences of urban social segregation.

One three-hour paper will be set. The paper will be divided into two sections: (a) Social and Cultural Anthropology, which will account for two-thirds of the paper, and (b) Human Geography, which will account for one-third of the paper. Candidates will be required to display knowledge of both sections.

Subject 4. Sociology and Demography

Sociology: Current and classic discussions of explanatory strategies and social mechanisms, models of individual action and the consequences of aggregation. Empirical research involving these approaches in areas of substantive sociological interest such as social class, ethnicity, religion, the family, politics.

Demography: Elementary aspects of population analysis. Comparative study of fertility, mortality, and family systems in selected human societies. The long-term development of human population and its relation to habitat and resources. The demographic transition.

One three hour paper will be set. The paper will be divided into two sections: (a) Sociology and (b) Demography. Candidates will be required to display knowledge of both sections.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


(b) Honour School in Human Sciences

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 230, after l. 33 insert:

`There will be a practical examination for paper 4, Demo-graphy and Population, in which candidates will be required to demonstrate their ability to interpret demographic measures and to apply quantitative skills to demographic problems. The practical examination will count for 25 per cent of the marks available for paper 4, and will be combined with the marks obtained in the Final Honour School examinations for this paper. The Chairman of Examiners will be responsible for notifying the candidates of the arrangements for the examination which will take place in the Michaelmas Term preceding Final Honour School examinations.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE

The Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine has granted leave to P. DAVEY, Magdalen, to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine. The evidence submitted by the candidate was entitled: `A clinical and experimental study of myocardial repolarisation in left ventricular hypertrophy and heart failure'.

Return to List of Contents of this section


EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Biological Sciences

A. MIRA, St Hugh's: `Nutritional and evolutionary studies of the host–endosymbiont relationship in the Blattodea'.
Department of Zoology, Monday, 10 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: A. Kacelnik, A. Douglas.

 

Return to List of Contents of this section


Clinical Medicine

B.L. BOOTH, Trinity: `The mechanisms of MHC class I antigen processing'.
Institute for Molecular Medicine, Thursday, 13 May, 9 a.m.
Examiners: T.J. Elliott, J. Trowsdale.

J. HUGHES, Wadham: `Comparative analysis of the PKD1 gene and protein, polycystin-1'.
Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Friday, 11 June, 2 p.m.
Examiners: E.Y. Jones, A.-M. Frischauf.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Law

J. AUBURN, Magdalen: `Legal professional privilege: derogations and absolutism'.
Mansfield, Friday, 14 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: R.M. Bagshaw, P. Roberts.

J. BLACK-BRANCH, Wolfson: `The constitutional entrenchment and judicial enforcement of minority language rights'.
Examination Schools, Wednesday, 19 May, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: G.S. Goodwin-Gill, S.M.A. Lloyd-Bostock.

 

Return to List of Contents of this section


Mathematical Sciences

P. RUDIN, St Hugh's: `A framework for diagrammatic reasoning'.
Wolfson Building, Thursday, 13 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: A. Stevens, A. Pitts.

 

Return to List of Contents of this section


Medieval and Modern Languages

E. BOVEE, Keble: `Petrus Borel: background, reception, and interpretation'.
Somerville, Monday, 17 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: A.J. Tooke, C. Crossley.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Physical Sciences

G. BLAKE, St Catherine's: `The electronic properties of mixed metal iridates'.
Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Friday, 14 May, 11 a.m.
Examiners: M.J. Rosseinsky, J.P. Attfield.

T. BROWN, Somerville: `Analytical studies of some amino acid secondary metabolism'.
Dyson Perrins Laboratory, Tuesday, 18 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: J.H. Jones, A.J. Kirby.

M.A. MARSHALL, Magdalen: `Pipe-jacked tunnelling: jacking loads and ground movements'.
Department of Engineering Sciences, Monday, 10 May, 10.30 a.m.
Examiners: G.T. Houlsby, R.N. Taylor.

C.E. ROSS, St Cross: `Palynofacies, palaeoenvironmental change, and sequence stratigraphy of the Middle Jurassic, Cleveland Basin, and Brent Group of the UK'.
Department of Earth Sciences, Tuesday, 15 June, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: H.C. Jenkyns, J.H.A. van Konijnenburg.

D.K. WILKINS, Linacre: `Studies of protein denaturation and aggregation'.
New Chemistry Laboratory, Thursday, 13 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: C.V. Robinson, P.A. Evans.

 

Return to List of Contents of this section


Social Studies

C.M. JENKINS, New College: `Post-independence economic policies and outcomes in Zimbabwe'.
Queen Elizabeth House, Tuesday, 15 June, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: C. Adam, A. Killick.

C.C. LHO, St Antony's: `The transformation of South Korea's foreign policy 1988–93: Nordpolitik, Moscow, and the road to Pyongyang'.
St Antony's, Friday, 28 May, 10.15 a.m.
Examiners: R.J. Foot, S. Kirby.

J.-W. MÜLLER, All Souls: `German intellectuals, unification, and national identity'.
Examination Schools, Tuesday, 25 May, 10 a.m.
Examiners: M.S. Freeden, R.D. Griffin.

T.G. PALMER, Hertford: `A cosmopolitan theory of justice'.
Balliol, Thursday, 22 July, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: A.R.G. Swift, H. Steiner.

 

Return to List of Contents of this section


Theology

R. FOX, St Benet's Hall: `The concept of time in thirteenth-century Western theology'.
Examination Schools, Friday, 21 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: R.A. Cross, J. Marenbon.

 

Return to List of Contents of this section


EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF STUDIES IN LEGAL RESEARCH

The examiners appointed by the following faculty board give notice of oral examination of their candidate as follows:

Law

L. BUSCH, Balliol: `Misfeasance in public office'.
St John's, Monday, 10 May, 11.30 a.m.
Examiners: P.P. Craig, M.R. Freedland.

 

Return to List of Contents of this section


Colleges, Halls, and Societies

Contents of this section:

Return to Contents Page of this issue


OBITUARIES

Christ Church

RODNEY GRAHAM YOULTON, MA, 17 March 1999; scholar 1957–60.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Merton College

WALTER NEWBIGGING BIRKS, MBE, 25 January 1999; commoner 1930–3. Aged 87.

KUAN-CHENG CHEN, 17 March 1999; commoner 1935–8. Aged 84.

THE REVD CANON PETER HAMMOND, 1 March 1999; commoner HT 1946–8. Aged 78.

GEOFFREY ESMOND HILL, 13 March 1999; commoner HT 1947–8. Aged 75.

MAJ. RICHARD HODGKINSON JESSOP, 8 April 1999; commoner 1935. Aged 81.

WILLIAM COLLAR HOLBROOK, 11 December 1998; Rhodes Scholar HT 1921–3. Aged 99.

ROBERT CYPRIAN HOPE, 11 March 1999; commoner 1934–8. Aged 83.

SIR LAURENCE KIRWAN, KCMG, 16 April 1999; commoner 1925–6. Aged 91.

