4 June 1998 - No 4477



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 128, No. 4477: 4 June 1998<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

4 June 1998





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<br /><br /><br /><title><br /> Oxford University Gazette, 4 June 1998: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 28 May

On Thursday, 28 May, the following were duly elected to hold office
from the first day of Michaelmas Term 1998 for the periods stated:

As a member of the Equal Opportunities Committee

For three years

S.E. MARSHALL, MA, Fellow of Exeter

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As a Curator of the Examination Schools

For three years

E.A. FALLAIZE, MA, Fellow of St John's

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As members of the General Board of the Faculties

(from members of the Faculties of English, Law, Literae
Humaniores, Modern Languages, Modern History, Music, Oriental
Studies, Social Studies, and Theology)

For four years

J.C.G. PITCHER, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St John's
A.M. VOLFING, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Oriel

(from members of the Faculties of Anthropology and Geography,
Biological Sciences, Clinical Medicine, Mathematical Sciences,
Physical Sciences, Physiological Sciences, and Psychological Studies)

For four years

B. CANTOR, MA, Fellow of St Catherine's

W.D. MACMILLAN, MA, Fellow of Hertford

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As members of the Hebdomadal Council

For six years

DAME FIONA CALDICOTT, BM, MA, Principal of Somerville

R.L. DEECH, MA, Principal of St Anne's

R.P.H. GASSER, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Brasenose

[The votes recorded were: for the Principal of Somerville, 682; for
the Principal of St Anne's, 554; for Dr Donaghy, 419; for Dr Gasser,
426]

As members of the Visitatorial Board Panel

For four years

B. CANTOR, MA, Fellow of St Catherine's

I. HONEYMAN, MA, Fellow of St Hugh's

J.F. ILES, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Hugh's

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CONGREGATION 1 June


Degree by Special Resolution

No notice to the contrary having been received under the
provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes,
1997, p. 15), the following resolution is deemed to have been
approved at noon on 1 June.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the
following:

NANCY S. GILES, Hertford College

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HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL


1 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts
under the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. v, cl. 1
(Statutes, 1997, p. 367) has been accorded to the
following persons who are qualified for membership of
Congregation:

KISHORE KUMAR BHAKOO, Lincoln College

MARK WILLIAM JOHN DEAN, Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art

BRAD SABIN HILL, Christ Church

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2 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been
added to the Register of Congregation:

Bhakoo, K.K., MA status, Lincoln

Brown, C.P.H., MA, Worcester

Dean, M.W.J., MA status, Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art

Giles, N.S., MA, Hertford

Hill, B.S., MA status, Christ Church

Leigh, M.G.L., MA, St Anne's

O'Hanlon, M.D.P., MA, Linacre

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CONGREGATION 2 June


1 Declaration of approval of unopposed
Statute promulgated on 19 May

No notice of opposition having been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor
declared the Statute establishing a Faculty of Management approved.


2 Promulgation of Statute

A form of Statute was promulgated. No notice of opposition having
been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor declared the preamble carried of
the proposed Statute concerning the Michael Daly Memorial Fund.

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BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect
on 19 June, see `Examinations and Boards' below.





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 4 June 1998: University Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 8 June


Degree by Special Resolution

The following special resolution will be deemed to be
approved at noon on 8 June, unless by that time the
Acting Registrar has received notice in writing from two
or more members of Congregation under the provisions of
Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1997, p.
15) that they wish the resolution to be put to a meeting
of Congregation.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the
following:

LIONEL DAVID SMITH, MA status, D.PHIL., Lincoln
College

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CONGREGATION 16 June 2 p.m.

¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that
written notice of any proposed amendment to, or intention
to vote against, the enacting part of the statute below,
signed by at least two members of Congregation, must be
given to the Acting Registrar by noon on Monday, 8 June
(see the Guide to Procedures in Congregation cited in the
note at the end of `University Agenda').


Voting on Statute promulgated on
2 June

Statute: Michael Daly Memorial Fund

(For form of Statute see p. 1209.)

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 4 June 1998: Notices<br />

Notices


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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KOLKHORST EXHIBITION

A Kolkhorst Exhibition has been awarded to ALISON BARTLETT, St
Peter's College.

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section



QUALITY ASSURANCE AND THE PROPOSED
INSTITUTE FOR LEARNING AND TEACHING


Replies to consultative documents issued
by the Quality Assurance Agency and the Institute for Learning
and Teaching Planning Group of the Committee of Vice-Chancellors
and Principals

Council and the General Board have recently approved replies,
appended at I and II respectively, on behalf of the University
to the following consultative documents:

(1) Developing the quality assurance and standards
framework for UK higher education
, issued by the Quality
Assurance Agency (QAA);

(2) An Institute for Learning and Teaching,
issued by the Institute for Learning and Teaching (ILT) Planning
Group of the Committee of Vice-Chancellors and Principals
(CVCP).

Both sets of proposals arise from recommendations in the report
of the National Committee of Inquiry into Higher Education (`the
Dearing Report'). The questions in the consultative documents are
reproduced in the replies. The full QAA document was published
in Higher Quality (the QAA bulletin), Vol. 1, No.
3 (March 1998), a copy of which is available for consultation in
the University Offices. The full CVCP document is available via
the CVCP Web site (http://www.cvcp.ac.uk/pubs/ilt.html), and a
copy is also available for consultation in the University
Offices.

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APPENDIX I

Reply from the University of Oxford to the QAA consultative
document on the proposed new quality assurance arrangements

(a) Given flexible application to take account
of the differing nature of individual institutions, is the

overall model one that could work constructively with the
internal procedures of your institution?

—We think that, with the exception of the arrangements for

REEs[1], the proposed model would
in certain circumstances be
useful in addressing questions of minimum standards in areas
where there is cause for concern. However, we believe it would
do little to encourage the pursuit of international standards of
excellence or to identify in which institutions such standards
were achieved.

—The model would furthermore involve a considerable drain
on academic time and other resources (for example, through the
preparation and updating of programme specifications for each
course or module, the demands of continued institutional audit,
and the maintenance of the REE system): in all, a burden which
we suggest is unnecessary in institutions which have already
demonstrated a high degree of excellence in quality assessment
exercises for teaching and research.

We would strongly resist the introduction of any system which
left open the `ways in which programme specification might be
utilised' (III.16) or benchmark standards which included
references to curriculum content beyond those already associated
with the requirements of PSBs [2]
(IV.12). We also think it
highly important to recognise that learning is a two-way process,
not simply delivery of a curriculum.

—We conclude that, though we could up to a point make the
system, or a somewhat modified version of it, work at a
superficial level, its application would be without benefit and
highly expensive in this or similar institutions. In this light
we consider that it would not be constructive for us to address
the detailed questions in part VIII of the paper.

(b) Do you agree that it is sensible to draw
upon the expertise of
external examiners to help
meet the need for information whilst minimising external scrutiny
processes? Are there measures, additional to those suggested in
the paper, you would wish to propose to safeguard the integrity
of external examining in your institution?

—We see many difficulties in practice and in principle in
the REE scheme (among them those of demands on academic time, the
calibre of the registered examiners, and potential conflicts of
loyalty and interests) and think that it should not be
pursued.

—We could envisage the development of the existing external
examiners' role in the context of the model which we propose
below.

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(c) Alternative proposals

We propose, bearing in mind the recognition accorded in both the
Dearing Report and the current QAA document to the acceptance and
encouragement of diversity in UK higher education institutions,
that the QAA and HEFCE consider a model along the lines set out
below. This is based on practices which are already current and
in some cases being developed further in Oxford, and which we
think provide for internal quality assurance and external
accountability at a level appropriate to a university which aims
to achieve the highest international standards. It is our firm
view, given this University's excellent record of results in
teaching quality assessments and its own, rigorous and externally
scrutinised, monitoring procedures, that the application of the
standards framework to all our teaching activities would be
irrelevant. For the same reasons, and because of the wholly
disproportionate demands it makes on academic time and resources,
we would in particular regard the imposition of institutional
review as otiose.

The framework to which we refer is set out below. We should be
happy to discuss details of how appropriate monitoring by the
agency might be incorporated.

—Publication by faculties in course handbooks of programme
specifications and standards, monitored by the University's
central quality assurance bodies.

—A system of external faculty/departmental review on an
eight-year cycle. At present review committees consist mainly of
external members, including always at least one from overseas;
their terms of reference embrace all areas of activity (i.e.
teaching, research, organisation, and finance) and relate
specifically to international standards of excellence.

—Annual
reports by faculty boards to the General Board, which include
inter alia reports on the progress of recommendations
of review committees, teaching quality assessors, and external
examiners.

—Annual reports of external examiners, scrutinised by the
central quality assurance bodies, which monitor also faculty
boards' responses to their recommendations.

—External advisory panels to faculties/departments,
containing members of the highest eminence in the relevant fields
such as Nobel Prizewinners, leaders of industry, charities, the
media, etc.

This model is, as indicated, based on our own current practice.
It has been suggested, however, that the QAA may wish to consider
the possibility of encouraging groups of similar institutions to
draw up and operate among themselves frameworks for the
monitoring of standards and quality in those groups of
institutions. We understand that many elements of such a system
operate in various parts of the United States.

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APPENDIX II

Reply from the University of Oxford to the CVCP consultative
document on the proposed ILT

(a) What kind of relationship, if any, should
there be between the accreditation of programmes/pathways and any
conferment of a `licence to practise' upon individual staff?
Should accreditation eventually become mandatory for all teaching
staff?

Accreditation should be optional and there should be no
question of a compulsory `licence to practise' either immediately
or in the future. The ILT's role would therefore be to accredit,
when invited, courses and qualifications devised by individual
universities or groups of universities. The institute needs to
build up its reputation and expertise. It will be accepted in due
course as an integral part of the professional development of
university teachers only if it provides rigorous and supportive
advice and guidance (when sought) and is seen as a helpful
resource, not an intrusive regulatory organisation.

(b) Should continuing professional development
(CPD) requirements be developed to enable members to remain in
`good standing'? Should these take the form of a minimum number
of hours of CPD per annum (the Booth Report [3] NAME="3note">
proposed between
5--8 days per annum)? How flexible should any CPD system be? What
should be the institutional role in supporting CPD?

We do not support any proposal which requires a particular number
of hours of CPD work. We expect academic staff to undertake
appropriate CPD and think any rigid formulation unnecessary.
Moreover, it is of the first importance to bear in mind that
high-quality teaching in a research intensive university is
dependent on teachers maintaining and updating research and
scholarship. Any definition of CPD in this context must take
account of these vital characteristics.

(c) Do you agree with the proposal to create
various levels of membership of the institute? How should the
criteria be developed to be as inclusive as possible of the
varied roles of staff involved in teaching and learning? Please
comment and expand on the indicative criteria for Member and
Fellow as set out above.
[4]

Since we envisage the institute's role as being only one of
accrediting universities' courses, we think issues such as levels
of membership are irrelevant, or at least premature. The ILT
needs to earn its right to be given professional
status, etc. Evolution must be allowed to take place. In due
course, if levels of membership were to be drawn up, we think
that the `career' level would be `Member' as for all similar
institutions, and that two levels of `associateship' would be
unnecessary.

(d) Your comments on the research and
development function of the institute would be welcome. For
example, should the institute focus more on developmental
activities than in developing a profile in `pure' research? What
should be the institute's priorities in this area in both the
short and longer term?

We think that the most useful research-associated role for the
institute would be that of monitoring and assessing current
research to identify gaps and weaknesses and to encourage further
work amongst the members in areas where it seemed to be needed.

(e) What should the institute's role be in the
stimulation of innovation? Do you agree with the possible range
of activities outlined in paragraph 18 above? [4] NAME="4note">
What priority
should the institute attach to the use of C&IT [5] NAME="5note">
in
learning and teaching both in the short and longer term?

