4 May 2000 - No 4546



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 130, No. 4546: 4 May 2000<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

4 May 2000


The following supplements were published with this Gazette:

Appointments

Staff Development Seminars,
Trinity Term

(details from the Staff Development Office)


University Health and
Safety
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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 4 May 2000: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL 1 May


1 Decrees

Council has made the following decrees, to come into effect on 19
May.

List of the decrees:


Decree (1): Departmental allowance for the
Head of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences

Explanatory note

The following decree provides for a Schedule III departmental
allowance to be paid to the Head of the Nuffield Department of
Clinical Laboratory Sciences, which has been created by the merger
(with effect from 10 December 1999) of the Nuffield Department of
Clinical Biochemistry and Cellular Science with the Nuffield
Department of Pathology and Bacteriology.

Text of Decree (1)

1 In Ch. VIII, Sect. I, § 7, Schedule III NAME = "2Dec">(Statutes, 1997, p. 395, as amended by
Decree (2) of 16 July 1998, Gazette, Vol. 128, p. 1474),
after `SCHEDULE III' insert:

`Head of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences'.

2 Ibid., Schedule IV, delete `Head of the
Nuffield Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Cellular Science'.

3 Ibid., Schedule VI, delete `Head of the
Nuffield Department of Pathology and Bacteriology'.

4 This decree shall be effective from 10
December 1999.

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Decree (2): Electoral Board for the Readership in Recent Social
and Economic History

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Social
Studies Board and with the concurrence of the General Board,
increases the permanent membership of the electoral board for the
Readership in Recent Social and Economic History from seven to nine
members in accordance with current practice. It further provides
that, on the occasion of the coming refilling of the readership, the
place on the electoral board normally taken by the Chichele Professor
of Economic History shall be taken by the professor-elect (the chair
being vacant until 1 October 2000), and also that, in view of
difficulties in ensuring that all interests are appropriately
represented on this occasion, a tenth member shall be appointed by
the General Board so that in particular it will be possible to
observe the statutory requirement that an electoral board should
contain at least two members external to Oxford.

Text of Decree (2)

1 In Ch. VII, Sect. III, § 122
(Statutes, 1997, p. 446), delete cl. 2 and substitute:

`2. The reader shall be elected by a board consisting of:

(1) the Vice-Chancellor;

(2) the head of the college with which the readership shall be for
the time being associated, or, if the head is unable or unwilling to
act, a person appointed by the governing body of the college;

(3) a person appointed by the governing body of the college
specified in (2) of this clause;

(4) the Chichele Professor of Economic History;

(5) a person appointed by Council;

(6) a person appointed by the General Board;

(7) a person appointed by the Board of the Faculty of Modern
History;

(8), (9) two persons appointed by the Board of the Faculty of
Social Studies.'

2 Notwithstanding the provisions of cl. 2 (4)
and (6) above, on the occasion of the refilling of the readership for
which proceedings begin in 2000 the Chichele Professor of Economic
History shall be replaced as an elector by the Chichele
Professor-elect of Economic History and the General Board shall
appoint an additional elector.

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Decree (3): Duties of the Regius Professor
of Medicine

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Clinical
Medicine and Physiological Sciences Boards and with the concurrence
of the General Board, deletes examining in the Second Examination for
the Degrees of Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery as one of
the Regius Professor of Medicine's specific duties.

Text of Decree (3)

1 In Ch. VII, Sect. III, § 206, cl. 2
(Statutes, 1997, p. 475, as renumbered by Decree (1) of
29 October 1998 and Decree (2) of 28 October 1999,
Gazette, Vol. 129, p. 276; Vol. 130, p. 256), delete
`shall act ... and Bachelor of Surgery, and'.

2 Ibid., delete `other'.

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Decree (4): Establishment of Yamanouchi Cell
Biology Prize

Explanatory note

The Yamanouchi Research Institute based at the Oxford Science Park
has offered the sum of £2,500, and possible further sums which
may be contributed for the purpose, to establish a prize for students
studying for the Honour School of Physiological Sciences. The
following decree, made on the recommendation of the Physiological
Sciences Board and with the concurrence of the General Board,
establishes the prize.

Text of Decree (4)

In Ch. IX, Sect. I (Statutes, 1997, p. 752, as
renumbered by Decree (4) of 25 June 1999, Gazette, Vol.
129, p. 1430, and by the deletion of the regulations of the Curators
of the Taylor Institution concerning the Zaharoff Travelling
Scholarships, Gazette, Vol. 128, p. 1486), insert §
384:

`§ 384. Yamanouchi Cell Biology Prize

1. The University accepts with gratitude the sum of £2,500
from the Yamanouchi Research Institute, and any further sums which
may contributed for the same purpose, to establish a fund the net
income of which shall be used for the award of a prize to be known as
Yamanouchi Cell Biology Prize.

2. The fund shall be administered by a board of management
consisting of

(1) the Director of Pre-Clinical Studies (or his or her nominee);

(2) a person appointed by the Medical Sciences Board in
consultation with the Director of Pre-Clinical Studies for such
period or periods as it shall determine.

3. The prize shall be awarded annually, provided that there is a
candidate of sufficient merit, for performance in the Honour School
of Physiological Sciences on such terms as the board of management
shall from time to time determine.

4. The board of management may in any year withhold the prize if
in its opinion there is no candidate of sufficient merit. Income not
expended in any year shall be carried forward for expenditure in
subsequent years.

5. Council shall have power to amend this decree from time to
time, provided that the purpose of the fund, as defined in clause 1
above, shall always be kept in view.'

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Decree (5): Replacement of the Preliminary
Examination in Physical Sciences with separate examinations

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Physical
Sciences Board and with the concurrence of the General Board,
replaces the Preliminary Examination in Physical Sciences with
separate Preliminary Examinations for Chemistry, Earth Sciences,
Metallurgy and Science of Materials, and Physics.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in `Examinations and
Boards' below.

Text of Decree (5)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p.
23, after l. 34 insert:

`Chemistry,'.

2 Ibid., after l. 36 insert:

`Earth Sciences,'.

3 Ibid., p. 24, after l. 9 insert:

`Metallurgy and Science of Materials,'.

4 Ibid., delete l. 21 and substitute:

`Physics,'.

5 Ibid., p. 25, l. 2, delete `Physical
Sciences' and substitute `Chemistry, or in Earth Sciences, or in
Engineering Science, or in Metallurgy and Science of Materials, or in
Physics'.

6 Ibid., p. 26, delete ll. 6--8 and renumber
existing cl. 17 (l. 9) as cl. 16.

7 Ibid., p. 72, ll. 5--6 and 10, in each case
delete `Physics in the Preliminary Examination in Physical Sciences'
and substitute `the Preliminary Examination in Physics'.

8 Ibid., p. 97, ll. 34--5, delete `for the
Preliminary Examination in Physical Sciences' and substitute `in the
schedule of subjects for the Preliminary Examinations in Chemistry,
Earth Sciences, Metallurgy and Science of Materials, and Physics'.

9 Ibid., p. 103, delete ll. 12--18 and
substitute:

`Preliminary Examinations in certain Physical Sciences

Chemistry

Earth Sciences

Metallurgy and Science of Materials

Physics

1. The subjects of each Preliminary Examination, its syllabus, and
the number of papers in it shall be prescribed by regulation from
time to time by the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board.

2. Candidates in each Preliminary Examination must offer five
subjects at one examination, provided that a candidate who has failed
in one, two, or three subjects may offer that number of subjects at a
subsequent examination.'

10 Ibid., p. 113, l. 46 and p. 114, l. 2, in
each case delete `Physics in the Preliminary Examination in Physical
Sciences' and substitute `the Preliminary Examination in Physics'.

11 Ibid., p. 120, delete ll. 42--5 and
substitute:

`The Preliminary Examinations in Chemistry,       Mathematical and
Earth Sciences, Engineering Science,               Physical
Metallurgy and Science of Materials, and           Sciences.'
Physics.

12 Ibid., p. 1026, delete ll. 44--5 and
substitute:

`in the Preliminary Examinations in Chemistry, in Earth Sciences, in
Engineering Science, in Metallurgy and Science of Materials, and in
Physics for two years;'.

13 Ibid., p. 1027, delete l. 33.

14 This decree shall be effective from 1 October
2000.

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Decree (6): Changes in the arrangements for
the admission of candidates to the First and Second Public
Examinations to allow the award of honours in Honour Moderations in
Classics and the Honour School of Literae Humaniores to candidates
suspending their studies

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Literae
Humaniores Board and with the concurrence of the General Board,
provides for candidates who have suspended their studies for up to
three terms to be classified in both Honour Moderations in Classics
and the Honour School of Literae Humaniores without the need to
obtain permission from the Applications Committee of Council.

Text of Decree (6)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p.
24, l. 32, delete `fifth' and substitute `eighth'.

2 Ibid., p. 125, l. 4, after `term' insert `,
or in the eighth term in the case of Honour Moderations in
Classics,'.

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Decree (7): Establishment of M.St. in
International Human Rights Law

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Committee on
Continuing Education and with the concurrence of the General Board,
establishes a new degree of M.St. in International Human Rights Law,
to be offered by the Department for Continuing Education. This will
draw on experience in the International Programmes Division of the
department of running courses in this subject area over the last six
years, and wide-ranging consultations have taken place with members
of the Law Faculty and others over the degree's content. The course
is innovative in its structure and mode of delivery, combining
elements of distance learning with face-to-face tuition. The decree
also provides for a fee of £5,444 to be charged for the course.
The level of fee reflects the unusual nature of the course, in
particular the costs associated with providing distance-learning
materials and intensive residential courses.

Associated changes in regulations are set out under `Examinations and
Boards' below.

Text of Decree (7)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p.
662, after l. 15 insert:

`International Human Rights Law         Committee on Continuing       
                                             Education'.

2 Ibid., p. 1090, after l. 14 insert:

`(d) for members of the University working for the Degree
of M.St. in International Human Rights Law, £5,444.'

3 Ibid., l. 15, delete `(d)' and
substitute `(e)'.

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Decree (8): Syllabus and assessment
arrangements for the Second Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of
Medicine

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Clinical
Medicine Board and with the concurrence of the General Board,
reflects changes agreed by the faculty board in the syllabus and
assessment arrangements for the Second BM.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in `Examinations and
Boards' below.

Text of Decree (8)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p.
924, l. 33, after `notified to candidates by it.' insert `No
candidate shall commence Year 2 or 3 until he or she has
satisfactorily completed Year 1 or 2 respectively, unless the
Director of Clinical Studies at his or her discretion should, in
exceptional circumstances, decide that the candidate may proceed to
the next year of study on condition that he or she should undertake
remedial work and if necessary be reassessed at a later date.'

2 Ibid., p. 1018, l. 32, delete `Orthopaedic
Surgery' and substitute `Trauma and Orthopaedics, Accident and
Emergency, and Musculo-Skeletal Medicine'.

3 Ibid., p. 1055, l. 27, delete `Chairman
of the Examiners
' and substitute `Director of Clinical
Studies
'.

Key to Decree (8)

Cl. 1 requires candidates to have satisfactorily completed each year
of the course before progressing to the next year of study (instead
of being required only to have satisfactorily completed the first two
years before proceeding to the third, which is the present
provision).

Cl. 2 provides for the appointment of examiners for a new integrated
course.

Cl. 3 changes one of the signatories required for the Years 1 and 2
pass lists for the Second BM.

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Decree (9): Amendments to provisions
governing the Certificate in Theology and the B.Th.

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Theology
Board and with the concurrence of the General Board:

(a) renames the Two-Year Certificate in Theology (which
is now the only certificate in that subject) as the Certificate in
Theology;

(b) allows for part-time provision in the course for the
certificate on the basis of the equivalence of two years of part-time
study to each single year of full-time study;

(c) reintroduces the possibility of allowing candidates
who have successfully completed the certificate to transfer to the
B.Th. (a provision which was inadvertently deleted in an earlier
revision some years ago).

Associate changes in regulations are set out in `Examinations and
Boards' below.

Text of Decree (9)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p.
994, l. 13, delete `TWO-YEAR'.

2 Ibid., l. 23, delete `Two-Year'.

3 Ibid., after l. 42 insert new cll. 5–6:

`5. Part-time students for the Certificate in Theology shall in each
case be required to pursue their course of study for twice the number
of terms required of an equivalent full-time student.

6. On completion of their course, candidates who have been awarded
the Certificate in Theology may, with the approval of the Board of
the Faculty of Theology, offer the remaining papers necessary to meet
the requirements for the award of the Degree of Bachelor of
Theology.'

4 This decree shall be effective from 1 October
2000, provided that candidates accepted onto the course with effect
from Michaelmas Term 1999 shall be examined under the provisions of
the decree and regulations governing the Two-Year Certificate as they
stood at 30 September 1999.

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Decree (10): Appointment of examiners in
the Honour Schools of Natural Science (Metallurgy and Science of
Materials) and Materials, Economics, and Management

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Physical
Sciences Board and with the concurrence of the General Board, will
facilitate a more equitable and efficient distribution of the
examining load over the academic staff of the Department of
Materials.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in `Examinations and
Boards' below.

Text of Decree (10)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 1028, ll. 38–40
delete `hold office ... Part II only' and substitute `normally hold
office for two years'.

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Decree (11): Approval of examining
conventions

Explanatory note

When legislation was enacted in Michaelmas Term 1998 to alter the
arrangements for the nomination of examiners so that nominating
committees became committees of faculty boards or of other bodies
responsible for the course and the examination (Decree (1) of 12
November 1999, Gazette, Vol. 129, p. 358), it was stated
in the explanatory note that one consequence of this would be that
the responsible bodies should henceforth extend their responsibility
to the giving of approval to the conventions adopted by examiners. It
has been decided by the General Board, in the light of various
queries, that it would be desirable to provide explicitly for this by
legislation, and Council has accordingly made the following decree to
that effect.

Text of Decree (11)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 1040, after l. 30
insert new cl. 18 as follows and renumber existing cll. 18–28
(pp. 1040–4) as cll. 19–29:

`Approval of Conventions


18. The conventions to be used by the examiners in any examination
shall be approved annually by the faculty board or other body
responsible for the course and the examination, subject to the right
of a board of examiners to make minor adjustments to the conventions
during any particular examination, without reference to the
responsible body, if there are exceptional circumstances which so
require. In the event of a dispute between the examiners and the
responsible body, the matter shall be referred to the Proctors who
shall act as arbiters to resolve the dispute.

Nothing in this provision shall affect the authority of the examiners
in the making of academic judgements on the performance of each
candidate.'

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Decree (12): Electoral Board for the
Professorship of Geology

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Physical
Sciences and Biological Sciences Boards and with the concurrence of
the General Board, provides for the appointment of a second General
Board elector to the Professorship of Geology, in accordance with
current practice, without diluting the representation of the two
faculty boards concerned.

Text of Decree (12)

Notwithstanding the provisions of Ch. VII, Sect. III, § 95, cl.
2 (Statutes, 1997, p. 436), the General Board shall
appoint two members of the electoral board for the Professorship of
Geology to serve for the duration of the impending proceedings to
fill the professorship.

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Decree (13): Number of examiners in the
Second Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Medicine in Year 3

Notwithstanding the provisions of Ch. VI, Sect. II. A, § 1, cl.
3 (Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 1019, ll. 13–16),
the number of additional examiners who may assist at the discretion
of the chairman of the Year 3 Examiners in the Second Examination for
the Degree of Bachelor of Medicine in 2000 shall be twenty-six.

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Decree (14): Consent to amendments to
Statutes of St Hilda's College

The consent of the University is given to the amendments to Statutes
III, VII, and XI of St Hilda's College approved by the Governing Body
on 10 November 1999, in so far as such consent is required by Section
7 (2) of the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923.

Note. The effects of the amendments are to remove
ambiguities and outdated elements.

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BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on
19 May, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 4 May 2000: University Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 8 May


Degree by Special Resolution

The following special resolution will be deemed to be approved at
noon on 8 May, unless by that time the Registrar has received notice
in writing from two or more members of Congregation under the
provisions of Tit. II, Sect. VI, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1997,
p. 15) that they wish the resolution to be put to a meeting of
Congregation.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

JEAN-SEBASTIEN CAUX, All Souls College

ROY KEITH WESTBROOK, St Hugh's College

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CONGREGATION 23 May 2 p.m.

¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that written notice of
any intention to vote against, or any proposed amendment to, the
enacting parts of the statutes at item 1 below or to vote against the
special resolution at item 3 below, signed in either case by at least
two members of Congregation, must be given to the Registrar by noon
on Monday, 15 May (see the Guide to Procedures in Congregation cited
in the note at the end of `University Agenda').

For arrangements concerning the notification of opposition to the
amendments to the proposed statute at item 2 below, or of any further
proposed amendments to that statute, see the explanatory note.


1 Voting on Statutes promulgated on 2 May

[See Gazette 16 March.]

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2 Voting on amendments to proposed Statute
revising the University's Intellectual Property Policy

Explanatory note

As announced in the Gazette dated 13 January
(Gazette, p. 563), further proceedings on the proposed
statute revising the University's Intellectual Property Policy, which
was promulgated on 14 December (Gazette, pp. 396, 499),
have been deferred pending consideration of possible additional
changes. Council has now considered these.

Council remains fully satisfied that the proposed new legislation
would achieve its intended objectives of resulting in equal treatment
for all members of staff and students, while increasing the financial
benefits potentially available to them through the exploitation of
intellectual property made or created by them in the course of their
employment or their studies respectively, but it has agreed to put
forward amendments which would change the applicability of the new
legislation from (1) all intellectual property devised, made, or
created on or after 1 January 2000, and (2) all intellectual property
devised, made, or created before 1 January 2000 and not the subject
on that date of any legally binding agreement which governs or
restricts its exploitation, to (simply) all intellectual property
devised, made, or created on or after 1 October 2000. Any other
intellectual property would thus be subject to the existing
legislation.

Secondly, Council has agreed to put forward an amendment to the
decree which will be made if the statute is approved, to require
expressly that the University ensure that researchers do not become
personally liable for product liability claims arising from the
University's exploitation activities.