CHRISTOPHER WARING ROBERTS-WRAY, 21 February 1999; Old Mertonian Exhibitioner 1949–52. Aged 70.

ROBERT GEORGE ANDREW SHERRATT, 5 March 1999; Postmaster 1941–2 and 1946–7. Aged 76.

ELVIS JACOB STAHR, 11 November 1998; Rhodes Scholar 1936–9. Aged 82.

Return to List of Contents of this section


COMMEMORATION

All Souls College

A Commemoration of THE RT. HON. LORD BELOFF (Max Beloff), KT., MA, D.LITT., FBA, F.R.HIST.S., FRSA, will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 19 June, in the Codrington Library, All Souls College.

Return to List of Contents of this section


ELECTIONS

Christ Church

To a Lecturership in German (TT 1999):

HELEN R. BRIDGE

To a Lecturership in Law (TT and MT 1999):

MS ISABEL J. HITCHING, BA

To a Dr Lee Visiting Research Fellowship in the Sciences (TT 1999):

DR CHARLES CLARK

To a Fowler Hamilton Visiting Fellowship (TT 1999):

PROFESSOR ECKHART HELLMUTH

Return to List of Contents of this section


Corpus Christi College

To Scholarships:

KATHERINE LUCY BLADEN BROWN, formerly of Lady Eleanor Holles

ARIK MICHAEL DONDI, formerly of Realgymnasium Ramibuhl, Zurich

DANIEL KISS, formerly of St Vituscollege, Bussum, Netherlands

JOANNE LAWSON, formerly of Nottingham High School

JOSHUA RAYMOND, formerly of Westminster School

DOUGAL GOWANLOCK ROBINSON TERVO, formerly of Ridley College

Return to List of Contents of this section


NOTICES

ALL SOULS COLLEGE

Visiting Fellowships 2000–1

All Souls College proposes to elect a number of Visiting Fellows, for periods up to one year, for the academic year October 2000–June 2001. These fellowships are intended to enable their holders to carry out study and research in Oxford, and to participate in the academic life of the University. Visiting Fellowships are open in all subjects, and to both men and women. Preference will be given to candidates who will be between the ages of thirty-five and sixty-five during the relevant academic year. Applications will be considered from staff of any university or other institution of higher learning, and from other persons who wish to carry out scholarly work in Oxford. In making its final choice, the college will give wight to intellectual quality, the interest and feasibility of the research project, and to the relevance for it of residence in Oxford.

Visiting Fellows will be entitled to accommodation, a study in college, and lunches and dinners without charge. Limited financial subvention may also be offered in exceptional circumstances. In certain cases (not expected to exceed one in each) such assistance may be extended to include the cost of replacment teaching at the Visiting Fellow's own institution. Any candidate desiring to take advantage of this provision should make specific application to the Dean of Visiting Fellows preferably some time before the general closing date given below.

Application forms and further particulars may be obtained from the Secretary to the Dean of Visiting Fellows, All Souls College, Oxford OX1 4AL, to whom applications should be addressed. Applications must be received by 15 September.

Return to List of Contents of this section


JESUS COLLEGE

Appointment of Junior Dean

Jesus College proposes to appoint a Junior Dean for a period of one year from 1 October 1999, with the possibility of renewal for a second year. The Junior Dean will be required to reside in college, free of charge, and will also receive free meals at the common table, as well as a stipend which, last year, was £1,075 per annum (there will be a small inflationary increase for 1999–2000). The Junior Dean will assist the Dean and other College Officers in the smooth running of the college. Applicants, who may be men or women, must be graduates, and it is expected that they will be pursuing advanced study or research.

The main responsibility for decanal matters in the college rests with the Dean, who is a fellow of the college. The current incumbent is Dr W.R. Moore, Fellow and Tutor in Engineering Science. In particular, the Junior Dean will normally be expected to be in college every night during the eight weeks of Full Term, both to act in a disciplinary role if necessary, but also to provide the first point of contact within the college in case of an emergency occurring during the night. It is a statutory requirement that a fellow, lecturer, or Junior Dean be in the college every night from 10.30 p.m. to 7 a.m.; it would, however, be possible, from time to time, for the Junior Dean to have a night off by prior arrangement with one of the resident fellows who could fulfil that requirement.

Applications, including a full curriculum vitae, should be sent to the Principal, Jesus College, Oxford OX1 3DW (telephone: Oxford (2)79718, fax: (2)79696, e-mail: gpeissel@ jesus.ox.ac.uk), by Friday, 28 May. Two referees should be asked to write direct to the Principal by the same date. If the applicant is a registered graduate student, one of the referees must be the applicant's University supervisor.

Return to List of Contents of this section


LINACRE COLLEGE

A.J. Hosier Studentship

The Board of Management of the A.J. Hosier Fund proposes to make election to an A.J. Hosier Studentship which will be tenable at Linacre College for the academic year 1999–2000 and will have a maximum value of £4,000. Candidates must be honours graduates of a university in the United Kingdom and be citizens of the UK, and must either have commenced reading or intend to commence reading in October 1999 for an advanced degree at Linacre College in one of the following subjects:

(i) husbandry;

(ii) agricultural economics or agricultural statistics; (iii) applied agricultural science.

Applications should be made by letter to the Principal, Linacre College, Oxford OX1 3JA. Candidates are asked to submit a curriculum vitae and to ask two referees to write directly to the Principal by the closing date for applications, 31 May.

Return to List of Contents of this section


MERTON COLLEGE

Schoolteacher Study Visits

Applications are invited for Schoolteacher Study Visits of 1–3 weeks' duration, available throughout the year, including vacations, from September 1999. The college will provide membership of the senior common room and board and lodging, but no stipend. A limited number of bursaries will be available to contribute to replacement teaching costs in the maintained sector in term. Applicants should be primarily engaged in sixth-form teaching, or have responsibility for advising sixth-formers, e.g. Head of Sixth Form, Housemaster, Head.

Further information may be obtained from the Tutorial Secretary, Merton College, Oxford OX1 4JD. Applications, including a curriculum vitae and one reference, should be submitted at least three months in advance of the proposed visit in keeping with one of the following closing dates: 31 May, 31 October, 28 February.

Return to List of Contents of this section


ORIEL COLLEGE

Eugene Lee-Hamilton Prize 1999

The Provost and Fellows of Oriel College offer a prize of £60 for the best Petrarchan sonnet in English submitted by an undergraduate of Oxford or Cambridge, on a subject to be chosen by the candidate. Enjambment between the eighth and ninth lines will be permitted.

No candidate may submit more than one sonnet, nor may the prize be awarded more than once to the same person. The competing sonnets should be sent to the College Secretary, Oriel College, Oxford OX1 4EW, not later than Monday, 31 May. Each sonnet must be accompanied by a certificate from the Head or a Fellow of the candidate's college, stating that the candidate is an undergraduate.