It is important to remember that high-quality teaching and
`innovation' are not synonymous. High-quality teaching can be
given (and often is) through adherence to certain basic and
long-established principles. We oppose the suggestion that the
ILT create `common units and modules' (which we would regard as
inimical to the diversity of the HE sector). It would, however,
be useful if the institute gathered and made available a library
of course materials and other resources upon which universities
could draw.

(f) How might the institute best include the
needs of students with disabilities under these three core HREF="#note6">[6]

and other functions?

We see no reason for the ILT to concern itself specifically with
the needs of students with disabilities, which are adequately
covered by the dedicated National Bureau for Students with
Disabilities (SKILL) (and do not understand why this is the only
special category of student about which a question has been put).

(g) Please comment on possible other functions
of the institute. Should a phased approach to these various
functions be developed, with the initial focus on some key areas?
If so, what should be the priority in the short and longer term?
If funding was short, what should be the key functions?

We are clear that the institute's function should be limited to
accreditation, the dissemination of relevant research, and the
identification of gaps in research (see (d) above). The
institute should certainly not become involved in
issues of discipline or conduct (which are for institutions
themselves to deal with). Nor should it duplicate any of the
review/audit functions of existing agencies.

(h) Do you support the establishment of the ILT
as a professional body, with charitable status and possible
regulation by law or Royal Charter?

No, certainly not from the outset. The ILT could conceivably
become a body similar to the Royal Colleges in Medicine or the
Law Society, for example, but that development should depend on
the status it achieves in its more limited role and the desire
of participating institutions to follow such a path.

(i) Should there be any formal requirement on the ILT
to work collaboratively with other key stakeholder organisations
with an interest in the field? What formal role or involvement
should other bodies have with the ILT? How should higher
education institutions interact with the ILT?

The ILT must work with all relevant bodies, but
above all with HEIs. HEIs should be in a position
to exert a significant influence on the institute. We would
highlight also that liaison with the PSBs [2] NAME="2note_2">
will be essential
(and that the institute should not attempt to duplicate their
function).

(j) Comments are invited on the relationship
and linkages between the institute and THETO.
HREF="#note7">[7]

We need more information about THETO's expected functions before
we can comment adequately on this question. It at present appears
that THETO is a potentially regulatory mechanism (directed by
DfEE) and as such should remain completely separate from the
institute (which should be the collective instrument of the
universities).

(k) Comments are invited on possible sources
of funding, both in terms of initial funding to establish the
institute and of core, longer-term funding. Should institutions
pay an annual subscription and also pay for specific services?
Should an individual membership fee be levied?

We would oppose any arrangement which would involve universities
in meeting the costs of activities which they can better provide
for themselves. There should be an institutional subscription set
at a low basic level with institutions paying ad hoc
in addition for specific services provided.


Footnotes

[1]
Registered External Examiners.


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[2]
Professional and statutory bodies.


Return to text: first occurrence, "#2note_2">second occurrence

[3] The report of the Accreditation and Teaching in
Higher
Education Planning Group.

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[4] Viz. as set out in the full consultative document.

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[5] Communications and information technology.

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[6] Viz. the accreditation of programmes of training for
higher
education teachers, research and development in teaching and
learning, and the stimulation of innovation.

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[7] The Higher Education Training Organisation.


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OXFORD UNIVERSITY STUDENT UNION


Code of Practice issued by the
Hebdomadal Council under the provisions of section 22 (3) of the
Education Act 1994

As explained in Part 1 of the Code of Practice in relation to the
Oxford University Student Union which is set out below, Council
is required to publish such a code in compliance with the
Education Act 1994. The initial version of the code was published
in Gazette No. 4359, 23 March 1995, pp. 919–21,
and a minor amendment was published in Gazette No.
4429, 27 February 1997, p. 797.

Council has now, on the recommendation of its Joint Committee
with Junior Members, made two further amendments to the code,
both of which more accurately reflect current practice. The
first, in para. (f) of Part 3, states that the OUSU
Financial Report will be made available to OUSU Council
representatives of each college Junior and Middle Common Room or
equivalent organisation (rather than, as under the initial
version, in each JCR and MCR, etc.). The second, in para.
(g) of Part 3, makes a similar substitution in respect
of OUSU Standing Orders.

The complete code, as so amended, is published below for ease of
reference.

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1 The Code of Practice

Section 22 (3) of the Education Act 1994 requires the Hebdomadal
Council, as the executive governing body of the University, to
publish a Code of Practice as to the manner in which the
requirements of the Act are to be carried into effect in relation
to any students' union for students at the establishment, setting
out in relation to each of the requirements details of the
arrangements made to secure its observance. Part 2 of this code
sets out Council's general duty under the Act and the framework
established for its performance. Part 3 of the code summarises
each of the specific requirements of the Act and gives details
of the arrangements made to secure their observance.

The Code of Practice will be published annually in the
Proctors' Memorandum together with information as to restrictions
imposed on the activities of the Oxford University Student Union
by the law relating to charities, and the provisions of section
43 of the Education (No. 2) Act 1986 relating to freedom of
speech and any code of practice issued under it relevant to the
activities of the union. The attention of all students will be
drawn to this information by Proctorial notices issued once a
year.

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2 General duty of the Hebdomadal
Council

Section 22 (1) of the Education Act 1994 requires the Hebdomadal
Council, as the executive governing body of the University, to
`take such steps as are reasonably practicable to secure that any
students' union for students at the establishment operates in a
fair and democratic manner and is accountable for its
finances'.

This duty is fulfilled through the requirements of the statute
concerning consultation with Junior Members (Tit. XIV, Sect. IV,
§ 1), through the provisions of the present Code of
Practice, and through those of the constitution of the Oxford
University Student Union. The operations of the Oxford University
Student Union will be monitored by the Hebdomadal Council through
its Joint Committee with Junior Members.

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3 Specific requirements of the
Education Act 1994

Section 22 (2) of the Education Act 1994 requires the Hebdomadal
Council, as the executive governing body of the University, to
`take such steps as are reasonably practicable to secure that the
following requirements are observed by or in relation to any
students' union for students at the establishment':

(a) The student union should have a written
constitution and the provisions of that constitution should be
subject to the approval of the governing body at intervals of not
more than five years
.

The Hebdomadal Council for its part has approved a written
constitution for OUSU and will review its provisions every five
years. Draft amendments to the constitution are submitted to
Council's Joint Committee with Junior Members and require the
ratification of the Hebdomadal Council before coming into effect.

(b) Students should have the right not to be
members of the union and students who exercise that right should
not be unfairly disadvantaged, with regard to the provision of
services or otherwise, by reason of their having done so
.

It is provided in the OUSU constitution that all Junior
Members have the right to opt out of membership of OUSU. This
right may be exercised by sending written notification to the
President of OUSU to arrive no later than the Sunday of week 4
in Michaelmas Term in any year. The Junior Member will then cease
to be a member of OUSU until he or she has sent written
notification to the President of his or her desire to assume
membership.

OUSU has agreed that all its services will be made available
to Junior Members whether or not they are members of OUSU. Junior
Members who have opted out of membership of OUSU will not,
however, be entitled to attend meetings of OUSU committees or
stand or vote in elections to office in OUSU.

(c) Appointment to major union offices should
be by election in a secret ballot in which all members are
entitled to vote. The governing body is required to satisfy
itself that the union elections are fairly and properly
conducted
.

The term `major union office' is defined in the OUSU
constitution. The election to all sabbatical posts is by secret
ballot.

OUSU's election standing orders and regulations will be
subject to ratification by Council's Joint Committee with Junior
Members. The Returning Officer will make a report on the conduct
of the election to the Proctors who shall also have the power to
investigate any complaints concerning the conduct of elections
and, where a complaint is upheld, to take such measures as may
be required to secure effective redress. Complaints concerning
OUSU elections will normally first be considered by the OUSU
Election Tribunal. The report of the Returning Officer and of any
Proctorial action will normally be transmitted to Council's Joint
Committee with Junior Members.

(d) A person should not hold paid elected union
office for more than two years in total
.

The OUSU constitution prevents the same person from holding
paid elected office for more than one year.

(e) The financial affairs of the student union
should be properly conducted and appropriate arrangements should
exist for the approval of the union's budget and the monitoring
of its expenditure by the governing body
.

The OUSU constitution requires OUSU to prepare an annual
budget which is to be submitted to the Hebdomadal Council for
approval. Council's Joint Committee with Junior Members will
normally give detailed consideration to this submission on
Council's behalf.

The expenditure of OUSU's funds is governed by financial
standing orders which will be reviewed by Council's Joint
Committee with Junior Members. OUSU's financial transactions are
recorded by the University Chest and details of its income and
expenditure account are available for inspection by university
officers. OUSU's accounts are audited by the University Auditor.
The Audit Report is available to the Hebdomadal Council and will
normally be scrutinised by Council's Joint Committee with Junior
Members.

(f) The student union is to publish a financial
report annually or more frequently. The report is to be made
available to the governing body and to all students and should
contain, in particular, a list of external organisations to which
the union has made donations during the period to which the
report refers and details of those donations
.

The constitution of OUSU requires the publication of such a
financial report on an annual basis. The report is to be made
available to the Hebdomadal Council and will normally be
scrutinised by Council's Joint Committee with Junior Members. The
report will be made available for reference by Junior Members at
the offices of OUSU and copies will also be made available to
OUSU Council representatives of each college Junior and Middle
Common Room or equivalent organisation.

(g) The procedure for allocating resources to
groups or clubs should be fair and should be set down in writing
and be freely accessible to all students
.

The constitution of OUSU provides that the procedure for
allocating allowances to committees, groups, and other
organisations should be specified in Standing Orders. The
Standing Orders will be scrutinised by Council's Joint Committee
with Junior Members and copies will be made available for
consultation at the OUSU offices and will also be made available
to OUSU Council representatives of each college Junior and Middle
Common Room or equivalent organisation.

( h) If the student union decides to affiliate
to an external organisation it must publish notice of its
decision, stating the name of the organisation and details of any
subscription or similar fee paid or proposed to be paid and of
any donation made or proposed to be made to the organisation and
such notice is to be made available to the governing body and to
all students
.

The constitution of OUSU makes provision for these procedures.
Notice to the governing body will be given to Council's Joint
Committee with Junior Members on behalf of the Hebdomadal
Council, and notice to students will be by circulation of notices
for display in colleges.

(i) When a student union is affiliated to any external
organisation there are to be procedures for the review of
affiliations under which the current list of affiliations is
submitted for approval by members annually or more frequently,
and at such intervals of not more than a year as the governing
body may determine, a requisition may be made by such proportion
of members (not exceeding 5 per cent) as the governing body may
determine, that the question of continued affiliation to any
particular organisation be decided upon by a secret ballot in
which all members are entitled to vote
.

The OUSU constitution makes provision for these procedures.
Approval of the current list of affiliations will be sought by
means of approval of the annual report on affiliations by the
OUSU Council. The Hebdomadal Council has determined that the
proportion of members required to secure a secret ballot shall
be 5 per cent, and that the result of such a ballot shall be
binding for one year.

(j) There is to be a complaints procedure to
be available to all students or groups of students who are
dissatisfied in their dealings with a union or claim to have been
unfairly disadvantaged by reason of their having exercised the
right to opt out of membership of the union. This complaints
procedure is to include provision for an independent person
appointed by the governing body to investigate and report on
complaints. Complaints should be dealt with promptly and
fairly and where a complaint is upheld there should be an
effective remedy
.

