30 April 1998 - No 4472



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 128, No. 4472: 30 April 1998<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

30 April 1998




: The following supplements were published
with this Gazette:

General Resolution: Report of
the Working Party on University Sites


Report of the Commision of
Inquiry: verbatim report of proceedings in Congregation


University Health and
Safety
information


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<br /><br /><br /><title><br /> Oxford University Gazette, 30 April 1998: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

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issue



CONGREGATION 27 April


Degree by Special Resolution

No notice to the contrary having been received under the
provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6
(Statutes, 1997, p. 15), the following
resolution is deemed to have been approved at noon on 27
April.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the
following:

KATHLEEN WEIL-GARRIS BRANDT, All Souls College

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section



HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL 27 April


1 Decrees

Council has made the following decrees, to come into
effect on 15 May.

List of the decrees:



Decree (1): Preliminary
Examination in and Honour School of Philosophy and Modern
Languages

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Literae
Humaniores Board and with the concurrence of the General
Board,
brings the provisions governing the Joint Committee for
Philosophy and Modern Languages into line with those for
other
Standing Joint Committees involving Philosophy.

Text of Decree (1)

1 In Examination Decrees,
1997, p. 96, ll. 18--21, delete `and to
submit ... Modern Languages' and substitute `regulations
concerning it, subject always to the preceding clauses of
this
subsection'.

2 Ibid., p. 473, ll. 20--3, delete
`and to submit ... Modern Languages' and substitute
`regulations concerning it, subject always to the
preceding
clauses of this subsection'.

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section



Decree (2): Honour School of
Economics and Management

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Standing Committee for Economics and Management and with
the concurrence of the Committee for the School of
Management Studies, the Social Studies Board, and the
General Board, replaces the requirement for candidates to
offer courses in Accounting and Finance and in
Organisational Behaviour and Human Resource Management
with a requirement to offer two courses in Management
Studies selected from a list of such courses, and makes
provision for a fourth examiner in Management.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in
`Examinations and Boards' below.

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section


Text of Decree (2)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 163, delete
ll. 10--16 and substitute:

`2. Candidates shall be required to offer, in addition to
the above subjects, at least two subjects from Schedule A
and a further four subjects from Schedules A and B.'

2 Ibid., p. 1043, l. 39, delete
`Three' and substitute `Four'.

3 Clause 1 of this decree shall be
effective from 1 October 1999, and clause 2 from 1
October 1998.

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section



Decree (3): Honour School of
Geography

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Anthropology and Geography Board and with the concurrence
of the General Board, removes the United Kingdom and
France paper from the list of compulsory papers for the
Honour School of Geography, in response to student
feedback and successive external examiners' reports
indicating that this paper has become somewhat obsolete
and too narrow in focus.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in
`Examinations and Boards' below.

Text of Decree (3)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 227, delete
ll. 7--8 and substitute:

`(2) The Philosophy, Nature, and Practice of Geography.'

2 This decree shall be effective from
1 October 2000.

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section



Decree (4): Establishment of M.St.s and
Diplomas in
Social Anthropology and in Ethnology and Museum
Ethnography

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Anthropology and Geography Board and with the concurrence
of the General Board, revises the existing pattern of
taught courses in Social Anthropology and in Ethnology
and Museum Ethnography by abolishing the existing M.St.s
in the two subject areas and introducing replacement
M.Sc. and diploma courses.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in
`Examinations and Boards' below.

Text of Decree (4)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 669, delete
ll. 34--5.

2 Ibid., p. 670, delete l. 37.

3 Ibid., p. 943, after l. 9 insert:

`DIPLOMA IN ETHNOLOGY AND MUSEUM
ETHNOGRAPHY

(i) DECREE

1. There shall be held an examination for the
purpose of granting Diplomas in Ethnology and Museum
Ethnography.

2. Subject to the provisions of this section any
member of the University may be admitted as a candidate
for the diploma examination who has obtained leave from
the Board of the Faculty of Anthropology and Geography:

provided that

(a) he or she has passed all the examinations
required for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts and has
obtained First or good Second Class Honours in the Second
Public Examination, or has obtained such honours in a
degree examination of another university, such university
having been approved by Council for the purpose of Senior
Status; or

(b) he or she is, in the opinion of the
board, otherwise adequately qualified to undertake the
course.