Thirdly, Council has agreed to put forward an amendment to that
decree to remove the reference in the earlier draft to the
inapplicability of the University's Intellectual Property Policy to
property devised, made, or created by employees of colleges in the
course of their employment by the colleges, unless they make use of
university facilities. This provision was intended to have a solely
clarificatory function but seems open to misinterpretation. The
position is, and will remain, that if an employee of a college
creates a work with the aid of university facilities otherwise than
in the course of his or her employment by the college, then any net
revenue will be distributed in accordance with the University's
legislation. If, on the other hand, an employee of a college creates
a work with the aid of university facilities in the course of his or
her college employment, then any net revenue will be distributed in a
manner to be agreed between the University and the college, and the
researcher will not have any entitlement to a share under the
University's legislation.

The explanatory note published in the Gazette dated 25
November 1999 (Gazette, p. 396) referred to the
`extensive consultation' by Council's Technology Transfer Advisory
Group which had preceded the final formulation of these proposals.
Council considers that it might be helpful to state that the
consultation process included the Committee of Heads of Science
Departments, the Appointments Committee of the General Board, the
Staff Committee, the Resources Committee, the General Board, and the
General Purposes Committee of Council, as well as the various
employees' trade unions and the Oxford University Student Union.
Individual members of staff who were known to have interests or
expertise in this area were also invited to comment. No objections
were voiced to the proposals which resulted from this iterative
process and which were subsequently approved by Council and then
submitted to Congregation.

The texts of the proposed statute and degree incorporating the above
amendments are set out below after the amendments. It is open to any
two or more members of Congregation to notify the Registrar in
writing not later than noon on Monday, 15 May of
their intention to oppose the proposed amendments to the statute, or
of any further amendments which they propose. While further
proceedings on the associated decree cannot take place until after
the statute (if and as amended) has been approved by Congregation, it
would be helpful if any member of Congregation who intends at that
stage to oppose the amended decree, or to propose further amendments
to the decree, would let the Registrar know by the same time, in
order that the whole question of the proposed revisions to the
University's Intellectual Property Policy can be debated at the
meeting of Congregation on 23 May. If such notice (or a request from
at least twelve members of Congregation for an adjournment) has not
been received by noon on 15 May in respect of either the statute or
the decree, Mr Vice-Chancellor will, under the statutory procedure,
declare the amendments to the statute to have been adopted, and the
amended statute will be submitted to Congregation on 6 June for
approval.

Text of amendments to Statute

1 In Tit. X, Sect. IV, as amended by clause 1 of Statute (2)
promulgated in Congregation on 14 December 1999
(Gazette, p. 397), delete cl. 4 and substitute:

`4. The provisions of this section shall take effect on 1 October
2000, and shall apply to all intellectual property devised, made, or
created on or after 1 October 2000.'

2 In Tit. XV, Sect. VI, as amended by clause 2
of Statute (2) promulgated in Congregation on 14 December 1999
(Gazette, p. 398), delete cl. 5 and substitute:

`5. The provisions of this section shall take effect on 1 October
2000, and shall apply to all intellectual property devised, made, or
created on or after 1 October 2000.'

3 In clause 3 of statute (2) promulgated in
Congregation on 14 December 1999 (ibid.), delete `1 January' and
substitute `1 October'.

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Amendments to Decree to be made by Council if the Statute is
approved

1 In Ch. VIII, Sect. XI, cl. 5, as amended by clause 1 of the
proposed decree annexed to statute (2) promulgated in Congregation on
14 December 1999 (Gazette, p. 398), after `further
development.' insert `The University shall ensure that researchers do
not become personally liable for product liability claims arising
from the University's exploitation activities.'

2 Ibid. (Gazette, p. 399), delete
cl. 11, concerning intellectual property devised, made, or created by
employees of colleges in the course of their employment by the
colleges, unless they make use of university facilities.

3 In clause 2 of the proposed decree annexed to
Statute (2) promulgated in Congregation on 14 December 1999 (ibid.),
delete `1 January' and substitute `1 October'.

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Texts of the proposed Statute and Decree incorporating the above
amendments

[Changed or inserted wording is indicated by underlining; the
deletion is indicated by square brackets.]

PROPOSED STATUTE

1 In Tit. X (Statutes, 1997, p. 78), delete Sect. IV,
and substitute:

`Section IV. Of Intellectual Property

1. Subject to clause 2 below and to the provisions of the Patents
Act 1977, and unless otherwise agreed in writing between the person
concerned and the University, the University claims ownership of the
following forms of intellectual property; in the case of
(c), (d), (e), and (f) (and
(g) as it relates to (c)–(f)) the
claims are to intellectual property devised, made, or created by
staff in the course of their employment by the University, and by
persons engaged by the University under contracts for services:

(a) works generated by computer hardware or software
owned or operated by the University;

(b) films, videos, multimedia works, typographical
arrangements, and other works created with the aid of university
facilities;

(c) patentable and non-patentable inventions;

(d) registered and unregistered designs, plant varieties,
and topographies;

(e) university-commissioned works not within
(a), (b), (c), or (d);

(f) databases, computer software, firmware, courseware,
and related material not within (a), (b),
(c), (d), or (e), but only if they may
reasonably be considered to possess commercial potential; and

(g) know-how and information associated with the above.

2. Notwithstanding clause 1 above, the University will not assert
any claim to the ownership of copyright in:

(a) artistic works, books, articles, plays, lyrics,
scores, or lectures, apart from those specifically commissioned by
the University;

(b) audio or visual aids to the giving of lectures; or

(c) computer-related works other than those specified in
clause 1 above.

3. "Commissioned works" for the purpose of clauses 1 and
2 above are works which the University has specifically employed or
requested the person concerned to produce, whether in return for
special payment or not. However, save as separately agreed between
the University Press and the person concerned, works commissioned by
the University Press in the course of its publishing business shall
not be regarded as "works commissioned by the University".

4. The provisions of this section shall take effect on 1 October
2000, and shall apply to all intellectual property devised, made, or
created on or after 1 October 2000.

5. The policy set out above shall be administered in accordance
with procedures which shall be determined from time to time by
Council by decree.'

2 In Tit. XV (p. 116, as renumbered by Statute
(2) approved by Congregation on 29 June 1999, Gazette,
Vol. 129, pp. 1433, 1482), delete Sect. VI and substitute:

`Section VI. Of Intellectual Property generated by Students

1. Subject to clause 2 below and to the provisions of the Patents
Act 1977, and unless otherwise agreed in writing between the student
concerned and the University, the University claims ownership of the
following forms of intellectual property; in the case of
(c), (d), (e), and (f) (and
(g) as it relates to (c)–(f)) the
claims are to intellectual property devised, made, or created by
students in the course of or incidentally to their studies:

(a) works generated by computer hardware or software
owned or operated by the University;

(b) films, videos, multimedia works, typographical
arrangements, and other works created with the aid of university
facilities;

(c) patentable and non-patentable inventions;

(d) registered and unregistered designs, plant varieties,
and topographies;

(e) university-commissioned works not within
(a), (b), (c), or (d);

(f) databases, computer software, firmware, courseware,
and related material not within (a), (b),
(c), (d), or (e), but only if they may
reasonably be considered to possess commercial potential; and

(g) know-how and information associated with the above.

2. Notwithstanding clause 1 above, the University will not assert
any claim to the ownership of copyright in:

(a) artistic works, books, articles, plays, lyrics,
scores, or lectures, apart from those specifically commissioned by
the University;

(b) audio or visual aids to the giving of lectures; or

(c) computer-related works other than those specified in
clause 1 above.

3. For the purpose of clauses 1 and 2 above:

(a) a "student" is a person reading and
registered for a degree, diploma, or certificate of the University;

(b) "commissioned works" are works which the
University has specifically requested the student concerned to
produce, whether in return for special payment or not. However, save
as may be separately agreed between the University Press and the
student concerned, works commissioned by the University Press in the
course of its publishing business shall not be regarded as
"works commissioned by the University".

4. Students shall sign any documents necessary in order to give
effect to the claim made by the University in clause 1 above; and
shall waive any rights in respect of the subject-matter of the claim
which may be conferred on them by Chapter IV of Part 1 of the
Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988.

5. The provisions of this section shall take effect on 1 October
2000, and shall apply to all intellectual property devised, made, or
created on or after 1 October 2000.

6. The policy set out above shall be administered in accordance
with procedures which shall be determined from time to time by
Council by decree.'

3 This statute shall be effective from 1
October 2000.

PROPOSED DECREE

1 In Ch. VIII (Statutes, 1997, p. 556), delete Sect.
XI and substitute:

`Section XI. Procedures for the Administration of the
University's Intellectual Property Policy

1. Where any person who is subject to the provisions of Tit. X,
Sect. IV or of Tit. XV, Sect. VI (a "researcher") creates
intellectual property [1]
which is capable of commercial exploitation, he
or she shall report its existence to the Head of Department (or
equivalent) and to the Director of the Research Services Office,
providing the Director with all necessary information concerning the
provenance of the intellectual property and the circumstances in
which it was created. The next step shall depend upon the source of
funding:

(a) whenever the conditions of research council grants
require the assignment of intellectual property to the research
council or its nominee, or to industrial collaborators, and whenever
there is a similar requirement in an agreement for research sponsored
by some other party, the research council, industrial collaborator,
or sponsor shall be given the responsibility for exploitation;

(b) Isis Innovation Limited ("Isis") shall be
responsible for the exploitation of research funded with research
council grants the conditions of which do not include such a
requirement;

(c) in all other cases, the University's preferred route
to exploitation is through Isis. A researcher who wishes to exploit
the intellectual property [2]
by some other means may apply to Council
for permission to do so. Council shall consider in particular the
question of whether the alternative means of exploitation are likely
to result in a reasonable return to the University from royalties or
equity or other means of sharing profits which may accrue.

2. In the event of a dispute between the researcher and the
University concerning the ownership of the intellectual property, the
matter shall be referred to an independent expert to be agreed
between the researcher and the University. If agreement on the
identity of the expert is not reached within thirty days, the expert
shall be a barrister specialising in intellectual property law, who
shall be nominated for the purpose by the then Chairman of the
General Council of the Bar. The expert's fee shall be paid by the
University, but shall constitute a first charge on any profits which
may accrue, whether to the researcher or to Isis or the University,
whichever party or parties is or are held by the expert to be the
owner of the intellectual property.

3. Where the University decides to seek exploitation of
intellectual property to which it lays claim, discussions between the
interested parties shall be held to determine the appropriate action
to be taken. This may include one or more of the following:

(a) control over disclosure;

(b) the filing of a patent application, with the
researcher as named inventor;

(c) the identification of potential licensees;

(d) the formation of a company to exploit the technology.

4. Notwithstanding paragraph (a) of clause 3, Isis and
the University may consult appropriate experts in the field of the
intellectual property in question, on a confidential basis, in order
(for example) to assist with an assessment of innovation or
commercial potential.

5. Where the University decides to seek exploitation, the
researcher shall provide reasonable assistance in the exploitation
process by (for example) promptly assigning his or her rights to Isis
and/or to a third party specified by the University, providing
information promptly upon request, attending meetings with potential
licensees, and advising on further development. The University
shall ensure that researchers do not become personally liable for
product liability claims arising from the University's exploitation
activities.

6. Where exploitation is through the medium of a company formed
for the purpose, royalty or sales fee income received by Isis or the
University from the company shall be treated in accordance with
clause 7. The respective shareholdings in the company of the
researchers and the University (or Isis) shall be negotiated at the
time of formation or capitalisation; and unless otherwise agreed,
revenues generated by the shareholdings (both capital and income
receipts) shall be retained by the shareholders, and shall not be
subject to distribution under clause 7.

7. In this clause the expression "net revenue" means
gross revenue less professional fees and expenses and other costs
incurred in protecting the intellectual property and negotiating the
arrangements for exploitation.

(a) Where there is a receipt by the University which is
in the nature of a university milestone payment, no part of the net
revenue shall be distributed to Isis or the researcher: the net
revenue shall be distributed as to 40 per cent to the General Revenue
Account and as to 60 per cent to the department(s). A university
milestone payment shall be taken for this purpose to be a payment
which is referable to the progress of research or development by the
University, but which is not covering or supporting the cost of such
research or development; as against a payment for the right to use
intellectual property, or a payment referable to the progress of
research or development by a party other than the University (such as
a licensee), where the net revenue shall be distributed in accordance
with the following paragraphs of this clause.

(b) Where responsibility for the exploitation of
intellectual property is given to a research council, industrial
collaborator, or sponsor under paragraph (a) of clause 1,
any net revenue received by the University shall be distributed as
follows: [3]

Total net revenue   Researcher(s)  General Revenue      Departments
                                       Account

Up to £50K           90%*              10%           0%

Band from £50K and
up to £500K          45%               30%           25%

Over £500K           22.5%             40%           37.5%

(c) Where responsibility for the exploitation of
intellectual property is given to Isis, any net revenue received by
Isis shall be distributed as follows:


Total net revenue Researcher(s)   General Revenue    Depts   Isis
                                    Account

Up to £72K         63%*              7%             0%        30%
Band from £72K
and up to £720K    31.5%             21%            17.5%     30%

Over £720K         15.75%            28%            26.25%    30%

(d) Where responsibility for the exploitation of
intellectual property is given to the University, then, unless some
other arrangement is approved by Council under clause 1 (c),
any net revenue received by the University shall be distributed as
stated in paragraph (c) of this clause, save that the 30 per
cent share payable to Isis shall be passed instead to the General
Revenue Account.

(e) The percentages asterisked above are intended to put
the University in funds to pay the employer's National Insurance
Contribution(s), but otherwise to leave the General Revenue Account
out of the allocation of the bands in question. These percentages
shall be adjusted to match this intention, as and when the rates of
National Insurance Contribution vary.

8. (a) The University shall account to researchers for
their entitlements under clause 7 on a monthly basis.

(b) A researcher's entitlement under clause 7 shall
continue to be paid to him or her should he or she leave the
University; and in the event of a researcher's death, the entitlement
shall continue for the benefit of his or her estate.

9. Where more than one researcher contributes to the creation of
the intellectual property, the distribution of their share of the
income between themselves shall be a matter for them to determine
(and to notify in writing to the Director of the Research Services
Office); save that where there is failure to agree, the distribution
of income shall be prescribed by the Vice-Chancellor, taking into
account each individual's contribution.

10. If the University decides not to seek to exploit intellectual
property to which it lays claim; or if, after the University has
initiated or sanctioned exploitation, the University decides (in
consultation with Isis) that the process of exploitation be
abandoned; the University shall not unreasonably withhold or delay an
assignment of the intellectual property to the researcher (at the
researcher's expense).

[11. The University's intellectual property policy shall not be
concerned with intellectual property devised, made, or created by
employees of colleges in the course of their employment by the
colleges, unless they make use of university facilities. If an
employee of a college creates a work with the aid of university
facilities otherwise than in the course of his or her employment by
the college, then any net revenue shall be distributed in accordance
with clause 7 above. If an employee of a college creates a work with
the aid of university facilities in the course of his or her college
employment, then any net revenue shall be distributed in a manner to
be agreed between the University and the college, and the researcher
shall not have any entitlement to a share by virtue of this decree.]'
[4]

2 This decree shall be effective from 1
October 2000.


Footnotes

[1]
In these procedures the term "intellectual property" refers to the items
detailed in Tit. X, Sect. IV, cl. 1 and Tit. XV, Sect. VI, cl. 1


Return to text

[2]
Members of the University who wish to seek permission from Council are asked
to contact the Director of the Research Services Office in the first instance.


Return to text

[3]

For an explanation of the asterisks see cl. 7 (e).


Return to text

[4]

Clause to be deleted.


Return to text

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3 Voting on Special Resolution authorising
expenditure from the Higher Studies Fund

That the Curators of the University Chest be authorised to expend
from the part of the Higher Studies Fund earmarked for Social Studies
the sum of approximately £21K per annum for ten years, to
provide the balance of funding required for the Professorship of
European Community Law.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 4 May 2000: Notices<br />

Notices


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or
recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



DONALD POLLOCK PROFESSORSHIP OF CHEMICAL
ENGINEERING

ZHANFENG CUI, MA (B.SC. Inner Mongolia Institute of Technology, M.SC., PH.D.
Dalian, China), Fellow of Keble College and Reader in Engineering Science, has
been appointed to the professorship with effect from 1 October 2000.

Dr Cui will be a fellow of Hertford College.

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ORATION BY THE SENIOR PROCTOR

Corrigendum

It is regretted that the Oration by the Senior Proctor, published in the
Gazette of 23 March, omitted the opening words. The correct
version of the opening paragraphs is printed below. The complete text can
also be found on the Internet at

http://info.ox.ac.uk/gazette/1999-00/weekly/230300/oration.htm
.

The Gazette apologises for this error.

SENIOR PROCTOR: Insignissime Vice-Cancellarie, maiores nostri imperaverunt
ut
procuratores orationem suam dicerent Latine; et haec lex, diutius in oblivionem
lapsa, forsitan in usum reducenda esse videatur. Quapropter—sed murmur
opicorum ad aures meas pervenit. Licetne Anglice loqui?

VICE-CHANCELLOR: Licet.

This is the moment at which, like released hostages dragged before the
world's media, the Proctors emerge blinking into the sunlight after a year
chained to the same desk to give some account of themselves, swearing eternal
friendship but feeling, just possibly, that they can manage the next fortnight
without each other's daily company. My few words of Latin provide me with
a peg on which to hang the trivial curiosity that for the second year running
one of the triumvirate of Proctors and Assessor has come from the Sub-faculty
of Classical Languages and Literature and another from the Department of
Engineering Science (to which I add the equally trivial note that this year
both Oxford and Cambridge have had a Proctor married to a clergywoman).
Sometimes the Proctors come from similar backgrounds: a few years back the
pair of them went on to write a book together. That is unlikely to happen this
time, unless there is a demand for Ancient Greek for Engineers.
The Proctors and Assessor are expected to learn about the University as a
whole, and the chance that each of us comes from a quite different part of it
has been happily educative.

[The remainder of the Oration can be found in the Gazette of 23
March (pp. 978–83).]

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CIRCULATION OF THE GAZETTE TO
RETIRED SENIOR MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY

It has been decided that any former member of Congregation over the age of
seventy-five who is resident in Oxford may continue to receive the
Gazette, if he or she so wishes, on application in writing to the
Information Office, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD. Such
applications must be renewed at the beginning of each academic year.

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DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS


Statistical Consulting Service

The Department of Statistics runs a consulting service available to members
of the University. The consulting officer is Dr Mario Cortina Borja, who may
be contacted at the department (telephone: Oxford (2)72597, fax: (2)72595,
e-mail: cortina@stats.ox.ac.uk).