The constitution of OUSU provides for a two-stage internal
complaints procedure. If this procedure has been exhausted
without the complaint having been resolved to the satisfaction
of the complainant, the matter may be referred in writing to the
secretary to Council's Joint Committee with Junior Members. The
Hebdomadal Council will appoint an independent person to
investigate and report on complaints. The independent person will
have, after due consideration, the power to report that the
complaint should be rejected summarily or to decide that a full
investigation should be undertaken and a report made to the
Hebdomadal Council. If a complaint is upheld at this stage, OUSU
is required by the terms of its constitution and the statutes of
the University to make an effective remedy.

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CONCERTS


Music Faculty

In connection with the symposium on `Concert life in eighteenth-
century Britain' (see `Lectures' below), Peter Holman will direct
a concert on Saturday, 4 July, entitled `English Classical
Orchestral Music', and Timothy Roberts will direct a concert on
Sunday, 5 July, entitled `Invocation'. The concerts will be open
to the public.

Full details may be obtained from the Administrator, the Faculty
of Music, St Aldate's, Oxford OX1 1DB (telephone: Oxford
(2)76125, e-mail: humaira.erfan-ahmed@music.ox.ac.uk).

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section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 4 June 1998: Lectures<br />

Lectures


Contents of this section:

Return to Contents Page of this issue



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Department of Plant Sciences: G.E. Blackman Lecture

PROFESSOR ROLAND DOUCE, Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire
Végétale, Grenoble, will deliver the twenty-third
G.E. Blackman Lecture at 4 p.m. on Thursday, 11 June, in the
Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Plant Sciences.

Subject: `Plant subcellular metabolism and the design
of new herbicides.'

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section



MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

PROFESSOR JUDITH RYAN, Harvard, will lecture at 5 p.m. on
Tuesday, 9 June, in the Taylor Institution.

Convener: T.J. Reed, MA, Taylor Professor of the
German Language and Literature.

Subject: `Rilke: mourning and modernism.'
(Texts will be provided in German and English)

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section



MUSIC

Concert life in eighteenth-century Britain: a symposium to
celebrate the 250th anniversary of the Holywell Music Room

This symposium will be held in Wadham College, and will take
place on Friday, 3 July, with the exception of the final meeting,
to be held on Sunday, 5 July.

Two concerts will be held on 4 July and 5 July in connection with
the symposium: see `Notices' above.

Those interested in receiving more information are asked to
contact the Administrator, the Faculty of Music, St Aldate's,
Oxford OX1 1DB (telephone: (2)76125, e-mail:
humaira.erfan-ahmed@music.ox.ac.uk).

Conveners: Dr Peter Franklin, Dr Harry Johnstone,
Professor Reinhard Strohm, and Dr Susan L. Wollenberg.

SIMON MCVEIGH, Goldsmith's College, University of London

9 a.m.: `The art of networking: mobility and
advancement in the concert profession.'

DONALD BURROWS, the Open University, and PETER WARD JONES,
Bodleian Library

9.15 a.m.: `Musicians and music copyists in
mid-eighteenth-century Oxford: the Hayeses and who else?'

PETER HOLMAN, Colchester Institute

10 a.m.: `The Colchester Part-Books.'

DR WOLLENBERG

11.15 a.m.: `"...so much rational and
elegant Amusement at an Expence comparatively
inconsiderable"; the Holywell concerts in the
eighteenth century.'

MICHAEL BURDEN

12 noon: ` "Le Genoue Inflexible" at
the Holywell Music Room: Madam Mara and concert
etiquette.'

PAUL LANGFORD

2.30 p.m.: `The musician in eighteenth-century
English society.'

ROSAMOND MCGUINNESS, Royal Holloway College, University of London


3.15 p.m.: `Gigs, roadies, and promoters:
marketing eighteenth-century concerts.'

WILLIAM WEBER, California State University

Sun. 5 July, 9.45 a.m.: `London and the capital
city beau monde.'

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section



CENTRE FOR BRAZILIAN STUDIES

Human impacts on the environments of Brazilian Amazonia: does
traditional ecological knowledge have a role in the future of the
region?

This international conference will be held on Friday, 5 June
(sessions 1–3), and Saturday, 6 June (sessions 4–6),
in the Tanner Room, Linacre College.

Enquiries should be directed to the Centre (telephone: Oxford
554026, fax: 554030, e-mail: enquiries@brazilian-
studies@oxford.ac.uk).

1. Human imprints on Amazonia (10.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m.)

DR J. HEMMING, Hemming Group, London (Chair): `An overview of the
human imprints of Amazonia.'

DR W. BALÉE, Tulane: `Antiquity of traditional ecological
knowledge in Amazonia.'

DR C. CLEMENT, INPA, Manaus: `The biogeography of Amazonian
landscape and crop domestication at contact.'

DR N. STEPAN, Wellcome Unit: `Human imprints on Amazonia: the
imprint of disease.'

DR G. MCMILLAN, Edinburgh: `The Amazon subsoil; some brief
notes.'


2. Native Amazonians and conservation (2–4 p.m.)

PROFESSOR P. RIVIÈRE (Chair): `The native Amazonian
environment and idioms of knowledge.'

PROFESSOR A. RAMOS, Brasília: `Frontiers unbounded:
genetic exploitation and the Indians in the Amazon.'

DR J. SALICK, Ohio: `Native Amazonians and conservation:
perspectives, problems, and potential.'

PROFESSOR S. NUGENT, Goldsmiths' College: `Ephemism in the
forest: ahistoricism and the valorisation of indigenous knowledge
in Brazilian Amazonia.'

DR W. MILLIKEN, Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh: `Conservation,
economics, traditional knowledge, and the Yanomani. Implications
and benefits for whom?'

Special discussant: Sr Miguel Hilário,
Representative of the Ashaninka-Conebo Indigenous Nation (Peru
and Oxford).


3. Traditional resource use and economic development
(4.30–6.30 p.m.)

PROFESSOR SIR GHILLEAN PRANCE, Director, Royal Botanic Gardens,
Kew (Chair): `Overview of traditional resources use and economic
development.'

DR C. PADOCH, New York Botanical Garden: `The forest in the
field: concurrent management and invisible technologies in
Amazonia.'

DR M. HARRIS, Manchester: `Peasant riverine economies and their
traditional impact in the Lower Middle Amazon.'

DR M. RICHARDS, Overseas Development Institute: `Forest,
indigenous institutions and market incentives in Amazonia: green
capitalism as saviour or destroyer?'

DR A. HALL, LSE: `Enhancing social capital: productive
conservation in the Brazilian rain forest?'


4. Commercial forestry and traditional forest management
(9.30–11.30 a.m.)

PROFESSOR J. BURLEY (Chair): `Overview of commercial forestry and
traditional forest management.'

DR V. VIANA, Sþo Paulo: `Participatory mapping and land use
planning with Ribeirinhos in the Tapajos National Forest.'

DR N. BROWN and DR S. JENNINGS, Oxford Forestry Institute:
`Collaborative forestry management with the Xikrin Indians of
Pará.'

DR C.U. PINHEIROS, Universidade Federal do Maranhþo, Sþo Luiz:
`Extractivism v. domestication v.
conservation: the case of Jaborandi (Pilocarpus Microphyllus
Stapf ex Holm, Rutaceae) in the pre-Amazon region of Maranhþo.'

DR J. PALMER, Forestry Research Programme: `UK bilateral support
for forestry research in the Brazilian Amazon.'


5. Fragile soils and environments (11.30 a.m.–1.30 p.m.)

PROFESSOR P. FURLEY, Edinburgh (Chair): `Fragility and resilience
of Amazonian soils.'

DR S. NORTCLIFF, Reading: `Is successful development of Brazilian
Amazonia possible without knowledge of the soil and soil response
to development?'

DR P. FEARNSIDE, INPA, Manaus: `Fragile soils and deforestation
impacts: the rationale for environmental services of standing
forest as a development paradigm in Amazonia.'

DR J. RATTER and DR S. BRIDGEWATER, Royal Botanic Garden,
Edinburgh: `Cerrado vegetation in the Amazon Basin.'

DR C. BARROW, Swansea: `A review of threats to Amazonian wetland
and riverine ecosystems.'


6. The future of Amazonia (2.30–4.30 p.m.)

PROFESSOR J. OVERING, St Andrews (Chair): `What's the difference
between a Peace Corps worker and an anthropologist?: a millennium
rethink of anthropological fieldwork.'

DR E. ALLEN, Glasgow: `Human impact on Brazilian Amazonia: the
Roraima fires of 1997–8.'

DR S. HECHT, UCLA: `Technology, regional integration, and the
current transformation of Amazonia.'

DR A. SERRAO, CPATU, Belém: `Science and technology-based
agricultural and forestry development in Amazonia: a
deforestation-reduction strategy.'

DR C. CAVALCANTI, Fundaçþo Joaquim Nabuco, Recife:
`Traditional resource use and ethnodevelopment: sustainable
characteristics of the Amazon Indians.'

Special discussant: Dr Michael Balick, Director,
Institute for Economic Botany, New York Botanic Garden.

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section


Globalisation and industrial competitiveness in Brazil

This conference will be held on Thursday, 11 June, in St Antony's
College. Enquiries should be directed to the Centre (details
above).

10.45 a.m.: Globalisation and industrial competitiveness in
Brazil: an overview (Chair: Professor M. Abreu, Rio de Janeiro)

DR J. FERRAZ, UFRJ: `Industrial competitiveness and policy
liberalisation.'

MR D. HAY: `The post-1990 Brazilian trade liberalisation and the
performance of large manufacturing firms: productivity, market
share, and profits.'

Discussants: Dr Edmund Amman, Research Fellow in
Economics, Centre for Brazilian Studies, and Dr Ricardo Carneiro,
Institute of Economics, UNICAMP and ILAS, London.

2 p.m.: Technology and industrial competitiveness (Chair:
Mr Donald Hay)

DR J. MEYER-STAMER, German Development Institute, Berlin:
`Towards knowledge-driven development? Upgrading to face the
challenges of an open economy: experience from industrial
clusters in Santa Catarina, Brazil.'

DR E. AMANN: `Technological capabilities and policy
liberalisation in Brazil: some sectoral evidence.'

Discussants: Dr John Humphrey, Sussex, and Mr
André Villela, LSE.

4.15 p.m.: `Foreign direct investment and industrial
competitiveness (Chair: Dr Valpy Fitzgerald)

DR R. BONELLI, IPEA, Rio de Janeiro: `Foreign direct investment
and industrial competitiveness.'

PROFESSOR C. CAMPOLINA DINIZ, Minais Gerais: `Regional aspects
of Brazilian export performance.'

Discussants: Dr Rhys Jenkins, East Anglia, and Dr
E. Haddad, Illinois.

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section



SAID BUSINESS SCHOOL

Interdepartmental Finance Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 12.30 p.m. on Mondays in
the Seminar Room, the Said Business School, the Radcliffe
Infirmary.

Conveners: Alexander Ljungqvist (Said Business
School), Hyun Shin (Economics), and Paul Wilmott
(Mathematics).

Enquiries may be directed to Elaine Durham, Said Business School,
59 George Street, Oxford OX1 2BE (telephone: Oxford (2)88650, e-
mail: elaine.durham@obs.ox.ac.uk).

WARD BROWN, LSE

8 June: `R.&D. intensity and finance.'

W. DE BONDT, Zurich

15 June: `Contrarian and momentum strategies in
Germany.'

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section



EUROPEAN HUMANITIES RESEARCH CENTRE

Archive of performances of Greek and Roman drama

PROFESSOR DR H. FLASHAR, Professor Emeritus of Greek, the
University of Munich, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 10
June, in the Headley Lecture Theatre, the Ashmolean Museum.

Conveners: O.P. Taplin, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Greek
Literature, and E.M. Hall, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer (CUF)
in Classical Languages.

Subject: `Sophocles and Mendelssohn—the
Antigone of 1841' (with visual and musical
illustrations
).

