30 January 1997 - No 4425

Oxford University Gazette

30 January 1997


 


University Health and Safety information

 


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University Acts

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 21 January

Approval on a division of General Resolution not confirmed

Since Council has decided that a postal vote should be held on the General Resolution concerning the entitlement of retired persons to membership of Congregation, the approval on a division of that resolution in Congregation on 21 January is not confirmed.

¶ The verbatim record of the debate on the General Resolution will be published as a Supplement to the Gazette in due course. Voting papers will then be sent to members of Congregation, and a date will be fixed by Mr Vice-Chancellor for holding the vote.

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HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL

1 Decree

Council has made the following decrees, to come into effect on 14 February.

List of the decrees:

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Decree (1): Establishment of Centre for Brazilian Studies

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Inter-faculty Committee for Latin American Studies and with the concurrence of the General Board, establishes a Centre for Brazilian Studies and provides for the directorship of the centre, both of which are to be funded by generous donations from Brazil. The centre is to be established for five years in the first instance, with the intention that it will continue thereafter if sufficient further funds can be raised.

Text of Decree (1)

1 In Ch III, concerning university bodies (Statutes, 1995, p. 274), insert new Sect. XVI as follows and renumber existing Sect. XVI as Sect. XVII:

`Section XVI. Brazilian Studies, Centre for

1. Following the provision of support from donors in Brazil, there shall be within the University a Centre for Brazilian Studies.

2. The functions of the centre shall be to co-ordinate and develop graduate teaching and research on Brazil and through its programme of lectures, seminars, conferences, and publications to act as a focus for the study of Brazil and for the promotion of a greater understanding of Brazil and its place in the world, in the United Kingdom, and in Europe. The aim of the centre shall be to promote a greater understanding of the history and culture of Brazil, its society, its economic and political development, and its place in the world.

3. There shall be an advisory council for the centre which shall contribute to promoting the centre in Brazil and internationally, and to raising funds for the continuation of the centre after the initial five years from the date of its establishment.

4. The centre shall be under the general supervision of the Inter-faculty Committee for Latin American Studies.

5. There shall be a director of the centre who shall hold the title of Director of the Centre for Brazilian Studies. The post shall be on the establishment of the Inter-faculty Committee for Latin American Studies. The director shall be appointed for such periods as Council may from time to time determine. The director shall be elected by an electoral board consisting of:

(1) the Vice-Chancellor or, if the head of the college specified in (2) of this clause is Vice-Chancellor, a person appointed by Council;

(2) the head of the college with which the directorship shall be for the time being associated, or, if the head is unable or unwilling to act, a person appointed by the governing body of the college;

(3) a person appointed by the governing body of the college specified in (2) of this clause;

(4)–(6) three persons appointed by the Inter-faculty Committee for Latin American Studies;

(7) a person appointed by Council;

(8), (9) two persons appointed by the General Board;

6. The director shall have charge of the premises allocated for the centre and shall make provision for the lighting, warming, water supply, and cleansing of the premises.

7. The director shall be a member ex officio of the Inter-faculty Committee for Latin American Studies and of the Latin American Centre Committee.

8. The director shall submit to the General Board an annual report on the work of the centre.

9. The director shall be subject to the General Provisions of the decree concerning the duties of professors and shall reside within the University during six months at least in each academical year, between the first day of October and the ensuing first day of August.

10. There shall be a management committee for the centre consisting of the director, the chairman and two nominees of the Inter-faculty Committee for Latin American Studies, and a nominee of St Antony's College. The director shall be chairman of the management committee. The management committee shall supervise the academic activities of the centre, including the selection of its visitors.

11. The staff of the centre shall be appointed, and their duties and conditions of service shall be determined, by the director, subject to:

(a) the provisions of any statute, decree, or regulation of general application;

(b) the approval by the Inter-faculty Committee for Latin American Studies, on the recommendation of a committee appointed by the inter-faculty committee (of which the director shall be a member and which may include other persons not being members of the inter-faculty committee), and by the General Board of any appointment which carries a stipend of more than the maximum prescribed in Ch. VII, Sect. IV, § 1, cl. 2 (ii), such approval to cover the person appointed, stipend payable, period of office, duties, and any other conditions.

2 Ibid., Sect. LII, concerning the Inter-faculty Committee for Latin American Studies (p. 300), delete cl. 1 and substitute: `1. There shall be an Inter-faculty Committee for Latin American Studies consisting of:

(1) the Director of the Centre for Brazilian Studies;

(2)–(9) two persons elected by each of the Boards of the Faculties of Anthropology and Geography, Medieval and Modern Languages, Modern History, and Social Studies;

(10) one person elected by the Board of the Faculty of Biological Sciences;

(11), (12) two persons elected by the Governing Body of St Antony's College.

The elected members of the committee shall hold office for four years from the date of election (except that casual vacancies shall be filled for the unexpired residue of the period) and shall be re-eligible. The committee shall have power to co-opt up to three additional members for periods of two years. The committee shall elect its own chairman.'

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2 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts under the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. vi, cl. 1 (Statutes, 1995, p. 345) has been accorded to the following persons who are qualified for membership of Congregation:

 

GUIDO BACCIAGALUPPI, Balliol College

DAVID ROBERT GOWEN, M.ST., St Catherine's College

JULIANE KERKHECKER, Faculty of Literae Humaniores

PAUL O'GRADY, St Catherine's College

HENRY ROSEWELL THOMAS SUMMERSON, Faculty of Modern History

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3 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of Congregation:

Bacciagaluppi, G., MA status, Balliol
Gowen, D.R., MA status, St Catherine's
Hewitt, K.R., MA, Lady Margaret Hall
Kerkhecker, J., MA status, Exeter
O'Grady, P., MA status, St Catherine's
Stanley, J.C., MA, D.Phil., Christ Church
Summerson, H.R.T., MA status, Faculty of Modern History

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BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 14 February, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

University Agenda

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 3 February

Degree by Special Resolution

The following special resolution will be deemed to be approved at noon on 3 February, unless by that time the Registrar has received notice in writing from two or more members of Congregation under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1995, p. 13) that they wish the resolution to be put to a meeting of Congregation.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

REGINALD PHILIP CARR, Balliol College

BRONWYN HUGHES HALL, Nuffield College

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CONGREGATION 25 February 2 p.m.

¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that written notice of any opposition to the following resolutions, signed by at least two members of Congregation, must be given to the Registrar by noon on Monday, 17 February (see the Guide to Procedures in Congregation cited in the note below).

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Voting on Special Resolutions approving the conferment of Honorary Degrees

(1) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Civil Law, honoris causa, upon SIR MARTIN JACOMB, MA, Honorary Fellow of Worcester College, and Chairman of the British Council, of Prudential Corporation plc, and of Delta plc, be approved.

(2) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Civil Law, honoris causa, upon THE RT. HON. THE LORD TAYLOR OF GOSFORTH, PC (MA Cambridge), Honorary Fellow of Pembroke College, Cambridge, and formerly Lord Chief Justice of England, be approved.

(3) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Letters, honoris causa, upon PROFESSOR PATRICK COLLINSON, CBE (MA Cambridge; PH.D. London), FBA, F.R.HIST.S., FAHA, Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, Regius Professor of Modern History Emeritus, University of Cambridge, and formerly Ford's Lecturer in English History and Visiting Fellow of All Souls College, be approved.

(4) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Letters, honoris causa, upon PROFESSOR SEAMUS JUSTIN HEANEY, MA (BA Belfast), Honorary Fellow of Magdalen and St John's Colleges, Boylston Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory, Harvard University, and formerly Professor of Poetry, be approved.

(5) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Science, honoris causa, upon PROFESSOR FREEMAN JOHN DYSON (BA Cambridge), FRS, Honorary Fellow of Green College, Professor Emeritus, School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, and formerly Radcliffe Lecturer and Tanner Lecturer at Brasenose College, be approved.

(6) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Science, honoris causa, upon PROFESSOR ANNE MCLAREN, DBE, MA, D.PHIL., FRS, FRCOG, Honorary Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall, and of King's and Lucy Cavendish Colleges, Cambridge, Principal Research Associate, Wellcome/Cancer Research Campaign Institute, Cambridge, and Fullerian Professor of Physiology at the Royal Institution, be approved.

(7) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Music, honoris causa, upon SIR CHARLES MACKERRAS, AC, CBE, HON. RAM, FRCM, conductor, be approved.

¶ If the Special Resolutions are approved, the honorary degrees will be conferred at the Encaenia on 25 June 1997.

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CONGREGATION 25 June

Conferment of Degree by Diploma

The Degree of Doctor of Civil Law by Diploma, approved by Special Resolution of Congregation on 15 October 1996, will be conferred upon his EXCELLENCY PROFESSOR ROMAN HERZOG, President of the Federal Republic of Germany.

¶ The degree will be conferred at the Encaenia. The list of the proposed honorands on that occasion is set out in the agenda for the meeting on 25 February (see above).

Notices

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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GEORGE WEBB MEDLEY ESSAY PRIZE 1996

The examiners have decided not to award the prize.

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University Gazette: TEMPORARY ALTERATION TO DEADLINE

Members of the University are asked to note that, with effect for the Gazettes of 13 February, 20 February, and 27 February (fourth to sixth weeks), the deadline for receipt of notices will be advanced to 12 noon on the preceding Thursday (i.e. noon on 6 February, for Gazette of 13 February; noon on 13 February, for Gazette of 20 February; noon on 20 February, for Gazette of 27 February).

It is emphasised that it will be necessary to adhere strictly to these deadlines.

The usual deadline of 5 p.m. on the preceding Thursday will apply to the 6 March and subsequent Gazettes.

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COMPUTING SERVICES

Archiving Computer Data

The OUCS central VAX service includes the provision of `archive' storage of inactive material. All users have had unrestricted access to this facility. The costs in terms of media, equipment and manpower are substantial, and would be greatly increased if regular copying continued to be performed to ensure that older material remains readable indefinitely. Also, the cost of disk storage has plummeted since the present system was set up in 1987.

The Technical Review Group of the University Information Technology Committee has therefore agreed, after consultation with the IT Users' Group, that this type of archive system will not be provided for storage of data from the new central Unix systems. These systems will have a fully supported service for reading material from the VAX archives, but this service will be wound down over a five-year period.

New facilities for archiving using the OUCS Hierarchical File Server will be available for University projects, under guidelines to be established by a Computing Archive Committee. For users who do not qualify for this central facility, there will be a new chargeable service for ongoing retention of material, at a rate which is yet to be determined but will not exceed £20 per gigabyte per year. Also, in the ten years since the VAX archive was set up, many new options for private storage have become available, such as personal computer hard disks, high-capacity tapes, and CD-Rom disks.

OUCS will also be offering a chargeable service to write CD-Rom disks, for archiving or transmission of data. Further information about all these new services will be released shortly.

VAX File Archive

The policy for future access is that files will be available up to five years from the date they were archived. Specifically, archives for the single years 1992 onwards will be removed at the end of the fifth year later, for example the OXFORD92 archive will be accessible only until 31 December 1997. The archive named OXFORD (covering 1987 to 1991) will be retained until 31 December 1997. The final closure of this service will be 31 December 2002. Access to files will be from the account on Sable or Ermine which has the same username as the old VAX account; it is the user's responsibility to ensure that registration remains valid for all such accounts.