Applications for leave under this clause shall be sent to
the Secretary of Faculties through the head or tutor of
the society to which the applicant belongs or desires to
belong. The board shall have power to determine the
character and length of a course of study to be followed
by the applicant before he or she may take the
examination.

On admitting an applicant as a candidate for the diploma
examination the board shall appoint a supervisor who
shall direct and superintend the work of the candidate.
The supervisor shall send a report on the progress of the
candidate to the board at the end of each term and at any
other time when the board so requests or the supervisor
believes it expedient. In particular the supervisor shall
inform the board at once if he or she is of the opinion
that a student is unlikely to reach the standard required
for the diploma. The Secretary of Faculties shall send a
copy of each report by the supervisor to the student's
society.

3. The examination shall be under the supervision of
the Board of the Faculty of Anthropology and Geography
and that board shall fix the date on which names for the
examination shall be entered.

4. After admission as a Diploma Student, a candidate
must have kept statutory residence and pursued a course
of study at Oxford for at least three terms before taking
the examination, provided (a) that time spent
outside Oxford during term as part of an academic
programme approved by Council shall count towards
residence for the purpose of this clause and (b)
that a candidate for the Degree of Master of Science in
Ethnology and Museum Ethnography may, with the approval
of the Board of the Faculty of Anthropology and
Geography, transfer to the status of a Student for the
Diploma in Ethnology and Museum Ethnography not later
than the last date for the receipt of entries for the
examination, in which case the date of his or her
admission as a Student for the Degree of Master of
Science shall be reckoned as the date of his or her
admission as a Diploma Student.

5. A student reading for the diploma who is not a
graduate of the University may wear the same gown as that
worn by Students for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy.

The attention of candidates is directed to Ch. VI, Sect.
I. C, § 3, cl. 6.'

4 Ibid., p. 946, after l. 27
insert:

`DIPLOMA IN SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY

(i) DECREE

1. There shall be held an examination for the purpose
of granting Diplomas in Social Anthropology.

2. Subject to the provisions of this section any
member of the University may be admitted as a candidate
for the diploma examination who has obtained leave from
the Board of the Faculty of Anthropology and Geography:

provided that

(a) he or she has passed all the
examinations required for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts
and has obtained First or good Second Class Honours in
the Second Public Examination, or has obtained such
honours in a degree examination of another university,
such university having been approved by Council for the
purpose of Senior Status; or

(b) he or she is, in the opinion of the
board, otherwise adequately qualified to undertake the
course.

Applications for leave under this clause shall be sent to
the Secretary of Faculties through the head or tutor of
the society to which the applicant belongs or desires to
belong. The board shall have power to determine the
character and length of a course of study to be followed
by the applicant before he or she may take the
examination.

On admitting an applicant as a candidate for the diploma
examination the board shall appoint a supervisor who
shall direct and superintend the work of the candidate.
The supervisor shall send a report on the progress of the
candidate to the board at the end of each term and at any
other time when the board so requests or the supervisor
believes it expedient. In particular the supervisor shall
inform the board at once if he or she is of the opinion
that a student is unlikely to reach the standard required
for the diploma. The Secretary of Faculties shall send a
copy of each report by the supervisor to the student's
society.

3. The examination shall be under the supervision of
the Board of the Faculty of Anthropology and Geography
and that board shall fix the date on which names for the
examination shall be entered.

4. After admission as a Diploma Student, a candidate
must have kept statutory residence and pursued a course
of study at Oxford for at least three terms before taking
the examination, provided (a) that time spent
outside Oxford during term as part of an academic
programme approved by Council shall count towards
residence for the purpose of this clause and (b)
that a candidate for the Degree of Master of Science in
Social Anthropology may, with the approval of the Board
of the Faculty of Anthropology and Geography, transfer to
the status of a Student for the Diploma in Social
Anthropology not later than the last date for the receipt
of entries for the examination, in which case the date of
his or her admission as a Student for the Degree of
Master of Science shall be reckoned as the date of his or
her admission as a Diploma Student.

5. A student reading for the diploma who is not a
graduate of the University may wear the same gown as that
worn by Students for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy.

The attention of candidates is directed to Ch. VI, Sect.
I. C, § 3, cl. 6.'

5 Ibid., p. 1011, after l. 19 insert:

`Four or five as required in Ethnology and Museum
Ethnography and in Social Anthropology.'