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section



DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS


Florence Nightingale Lectures

PROFESSOR BARRY SCHECK, Cardozo Law School, will deliver a
Florence Nightingale Lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Monday, 15 June, in
the Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, St Anne's College.

Subject: `Scientific evidence and criminal justice.'

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section



LADY MARGARET HALL


Canada Seminars

SIR ROBERT FELLOWES, GCB, GCVO, Private Secretary to HM The
Queen, will lecture at 5.15 p.m. on Wednesday, 17 June, in Lady
Margaret Hall. Further information may be obtained from Mrs
Elizabeth Jubb (telephone: (2)74302, e-mail:
liz.jubb@lmh.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `The Queen of Canada—what it means in
theory and how it works in practice.'

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section



ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE


Asian Studies Centre

Judicial independence and the rule of law in the Hong Kong
Special Administrative Region

This conference will be held from 9.30 a.m. on Friday, 12 June,
in the European Studies Centre Seminar Room, St Antony's College,
and from 9.30 a.m. on Saturday, 13 June, in the New Lecture
Theatre, St Antony's College.

This notice replaces the incomplete notice published in the
Gazette of 21 May (p. 1258).

Further information is available from Chloe Dobree, Asian Studies
Centre, St Antony's College, Oxford OX2 6JF (telephone and fax:
Oxford (2)74559, e-mail: asian@sant.ox.ac.uk).

Conveners: Steve Tsang and David Faure.

Friday, 12 June

D. FUNG, Solicitor General, Hong Kong Special Administrative
Region

9.35 a.m.: `Judicial independence—the view
from within the SAR government.'

B. WENG, Chinese University of Hong Kong

10.45 a.m.: `The protection of judicial
independence in the HKSAR Basic Law.'

FU HUALING, Hong Kong

11.45 a.m.: `Judicial independence in the SAR
within the context of the PRC's jurisdiction.'

P. WESLEY-SMITH, Hong Kong

1.45 p.m.: `Institutional arrangements for
protecting judicial independence in the SAR.'

A. DICKS, SOAS

3 p.m.: `Conflicts of law and jurisdiction: the
search for a jurisprudential umbrella.'

M. PALMER, SOAS

4 p.m.: `Burying the past: administration and
the rule of law in the New Territories.'

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section


Saturday, 13 June

C. MUNN, Toronto

9.30 a.m.: `Criminal justice, judicial
independence, and the rule of law in nineteenth-century Hong
Kong.'

J. CHAN, Hong Kong

10.30 a.m.: `Due process in Hong Kong—the
prospect under Chinese sovereignty.'

R. CULLEN, Deakin University and City University of Hong Kong

11.45 a.m.: `Maintaining media freedom in the
SAR.'

LORD THOMAS OF GRESFORD

2 p.m.: `Judicial independence and the
protection of human rights in the SAR.'

C.Y. LEUNG, Baker and McKenzie, Hong Kong

3 p.m.: `The usage of Hong Kong's capital
market by PRC companies and its implications for the
SAR.'

L. GOODSTADT, formerly head of Central Policy Unit, Hong Kong
Government

4.15 p.m.: `The transfer of sovereignty and the
survival of the rule of law in Hong Kong: the political
dimension.'

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section



George Antonius Lecture

PROFESSOR ROGER OWEN, Harvard, will deliver the twenty-third
George Antonius Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 18 June, in the
New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College. All are welcome to
attend.

Subject: `Why write another biography of Evelyn
Baring (Lord Cromer)?'

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section



OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARY
FORUM

JENNIE MIELL, Senior Assistant Editor, OED, will
lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 8 June, in Rewley House.

Subject: `Dwile flonkers and Internauts: new words
in the OED.'

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section



FRIENDS OF THE BODLEIAN


Annual General Meeting

The fifty-third Annual General Meeting of the Friends of the
Bodleian will be held at 3 p.m. on Tuesday, 23 June, in the
Sheldonian Theatre. Sir Anthony Kenny, Pro-Vice-Chancellor, will
take the chair.

After the formal business, SEAMUS HEANEY will address the
meeting.

Subject: `Fretwork: on translating
Beowulf.'

Non-members of the Friends who would like to attend the meeting
are asked to inform the Membership Secretary, Friends of the
Bodleian Library, Bodleian Library, Oxford OX1 3BG (telephone:
Oxford (2)77234) in advance.

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section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 4 June 1998: Grants and Funding<br />

Grants and Research Funding


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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BRITISH ACADEMY RESEARCH READERSHIPS AND
BRITISH ACADEMY/LEVERHULME TRUST SENIOR RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS IN
THE HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

The British Academy has announced that, under its scheme for
Research Readerships, it intends to confer on
`serving members of academic staff' the title of British Academy
Research Reader. There will be nine awards tenable for two years
from 1 October 1999. The Readerships will be awarded on a
competitive basis and are not renewable.

In addition, the academy has announced that, under the
scheme for Senior Research Fellowships, it
intends to confer, again on members of academic staff, the title
of British Academy/Leverhulme Trust Senior Research Fellow. Under
this scheme there will be seven awards tenable from 1 October
1999, of one year's duration. In exceptional circumstances awards
may be extended to a maximum of two years.

Applicants will need to submit a programme of research for the
Research Readerships and Senior Research Fellowships in one or
more of the following fields; the ancient world (all aspects,
including archaeology); history (of all periods, and including
the history of art, music, ideas, science, etc.); philosophy;
religious thought; language; linguistics; literature; law;
economics; politics; sociology; psychology; social and cultural
anthropology; human geography.

All award-holders are relieved of all teaching and
administrative duties, but may engage in limited supervision of
research students.

While they hold the relevant academy title, award-holders of
Research Readerships and Senior Research Fellowships will
continue to receive their normal stipend, and their employing
institutions will be expected to provide them with all the
facilities necessary to enable them to carry out their research
programme. Under the Research Readership scheme, the Academy will
meet the cost of substitute teaching in a form to be agreed up
to a maximum sum equivalent to the sixth point of the current
national Lecturer A scale (£16,927) in year one, and the
seventh point (£17,606) in year two; under the Senior
Research Fellowship scheme the Academy will meet the agreed costs
of substitute teaching up to the sixth point on the university
lecturer scale. Detailed arrangements in any particular case will
have to be considered by the University and the college
concerned, and in consultation with the academy, once it is known
that the application is successful.

Candidates must be of an age to complete the award and return
to teaching afterwards to disseminate the results of their
research. The Academy will therefore not accept applications from
candidates aged over 55 on 1 October 1999. Applications from
candidates under the age of 35 are discouraged. Applicants are
not discouraged from applying for the Research Readerships and
the Senior Research Fellowships simultaneously, but in such cases
two sets of separate and fully self-contained applications should
be submitted, with the research project in each case tailored to
the duration of the award.

Applications under all schemes must be
submitted through the University or through the college (for CUF
lecturers). Applicants holding joint appointments must, however,
obtain the support both of the University
and of the college concerned. The University
will advise the academy separately of its support for an
application by a CUF lecturer.

Further details and application forms in respect of the schemes
are available from the appropriate faculty board secretaries, to
whom applications should be returned as soon as possible. The
academy's closing date for the receipt of applications is
31 July 1998.

Applicants will be informed of the results of their applications
by the academy in December 1998.

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section






<br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 4 June 1998: Examinations and Boards<br />

Examinations and Boards


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



GENERAL BOARD OF THE FACULTIES

The General Board of the Faculties has co-opted L.G. BLACK, MA,
D.PHIL., Fellow of Oriel College, to membership of the Board for
the academic year 1998–9.

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section



CHAIRMAN OF EXAMINERS

The Vice-Chancellor desires to call the attention of all
examiners to the provisions of Ch. VI, Sect. ii.c, § 1,
clauses 1–3 (Examination Decrees, 1997, pp.
1047–8), which require examiners in all university
examinations to appoint one of their number to act as Chairman,
to notify the appointment to the Vice-Chancellor, and to publish
it in the University Gazette.

He desires that these appointments shall be notified to the
Clerk of the Schools who will inform the Vice-Chancellor and see
that notice of them is duly published in the University
Gazette
.

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section



EXAMINATION SCHOOLS


Accommodation for Lectures

Michaelmas Term 1998

The Chairman of the Curators of the Schools would be grateful if
Professors, Readers, and University Lecturers who wish to lecture
at the Schools in Michaelmas Term 1998 could inform the Clerk of
the Schools at the end of the present term. It is necessary to
know whether a room suitable for an audience of more than one
hundred persons is required; only the three large writing-schools
will accommodate more than that number.

Afternoon lectures should normally finish by 6 p.m.

Attention is drawn to the fact that overhead projection
equipment and 35-mm projectors are available. When these
facilities are required the Clerk of the Schools should be
notified in advance.

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section



CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in
regulations made by boards of faculties will come into effect on 19
June.


1 Board of the Faculty of Literae
Humaniores

Honour School of Literae Humaniores

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 263, delete ll.
16–25 and

insert:

`Arrian, Anabasis (Loeb, Brunt),

[Demosthenes] XVII (Loeb),

Diodorus Siculus, XVI.89, 91–5; XVII.5–7, 16–21,
32, 47–8, 62–3, 69–73, 76–7, 93–5,
100–1, 108–11, 113–15, 117–18; XVIII, the whole;
XIX.12–64, 66–8, 77–100, 105; XX.19–21,
27–8, 37, 45–53, 81–99, 100–3, 106–13
(Loeb), Plutarch, Lives of Alexander, Eumenes and Demetrios 1–27
(Loeb), the
inscriptions translated in a dossier available from the Classics
Office, 37 Wellington Square and the texts in P. Harding, Translated
Documents of Greece and Rome 2: From the End of the Peloponnesian War
to the Battle of Ipsus (Cambridge, 1989) Nos. 123, 125, 126, 128,
129, 132, 133, 136, 138.

Optional passages for comment will be set from these texts in
translation and from Arrian, Anabasis VII (Loeb, Brunt) in Greek
only.'

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2 Boards of the Faculties of Literae
Humaniores and Modern History

Honour School of Ancient and Modern History

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 126,
ll. 31–2 (as amended in Gazette, 23 April 1998, p.
1058), delete `as specified for the Honour School of Literae
Humaniores (I. 10)' and
insert:

`The following texts are prescribed for study in translation;

compulsory passages for comment will be set:
Arrian, Anabasis (Loeb, Brunt), [Demosthenes] XVII (Loeb), Diodorus
Siculus, XVI.89, 91–5; XVII.5–7, 16–21, 32, 47–8,
62–3, 69–73, 76–7, 93–5, 100–1, 108–11,
113–15, 117–18; XVIII, the whole; XIX.12–64,
66–8, 77–100, 105; XX.19–21, 27–8, 37,
45–53, 81–99, 100–3, 106–13 (Loeb), Plutarch,
Lives of Alexander, Eumenes and Demetrios 1–27 (Loeb), the
inscriptions translated in a dossier available from the Classics
Office, 37 Wellington Square and the texts in P. Harding, Translated
Documents of Greece and Rome 2: From the End of the Peloponnesian War
to the Battle of Ipsus (Cambridge, 1989) Nos. 123, 125, 126, 128,
129, 132, 133, 136, 138.

Optional passages in Greek for comment will be set from Arrian,
Anabasis VII (Loeb, Brunt).'