Inactive VAX usernames

Current OUCS policy is that computer accounts are retained for as long as the owner has an appropriate status in the University. Prior to 1995, accounts on the VAX systems could also be closed if the user had been inactive for several months. The files were saved in the VAX archive, and can be restored if the owner re-activates the account. The time limit in this case is three years. Anyone relying on OUCS to preserve files for inactive usernames is strongly recommended to revive the username before Easter 1997 so that secure storage of this data can be arranged.

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SAFETY OFFICE

Safety Campaign, 3–14 February

The Committee on Health and Safety continues to recognise that the majority of accidents which happen in the University can be categorised under just two headings—`manual handling and lifting' and `glass and sharps' accidents—and is committed to reducing such accidents. To heighten awareness of the risks associated with the casual factors and the appropriate control measures, each employee will be sent a mainly humorous communication from the Safety Office, and departments will be displaying posters in communal areas. All members of the University are asked to give support to the safety campaign, and in particular to increase awareness of the safety message in students.

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WOMEN'S STUDIES COMMITTEE

The next meeting of the Oxford University Women's Studies Committee will be at 1 p.m. on Thursday, 6 February (third week), in the Senior Common Room, the St Cross Building, Manor Road.

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UNIVERSITY PROFESSIONAL INDEMNITY INSURANCE

Personal Consultancies

The University holds a Professional Indemnity Insurance policy which indemnifies the University, together with its employees and officers whilst acting on behalf of the University, against liability for damages (and claimants' costs and expenses) in respect of claims arising out of the University's activities as a university by reason of (amongst other things):

(i) any act, neglect, error, or omission, occurring or committed in good faith by the University (together with its employees and officers whilst acting on behalf of the University);

(ii) libel and slander committed in good faith by reason of words written or spoken by the University (together with its employees and officers whilst acting on behalf of the University).

In the event of liability arising from any dishonest or fraudulent act or omission, no person committing or condoning the act or omission is entitled to indemnity.

The policy does not cover the first £1,000 of any claim for damages.

The policy also provides the same cover for individual members of the University's academic, academic-related, and technical staff who undertake private work, provided that

(a) the permission of the University has been obtained, and

(b) fees received for such work are declared to the insurer.

It should be noted, however, that claims in US and Canadian courts are excluded.

This insurance cover is subject to a number of conditions, of which the most important are:

(a) that written notice is given to the insurance company as soon as possible after the University is aware of circumstances which might reasonably be expected to produce a claim against the University (including its employees and officers if within the cover)—irrespective of the validity of the claim—or as soon as it is informed of such a claim for which there may be liability under the insurance cover; and

(b) that every letter, claim, writ, summons and process is forwarded to the insurance company immediately on receipt. No admission, offer, promise, payment, or indemnity is to be made or given by or on behalf of the University (including its employees and officers if within the cover) without the written consent of the company.

Members of the academic staff undertaking consultancy work with the permission of the University (under the rules laid down by the General Board), and academic-related and technical staff (who must obtain the permission of the head of their department), are strongly urged to take advantage of this cover. They may do so by writing, on a strictly confidential basis, to Ms J. Clark, Director, Research Services Office, Wellington Square, Oxford, stating the name of the employer for each consultancy and the fee or the remuneration receivable.

The insurance company will only be notified of the aggregate number of consultancies and the aggregate fees on an annual basis except in the event of a claim, when details of a particular consultancy will be required by the insurer.

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ISIS INNOVATION LIMITED

2 South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3UB

Isis Innovation, a wholly-owned company of the University, was established in 1988. The company has been formed to exploit know-how arising out of research funded by the UK Government through the Research Councils and funded by other bodies where the rights are not tied. The function of the company is to ensure that the results of research bring rewards to Oxford, and to the inventors, who are given a financial incentive for exploitation.

Isis seeks licensees willing to pay lump sums andor royalties for the use of know-how arising out of research. Isis also exploits the intellectual property of the University by setting up individual companies using venture capital or development capital funds.

Isis' services are also available to individuals who wish to exploit the results of research supported by non-Research Council sources, when there are no prior conditions on the handling of the intellectual property rights. Isis Innovation has at its disposal a small pre-seedcorn fund for paying the costs of protecting intellectual property rights and for taking work to a stage where its potential can be assessed.

Isis finds industrial partners to ensure that new ideas can be developed for market requirements. The company has established the Oxford Innovation Society for major industrial companies, so that they can have a window on Oxford technology and an opportunity to license and invest where appropriate.

A brochure explaining Isis' activities is available. Please contact the above address, or the telephone and fax numbers given below.

Members of the University should contact the Managing Director if they wish to take advantage of the services that Isis provides. (Telephone: (2)72411; fax: (2)72412.)

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CIRCULATION OF FLYSHEETS

Ten or more members of Congregation may arrange to have a flysheet circulated with the Gazette (a) on matters before Congregation, or Convocation in regard to the election of the Professor of Poetry, or (b) relating to matters of general interest to the University, subject to the following general conditions:

 

(i) no flysheet will be circulated which in the opinion of the Vice-Chancellor and Proctors might be defamatory or otherwise illegal;

 

(ii) the right is reserved on behalf of the University and its employees, without prior consultation with the signatories, to publish an apology in respect of any statement in a flysheet which is complained of as defamatory or otherwise illegal (whether or not the statement can be shown to be true);

(iii) the signatories shall jointly and severally indemnify the University and its employees against any costs or damages payable in respect of their flysheet and, unless a Queen's Counsel (to be mutually agreed on by the signatories and the University) shall advise within four months of the making of any claim in respect of a flysheet that any proceedings could be contested with the probability of success, such damages shall include any sum paid by the University in settlement of any claim arising out of the flysheet;

 

(iv) the flysheet shall consist of one leaf only (though text may appear on both sides of the leaf); the text shall include the name and college or department of each of the signatories;

 

(v) a copy of the text of the flysheet shall be delivered to the Registrar before 10 a.m. on the Monday of the week in which circulation is desired; it shall be accompanied by an indemnity in accordance with condition (iii) above drawn up on a form obtainable from the Registrar and signed by each of the signatories of the flysheet; the Registrar shall be informed at the same time which of the signatories is to be notified whether the Vice-Chancellor and Proctors have authorised circulation;

 

(vi) the Registrar shall arrange for the production by the University Press of copies of a flysheet the circulation of which has been duly authorised.

Though every effort will be made to circulate on the day desired flysheets so received, it must be understood that this cannot be guaranteed.

(a) Matters before Congregation or Convocation

If the flysheet deals with a matter that is a formal agendum for Congregation, or for Convocation in regard to the election of the Professor of Poetry, or the subject of a report published in the Gazette, the production costs will be met from university funds.

(b) Matters of general interest to the University

If the flysheet deals with a matter that is not a formal agendum for Congregation or the subject of a report published in the Gazette, the Vice-Chancellor will decide whether it is of sufficient general interest to warrant circulation with the Gazette; the production costs for such a flysheet will be the responsibility of the signatories.

Oxford University Student Union

The Executive and the Graduate Committee of the Oxford University Student Union may have flysheets circulated with the Gazette under the arrangements and subject to the conditions set out above, provided that:

 

(1) the number of names to be included on the flysheet under condition (iv) shall be not less than a majority of the total number of members of the Executive or the Graduate Committee of OUSU, as the case may be, and each of the persons named shall sign the indemnity required under condition (v);

 

(2) the maximum number of flysheets to be circulated as of right, whether on matters before Congregation (to be paid for by the University) or on matters of general interest to the University (to be paid for by OUSU and to be subject to the Vice-Chancellor's decision as prescribed under (b) above) shall be three per term for each of these bodies, save that the Vice-Chancellor shall have discretion to permit further flysheets.

Subject to proviso (1) above, the Executive and the Graduate Committee of OUSU may also support flysheets signed by not less than ten members of Congregation.

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EXAMINATION SCHOOLS

Visitors to the Examination Schools are asked to note that work is currently in progress on the installation of a lift in the Schools which will improve accessibility for students with disabilities.

Members of the University are asked to be as tolerant as possible of any difficulties which this work may cause.

Lectures

Contents of this section:

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SIR BASIL ZAHAROFF LECTURE 1996–7

PROFESSOR J. KRISTEVA, Université Paris 7–Denis Diderot, will deliver the Zaharoff Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 4 February, in the Taylor Institution.

Subject: `Proust, questions d'identité.'

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HUSSEY LECTURES ON THE CHURCH AND THE ARTS

Discerning the body

THE VERY REVD JOHN DRURY, Dean of Christ Church, will deliver the Hussey Lectures at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in Hilary Term in the Lecture Hall, the Taylor Institution.

6 Feb.: `The incarnation of the Word and the words.'

13 Feb.: `The isolation of the sacrifical body.'

20 Feb.: `The social body.'

27 Feb.: `Two worlds/one world.'

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O'DONNELL LECTURE IN CELTIC STUDIES 1996–7

PROFESSOR DONNCHADH Ó CORRÁIN, University College, Cork, will deliver the O'Donnell Lecture for 1996–7 at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 8 May, in the Taylorian Hall, the Taylor Institution.

Subject: `Vikings in Ireland and Britain: a reconsideration.'

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JENKINSON MEMORIAL LECTURE

DR J. SMITH, National Institute for Medical Research, will deliver a Jenkinson Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 3 February, in Lecture Theatre A, the Zoology/Psychology Building.

Subject: `How to make mesoderm: inducing signals and responding genes.'

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ANTHROPOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY

African Studies Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Thursdays in the Senior Common Room, the School of Geography.

Convener: P.O. Daley, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in Human Geography.

DR T. DOWNING
6 Feb.: `A revolution in African resource management? Towards linking climate prediction and vulnerability assessment.'

DR D. POTTS, SOAS
13 Feb.: ` "Basics are now a luxury": migrants' perceptions of ESAP's impact on rural and urban areas in Zimbabwe.'

MS C. TWYMAN, Sheffield
20 Feb.: `Community development and wildlife management in Botswana.'

DR G. MOHAN, Portsmouth
27 Feb.: `Neoliberal political theory and democratic practices in Ghana.'

DR U.E. ITE, Lancaster
6 Mar.: `Community perceptions of the Cross River National Park, Nigeria.'

MS E. ROBSON, Keele
13 Mar.: ` "Working boys and girls": children's roles within household survival in West Africa.'

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Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology

Ethnicity and Identity Seminar: the identity of cities

The following seminars will be given at 11 a.m. on Fridays in the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology. All are welcome to attend.

Conveners: S. Ardener, T. Dragadze, L. Sciama, and J. Webber.

DR P. WALEY, Leeds
31 Jan.: `Tokyo's East End: new stories, old identities—old stories, new identities.'

PROFESSOR S. WALMAN, Hull
7 Feb.: `The effect of open systems on identity.'

PROFESSOR J. CLAMMER, Japan
14 Feb.: `Identity in a city of migrants: city image and social geography in multi- ethnic Singapore.'

C. SALAMANDRA
21 Feb.: `Consuming the city: the construction of social identity in Damascus.'

C. ATKINSON, Liverpool
28 Feb.: `The Black Indian gangs of the New Orleans Mardi Gras.'

DR M. CHAPMAN, Leeds
7 Mar.: `Bradford, a Midlands city.'

F. GRIGNON, Bordeaux
14 Mar.: `Searching for the core of an African city: the Matatus of Nairobi, Kenya.'

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CLINICAL MEDICINE

Nuffield Department of Surgery: principles of immunology

The following lectures will be given at 9 a.m. on Tuesdays in the Seminar Room, the Nuffield Department of Surgery, the John Radcliffe Hospital (level 6).

DR J.M. AUSTYN
4 Feb.: `T cells.'

DR K.J. WOOD
11 Feb.: `Antigen receptors.'