The winner will be deemed to have given permission to publish his/her sonnet in the Oriel Record.

Return to List of Contents of this section


ST CROSS COLLEGE

Appointment of Junior Dean

St Cross College proposes to appoint a Junior Dean for a period of one year from 1 October 1999 with the possibility of renewal for a second year. The Junior Dean will be required to reside in college, free of charge, and will also receive free lunches and a stipend of £1,000 per annum.

The Junior Dean will assist the college officers in the smooth running of the college, with particular responsibility for the supervision of the main site at night. Applicants must be graduates and it is expected that they will be pursuing advanced study or research.

Applications, with full curriculum vitae, should reach the Master, St Cross College, St Giles', Oxford OX1 3LZ, by Friday, 28 May. Applicants should inform the Master of the names, addresses, and telephone numbers of two referees and arrange for their referees to write directly to the Master by 28 May. If the applicant is a registered graduate student, one of the referees should be the applicant's university supervisor. It is likely that interviews will be held on Friday, 11 June.

Return to List of Contents of this section


SOMERVILLE COLLEGE

Six-hour Lecturership in Organic Chemistry

Somerville College proposes to appoint a Stipendiary Lecturer in Organic Chemistry for the academic year 1999– 2000. Ability to teach the range of subjects required for the Final Honours papers Organic Chemistry I and II and some topics for Advanced Organic Chemistry is essential.

The appointment will be on point one (£7,408) or point two (£7,868 ) of an incremental scale, depending on ex- perience. The lecturer will be expected to teach six hours a week.

Further information may be obtained from the College Secretary, Somerville College, Oxford OX2 6HD, to whom applications, including a curriculum vitae and the names of two referees, should be sent as soon possible. The closing date for applications is Friday, 21 May. Short-listed candidates are likely to be invited for interview in the week beginning Monday, 31 May.

Somerville College is committed to achieving equal opportunities.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Advertisements

Contents of this section:


How to advertise in the Gazette

Terms and conditions of acceptance of advertisements

Return to Contents Page of this issue


The Bodleian Shop

Retirement? Graduation? Anniversary? We have a selection of Oxford or Bodleian-related items suitable for that special gift: some can be customized. Prices from £13.95 to £425. Consult our shop staff or tel.: Oxford (2)77091 or (2)77216. Open Mon.–Fri., 9 a.m.–6 p.m.; Sat. 9 a.m.-12.30 p.m., or see the Bodleian Shopping Arcade at http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/arcade/.

 

Return to List of Contents of this section


Oxford University Museum of Natural History Shop

Recent arrivals include cheerful dodo mousemats (£3.99), David Lawrence's dodo figurines (£23.50), and a range of crepe de chine ties on natural history themes handpainted by Mary and Rachel Sumner (£32.50). The ever-changing mineral stock currently boasts richly coloured amethyst, striking fossil fish, and interesting septarian nodules. Open daily 12 noon–5 p.m. including Bank Holiday Monday. Enquiries tel.: Oxford (2)72961.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Swifts in a Tower

Copies are sought of the 2 studies of the swift colony nesting in the tower of the University Museum of Natural History. As a result of the live video relayed to the museum court during the breeding season, several requests are made for these books. Should you have an unwanted copy of David Lack's classic Swifts in a Tower, or of David Bromhall's Devil Birds, please contact (or leave a message for) Margaret Williamson, tel.: Oxford (2)72961. Their re-sale through the museum shop would support the work of the OUMNH.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Tuition Offered

Piano lessons. Experienced teacher. Adults and children. All grades. Beginners welcome. Contact Miss P. Read, BA (Hons), LRAM. Jericho, tel.: Oxford 510904.

Pallas: Inter-University Postgraduate Curriculum, LL.M. in European Business Law, 1999/2000.The Pallas LL.M. programme in European Business Law is a postgraduate full-time course of 1 year. This programme has been set up by the law departments of the universities of Barcelona (Spain), Bologna (Italy), Essex (Great Britain), Konstanz (Germany), LUISS Guido Carli (Italy), Jean Moulin Lyon 3 (France) and Nijmegen (The Netherlands) in 1995. The team of lecturers consists of leading professors and practising lawyers from various European countries. In Sept. 1999 and Sept. 2000 this course will be organised again. Host University: University of Nijmegen, the Netherlands. Working language: English. Tuition costs: EURO 8,865 (approx. NLG 19,500) for 1999/2000 year. Living expenses (accommodation included for 11 months of study in Nijmegen): approximately NLG 1,200 (550 EURO) per month for a single student. Further information available from Centre for Postgraduate Legal Education, University of Nijmegen, Faculty of Law, PO Box 10520, 6500 MB Nijmegen, the Netherlands (attn. Ms Mariëlle Cornielje). Tel.: + 31 24 3613090, fax: + 31 24 3615838, e-mail: cpo@jur.kun.nl.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Services Offered

Town and Country Trees: professional tree surgeons. All aspects of arboriculture undertaken including orchard and shrub pruning, planting, hedge trimming, stump grinding, etc. Quality work at competitive prices. We are fully insured. For a free quotation, call Paul Hodkinson. Tel.: 01869 351540.

Shipping? Abyssinia to Zanzibar, New York to Newmarket. Today, tomorrow, next week? All the best options are at Mail Boxes Etc. Will collect from college, home, factory, or elsewhere. Also 24-hour photocopying, secure mailboxes, computer workstation, high-grade colour photocopying, faxing, laminating, binding, etc. 266 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7DL. Contact Justin Brookes. Tel.: Oxford 514655, fax: 514656, e-mail: summertown@020.mbe.uk.com.

Tax advice. Ex-KPMG Chartered Accountant specialises in assisting professionals and small businesses with tax problems including self-assessment. Convenient North Oxford premises. To receive further information please tel.: Oxford 513381, e-mail: 100430.145@compuserve.com.

Experienced freelance copy-editor available to edit theses, conference papers, articles, and other documents. Reasonable rates, can work speedily. Tel.: Oxford 559061, e-mail: djlm@aol.com.

Efficient medical secretary offering an efficient, personal, and reliable secretarial support for professional and medical personnel. With fully-equipped home office (conputer, printer, e-mail, Internet). Any job undertaken, copy or audio work. For further details, please contact Jackie Webster, tel./fax: Oxford 882499.

Software training: I can offer training and help with many Windows applications (Windows 95, Word, e-mail, etc), one- to-one or in small groups. If you are struggling to get started, or want to get the best possible use from your PC resources, contact me and we can see where I can help with filling knowledge gaps, suggesting short cuts, and turning software use into an enjoyable and meaningful activity. Janet Caldwell, Oxford Software Training, 23 Squitchey Lane, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 511566, e-mail: janet.caldwell@virgin.net.

Research 4 Hire. For details, see http://www.research4hire.com.

Windows, doors, and conservatories installed with craftsmanship and care by Oxford's longest-established double glazing company. A third-generation family firm, we believe in giving clear practical advice without pressure or obligation. Proud to have served over 30 university colleges. Oxford Double Glazing, tel.: Oxford 248287.