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UNIVERSITY ENVIRONMENT PRIZE

In 1997, the University's Environment Committee was established to monitor
environmental performance and to encourage feasible improvements. In July
1999 a set of nine targets was adopted, covering everything from energy-
efficient, green travel, and recycling to sustainable purchasing, environmental
building/refurbishment, and waste reduction measures.

The committee is now offering two prizes (£200 and £100) to
encourage students to raise awareness of environmental issues within their
colleges and/or departments. Prizes will be awarded to students who can
demonstrate that they have made a major contribution to improving the
environment of the University (through their college or department) by
making progress towards any one or more of the nine university targets
(printed in the Gazette of 20 January—copies can be obtained
from Sarah Cowburn, University Offices).

Entries may consist of a short statement or longer description, but should in
any event be no longer than 1,000 words. The following points should be
addressed:

—Which target(s) have you concentrated on and why?

—What has been achieved? The effect of the claimed environmental benefit
should be quantified, wherever possible.

—How did you work towards this target?

—Who else was involved and what did they do?

—Could your work be replicated by other colleges/departments?

—If you were to do something like this again, would you do anything
differently?

—What difficulties did you experience in making progress towards your
chosen target(s)?

Entries, which will be judged during the Long Vacation by a panel headed by
Dr Boardman (Environmental Change Institute), should be signed by the head
of department or college to verify that the achievements are actual, and
handed in to Sarah Cowburn, University Offices (telephone: (2)70193), by
midday on Friday, 23 June.

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LANGUAGE CENTRE


Opening hours

The Language Centre's library and self-access facilities are open in Trinity
Term from 9.30 a.m. to 6.30 p.m., Monday–Friday, and 10 a.m.–1 p.m.
on Saturday. Classes restart in First Week.


Intensive courses

The Centre is running four weekend language courses this term:

20–1 May: German (Absolute Beginners and Intermediate) and
Italian
(Absolute Beginners [waiting list only] and Lower Intermediate)

3–4 June: French (Near/False Beginners, Lower Intermediate
and Upper
Intermediate) and Spanish (Absolute Beginners [waiting list only] and
Lower
Intermediate).

Each course will consist of eight hours' tuition and will last from 9 a.m. to
1.30 p.m. on both Saturday and Sunday. The emphasis will be on speaking
and listening. The fee will be £28 for junior members of the University
and other full-time students, £36 for members of Congregation and
members of staff and £48 to non-members. An application form can be
downloaded from the Centre's web page at
http://info.ox.ac.uk/departments/langcentre/courses/weekend_courses/.

Booking is also open for the Pre-Sessional English as a Foreign Language
Courses in August and September, designed to ensure that international
students and academic visitors are adequately prepared to begin their studies
at Oxford and other universities. Further details of all courses and activities
may be obtained from Angela Pinkney at the Language Centre, 12 Woodstock
Road, Oxford OX2 6HT (telephone: Oxford

(2)83360, e-mail:
admin@lang.ox.ac.uk, Internet site: http://info.ox.ac.uk/departments/langcentre/.

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BODLEIAN LIBRARY AND LIBRARIES AUTOMATION
SERVICE


Bodleian Library Pre-1920 catalogue

The Bodleian Pre-1920 catalogue is now publicly available via OLIS. Those
logging on to OLIS using telnet to reach library.ox.ac.uk will be presented
with a choice at the initial screen:

The OLIS catalogue

The Bodleian Pre-1920 catalogue

If you choose OLIS you will reach the Choose your Library screen or go
straight to the Welcome to OLIS screen (depending on your location). If you
choose Pre-1920 you will be taken to the GEAC version of the Bodleian
Pre-1920 catalogue.

The Bodleian Pre-1920 catalogue describes books and periodicals published
before 1920 and catalogued before 1989 which are held in the Bodleian Library
and its dependent libraries (the Radcliffe Science Library, Rhodes House
Library, the Bodleian Law Library, the Indian Institute Library and the
Bodleian Japanese Library). Pre-1920 works acquired since then appear in
OLIS, as do about 20% of the holdings recorded in the Pre-1920 catalogue,
including all the dependent library material. It contains brief details of 1.1
million copies of 1.0 million titles. Its entries were catalogued according to an
older set of rules than those used for OLIS and are less comprehensively
indexed. You are advised to search the main OLIS catalogue first.

It is possible to confuse the Pre-1920 Catalogue and OLIS using telnet as
they use identical software and an identical interface. Please bear in mind that
the Pre-1920 and OLIS are separate catalogues, and there is little overlap
between them.

GeoWeb also offers access to either database, and in this catalogue the
different catalogues are labelled on each screen; it is hoped also to offer soon
a single search facility across both databases using GeoWeb. GeoWeb is
available at http://library.ox.ac.uk.

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RADCLIFFE SCIENCE LIBRARY


Installation of enlarged ethernet and associated
electrical works

The installation of a new, larger ethernet within the Radcliffe Science Library
has been delayed by difficulties relating to the construction of the building
and the provision of new electrical infrastructure. In consequence, Phase 1 of
the project will be taking place in Trinity Term and not, as had been hoped
initially, in a vacation. This phase covers electrical and data works in the
Lankester Room (Physical Sciences) and in staff areas elsewhere in the
library. Inevitably, and regrettably, there will be some noise and
disruption.

The library apologises for any inconvenience caused to readers. Staff will
direct readers to areas of the building that are unaffected.

Once the project is complete, the network facilities for readers will be greatly
improved, and it should be possible for readers to connect their portables to
the network.

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LADY MARGARET HALL


Forthcoming exhibition

Barbary Delaney: paintings and works on paper (in Jerwood New Room, 26
May–9 June; private viewing 26 May, 5.30–7 p.m.).

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DATASETS COMMITTEE


Frequently Asked Questions

What is the Datasets Committee?

Who is on the Datasets Committee?

How does the Datasets Committee work?

What happens to an order once it has been agreed?

Does the Datasets Committee deal with orders that are non-centrally
funded?

I wish to order a dataset myself, but what help can the Datasets Committee
offer?

I need to change a subscription to a datasets, again what help can the
Datasets Committee offer?

Does the Datasets Committee deal with orders for electronic journals?

How do I keep in touch with what the Datasets Committee is currently
doing?

Return to List of Contents of this section


What is the Datasets Committee?

The Datasets Committee is the University committee charged with co-ordinating
the evaluation, purchasing, and networking of datasets (electronic products
such as CD-ROMs and on-line subscriptions). It evolved out of the Datasets
Working Party, and since 1998 has been an executive committee with a
centralised budget. It reports directly to the Sub-Committee on Library
Automation.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Who is on the Datasets Committee?

A full list of all the current members is available at:
http://info.ox.ac.uk/localnat/dwp/what.html. However, the most important point
to note is not necessarily the names of the members but their functions. It
has been a policy of the DC to be inclusive, representing all members of the
University. Therefore all five of the library subject groups are covered, plus
the main central libraries, department libraries, and college libraries.
Furthermore there are representatives from the computing services, collection
development, reader services, and networking groups.

Return to List of Contents of this section


How does the Datasets Committee work?

The main role of the DC is to co-ordinate the purchasing of datasets from a
central budget. A formal procedure has been established now to deal with
receiving proposals, evaluating them, and progressing the order. Anyone in
the University is allowed to forward a proposal via the on-line form at:
http://info.ox.ac.uk/localnat/dwp/submit.html. Once received the DC will then
categorise the product as either a type 1, 2, or 3 product (see
http://info.ox.ac.uk/localnat/dwp/how.html). Type 1s are the products that most
concern the DC and these are then prioritised according to a list of set
criteria (http://info.ox.ac.uk/localnat/dwp/priority.html). Products are then
targeted accordingly from this list. This is often in conjunction with a trial
of the product co-ordinated by the Testing and Evaluating Datasets SIG
(TED-SIG, led by Mrs Grazyna Cooper).

All this information is publicly available on the DC's Web site
(http://info.ox.ac.uk/localnat/dwp/) including an on-line database listing the
progress of proposals (http://henman.oucs.ox.ac.uk/datasets/index.asp).

Return to List of Contents of this section


What happens to an order once it has been agreed?

As soon as the DC has decided to order a product the ball is taken up by the
Collection Development Department at Bodley, under the jurisdiction of Dr Greg
Walker. The CDD then contact the publisher and order the product. We have
a general policy not to pay any pro forma invoices until we are sure that the
product is satisfactory.

Sometimes this process can take a lot longer than we would wish, but
more often than not this is due to a hold-up at the publisher's end. If you
wish to see how an order is progressing check the on-line database or contact
Greg Walker directly.

Return to List of Contents of this section


Does the Datasets Committee deal with orders that are non-centrally
funded?

Yes and no. The Datasets Committee has no jurisdiction over any order that
does not stem from its own budget. However, experience has taught us that
a centralised ordering system benefits everyone in the long run. Therefore,
if you have the money to buy a dataset but would rather someone else did the
ordering for you, then the CDD, acting for the Datasets Committee, recognises
this as part of its remit. Again, to discuss this further please contact Greg
Walker.

Return to List of Contents of this section


I wish to order a dataset myself, but what help can the Datasets
Committee offer?

If you do wish to order the dataset yourself then there are two ways the DC
can help. First, on the Web site, there are guidelines to help you in your
negotiations with the publisher
(http://info.ox.ac.uk/localnat/dwp/guide.html)—we strongly recommend you
follow these. Second, we recommend that once the order has gone through you
send a copy of all paperwork to the CDD as a record of the order.

Return to List of Contents of this section


I need to change a subscription to a dataset, again what help can the
Datasets Committee offer?

As much as we can. Changing subscriptions will be greatly assisted if you
have followed our advice and lodged a copy of the order and licence with CDD
in the first place. If the change in the subscription is to satisfy increased
demand then you could make a case to the Datasets Committee to ask for
financial assistance in this.

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Does the Datasets Committee deal with orders for electronic journals?

Yes, at present. It was the Datasets Committee that progressed the order for
JSTOR and Project Muse for example. However, at the moment no part of our
budget has been earmarked for the growing problem of e-journals. We are
therefore lobbying for more money to deal with this and for a formal post to
be established to cater for this, and other emerging issues. To assist,
however, Gill Cooper at the Radcliffe Science Library has made available two
papers: E-Journals and Offers for 2000
(http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/users/gac/oxford/edeals.htm), and How to Register
an E-Journal (http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/users/gac/oxford/ejreg.htm).

Return to List of Contents of this section


How do I keep in touch with what the Datasets Committee is currently
doing?

There are several ways to keep in touch. First, try to make regular visits to
the DC's Web site (http://info.ox.ac.uk/localnat/dwp/). Second, join the DC's
mailing list datasets-sig. On this you will receive regular (but not too many.)
postings on the recent activities of the DC. To join this send the message:

SUBSCRIBE DATASETS-SIG

to:

MAJORDOMO@MAILLIST.OX.AC.UK

Third, keep an eye out for articles in such things as OLIS News. Finally, if
you have any questions, send a note to Stuart Lee, Chair, Datasets Committee
(e-mail: Stuart.Lee@oucs.ox.ac.uk).

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 4 May 2000: Lectures<br />

Lectures


Contents of this section:

Return to Contents Page of this issue



INAUGURAL LECTURES


Action Research Professor of Clinical
Neurology

PROFESSOR G.C. EBERS will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on
Tuesday, 9 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Multiple sclerosis—a complex trait
paradigm.'

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Harold Vyvyan Harmsworth Professor of
American History

PROFESSOR R.W. WINKS will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on
Thursday, 18 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `To stimulate to some action: the Harmsworth
Professorship, 1920–2000.'

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Reuters Professor of Intellectual Property
and Information Technology Law

PROFESSOR D. VAVER will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5.30 p.m. on
Wednesday, 17 May, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross
Building.

Subject: `Intellectual property: the state of the art.'

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WEIDENFELD VISITING PROFESSOR OF EUROPEAN
COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 1999–2000

Literature and the gods

PROFESSOR ROBERTO CALASSO will lecture at 5 p.m. on the following
days in the Examination Schools.

Thur. 4 May: `Mental waters.'

Wed. 10 May: `Incipit parodia.'

Thur. 11 May: `Musings of a serial killer.'

Wed. 17 May: `An abandoned room.'

Thur. 18 May: `Mallarmé in Oxford.'

Wed. 24 May: ` "Metres are the cattle of the
gods" .'

Thur. 25 May: `Absolute literature.'

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O'DONNELL LECTURES IN CELTIC STUDIES 2000

DR N. EDWARDS, School of History and Welsh History, University of
Wales, Bangor, will deliver two O'Donnell Lectures on the following
subject, at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 11 May, and Friday, 12 May, in the
Examination Schools.

Subject: `Early medieval stones and stone sculpture in
Wales: context and connections.'

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HALLEY LECTURE 2000

PROFESSOR SIR ALAN COOK, FRS, formerly Master of Selwyn College and
Emeritus Professor of Natural Philosophy, Cambridge, will deliver the
Halley Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 16 May, in the Lecture Theatre,
the University Museum.

Subject: `Edmond Halley and the magnetic field of the
Earth.'

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CHERWELL–SIMON LECTURE 2000

PROFESSOR FRANCIS HALZEN, Director, Institute for Elementary Particle
Physics Research, University of Wisconsin—Madison, will deliver
the Cherwell–Simon Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Friday, 9 June, in
the Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon Laboratory.

Subject: `Neutrino astronomy: Antarctic dreams.'

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SIMONYI LECTURE

PROFESSOR R. GREGORY will deliver the second annual Simonyi Lecture
at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 18 May, in the Department of Zoology. The
lecture will be introduced by Professor Richard Dawkins, Simonyi
Professor of the Public Understanding of Science, and Dr Charles
Simonyi is expected to be present.

Subject: `Shaking hands with the Universe.'

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SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES ANNUAL LECTURE

PROFESSOR H.W. PERRY, University of Texas at Austin, will deliver the
sixth annual lecture in Socio-Legal Studies at 5.30 p.m. on Friday,
12 May, in the Examination Schools. The meeting will be chaired by
Professor Denis Galligan.

Subject: `Law and politics in America's Constitutional
Court.'

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J.W. JENKINSON MEMORIAL LECTURE

PROFESSOR M. BEAR, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Brown University,
Providence, USA, will deliver a Jenkinson Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m.
on Monday, 15 May, in Lecture Theatre B, the Zoology/Psychology
Building. Tickets are not required for admission.

Subject: `Molecular basis for a theory of synapse
modification.'

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THOMAS HARRIOT LECTURE

DR J.R. PEPPER will deliver the Thomas Harriot Lecture at 5 p.m. on
Thursday, 11 May, in the Champneys Room, Oriel College.

Subject: `Thomas Harriot and the great mathematical
tradition.'

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ANTHROPOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY

Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology

Fertility and Reproduction Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 11 a.m. on Mondays in the
basement Seminar Room, the Institute of Social and Cultural
Anthropology.

Convener: Dr Soraya Tremayne.

H. ZHANG, East Anglia

8 May: `Reproductive rights, strategies, and well-
being: the Vietnam situation.' (Provisional
title
)

S. RANDALL, University College, London

15 May: `Is mortality important? Reproductive
decisions, outcomes, and strategies in Senegal.'

S. ULIJASZEK

22 May: `Fertility and maternal and child health in
Papua New Guinea.'

R. KANE, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

5 June: `Integrating family planning and
genitourinary medicine in NHS: the views of health-care
professionals.'

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Institute of Biological Anthropology

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the
Pauling Human Sciences Centre, 58 Banbury Road.

PROFESSOR C. STANFORD, Southern California

4 May: `The hunting ape: predatory chimpanzees and
human evolution.'

PROFESSOR J. MOORE, Florida

11 May: `Palaeolithic gene flow.'

PROFESSOR J. BELL

18 May: `Genomics and the rise of non-hypothesis
driven research.'

DR M. BURFORD, Cardiff

25 May: `Non-invasive genetics and primate
molecular ecology.'

PROFESSOR D. BARKER, Southampton

1 June: `Foetal growth and risk of chronic
disease.'

PROFESSOR A. KUPER, Brunel

8 June: `A cultural perception of human genome
research.'

DR R. HARDING

15 June: `Patterns of diversity in the melanocortin
1 receptor gene.'

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BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Department of Plant Sciences

The following research talks will be given at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in
the Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Plant Sciences.

PROFESSOR D. READ, Sheffield

4 May: `Mycorrhizas in the real world—a
journey from precision to relevance.'

PROFESSOR M. MCNAIR, University of Exeter

11 May: `The whys and wherefores of tolerance
hyperaccumulation.'

DR R. SAWERS

18 May: `Bundle Sheath Defective2 (BSD2); a novel
protein required for the accumulation of Rubisco.'

PROFESSOR J. MATTICK, Queensland

25 May: `Twitching motility in bacteria.'

PROFESSOR J. GRAY, Cambridge

1 June: `Chloropolast control of nuclear gene
expression.'

DR R. BATEMAN, Natural History Museum

8 June: `Integrating morphological and molecular
evidence of evolutionary radiations.'

PROFESSOR A. MCHUGEN, Saskatchewan

15 June: `Green genes and red herrings: a
consumer's guide to GM food.'

DR B. GLOVER, Cambridge

22 June: `Cellular differentiation and the
manipulation of animals.'

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CLINICAL MEDICINE

Oxford Eye Hospital

The following lectures and meetings will be held at the times shown
on Mondays in the Radcliffe Infirmary. Unless otherwise indicated,
they will take place in the Lecture Theatre, the Oxford Eye
Hospital.

Consultation clinics will be held at 2 p.m. on 8 May and 5 June.

Details of the 1 p.m. lecture on 19 June will be announced later.

Convener: A.J. Bron, MA, Clinical Professor and Margaret
Ogilvie's Reader in Ophthalmology.

Thursday, 8 May

MISS J. OLIVER, Western Eye Hospital, London

5 p.m.: `Endonasal lacrimal surgery.'

Thursday, 15 May

DR J. TIFFANY

1 p.m., the Library, Nuffield Laboratory of
Ophthalmology
: `Expressability of meibomian oil.'

DR P. FRITH

2 p.m.: Fluorescein angiogram teaching.

MR J. ELSTON and DR G. QUAGHEBEUR

2.30 p.m., Radiology Department: `Neuro-
radiology.'

MR A. GIBSON

3.30 p.m.: Presentation.

MR SALMON'S TEAM

4.30 p.m.: medical audit.

E. BASSANI

5 p.m.: `Working in partnership with visually
impaired people.'