DR S. MARSHALL
18 Feb.: `Clinical immunology—II.'

DR J.M. AUSTYN
25 Feb.: `B cells.'

DR J.M. AUSTYN
4 Mar.: `Cellular cytoxicity.'

DR S. MARSHALL
11 Mar.: `Clinical immunology—III.'

DR K.J. WOOD
18 Mar.: `Soluble effector mechanisms.'

DR S. MARSHALL
25 Mar.: `Clinical immunology—IV.'

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Norman Heatley Lecture in association with the Oxford Immunology Group

DR P. GOLSTEIN, Centre d'Immunologie INSERM-CNRS, Marseilles, will lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Thursday, 6 February, in the Lecture Theatre, the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology. The meeting will be chaired by Professor Herman Waldmann.

Subject: `Programmed cell death and evolution.'

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Nuffield Department of Surgery: seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Seminar Room, the Nuffield Department of Surgery, Level 6, the John Radcliffe Hospital.

A. COOKE, Cambridge
4 Feb.: `Development in insulin- dependent diabetes mellitus in NOD mice.'

P. RATCLIFFE
11 Feb.: `Oxygen sensing and vascular biology.'

A. BALLARO and B. CASADEI
18 Feb.: (A.B.) `Seasonal variation in aneurysm rupture.'
(B.C.) `Cardiac physiology of thoracoscopic sympathectomy.'

P. PHILLIPS
25 Feb.: `Vasopressin antagonism: physiological and pharmacological.'

G. LIBERTINY
4 Mar.: `Deep venous thrombosis in peripheral vascular disease.'

C. CHAN
11 Mar.: `Vascular targeting of gene therapy.'

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COMMITTEE FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY AND GENERAL LINGUISTICS

General Linguistics Graduate Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 4.45 p.m. on Fridays in the Ground Floor Lecture Room, 47 Wellington Square.

Conveners: J.T. Higginbotham, MA, Professor of General Linguistics, and G.C. Ramchand, MA, University Lecturer in General Linguistics.

MRS D. LEIGH
31 Jan.: `The confused bilinguals?'

PROFESSOR J.A.W. KAMP, Stuttgart
7 Feb.: to be announced.

PROFESSOR HIGGINBOTHAM
14 Feb.: `A plea for implicit anaphora.'

DR D. ADGER, York
28 Feb.: `Unselected embedded questions and clausal polarity types.'

DR YAN HUANG, Reading
7 Mar.: `Discourse anaphora: four theorical models.'

PROFESSOR A. GIORGI, Bergamo
14 Mar.: `Present tense and perfectivity: from semantics to morphosyntax.'

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MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

Mathematical biology and ecology seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Fridays in Lecture Room 3, the Mathematical Institute.

Conveners: Dr P.K. Maini (telephone: (2)73553, e-mail: maini@maths.ox.ac.uk), and Dr N. Monk (telephone: (2)80601, e-mail: nmonk@maths.ox.ac.uk).

P. BRESSLOFF, Loughborough
21 Feb.: `Neural pattern formation and sychronisation: the dynamical effects of dendritic structure.'

T. HÖFER, Max Planck Institute, Dresden
28 Feb.: `Patterning instabilities in primitive cell assemblies.'

P. ROHANI, Cambridge
7 Mar.: `Chaos in ecology: back from the brink?'

J. RASHBASS, Cambridge
14 Mar.: `The biological toolbox: a cell simulation environment for biologists.'

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MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

PROFESSOR S. KORD, Georgetown, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 10 March, in Room 3, the Taylor Institution.

Convener: S.J. Colvin, MA, Junior Research Fellow in German, St John's College.

 

Subject: `The curtain never rises: gender- specific censorship on the German stage.'

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MODERN HISTORY, SOCIAL STUDIES

Graduate seminar in twentieth-century British history

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in Lecture Room VII, Brasenose College.

Conveners: V.B. Bogdanor, MA, Professor of Politics, E.H.H. Green, MA, University Lecturer (CUF) in Modern History, K.O. Morgan, MA, D.Litt., Honorary Fellow, Queen's College, N.J. Owen, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer (CUF) in Politics, and J.S. Rowett, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer (CUF) in Modern History.

PROFESSOR D. MARQUAND
4 Feb.: `The wrong new world? The Attlee Government in a political economy perspective.'

G. GOODMAN, London
11 Feb.: `British industrial relations since 1945.'

PROFESSOR R. FOSTER
18 Feb.: `W.B. Yeats and the politics of nationalism before the First World War.'

PROFESSOR F. LEVENTHAL, Boston
25 Feb.: `Eric Knight's War: the campaign for Anglo-American understanding.'

PROFESSOR MORGAN
4 Mar.: `England, Britain, and the audit of war.'

DR A. MCDONALD
11 Mar.: `British public records and the modern historian; the impact of open government policy on the national archive as a resource for historians.'

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PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Astrophysics colloquia

The following colloquia will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Nuclear and Astrophysics Lecture Theatre.

Conveners: Dr M.D. Lacy and Dr A.E. Lynas- Gray.

DR V. EKE
4 Feb.: to be announced.

DR C.J. DAVIS, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies
11 Feb.: `Understanding bipolar outflows from young stars.'

DR H.J. WALKER, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory
18 Feb.: `The Darwin Space Interferometer: the search for extra-solar planets and life.'

DR L.L.R. WILLIAMS, Cambridge
25 Feb.: `Weak lensing of QSOs and the large scale structure.'

DR S. LILLY, Cambridge
4 Mar.: `The history of galaxies in the universe.'

DR K.M. GÓRSKI, Copenhagen
11 Mar.: to be announced.

PROFESSOR D.D. CLAYTON, Clemson
18 Mar.: `Placing the sun in galactic chemical evolution: mainstream SiC particles.'

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Interdepartmental Polymer Seminars

PROFESSOR P. HODGE, University of Manchester, will lecture at 4 p.m. on Thursday, 6 February, in the Lecture Theatre, the Dyson Perrins Laboratory.

Subject: `Some macromolecules of novel topology.' DR M.R. MACKLEY, Cambridge, will lecture at 4.15 p.m. on Tuesday, 18 February, in Lecture Room 3, Thom Building (sixth floor), Department of Engineering Science.

Subject: `The processing and microstructure of complex fluids including polymers, chocolate, and blood.' DR C.P. BUCKLEY, University Lecturer in Engineering Science, will lecture at 1.15 p.m. on Friday, 7 March, in Lecture Room 7, the Engineering and Technology Building (Department of Materials).

Subject: `Physically based constitutive modelling of amorphous polymers near the glass transition.'

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Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory: solid-state seminars

The following talks on the chemistry, structure, and properties of solids will be given at 11.45 a.m. on Tuesdays in the Abbot's Kitchen, the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory.

Convener: A.M. Chippindale, MA, D.Phil., Lecturer in Chemistry, Christ Church.

DR S.J. CLARKE
4 Feb.: `Recent developments in nitride chemistry.'

DR J. CZERNUSZKA
11 Feb.: `Making and breaking new bones.'

DR R.H. JONES, Keele
18 Feb.: `Uses of advanced radiation sources in structural chemistry.'

DR J.A HRILJAC, Birmingham
25 Feb.: `XRD studies of zeolite inclusion complexes.'

DR S. HALASYAMANI
4 Mar.: `Composition space: syntheses and structures of new mixed-metal compounds (Cu/Nb, Cu/W, and Cd/Nb).'

K.M. ALLEN
11 Mar.: `The chemistry of some higher fullerenes.'

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SOCIAL STUDIES

MR W. MARSDEN, Director, Americas Command, the Foreign Office, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 4 February, in the Clay Room, Nuffield College.

Convener: B.E. Shafer, MA, Andrew W. Mellon Professor of American Government.

 

Subject: `North American relations with the UK and the EU: an action agenda.'

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The political economy of transitions from command to market systems

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in Seminar Room B, the Social Studies Faculty Centre.

 

Convener: A. Chawluk, MA, Faculty Lecturer in Soviet-type Economies and their Transformation.

PROFESSOR M. SCHAFFER, Heriot-Watt
6 Feb.: `Financial discipline in the enterprise sector in transitional economies: concepts, measurement, evidence.'

PROFESSOR W. CHAREMZA, Leicester
13 Feb.: `Econometric modelling of the Polish economy: a report on first-hand experience.'

D. ALLEN, Foreign and Commonwealth Office
20 Feb.: `Privatisation and the development of state capitalism in Russia.'

DR E. SEROVA, Institute for the Economy in Transition, Moscow
27 Feb.: `Agricultural reform in the transitional Russian economy.'

MS B. GRANVILLE, Royal Institute for International Affairs, and DR J. SHAPIRO, Goldsmiths' College
6 Mar.: `The social costs of high inflation in Russia.'

PROFESSOR S. GOMULKA, LSE
13 Mar.: `Causes of output decline, sources of recovery, and prospects for growth in transitional economies.'

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OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC STUDIES

The contemporary Islamic world

The following seminars will be given at 5.15 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies.

At the request of the Centre, this notice includes details of two seminars held earlier in the term.

A. HUSSAIN, Leicester
22 Jan.: `Exploration of an Islamic movement: Hizbullah of Lebanon.'

G. KEPEL, Fondation Nationale des Sciences Politiques
29 Jan.: `Islam in France.'

M. DILLON, Durham
5 Feb.: `Muslims in post-Mao China.'

A. HYMAN, Central Asian Survey
12 Feb.: `Afghanistan: political fragmentation or stalemate.'

F. ROBINSON, Royal Holloway College, London
19 Feb.: `Religious change and the self in Muslim South Asia in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.'

S.R. SONYEL, London
5 Mar.: `The Turkish Muslims of Cyprus.'

H.T. NORRIS, SOAS
12 Mar.:`Muslim Tatars today amidst contemporary Islam and Christianity in Poland and Lithuania.'

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MAISON FRANÇAISE

Amendment to published notice

A. BESANÇON, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, will lecture at 5.15 p.m. on Wednesday, 19 February, in the Maison Française.

This replaces the notice in this term's Special Lecture List, which gives the date of the lecture as 17 February.

Subject: `L'image divine et ses ennemis.'

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SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES

Marketing research seminar

PROFESSOR R. EAST, Kingston Business School, will give a seminar at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, 4 February, in the Seminar Room, the School of Management Studies, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

Subject: `Customer loyalty: issues from empirical data analysis.'

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QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women

Work-in-progress discussion group

The Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women invites young researchers to a `work-in-progress discussion group' with an emphasis on social sciences and development topics. This is intended as a very informal `brainstorm' and experience-swapping session to help those researching gender at all levels solve practical and theoretical problems.

The first meeting will take place at 5 p.m. on Monday, 10 February, in Queen Elizabeth House. Everyone is welcome to attend. For further details, telephone Oxford (2)73644.

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CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES

J. HASKEY, National Statistical Office, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 5 February, in the Library, the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies.

Subject: `The records: what can we learn about the impact of implementation from marriage and divorce statistics.'

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WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE

Aspects of general practice

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the Wellcome Unit, 47 Banbury Road.

Conveners: M.J. Dobson, MA, D.Phil., Senior Research Officer, the Wellcome Unit, and J.E. Lewis, MA, Professor of the History of Medicine and Director, the Wellcome Unit.

 

PROFESSOR R. FOX
6 Feb.: `Doctors without borders and doctors of the world.'

PROFESSOR LEWIS
13 Feb.: `GPs and the GP contract in the post-war period.'