Personal Computer Consultants: we offer expert advice and tuition for both hardware and software. On-site service at home or in the office. We provide upgrades for most computers, or alternatively we now supply our range of personally-built to your own specifications K Tec computers. We will also supply or source software to match your requirements. For a quality service matched with competitive prices, contact Chris Lewis, tel.: Oxford 461222, fax: 461333.

Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press—the University Printers: specialising in booklet and publicity material, typesetting, printing, and finishing. Output Bureau provides high- quality output from disc from all major DTP programs onto paper, bromide, colour-separated positive or negative film; high-quality specialist colour copier service. For service, quality, and competitive prices contact Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press, Great Clarendon Street, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 514691, fax: 514010.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Domestic Services

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre- occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford 726983 or Abingdon 555533.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Situations Vacant

St Edmund Hall: Assistant Director of Development (3 year post in first instance). To assist the Director in planning and launching a major capital fundraising campaign in 2000–5, while managing the day-to-day operations of the Development and Alumni Relations Office and consolidating its reorganisation. Duties will include managing financial and information systems, managing a programme of events, undertaking research, and managing production of the development newsletter and the updated Who's Whoof College alumni. Applicants should possess relevant experience in the fields of office administration, fundraising, and external relations. Experience of MS Windows, Word, and Excel would be preferred. For further information, please apply, enclosing full c.v. to the Domestic Bursar, St Edmund Hall, Oxford OX1 4AR, or e-mail: bursary@seh.ox.ac.uk. General details about the College are available at http://www.seh.ox.ac.uk. Applications close: 10 May.

Department of Materials. Three 3-year Technician posts. (1) Grade E Technician, to develop, maintain, and operate vacuum, computing, measuring, and microscopy equipment, and to assist, advise, and instruct users. This is an opportunity to contribute to a major research project being carried out in close co-operation with a Japanese company. Post requires the ability to get systems working and to find solutions to problems in the development and operation of sophisticated experimental aparatus. Salary £15,826–£18,345 (under review). (2) Grade E Technician, to assist with maintenance and operation of a wide variety of scanning and transmission electron microscopes. Post requires the ability to troubleshoot electronics to board level; microcomputer experience; some experience in electron optics; practical knowledge of vacuum systems. Salary £15,826–£18,345 (under review). (3) Grade F Senior Fabrication Technician, to assist in the concept, desidn, development, operation, and maintenance of processing equipment, and to instruct and advise users. Post requires liaison with external collaborating companies and suppliers, particularly with CAD software and large scale equipment design, and overseeing the safe and scheduled operation of equipment. Salary £18,345–£20,649 (under review). Applications (c.v., names/addresses of 2 referees) to the Administrator, Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH, from whom further particulars are available. Applications close 14 May. Please quote the post number.

Department of Pharmacology: part-time evening receptionist. Clerical and Library C2 (salary £9,463–£11,294 p.a.). Evening receptionist required to work from 5–6.30 p.m., Mon.–Fri. Applicants should be well presented, and have a good telephone manner and the ability to work well on their own initiative. Post available for 1 year in the first instance. Further particulars are available from Ms Kate Butler, Deputy Administrator, Department of Pharmacology, Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3QT, tel.: Oxford 281123, to whom applications should be sent, including 2 copies of current c.v. and names/addresses of 2 referees (at least 1 of whom should be a previous or current employer). Applications should be clearly marked with the reference PH/ADMIN/006, and should arrive no later than Mon. 17 May.

Balliol College Library: library desk issue staff. A part-time member of staff is required for 18.5 hours p.w. (afternoons: terms and vacations) beginning on Mon. 31 May, or as soon as possible thereafer. The post involves staffing the issue desk, checking readers' cards, running the book loan system (shortly to be automated), answering enquiries and other clerical tasks. Starting rate of pay: £4.86 p.h. Written applications, including c.v. and names/addresses of 2 referees, should reach the Librarian, Balliol College, Oxford OX1 3BJ, by Fri. 31 May 1999. Balliol College is an equal opportunities employer.

Balliol College: Master's Secretary. To start early July 1999 or at a mutually convenient date. The successful candidate will be well-qualified and experienced, and will preferably have some knowledge of the University and/or college administration. Salary will be paid on Balliol Grade 4 (£14,250–£16,496 p.a.); benefits are detailed in the further particulars. Application form and further particulars are available from the College Secretary, Balliol College, Oxford OX1 3BJ. Applications close: Fri. 18 May, interviews will be held in mid-June. Balliol College is an equal opportunities employer.

Trinity College: Conference and Functions Administrator, to promote and organise this important area of activity which currently has a turnover in excess of £450K. Applicants should preferably be members of the HCIMA and have previous conference/functions administration experience. Good IT skills essential (Word, Excel, Access, e-mail). Salary £17,000–£19,000 (pensionable). Letters of application, including brief c.v. and names/addresses of 2 referees, should be sent to the Domestic Bursar, Trinity College, Oxford OX1 3BH. Further details will be sent on request (tel.: Oxford (2)79890. Applications close: Fri. 14 May.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Houses to Let

North Oxford : furnished 3-bedroom house available for year or longer from mid-June/July 1999. Garage, front and rear gardens, gas c.h., newly-fitted kitchen and bathroom; on bus route to city centre. £900–£950 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 515547 or 01869 331575.

Three properties: (1) Summertown: sunstantial, well- presented, furnished, 4-bedroom family home. Fully equipped spacious kitchen/dining area. Two attractive lounges and south-facing garden. Very conveniently situated for Summertown shops. Available July, £1,700 p.c.m. (2) Central North Oxford: unfurnished 3-bedroom home. Lounge, very spacious lounge/dining area and kitchen equipped with all electrical appliances. Conveniently located for city centre. Available May, £1,150. (3) Whytham village: 3-bedroom character cottage. Fully furnished. Very large secluded garden. Available June. £1,500 p.c.m.

Quiet street in Headington (May/June). Five minutes from shops, 15 minutes' bus ride to city centre and close to hospitals. Pretty garden, garage, and off-street parking. Suit visiting academic/medical couple or family with 2/3 children. Three bedrooms, 1 study, 2 bathrooms, large open plan sitting-room/diner. Newly furnished with all appliances. Available 1 May–30 June. £850 p.c.m. Tel.: 01494 482193, e-mail: jocelyn.bradley@batth.demon.co.uk.

Beautiful, modern, furnished 4-bedroom house in an attractive leafy cul-de-sac in Iffley, 2 miles from city centre, close to buses. Washing machine, drier, dishwasher, freezer, fridge, gas c.h. formal diing-room. Large and sunny sitting-room. Available 1 Aug.–30 Dec. £1,100 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 771696, e-mail: ali.sheikholeslami@orinst.ox.ac.uk.