Thursday, 22 May\

DR G. CHIDLOW

1 p.m., the Library, Nuffield Laboratory of
Ophthalmology
: `Betaxolol and sodium channels.'

Thursday, 5 June

DR J. MELENA

1 p.m., the Library, Nuffield Laboratory of
Ophthalmology
: `Voltage-dependent calcium channels in the
retina: relevance to neuroprotection.'

PROFESSOR S. HARDING, St Paul's Eye Unit, Liverpool

5 p.m.: `New treatments in age-related macular
degeneration.'

Thursday, 12 June

PROFESSOR J. HARDING

1 p.m., the Library, Nuffield Laboratory of
Ophthalmology
: `Binding of rhodamine-labelled [alpha]-
lactalbumin to the lens chaperone [alpha]-crystallin.'

DR P. FRITH

2 p.m.: Fluorescein angiogram teaching.

MR J. SALMON

2.30 p.m.: Glaucoma teaching.

DR J. BALL

3.30 p.m.: Presentation.

DR R. MARTIN, Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead

5 p.m.: `Tissue engineering for the ocular
surface.'

Thursday, 19 June

DR P. FRITH

2 p.m.: Fluorescein angiogram teaching.

MR ELSTON, DR ZAIWALLA, and DR KENNETT

2.30 p.m.: `Paediatric ERG and VEP studies.'

DR M. BURTON

3.30 p.m.
: Presentation.

MR J. AINSWORTH

5 p.m.: `Retinopathy of prematurity.'

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Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Mondays in the
library, the Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology.

Convener: J.J. Harding, MA status, Professor of Ocular
Biochemistry.

DR J. TIFFANY

15 May: `Expressibility of meibomian oil.'

DR G. CHIDLOW

22 May: `Betaxolol and sodium channels.'

DR J. MELENA

5 June: `Voltage-dependent calcium channels in the
retina: relevance to neuroprotection.'

PROFESSOR HARDING

12 June: `Binding of rhodamine-labelled, [alpha]-
lactalbumin to the lens chaperone [alpha]-crystallin.'

N. CLOUT, Birkbeck College, London

19 June: `Beta-gamma crystallins: the ancient
relatives.'

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Diabetes Research Laboratories: Clinical Endocrine and Metabolic
Meetings

The following seminars will be held at 12.45 p.m. on Wednesdays in
the Committee Room, Green College.

Details of the 17 May meeting will be announced later.

DR J. DANESH

10 May: `Emerging risk factors for heart
attacks.'

PROFESSOR R. BRUCKDORFER, Royal Free Hospital

24 May: `The regulation of tissue factor activity
and expression by lipoproteins.'

PROFESSOR T. DAVIS, University of Western Australia

31 May: `Metformin: something old, something
new.'

PROFESSOR J. MONSON, St Bartholomew's Hospital

7 June: `GH replacement in adults—long-term
effects on lipids and carbohydrate metabolism.'

DR A. FARMER

14 June: `Cascade screening for type 2 diabetes:
will it provoke anxiety or over-reassure?'

DR S. COPPACK, Royal London Hospital

21 May: To be announced.

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LAW, SOCIAL STUDIES

The function of law in the international community

Unless otherwise stated, the following seminars will be held at 5
p.m. on Wednesdays in the Chester Room, Nuffield College.

Conveners: G. Goodwin-Gill, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
International Refugee Law, and A.J. Hurrell, MA, D.Phil., University
Lecturer in International Relations.

PROFESSOR F. FRANCIONI

10 May: `Environmental threat.'

PROFESSOR R. FOOT

17 May: `China and the international human rights
regime.'

PROFESSOR SIR FRANKLIN BERMAN, formerly Legal Adviser, Foreign and
Commonwealth Office

24 May, Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building: `The
relevance of international law.'

K. GAUBATZ

31 May: `How international is "international
law"? The International Court of Justice and the function
of international law.'

PROFESSOR V. GOWLLAND-DEBBAS, Institut Universitaire de Hautes
Études Internationales, Geneva

7 June: `The United Nations and unilateralism.'

J. BLACKETT (with DR M. WELLER, to be confirmed)

14 June: `Humanitarian intervention.'

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LITERAE HUMANIORES

PROFESSOR FROMA ZEITLIN will lecture at 3.30 p.m. on Wednesday, 14
June, in the Headley Lecture Theatre, the Ashmolean Museum.

Convener: O.P. Taplin, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
Classical Languages and Literature.

Subject: `Reflections on Dionysus in '69.'

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MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics

Differential equations and applications seminars

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 5
p.m. on Mondays in the common room, Dartington House.

Convener: S.J. Chapman, MA, D.Phil., Fellow, St
Catherine's College.

PROFESSOR P.G. DRAZIN, Bath

4 May: `Continued fractions and generalised Pade
approximation.'

DR A. CONSTANTIN, Newcastle

11 May: `Stability of peakons.'

PROFESSOR J. LOVE, ANU

18 May: `Mathematical modelling of propagation
through optical fibre systems for high-capacity
telecommunications applications.'

PROFESSOR W. ZIEMBA, UBC

25 May: `Growth versus security in dynamic
investment analysis.'

DR T. MULLIN, Manchester

8 June: `Patterns in the sand.'

PROFESSOR J.M. GREENBERG, CMU

Mon. 12 June, 3 p.m., L2, Mathematical Institute:
`Melt fracture revisited.'

PROFESSOR S.P. HASTINGS, Pittsburgh

15 June: `Internal layers and chaos for a forced
Duffing equation: a shooting approach.'

PROFESSOR R. WESTBROOK, Calgary

22 June: `Elastic contact problems.'

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MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

Portuguese graduate seminar

PROFESSOR V. CHAVES, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, will give a seminar
in Portuguese at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 11 May, in 47 Wellington Square,
Room T.11.

Convener: T.F. Earle, MA, D.Phil., King John II Professor
of Portuguese Studies.

Subject: `Pero de Andrade Caminha: o rival de Camoes.'

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MODERN HISTORY

Seminar in Medieval History

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the
Wharton Room, All Souls College.

S. JAKAKUMAR

8 May: `Edgar "the Peaceable" and his
times.'

D. ROLLASON, Durham

15 May: `Symeon of Durham and the shaping of the
past.'

R. LAVELLE, King Alfred's College, Winchester

22 May: `Royal estates in Anglo-Saxon Wessex: the
"Farm of One Night".'

C. ALLMAND, Liverpool

29 May: `The reception of Vegetius's De Re
Militari
in the Middle Ages.'

J. HUESMANN

5 June: `Being hospitable: procedure and rituals at
the court of Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy.'

A. GOODMAN, Edinburgh

12 June: `Ransoming in the fourteenth century: the
case of the Count of Denia revisited.'

T. GREENWOOD

19 June: `Social structure in seventh-century
Armenia.'

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Social and Economic History of the British Isles 1000–1600

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
Hovenden Room, All Souls College.

D. STONE

10 May: `Medieval farm management and agricultural
mentalities: evidence from Hinderclay before the Black
Death.'

C. PHYTHIAN-ADAMS, Leicester

17 May: `Locating English pasts
(c.1000–c.1600): the contexutal
travails of a provincial historian.'

N. MAYHEW and M. WHITTOW

24 May: `The feudal revolution revisited: the
economy.' (Discussion session)

M. COSTEN, Bristol

31 May: `A social revolution in tenth/eleventh-
century England? Towards an explanation.'

S. REYNOLDS, London, and others

7 June: `The long twelfth century.'
(Discussion session)

R. LIDDIARD, East Anglia

14 June: `Power, status, and symbolism in the
medieval countryside: Norman castles and designed
landscapes.'

C. WATKINS, Cambridge

21 June: `Sin, penance, and purgatory
c. 1100–1300.'

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ORIENTAL STUDIES

Lectures in Korean Studies 2000

DR BYONG WON LEE, Professor of Ethnomusicology, University of
Hawai'i, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 10 May, in the Lecture
Theatre, the Pitt Rivers Research Centre, 64 Banbury Road.

Conveners: J.B. Lewis, MA, Korea Foundation University
Lecturer in Korean, and H. La Rue, MA, Lecturer and Curator of the
Bate Collection of the Musical Collections in the Pitt Rivers
Museum.

Subject: `Styles and aesthetics in Korean traditional
music.'

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PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory: departmental
seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Mondays in the
Lecture Theatre, the Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
Laboratory.

PROFESSOR W.J. VAN DER ZANDE, FOM Institute, Amsterdam

15 May: To be announced.

PROFESSOR D.J. SCHIFFRIN, Liverpool

22 May: `Nanoparticles and self-organised
nanostructures.'

DR S.L. WILSEY

29 May: `Conical intersections: ubiquitous control
elements in the photochemical rearrangements of alkenes.'

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Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory: RSC Faraday
Division half-day symposium

This symposium, on the subject of `Dynamics from atoms to
biomolecules', will be held on Tuesday, 9 May, in the Lecture
Theatre, the Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory.

PROFESSOR R.M. HOCHSTRASSER, Pennsylvania

2.05 p.m.: `Structural dynamics of complex
molecules by nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy.'
(Centenary lecture)

DR D. KLUG, Imperial College, London

2.55 p.m.: `Protein and solute dynamics:
calculations and measurements.'

DR M. BROUARD

4 p.m.: `The dynamics of elementary hydrogen atoms
reactions: from hot hydrogen atoms to photons.'

PROFESSOR J.N.L. CONNOR, Manchester

4.35 p.m.: `Recent advances in understanding the
dynamcis of chemical reactions and molecular collisions.'
(Tilden Lecture)

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Department of Materials: colloquia

The following colloquia will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Thursdays in
Lecture Room 7, the Engineering and Technology Building.

Conveners: J.D. Hunt, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Materials
Science, and G.A.D. Briggs, MA, Reader in Materials.

P. CREW, Archaeology Officer, Snowdonia National Park

4 May: `Prehistoric and experimental iron-working
in North-west Wales: an integrated approach.'

PROFESSOR J.P. BADYAL, Durham

11 May: `Plasmechanical tailoring of solid
surfaces.' (Interdepartmental Polymer Seminar)

DR S. ELLIOTT, Cambridge

18 May: To be announced. (Interdepartmental
Condensed Matter Seminar
)

DR A. SMITH, GKN

25 May: `The current status and applications of
aluminium-lithium alloys.'

PROFESSOR L.L. HENCH, Imperial College

1 June: `Medical materials for the new
millennium.'

DR J.A. FORREST, Sheffield

8 June: `The glass transition in thin films: recent
advances and future challenges.' (Interdepartmental
Condensed Matter Seminar
)

PROFESSOR D. COCKAYNE

15 June: `From amorphous materials to quantum
dots—refining structures by modelling and microscopy.'

DR O. KOLOSOV, Symyx Technologies, Inc., California

22 June: `Combinatorial discovery of new
materials.'

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PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

The following seminars will be held at 12 noon on Wednesdays in the
Sherrington Room, the University Laboratory of Physiology.

Details of the 31 May seminar will be announced later.

Convener: J.C. Ellory, MA, D.Sc., Professor of
Physiology.

DR B. CUMMING

10 May: `Can neurons in the visual cortex support
depth perception?'

(McDonnell–Pew Seminar)

DR J. BULLIER, Centre de Recherche Cerveau et Cognition,
Université Paul Sabatier, France

17 May: `Role of feedback connections and timing in
cortical processing of visual information.' (Sponsored by
the Physiological Society
)

PROFESSOR AKINORI NOMA, Kyoto

24 May: `Cell volume regulation of cardiac myocytes
through sarcolemmal ion channel flux.' (Sponsored by the
Physiological Society
)

DR D. MCALPINE, University College, London

7 June: `Spatial channels in the auditory system.'
(McDonnell–Pew Seminar)

DR I. LLANO, Göttingen

14 June: `Contribution of intracellular calcium
stores to calcium signalling in GABAergic cerebellar neurones.'
(Sponsored by the Physiological Society)

DR A. SILVER, University College, London

21 June: `Presynaptic modulation of central
synaptic transmission by transmitter spillover.'
(Jenkinson Seminar)

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SOCIAL STUDIES

J. HARRIS, Foreign Affairs Correspondent, The Washington
Post
, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 9 May, in the Clay
Room, Nuffield College.

Convener: B.E. Shafer, MA, Mellon Professor of American
Government.

Subject: `The cloudy shore: US foreign policy and the
2000 presidential election.'

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Race relations seminar: colonialisms, intermediaries, and
difference

The following seminars will be held on Tuesdays. The 9 May seminar
will take place at 5 p.m. in the Humanities Research Centre (Room
SGO5), in Oxford Brookes University; following seminars will take
place at 4.45 p.m. in the Fellows' Dining Room, St Antony's
College.

Further information may be obtained from Professor William Beinart
(telephone: Oxford (2)84730, e-mail: william.beinart@sant.ox.ac.uk).

Conveners: W. Beinart (St Antony's), S. Jeppie
(Somerville and OCIS), D. Lowry (Oxford Brookes), A. Jackson
(Mansfield), and S. Howe (Ruskin).

S. HOWE

9 May: `The colonists' anti-colonialism? Attitudes
to Empire in settler societies.'

A. RATTANSI, City University

16 May: `On being and not being Brown/Black
British: racism, class, sexuality, and ethnicity in post-
imperial Britain.'

M. NEWTON

23 May: ` "The Children of Africa in the
Colonies": free people of colour and emancipation in
Barbados, 1820s–30s.'

D. WASHBROOK

30 May: `Colonialism without colonies:
manufacturing "Imperial" subjects in the British
Indian Empire.'

A. JACKSON, M. CARTER, and R. D'UNIENVILLE

6 June: `French and Indian Mauritians as
intermediaries of empire.'

S. JEPPIE

13 June: `The travelling Ottoman Egyptian vali:
Mehmed Ali in the upper Nile valley, 1838.'

J. HANSEN

20 June: `Imperial discourse and Ottoman
archaeology: the Ottoman excavation in Beirut in 1887.'

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Meetings

The following meetings will be held as indicated.

Conveners: G. Peele, MA, M.Phil., University Lecturer
(CUF) in Politics, and L. Tawney, Starr Foundation Visiting Fellow,
Lady Margaret Hall.

CONGRESSWOMAN MRS NANCY PELOSI (California: D.) will give a seminar
at 5 p.m. on Friday, 12 May, in Lady Margaret Hall.

Subject: `The problem of leadership in Congress.'

TAYLOR BRANCH will give a lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 15 May, in
Lady Margaret Hall.

Subject: `The Civil Rights Movement revisited.'

Mr Branch will also lead a seminar at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, 16 May, in
Lady Margaret Hall.

Subject: `Race in the United States today.'

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THEOLOGY

Eastern Christian Studies

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Thursdays in the
Keston Institute, 4 Park Town.

Convener: K.T. Ware, MA, D.Phil., Spalding Lecturer in
Eastern Orthodox Studies.

DR A. POPESCU

11 May: `Romania and Moldova: the new Iron
Curtain?'

T. KODACSY

25 May: `The development of a reformed "City-
Congregation" in Hungary.'

P. PETKOV

8 June: `Social and political aspects of the
Bulgarian Law on Religion.'

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DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY


Rodney Porter Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR R.A. LEARNER, Scripps Research Institute, will deliver the
third Rodney Porter Memorial Lecture at 4 p.m. on Thursday, 15 June,
in the University Museum. The lecture will be followed by a champagne
reception. All members of the University are welcome to attend.

Subject: `Antibodies yesterday, antibodies today,
antibodies tomorrow.'

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DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL STUDIES

The following research seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in
Lecture Room 1, the Department of Educational Studies.

PROFESSOR G. CLAXTON, Bristol

8 May: `Getting smarter, thinking less: promoting
intuition in education.'

DR S. HEGEDUS

15 May: `The electronic thesis—progression or
regression?'

N. AMHOLD, B. STREITWIESER, Teachers' College, and S. WILDE

12 June: `Investingating educational issues in
Eastern Germany: problems of method.'

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OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC STUDIES

Central Asia: the historic heritage

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on the days shown in
the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies (George Street). With the
exception of the seminar to be held on Friday, 2 June, they will take
place on Tuesdays.

This series is sponsored by the Inter-faculty Committee for Modern
Middle Eastern Studies, the Inter-faculty Committee for Slavonic and
East European Studies, and the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies.

Conveners: P. Bergne, St Antony's College, and Dr J.
Piscatori, Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies.

DR S. HORSMA, Sheffield

9 May: `Pik Communism: the politics and propaganda
of mountains and mountaineering in Soviet Central Asia.'

DR M.S. DILLON, Durham

16 May: `The historical origins of conflict in
today's Xinjiang.'

DR M. MESBAHI, Florida International

23 May: `Islam and international relations in
Central Asia.'

DR E. HERZIG, Manchester

30 May: `Iran, Khorasan, and Central Asia:
historical perspectives on shifting identities.'

DR I. BALDAUF, Humboldt-Universität, Berlin

Fri., 2 June: `Different paths to reform in early
twentieth-century Turkestan.'

DR A. NYMARK, Hofstra University, Long Island

6 June: `Central Asian historiography: stages of
corruption.'

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Themes in Muslim politics

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies.

This series is co-sponsored with the Centre of Near and Middle
Eastern Studies, School of Oriental and African Studies, University
of London.

Conveners: Dr F.A. Nizami and Dr J. Piscatori.

PROFESSOR A.R. NORTON, Boston

10 May: `Civil society and political reform in
Muslim societies.'

K. ARMSTRONG, London

17 May: `Islamic fundamentalism and the battle for
God.'

DR B. MILTON-EDWARDS, Belfast

24 May: `Islamism and the Middle East peace
process.'

DR O. ROY, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris

31 May: `Post-Islamism: towards a new form of
secularism.'

PROFESSOR M. VAN BRUINESSEN, Utrecht

7 June: `Ulama, Muslim intellectuals, and
politics.'

PROFESSOR A. MOUSSALLI, American University of Beirut

14 June: `Conceptual models of an Islamic
state.'

DR C. TRIP, SOAS, London

21 June: `Muslim politics or the political
engagement of Muslims?'

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NISSAN INSTITUTE OF JAPANESE STUDIES

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the
Lecture Theatre, the Nissan Institute.

R. EFIRD, Washington

5 May: `The "Multicultural Co-existence"
of Chinese returnees to Japan: history, family, and linguistic
identity.'

DR B. SLAVINSKY, Russian Academy of Sciences

12 May: `The San Francisco Peace Settlement with
Japan in 1951 and the Northern Territories problem in
Russian–Japanese relations.'