M. MARINKER, United Medical and Dental Schools, London
20 Feb.: `Changing concepts of illness in general practice.'

J. HORDER, Centre for the Advancement of Interprofessional Education, London
27 Feb.: `International comparisons in primary care.'

N. WHITESIDE, Bristol
6 Mar.: `National Health Insurance in Great Britain: why the scheme failed (1912–46).'

S. GRAHAM-JONES
13 Mar.: `General practice in the NHS: was there a golden age for doctors and patients?'

 

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Conference: German medical war crimes, medical ethics, and post-war justice

This symposium, to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the Nuremberg Medical Trial, will be held on Friday, 14 March, in Linacre College. Those wishing to attend should contact Dr Paul Weindling (telephone: Oxford (2)74603).

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ALL SOULS COLLEGE

Seminar series: `Force' The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Old Library, All Souls College.

Conveners: Dr R.R. Smith, All Souls College, and Ms Clare Connors, St Cross College.

DR SMITH
4 Feb.: `Memento mori.'

D. LEE
11 Feb.: `Identifying the body: the force of a writer's death.'

F. JENKINS, Essex
18 Feb.: `Unstable identities: Nietzsche and the force of art and language.'

T. CLARK, Durham
25 Feb.: `Literary force: institutional values.'

L. RAINFORD
4 Mar.: `Kierkegaard and the force of irony.'

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BALLIOL COLLEGE

Special lecture to commemorate the memory of Adam von Trott

PROFESSOR JOACHIM FEST will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 25 February, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `The unnoticed Resistance.'

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GREEN COLLEGE

Green College Lectures 1997

The shape of things to come

The Green College Lectures will be given at 6 p.m. on Mondays in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

PROFESSOR J. GRAY
3 Feb.: `The future of human society.'

BRIAN ALDISS
10 Feb.: `Inventing the future: Utopia or Dystopia.'

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KELLOGG COLLEGE

Research seminars: current issues in professional education

DR P. DAVIES will give a seminar at 5.30 p.m. on Friday, 21 February, in the Sadler Room, Kellogg College.

Subject: `Problem-based learning and evidence-based health care.'

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OXFORD SIGNALLING GROUP

A. MORRIS, Department of Pharmacology, Stony Brook, New York, will lecture at 5.45 p.m. on Thursday, 13 February, in the Department of Pharmacology.

Subject: `Structure, regulation, and function of yeast and mammalian phospholipase D enzymes.'

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FRIENDS OF THE PITT RIVERS MUSEUM

The following lectures will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Pauling Human Sciences Centre, 58 Banbury Road.

Visitors are welcome, but are asked to make a contribution to the Friends' purchasing fund.

P. HARRIS, photo-journalist
12 Feb.: `The colours of India—east to west.'

PROFESSOR G. BROTHERSTON, Essex
12 Mar.: `Painted books of ancient Mexico—recent discoveries.'

B. LEAR, research student in anthropology
9 Apr.: `Lifting the lid off Tuluma boxes: the material culture of the Pacific atoll environment.'

 

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Grants and Research Funding

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CHAIRMEN OF EXAMINERS

HILARY TERM AND APRIL 1997

Preliminary Examination

Oriental Studies: C.J. KERSLAKE, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Antony's (address: Oriental Institute)

Bachelor of Fine Art

Final Examination: B.D. CATLING, MA, Fellow of Linacre (address: Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art)

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TRINITY TERM 1997

Honour Moderations

Biological Sciences: R.H. MCCLEERY, MA, D.PHIL., Wadham (address: Department of Zoology)

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Master of Philosophy

Economics: S. ANAND, B.PHIL., MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Catherine's

Economics (first-year examination): S. ANAND, B.PHIL., MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Catherine's

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Master of Studies

Byzantine Studies: M.C. MANGO, D.PHIL., Fellow of St John's (address Institute of Archaeology)

Oriental Studies: S.P. BROCK, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Wolfson (address: Oriental Institute)

Syriac Studies: S.P. BROCK, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Wolfson (address: Oriental Institute)

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SCHEDULES OF LECTURES FOR TRINITY TERM 1997

Under the provisions of the relevant decree (Ch. II, Sect. vii, § 4, in Statutes, 1995, p. 238), the date by which Professors, Readers, University Lecturers, and Heads of Societies, are required to send to the Secretary of Faculties, University Offices, Wellington Square, their schedules of lectures or courses for the ensuing term, has been fixed as Friday, 7 February 1997.

Attention is drawn to the provisions of the decree, and particularly to the fact that the Lecture Lists compiled from these schedules, and any subsequent changes therein, require approval by or on behalf of the faculty board or other body concerned. Schedules received after the above date may be too late for inclusion in the Lecture Lists.

UNIVERSITY OFFICES                             P.M. NORTH
27 January 1997                          Vice-Chancellor


Full Term begins on Sunday, 27 April.


Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores

The Board of the Faculty recommends that lectures should be given at the following hours:

Monday       9      Greek History/Latin Literature
            10      Philosophy
            11      Roman History/Greek Literature
            12      Archaeology/Philosophy
            5–7    Free

Tuesday      9      Archaeology
            10      Philosophy
            11      Literature
            12      History
            5–7    Free

Wednesday    9      Roman History/Greek Literature
            10      Philosophy
            11      Latin Literature/Greek History
            12      Archaeology/Philosophy
            5–7    Free

Thursday     9      Literature
            10      Philosophy
            11      Greek History/Latin Literature
            12      Archaeology
            5–7    Free

Friday       9      History
            10      Philosophy
            11      Roman History/Greek Literature
            12      Archaeology/Philosophy
            5–7    Free

Sub-faculty of Languages and Literature

It is recommended that lectures for Honour Moderations should be given at the following hours whenever possible:

Homer               11 (Wednesdays, Fridays)
Virgil              11 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
Greek Authors       12 (Mondays, Wednesdays)
Latin Authors       11 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
Language Papers     10 (Fridays)
A                   11 (Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, TT;      
                     Mondays, Wednesdays, MT, HT)
C                   10 (Mondays, Wednesdays)
D                   10 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
E                   12
F                   12 (Tuesdays, Thursdays, HT, TT);
                    11 and 12 (Tuesdays, Thursdays, MT)

Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages

Timetable of introductory or survey lectures

The Board of the Faculty recommends that lectures should be given at the following hours:

Monday      10      French
            11      German
            12      German
Tuesday      9      Italian
            10      Spanish
            11      Italian 
            12      Spanish
Wednesday    9      Russian
            10      French
            11      Linguistics
            12      Linguistics
Thursday     9      Spanish
            10      Russian
            11      Russian
            12      Italian
Friday      10      French
            11      German
            12      Linguistics

Board of the Faculty of Social Studies

The Board of the Faculty recommends that:

(a) lectures for the Preliminary Examination for Philosophy, Politics, and Economics should be given at the following times:

Politics    10
Economics   11
Philosophy  12 noon (or a 10 o'clock period not occupied by    
            Politics);

(b) courses of introductory lectures and lectures on compulsory subjects for undergraduates in their first three or four terms of work for the Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics should normally be given at the following times:

Politics    12 
Economics   11
Philosophy  10

Board of the Faculty of Theology

To avoid clashes with Philosophy lectures members of the faculty are asked not to offer Theology lectures of interest to those reading for the Joint Honour School of Philosophy and Theology at the following times:

Preliminary Examination

Monday to Saturday 12

Honour School

Monday 10 and 12
Tuesday 10
Wednesday 10 and 12
Thursday 10
Friday 10 and 12
Saturday 10

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SPECIAL LECTURE LIST

Trinity Term 1997

The Special Lecture List for Trinity Term 1997 will appear shortly before term, at the same time as the ordinary Lecture Lists. It will include all lectures appearing in the Gazette this term and also lectures of which details are sent to the Secretary of Faculties specifically for this purpose by 20 March 1997.

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties will come into effect on 14 February.

1 Board of the Faculty of Modern History

Honour School of Modern History

(i) With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 316, after l. 23 insert:

`23. War and reconstruction: ideas and politics and social change 1939–45.'.

2 Ibid., p. 330, delete l. 16 and substitute:

`J.A. Hobson, Imperialism: a study (3rd edn., 1968) pp. 28–109; 113–52; 285–327.

Edward Said, Orientalism (pbk. edn., 1985) pp. 1–28; 31–110; 149–197.'.

3 Ibid., p. 365, after l. 14 insert:

`23. WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION: IDEAS, POLITICS AND SOCIAL CHANGE 1939–45

Proposed Documents and Prescribed Further Reading

1. Unpublished archives

Cabinet papers (CAB 87/77), War Cabinet. Interdepartmental Committee on Social Insurance and Allied Services, minutes of 6 May 1942, evidence of the TUC, 53 pp., and minutes of 2 June 1942, evidence of Family Endowment Society, 24 pp. (Public Record Office).

Conservative Party Archive CRD 600/01 `Report on the Beveridge Proposals' (1943) and Covering Note, 20 + 2 pp.: and 600/03 `Looking Ahead: a Policy for Housing in England and Wales', March 1994, 16 pp. (Bodleian Library).

Mass Observation Archive, files 1538 and 1565 (extracts). Popular reaction to the Beveridge Report (Dec. 1942 and Jan. 1943) (University of Sussex).

Nuffield College Social Reconstruction Survey: Minutes of Conference, 4 to 5 October 1941, 19 pp. (Nuffield College library).

2. Parliamentary Debates

HCDeb. Vol. 386, cols. 1614–1694, 1766–1916, 1964–2054 (Feb. 1943).

3. Newspapers

Picture Post, 14 Jan. 1941.

4. Official Reports and Government Publications

Curriculum and Examinations in Secondary Schools (Norwood Report, 1941), pp. vii–ix, 1–25.

Royal Commission on the Distribution of the Industrial Population (Barlow Report, Cmnd. 6153, 1940) pp. 3–50, 116–19, 185–232. Committee on Land Utilisation in Rural Areas (Scott Report, Cmnd., 6378, 1942), pp. 33–8, 45–75, 89–123.

Expert Committee on Compensation and Betterment (Uthwatt Report, Cmnd. 6386, 1942), pp. 4–30, 156–70. Social Insurance and Allied Services (Beveridge Report, Cmnd. 6404, 1942), pp. 2–20, 154–72.

The Public Schools and the General Educational System (Fleming Report, 1944), pp. 35–105.

Employment Policy (Cmd. 6527, 1944), pp. 3–31.

Family Allowances. Memorandum by the Chancellor of the Exchequer (1944), pp. 51–61.

5. Art and Film: Representations of War and Reconstruction

Listening to Britain: A Jennings Trilogy

Keeping the Wheels Turning: Women and Children at War 1939–45

M.R.D. Foot, Art and War: Twentieth-Century Warfare as Depicted by War Artists, colour plates 23–6, 37; black- and-white plates 119–24, 128–38.

S. Sillars, British Romantic Art and the Second World War, plates 4 to 12.

P. Stansky and W. Abrahams, London's Burning, Life, Death and Art in the Second World War (1994), colour plates between pp. 50 and 51.

J. Darracott and B. Loftus, Second World War Posters (1972), plates on pp. 18–21, 24–5, 27–34, 39, 42, 44–6, 48, 53–5, 59, 61–72.

6. Contemporary Books, Pamphlets, Private Reports and other published works

Abercrombie, P., Greater London Plan, 1944 (1945), pp. 1–221.

Benn, E., Hard Times Ahead (1942), pp. 2–27.

Beveridge, W.H., Full Employment in a Free Society (1944), pp. 242–74.