Iffley village: 2-bedroom, Victorian terrace house. Hardwood floors, open fires. Two miles to city centre, minutes from riverside walks. Furnished/unfurnished. Availablke for long term lease, July/Aug. 1999 onwards. £750 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 717712, e-mail: RobinE@Pads.com.

Comfortable semi-detached house in Marston, available July for 1 year or longer. Recently refurbished. Fully furnished to a high standard. Three bedrooms, 2 reception rooms, fitted kitchen, gas c.h., bathroom with power shower, garden. Quiet position with good views of central Oxford. Close to JR Hospital and cycle track across parks to city centre; good bus route. £700 p.c.m. plus bills and Council Tax. Tel.: Oxford 874310, e-mail: markchapman@ripon- cuddesdon.ac.uk.

Old Marston village. Convenient for Oxford and Headington. Quaint but centrally-heated 1-bedroom cottage. Available 1 June for 1 year. £580 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 511967.

Woodstock: small period cottage in quiet location close to Blenheim Park and town centre. Delightfully furnished and fully equipped. One double and 1 single bedroom, bahtroom and separate w.c., sitting/dining-room, kitchen. Gas c.h. Telephone. Conservatory area leading to small walled garden. Suit visiting academic/professional couple/single. Available immediately for up to 1 year by agreement. £675 p.c.m. Tel.: 01993 812639.

Victorian terraced house situated in a quiet cul-de- sac off the Abingdon Road. Two reception rooms and 3 bedrooms. Downstairs bathroom and w.c. Fully furnished, c.h., fitted carpets. Small back garden. £800 p.c.m. Available from July for 1 year. Please tel.: 01639 844285.

Central North Oxford: attractively-furnished 4- storey Victorian house in very quiet street, 15 minutes' walk from city centre, quarter mile from river Thames and Port Meadow. Two double bedrooms and 1 single. Two bathrooms (1 with shower, 1 with bath, both with w.c.). Double reception room with stripped pine floor, oriental rugs, and desk. Modern pine kitchen/diner with large table. Dishwasher, fridge, freezer, gas c.h., linen, washing machine, drier, TV, 4 bicycles. Free street parking. £965 p.c.m. inclusive of charges except phone calls. Available 24 July–4 Sept. Exchange considered for house near sea. Dr Josephine Reynell, tel.: Oxford 516615, fax: 516616.

Old Boars Hill. Available full/part academic year 1999–2000. Four miles city centre. Hourly bus service. 2/3 bedrooms, 2 reception, gardens. £750 p.m. Tel. (before 8 May; USA) 219 287 1449, (after 8 May): Oxford 735305.

Large 4-bedroom North Oxford House in quiet cul- de-sac ending in park. Fully furnished. Available mid-Oct.–27 Dec. £1,400 p.m. including utilities. Spacious accommodation includes loft, dining-room/sun room, and 2.5 bathrooms. Tel.: Oxford 454274.

Make finding accommodation a pleasure, not a chore. Finders Keepers is dedicated to making it easy for visitors to Oxford to find the right property. Browse through our Web site for up-to- date detailed information on properties available and make use of our interactive database, priority reservation service (credit cards accepted), welcome food pack, personal service, and much more. Call us and you will not need to go elsewhere. For further information contact Finders Keepers, 226 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk; Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

An Englishman's home is his castle—so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or e-mail us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 764533, fax: 764777, e-mail: info@qbman.co.uk.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Flats to Let

Central Headington, available June. Beautifully- converted, spacious, 2-bedroom, first-floor flat. Tastefully furnished, large living-room, fully-fitted kitchen with washing machine, bathroom with bath and separate pumped shower, gas c.h., double glazing, off- street parking. Professionals and academics only. £650 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 768504 (evenings).

Flat to rent, available end of May (long let only). Modern decor and furnishings, 1 double bedroom, living-room, kitchen, bathroom, c.h. All facilities. Private parking. Quiet Banbury Road location, 1.5 miles city centre. Non-smoker. £575 p.m. plus Council Tax. Tel.: 01993 852196.

Newly-converted self-contained basement studio with private entrance, in St Clements area of Oxford, short walk to city centre. Bed/sitting-room with cooking facilities, gas coal-effect fire, shower room. Fully furnished. Suit professional/academic/graduate. £450 p.c.m. including gas, electricity, Council Tax. Tel.: Oxford 436381.

St Clements/East Oxford borders. Spacious, modern, ground-floor, 2-bedroom apartment with private parking. Large lounge/diner, fitted kitchen with appliances including washer. double bedroom, single bedroom, bathroom with power shower, gas c.h., communal drying room, courtyard. Available 1 May. £675 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 798737.

Elegant 1-bedroom ground-floor flat in St Margaret's Road, central North Oxford. Double bedroom, large sitting- room, kitchen, bathroom. Fully furnished, newly decorated, washing machine and gas c.h. Use of charming shared garden. £725 p.c.m. plus bills. Available now. Let of 6 months or longer preferred. Tel.: Oxford 343384.

Central North Oxford: 10 minutes' walk from city centre, all main university buildings, and parks, and very close to the river. Available for short/long let. Exceptionally well-furnished, comfortable flat in extremely quiet, civilised, large Victorian house in this exclusive, leafy, residential Victorian suburb, with large, light, airy rooms. First-floor (available now): double bedroom, drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom. Off-street parking; large secluded garden. Tel./fax: Oxford 552400.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Summer Lets

Available in August: light and spacious semi- detached house in south Oxford. Close to city centre (10 minutes by bicycle—2 available). Two bedrooms, 2 reception, kitchen/dining- room, bathroom, garden. Fully furnished and equipped. Overlooks open country from the back. Frequent bus service. Prefer 1 or 2 persons. Resident cat to be fed. £450 for 1, £700 for 2. Tel.: Oxford 728111, e-mail: Majaob@aol.com.

Live in comfort near the Thames and a short walk from the city centre. Beautiful Victorian house, 4 bedrooms, south facing garden, c.h. Architect converted, large split-level living-room, pale wood floors, dining-room, new and fully-equipped kitchen, bathroom with bidet and w.c., shower-room with w.c. Available 6 weeks, 24 July–5 Sept. 1999. Price negotiable. Tel.: Oxford 725193.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Accommodation Offered

Large sunny room in lovely 3-bedroom Victorian house in Summertown, to share with 1 other person. All mod. cons., open fire in living-room, mature garden, easy access to city centre. Available June. £350 p.c.m. plus bills. Tel.: Oxford 515810, e-mail: woodn@oup.co.uk.

Delightful rooms, North Oxford. Smallest room £30 p.w., telephone, shower, c.h., all mod. cons. Available now, short stay up to 3 months. Located near Woodstock Road roundabout. Tel.: Oxford 511657.

Bed-and-breakfast available in the warm comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple in exclusive, leafy, central North Oxford; within easy walking distance of the city centre and all main university buildings; a stone's throw from the river, parks, excellent pubs and restaurants and a 9–9 corner shop. All rooms have colour TV, microwave, tea- and coffee-making facilities, c.h., and independent heating. Refrigerators available. Very moderate terms. Tel./fax: Oxford 557879, mobile: 0374 434489.