2 Ibid., ll. 33–4, delete `, as specified for
the Honour School of Literae Humaniores (i.11)', and insert `. The
following texts are prescribed for study in translation; compulsory
passages for comment will be set:

Sallust, Catilina (Loeb),

Cicero, In Verrem (Actio I) (Loeb),

De Imperio Cn. Pompei (Loeb),

Pro Sestio 97–137 (Loeb),

In M. Antonium Philippica XI (Loeb),

Pro Murena (Loeb),

In Catilinam IV (Loeb),

Epistulae ad Atticum i.1, 2, 13, 14, 16, 17, 19; ii.1, 2, 16, 18;
iv.1, 3, 5,; v.16 and 21; vi.1 and 2; vii.7, 9, 11; viii.3 and 11;
ix.6A, 10, 11A, 18; x.8 (incl. A and B); xi.6; xii.21 and 40; xiii.19
and 52; xiv.1, 12, 13, 13A and B; xv.1A and 11; xvi.7, 8 and 11
(Loeb),

Epistulae ad Familiares i.1, 8, 9; ii.12; iii.6 and 7; iv.4, 5;
v.1, 2, 7, 12; vi.6; vii.3, 5, 30; viii.1, 5, 6, 8, 13, 14, 16; ix.16
and 17; x.24 and 28; xi.3, 20, 27, 28; xii. 3 and 5; xiii.1 and 9;
xiv.4; xv.1, 4, 5, 6, 16, 19; xvi. 12 (Loeb),

Epistulae ad Quintum fratrem ii.3, 15; iii. 5 and 6 (Loeb),

Epistulae ad M. Brutum 17, 25 (Loeb),

Brutus 301–33 (Loeb),

De Oratore i.137–59, 185–203; ii.30–8 (Loeb),

Orator 113–20, 140–6 (Loeb),

De Re Publica i.1–18, 58–71 (Loeb),

De Legibus ii.1–33; iii.1–49 (Loeb),

Tusculanae Disputationes i.1–8 (Loeb),

De Divinatione ii.1–24; 136–50 (Loeb),

De Natura Deorum i.1–13; iii.1–10 (Loeb),

De Officiis i.1–60; ii.1–29, 44–60, 73–89
trans. Griffin and Atkins (Cambridge), Cornelius Nepos, Atticus
(Loeb).

Optional passages in Latin for comment will be set from: In
Catilinam I (Loeb), De Finibus I 1–12 (Loeb, pending Reynolds
OCT).'

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3 Boards of the Faculties of Mathematical
Science and Physical Sciences

Honour School of Engineering and Computing Science

With effect from 1 October 1998

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 176, delete 1.2.

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4 Board of the Faculty of Physical
Sciences

Honour School of Natural Science (Physics)

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first Part A examination in
2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 424,
delete ll. 44–6 and substitute:

`The syllabuses for the five written papers will be published in
the course handbook by the sub-faculty of Physics not later than the
beginning of Michaelmas Full Term for examination five terms thence.'

2 Ibid., p. 425, l. 44, delete
`Gazette not later than the end' and substitute `course
handbook not later than the beginning'.

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF
PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice
of oral examination of their candidates as
follows:

Clinical Medicine

CHEN-LUNG LIN, University: `The role of chemokines in the regulation
of dendritic cells chemotaxis and transendothelial migration in
vitro
'.

Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, Wednesday, 17 June, 2 p.m.


Examiners: J. Westwick, P.J. Fairchild.

R. MELLER, Keble: `Neurochemical studies on cultured glial
cells'.

St Anne's, Monday, 15 June, 2.15 p.m.


Examiners: D.A. Kendall, M. Fillenz.

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Literae Humaniores

M. MENDONCA, St Anne's: `The Dinos Painter'.

Ashmolean Museum, Friday, 19 June, 2 p.m.


Examiners: J. Boardman, B.B. Shefton.

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Physical Sciences

W. BROWN, Worcester: `The development of non-perturbative methods for
supersymmetric and non-supersymmetric quantum field theories'.

Sub-department of Theoretical Physics, Monday, 29 June, 2 p.m.


Examiners: D. Diakonov, M. Teper.

A.J. DAVISON, Keble: `Mobile robot navigation using active
vision'.

Department of Engineering Science, Wednesday, 10 June, 2 p.m.


Examiners: A. Blake, P. Palmer.

S. JACOB, Christ Church: `Electrochemical studies of the automotive
lubricant additive zinc n-dibutyldithiophosphate'.

Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Monday, 8 June, 2 p.m.


Examiners: H.M. Cartwright, A.C. Fisher.

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Social Studies

G. AGEBA, St Antony's: `Financial liberalisation in Ethiopia: a firm
level, analysis of credit allocation, financial constraints, and
investment'.

Institute of Economics and Statistics, Monday, 15 June, 2.30 p.m.


Examiners: J.W. Gunning, A. Bigsten.

J.E. BORDOFF, Wadham: `Israel's Labour governments and the West Bank,
1967–77: domestic politics and foreign
policy'.

St Antony's, Monday, 29 June, 11 a.m.


Examiners: A. Shlaim, J. Peters.

J.A. KLASS, St Antony's: `The politics of propaganda: media wars and
Nicaragua'.

St Antony's, Thursday, 6 August, 11 a.m.


Examiners: A.E. Angell, R. Sieder.

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section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 4 June 1998: Colleges<br />

Colleges, Halls, and Societies


Contents of this section:

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issue



OBITUARIES


Magdalen College

PROFESSOR CECIL GRAYSON, 29 April 1998; Serena Professor
of Italian Studies 1958–87; Fellow, 1958–87,
Emeritus Fellow. Aged 78.

SIR ALAN WIGAN, 3 May 1996; commoner 1932–5. Aged
92.

ALBERT WILLIAM FULLER, 28 March 1998; academical clerk
1932–5. Aged 83.

RICHARD WALFORD MORRIS, 3 April 1998; commoner
1949–52. Aged 67.

ANTHONY MICHAEL FRANCIS WEBB, 4 March 1998; commoner
1934–7. Aged 83.

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section



St Anne's College

MISS HAZEL EARDLEY-WILMOT; Member of the Society of
Oxford Home-Students 1928–31.

MRS JOYCE HARRISON (née Hodgson);
Member of the Society of Oxford Home-Students
1940–3.

MRS JOAN KENDALL (née Pynegar); Member
of the Society of Oxford Home-Students 1931–4.

MISS MILDRED MORANT; Member of the Society of Oxford
Home-Students 1933–6.

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section



St Hilda's College

SONIA ANDERSON (née Schreiner), BA,
January 1998; commoner 1939–42. Aged 77.

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section



St John's College

PATRICK JOHN WARREN AMBLER, MA, 12 March 1998; Fish
Exhibitioner 1951–5. Aged 65.

ROBIN WILLIAM GEOFFREY POWYS BEST, BM, MA, 21 January
1998; commoner and graduate 1946–53. Aged 74.

JOHN CHARLES CATER, BA, 31 March 1998; commoner
1931–4. Aged 84.

GEOFFREY WILLIAM COX, 1998; open scholar TT
1941–4. Aged 75.

CLAUDE MICHAEL TREVOR FOLLETT, BA, 1 January 1997;
commoner HT 1941–HT 1942. Aged 74.

GERALD FREUND, D.PHIL., 4 May 1997; Fulbright Scholar
1952–4. Aged 66.

EDWARD TATE GOULDING, MA, 22 March 1998; Sir Thomas
White Scholar 1928–32. Aged 88.

JOSEPH SWINFEN GREEN, MBE, BA, 8 March 1998; commoner
1953–5. Aged 83.

THOMAS GRAY HILL, MA, 1998; open scholar 1947–50.
Aged 71.

ARTHUR JOSEPH FYNNEY JOHNSON, MA, MBE, CD, QC, 15
August 1997; Rhodes Scholar 1936–9. Aged 82.

RONALD WILLIAM JOHN KEAY, CBE, B.SC., MA, D.PHIL., 7
April 1997; open exhibitioner 1939–MT 1942. Aged 77.

HERBERT HENRY DAVID LANCASHIRE, MA, 10 December 1997;
commoner 1937–40. Aged 79.

MYRES SMITH MCDOUGAL, BA, BCL (Doctor of Humane
Letters, Columbia, LL.D. North Western University, York
University, Canada, University of New Haven, LHD Temple
University, Hon. Doctorate, University of the
Philippines), 7 May 1998; Rhodes Scholar 1927–30,
Honorary Fellow 1981–98; Sterling Professor of Law
Emeritus, Yale University. Aged 91.

JAMES STANLEY MILLEN, BA, DIP. PUB. AND SOC. ADMIN., 6
October 1997; commoner and graduate 1961–5. Aged 54.

ALFRED CHARLES RABY, MA, 30 January 1998; Wickes
Exhibitioner 1923–7. Aged 93.

REGINALD JOSEPH ALFRED WHITE, DIP. ECON. AND POL.
SCI., 5 January 1998; graduate 1948–MT 1950. Aged
70.

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section



ELECTIONS


Christ Church

To a J.L. Field Exhibition:

CIARAN D. PATRICK

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section



Exeter College

To an Official Fellowship and Lecturership in Modern
History (with effect from 1 October 1998):

FARAMERZ
NOSHIR DABHOIWALA, MA, D.PHIL.

To Honorary Fellowships:

SIR RICHARD JOSEPH BUXTON, MA

PROFESSOR IVOR MARTIN CREWE, MA

THOMAS GARNET HENRY JAMES, CBE, FBA

DR JOSEPH SAMUEL NYE (PH.D.)

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section



St Hugh's College

To a Dorothea Gray Senior Scholarship:

OLIVER
RANNER, M.ST.

To a Yates Senior Scholarship:

E. CHRISTIAN
BRUGGER, M.ST. (M.TH. Harvard)

To a Biological Research Scholarship:

HYUN JI
KIM (B.SC. Pusan)

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section


To Denise Skinner Graduate Scholarships:

KATHERINE MULLIN, BA, M.ST. (MA London)

LUISE CALÈ (DOTT. Genoa)

To a Harris Graduate Scholarship:

RHONA J. COX,
BA

To a Larkinson Graduate Scholarship:

MARGARET
JANE HOVERD, BA (M.SC. London)

To a Mary Lunt Graduate Scholarship:

RUY MIGUEL
DE RIBEIRO (B.SC. Lisbon)

To a Seaton Graduate Scholarship:

STEPHEN
JEFFERY, BA

To a William Thomas and Gladys Willing Graduate
Scholarship:

KATHERINE MARGARET MACDONALD (BA
Toronto)

To Graduate Bursaries:

JUN JIE WU (B.ENG. Tianjin)

SIENHO YEE (BA Beijing, BA Brandeis, D.JUR. Columbia)

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section



St Peter's College

Visitor

The Trustees of the college have appointed THE RT REVD
COLIN JAMES BENNETTS (MA Cambridge), Lord Bishop of
Coventry, as Visitor of the college.