Bondfield, M., Our Towns: A Close Up (1943), pp. xi–xx, 1–111.

British Medical Association, Draft Interim Report of the Medical Planning Committee (1942).

Burt, C., `Ability and Income', British J. of Educational Psychology (June 1943), pp. 83–98.

Chuter Ede, J., Labour and the Wartime Coalition: from the Diary of James Chuter Ede 1941–5 (ed. K. Jeffreys), pp. 105–49.

Cole, G.D.H., and A. Bevan, et al., Plan for Britain (1943), pp. 1–127.

Conservative Women's Reform Group, When Peace Comes (1945), pp. 3–12.

Durbin, E.F.M., The Politics of Democratic Socialism: An Essay on Social Policy (1940), pp. 63–72, 235–354.

Eliot, T.S., The Idea of a Christian Society, pp. 5–99.

Hayek, F., The Road to Serfdom (1943), pp. 1–148.

Lester Smith, W., To Whom do Schools belong? (1942), pp. 9–39, 76–115, 139–90.

Keynes, J.M., Collected Writings, vol. XXIII, pp. 40–155; vol. XXVII, pp. 203–63; vol. XXVIII, p. 264–419.

Labour Party, report of Special Conference on the Beveridge Report (1943), pp. 20–6.

Liberal Publications Department, Family Allowances and Social Security: Lady Rhys-Williams Scheme (1944), pp. 2–23.

K. Mannheim, `Towards a new Social Philosophy', in Diagnosis of Our Time (1943), pp. 100–67, 172–3.

McAllister, G. and E.G., Homes, Towns and Countryside (1945), pp. 1–66, 100–119.

Rathbone, E., The Case for the Immediate Introduction of a System of Family Allowances (1940), pp. 13–106.

Saxton, C. Clive, Beveridge Report Criticised (1943), pp. 1–32. Socialist Party of Great Britain, Family Allowances: a Socialist Analysis (1944), pp. 1–8.

Temple, William, Christianity and the Social Order, pp. 7–23, 62–90.

Williams, J. Rhys, Something to Look Forward To (1943), pp. 138–208.

Woolton, Lord, The Adventures of Reconstruction (1945), pp. 1–120. Barbara Wootton, Freedom under Planning (1945), pp. 9–157.

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7. Recommended Further Sources

E. Abbott and K. Bompas, The Woman Citizen and Social Security: A Criticism of Proposals in the Beveridge Report as they affect Women (1943).

Benn, E., Murmurings of an Individualist.

Bowen, E., The Heat of the Day (1948).

Hartley, H. (ed.), Hearts Undefeated. Women's Writing of the Second World War (1994).

McAllister, G. and E.G., Town and Country Planning (1941).

Orwell, G., The Collected Essays. Journalism and Letters (ed. S. Orwell and I. Angus, 1968). Vol. 2, My Country Right or Left 1940–3; Vol. 3, As I Please 1944–5.

A. Ross, Colours of War. War Art 1939–45 (1983).

Sheridan, D. (ed.), Wartime Women (1990).

Sinclair, A. (ed.), The War Decade. An Anthology of the 1940s (1989).

Smith, H.L., Documents in Contemporary History, Britain in the Second World War: A Social History (1996).

Titmuss, K. and R., Parents Revolt (1942).'

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 322, l. 15, delete `the whole' and substitute `portrait, title page and pp. 1–14'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 18–19.

3 Ibid., delete l. 23.

4 Ibid., delete ll. 25–30.

5 Ibid., l. 32, delete `4,' and `23,'.

6 Ibid., l. 33, delete `14, 19, 21,'.

7 Ibid., l. 34, delete `10, 11,', `27,' and `51'.

8 Ibid., delete l. 35 and substitute `Section IV, nos. 12, 13, 21, 31, 33, 37, 38, 45, 46, 50,'.

9 Ibid., l. 37, delete `21,'.

10 Ibid., delete l. 38 and substitute `Section VI, nos. 16–18, 51, 55, 60.' 11 Ibid., l. 39, delete `2', `14'.

12 Ibid., after l. 41, insert:

`K.J. Allison, `An Elizabethan Village Census', Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research, xxxvi (1963), pp. 95–103.

The Inhabitants of Bristol in 1696, ed. E. Ralph and M.E. Williams (Bristol Record Soc., 25, 1968), pp. 1–4, 52–96.

Poverty in Early-Stuart Salisbury, ed. Paul Slack (Wiltshire Record Soc., 31, 1975), pp. 65–82.

E.R.C. Brinkworth, Shakespeare and the Bawdy Court of Stratford (London and Chichester, 1972), pp. 147–74.

County of Middlesex Calendar to The Sessions Records, ed. W. Le Hardy, new ser., 4 vols. (London, 1935–41), vol. i, pp. 87–116.

Depositions from the Castle of York Relating to Offences committed in the Northern Counties in the Seventeenth Century, ed. James Raine (Surtees Soc., 40, 1861), the whole.

Sir Robert Filmer, An Advertisement to the Jury-men of England, Touching Witches (London, 1653), the whole.

C. L'Estrange Ewen, Witch Hunting and Witch Trials (London, 1929), Appendix VI, pp. 291–313.

`A. Dyurnall . . . [by] Adam Eyre', in Yorkshire Diaries and Autobiographies of The Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries, ed. H.J. Morehouse (Surtees Soc., 65, 1877 for 1875), pp. 1–118.

The Journal of William Schellinks' Travels in England, 1661–1663, ed. and trans. Maurice Exwood and H.L. Lehmann

(Camden Soc., 5th ser., 1, 1993), pp. 31–181.

Richard Gough, Antiquities and Memoirs of the Parish of Myddle, County of Salop . . . A.D. 1700 (Shrewsbury, 1875; or ed. David Hey, Penguin, 1981), the whole.'

13 Ibid., p. 333, delete ll. 33–46 and insert:

`The following texts are prescribed for detailed study and candidates will be required to answer one or more questions related to these texts.

Aquinas, Summa Theologiae, Ia. 92, 96, 103 (Blackfriars edn., vols. xiii, pp. 35–47, 123–35; xiv, pp. 3–33); IaIIae. 21, 85 arts 1 and 2, 90–7 (Blackfriars edn., vols. xviii, pp. 105–19; xxvi, pp. 79–89; xxviii, passim); IIaIIae. 3 arts 10, 11, 40, 57–8, 60, 104 (Blackfriars edn., vols. xxxii, pp. 39–95; xxxv, pp. 81–93; xxxvii, pp. 3–53, 67–85; xli, pp. 47–73).

Marsilius of Padua, The Defender of Peace, trans. A. Gewirth (New York, 1956; reprint Toronto, 1980).

Machiavelli, The Prince, ed. Q.R.D. Skinner and R. Price (Cambridge, 1988); Discourses on Livy, trans. S.J. Walker, rev. Brian Richardson (Penguin, 1970).

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Further Texts

Candidates will be required to show a good general knowledge of the subject. The following texts are recommended for study and candidates will be expected to refer to them whenever appropriate.

John of Salisbury, Policraticus, trans. C. Nederman (Cambridge, 1990).

Giles of Rome, On Ecclesiastical Power, trans. R.W. Dyson (Woodbridge, 1986).

John of Paris, On Royal and Papal Power, trans. J.A. Watt (Toronto, 1972).

James of Viterbo, On Christian Government, trans. R.W. Dyson (Woodbridge, 1995).

Dante, On Monarchy, ed. P. Shaw (Cambridge, 1995).

Bartolus of Sassoferrato, `On Tyranny'; `On Guelfs and Ghibellines'; `On City Government' [typescript translations available from the History Faculty Library].

William of Ockham, A letter to the Friars Minor and Other Writings, ed. J. Kilcullen and A.S. McGrade (Cambridge, 1995).

Texts by Petrarch, Leonardo Bruni, and Poggio Bracciolini, in The Earthly Republic, ed. B.G. Khol and R.G. Witt (Manchester, 1978), pp. 35–78, 135–75, 231–89.

More, Utopia, either ed. M. Surtz and J.H. Hexter (New Haven, Conn., 1965); or ed. G.M. Logan, R.M. Adams and C.H. Miller (Cambridge, 1995).

Guicciardini, Dialogue on the Government of Florence, trans. A. Brown (Cambridge, 1994).'

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2 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and England Language and Literature

Honour School of Modern History and English

(i) With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 376, delete ll. 44–6 and substitute:

`A thesis may be offered as under the existing regulations of the Modern History syllabus in lieu of any one of the following papers: a paper in the History of the British Isles, or a paper on a period of General History; or a Further Subject paper; or a Special Subject paper (b). In addition, an optional thesis may also be offered as under the regulations of the Modern History syllabus, provided that no more than one thesis can be submitted if extended essays are offered.'

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 1 (i) above).

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(iii) With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 1 (ii) above).

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3 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Literae Humaniores

Honour School of Ancient and Modern History

(i) With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 1 (i) above).

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 1 (ii) above).

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4 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Modern Languages

Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

(i) With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 382, delete l. 19 and substitute: `No candidate may offer a period of British History which he or she has already'.

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 1 (i) above).

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(iii) With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 1 (ii) above).

5 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Social Studies

Honour School of Modern History and Economics

(i) With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 1 (i) above).

(ii) With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 1 (ii) above).

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Clinical Medicine

M.A. BREEN, Green College: `Molecular characterisation of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase of human Islets of Langerhans'.
Diabetes Research Laboratories, Wednesday, 12 February, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: R.C. Turner, S.J. Hughes.

R. NEWTON, Green College: `The epidemiology of HIV- associated cancers'.
Green College, Tuesday, 4 February, 2 p.m.
Examiners: L.J. Kinlen, P.G. Smith.

 

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Mathematical Sciences

A. PECK, Magdalen: `On the difference between consecutive primes'.
Mathematical Institute, Tuesday, 18 February, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: G. Harman, B.J. Birch.

N. SPARKS, Wolfson: `Studies in logic and the theory of Banach spaces'.
Mathematical Institute, Tuesday, 11 March, 2 p.m.
Examiners: A.J. Macintyre, W.T. Gowers.

 

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Oriental Studies

J. TATELMAN, Wolfson: `A critical edition, annotated translation, and study of Bhadrakalpavadana II–V'.
Oriental Institute, Monday, 10 February, 10 a.m.
Examiners: M. Hahn, R.F. Gombrich.

 

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Physical Sciences

SIEW-LI KOK-WILES, Brasenose: `Comparing mammogram pairs in the detection of mammographic lesions'.
Department of Engineering Science, Wednesday, 26 March, 10 a.m.
Examiners: J.A. Noble, E. Claridge.

HUI LU, Corpus Christi: `Studies of protein folding and unfolding using NMR and optical methods'.
Corpus Christi, Wednesday, 5 February, 2 p.m.
Examiners: P.A. Evans, P.J. Hore.

M. SEAMAN, St John's: `Computational models of structure and dynamics'.
Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Tuesday, 18 March, 2 p.m.
Examiners: R. Dupree, W.G. Richards.

 

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Psychological Studies

H.J. LEEVERS, New College: `Children's logical reasoning'.
Department of Experimental Psychology, Tuesday, 11 February, 2 p.m.
Examiners: P.E. Bryant, J. Russell.

 

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Social Studies

S. COOK, Wadham: `Essays on macroeconometric modelling with reference to consumers' expenditure'.
Nuffield, Tuesday, 20 February, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: G.E. Mizon, S. Wren Lewis.