Lovely, peaceful, large room in a detached house with surrounding gardens, overlooking fields and woods in Headington area. Close to frequent 24-hour bus routes to Oxford city centre (20 minutes) and to London. Fully furnished, c.h., shared kitchen and bathroom, etc. £60 p.w. (exclusive). Available to rent from May to quiet, female, non-smoker. Please tel./fax: Oxford 766503 for further details.

Self-contained luxury open plan accommodation in North Oxford, well within ring road. Quiet, with patio and lovely views to open countryside; near convenient bus route. Suit visiting academic/professional single or couple. Available now. Rent £650 p.m. for single, £700 for couple, including electricity and Council Tax. Regret no children, pets, or smokers. Tel.: Oxford 515085, e-mail: trishaboyd@hotmail.com.

Elderly doctor in Headington living alone has comofortable self-contained furnished accommodation available and would like to find a responsible person who could use this and in exchange provide accessibility in an emergency together with some minor home-care housekeeping (local shopping, some light cooking, etc.). Arrangements could be quite flexible and open to experiment but the home-care element might involve 10–12 hours p.w. An incumbent could therefore also, if desired, take on other part-time home care (or nursing?) activities, whether nearby, or at some distance. Might also suit retired person who could use furnished accommodation and has some time to spare, or possibly somone with some writing to do. No cleaning. Occasional driving might be useful. To discuss options, please tel.: Oxford 768925.

Single room in quiet, modern, city centre flat, available immediately. Two-minute walk from Oxford station; off-street parking available. Would suit young professional/academic female, non-smoker. Weekday let preferred. £300 p.c.m., including bills (except phone). Tel.: Oxford 722783 (after 7 p.m.).

Return to List of Contents of this section


Accommodation Sought

House sitter. College lecturer available for house- sitting in the Oxford area over the summer months and for all of the next academic year until Oct. 2000. Long term preferred (over 2 months). References available. Tel.: Oxford 280273.

Rented house/apartment in Oxford needed. Two twin or double bedrooms. Inside ring road. To be shared by 2 non-smoking academic couples (Italian), no children, no pets. Ideally end June–end Sept. 1999, but some flexibility possible on dates. Contact Dr J.F. Gregg, Magdalen College, tel.: Oxford (2)72311, e-mail: gregg@ermine.ox.ac.uk.

Academic married couple (Medicine/English) seeks flat/house to rent or house sit in Oxford area, 1 July–30 Sept. 1999 during fellowship. No children or pets (although happy to look after pets), non-smokers, references provided. Tel.: Oxford 240384, e- mail: clark.lawlor@ehrc.ox.ac.uk.

Visiting academic and family seeks 3/4-bedroom house close to city centre to rent for 2-week period, 6 July–6 Aug. Non-smokers, local references available. James Basker, Columbia University, tel.: 212 531 3732, e-mail: jgbassist@aol.com.

Academic couple with child (2 years) and baby, planning research stay in Oxford Aug. 1999–July 2000/2001, seeks unfurnished house/flat with small garden (2 bedrooms). Monthly rental up to £650. Contact Florian Theil, Im Langen Feld 8, D- 30880 Laatzen. Tel.: +49 341 9959 709 (office), 511 221393 (home), fax: 9959 658, e-mail: ftheil@mis.mpg.de.

Visiting professor and wife need 2-bedroom fully- furnished apartment/flat, c.h. laundry facilities, parking garage, near University, for period 1 July–30 Nov. 1999. Responses to Dr H.T. Debas, 240 St Francis Blvd, San Fransisco, CA 94127, USA. Fax: 415 502 0317, e-mail: kdebas@medsch.ucsf.edu.

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us: Oxford 764533, fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk. Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.

Mallams Residential Letting is well placed to help with your letting and management requirements. Based in Summertown, we offer a professional service tailored to your individual requirements. If you are thinking of letting your property, please call us. Tel.: Oxford 311006, fax: 311977.

Finders Keepers specialises in managing your home or investment. We have celebrated 25 years in Oxford letting and managing properties—try us first! Many of our landlords have remained with us since we opened and are delighted with our service—why not pop in and read their comments? Contact Finders Keepers, 226 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk, Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Accommodation Exchange

Professor, wife, and 3 children (girl aged 11, boys aged 8, 13) would like to live in Oxford or about 3 weeks between late July and mid-Aug. Would swap their 4-bedroom house in Boston for residence in Oxford. Central location in residential neighbourhood, 20 minutes from Boston museums and Cambridge (Harvard and MIT). One hour from beaches on Cape Cod and from lakes and mountains in New Hampshire. Contact Stephen Pope, tel.: 001 617 5523829, e-mail: stephen.pope1@bc.edu.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Accommodation Sought to Rent or Exchange

Visiting professor requires accommodation for 2 adults and 2 children for May and June. Strong preference for North Oxford, but will consider others within walking distance of city cente. Will consider house swap, current residence is a 4-bedroom house in Concord, Massachusetts (suburban Boston), and is well suited for small children. Contact Bill Wilhelm. Tel. (USA): 001 617 552 3990, e- mail: william.wilhelm@bc.edu.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Accommodation Offered to Rent or Exchange

Spacious family home available for exchange or rent in Cork. City centre and University within 15 minutes' walk. Quiet location, south-facing, fine views. Four bedrooms on 2 floors, c.h., bathroom, large drawing room, family room. Available from July 1999 in exchange for accomodation near central Oxford, or for rent £700 p.c.m. excluding charges. For further information, e-mail: ptod@ucc.ie.

Academic couple would like to let out sunny, antique-furnished apartment (2 bedrooms, dining-room, sitting-room, kitchen, workroom, 1.5 bathrooms), in northern Chicago (Evanston, near Northwestern University). Let or exchange for accommodation in/near Oxford/London/Cambridge etc. June–Aug. 1999. Beach, shops, downtown trains, restaurants, services—3 minutes by foot. Contact Calvert-Lee/Kahane, tel.: 1-847/475-7410; e-mail: aka120@nwu.edu.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Holiday Lets

Experience 99.9% eclipse (11 Aug.) from coastguard cottage close to Portland Bill on Chesil Beach in Dorset. Spectacular position. Sleeps 4 in 2 bedrooms or 5 at a pinch. £450 p.w., includes all electricity for water and heating. Don't wait for the next eclipse in Sept. 2090! Simon, tel.: 01608 810563.

Mainland Spain, Costa del Sol, Andalusia style English Riviera maisonette, £75 p.w.; double bedroom, double salon, grand terrace, kitchen, bathroom, well-equipped, view over sea, large swimming pool by step of maisonette, residential shops and laundry all week. 15 km Marbella, 80 km Gibralter. Tel.: Oxford 511657.

Annual multi-trip holiday insurance. From as little as £26 per year, you can travel as many times as you like. This insurance is arranged by Affinity Groups Advantage Limited, an independent intermediary for selling of general insurance. For further details, tel.: 0345 660453.