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section


To an Honorary Fellowship:

THE RT REVD AND RT
HON. DAVID STUART, LORD SHEPPARD OF LIVERPOOL (MA
Cambridge), lately Lord Bishop of Liverpool and Visitor
of the college

To a Choral Scholarship:

BENJAMIN SEIFERT,
formerly of St Paul's School, London

To Instrumental Exhibitions:

DELPHINE MORDEY, formerly of Queen Elizabeth's Grammar
School, Ashbourne

PETER THOMAS, formerly of Shrewsbury School

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section


To College Scholarships:

ALISON BARTLETT, formerly of Chichester High School for
Girls

PAUL BRACKLEY, formerly of Goff's School, Cheshunt

JONATHAN CONLIN, formerly of Sherborne School

KIMULI KASARA, formerly of Wycliffe College,
Gloucestershire

KATE PINNINGTON, formerly of St Mary's School,
Cambridge

IAN ZEIDER, formerly of City of London School

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section


To College Exhibitions:

LAURA BARRY, formerly of Thurston Upper School

JOANNA CARGILL, formerly of Oldershaw School, Wallasey

MATTHEW CLARKE, formerly of Judd School, Tonbridge

LAURA VAUGHAN, formerly of Clifton College

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section


To a Choral Exhibition:

CORINNE SPARKES,
formerly of Queenswood School, Hatfield

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section



PRIZES


Christ Church

John V. Lovitt Prize:

BENJAMIN C. SHAW

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section


English Prose Prize:

FELICITY R. JAMES

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section



Mansfield College

Collections Prizes:

BENJAMIN TODD BROWN

PHILIPPA JANE M. CORSON

WILLIAM MICHAEL DANNY

CHRISTOPHER DAVID FOSTER

JENNIFER CLARE GAFFIN

OLWEN ELIZABETH GREANY

MAAIKE LIESBETH A. KOK

GRAHAM PAUL MARTIN

MUNIRA MIRZA

JAMES ROBERT PITTS

CHRISTOPHER ANDREW STEER

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section



St Hugh's College

Elizabeth Francis Prize:

SIMON JOHN WILKINSON

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section


Lorna Limpus Prize:

HELEN EVA MARY JEFFRIES

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section


Hilary Haworth Prizes:

MAYA MEHTA

AMIR AUSSIA

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section


Collections Prize:

KELLY JANE PARREIRA

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section



St Peter's College

J. Bossanyi Graduate Bursary in Environmental
Conservation and Sustainable Resource Use:

FRANCISCO ASCUI

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section


Leonard Theberge Essay Prize (`The Age of
Johnson'):

NICHOLAS SMITH

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section


Durham Award:

ELIZABETH UNDERHILL

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section



NOTICES


Balliol College


Lecturership in Modern History

Balliol College proposes, if suitable candidates apply, to appoint
one stipendiary four-hour lecturer for 1998–9 and one
stipendiary six-hour lecturer for Hilary Term 1999 and Trinity Term
1999.

Applicants for the four-hour lecturership should be able to
teach British History 1500–1685; at least of the two General
History periods VIII and IX in the Final Honour School and General
History III in Honour Moderations;
and Comparative History and Historiography (including, if possible,
Historiography for Honour Moderations).

Applicants for the six-hour lecturership will be expected to
teach principally modern European History
(as much as possible of the period covered by General
History Periods XI–XIV in the Final Honour School and General IV
in Honour Moderations). Ability to teach one or more Special,
Further, and Optional Subjects in this chronological range would be
an advantage.

Applicants should provide a curriculum vitae and
should indicate which subjects they would be willing to teach. They
should give names of two referees whom they should ask to write
directly to the Senior Tutor. Applications and references must reach
the Senior Tutor, Balliol College, Oxford OX1 3BJ, by Wednesday, 17
June.

Balliol College is an equal opportunities employer.

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St John's College


Opening of collection of medieval
vestments

St John's College intends to open to the public its col-
lection of medieval vestments on Saturday, 13 June, from 2 p.m. to 5
p.m. The collection is displayed in the Garden Quadrangle and
entrance, free of charge, will be via the Parks Road Lodge or the
Main Lodge.

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Trinity College


Fixed-term (three-year) Tutorial
Fellowship in Medicine

Applications are invited for a fixed-term Tutorial Fellowship in
Medicine, tenable from 1 October 1998. The successful candidate is
expected to hold a position such as a Departmental Demonstratorship
or Postdoctoral Fellowship in one of the relevant departments in the
University. The tutorial fellowship will be for three years (with the
possibility of renewal up to a maximum of five years). The person
appointed will have an active research programme and will be expected
to take charge of the subject and teach between two and six hours a
week in aspects of Medicine relevant to the first BM and the Honour
School of Physiological Sciences. He/she will be appointed full
membership of the senior common room and governing body. The salary
will be up to £6,634 per annum, depending on the number of hours
taught. Entertainment and
research allowances will be available.

Further particulars are obtainable from the Academic
Administrator, Trinity College, Oxford OX1 3BH (telephone: Oxford
(2)79910, e-mail: katie.andrews@trinity.
ox.ac.uk). The closing date for completed applications and references
is 15 June.

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section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 4 June 1998: Advertisements<br />

Advertisements


Contents of this section:



How to
advertise in the Gazette

"../../../stdg/conds.htm">

Terms and conditions of
acceptance of advertisements

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issue



Concert

A Summer Evening Concert with Queen's
College Chapel Choir. The choir will perform a first half
of choral music in the chapel, followed by a lighthearted
second half (choral arrangements of popular songs,
madrigals, and classics, interspersed with a selection of
favourites for string quartet) in the Nun's Garden.
Tickets £5 (£3 concessions) on the door, to
include 2 glasses of wine in the garden. Wed., 10 June, 8
p.m., Queen's College.

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section



Services Offered

Financial planning: fee-based financial
planning and investment advice for academics and
professionals. We are authorised to review and advise on
all types of pensions, health and life insurances, and
collective investments. Free initial half-hour meeting.
Apsley Cameron Associates. Tel.: Oxford 882621, e-mail:
Camerons@dial.pipex.com.

JBA Secretarial and Office Services:
word processing; spreadsheets---Excel 5.0;
presentations---Powerpoint; sales and purchase ledger;
PAYE; e-mail and Internet. Contact Jean Bennett, 5
Lenthal, Bletchingdon, Kidlington, Oxon OX5 3EB. Tel.:
01869 350655, e-mail: JBennett11@compuserve.com.

Frederick and Sudabeh Hine import old
and new Persian carpets from Iran and sell direct to the
public. We usually also have a good selection of
hand-knotted rugs and runners from Turkey, Afghanistan,
and China. Our Beluch tribal camel/tent bags make
splendid cushions. Come and browse without obligation.
Low prices, special offers, home trial. First class
repairs and cleaning. Usual business hours are 10 a.m.--6
p.m., Mon.--Sat. Ring first or just drop in. Old Squash
Court, 16 Linton Road, North Oxford. Tel.: Oxford
559396.

Personal Computer Consultants: we offer
expert advice and tuition for both hardware and software.
On-site service at home or in the office. We provide
upgrades for most computers or alternatively we will
supply or source hardware or software to your
requirements. For a quality service matched with
competitive prices, contact Chris Lewis. Tel./fax: Oxford
461333.

Tax advice: ex-KPMG Chartered Accountant
specialises in assisting academics and other
professionals with their tax affairs, inc.
self-assessment. Convenient North Oxford premises. Tel.:
Oxford 513381, fax: 558064, e-mail:
100430.145@compuserve.com.

Fine Furniture: we specialise in
restoration, and design and make pieces to your
requirements. Furniture for restoration is surveyed free
of charge. We will take a brief with no obligation for
bespoke pieces in the fine art of cabinetry, where true
inspiration and experienced skills can come together at
affordable costs. Please contact Forman Fine Furniture,
tel./fax: 01844 238389, and speak to Danny Forman.

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section



Domestic Services

Responsible person required from Sept.
to care for 2 boys (12 and 14) after school, 3--4 days
p.w., 3.30--6.30 p.m. Woodstock Road area. Car driver
preferred. Accommodation available if required. Tel.:
01993 812651.

Nanny share offered. We are looking for
someone to share our nanny with our 2 boys (4 and 8), for
about 6 months. Share could be full time (8--6,
Mon.--Fri.) or part time. Could start June, July, or
Aug., to run to sometime in Feb. For further information,
tel.: Oxford 558583.

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by
Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work,
competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also
carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy
cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning.
For free estimates and friendly advice, call
Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford 726983 or Abingdon 555533.

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section



Situations Vacant

Lady Margaret Hall: Conference
Administrator. Required to manage and develop all aspects
of our conference business. Varied and challenging role,
requiring flair and initiative. The ideal candidate will
have relevant experience, good communication skills, and
a high standard of computer literacy. Full-time, 6 month
appointment in the first instance, but potentially
renewable. Salary (University scale C5)
£14,580--£18,992. Details from the Bursar's
Secretary, Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford OX2 6QA, tel.:
Oxford (2)74323, e-mail: anna.angell@lmh.ox.ac.uk.
Applications close: 12 June.

Brasenose College: Domestic Bursar's
Secretary. Excellent secretarial skills and computer
literacy (Word, Excel) required, along with initiative,
accuracy over detail, ability to work under pressure,
flexible outlook, sense of humour, and ability to fit in
with the team. Duties inc. correspondence and internal
communication, monitoring domestic services, and
organising events. Salary (University scale C3)
£10,881--£12,972, plus pension, free lunches,
generous holiday. Applications with c.v. and references
to the Domestic Bursar, Brasenose College, Oxford OX1
4AJ, from whom further details available. Applications
close: 12 June.

Childcare after school wanted for 3
children aged 9--13. Three days per week. Some holiday
cover also required. Driver essential. Would consider
share. Tel.: Oxford 750924 (eve./weekend), e-mail:
alb@ermine.ox.ac.uk.

Linacre College: Development Office
Assistant. 20 hours p.w., salary: University clarical C3
(£10,881--£12,595) pro rata. Applicants should
demonstrate excellent interpersonal and word-processing
skills, be well-organised, and able to work on their own
initiative. They will have a good telephone manner and be
able to fit into a small, friendly working environment.
An essential part of this post is the upkeep of an
extenxive alumni database, and experience of database
work is required. Arrangement of hours can take a
flexible approach towards school holidays, if the right
candidate prefers. Details from the Development Office,
Linacre College, Oxford OX1 3JA, tel.: Oxford (2)71671,
e-mail: development@linacre.ox.ac.uk. Applications close:
8 June, but position open until filled.

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section



Houses to Let

Central Summertown: 7-bedroom house within walking
distance of Summertown shops and regular bus service into
Oxford centre. Fully furnished; gas c.h. Possibly suit
students/sharers. £1,400 p.c.m. Available from Sept.
1998. Tel.: Oxford 728597.

Quietly-situated, refurbished, and
fully-equipped coach house in Old Marston village.
Available from 1 Aug. 1998. Living kitchen, bathroom,
south-facing sitting-room, 2 bedrooms; c.h.,
fridge/freezer, washing machine, telephone, off-street
parking. £700 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 244130.

Lovely period cottage in centre of
Wantage; 3/4 bedrooms; newly renovated/ decorated, and
furnished to high standard; delightful walled garden to
rear. Available now. £1,150 p.c.m. Tel.: 01235
762161.

Headington: close to JR Hospital,
available 1 Sept--15 Dec. 1998. Cosy detached house in
quiet area, with 4 bedrooms, 2 reception rooms, modern
kitchen. Bus stop close by; 30 minutes' walk to town.
Rent negotiable, in region £900 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford
764589, e-mail: brian.steer@hertford.ox.ac.uk.

Ideal family house in one of North
Oxford's quiet leafy roads. Six bedrooms, 2 bathrooms,
spacious living accommodation, private garden, off-road
parking. Available furnished, from mid-Aug. £1,950
p.c.m. Apply to E. Gordon Hudson & Co., 24 Friar's Entry,
Oxford OX1 2DB, tel.: Oxford 244089, fax: 728942.

Charming cottage on edge of village 15
minutes north-west of Oxford. Double bedroom plus spare
bedroom/study. Furnished and equipped to a very high
standard. Beams, inglenook fire, country antiques, c.h.
Very private walled patio garden. Suit caring non-smoking
couple. Available from Sept. Tel.: Oxford 510542.

Just modernised (c.h., kitchen,
bathroom, etc.) well-appointed 3-bedroom house in Kiln
Lane, Headington, Oxford, with off-street parking. On
excellent bus routes to city centre and London. Close to
shops, John Radcliffe, Churchill, and Nuffield
Orthopaedic Hospitals. Easy access to Oxford centre, M40,
and University. Ideally suited to professional University
or medical couple. £700 p.c.m., plus bills.
Initially 1 year, with possibility of renewal.
Non-smokers only. Available from July/Aug. Tel./fax:
Oxford 735540.