J.A. JACKSON PREECE, University: `The international status of national minorities in the European nation-states system 1919–95'.
Soc St Faculty Centre, Tuesday, 11 March, 10.30 a.m.
Examiners: J.B.L. Mayall, E.A. Roberts.

H.E. RUSSELL, Nuffield: `Women's experience of unemployment: a study of British women in the 1980s'.
Nuffield, Wednesday, 12 February, 4.30 p.m.
Examiners: S. Arber, G. Marshall.

 

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EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE

The examiners appointed by the following faculty board give notice of oral examination of their candidate as follows:

Biological Sciences

B.E. MOFFATT, Green College: `Characteristics of human complement. Factor H and A comparison with factor H-like proteins in other species'.
Department of Biochemistry, Friday, 21 February, 2 p.m.
Examiners: A.J. Day, M.P. Esnouf.

 

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Colleges, Halls, and Societies

Contents of this section:

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OBITUARIES

Somerville College

BARBARA BURGESS, MA, née Smith, 19 November 1996; commoner 1943–7. Aged 72.

BEATRICE DEAYTON, MA, July 1996; commoner 1928–31. Aged 86.

EDITH GUNN, BA (née Turner), 22 December 1996; commoner 1928–9 and 1930–2. Aged 86.

JEAN HAZEL HICK, MA (née Bowers), September 1996; commoner 1944–7. Aged 70.

CRYSTAL HOLME, BA, March 1996; commoner 1932–4. Aged 81.

PENELOPE JESSEL, MA (née Blackwell), 2 December 1996; scholar 1937–9, ASM President 1991–4. Aged 79.

MIRIAM VIOLET LOVELOCK, MA, 22 October 1996; scholar 1926–9. Aged 89.

SUSANNA JANE MARSH, MA, 14 August 1996; Bousfield Scholar 1968–72. Aged 46.

MILDRED TAYLOR (née Hartley), 15 December 1996; Tutor in Classics 1934–65, Fellow and member of Council 1936–65, Emeritus Fellow 1965–96. Aged 92.

BARBARA WHEELER, MA (née Miles), 1 October 1996; commoner 1944–7. Aged 71.

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ELECTION

Kellogg College

To an Honorary Fellowship:

DAVID GEORGE VAISEY, CBE, MA, Professorial Fellow, Exeter College; Bodley's Librarian and Keeper of the University Archives 1986–96

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NOTICES

Keble College

Douglas Price Non-Stipendiary Research Fellowship

The college proposes to elect a non-stipendiary Research Fellow for a period of two years, renewable to a maximum of three, with effect from 1 October 1997. The fellowship is restricted to arts subjects. The fellow will be a member of the senior common room and will be entitled to lunch and dinner at the common table as well as an allowance for books and research; a room in college, if necessary on a shared basis, will be available if no such room is provided elsewhere in the University. Candidates should submit a curriculum vitae, a statement of research, and the names of two referees to the Warden's Secretary, Keble College, Oxford OX1 3PG, from whom further particulars may be obtained. The closing date for applications is Friday, 28 February. Candidates should ask their referees to write directly to the Warden by this date.

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Liddon Non-Stipendiary Junior Research Fellowship in Theology

The college proposes to appoint a suitably qualified candidate to a non-stipendiary Liddon Junior Research Fellowship in Theology for two years from 1 October 1997. The fellow will be a member of the senior common room and will be entitled to lunch and dinner at the common table, as well as a book allowance. Candidates should submit a curriculum vitae, a statement of research, and the names of two referees to the Warden's Secretary, Keble College, Oxford OX1 3PG, from whom further particulars may be obtained. The closing date for applications is Friday, 28 February. Candidates should ask their referees to write directly to the Warden by this date.

Keble College is an equal opportunities employer.

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Oriel College

Appointment of Secretary to the Provost

The college invites applications for the post of secretary to the Provost. The primary duties will be those of a private secretary, but the person appointed will be expected to assist the College Secretary in the more general duties of the College Office.

The applicant should be a good communicator and be proficient at word-processing, shorthand, and other secretarial skills. The post requires someone prepared to work with a high degree of confidentiality, using initiative and discretion.

The salary will be based on the university clerical and library scales for a thirty-five hour week, starting in the range £11,087–£11,406 per annum, depending on experience. The normal hours of work are 9 a.m.–5 p.m.; generous holidays are allowed.

Further information can be obtained from the College Secretary, Oriel College, Oxford OX1 4EW (telephone: Oxford (2)76543) to whom applications, with a current curriculum vitae and including the names and addresses of two referees, should be sent to arrive by Friday, 7 February. Oriel College is an equal opportunities employer.

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St Cross College

Graduate Scholarships 1997–8

St Cross College offers the following scholarships for which it invites applications from students who will be studying for a postgraduate degree in the University in the academic year 1997–8.

Two Paula Soans O'Brian Scholarships, unrestricted in subject area, with a value of £1,675 per annum, normally tenable for between one and three years coterminous with college fee liability though consideration will be given to doctoral candidates in their fourth year for that year alone. Applications should be received by 17 March. It is intended to hold interviews on 16 May.

One Unilever Scholarship in the Sciences, with a value of £1,675 per annum, tenable for between one and three years coterminous with college fee liability. Preference will be given to study for degrees in engineering or biochemistry. Applications should be received by 17 March. It is intended to hold interviews on 23 May.

Scholarships are awarded only after interview. Only in the most exceptional circumstances is the college able to pay travel expenses for interview.

Any candidates unsuccessful in their application for a scholarship may, if they wish, be considered for normal membership of the college.

Enquiries about the procedures for applying for a scholarship and requests for application forms should be sent to the Tutor for Admissions, St Cross College, Oxford OX1 3LZ.

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St Hilda's College

McIlrath Research Fellowship

St Hilda's College proposes to make an election to a non-stipendiary McIlrath Research Fellowship from 1 October 1997, tenable for up to two years in the first instance, and possibly renewable for a further year. The fellowship is open to women graduates from the United Kingdom, Eire, or the Commonwealth. The fellow will be offered free meals in college and a research allowance of £500 a year. The college statutes, made under the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923, provide that all fellows must be women.

There is no restriction on subject, but candidates will be expected to pursue research at postdoctoral level and to be assured of adequate funding for the duration of their research fellowship.

The McIlrath Fellowship could be combined with the stipendiary lecturerships currently being advertised in Biochemistry or Chemistry. For application details, see below.

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Stipendiary Lecturership in Biochemistry

The college proposes to appoint a Stipendiary Lecturer to teach four hours a week in Biochemistry for one year from 1 October 1997, with the possibility of renewal for a second year. The lecturer will be responsible for the teaching of Biochemistry to undergraduates reading for the Final Honour School of Biochemistry.

The person appointed will be paid on the stipendiary lecturers' scale, at present between £4,772 and £6,098 per annum (under review) for a four-hour lecturership. The post, which is open to both men and women, would be suitable for a postdoctoral applicant who already has laboratory funding at Oxford. For application details, see below.

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Stipendiary Lecturership in Organic Chemistry

The college proposes to appoint a Stipendiary Lecturer to teach four to six hours a week in Organic Chemistry for one year from 1 October 1997. The lecturer will be responsible for the teaching of Organic Chemistry to undergraduates reading for the Final Honour School of Chemistry and for the Biochemistry Prelim.

The person appointed will be paid on the stipendiary lecturers' scale, at present between £4,772 and £6,098 per annum (under review) for a four-hour lecturership. The post, which is open to both men and women, would be suitable for a postdoctoral applicant who already has laboratory funding at Oxford. For application details, see below.

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Stipendiary Lecturership in the Use of Statistical Computer Packages and Experimental Design in the Biological Sciences

The college proposes to appoint a Stipendiary Lecturer to teach for four hours a week for one year from 1 October 1997, with the possibility of renewal for a second year. The lecturer will be involved in teaching undergraduates reading Experimental Psychology and the Biological Sciences.

The person appointed will be paid on the stipendiary lecturers' scale, at present between £4,772 and £6,098 per annum (under review) for a four-hour lecturership. The post is open to both men and women. Further particulars for all of the above posts should be obtained from the College Office, St Hilda's College, Oxford OX4 1DY (telephone: Oxford (2)76815), and applications (six copies, or one only from candidates overseas) should be sent to the College Secretary by 28 February. Appli-cants should also ask two referees to write directly to the Principal of St Hilda's by this date.

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Wolfson College

Non-stipendiary Junior Research Fellowships 1997

The college proposes to elect up to twelve non-stipendiary Junior Research Fellows, without limitation of subject, for two years in the first instance (renewable for not more than one further two-year period), from 1 October 1997. For details and an application form see below.

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Stipendiary Junior Research Fellowship in Humanities (Oriental and African Studies) 1997

Applications are invited from men and women, preferably under thirty, for a Junior Research Fellowship in Humanities (Oriental and African Studies)—-language, literature, art, music (India excluded). The fellowship will be tenable for three years from 1 October 1997, at an annual stipend of £9,797 plus any general percentage increase in academic salaries that may come into effect, together with single accommodation (or an allowance in lieu) and common table meals. For details and an application form see below.

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Stipendiary Junior Research Fellowship in Indology 1997

Applications are invited from men and women, preferably under thirty, for a Stipendiary Junior Research Fellowship in Indology. Indology will be understood as the study of the history, languages, literature, philosophy, science, religion, music, art or culture of the Indian sub- continent through the medium of one or more oriental language, ancient or modern. Candidates will be expected to be competent in any language necessary for the conduct of original research in their chosen field. The fellowship will be tenable for three years from 1 October 1997, at an annual stipend of £9,797 plus any general percentage increase in academic salaries that may come into effect, together with single accommodation (or an allowance in lieu) and common table meals. For details and an application form see below.

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Stipendiary Junior Research Fellowship in History and/or Philosophy of Mathematics 1997

Applications are invited from men and women, preferably under thirty, for the above Junior Research Fellowship, tenable for three years from 1 October 1997, at an annual stipend of £9,797 plus any general percentage increase in academic salaries that may come into effect, together with single accommodation (or an allowance in lieu) and common table meals. For details and an application form see below.

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Hornik Stipendiary Junior Research Fellowship in Intellectual History 1997

Applications are invited from men and women, preferably under thirty, for the Hornik Stipendiary Junior Research Fellowship in Intellectual History (the history of ideas in Europe in the period from the Middle Ages to the present). The fellowship will be tenable for three years from 1 October 1997, at an annual stipend of £9,797 plus any general percentage increase in academic salaries that may come into effect, together with single accommodation (or an allowance in lieu) and common table meals. For details and an application form see below.

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Charter Fellowships in Humanities and Social Sciences 1997—8

Wolfson College offers two Charter Fellowships, to be chosen from the above subjects. Applications are invitedfrom persons holding a university lecturership (or comparable position) in the UK or abroad. Fellows will be expected to carry out research in Oxford for at least one university term, but may hold the fellowship for up to an academic year in all. Fellowships carry no stipend, but the college will make available up to £1,200 towards the expenses of each fellow. College accommodation at the normal rent may be available. For details and an application form see below.

The closing date for applications for all the above fellowships is 24 March. For further details and an application form send a self-addressed envelope (including addresses in the University Messenger area), stamped for UK residents, specifying for which fellowships you would like information, to the President's Secretary, Wolfson College, Oxford OX2 6UD.