France: large farmhouse to let, beautiful chestnut grove, set in 3 hectares on edge of hamlet. Four rooms, plus bathroom and well-equipped kitcen. Beautiful countryside, close to Lot River and historic Bastide towns. Available for long or short lets (except for Aug.). £500 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 559061, e-mail: djlm@aol.com.

Forty Baskets is a small secluded beach on Sydney Harbour adjacent to National Park Bushlands and close to Manly, with surf and ferries to downtown Sydney (30 minutes). Three-bedroom, 2- bathroom, family home right on the beach; available June–Sept. 2000; £1,100 p.c.m. Details from Hanbury and Heaher Brown, tel./fax: 01264 772334, or e-mail: marion.brown@pathology.ox.ac.uk.

Share a beautiful, newly-renovated flat in central Florence with 3 delightful cats (cat supplies provided). Situated on the south bank of the River Arno, near Piazza el Carmine, the flat is on 2 floors and has 2 bedrooms (1 double, 1 single), 2 bathrooms, large well- equipped kitchen, living-room (with double sofa bed) opening onto furnished terrace with Duomo, washing machine, dishwasher. Available Sat. 24 July–Sat. 4 Sept. £450 p.w. including utilities. Contact Walsh, tel.: 0039 0552398759, e-mail: walsh@posta.cce.unifi.it.

Andalucia: house, or part, to let; Gaucin. Pool. Charming, magical, medieval white village. Panoramic views from house. Morocco. Stunning landscape. Butterflies, birds, and fun. Visit Granada, Ronda, Cordoba, Seville, Morocco, Cadiz, Jerez, Arcos. From £85 p.w. Reduction long let. Dr Campbell. For brochure, tel./fax: Oxford 513935, e-mail: l.lustgaten@soton.ac.uk.

Alpine chalet in farming hamlet at 3,000 ft., Haute Savoie, France. Sleeps 2–7; garden, wild flowers, cowbells. Mountain walking, winter skiing, or just unwinding. Not far from Lake Geneva, Annecy, Chamonix. Local swimming pool, tennis, riding. Jackie Becker, tel./fax: 0030 450 357412, e-mail: jlbecker@compuserve.com.

Northumberland, between the Cheviots and the sea. A stone-built cottage in a small unspoilt village 5 miles from Alnwick castle, within easy reach of half a dozen more, and miles of beautiful sea shore. Two double bedrooms and a third with bunk beds. Sitting- room, kitchen, bathroom. For details, tel.: 01665 579292.

Burgundy (Morvan National Park): 19th-c. stone cottage in quiet hamlet. Sleeps 5+. Enclosed front and rear gardens backing onto meadow with stream. Spacious sitting-room, 2 double bedrooms, study, bathroom, fully-equipped kitchen, washing machine, c.h., telephone, log fires. Ideal for peace and quiet, walking, swimming in nearby lakes, wine-tasting, and sight-seeing in Burgundy (half hour from Vézelay and Avallon. Available all dates except 19 July–14 Aug. inclusive. £225–£275 p.w. Tel.: Oxford 721539.

Paris: lovely well-appointed 1-bedroom apartment, suit couple, in 17e; excellent transport, available from 1 July for short or long-term stay. Rate depends on length of stay. Tel.: 00 1 607 257 3567, e-mail: price@law.mail.cornell.edu.

Greece: charming old village house to let on the beautiful island of Skopelos. Tel.: 01280 847849.

French Alps, 1 hour Geneva. Peaceful sunny location, 1 km centre Morzine, newly-equipped chalet. Sleeps 7/8. Fantastic for summer holidays. Swimming, walking, riding, paragliding, white water rafting, climbing, plus tourist attractions galore. £400 p.w. Book now for 2000 skiing. Tel.: 01295 810063.

Skopelos, Skiathos, Alonissos. Lovely island houses available for rent. Town, country, seaside locations, sleeping 2–8 persons, prices from £39 per person p.w. For brochure, tel.: 003042422947, fax: 003042423057, e-mail: thalpos@otenet.gr.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Houses for Sale

Two 4-storey Victorian houses (31/32 Kingston Road) separated by driveway allowing shared use of the grounds—parking for 5 cars. This adds £30,000 to the value of each flat, for which £50,000 is estimated value of each floor, fully furnished. Flat 31 comprises 3 floors equipped for multi- occupation. 31A is lower ground-floor facing west. Lawns and garden. Flats 32 and 32A have 2 floors each. Property value: £520,000. Tel.: Oxford 556460 (preferably before noon).

Greece, Spetses: beautiful island, no cars, 1 hour 50 minutes from Piraeus. Charming house in quiet residential area, in excellent condition. 400 sq. metre detached plot, 120 sq. metre living area. Three bedrooms, 2 bathrooms. Large cross-ventilated kitchen, living-room with fireplace. Plenty of shelving, wall-seating, and built- in cupboards. Terrace with open view, awnings. Garden with cypress and olive trees. Beach 5 minutes' walk. Near supermarket. Perfect for vacations, retirement, sabaticals. £180,000. Tel.: Oxford 284722.

Return to List of Contents of this section


For Sale

1955 Citroën Light 15 (Traction Avant). Right- hand drive with wood dash and leather interior trim. In beautiful condition and a please to drive subsequent to complete body and mechanical restoration. To view, tel.: Oxford 284274, e-mail: hugh.forsyth@yahoo.com. n

 

Return to List of Contents of this section


Diary

Contents of this section:

Academic Staff Development Seminars: places should be booked in advance through the Staff Development Office, University Offices, Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

For the full list of courses, see the Staff Development ProgrammeWeb site.

Return to Contents Page of this issue


Friday 7 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `East meets West: the world of tea', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

 

 

SIR JOHN HOUGHTON: `Global climatic change' (School of Geography Centenary Lectures), School of Geography, 2.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR A. SCOTT: `Global economic change' (School of Geography Centenary Lectures), School of Geography, 3.45 p.m.

 

PROFESSOR J. FENTON: `Auden's prose' (second in a series of three lectures), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

DR P. NURSE: `Life and the reproduction of cells' (Ian Woolf Lecture), Auditorium, St John's, 5.15 p.m.

DAME ELIZABETH BUTLER-SLOSS: `Who is to judge? The role of the judiciary in ethical issues' (Eric Symes Abbott Memorial Lecture), the chapel, Keble, 5.30 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Sunday 9 May

LORD HABGOOD: `Varieties of unbelief—all or none' (fifth Bampton Lecture), St Mary's, 10 a.m.

JANE APPEL and Lynton Appel: piano and cello recital of works by Schubert, Bartok, Schumann, and Brahms, Wolfson College, 6.30 p.m. (admission £5, or family ticket £12; proceeds to African and Medical Research Foundation).