DR C. BRUMANN, Cologne

19 May: `Birth pangs of a public good: townscape
debates in Kyoto.'

PROFESSOR HIROCHIKA NAKAMAKI, National Museum of Ethnology, Osaka

26 May: `Company funerals, religion, and company
ties in Japan.'

PROFESSOR HIROCHI ODA, University College, London

2 June: `Corporate governance in Japan revisited
(with special reference to derivative action).'

PROFESSOR HIDEO OTAKE, Kyoto

9 June: `Japanese politics in a comparative
perspective.'

PROFESSOR WATARU KITAMURA, Kônan University, Kobe

16 June: `Reforming local government in Japan: the
abolition of agency-delegated functions in 1999.'

J. WORONOFF, journalist and writer

23 June: `Social causes and consequences of the
Japanese economic crisis.'

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QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women

Kaberry Lecture

DR SANDY TOUSSAINT, Department of Anthropology, University of Western
Australia, will deliver the Kaberry Lecture (in memory of Dr Phyllis
Kaberry) at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 10 May, in the Taylor Institution.
The lecture will be followed by drinks. Further information may be
obtained from the CCCRW (telephone: Oxford (2)73644, e-mail:
cccrw@qeh.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `Interpreting cultural narratives: ethnography,
biography, and the paradox of memory.'

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DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS


Florence Nightingale Lecture

PROFESSOR SIR ROBERT MAY, Chief Scientific Adviser to the UK
Government and Head of the Office of Science and Technology, will
deliver the Florence Nightingale Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 26 May,
in the Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, St Anne's College.

Subject: `Extinction: biodiversity challenged.'

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ALL SOULS COLLEGE

PROFESSOR J.P. CARLEY, Professor of English, York University,
Toronto, and Visiting Fellow, All Souls College, will lecture at 5
p.m. on Friday, 16 June, in the Old Library, All Souls College.

Subject: ` "An excellent oratour and poet,
moreover a man lerned in many sondrye languages": John Leland,
All Souls, and his other university connections.'

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PEMBROKE COLLEGE


Blackstone Lecture

H.E. JUDGE ROSALYN HIGGINS, DBE, QC, Judge of the International Court
of Justice, will deliver the twenty-fourth Blackstone Lecture at
11.30 a.m. on Saturday, 20 May, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre,
the St Cross Building.

Subject: `Running a tight courtroom and respecting
sovereign states.'

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ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

European Studies Centre

Holocaust Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
European Studies Centre, St Antony's College (70 Woodstock Road).

S. PAULSSON, Imperial War Museum

9 May: `Life and death in "Aryan" Warsaw:
did the Poles help or harm the Jews?'

N. STAEHLE, Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine

16 May: `Forgotten victims: slave labourers and the
battle for compensation.'

P. LONGERICH, Royal Holloway and Bedford New College

23 May: `The historical evidence for the Holocaust:
a view from the witness box during the recent David Irving
trial.'

A. APOSTOLOU

30 May: `The exception of Salonika: the Holocaust
in Greece, 1942–3.'

Z. WAXMAN

6 June: `Unheard testimony, untold stories: the
representation of women's Holocaust testimonies.'

M. LEVENE, Warwick

13 June: `Looking beyond the Holocaust:
understanding genocide in the contemporary world.'

Z. MANKOWITZ, Hebrew University

20 June: `Rethinking the role of survivors in the
immediate aftermath of the Holocaust.'

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Latin American Centre

Regions and regionalisms in Latin America

This meeting will be held on Friday, 19 May, in the Latin American
Centre, 1 Church Walk.

A. KNIGHT
9.15 a.m.: introduction.

T. PLATT, St Andrews

9.30 a.m.: `Routes, frontiers, and settlement:
pulls and superimpositions in the transformation of upper
Peru.'

L. TAYLOR, Liverpool

10 a.m.: `Regions and regionalism in Peru:
Cajamarca and Cusco compared.'

P. DRINOT

10.30 a.m: comment.

A. ESCOBAR, CIESAS, Mexico

11.15 a.m.: `Las Huastecas (Mexico), ¨una
región "imaginada" en el siglo XIX?'

G. DE LA PEÑA, CIESAS, Occidente

11.45 a.m.: ` "El Sur" and "Los
Altos": two Jalisco regions compared.'

D. BRADING, Cambridge, G. THOMPSON, Warwick, and W. PANSTERS, Utrecht

12.15 p.m.: comment.

P. LONDOÑO, Medellín, Colombia

2.15 p.m.: `Antioquia, 1860–1930: una
región conectada al mundo.'

M. ROLDAN, Cornell

2.45 p.m.: `Seeing like a region, acting like a
state: authority, legitimacy, and citizenship in Antioquia,
Colombia, 1930–53.'

E. POSADA, ILAS, London

3.15 p.m.: `Region and nation in the Colombian
Caribbean.'

M. DEAS

4 p.m.: comment and general discussion.

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Middle East Centre

Shell Conference on Iranian Foreign Policy

This conference will be held on 12 and 13 May in the Middle East
Centre/New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

Friday, 12 May: Domestic sources of Iran's foreign
policy

PROFESSOR M. MESBAHI, Florida International

2.30 p.m.: `Introduction: domestic factors and the
genesis of the project.'

PROFESSOR F. RAJAEE, Carleton

3 p.m.: `Identity and foreign policy.'

DR H. MOSHIRZADEH, Tehran

3.30 p.m.: `Islam, ideology, and foreign
policy.'

DR H. SEMATI, Tehran

4.15 p.m.: `Decision making institutions and
foreign policy.'

DR N. HADIAN, Tehran

4.45 p.m.: `Factions, factionalism, and foreign
policy.'

Saturday, 13 May: Iran's regional policy: the Caspian
Basin and the Persian Gulf

PROFESSOR M. MESBAHI, Florida International

10 a.m.: `Iran's foreign policyi towards the post-
Soviet space: a conceptual framework.'

DR N. GHORBAN, Caspian Studies, Tehran

10.30 a.m.: `Iran and the dynamics of the Caspian
energy.'

DR E. HERZIG, Manchester

11 a.m.: `Iran and the Transcaucasus: Armenia and
Azerbaijan.'

DR S. CHUBIN, Geneva Centre for Security Policy

2.30 p.m.: `Iran and security in the Persian
Gulf.'

DR G. SICK, Columbia

3 p.m.: `Iran and the Persian Gulf: the US
factor.'

DR F. BIN SALMAN AL-SAUD, King Saud University

3.30 p.m.: `Saudi–Iranian relations.'

DR K. SAJJADPOUR, Director, Institute for Political and International
Studies (Iran's Ministry of Foreign Affairs)

5 p.m: `Iran's regional policy.' (cKeynote
lecture\)

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Hamid Enayat Lecture

DR H. KATOUZIAN will deliver the seventeenth Hamid Enayat Lecture at
5 p.m. on Thursday, 11 May, in the New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's
College. The lecture will be followed by a lecture in the Middle East
Centre.

Subject: `European liberalisms and modern conceptions of
liberty in Iran.'
D

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ST CATHERINE'S COLLEGE

Millennium Lecture Series: the impact of the Human Genome Project
on Society

Unless otherwise indicated, the following lectures will be given at 5
p.m. on Thursdays in the Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, St
Catherine's College.

Trinity Term

PROFESSOR I. CRAIG, Institute of Psychiatry, University of London

11 May: `The Human Genome Project—facts and
fallacies.'

PROFESSOR T. MEADE, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, London

18 May: `After the Human Genome Project—the UK
Population Biomedical Collection.'

DR P. GOODFELLOW, Senior Vice-President, Glaxo-Smith-Kline

25 May: `Why are pharmaceutical companies
interested?'

PROFESSOR M. STRATTON, London and Cambridge

1 June: Patenting of genes: a case study of
BRCA2.'

Michaelmas Term

Speaker to be announced

19 Oct.: `Gene therapy: promises or problems?'

SIR DAVID WEATHERALL

Fri. 27 Oct.: `The new genetics or the new
eugenics?' (Nairne Lecture)

PROFESSOR S. MCCALL-SMITH, Edinburgh

2 Nov.: `Genetic information—something
special?'

M. REDFERN, QC, Chair, the Alser Hey Hospital Inquiry

9 Nov.: `Ownership of tissue samples and organs in
medical research: the Liverpool experience.'

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TRINITY COLLEGE


Margaret Howard Lecture

THE HON. MICHAEL BELOFF, QC, President, Trinity College, will deliver
the Margaret Howard Lecture at 5.45 p.m. on Thursday, 18 May, in the
Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building. Admission is free.

Subject: `Advocacy as art.'

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Chatham Lecture

Trinity Term

SEN. GARY HART will deliver the second Chatham Lecture at 5 p.m. on
Thursday, 1 June, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross
Building. Admission is free.

Subject: `The future of Anglo-American relations.'

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Michaelmas Term

THE RT. HON. CHRISTOPHER PATTEN will deliver the third Chatham
Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 26 October, in the Gulbenkian Lecture
Theatre, the St Cross Building. Admission is free.

Subject: `The future of East–West relations.'

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WOLFSON COLLEGE


Isaiah Berlin Lecture

PROFESSOR ORLANDO FIGES will deliver the annual Isaiah Berlin Lecture
at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 25 May, in the Hall, Wolfson College. The
lecture is open to the public.

Subject: `The cultural tradition of St Petersburg.'

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REGENT'S PARK COLLEGE


Centre for the Study of Christianity and
Culture

Trinity Term lectures

Unless otherwise indicate, the following lectures will be given at 5
p.m. on Wednesdays in Regent's Park College.

DR A. KREIDER

10 May: `Celts and Anabaptists: wisdom from the
margins for tomorrow's Church?'

THE REVD ANNE DUNKLEY, Northern Baptist College

Mon. 15 May, 4 p.m.: `Seen and heard: reflections
on children and Baptist tradition.'

DR P. HEEKS

17 May: ` "Only a story": the role of
story in the faith community.'

DR N. BLOUGH, École Pratique des Hautes Études, Paris,
and Faculté Libre de Théologie Evangélique, Vaux
sur Seine

24 May: `Looking again at the Reformation: cities,
peasants, and Anabaptists.'

DR L. KREITZER

31 May: `Intimations of the Passion: T.S. Eliot's
Journey of the Magi and the cinematic Jesus.'

DR M. ATHERTON

Tue. 6 June: ` "The sacred sound through which
all creation resounds": the appeal of Hildegard of
Bingen.'

DR K.S. CHI, Georgetown College, Kentucky

14 June: `Freedom of religion and American
politics.'

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Statistics in New Testament Studies

THE REVD MICHAEL HUMPHREYS will give the following lectures at 5 p.m.
on Thursdays in Regent's Park College.

4 May: `Potential and limitations.'

11 May: `Comparing and contrasting short texts.'

18 May: `Vocabulary growth and richness.'

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OXFORD ITALIAN ASSOCIATION

Lectures

The following lectures will be held at 8 p.m. on the days shown.
Admission is £1 for members, £2 for non-members (students
free).

For further details, telephone Oxford 377479.

PROFESSOR J.R. WOODHOUSE

Wed. 17 May, Pauling Centre for Human Sciences:
`The decline of the gentleman and the rise of the snob.'

DR C. WHISTLER

Thur. 1 June, Mary Ogilvie Theatre, St Anne's
College
: `Claude and Virgil and the art of narrative.'

Other events


Tue. 9 May, 8 p.m., Rewley House Theatre, film-
showing
: Cadaveri eccellenti (with subtitles).
Admission free.

Mon. 22 May, 8 p.m., Holywell Music Room: Arie
antiche—Neapolitan songs, Vivaldi, with Rossella Bondi
Blumberg and Bethe Alpert-Levvy: recital for solo voice and
piano. Admission £6; students £3 (proceeds to the
Mozambique appeal).

Mon. 5 June, 8 p.m., No. 48 Common Room, St Anne's
College
: Conversazione in italiano (wine and cheese).
Admission free.

Sat. 24 June, 5.30–7.30 p.m.: tenth annual garden
party. TOIA members and guests only. Members £4, TOIA
guests £5.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 4 May 2000: Grants and Funding<br />

Grants and Research Funding


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



RESEARCH SERVICES OFFICE

The Oxford University Research Services Office (RSO) is based in
the University Offices, Wellington Square (with a satellite
office in the Medical School Offices, Level 3, John Radcliffe
Hospital). The RSO is part of the Finance Division of the
University's central administration.

The RSO processes and approves all applications to outside
bodies for research grants and approves research-related
agreements on behalf of the University. It also acts in an
advisory capacity for those seeking outside funding or requiring
information about specific initiatives (e.g. LINK, ROPA, Teaching
Company Schemes, EU research programmes, etc.).

The RSO produces a weekly bulletin on funding opportunities,
electronic Research Funding News
(eRFN), which is available
to members of the University via the World Wide Web at:
http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/erin/. Research-related information
other than that regarding funding opportunities is communicated
via the RSO's electronic Bulletin Board, which is updated on an
ad hoc basis. This is also available to members of
the University
via the World Wide Web at:
http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/oxonly/bboard.htm.

Research contracts with industry are negotiated through the
RSO, which deals with research-related agreements covering the
sponsorship of research, clinical trials, services to industry,
confidentiality issues, material transfer, and consultancy.
Contact details for members of the RSO are as follows:

Ms Catherine Quinn, Director (telephone: (2)70158, e-mail:
catherine.quinn@admin. ox.ac.uk);

Dr Richard Liwicki, Head of Research Contracts Administration

(telephone: (2)70011, e-mail: richard.liwicki@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Mr Pierre-Manuel Espinasse, Head of Research Grants
Administration (telephone (2)70043, e-mail:
pierre.espinasse@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Ms Stephanie Malcolm, Research Grants Administrator

(telephone (2)70145, e-mail:
stephanie.malcolm@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Dr Michael Halsey, Assistant Registrar, John Radcliffe
Hospital satellite office (telephone: (2)22604, e-mail:
michael.halsey@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Ms Kathryn Dally, Research Administration Officer (telephone:

(2)80319, e-mail: kathryn.dally@ admin.ox.ac.uk);

Ms Grace Garland, Research Administration Officer (telephone:

(2)22131, e-mail: grace.garland@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Ms Linda Andrews, Research Administration Officer (telephone:

(2)80666, e-mail: linda.andrews@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Dr Clara Ovenston, Research Administration Officer

(telephone: (2)70142, e-mail: clara.ovenston@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Ms Barbara Murray, Research Administration Officer

(telephone: (2)70039, e-mail: barbara.murray@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Enquiries relating to day-to-day processing of research grant
applications should be addressed to the RSO's Research Grants
Office (telephone: (2)70146), or, in the case of certain clinical
departments, to the RSO satellite office, the Medical School
Offices, Level 3, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington (telephone:
(2)22544).

General enquiries may be addressed, in the first instance,
to Mrs Jane Taylor (telephone: (2)70143), who will be pleased to
direct calls to the appropriate member of staff.

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section


Submitting research grant applications to external sponsors

Members of the University are reminded that all applications for
external research funding support must be endorsed on behalf of
the University through the RSO before they are despatched to the
sponsor, whether or not this is required by the funding body.

The reasons for the requirement are (i) to ensure that the
funds being requested are adequate for the purpose and that the
costing rules of the sponsor have been applied correctly, and

(ii) to ensure that the University could undertake the
obligations arising from an award and that these do not
contravene University policy.

The detailed arrangements are as follows: applicants for
research grants should submit the original plus one copy of their
application, together with a completed copy of the University's
outside grants form, to the Research Services Office, Wellington
Square (telephone (2)70146), leaving three clear working days for
it to be processed.

In connection with the acceptance of awards and signature of
contracts it should be noted that Statutes, Tit. X, cl. 3,
provides that `no official of the University or any other person
employed by the University or working in or in connection with
any department of or under the control of the University shall
in connection with any invention, discovery, or patent, or ...
process, or manufacture have authority to make any
representations on behalf of the University or to be concerned
in any transaction whatsoever in connection therewith on behalf
of the University except with the express consent of Council'.

The Research Services Office has been given authority to
approve research funding applications to external sponsors and
the terms of contracts in straightforward cases under this
provision; in more complicated cases, specific authority is
necessary.

Enquiries related to any aspect of externally sponsored
research should be directed to the Research Services Office,
whose staff would be pleased to help.

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section



SIR JOHN HICKS FUND

The Committee for the Sir John Hicks Fund invites applications
from members of the University for grants towards the costs of
research in economic history. Applications will be considered
from undergraduates, graduate students, and members of the
academic staff, and may relate to research into the economic
history of any period or country.

Applicants should (a) provide sufficient information
about the general nature of their research to establish that it
falls within the field of economic history; and (b)
specify the precise nature and cost of the expenditure for which
a grant is requested. They should also give the name of one
referee who might be consulted by the committee.

It is intended by the committee that grants should normally
be made for sums of up to £250, though this may on occasion
be exceeded. Retrospective grants will be made only in
exceptional circumstances.

The committee will consider applications twice each year. The
closing date for the first round is Monday of the third week of
Hilary Term, and for the second round Monday of the third week
of Trinity Term. Applications should be sent to Mrs E.A.
Macallister, Secretary of the Committee for the Sir John Hicks
Fund, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD.

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section





<br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 4 May 2000: Examinations and Boards<br />

Examinations and Boards


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE
AND LITERATURE


Final Honour School of English Language
and Literature

The four syndicated Special Topics for Course I, Paper 8
(h) and the four syndicated Special Topics for Course
II, Paper B7 ( h) for examination in 2001 are the same
and in each case will be:

(i) Dissident writing, c.1381--
c.1414.

(ii) Approaches to Biography.

(iii) Language and the Media.

(iv) Anglo-American Film.

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section



CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations
made by boards of faculties and the Committee on Continuing Education will
come into effect on 19 May.


1 Board of the Faculty of Biological Sciences

Preliminary Examination in Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 98, in ll. 14 and 15 delete
`Preliminary Examination in Physical Sciences' and substitute `schedule of
subjects for the Preliminary Examinations in Chemistry, Earth Sciences,
Metallurgy and Science of Materials, and Physics'.