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Worcester College

Sackler Research Fellowship

In association with the Ashmolean Museum

Applications are invited for the Sackler Research Fellowship at Worcester College. The fellowship, which is tenable for two years from 1 October 1997, is to be held in the Heberden Coin Room in the Ashmolean Museum. The Sackler Fellow will be expected to undertake one of the following projects: either to prepare two volumes of the Oxford Catalogue of Islamic Coinage, for which the candidate will be expected to have an established competence in numismatics and monetary history; or to work on Roman Provincial Coinage (a major international publication project), for which the candidate would be expected to have considerable experience of research on the coinages of the Roman East. Stipend £12,100 plus lunching and dining rights in college. Application forms and further particulars are obtainable from the Director's Secretary, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford OX1 2PH. The closing date is 21 February.

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Advertisements

Contents of this section:


How to advertise in the Gazette

Terms and conditions of acceptance of advertisements

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Bodleian Shop

Bodleian Shop: you will find many bargains and special prices during Jan. and Feb., and, of course, all our popular stock items such as the Bodleian Bookrest, the `Opie' jolly jotter-pads, and the Shakespeare note pad. Note: reduced opening hours from Jan. until the end of Mar.: Mon.--Fri. 9 a.m.--5 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.--12.30 p.m.

Tuition Offered

French and Spanish tuition offered at all levels—beginners, GCSE, or A level. Sympathetic and well-qualified tutor in North Oxford. Barrington. Tel.: Oxford 316792.

English language. Academic writing, grammar, pronunciation, etc., flexible timetables including evenings, Saturdays. Conversation hour, Cambridge exams., general English are best value in Oxford. Writing up? Private tuition available with experienced tutors. Free test/advice from the Director of Studies Mon.--Fri. 1--5 p.m. Oxford Language Training, 9 Blue Boar Street (off St Aldate's by Christ Church), Oxford. Tel. Oxford 205077, e-mail: OLT@dial.pipex.com.

 

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Services Offered

Psychotherapy and counselling available through the Oxford Centre for Human Relations with qualified practitioners. Low-cost service (£5–£15 per hour's session) also available with trainees and graduates under supervision. There is no waiting list. Tel.: Oxford 202775 (OCHRe), 510362 (Nick Owen), or 01926 311356 (Margaret Godwin).

Town and Country Trees: professional tree surgery, orchard and shrub pruning, planting, and hedges. Quality work at competitive prices. Fully insured. Locally based. For a free quotation, please call Paul Hodkinson. Tel.: 01993 811115.

Tax advice and accounts preparation. Ex-KPMG Chartered Accountant specialises in assisting academics and other professionals with their tax affairs, including self-assessment. Tax returns from £125, accounts from £150. Convenient North Oxford premises with parking. Tel.: Oxford 513381, fax: 558064.

Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press---the University Printers: specialising in booklet and publicity material, typesetting, printing, and finishing; Output Bureau provides high-quality output from disk from all major DTP programs onto paper, bromide, colour-separated positive or negative film; high-quality specialist colour copier service. For service, quality, and competitive prices contact Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press, Great Clarendon Street, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 514691, fax: 514010.

 

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Domestic Services

Balliol College morning playgroup has vacancies for children 18 months–4 years. For further details contact Pat Jones. Tel.: Oxford (2)77752.

Blue House is a small, intimate nursery for children 2½–5 years. Open Mon.–Fri., 8.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m., full or half-days. NNEB staff. All pre-school activities. Our aims are to encourage independence, self-confidence, and social skills. Safe secluded garden. Afternoon vacancies from Easter and a waiting list is available. Tel.: Oxford 247877.

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford 726983 or Abingdon 555533.

 

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Situations Vacant

Small academic association requires part-time, possibly full-time assistance with European database and directory for 6–8 months. Duties include: data input; some library research; correspondence. Remuneration to be negotiated. Tel.: Oxford 374010 or 377946, ext.111 (9 a.m.–5 p.m.); e-mail: eajs@sable.ox.ac.uk.

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Volunteer Sought

The University Alumni Office, Oxenford House, Magdalen Street, Oxford, requires a volunteer to help for up to 4 hours p.w., to be worked on either Mon. or Tue., to assist with mailing, photocopying, and general clerical work. Contact Rodney Buckton, University Alumni Officer. Tel.: Oxford (2)78184, fax: (2)78180.

 

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Employment Sought

Capable and experienced Oxford graduate willing to help with research, publications, personal administration, public relations, etc., seeks freelance work. Tel./fax: Oxford 511810.

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Houses to Let

Charming thatched cottage to rent in quiet village location (Oxford c.12 miles), £550 p.m.; sitting-room with inglenook fireplace, kitchen/dining area with Rayburn stove, small pretty garden, bathroom, upstairs one/two bedrooms (smaller room has convertible bed/desk). Available from end Feb. MacInnes. Tel.: Oxford 790593.

Jack Straw's Lane, Headington, near centre, hospital, universities: detached house, furnished, 4 bedrooms (one with en-suite), study, large kitchen and living room, 80-ft front and 110-ft rear garden with summer-house. Available from Aug. while owner is on leave. £1,500 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 308362.

Charming cottage on edge of village 12 miles north-west of Oxford. Double bedroom plus spare bedroom/study. Furnished and equipped to a very high standard. Beams, inglenook fire. South-facing. Very private walled patio garden. Garage. Suit caring non-smoking couple. Tel./fax: Oxford 510542.

Short-term accommodation. Comfortable cottages in Witney, 12 miles west of Oxford. Fully furnished and well equipped. Frequent bus service to Oxford. Sleep 2/6. £695 p.c.m. or £195 p.w. Non-smokers only. Tel.: 01993 703035, fax: 01993 771014.

An Englishman's home is his castle—so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Please telephone or fax us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 64533, fax: 64777.

 

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Flat to Let

Central North Oxford, 10 minutes from city centre: delightful and very comfortable flat available now in quiet, civilised family house; large double bedroom, single bedroom, drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom. Off-street parking, garden. Regret no children or pets. Short or long let. Tel.: Oxford 552400.

 

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Accommodation Offered

Bed-and-breakfast available in the home of a semi- retired academic couple. Warm, comfortable house in exclusive central North Oxford within easy walking distance of city centre, all main university buildings, parks, river, shops, pubs, and restaurants. Every room has tea- and coffee-making facilities, microwave, and colour television. Very moderate terms. Tel. and fax: Oxford 557879.

Premier: properties to rent all over the city, from £500 one-bed properties to £700 p.c.m. luxury apartments and £1,000 p.c.m. family houses. Tel.: Oxford 792299, fax: 798087.

 

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Accommodation Sought

Visiting law professor (non-smoker) teaching at Oxford requires flat/house in Oxford, approx. end Apr.–mid-June. Professor W. Barker, USA. Tel.: 717 240 5263, fax: 717 240 5126, e-mail: wbarker@dsl.edu.

Visiting American professor and wife seek furnished house or flat to rent in central Oxford for a.y. 1997–8 (1 Oct.–30 June). Local references furnished on request. Contact Charles Shaw, Assistant Registrar, University Offices. Tel.: Oxford (2)70036, e-mail: charles.shaw@admin.ox.ac.uk.

Three-bed furnished accommodation required in Oxford, approx. 25 May–30 Aug., for 3 professional adults working in the city during this period. Tel.: 01235 530620.

Office space required in Oxford—min. 150 sq. ft.—for period 25 May–30 Aug., for professional staff managing established summer language schol. Services required. Tel.: 01235 530620.

Cornelia v. Bismarck asks if an English family would take her 15- year-old son Leopold for some time over the Easter holidays: 22 Mar.- -13 Apr., with a view to a return visit later to Germany. He is said to have pretty good English and an outgoing personality. His grandfather, Karl-Gunther v. Hase, was German ambassador in London. Address: Brend'amour Strasse 65, 40545 Dusseldorf. Tel./fax: 0049211 588455.

Visiting professor and family (4 people) seek furnished apartment or house in central Oxford from 1 Apr. to 15 May (approx.). Please contact (a) Manuel Arellano or (b) Olympia Bover. (a) Tel: Madrid (341) 429-0551, fax: (341) 429-1056, e-mail: arellano@cemfi.es; (b) tel:(341) 338-5979.

University lecturer in French, responsible, female, non-smoker, seeks house-sitting in Oxford for a period or periods between 24 Mar. and the end of Aug., owing to impending leave. Cat care no problem if required. Conditions negotiable; all serious offers welcome. Dr Meryl Tyers, 46 Airlie Street, Glasgow G12 9TR. Tel.: 0141- 339 6231, e-mail: mlst@arts.gla.ac.uk.

Visiting Polish woman scientist (postdoctoral) coming to the Department of Zoology for 3 weeks from about 27 May, wants a bed- sit with some cooking facilities, and preferably within easy reach of South Parks Road. Contact Dr John Clarke, Department of Zoology, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS. Tel.: Oxford (2)71234 (office), or 558055 (home).

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management are one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us. Tel.: Oxford 64533, or fax: 64777.

 

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Accommodation Exchange

Edinburgh/Oxford exchange for 5–6 month sabbatical. Central Edinburgh third-floor flat, peaceful and airy, fully furnished, with stunning views of Castle, Arthur's Seat, and Pentland Hills; 20 minutes' walk through the Meadows to university and libraries, 5 minutes from theatres, concert hall, cinemas, swimming-pool, excellent local shops. Double bedroom, single bedroom, study-bedroom, spacious kitchen, bathroom, drawing room with open fire. Available late Mar.–late Sept. in exchange for similar house/flat in central Oxford. Non-smoking. Suit academic/professional couple. Tel.: 0131–229 8154.

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Accommodation Sought to Rent or Exchange

Visiting American professors with two older children seek house- and car-swap in Oxford for 5 weeks, in July and the beginning of Aug. Our 10-room house is located in Bridgewater, Mass., 20 miles south of Boston in Plymouth County, close to the beaches and Cape Cod. We seek a comfortable house in central Oxford area, such as North Oxford. Garage, Volvo wagon, lovely garden, small, safe New England college town. Write: Dr W. Smith, 21 Park Terrace, Bridgewater, MA 02324, USA; tel.: 508 697 5460; e-mail: W1Smith@bridgew.edu.

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Holiday Lets

Verona outskirts. To let in exceptionally beautiful 15th-c. villa, self-contained ground-floor flat; large double bed- sitting room, kitchen/dining rooms, and bathrooms; garden area, parking, frequent buses from door to city centre. £300 p.w. inc. all services and weekly cleaning. Contessa da Sacco. Tel.: 00 39 452 6499; or 01844 238247 (Moore).

Spring/early summer in the south of France? Village mansion in Languedoc; sleeps 20; huge garden and swimming. £100 p.p. p.w., min. let 8 people. House is free from after Easter until the last week in June. Tel.: Oxford 511065/512470.

Well-appointed 3-bedroom house in the unspoilt Catalonian village of Regencós (about 60 miles north-east of Barcelona and 4 miles inland) near Palafrugell. Several superb beaches within a radius of 6 miles. Sleeps 6; on 2 floors, each a self-contained flat with kitchen, bathroom, and lounge/dining area; ground floor has large double bedroom, upper floor similar bedroom plus twin-bed room. Attractive roof garden with superb views over surrounding countryside. Spanish maid visits every Sun. and will cook delicious meals. £1,000 p.c.m. or £300 p.w. Dr Charles Mould. Tel.: 01993 831747, fax: 831748, e-mail: charles.mould@st-cross.ox.ac.uk.

Lake Garda—Dolomites, near Riva-del-Garda in peaceful hillside villa with spectacular mountain panorama, self- contained accommodation for two, May–Oct. Separate garden entrance with patio; private facilities; £45–£55 p.n. Excursions to the Dolomites, Trento, opera at the Arena Verona. Botanic gardens. Wine tastings. Tel./fax: 0039 464 518559 or 0171-987 5604 (English spoken).