London: comfortable 3-bedroom house with
garden, available Aug.--Christmas. Easy access Oxford by
car or train (Paddington); central London by tube 15
minutes. Good shops and transport; all mod. cons.;
references required. £225 p.w. Tel.: 0171
3286604.

Central Oxford: quiet, on river bank
with attractive views and riverside walks---yet 2
minutes' walk to rail station (London Paddington 52
minutes), 5 minutes to bus station (Heathrow 70 minutes),
and 12 minutes to Bodleian, etc. New town house built for
easy living and to high specification. 4/5 bedrooms, 3/2
reception rooms, 3 bathrooms (2 en suite),
downstairs w.c., modern fully-equipped kitchen,
conservatory, small garden, parking. Available carpeted
but unfurnished, £2,000 p.c.m., (but could be
furnished). for details, tel.: 01844 208315, fax: 201511,
e-mail: 100574.451@compuserve.com.

Newly-renovated detached house in
Headington with large garden overlooking nature reserve.
Available from mid-June to non-smokers. Convenient for JR
Hospital; 2 miles from city centre and University. Fully
furnished to high standard with 3 bedrooms, 2 receptions
rooms, bathroom, well-equipped kitchen (dishwasher and
fridge-freezer), utility room (washer-drier), gas c.h.,
off-street parking. £900 p.c.m., plus bills and
Council Tax. Tel.: Oxford 249429, e-mail:
christine.bond@zoo.ox.ac.uk.

Walk to colleges: furnished central
North Oxford house, available 15 Sept. for 1 year or
less. Walk to colleges, train station, bus station. Near
Port Meadow. Recently redecorated; desks, filing
cabinets, several large closets; secluded garden; 2.5
bathrooms; c.h.; washing machine, drier, telephone,
linen, dishes; 2 bicyles. Suit visiting academics.
£950 p.m. (2 bedrooms), £1,250 p.m. (3
bedrooms; includes bedsit with separate entrance).
Contact (Canada) A. Gaston, tel.: 613 745 1368, fax: 745
0299, e-mail: Tony.Gaston@EC.GC.CA. Local contact: J.
Mackrell (eve.), tel.: Oxford 775567 or (27 May--1 June)
553679.

Headington, Derwent Avenue. Unfurnished
semi-detached house suitable for professional family.
Three bedrooms, 2 reception rooms, kitchen with washing
machine, bathroom, gas c.h., garage, gardens. Near JR
Hospital, direct bus to city centre. £750 p.c.m.
Tel.: Oxford 762436 (eve.).

Available beginning July for 6--12
months plus: 3/4 attractive Victorian terrace house,
central North Oxford. Suit family. Three double bedrooms,
28-foot sitting-room, bathroom, kitchen/diner. £950
p.c.m. Well-equipped. Gas c.h., street parking permit
available. Write to 123 South Avenue, Abingdon, Oxon.
Tel.: Oxford 559911.

St Ebbe's, in new development near the
river and 5 minutes from Carfax. Terrace house, fully
furnished: 2 bedrooms, open plan ground floor, fitted
kitchen, c.h., telephone, sunny garden with parking
space. Available 1 Sept. (or possibly earlier) for long
let. £600 p.c.m., plus bills and Council Tax. Suit
visiting academic. Mr Braithwaite, tel.: Oxford 244637
(agent).

An Englishman's home is his castle---so
the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many
castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental
accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be
able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost
letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics,
medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to
offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford.
Visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view
details of all the properties that we have currently
available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or
e-mail us with details of your requirements and we will
do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: Oxford
764533, fax: 764777, e-mail: info@qbman.co.uk.

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Flats to Let

Spacious Jericho flat: 2 bedrooms, 1
bathroom, living-room/kitchen. Centrally located. Fully
furnished and equipped, with leafy views. Private
parking. No pets. Available 1 July (possibly earlier)--30
Sept. £490 p.c.m., plus bills. Tel.: Oxford 514597
and leave a message.

FLat on second (top) floor of
purpose-built block in Osberton Road, Summertown. Fully
furnished and equipped with kitchen utensils, crockery,
etc., plus washer-drier, fridge-freezer, gas c.h.,
shower, garage, and garden access. Living-room and 2
double bedrooms. Available to non-smokers from early
June. Rent (exc. utilities and Council Tax): £620
p.c.m. for 1-year lease or £650 p.c.m. for 6-month
lease. Tel.: Oxford 727650, e-mail:
binney@thphys.ox.ac.uk.

Overlooking river in quiet location
close to nature reserve, yet only 5 minutes' walk from
city centre shops, 10 minutes from colleges, and easy
walk to railway station. Bright, fully-furnished,
carpeted, second-floor flat. Sitting-room with balcony;
double bedroom; electric cooker; washing machine; entry
phone; own under-cover parking space. Suit single person
or couple. Available 1 Aug. £625 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford
512138, e-mail: mdy@bioch.ox.ac.uk.

Central North Oxford: spacious 1-bedroom
flat in quiet road. Shared garden. Suit postdoc couple or
similar. Available 1 July. Tel.: 0171 794 8965.

Central North Oxford: 10 minutes' walk
from city centre, all main university buildings, and
parks, and very close to the river. Available end Aug.
for short/long let. Exceptionally well-furnished,
comfortable, first-floor flat in extremely quiet,
civilised, large Victorian house in this exclusive,
leafy, residential Victorian suburb, with large, light,
airy rooms. Double bedroom, drawing-room, kitchen,
bathroom. Off-street parking; large secluded garden.
Regret no children or pets. Tel./fax: Oxford 552400.

Two-bedroom second-floor flat with
parking. Woodstock Road, 1 mile from St Giles. fully
furnished and well equipped (washer-drier, dishwasher,
etc). Suit visiting academics or business people. Regret
no smokers, children, or pets. £800 p.c.m., inc.
Council Tax. Tel.: Oxford 515323.

Luxurious well-lit apartment on 2
floors, central North Oxford, near Port Meadow.
Convenient for university, schools, shops. Three bedrooms
(2 double, 1 single), sitting-room, dining room, modern
well-equipped kitchen, 2 luxury bathrooms (1 with
separate shower). Small terrace and paved, well-stocked
garden. Beautifully furnished and decorated, carpeted
throughout. Gas c.h., washing machine, drier, dishwasher,
2 telephones, TV points. £1,450 p.m. Families only.
Available from mid-July. Tel.: Oxford 559614.

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section



Summer Lets

Three-bedroom, 2-bathroom house
available all July and early Aug. Ten minutes to city
centre. Bicycles, piano, all mod. cons. £250 p.w.
Tel.: Oxford 725735.

Available 25 July--8 Aug. Three-bedroom
cottage in Islip near Oxford. Large garden by river Ray.
Use of boat and bicycles. £375 p.w. Tel./fax: Oxford
376326, e-mail: darcy@vallance.clara.net.

Short lets! We have a selection of
studios and 1- and 2-bedroom apartments in a Grade 1
listed manor house in Old Kidlington, a village just
north of Oxford. Some apartments are self contained;
others will have use of shared bathrooms, kitchen, and
laundry facilities, and sitting-room with colour TV.
Available beginning June--end Aug. 1998, at rents
£300--£800 p.c.m. Details from Finders Keepers,
73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE, tel.: Oxford 311011,
fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk.

Victorian house in North Oxford, 15
minutes' walk from city centre. One double and 1 single
bedroom, 2 living rooms, 2 bathrooms, study with PC and
e-mail. Nice garden. Available 27 July--5 Sept. £275
p.w. or £1,400 for whole 6 weeks. Tel.: Oxford
515077.

Central houses and flats for the summer
(1 July--25 Sept): 1- or 2-month leases posible. Average
cost £300 per bedroom with utilities. TV, video,
phone installed. Suit visiting academics. Tel.: Oxford
201132, fax: 243600.

Summer let in Oxford: live in comfort
near the Thames. Four bedrooms, large split-level
living-room, south-facing garden, dining-room,
fully-equipped kitchen, bathroom (with bidet and w.c.),
shower room (with w.c.); c.h. Available 6 weeks 18
July--2 Sept. Price negotiable. Tel.: Oxford 725193.

Four-storey Victorian town house to let
in Oxford, 1--29 Aug. Sleeps 4/5. All mod. cons. Small
sunny garden to Oxford canal. Close to city centre and
river Thames. Bikes, rowing boat. Feed 2 cats and water
plants. Tel.: Oxford 557133, e-mail:
sledwith@brookes.ac.uk.

Holiday accommodation: attractive and
comfortable, 10 minutes to city centre, in quiet road,
central North Oxford, near water meadows. Well equipped,
sleeps 6/7. Available July, Aug., and Sept. Write to 123
South Avenue, Abingdon, Oxon. Tel.: Oxford 559911.

Exquisite part of Georgian stable block
in beautiful Cotswold village near Burford. Two bedrooms,
open fireplace, lots of light and beautiful views,
surrounded by NT woods and rivers. Available fully
equipped, 24 July--4 Sept. 1998. £200 p.w. Tel.:
01451 844829, fax: Oxford 794652.

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section



Accommodation Offered

Part of a luxury barn conversion in
Cumnor village, 4 miles west of Oxford in secluded rural
setting. Available through summer. Large lounge,
fully-fitted and equipped kitchen, shower room, large
double bedroom, adjoining bathroom, attractively
furnished, telephone, off-street parking. £325 p.w.
Tel./fax: Oxford 864690, e-mail: RFrancis4@aol.com.

Kidlington: accommodation available,
either whole 2-bed house from end July for 4--6 weeks, or
as lodger from end July. Would suit young Christian lady
in 30's. Please contact Bridget, tel.: Oxford 378022,
e-mail: 96143177@brookes.ac.uk.

Bed-and-breakfast available in the warm
comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple in
exclusive, leafy, central North Oxford; within easy
walking distance of the city centre and all main
university buildings; a stone's throw from the river,
parks, excellent pubs and restaurants and a 9--9 corner
shop. All rooms have colour TV, microwave, tea- and
coffee-making facilities, c.h., and independent heating.
Refrigerators available. Very moderate terms. Tel./fax:
Oxford 557879, mobile: 0374 434489.

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section



Accommodation Sought

Former student of St Antony's College,
with wife and 3 children, seeks house within reasonable
distance of the college for 3 weeks from 24 June. Tel.:
Oxford 515210 (eve).

Senior lecturer seeks self-contained
accommodation, for a 6-month to 1 year let, to begin July
or Aug. 1998. Ideally a 1-bedroom flat, but would
consider a house share. Prefer central location, or
accommodation with good public transport links. Tel.:
Oxford 433819.

Professional couple (non-smokers, no
children, 1 collie dog) seeks quiet rural accommodation
in Charlbury/Woodstock area; furnished or unfurnished,
preferably 2/3 bedrooms, with garden. Rental around
£500--£550. E-mail:
nick.marston@spc.ox.ac.uk.

The University Accommodation Office is
looking for furnished houses and flats for couples and
families available now and for the next academic year.
Reasonably-priced rooms for single people and short-term
accommodation also required. Tel.: Oxford (2)78286/7.

d'Overbroek's College is now looking for
more good family and self-catering accommodation in North
Oxford for A level students from 7 Sept. We are
particularly interested in self-catering flatlets within
private houses. Excellent rates are paid through the
College. If you think you can help, or would like further
information, please tel.: Oxford 310000.

Academic married couple (Medicine,
English) seeks flat/house to house sit or rent in Oxford
area, Jan.--Sept. 1999 during fellowships. No children or
pets; non-smokers; tidy; references provided. Tel.: 0191
265 6341 (after 20 Sept. 456 0898), e-mail:
100653.404@compuserve.com.