Return to List of Contents of this section


Monday 10 May

DR O. CAMPBELL: `The shifting paradigm for safe motherhood programmes in developing countries' (Fertility and Reproduction seminars), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

C. ABELS: `Public health in Latin America: 1900 and the new millennium' (Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine seminars: `History of tropical medicine and infectious diseases'), Wellcome Unit, 2.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR S. VERBA: `Social theory and social science: two cultures?' (Tanner Lectures on Human Values: `Representation: democratic theory and social surveys'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR M. ROE: `The determinants of corporate governance' (first of three Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR O. RACKHAM: `Trees and timber in Greek history' (Myres Memorial Lecture), McGregor-Matthews Room, New College, 5 p.m.

J.-P. DE BEAUMARCHAIS: `Les metamorphoses de Figaro' (Besterman Lecture), Taylor Institution, 5 p.m. (the Chancellor presiding).

PROFESSOR DR H. RIKHOF: `Changing perspectives: approaching the Trinity' (St Cross College Visiting Fellow Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

J. KAHN: `A federal façade: Russia's republics in transition' (lecture series: `Russian politics and society: Soviet and post-Soviet'), Lecture Theatre, New Building, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

 

MAISON FRANÇAISE/VOLTAIRE FOUNDATION soirée marking bicentenary of death of Beaumarchais: Main droite, main gauche (dialogue between Beaumarchais and Voltaire, by J.-P. de Beaumarchais, created by M. Favier and P. Vion), Maison Française, 8 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Tuesday 11 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Greek pots: their origins and uses', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

 

 

 

PROFESSOR I. MELLMAN: `The cellular basis of biological asymmetry' (Newton-Abraham Lecture), Lecture Theatre, Department for Continuing Education, 4.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR S. VERBA: `Citizens in democracies and democratic citizens' (Tanner Lectures on Human Values: `Representation: democratic theory and social surveys'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR M. ROE: `The determinants of corporate governance' (second of three Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR M.B. PARKES: `The hasty scribe (cursive handwriting in antiquity and the Middle Ages)' (Lyell Lectures in Bibliography: `Their hands before our eyes: a closer look at scribes'), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

J. TAVENER: `Hymn of entry' (Hussey Lecture on the Church and the Arts), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR B. STROUD: `Perceptions of colour and the colours of things' (Gareth Evans Memorial Lecture), St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

J. WHITELEY: `Daubigny et le Dauphiné' (lecture series: `Grenoble et sa région'), Maison Française, 6 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Wednesday 12 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Art in the Islamic world', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

J. DEMPSTER: `How to enhance learning through technology: addressing the needs of a research-led university' (OxTalent `How to...' seminar series), Language Centre, 1 p.m.

PROFESSOR M. ROE: `The determinants of corporate governance' (Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies—final lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

S. FAULKS: `Something happened: how narrative helps tell the time' (Richard Hillary Memorial Lecture), Gulbenkian Theatre, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. LOIZOS: `Half-life of the Ottoman Empire: long-term studies of four communities, 1895–1995' (Refugee Studies Programme: Elizabeth Colson Lecture), Rhodes House, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR N. FRIEDMAN: `The colonisation of land and the origin of organismic complexity' (Waynflete Lectures: `Seminal events in the evolutionary history of plants'), Grove Auditorium, Magdalen, 5 p.m.

K. RETFORD: `The Englightenment and the family—mothers and children in Enlightenment England' (Enlightenment Workshop series), Voltaire Foundation, 5 p.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM evening tour: `The Pre-Raphaelites', 5.30 p.m. (Admission £1.50. Places must be booked: tel. (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

DR J. RAWSON: `Ancestral spirits and extraordinary deities: religious change in ancient China' (annual public lecture of Friends of Pitt Rivers Museum), Inorganic Chemistry Lecture Theatre, South Parks Road, 7 p.m.

THE BAND OF INSTRUMENTS with the New Chamber Opera perform Mozart's opera Bastien und Bastienne, the chapel, New College, 8.30 p.m. (admission £6, concessions £4).

Return to List of Contents of this section


Thursday 13 May

ACADEMIC STAFF Development Seminar: `Time management', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

PROFESSOR D.F. EICKLEMAN: `Shifting centres and emerging peripheries: the changing political geography of Muslim transnationalism' (ESRC Research Programme on Transnational Communities: `Transnational religious communities: Muslim and Hindu movements and networks'), Seminar Room, School of Geography, 2 p.m.

DR M. JASCHOK: `Possessed by a goddess: ethnographic notes from encounters with a ritual healer from Shaanxhi, China' (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Gender and health: healers, carers, and patients'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. STROHM (J.R.R. Tolkien Professor of English Literature and Language): `Chaucer's Troilus as temporal archive' (inaugural lecture), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

A. RAMUSSEN: `A small world? The forms, spaces, and languages of international science in 1900' (Maison Française seminar series: `Science and the new century: Britain, France, and Germany .1900'), History of Science Seminar Room, Modern History Faculty Building, 5 p.m.

T. MKANDAWIRE: `Thinking about developmental states in Africa' (African Studies Lecture), Oakeshott Room, Lincoln College, 5 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Friday 14 May

PROFESSOR D.J.B. ROBEY: `Future national teaching and learning policies: the role of IT' (OxTalent seminar), Computing Laboratory, Wolfson Building, 11.30 a.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Dutch painting', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

PROFESSOR J. FENTON: `Auden's poetry' (final lecture in series), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

DR J. LANGTON: `The changing geography of poor relief in rural Oxfordshire: 1772–1834' (School of Geography Centenary Lectures), School of Geography, 5 p.m.

GEORGE BENJAMIN lectures in series `The Composer Speaks', Holywell Music Room, 5 p.m. (with a live performance of his duo Viola, Viola by Ralph Ehlers and Catherine Manson; free and open to the public).

PROFESSOR L. ROSEN: `Defending culture: the cultural defence plea and judicial uses of the concept of culture' (Socio-Legal Studies Annual Lecture), Schools, 5.30 p.m.

OXFORD PHILOMUSICA STRINGS (with Marios Papadopoulos, piano) perform works by Vaughan Williams, Benjamin, Sakalis, and Dvorak, Holywell Music Room, 8 p.m. (full-price tickets £10, from Oxford Playhouse or at the door).

Return to List of Contents of this section


Saturday 15 May

BRITISH CENTRE for Durkheimian Studies Study Day I (various speakers): `Durkheim and the Durkheimians and the arts at the turn of the nineteenth century', Maison Française, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.

PROFESSOR P.B.A. BIRKS: `Rights, wrongs, and remedies' (Blackstone Lecture), Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 11.30 a.m.

MUSIC FACULTY concert: Joan Conway Scholarship winners, 1998–9, perform works by Schubert, Liszt, Finzi, Messiaen, and Takemitsu, Holywell Music Room, 12 noon (free and open to the public).

Return to List of Contents of this section


Sunday 16 May

LORD HABGOOD: `Varieties of unbelief—anorexia religiosa' (sixth Bampton Lecture), St Mary's, 10 a.m.

Return to List of Contents of this section