 

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Houses for Sale

Large Edwardian house in Divinity Road, with 4/5 bedrooms, lounge, book-room, breakfast-room, family room and 2 bathrooms. Attractive garden. Easy access to Brookes University, John Radcliffe and other hospitals and to central Oxford. We are emigrating so the house is ready for immediate occupancy. Tel. (London): 0181-997 3029/8556.

 

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Flat for sale

Spacious south-facing studio flat in co-ownership housing scheme (Ritchie Court, North Oxford); living area approx. 16 by 12 ft., bed recess 9 by 9 ft. inc. fitted wardrobes, fitted kitchen 9 by 9 ft., hall, bathroom, and walk-in cupboard. Facilities inc. restaurant, guest rooms, and laundry. Tel.: Oxford 510334.

 

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Diary

Contents of this section:

Academic Staff Seminars: places should be booked in advance through the Staff Development Office, University Offices, Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

For the full list of courses, see the Staff Development Programme supplement.

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Friday 31 January

DR P. WALEY: `Tokyo's East End: new stories, old identities—old stories, new identities' (Ethnicity and Identity seminars: `The identity of cities'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

DR O. KOLOSOV: `Beyond the wavelength limits' (Interdepartmental Graduate Lectures in Science: `The new microscopies---from molecules to man: acoustic microscopy'), Lindemann Lecture Theatre, Clarendon Laboratory, 12 noon.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Introduction to sculpture in western art', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

PROFESSOR J. HARRIS: `The nation as "moral community" or "business firm"?' (James Ford's Lectures in British History: `A land of lost content? Visions of civic virtue from Ruskin to Rawls'), Schools, 5 p.m.

D. TOMLINSON: `Post-evangelical theology' (lecture series: `Radical theologies'), Mansfield, 5 p.m.

P. MONTAGNON: `China's economic success: prospects and implications' (All Souls Foreign Policy Studies Programme: `China and the world'), Old Library, All Souls, 5 p.m.

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Saturday 1 February

REFUGEE STUDIES PROGRAMME meeting: `Towards understanding the crisis in the Great Lakes region', Nissan Building, St Antony's, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. (registration at door, £5).

PITT RIVERS MUSEUM `Pitt Stop' event for children and families (not unaccompanied children): `Lighting the Chinese New Year', Main Museum Building, 2–4 p.m. (admission free).

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Sunday 2 February

THE REVD DR MAURICE WILES preaches, Cathedral, 10 a.m.

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Monday 3 February

BODLEAN LIBRARY exhibitions open: `Keeper's choice'—a selection of the acquisitions made during the tenure of the retiring Keeper of Printed Books; and `Land and lineage: the world of the nobility and gentry in England, 1500–1700' (both until 3 May).

CONGREGATION elections, 20 February: nominations by six members of Congregation to be received at the University Offices by 4 p.m.

 

DR J. BURGESS: `The economics of tropical forest land use options' (Environmental Change Unit seminars), Main Lecture Theatre, School of Geography, 2.15 p.m.

DR J. SMITH: `How to make mesoderm: inducing signals and responding genes' (Jenkinson Memorial Lecture), Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. GRAY: `The future of human society' (Green College Lectures: `The shape of things to come'), Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 6 p.m.

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Tuesday 4 February

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Children in art', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m.).

 

PROFESSOR J. KRISTEVA: `Proust, questions d'identité' (Sir Basil Zaharoff Lecture), Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. RINGE: `Language classification: scientific and unscientific methods' (Wolfson College Lectures: `The human inheritance: genes, language, and evolution'), the Hall, Wolfson, 5 p.m.

THE RT. HON. DOUGLAS HURD, MP, and Lord Dahrendorf: `Should there be a common European foreign and defence policy?' (lecture series: `The constraints on British governments: how much difference can a change of governing party now make?'), New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m. (may be subject to cancellation: tel. (2)74496 to check).

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Wednesday 5 February

DR G. DICKSON: `Medieval Pentecostalism: phenomenology and behaviour' (Wilde Lectures in Natural and Comparative Religion: `Medieval Pentecostalism—the tradition of charismatic Christian enthusiasm in Western Europe, c.1000–1500'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. BOMFORD: `Trompe l'oeil, perspective, and illusion' (Slade Lectures: `Art and uncertainty: technical studies, art history, and conservation'), Lecture Hall, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR C. GALLAGHER: `Discordant canons: medieval canon law and canonists in the East and in the West' (second of six Martin D'Arcy Lectures), Lecture Room, Campion Hall, 5 p.m.

DR A. AGER: `Psychosocial wellness: the role of research' (Refugee Studies Programme Seminars on Forced Migration: `Forced migration and psychological well- being'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m. (open to the public).

 

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Thursday 6 February

DR A. PETFORD-LONG: `Using electrons to see atoms' (Interdepartmental Graduate Lectures in Science: `The new microscopies---from molecules to man: electron microscopy'), Lindemann Lecture Theatre, Clarendon Laboratory, 12 noon.

H. BELL: `Midwifery and female circumcision in the inter-war Anglo-Egyptian Sudan' (Centre for Cross- Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Gender and culture—identity and crisis'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

THE VERY REVD JOHN DRURY: `The incarnation of the Word and the words' (Hussey Lectures on the Church and the Arts: `Discerning the body'), Lecture Hall, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

LORD BELOFF: `Amery and the Constitution—what is new today?' (lecture series: `More thoughts on the Constitution'—to mark fiftieth anniversary of L.S. Amery's Chichele Lectures `Thoughts on the Constitution'), Old Library, All Souls, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR PAUL RICHARDS and Professor Lewis Wolpert: `Is indigenous knowledge science?' (Oxford Centre for the Environment, Ethics, and Society `Head to Head' debates), Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

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Friday 7 February

PROFESSOR S. WALMAN: `The effect of open systems on identity' (Ethnicity and Identity seminars: `The identity of cities'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

DR A. PETFORD-LONG: `Watching atoms move' (Interdepartmental Graduate Lectures in Science: `The new microscopies---from molecules to man: electron microscopy'), Lindemann Lecture Theatre, Clarendon Laboratory, 12 noon.

 

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Narrative paintings', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m.)

 

 

PROFESSOR J. HARRIS: `What to do with the "sleeping partner": the incorporation of women' (James Ford's Lectures in British History: `A land of lost content? Visions of civic virtue from Ruskin to Rawls'), Schools, 5 p.m.

THE REVD PROFESSOR ANDREW LINZEY: `Animal theology' (lecture series: `Radical theologies'), Mansfield, 5 p.m.

IMOGEN COOPER performs piano works by Schubert, Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's, 8.30 p.m. (admission by free programme, available in advance from Porters' Lodge).

DR G. SEGAL: `China's security interests: challenges and responses' (All Souls Foreign Policy Studies Programme: `China and the world'), Old Library, All Souls, 5 p.m.

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Sunday 9 February

THE REVD DR IAN KER preaches the Sermon on the Grace of Humility, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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Monday 10 February

ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Financial management: financial and business planning', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

DR K. RAWLES: `Ethics and elephants' (Environmental Change Unit seminars), Main Lecture Theatre, School of Geography, 2.15 p.m.

DR B. GÄHWILER: `Causes and consequences of epilepsy in the hippocampus: new insights from in vitro studies' (Newton-Abraham Lecture), Large Lecture Theatre, University Laboratory of Physiology, 5 p.m.

BRIAN ALDISS: `Inventing the future: Utopia or Dystopia' (Green College Lectures: `The shape of things to come'), Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 6 p.m.

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Tuesday 11 February

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The materials of Asian sculpture', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m.)

 

 

CONGREGATION meeting, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR S.N. MACFARLANE (Lester B. Pearson Professor of International Relations): `The role of the United Nations in contemporary world politics: the pursuit of the possible' (inaugural lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR G. DOVER: `Human evolution: our turbulent genes and why we are not chimps' (Wolfson College Lectures: `The human inheritance: genes, language, and evolution'), the Hall, Wolfson, 5 p.m.

MR J. FLEMMING and Dr Andrew Walter: `Economic globalisation and national economic policy: what difference could a new British government make?' (lecture series: `The constraints on British governments: how much difference can a change of governing party now make?'), New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m. (may be subject to cancellation: tel. (2)74496 to check).

PROFESSOR J. AITCHISON: `Language origin and language today: an endless stairway?' (Friends of Rewley House Annual Lecture), Lecture Theatre, Rewley House, 8 p.m. (entry free to Friends, £2 to others).

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Wednesday 12 February

DR G. DICKSON: `Pentecostalism and prophecy in the Middle Ages' (Wilde Lectures in Natural and Comparative Religion: `Medieval Pentecostalism—the tradition of charismatic Christian enthusiasm in Western Europe, c.1000–1500'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. BOMFORD: `Authenticity and authorship' (Slade Lectures: `Art and uncertainty: technical studies, art history, and conservation'), Lecture Hall, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR C. GALLAGHER: `Discordant canons: medieval canon law and canonists in the East and in the West' (third of six Martin D'Arcy Lectures), Lecture Room, Campion Hall, 5 p.m.

P. HARRIS: `The colours of India–east to west' (Friends of the Pitt Rivers Museum lecture series), Pauling Human Sciences Centre (58 Banbury Road), 5 p.m.

DR M. POTACKY: `Psychosocial wellness: use of census data' (Refugee Studies Programme Seminars on Forced Migration: `Forced migration and psychological well- being'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m. (open to the public).

 

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Thursday 13 February

DR A. CEREZO: `Using atoms to see atoms' (Interdepartmental Graduate Lectures in Science: `The new microscopies---from molecules to man: the atom probe field ion microscope'), Lindemann Lecture Theatre, Clarendon Laboratory, 12 noon.

 

ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Lecturing skills practice—video playback', 2 p.m. (see information above).

G. SOMJEE: `Indian women: their growing participation in social and economic opportunities' (Centre for Cross- Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Gender and culture—identity and crisis'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

 

 

 

THE VERY REVD JOHN DRURY: `The isolation of the sacrificial body' (Hussey Lectures on the Church and the Arts: `Discerning the body'), Lecture Hall, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

LORD BELOFF: `The nature of the United Kingdom and the challenge of "devolution" ' (lecture series: `More thoughts on the Constitution'—to mark fiftieth anniversary of L.S. Amery's Chichele Lectures `Thoughts on the Constitution'), Old Library, All Souls, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR H. RITVO: `The animal environment' (Linacre Lectures: `Culture and environment'), Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building, 5.30 p.m.

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Friday 14 February

PROFESSOR J. CLAMMER: `Identity in a city of migrants: city image and social geography in multi-ethnic Singapore' (Ethnicity and Identity seminars: `The identity of cities'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

 

DR A. CEREZO: `An atomic-scale body scanner for metals' (Interdepartmental Graduate Lectures in Science: `The new microscopies---from molecules to man: the Atom Probe Field Ion Microscope'), Lindemann Lecture Theatre, Clarendon Laboratory, 12 noon.

 

 

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: ` "By my Valentine" ', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m.)

 

 

PROFESSOR J. HARRIS: `Morality and "social welfare" ' (James Ford's Lectures in British History: `A land of lost content? Visions of civic virtue from Ruskin to Rawls'), Schools, 5 p.m.

THE REVD MICHAEL VASEY: `Gay theology' (lecture series: `Radical theologies'), Mansfield, 5 p.m.

B. HALL: `China and the United States' (All Souls Foreign Policy Studies Programme: `China and the world'), Old Library, All Souls, 5 p.m.

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