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2 Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Second Examination for the Degree of BM

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, delete from p. 936, l. 8, to
p. 939, l. 10, and substitute:

`3. *Second examination for the Degree of BM

1. Syllabus and Examination

The Second Examination shall be divided as follows:

Year 1

In year one, students are required to satisfy the examiners in:

(a) The Foundation Course (being an introduction to clinical
methods, history taking, and physical examination);

(b) The Laboratory Medicine Course (concerning the application
to human disease of the principles of Laboratory Medicine, including
Histopathology, Microbiology, Clinical Biochemistry, Immunology, and
Haematology);

(c) Surgery;

(d) Medicine;

(e) Special Study approved by the Medical Sciences Board.

Each candidate will be assessed according to the methods of assessment
approved by the Medical Sciences Board and notified to candidates before the
commencement of each course of instruction.

Candidates must satisfy the relevant head of department or his/her deputy,
or in the case of (d) to (g) the Director of Clinical
Studies, that they have attended a course
of instruction, and attained the necessary skills and knowledge in:

(a) Clinical Pharmacology;

(b) Primary Health Care;

(c) Radiology;

(d) Medicine and surgery at a district general hospital;

(e) Communication skills;

(f) Evidence-based medicine and Informatics;

(g) Medical ethics and law.

No candidate shall commence year 2 until he or she has satisfactorily
completed year 1, unless the Director of Clinical Studies at his or her
discretion should, in exceptional circumstances, decide that the candidate may
proceed to year 2 on condition that he or she should undertake remedial work
and if necessary be reassessed at a later date.

Year 2

In year two, students are required to satisfy the examiners in:

(a) Trauma and Orthopaedics, Accident and Emergency, and
Muscular Skeletal Medicine;

(b) Neurology (including neurosurgery);

(c) Obstetrics and Gynaecology (including Genito-urinary
medicine);

(d) Paediatrics;

(e) Primary Health Care;

(f) Psychiatry;

(g) Public Health Medicine.

Each candidate will be assessed according to the methods of assessment
approved by the Medical Sciences Board and notified to candidates before the
commencement of each course of instruction.

Candidates must satisfy the relevant head of department or his/her deputy,
that they have attended a course of instruction in, and attained the necessary
skills and knowledge in:

(a) Clinical Geratology;

(b) Ophthalmology;

(c) Otolaryngology;

(d) Palliative Care.

No candidate shall commence year 3 until he or she has satisfactorily
completed year 2, unless the Director of Clinical Studies at his or her
discretion should, in exceptional circumstances, decide that the candidate may
proceed to year 3 on condition that he or she should undertake remedial work
and if necessary be reassessed at a later date.

Year 3

In year three students are required to satisfy the examiners in:

(a) Medicine (including clinical pharmacology and radiology); and

(b) Surgery (including radiology).

Candidates must satisfy the relevant head of department or his/her deputy,
or in the case of (b) and (d) the Director of Clinical
Studies, that they have attended a course of instruction in, and attained the
necessary skills and knowledge in:

(a) An attachment to a District General Hospital including
shadowing of a Pre-registration House Officer;

(b) An elective attachment;

(c) Dermatology; and

(d) Special study and clinical options approved by the Medical
Sciences Board.

Candidates must satisfy the Director of Clinical Studies that they have
attained the necessary skills and knowledge in Evidence-based medicine.

No candidate shall be examined in year 3 until he or she has satisfactorily
completed years 1, 2, and 3. The examination in Year 3 shall consist of:

(i) a three-hour paper in Medicine and Surgery containing
short-answer questions. Candidates must answer at least one question relating
to the specialties studied but not formally examined in years 2 and 3 (namely
clinical Geratology, Dermatology, Ophthalmology, Otolaryngology, and Palliative
Care);

(ii) an essay of not more than 3,000 words on a subject approved by the
Director of Clinical Studies. Such approval must be sought by 1 December in
the academic year in the year which candidate takes the examination (or not
later than four weeks before the set date of the written paper in a
subsequent examination in the case of any candidate who fails the year 3
examination in Trinity Term and is required to submit a further essay when
the examination is retaken). Essays shall be submitted to the Board of
Examiners, c/o Medical School Office, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, no
later than the date set each year by the Director of Clinical Studies; this will
normally be the last Friday before the second elective period. A candidate who
fails to submit an essay by the due date will fail the whole examination in
year 3. A certificate, signed by the candidate in respect of each essay,
indicating that it is the candidate's own work and that it has not been
submitted for any degree, diploma, or prize, or for publication, prior to the
commencement of the candidate's third year of clinical studies, must be
submitted separately in a sealed envelope addressed to the chairman of the
examiners. A candidate who fails the year 3 examination shall not be
required to submit a further essay when the examination is retaken provided
that a satisfactory standard has been reached in the essay on the occasion
of the first attempt at the examination;

(iii) a clinical examination in both medicine and surgery.

Candidates may be required, at the discretion of the examiners, to undergo an
oral examination which may include a further clinical examination.

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2. Assessment

Years 1 and 2

Proposals for the assessment of candidates in years 1 and 2 of the examination
shall be drawn up by each specialty group and submitted for approval to the
Medical Sciences Board, at such times as the Board shall determine. The form
or forms of assessment are chosen from among the following:

1. clinical examination;

2. competency check sheets or logbooks;

3. examination and comment (written or viva voce) on
specimens;

4. objective structured clinical examinations;

5. poster presentations;

6. short written tests which may consist in whole or in
part of multiple choice questions;

7. submission of case histories and commentaries;

8. viva voce examination; and

9. other tests individually approved by the board.

In clinical subjects, all assessments shall include a separate test of clinical
competence. In addition, reports on candidates' attendance and general
aptitude shown during the course of instruction shall be made by those
responsible for the courses and taken into consideration in association with
the performance of candidates in the assessment. A candidate shall be warned
(in writing with a copy to the Director of Clinical Studies) by those
responsible for the course in question at a reasonable time before the
assessment takes place, if his or her attendance and general aptitude are such
as seem likely to jeopardise his or her chances of passing the assessment.

The first assessment of candidates shall be carried out during or at the
conclusion of each section of the course by the staff, as appointed by the
head of the relevant department. A candidate who fails to reach a satisfactory
standard in any part of the assessment may offer himself or herself for
reassessment on one further occasion. If a candidate fails to reach a
satisfactory standard at the
second attempt in any part of the assessment, then the candidate shall be
deemed to have failed the complete
assessment, and the head of department concerned shall require the candidate
to be reassessed in the relevant parts of the assessment after completing the
necessary coursework; this assessment shall be carried out and
adjudged by the staff appointed by the relevant head of
department and in the presence of an external examiner. In the event that a
candidate's performance is judged to be unsatisfactory at this attempt then
his or her name shall be removed from the Register of Clinical Students
subject to appeal to the Medical Sciences Board.

It shall be the responsibility of the staff concerned, under the supervision of
the divisional board, to give the candidates and the relevant examiners
reasonable notice of the dates on which the assessment will be made, to
decide on the outcome of each assessment, and to keep department records of
each assessment. A candidate should not normally be assessed exclusively by
staff members who have been responsible for his or her instruction.

Year 3

The methods of assessment in year 3 shall be approved by the Medical
Sciences Board. A candidate who is unsuccessful in year 3 may be permitted
to offer himself or herself in that examination on not more than one further
occasion. Failure to satisfy the examiners at the second attempt shall lead,
subject to appeal to the Medical Sciences Board, to the removal of that
student's name from the register of clinical students.

3. The duties of the examiners

Years 1 and 2

In the first assessment of candidates in year 1 each relevant pair of
examiners shall be required to attend, and if they so wish participate, on at
least one occasion each year.

In the first assessment of candidates in year 2 each relevant pair of
examiners shall be required to attend, and if they so wish participate, on at
least two occasions in each year.

In the reassessment of any candidate who has been deemed to have failed the
whole assessment in years 1 and 2, the external examiner shall be present and
may participate if he or she wishes.

Year 3 examiners assist with the assessment of the year 1 special study
attachment.

Year 3

In the examination of a candidate in year 3, the chairman of the year 3
examiners and the relevant subject examiners shall arrange and conduct the
examination (provided that the chairman and one relevant subject examiner in
each subject shall conduct the examination when fewer than ten candidates
present themselves).

In considering whether a candidate shall have passed year 3, the year 3
examiners may:

(a) have regard to his/her assessments in years 1 and 2 as well
as to his/her performance throughout year 3 and;

(b) fail a candidate who does not satisfy them in the clinical part
of the examination in year 3 even if he or she has satisfied them in other
parts in that stage.'

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3 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores
and Physical Sciences

(a) Moderations in Physics and Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 72, delete ll.
23–8 and substitute:

`For the papers in Physics and Mathematics the use of calculators will not
be permitted in the papers set for subjects (16) and (17) as specified in the
schedule of subjects for the Preliminary Examinations in Chemistry, Earth
Sciences, Metallurgy and Science of Materials, and Physics; in the papers set
for subjects (5) or (7) in the same schedule
candidates are restricted to models of calculators included in a list provided
by the Chairman of the Moderators in the Preliminary Examination in Physics
not later than the Wednesday of the fourth week of the Michaelmas Full Term
preceding the examination.'

2 Ibid., delete l. 31 and substitute `specified in the
schedule of subjects for the Preliminary Examinations in Chemistry, Earth
Sciences, Metallurgy and Science of Materials, and Physics'.

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(b) Preliminary Examination in Physics and Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 114, delete ll.
18–21 and substitute:

`3. For the two papers in Physics candidates are restricted to models of
calculators included in a list provided by the Chairman of the Moderators in
the Preliminary Examination in Physics not later than the Wednesday of the
fourth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination. For the
two papers in Mathematics the use of
calculators will not be permitted.'

2 Ibid., in ll. 27 and 28, delete `Preliminary Examination
in Physical Sciences' and substitute `schedule of subjects for the Preliminary
Examinations in Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Metallurgy and Science of Materials,
and Physics'.

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4 Board of the Faculty of Physical Sciences

(a) Preliminary Examinations in Chemistry, Earth Sciences,
Metallurgy and Science of Materials, and Physics

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 103, delete l. 38, and substitute:

`1. The subjects and syllabuses for the Preliminary Examinations in
Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Metallurgy and Science of Materials, and Physics
shall be taken from the annexed schedule.'

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(b) Final Honour School of Natural Science (Metallurgy and
Science of >Materials)

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 429, ll. 23 and 24, delete `not later
than Monday of first week' and substitute `by noon on the Friday of the week
before the start'.

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5 Board of the Faculty of Theology

Two-Year Certificate in Theology

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 995, l. 2,
delete `Two-Year'.

2 Ibid., l. 10, delete `in section B of the regulations' and
substitute `as outlined'.

3 Ibid., ll. 10–17, delete from `and must include' to
`are given in the syllabus', and substitute `In Part 1 candidates must take all
four papers. In Part 2 they must take one paper each from sections B, C, and
D. The Supervisory Committee may dispense a candidate from individual
compulsory papers on the basis of previous academic work, but not from the
total number of papers required.'

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6 Committee on Continuing Education

M.St. in International Human Rights Law

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 692, after l. 53 insert:

`International Human Rights Law

1. Candidates must follow a course of instruction in
International Human Rights Law. The course will be taken on a part-time basis
over a period of thirty months.

2. Every candidate will be required to satisfy the
examiners in the following:

(a) attendance at classes, individual tutorials, group seminars,
and other teaching sessions as required;

(b) four written papers, each of three hours' duration, as set out
below:

(i) Fundamentals of Human Rights Law

(ii) Human Rights Advocacy I

(iii) Human Rights Advocacy II

(iv) an elective paper, to be chosen from the schedule below;

(c) a pre-course portfolio consisting of six essays, each of 2,000
words in length, covering key concepts and issues of the course;

(d) a written portfolio consisting of three essays or exercises,
each of 1,500 words in length, covering the period of supervised private
study;

(e) a research skills portfolio of five short exercises, covering
skills required in the production of a dissertation, and a statement of 1,000
words in length which identifies
the dissertation topic, hypothesis and methodology, and provides an outline
of the dissertation and schedule for completion;

(f) submission of a dissertation of no more than 15,000 words on
a topic selected by the student in consultation with the tutor and agreed by
the Board of Studies, to be forwarded to the examiners c/o Registry,
Deaprtment for Continuing Education, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA, for
receipt by such date as the examiners shall determine and shall notify the
candidates and tutors.

3. Candidates may be required to attend a viva voce
examination at the end of the course of study at the discretion of the
examiners.

4. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence
in the whole examination.

5. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners in the
written examinations under 2(b), the written portfolios under
2(c)–(e), or the dissertation under 2(e) may
be permitted to resubmit work in respect of the part or parts of the
examination which they have failed for examination on not more than one
occasion which shall normally be within one year of the original failure.

Schedule

(i) Rights of Minorities, Groups, and Indigenous Peoples

(ii) International Human Rights and Refugee Law

(iii) International Human Rights of Women

(iv) Human Rights and the International Criminal Process.'

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DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE

The Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine has granted leave to C.
HARRISON, St Catherine's, to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.

The evidence submitted by the candidate was entitled: `Biological studies of
the haemopoietic system in essential thrombocythaemia'.


The Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine has granted leave to B.J.
KNEALE, Worcester, to supplicate for the
Degree of Doctor of Medicine.

The evidence submitted by the candidate was entitled: `The influence of
gender on forearm resistance vessel function'.


The Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine has granted leave to K. PALMER,
Corpus Christi, to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.

The evidence submitted by the candidate was entitled: `Aspects of human
health and occupational exposure to vibration'.


The Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine has granted leave to A.B.
WALKER, St Catherine's, to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.

The evidence submitted by the candidate was entitled: `The effect of insulin
on resistance artery function in
insulin-resistant states'.

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF
PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards and committee give
notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

English Language and Literature

F.A. CHIU, St Hilda's: `"Too much of the terrific": political polemics
in Gothic and Radical fiction, 1780–1800'.

Examination Schools, Friday, 12 May, 11 a.m.


Examiners: J.A. Mee, D. Worrall.

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Literae Humaniores

P.S. HAARER, Balliol: `Obeloi and iron in archaic Greece'.

Ashmolean Museum, Thursday, 11 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: C.J. Howgego, W.G. Cavanagh.

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Modern History

R. CAMPBELL, Linacre: `The decline of Calvinism among British Baptists: a
study of three pastors'.

Westminster Institute, Friday, 12 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: T.S.A. Macquiban, J.H.Y. Briggs.

S.A. SKINNER, Balliol: `Tractarians and the "condition of England":
the social and political thought of the Oxford Movement'.

Examination Schools, Friday, 19 May, 2.15 p.m.


Examiners: J.D. Walsh, P.D. Nockles.

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Physical Sciences

C. HARFORD-CROSS, Queen's: `The oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
by cytochrome P450cam'.

Dyson Perrins Laboratory, Monday, 15 May, 11.15 a.m.


Examiners: C.J. Schofield, E. Raven.

J. JONES, Linacre: `The enzymatic oxidation of polychlorinated organics'.

Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Tuesday, 16 May, 11 a.m.


Examiners: J.C. Green, G.K. Robinson.

E. TOMME, Merton: `An investigation of dusty plasmas'.

Department of Engineering Science, Monday, 22 May, 3 p.m.


Examiners: R.N. Franklin, G.E. Morfill.

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Social Studies

M. DOCTOR, St Antony's: `The politics of port reform in Brazil: business
lobbying and the legacy of corporatism (1990–8)'.

St Antony's, Wednesday, 10 May, 11 a.m.


Examiners: A.E. Angell, W. Suzigan.

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Theology

A.G. RYRIE, St Cross: `English Evangelical Reformers in the last years of Henry
VIII'.

Lincoln, Tuesday, 9 May, 2.30 p.m.


Examiners: S.E. Brigden, R.A. Houlbrooke.

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Committee for Educational Studies

JI-YEON HONG, St Cross: `Educational inequalities in a Confucian society:
Korea'.

Examination Schools, Friday, 19 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: D.G. Phillips, I. Neary.

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EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF
LETTERS

The examiners appointed by the following faculty board give notice of oral
examination of their candidate as
follows:

Literae Humaniores

A. KAMARA, Wolfson: `Antioch and its territory, from the Tetrarchy to
Anastasius: social and political implications of the expansion of Christianity, AD
284–491'.

Lady Margaret Hall, Monday, 22 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: S.R.F. Price, J.H.W.G. Liebeschuetz.

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EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF
SCIENCE

The examiners appointed by the following faculty board give notice of oral
examination of their candidate as
follows:

Physical Sciences

J. BRANDIZZI, Worcester: `Adaptive fuzzy control for cryogenic
applications'.

Department of Engineering Science, Monday, 15 May, 2.15 p.m.


Examiners: S.R. Duncan, K. Warwick.

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section





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 4 May 2000: Colleges<br />

Colleges, Halls, and Societies


Contents of this section:

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OBITUARIES


Christ Church

THE VERY REVD PETER BAELZ, 15 March 2000; Dean Emeritus of Durham;
Member of the Governing Body 1972–80. Aged 76.

JAMES RICHARD BAILEY, MA, 29 February 2000; commoner 1938–9, 1946,
1947, and 1949–50. Aged 80.

SIR FRANCIS JOHN VERNON HEREWARD DASHWOOD, BT., MA, 9 March 2000;
commoner 1946–8. Aged 74.

HAROLD SAMPSON DAY, MA, QC; Rhodes Scholar 1931–4.

JOHN STANDISH FFORDE, MA, 10 April 2000; commoner 1947–9. Aged 78.

THE HON. HUMPHREY FISHER; commoner 1945–6.

THE REVD PROFESSOR WILLIAM D. MCHARDY, CBE, 9 April 2000; Member of
the Governing Body 1938, Emeritus 1979. Aged 88.

COLIN PILKINGTON LYLE OLIPHANT, MA, 5 April 2000; commoner 1966–7
and 1968–70. Aged 52.

ANDREW THOMAS EMILE PACEWICZ; scholar 1973–4.

JOHN RICHARD REEVES, MA, 12 March 2000; commoner 1942 and 1946–9.
Aged 75.

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Corpus Christi College

PETER RALPH QUIXANO HENRIQUES, MA, 6 January 2000; commoner
1928–31. Aged 90.

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University College

OZREN SLAVUJEVIC, 26 March 2000; commoner October 1999. Aged 20.

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MEMORIAL SERVICE


University College

A Memorial Service for OZREN SLAVUJEVIC, formerly commoner of the college,
will be held at 12 noon on Saturday, 6 May, in the college chapel.