House rental sought, 3/4 bedrooms. From
1 July for a year (or possibly 1 summer and 1 academic
year rental). Anywhere in city considered. Contact Stella
Tillyard, tel.: 0039 55 4685594 (day) or 0039 55 5002335
(eve.), e-mail: brewer@datacomm.iue.it.

Visiting academic from New Zealand
requires furnished accommodation for self, wife, and
daughter (age 7); late Nov. 1998--July 1999. Especially
Headington, but anywhere considered. Reply to Dr R.
Phillips, History, Auckland University, Private Bag
92019, Auckland. E-mail: rt.phillips@auckland.ac.nz.

Going abroad? Or just thinking of
letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's
foremost letting agents and property managers. We
specialise in lettings to both academic and professional
individuals and their families, and have a constant flow
of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property
in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our
services, or if you simply need some informal help and
advice without obligation, telephone us: Oxford 764533,
fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk.
Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site
at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be
marketing your property.

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section



Accommodation Sought to Rent or
Exchange

Canadian professor, wife, and highly
responsible teenage son require quiet accommodation from
Sept. 1998 for up to 11 months. Local references
available. Piano an asset. Maximum of about £750
p.c.m. Would consider exchange for our house in Edmonton,
Alberta. Fax (Canada): 403 492 9234, e-mail:
reuben.kaufman@ualberta.ca.

Visiting fellow seeks to rent
1/2-bedroom furnished house or flat, Oct. 1998--end May
1999. Can exchange lovely 3-storey London house with
garden for same period or end of Aug. 1999. Tel.: 0181
855 3721.

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section



Holiday Lets

Cornwall: Lizard Peninsula.
Accommodation in 18th-c. house. Sleeps 5. Tel.:
280216.

Barcelona: pleasant spacious flat in
central Barcelona, available July and Aug. Two double
bedrooms; TV and washing machine. £400 p.c.m. (Cheap
Easyjet flights from Luton.) For details, tel.: Oxford
250109 or 00 3493 265 3286.

Charming terrace house for short and
long lets in conservation zone of unspoilt Southwold
(Suffolk), seconds from the sea. Some weeks still
available in Aug. and Sept. Sleeps 4+. Marvellous area
for walking, cycling (2 bicycles available),
church-visiting, bird-watching, and pub-hopping. Tel.:
Oxford 513464 (eve.).

Portugal: recently-renovated half duplex
near beach. Four bedrooms (sleeps 6), 2 bathrooms (1
en suite), spacious living-room. Walking
distance from beaches. Near lovely Sintra and 35 miles
fron Lisbon. Ideal for EXPO 98. Available for weekly lets
(£450 p.w.) or longer. Tel.: Oxford (2)71160,
e-mail: ruy.ribeiro@zoo.ox.ac.uk.

Tuscany: 180 hectar, award-winning wine
farm, formally Machiavelli property, half hour from
central Florence but far from the madding crowd, offers
newly-restored farm houses and apartments for short and
longer-term rentals. Fattoria Corzano and Paterno, San
Casciano VP, fax: 00 39 55 8249 120, e-mail:
pgklpoggio@ftbcc.it.

Andalucia: house or part of house to let
in magical Medieval village with stunning landscape. Our
house is at the front of the village with unobstructed
views past Gibraltar and the Mediterranean to the Rif
mountains of Morocco. Excellent walking and
bird-watching. Visit Granada, Cordoba, Ronda, Seville,
Cadiz, and Morocco. Prices range from £85--£365
p.w., per suite. Reduction for long let. Dr Campbell,
tel.: Oxford 513935, e-mail: l.lustgarten@soton.ac.uk,
for brochure.

South Shropshire, near Ludlow: 3-bedroom
terrace holiday cottage with fabulous views over south
Shropshire hills. Full of antiques and interesting
objects. Perfect for exploring Welsh Marches. Dishwasher
and microwave; garden. £220 p.w. during term time,
£250 p.w. during vacation. 3 keys commended by
tourist board. Contact William Longrigg, tel.: 0171 203
5090 (day) or 350 1435 (eve.).

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Properties for sale at Oxford
Waterside

Central North Oxford/Jericho.
Classically styled homes built by nationally renowned
quality house-builders, Berkeley Homes. Properties
available include: 2-bedroom apartments from
£118,500; 3-bedroom, 2-bathroom houses from
£169,500; 4-bedroom, 3-storey houses with garages
from £275,000. Marketing suite and show homes open
daily, 10 a.m.--5 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 311449, or
726000/515000 (joint selling agents, Savills and Thomas
Merrifield).
n

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<br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette: Diary, 5 June<br /> - 23 June

Diary


Contents of this section:

Academic Staff
Development Seminars
: places should be booked in advance
through
the Staff Development Office, University Offices,
Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

For the full list of courses, see the HREF="http://admin.ox.ac.uk/training/">Staff Development
ProgrammeWeb site.

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Contents Page of this issue



Friday 5 June

ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY of Modern and Contemporary
France meeting, Maison Française, 10 a.m.–4
p.m. (details from Maison Française).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `East meets West:
portraiture', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for
bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--1 p.m.)

PROFESSOR Z. BAUMAN: `Ethic networks in a networked
world' (ESRC Research Programme in Transnational
Communities: `Conceiving transnational activity'), Upper
Lecture Theatre, School of Geography, 2 p.m.

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section



Saturday 6 June

GARY COOPER (harpsichordist) performs Bach's
Goldberg Variations, 8.15 p.m., New College
Ante-Chapel (tickets £7/£5 from Blackwell's
Music Shop, or at the door).

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section



Sunday 7 June

THE VERY REVD STEPHEN PLATTEN preaches, Lady Margaret
Hall, 10 a.m.

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section



Monday 8 June

JENNIE MIELL: `Dwile flonkers and Internauts: new words
in the OED' (Oxford English
Dictionary
Forum), Rewley House, 5 p.m.

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section



Tuesday 9 June

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Shoes and gloves', 1.15
p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30
a.m.--1 p.m.)

WOMEN TUTORS' GROUP summer party plus mini-meeting,
Warden's Lodgings, 19 Merton Street, 5–7 p.m.

DR N. KENNY: `Curiositas in German
university dissertations, 1652--1714' (Seminar in Social
and Cultural History, 1500--1800), Hovenden Room, All
Souls, 8.30 p.m.

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section



Wednesday 10 June

DR D. HARLEY: `The species of disease and the destruction
of learned medicine' (seminar series: `Collection and
comparison in the sciences'), Museum of the History of
Science, 5 p.m.

DR M. BERDAL: `The rise and fall of the safe areas in
Bosnia, 1993--5' (Refugee Studies Programme: Seminars on
Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen
Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

DR C. GARCIA-PENALOSA: `A rational learning model of
gender-segregation in labour markets' (interdisciplinary
seminars: `Gender and the public/private divide'),
Seminar Room, Nuffield, 5 p.m.

THE BAND OF INSTRUMENTS (with students from the
Faculty of Music and soloists from New Chamber Opera)
perform Arne's The Masque of Alfred, 7.30
p.m., New College Cloisters (tickets £10/£5
from Blackwell's Music Shop, or at the door).

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section



Thursday 11 June

PROFESSOR A. COHEN: `Politics and the stability of
marriage' (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women
seminars), Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

COLIN CARR performs Bach's suites 4, 5, and 6 for
unaccompanied cello, Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St
John's, 8.30 p.m. (admission by free programme, available
from the Porters' Lodge one week before concert).

THE BAND OF INSTRUMENTS (with students from the
Faculty of Music and soloists from New Chamber Opera)
perform Arne's The Masque of Alfred, 7.30
p.m., New College Cloisters (tickets £10/£5
from Blackwell's Music Shop, or at the door).

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section



Friday 12 June

ACADEMIC STAFF DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR: `Lecturing to
conferences', 9.30 a.m. (see
information above
).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The roots of
Impressionism', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for
bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--1 p.m.)

PROFESOR S. CASTLES: `New migrations, ethnicity, and
nationalism in south-east and east Asia' (ESRC Research
Programme in Transnational Communities: `Conceiving
transnational activity'), Upper Lecture Theatre, School
of Geography, 2 p.m.

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section



Saturday 13 June

THE OXFORD GAMELAN SOCIETY perform music, songs, and
dance from central Java on the Bate Collection Gamelan,
Kyai Madu Laras, 7 p.m., Wesley Memorial
Church, New Inn Hall Street (tickets £7/£5 from
Blackwell's Music Shop, or at the door).

THE BAND OF INSTRUMENTS with the Choir of Magdalen
College perform J.S. Bach's Cantata BWV 106 (`Gottes Zeit
ist die allerbeste Zeit'), 6.15 p.m., the chapel,
Magdalen (Evensong service; free admission).

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section



Sunday 14 June

MRS LUCY GARDNER preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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section



Monday 15 June

PROFESSOR BARRY SCHECK: `Scientific evidence and criminal
justice' (Department of Statistics, Florence Nightingale
Lectures), Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, St Anne's, 5.30
p.m.

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section



Tuesday 16 June

CONGREGATION meeting, 2 p.m.

R. WALINSKI-KIEHL: `Men as witches and male
witch-hunting in early modern Germany' (Seminar in Social
and Cultural History, 1500--1800), Hovenden Room, All
Souls, 8.30 p.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The Pre-Raphaelites',
1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015,
9.30 a.m.--1 p.m.)

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section



Wednesday 17 June

ACADEMIC STAFF DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR: `Financial
management, module V: budget monitoring and control',
9.30 a.m. (see information
above
).

DR J. KUPER: `The enforcement of international law
affecting children in armed conflict' (Refugee Studies
Programme: Seminars on Forced Migration), Library Wing
Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

DR V. RANDALL: `The politics of child-care:
implications for the public/private debate'
(interdisciplinary seminars: `Gender and the
public/private divide'), Seminar Room, Nuffield, 5 p.m.

UNIVERSITY CLUB wine-tasting: Wines for summer
drinking, 5.45 p.m. (admission £2).

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section



Thursday 18 June

AKIKO ISHIKAWA: `Japanese marriage and gender roles:
investing it with new meanings' (Centre for Cross-
Cultural Research on Women seminars), Queen Elizabeth
House, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. OWEN: `Why write another biography of
Evelyn Baring (Lord Cromer?' (George Antonius Lecture),
New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m

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section



Friday 19 June

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Small treasures of the
Ashmolean' (monthly series of in-depth cross-cultural
talks), 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings:
(2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--1 p.m.)

ACADEMIC STAFF DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR: `Dealing with
harassment' (follow-up session), 2 p.m. ( HREF="#seminars">see information above).

PROFESSOR R. COHEN: `Transnational social movements:
an appraisal' (ESRC Research Programme in Transnational
Communities: `Conceiving transnational activity'), Upper
Lecture Theatre, School of Geography, 2 p.m.

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section



Saturday 20 June

TRANSLATION RESEARCH IN OXFORD meeting (various
speakers): `Psychoanalysis and translation', St Hugh's,
10 a.m.–5 p.m. (tel.: Edith McMorran, St Hugh's,
(2)74996, or Sue Robinson, Maison Française,
(2)74220).

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section



Sunday 21 June

THE RT REVD AND RT HON THE LORD COGGAN preaches, St
Mary's, 10 a.m.

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section



Monday 22 June

CHRIST CHURCH Picture Gallery exhibition opens: `Artist
in focus—Salvator Rosa' (until 31 August).

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section



Tuesday 23 June

ACADEMIC STAFF DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR: `Audio-visual aids to
lecturing', 9.30 a.m. (see
information above
).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The Acropolis', 1.15
p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30
a.m.--1 p.m.)

SEAMUS HEANEY: `Fretwork: on translating
Beowulf' (address follows Annual General
Meeting of the Friends of the Bodleian, to be held in
Sheldonian Theatre, 3 p.m.) (non-members to tel. in
advance: (2)77234; full details in `Lectures' above).

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section