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ELECTIONS


All Souls College

Visiting Fellowships

The following will be in residence for Trinity Term 2000 as Visiting Fellows at
All Souls College:

PROFESSOR ROBERT C. ALLEN, University of British Columbia

PROFESSOR BRIAN J. BOND, King's College, London

PROFESSOR JAMES P. CARLEY, York University, Toronto

PROFESSOR MARGALIT FINKELBERG, Tel Aviv University

DR IAN C. HARRIS, University of Leicester

PROFESSOR STEPHANIE W. JAMISON, Harvard University

PROFESSOR MICHAEL POWER, London School of Economics and Political
Science

PROFESSOR ALAN SOKAL, New York University

PROFESSOR LARRY S. TEMKIN, Rice University

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St Hugh's College

To an Evans Scholarship:

ALASTAIR JAMES CHARLES MATTHEWS,
formerly of Wesley College

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PRIZE


St Hugh's College

Elizabeth Francis Prize:

KATE BAIN

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NOTICE


Oriel College

Eugene Lee-Hamilton Prize 2000:

The Provost and Fellows of Oriel College offer a prize of £60 for the best
Petrarchan Sonnet in English submitted by an undergraduate of Oxford or
Cambridge, on a subject to be chosen by the candidate. Enjambment between
the eighth and ninth lines will be permitted. No candidate may submit more
than one sonnet, nor may the prize be awarded more than once to the same
person.

The competing sonnets should be sent to the College Secretary, Oriel College,
Oxford OX1 4EW, not later than Friday, 2 June. Each sonnet must be
accompanied by a certificate from the head or a fellow of the candidate's
college, stating that the candidate is an undergraduate. The winner will have
been deemed to have given permission to publish his/her sonnet in the
Oriel Record.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 4 May 2000: Advertisements<br />

Advertisements


Contents of this section:



How to advertise in the
Gazette


Terms and conditions
of acceptance of advertisements

Return to Contents Page of this issue



Oxford Chamber Music Society

Trinity Term 2000. 7 May , 8 p.m., Leopold String Trio, works
by Sibelius, Moeran, R. Strauss, Beethoven: 25 June, 8 p.m., London Wind Trio
and Sam Haywood (piano), works by Mozart, Milhaud, Walthew, Glinka,
Canteloube, Poulenc. Holywell Music Room. Tickets: £11, or £10 in
advance from the Oxford Playhouse Box Office (tel.: Oxford 798600); concs:
Seniors £9/£8, students and juniors £4.50.

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Westminster Classic Tours

From Troy to Tarsus, we cruise the Turkish coast offering
classical tours for a maximum of 12 per group, on traditional Turkish gulets.
We also offer painting tours, private charters for friends or family, and tours
of mainland Greece. For a copy of our brochure contact us at Westminster
Classic tours, suite 120, 266 Banbury Road, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 728565, fax:
728575, e-mail: info@wct99.com.

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Friends of Oxford Botanic Garden

Grand, millenium plant sale, to be held in the Oxford
University Parks, South Parks Road, on Sun., 7 May at 2.30 p.m. Good plants
from Friends' gardens, both celebrated and less well known, also from
nurseries and colleges. There will be free horticultural advice from top- notch
gardeners, as well as teas and second-hand gardening books. Parking in the
St Cross Building, Manor Road. All proceeds go to the fund set up by the
Friends of Oxford Botanic Garden, to put the work of our Education Officer
on to a firm footing for the future. The plant sale is one of many efforts to
raise the £350,000 needed to establish the Education post.

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Musica Humana Oxford

Dana T. Marsh, Director, will offer the programmes
`Splendours of Tudor Polyphony: Music for the Sarum Rite', featuring the
Cantate Mass of John Sheppard, with additional motets and responds by
Thomas Tallis and Sheppard. Sat., 13 May at 8.15 p.m. in the Chapel of Queen's
College. Tickets £6 (£4 concessions, £2 students) at the door.

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Bodleian Shop

See our full range of postcards, greetings cards, and
stationery with a difference! Our `Oxford Views' writing paper, using
engravings from the John Johnson Collection of Printed Ephemera, is printed
in the Bodleian on high quality conservation paper; A4 size, 16 sheets and 16
envelopes, £5.95. Shop open Mon.--Fri., 9 a.m.--5 p.m., Sat., 9 a.m.--12.30
p.m.

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Tuition Offered

Coaching and supervising your staff. If you supervise and
train staff this training day will increase your effectiveness and confidence
in getting the most out of your staff. You will learn techniques, and how they
apply to your work: 14 Sept. Team building is fun. Learn to interact
effectively as part of a team. Know how to compensate for imbalances in an
existing team, how to set team goals alongside optimising individual skills and
expertise: 15 Sept. Venue Oxford, £130 each, discount for attending both
days. Contact R & T S on Oxford 774554, e-mail:
patlockley@rowingandtraining.freeserve. co.uk.

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Services Offered

Your basic personal tax return completed, and all liabilities
calculated for £120. Letting, authorship, royalty income etc., £40
extra. No VAT charged. For business and trust accounts etc., please ask for
a quotation. John Hanks LLM FCA, Chartered Accountant, 50 Thames Street,
Oxford OX1 1SU. Tel.: Oxford 438572, or e-mail: john.hanks@ukonline.co.uk.

Cordon Bleu cook now provides organic fayre for dinner
parties or other social events. Tel.: Oxford 556994.

Personal computer consultants, offering expert advice and
tuition for both hardware and software. On site service at home or in the
office. We provide upgrades for most computers, or alternatively, we also
supply our range of personally built, to your specification, KTec computers.
We will also supply or source software to match your requirements. For a
quality service, matched with competitive prices, tel.: Chris Lewis on Oxford
461222, fax: 461333, e-mail: info@kristontec.co.uk.

Town and Country Trees, arboricultural contractors. Tree
surgery, felling, planting, hedges, orchard and shrub pruning, stump removal.
Fully qualified, fully insured. Tel.: 01869 351540, or 01993 811115.

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Domestic Services

Au-pair. Nineteen year old German girl available June--Dec.
My experience includes caring for my four younger siblings (aged 17, 13, 6
and 2), working in children's summer camps, and with dance groups for
children aged 5--12. Please contact Johanna Pallocks, Klosterwaldhof, D-66484
Dietrichingen, Germany. Tel.: 0049 6338 265, fax: 0049 6338 809314, or e-mail:
JohannaGeorgia@web.de.

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your
local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college.
Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre- occupancy cleaning, flood
cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice,
call Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford 726983 or Abingdon 555533.

Do you need a nanny? All Counties Nannies, qualified and
experienced staff. Full and part-time, permanent and temporary. Newborn,
toddlers, school age. Our aim is to provide the best possible care for your
family. Tel.: Lynda on 01235 524462, mobile: 0402 068165.

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Situations Vacant

Looking for part-time work in the City Centre? Try our
Visitor Reception Centre and Saxon Tower at St Michael at the North Gate.
Hours 9.30 a.m.--5.30 p.m. (11.30 a.m.--5.30 p.m. on Sundays). Two or three
days a month, mainly at weekends. Friendly and alert manner essential,
£4.50 p.h. No previous experience necessary. Would suit graduate student
needing some income top-up. Contact Stephen Pix by 'phone or fax on: Oxford
242444.

The Examination Schools: Invigilators. We are looking for
people to add to our Register of Invigilators. Work is on a temporary basis
during the exam periods and involves laying out of question papers and
invigilating during the examination session. Each session is approximately 4
hours. If you are interested please send a C.V. and covering letter to the
Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG. For
further information phone the Deputy Clerk (Exams) on (2) 76911.

The Examination Schools: Room Assistants. We are looking for
people to work full time, including some Saturdays, for a 6 week period in
Trinity term to cover the exam season (22 May--30 June 2000). The duties
include setting up examination rooms, tidying up between sessions, laying out
script booklets and exam materials, and delivering packages in central Oxford.
If you would like to apply please send a C.V. and covering letter to the Clerk
of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG. For further
information phone the Deputy Clerk (Building) on (2) 76905.

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Houses to Let

Jericho. Two bedroom furnished house, located close to the
canal in Jericho. Stripped wooden floors, with open plan kitchen and dining
room. Two double bedrooms, fully equipped kitchen, 1 reception room, and
bathroom. Elaborate fixtures with an eclectic style of furnishings. Available
now at £825 p.c.m. For more details please contact Julia at Finders
Keepers, 226 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: Oxford 311011,
e-mail: julian@finders.co.uk, or visit our website at: www.finders.co.uk

An Englishman's home is his castle--- so the saying goes.
We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are
seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we
may be able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents,
specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other
professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in
Oxford. Visit our web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all
the properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone,
fax, or e-mail us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever
we can without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 7611533, fax: 764777, e-mail:
info@qbman.co.uk.

Make finding accommodation easy. Finders Keepers have a
dedicated approach to helping you find the right property. Browse through
our website for up-to-date detailed information on properties available and
make use of our interactive database, priority reservation service (credit
cards accepted), personal service and professional advice. For further
information please contact Finders Keepers at 226, Banbury Road, Summertown,
Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: Oxford 311011. Fax: Oxford 556993. E-mail:
oxford@finders.co.uk. Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

Summertown. Detached, Victorian 5 bedroom house in
Summertown, with easy access to all local amenities. Fully fitted kitchen,
living/dining room, and easily maintained garden. Ideal property for sharers
needing access into town, and also onto major road networks surrounding
Oxford. Available now at £1,050 p.c.m. For more information please contact
Julia at Finders Keepers, 226 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY.
Tel.: Oxford 311011 or by e-mail: julian@finders.co.uk, or visit our website at
www.finders.co.uk.

East Oxford. Excellent 3/4 bedroom house. Huge
kitchen/diner, lounge, bath and power shower. Utility room. Bedrooms
carpeted, ground floor wooden floors throughout. Large garden. Near
amenities. Tel.: 020 8568 5390 or Oxford 747793.

Quiet, modernised terrace house, fully furnished, central
north Oxford. Two bedrooms, garden, c.h. Suitable visiting academics. Available
to let to 1 or 2 persons only from 16 Sept., for one academic year. For
further details, tel.: Mrs Ockenden, Oxford 512747, or e-mail:
rosaleen@community.co.uk.

Three bedroom house in Old Marston, in very quiet
cul-de-sac location, close to J.R. Hospital, and short cycling distance to the
city. Living and dining room, conservatory for summer use, fully-fitted
kitchen with dishwasher, extra cloakroom, large rear garden, own drive and
garage. £750 p.c.m. No smokers or pets. Available for 1 year from Sept.
E-mail: anindya.banerjee@economics.ox.ac.uk. Tel.: + 44 1865 764262 (eves.).

Excellent location close to schools and all North Oxford
recreational facilities: house with 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 3 reception room
and large enclosed garden. Available May/June for 6 months or 1 year.
£850 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 556994.

A beautifully converted old village bakery, in a peaceful
relaxed environment, set in a village 15 minutes' drive from Oxford. Double
bedroom en suite, living room leading to sunroom, overlooking a secluded
walled garden; kitchen with dishwasher, cooker, microwave, fridge/freezer,
washing machine/drier. C.h., TV's, video, telephone. Short or long term let
(6--12 months) would be considered. £850 p.m. inc. electricity/heating.
Tel.: 01869 350017.

Central North Oxford. Elegantly furnished, Victorian style
house in landscaped surroundings, overlooking canal. Four bedrooms, 2
bathrooms, kitchen/breakfast, utility, dining room, sitting room. Short walk
from city centre. Reserved parking. £1,900 p.c.m. Non-smokers. Available
from 6 Aug. E-mail: vballeny@callnetuk.com.

Charming, well equipped, family accommodation, overlooking
River Thames in Oxford. Friendly neighbourhood, convenient for trains and
city centre. Two/three double bedrooms. Available mid-Sept., for 1 year.
Non-smokers only. £1,000 p.c.m. exc. bills and local tax. Tel.: Oxford
244480, or e-mail: maukie@dtn.ntl.com.

Pretty Edwardian house, newly refurbished to mix classic
features with modern amenities. Central location in quiet residential area, close
to University and riverside meadows. Three bedrooms, large study, lounge,
dining room, completely new kitchen, bathroom, and garden. Furnished and
equipped to high standard; bed linen provided. Rent: £1,250 p.c.m. excl.
bills. Available from September. Tel.: 00 44 (0) 1865 251003 or
e-mail:mpaehoney@aol.com.

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Flats to Let

Sunny Edinburgh flat, period features, and stunning views.
Beautifully furnished, fully equipped. Drawing room, study, 1 double, 1 single
bedroom, kitchen/dining, bath/power shower, g.c.h. Shared garden. Excellent
amenities. Short walk to University and city centre. Available 21 June--21
Sept. £700 p.c.m. Tel.: 0131 229 8154, or e-mail:jolyon.mitchell@ed.ac.uk

Two bedroom furnished flat, in new development very close
to River Thames, within 5 minutes' walking distance of the city centre, with
parking. Available any time Apr.--Sept. £350 p.w. inc. linen and weekly
cleaning. Please tel.: 01628 591246 (day) or 01628 773326 (eves.).

Luxury unfurnished flat, only 2 years old. Two bedrooms, 2
bathrooms (1 en suite), entrance hall, lounge/diner. 1 car parking space.
Temple Cowley area. Available 8 May. £725 p.m. Tel.:Oxford 452132.

Grandpont Place. Brand new ground floor flat, located 5
minutes' walk from the city centre. Two bedrooms, bathroom with power
shower, fully fitted kitchen, lounge, alarm system, patio, large communal
garden in rear, 1 parking space with electronic gate entry. Would suit couple
or a single professional. Unfurnished. £800 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 723544 or
510746.

To let from 8 April, an attractive flat, comprising a sitting
room with French door opening onto sheltered garden, bedroom (double bed),
kitchen (electric cooker), and bathroom. Car essential as this is a country flat
5 miles outside Oxford. Parking for 2 cars outside door in the property. If
interested please tel.: Oxford 735203.

Self catering, short break apartment in Oxford. Situated on
the beautiful tree lined Woodstock Road, on 2--2 1/2 miles from the City
centre. This 1 bedroom apartment is ideal for business, academic, or holiday
visits to Oxford. Kitchen, lounge/diner, double bedroom, and bathroom. Sleeps
2 people (3/4 if you take advantage of the sofa/bed in the lounge). £295
per week. Off-street parking and maid service are available. Tel.: Oxford
310782, or e-mail: john@g.c.pipkins.freeserve.co.uk.

Central North Oxford, 4 minutes' walk from University Parks
and easy walking to University Science Area, libraries and city centre.
Charming and spacious garden flat in quiet residential street, incl.
sitting-room, double bedroom, kitchen with washing machine, bathroom with
bath and shower, plentiful storage space. Gas central heating. Suit single
person or couple. No smokers. Available from July. £740 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford
512138; e-mail:mdy@bioch.ox.ac.uk

A luxury, self-catering, 1 bedroom apartment is available for
short lets, minimum 1 week. ideal for visiting academics, business people, or
for holidays. Next to the River Thames, yet only 5 minutes' walk to the city
centre, it is an ideal location. Recently refurbished to a very high standard
it consists of: 1 double bedroom, a newly fitted bathroom, lounge/diner with
T.V. Video, sofa/bed etc.; new kitchen with dishwasher, fridge, washer/drier
and microwave. By taking advantage of the sofa/bed it will accommodate up
to 4 people. The price is £500 p.w. incl. fresh linen, and cleaning once
a week, heating and electricity. Oxford Riverside Apartments, tel.: Oxford
310782, fax: Oxford 310649, or: www.oxfordcity.co.uk/accom/pembrok.

Central North Oxford, 10 minutes' walk from city centre, all
main University buildings and parks, and very close to the river. Available
for short/long let. Exceptionally well-funrished, comfortable flats in extremely
quiet, civilised, large Victorian house in this exclusive, leafy, residential
Victorian suburb, with large, light, airy rooms. First-floor flat available 23
June, large double bedroom, large drawing room, kitchen, bathroom; ground
floor flat available from end June, and second floor flat available mid-Sept.,
1 double, 1 single bedroom, drawing room, kitchen, bathroom. Off- street
parking and secluded garden. Tel.:/fax: Oxford 552400.

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Accommodation Offered

Attractive double room in very modern, comfortable, 2
bedroom house. Gas c.h., d.g., washing machine and dryer. Small garden.
Pleasant East Oxford location. Suit professional. Non- smokers please. £345
p.c.m. Tel.: Dave on Oxford 724189.

Finders Keepers specialises in managing your home and
investment. With our 27 years' experience we assure you of a high level of
service from dedicated and professional letting and management teams. Many
of our landlords have remained with us since we opened and are still reaping
the benefits of our high standards of property management. if you would like
details of our services please contact Finders Keepers at 226 Banbury Road,
Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: Oxford 556993, e-mail:
oxford@finders.co.uk. Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

Self-contained, luxury, open plan accommodation in North
Oxford, well within Ring Road. Quiet, with patio and lovely views to open
countryside. Near convenient bus route. Suit visiting academic/professional,
single or couple. Available June. Rent £650 p.m. for single, £700 for
couple, inc. electricity and council tax. Regret no children, pets or smokers.
Tel.: Oxford 515085, or e-mail: trishaboyd@hotmail.com.

Summer House-sit. Family home available from 8 July until
middle to end Sept., North Oxford, within ring road. Fully furnished, 4
bedrooms, off-street parking for 2 cars. Interested in having 1 person or
couple house-sit. For further information telephone or fax Oxford 553617.

Paying guests, visiting academics, welcomed for short or long
stays in the comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple, in exclusive,
quiet, leafy central North Oxford, within walking distance of all main
university buildings, town centre, parks, river, good shops and restaurants.
All rooms have colour TV, tea-/coffee-making facilities, microwave, and
refrigerator and/or refrigerator and deep-freeze availability, c.h., and
independent heating. Breakfast included in the very moderate terms. Tel./fax:
Oxford 557879.

Folly Bridge, 6 brand new 1/2 bedroom flats, on the banks
of the River Isis, available from mid-May onwards, either for the Summer, or
for the academic year from Sept. Accommodation consists of 1 double bedroom,
1 study/single bedroom, sitting room, kitchen, and bathroom. All flats are fully
furnished and have magnificent river and Christ Church Meadow views.
£900 or £950 p.c.m. Further details from the Bursar, Hertford College,
tel.: Oxford 279414, or e-mail: peter.baker@hertford.ox.ac.uk.

Flat share offered. Quiet modern apartment in New Osney, 5
mins.station, river view, allocated parking. suit n/s, female academic.
Available 1 June. £350+ neg. p.m. Tel.: Oxford 203624.

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Accommodation Sought

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB
Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers.
We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and
their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good quality tenants
seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services,
or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation,
telephone us: Oxford 7611533, fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk.
Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our web site at:
http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.

Family returning after 5 years Christian work in Uganda
seek house- sit/caretaker accommodation at modest rent from July, preferably
in Jericho/North Oxford/Summertown. Mother EFL teacher, father studying, and
boy aged 11 and 9. Non-smokers, happy to caretake, housekeep, garden etc.
References available. Contact Kathryn.Bunch@ccrg.ox.ac.uk, or tel.: Oxford
516492.

Japanese Professor with his wife (non- smokers), and son
aged 12, seek a well appointed, centrally located 2 bedroom furnished flat, or
similar, in Oxford for 2 months between 30 July and 29 Sept.,(exact dates are
flexible). Please contact: Shirley Day, e-mail: shirley@comlab.ox.ac.uk, or tel.:
Oxford 273885.

Academic couple (non-smokers), directing US university
exchange programme, seek furnished 2 bedroom flat, or small house, late
Aug.,--late Dec. Central Oxford location within walking/biking distance
preferred. Contact Prof. Ellen Todd, e-mail: etodd@gmu.edu, tel.: 011 202 363
5686, or fax: 011 703 993 1251.

Visiting American academics are looking for a 3/4 bedroom
house to rent in Wolvercote, from 1 Sept.,2000--June 20001. Furnished,
washer/drier, and ideally with view of meadows!. Please contact Matthew
Sparke (sparke@u.washington.edu; tel.: 001 206 526 5363) or, locally, Dr Peter
Bull at Hertford College.

International Copyright Lawyer from continental Europe,
frequently travelling abroad, is looking for a centrally located base in Oxford,
ideally consisting of either a small self-contained flat, or a single bedroom
plus study, or a very large room in a shared house or flat. Please contact:
Brigitte_Lindner@Compuserve.com, or tel.: 020 7837 3927.

Theatre Company seeks 2-bedroom accomodation for Director
and
18 month old child, 4 June--12 July. Accommodation should
be of good quality and child-friendly. Please phone Fiona Bennett
on Oxford 250636 (office hours).

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Accommodation Exchange

Cape Town--Oxford. Three weeks from 9 Dec. Offer
comfortable house with wonderful outdoor living, bar-b-que, pool. sleeps 6/7.
Near all amenities. Seek house/flat within 1 1/2 miles of Oxford city centre.
Please contact Judy Davies at: vanes@iafrica.com.


Accommodation Sought to Rent or Exchange

Perth, Western Australia. Swap or rental. Five bedrooms,
large kitchen, study, attic, lounge, dining room, terraces, pool, garden. In
Claremont, close to beaches, river, railway, city, schools and University of WA.
Available 1 July 2000--21 Jan. 2001. Swap for house in Oxford, or rental at
£1,300 per month. Tel.: 62 08 93831816 or 62 08 93462833, fax: 62 08
93463160, or e-mail: peter.hollingsworth"@health.wa.gov.au.

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Summer Lets

Summer Let in Oxford. Live in comfort near the Thames, just
a short walk to the city centre. Beautiful Victorian house, 4 bedrooms,
south-facing garden. Centrally heated, large split-level living room, dining
room, new and fully equipped kitchen, bathroom with bidet and w.c., shower
room with w.c. Available 6 weeks, Sat. 22 July--Sun., 3 Sept. Price negotiable.
Tel.: +44 (0) 1865 725193.

City centre house, with view of Thames, available for 4
months, June-- Sept. Fully equipped, 3 bedrooms (2 double, 1 single), 2
bathrooms, gas c.h., garden, garage. £1,000 p.c.m. inc. of charges except
telephone calls. Tel.: Oxford 250462.

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Holiday Lets

Northumberland, between the Cheviots and the sea. A stone built cottage, in
a small unspoilt village, with 3 bedrooms, and sitting room with view over the
garden. Five miles Alnwick castle and easy reach of half a dozen more, plus
miles of beautiful seashore. Please tel.: 01665 577292.

Venice. Holiday home of Anglo-Italian couple, tastefully
modernised, and furnished, access on to quiet `Corte', sleeps up to 4. Available
weekly or termly. Situated between railway and Rialto, near Ghetto, well
served by water buses, shops and restaurants. Tel.: 0039 0644230361.

Skopelos, Skiathos, Alonissos. Lovely island houses available
for rent. Town, country and seaside locations, sleeping from 2--8 persons,
with prices from £49 p.p.p.w. For brochure tel.: 0030 424 22947, fax: 0030
424 23057, or e-mail: thalpos@otenet.gr.

France. Beautiful old farmhouse high above the Sorgue valley
in the Languedoc/Aveyron hills. Easy drives to the gorges du Tarn, Millau,
Montpellier, Albi. Enormous stone-flagged living area with mezzanine.
Magnificent kitchen. Huge beams and fireplace. Five bedrooms (sleeping up to
11). Utility room. Barn. Roof terrace. Orchard garden with hammocks. Stunning
views. River bathing. Riding and tennis. Excellent restaurants. Completely
unspoilt area. Some availability July, also May, June and Sept.
£250--£450 p.w. Tel.: Oxford 244619.

Self-catering accommodation 5 minutes walk to city centre.
We have 4-bedroom self-contained flats to let from July to Sept., fully
equipped kitchens for groups or families. Close to shops, restaurants and
buses. A 24-hour lodge with CCTV. Pleasant gardens in tranquil surroundings.
Use of the adjacent sports ground. Washing machines on site. Free off-road
parking. For rates tel./fax Oxford 725364.

Dordogne and Rome holiday rentals. Stone house in an acre
of garden in the Dordogne, France, with a fabulous 270 degree panorama
(sleeps 8/10). Also Rome, Italy, marble floored flat (4/5) and 19th-c., country
farmhouse with lovely views, 115 minutes' from Rome and 2 hrs to Florence
(sleeps 4 with downstairs rooms available to sleep 4 more). Prices vary from
£250--£550 p.w. Private owner. Tel.: 01223 353603 for details.

Share a beautifully modernised flat in a quiet corner of
central Florence with 3 sociable cats. On the third floor (no lift), it sleeps 4/5
(1 double bedroom, 1 single room and double sofa bed in the sitting room).
Also large kitchen, 2 bathrooms, large furnished terrace (with view), washing
machine, dishwasher. Available from Sat., 22 July -- Sat., 26 Aug.---minimum
let 1 week. The rent (£300 p.w.) inc. utilities (not phone), bed linen, etc.,
and kitchen equipment. Cat supplies are provided. Phone Walsh on: 0039055
2398759; e-mail: phwalsh@tin.it.

Crete. A traditional Cretan house in old town Rethimno,
superbly renovated to provide space and comfort in beautifully furnished
surroundings. Elevated, vine-covered, sitting area with brick
barbecue---perfect for alfresco dining. It is in a quiet area, and close to long,
sandy beach, taverns, shops, and the many interesting sights in and around
this historic area. Sleeps 4 (1 double, 1 twin). Available all year round.
£280 p.w., £1,000 p.m. All linen, electricty and cleaning inc. Tel./fax:
Nikolaos Glinias, 0030 831 56525, e-mail: nglynias@ret.forthnet.gr.

Italy, Umbria. Twelfth-century San Orsola, a short distance
Perugia, Todi. Combines charm and comfort in a beautiful settiing of
sunflowers, and rolling Umbrian hills. Bed and breakfast, or self-catering.
Fresh eggs and veg. Tel.: Maria McCourt 0039 075 8748997.

French Riviera, ground floor, 2 bedroom flat, between St
Raphael and Cannes. Five minutes' walk from the beach, pool, shops,
restaurants. Tennis and golf nearby. South-facing private patio; parking
alongside. Linen provided. Reasonable rates. Tel.: Epsom, 01372 744246.

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Houses for Sale

Spacious 2 bedroom house with large L-shaped sitting
room/dining room in Witney (12 miles from Oxford). Upstairs bathroom and
downstairs w.c. Generous cupboard space, gas c.h. Secluded walled garden. In
excellent condition. No chain. Price: £115,000. For further information tel.:
Oxford 554684.

High-quality 2 bedroom house on Oxford Waterside development. Built
in 1998,
condition as new with high ceilings, gas c.h. and luxury fittings. Master
bedroom with en suite shower, bathroom, gardens, allocated parking. Available
now. guide £190,000. Tel.: 0370 753915.

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<br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette: Diary, 5 May<br /> - 15 May

Diary


Contents of this section:

Academic Staff
Development Seminars
: places should be booked in advance
through
the Staff Development Office, Littlegate House, St Ebbe's, Oxford OX1 1PT
(telephone: (2)86803).

For the full list of courses, see the HREF="http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/training/">Staff Development
ProgrammeWeb site.

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Contents Page of this issue



Friday 5 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Crete, Cyprus, and the Levant', 1.15 p.m.
(Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

PROFESSOR P. VAN INWAGEN: `God and science' (Wilde Lectures in Natural and
Comparative Religion: `Evil and superfluity: two arguments against the
existence of God'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR I. KERSHAW: `Why did Nazi radicalism not subside?' (Faculty of
Modern History: Special Faculty Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR P. VITEBSKY: `Forgetting the ancestors: living without the dead' (Marett
Memorial Lecture), Saskatchewan Lecture Room, Exeter, 5 p.m.

JEREMY PAXMAN: `Surviving spin' (Philip Geddes Memorial Lecture), Schools,
5 p.m.

G. DUMENIL: `The costs and benefits of neo-liberalism: a class analysis'
(lecture), Maison Française, 5 p.m.

DR M. PERCY: `Knowledge of Angles: how spiritual are the English?' (Eric
Symes Abbott Memorial Lecture), the chapel, Keble, 5.30 p.m.

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Saturday 6 May

STUDY-DAY (Association for the Study of Modern and Contemporary France):
`Le Royaume-Uni et l'euro: quelle cohabitation entre esprit anglo-saxon et
modèle franco-allemand?', and `Euro-vaches, Euro-corps et Euro-
monnaie: l'Europe appelle-t-elle à un axe anglo-française?',
Maison Française, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. (advance registration required:
(2)74220).

PATRICIA ROZARIO (soprano), Francis Grier (piano), and Colin Carr (cello):
programme of works by Beethoven, Tavener, and Britten, with world
première of song-cycle Love without Hope by Francis Grier
(words by Robert Graves), Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's, 8 p.m.
(admission by free programme, available from the college lodge).

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Sunday 7 May

THE BAND OF INSTRUMENTS, with the Choir of Christ Church, perform J.S.
Bach's cantata `Ich bin ein guter Hirt' (BWV 85), Christ Church, 6 p.m. (part
of Evensong service; free admission).

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Monday 8 May

H. ZHANG: `Reproductive rights, strategies, and well-being: the Vietnam
situation' (Fertility and Reproduction Seminars), basement Seminar Room,
Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

DR M. SCHOFIELD: `Rule by philosophers: knowledge, virtue, and power'
(Carlyle Classes in Classical Political Thought: `The politics of Plato's
Republic'), All Souls, 2 p.m.

DR H. KING: `Did Roman medicine exist? Nineteenth-century reconstructions of
the Roman past' (Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine seminar series:
`Historical perspectives on medicine and culture'), Wellcome Unit, 2 p.m.

THE REVD DR BRYAN SPINKS: `Calvinist consensus and Patristic Reformed
Sacramentalism, and the débâcle of the 1637 Book of Common
Prayer' (Hensley Henson Lectures in Theology: `Sacraments, Ceremonies, and
Stuart Divines: sacramental theology and liturgy in England and Scotland,
1603–62'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J.E. SMITHBURN: `The Hague Convention on International Child
Abduction: a socio-legal overview' (seminar), Centre for Socio-Legal Studies,
Wolfson, 5 p.m.

J.-P. GENET: `Political society and the public space in later medieval France
and England' (Seminar series: `Political societies and culture in late medieval
France, the British Isles, and the Netherlands'), Maison Française, 5
p.m.

PROFESSOR R. HACOHEN: `Arnold Schoenberg's Moses und Aaron:
a theological-political-aesthetic tractate' (public lecture), Holywell Music Room,
5 p.m.

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Tuesday 9 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Coffee and chocolate pots', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
£1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

DR M. SCHOFIELD: `Economic man: property and human nature' (Carlyle Classes
in Classical Political Thought: `The politics of Plato's Republic'), All
Souls, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR G.C. EBERS (Action Research Professor of Clinical Neurology):
`Multiple sclerosis—a complex trait paradigm' (inaugural lecture), Schools,
5 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. VAN INWAGEN: `God and evil' (Wilde Lectures in Natural and
Comparative Religion: `Evil and superfluity: two arguments against the
existence of God'), Schools, 5 p.m.

E. SENICI: `Verdi's Falstaff and the Italian fin-de-
siècle
' (Faculty of Music: Graduate Students' Colloquia), Denis
Arnold Hall, Music Faculty, 5.15 p.m.

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Wednesday 10 May

RUPERT GOUGH: organ recital, in series `Bach at Queen's 2000', the chapel,
Queen's, 1.10 p.m. (admission free; retiring collection).

PROFESSOR ROY FOSTER: `Remembering to forget: history and commemoration
in Ireland' (A.B. Emden Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. CALASSO: `Incipit parodia' (Weidenfeld Lectures in
European Comparative Literature: `Literature and the gods'), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR D. MCKITTERICK: `Dependent skills' (Lyell Lectures in Bibliography: `Set in
print: the fortunes of an idea, c.1450–1800'), Lecture Theatre
2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

DR A. O'MAHONEY: `The Copts, politics, and Muslim–Christian relations in
modern Egypt' (Becket Institute Lectures), Becket Institute, St Hugh's, 5
p.m.

S. TOUSSAINT: `Interpreting cultural narratives: ethnography, biography, and
the paradox of memory' (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women
Commemorative Lecture), Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

J. HART: `Refugees or citizens? Children in a Palestinian camp in Jordan'
(Refugee Studies Centre: Seminars on Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar
Room, Queen Elizabeth house, 5 p.m.

DR S. TOUSSAINT: `Interpreting cultural narratives: ethnography, biography,
and the paradox of memory' (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women:
Kaberry Lecture, in honour of Dr Phyllis Kaberry), Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.
(further details from (2)73644, cccrw@qeh.ox.ac.uk).

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Thursday 11 May

PROFESSOR P. VAN INWAGEN: `The vast amount of evil' (Wilde Lectures in
Natural and Comparative Religion: `Evil and superfluity: two arguments against
the existence of God'), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR N. EDWARDS: `Early medieval stones and stone sculpture in Wales: context
and connections' (O'Donnell Lectures in Celtic Studies: first of two lectures),
Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. CALASSO: `Musings of a serial killer' (Weidenfeld Lectures in
European Comparative Literature: `Literature and the gods'), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR D. MCKITTERICK: `A house of errors' (Lyell Lectures in Bibliography: `Set
in print: the fortunes of an idea, c.1450–1800'), Lecture
Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

DR H. KATOUZIAN: `European liberalisms and modern conceptions of liberty in
Iran' (Hamid Enayat Lecture), New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

DR J.R. PEPPER: `Thomas Harriot and the great mathematical tradition' (Thomas
Harriot Lecture), Champneys Room, Oriel, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR I. CRAIG: `The Human Genome Project—facts and fallacies' (St
Catherine's Millennium Lecture Series: `The impact of the Human Genome
Project on Society'), Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, St Catherine's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR E. SWENSON: `Piano manufacturing in mid-nineteenth-century
America: a tour through the factories of Steinway & Sons, Chickering, and
Boardman and Grey' (lecture), Bate Collection, Music Faculty, 5.30 p.m.

JAMES O'DONNELL: organ recital, in series `Bach at Queen's 2000', the chapel,
Queen's, 8 p.m. (admission £5/£3).

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Friday 12 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The decorative watch', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
£1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

PROFESSOR P. VAN INWAGEN: `Horrors' (Wilde Lectures in Natural and
Comparative Religion: `Evil and superfluity: two arguments against the
existence of God'), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR N. EDWARDS: `Early medieval stones and stone sculpture in Wales: context
and connections' (O'Donnell Lectures in Celtic Studies: second of two lectures),
Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR H.W. PERRY: `Law and politics in America's Constitutional Court'
(Annual Lecture in Socio-Legal Studies), Schools, 5.30 p.m.

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Monday 15 May

ACADEMIC STAFF Development Programme seminar: `Time management', 9.30 a.m.
(see information above).

ST ANNE'S COLLEGE exhibition opens: works by Mary Moser and Betsy Tyler-
Bell (in the Mary Ogilvie Gallery, until 2 June; open 10 a.m.–4 p.m., but
tel. (2)74800 for confirmation of hours).

S. RANDALL: `Is mortality important? Reproductive decisions, outcomes, and
strategies in Senegal' (Fertility and Reproduction Seminars), basement Seminar
Room, Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

DR M. SCHOFIELD: `Plato the feminist?' (Carlyle Classes in Classical Political
Thought: `The politics of Plato's Republic'), All Souls, 2 p.m.

DR J. PATRICK: `The doctor's dossier: medicine, bureaucracy, and novelistic
form in Zola, Huysmans, and George Eliot' (Wellcome Unit for the History of
Medicine seminar series: `Historical perspectives on medicine and culture'),
Wellcome Unit, 2 p.m.

J. GURY: `Voyageurs français Outre-Manche de Voltaire à Taine:
en quête de ces étranges insulaires' (Maison Française
lecture), Room 3, Taylor Institution, 3 p.m.

THE REVD DR BRYAN SPINKS: `Baptismal controversy, the Westminster Assembly,

and Royal Episcopal Divines' (Hensley Henson Lectures in Theology:
`Sacraments, Ceremonies, and Stuart Divines: sacramental theology and liturgy
in England and Scotland, 1603–62'), Schools, 5 p.m.

P. FRANCE: `Lost for words: travel and translation' (Besterman Lecture),
Lecture Hall, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

J.-P. BOUDET: `La magie dans la société de la fin du Moyen Age'
(Seminar series: `Political societies and culture in late medieval France, the
British Isles, and the Netherlands'), Maison Française, 5 p.m.

DR X. HASCHER: `A propos of the slow movement of Schubert's C major quintet,
D.956' (public lecture), Denis Arnold Hall, Music Faculty, 5 p.m. (public
lecture).

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