6 Ibid., p. 1012, delete ll. 24--7.

7 Ibid., p. 1013, after l. 41 insert:

`Diplomas in Ethnology and Museum         Four or five as
  Ethnography and in Social                required.'

8 Ibid., p. 1023, l. 34, after
`Philosophy' insert `and for the Degree of Master of
Science and the Diploma'.

9 Ibid., ll. 36--7, delete `and in
Ethnology and Museum Ethnography and Social
Anthropology,'.

10 Ibid., l. 38, after `Biology,'
insert `and in Ethnology and Museum Ethnography and in
Social Anthropology,'.

11 Ibid., p. 1031, l. 2, delete `.'
and substitute `;'.

12 Ibid., after l. 2 insert:

`in Ethnology and Museum Ethnography and in Social
Anthropology for one examination.'

13 This decree shall be effective
from 1 October 1998.

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section


Key to Decree (4)

Cll. 1 and 2 abolish the M.St.s in Ethnology and Museum
Ethnology and in Social Anthropology.

Cl. 3 inserts Ethnology and Museum Ethnography into the
provisions governing examinations for diplomas.

Cl. 4 inserts Social Anthropology into the provisions
governing examinations for diplomas.

Cl. 5 provides for the appointment of examiners for the
M.Sc.s in Ethnology and Museum Ethnography and in Social
Anthropology.

Cl. 6 deletes provision for the appointment of examiners
for the M.St.s in Ethnology and Museum Ethnography and in
Social Anthropology.

Cl. 7 provides for the appointment of examiners for the
Diplomas in Ethnology and Museum Ethnography and in
Social Anthropology.

Cll. 8--10 provide for nominating committees for the
Diplomas and the M.Sc.s in Ethnology and Museum
Ethnography and in Social Anthropology, and delete
provision for such committees for the M.St.s in Ethnology
and Museum Ethnography and in Social Anthropology.

Cll. 11 and 12 define the length of service of examiners
for the M.Sc.s in Ethnology and Museum Ethnography and in
Social Anthropology.

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section



Decree (5): Establishment of M.St. in Modern
Middle
Eastern Studies

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Oriental Studies Board and with the concurrence of the
General Board, establishes a one-year M.St. in Modern
Middle Eastern Studies. It provides a more structured
course than the M.St. in Oriental Studies. It draws on
optional papers currently available under the M.Phil. in
Modern Middle Eastern Studies and so avoids the necessity
for M.St. supervisors to devise a course of study and
tutorials for each student individually. It provides a
taught course for those native speakers or holders of
degrees in oriental languages who do not wish to take a
new language. Examination will be by written papers,
essay, and viva.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in
`Examinations and Boards' below.

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section


Text of Decree (5)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 670, after l.
25 insert:


`Modern Middle Eastern
    Studies                          Oriental Studies'.

2 Ibid., p. 1008, l. 27, after
`Oriental Studies' insert `(who shall also examine for
the Degree of Master of Studies in Modern Middle Eastern
Studies)'.

3 Ibid., p. 1021, l. 18, after
`Korean Studies,' insert `Modern Middle Eastern
Studies,'.

4 This decree shall be effective from
1 October 1998.

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section


Key to Decree (5)

Cl. 1 inserts Modern Middle Eastern Studies into the list
of examinations for the degree of M.St.

Cll. 2 and 3 provide for the appointment of examiners.

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section



Decree (6): Nominating Committee for
Examiners in
Modern History

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Modern History Board and with the concurrence of the
General Board, increases from three to four the number of
elected members on the Nominating Committee for Examiners
in Modern History. This is intended to provide expertise
on the committee in the three main periods of the
subject, and expertise in graduate courses.

Text of Decree (6)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 1016, l.
10, delete `clause 7 (vv)' and substitute `clause 7 (3)
and (48)'.

2 Ibid., p. 1019, l. 1, delete
`three' and substitute `four'.

3 This decree shall be effective from
1 October 1998.

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section



Decree (7): Class List for the Honour School
of
Jurisprudence

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Law Board and with the concurrence of the General Board,
reinstates the provision for the national law studied by
Course 2 candidates to be indicated in the Class List for
the Honour School of Jurisprudence.

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section


Text of Decree (7)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 1055 (as
amended by Decree (3) of 19 March 1998,
Gazette, p. 931), after l. 5 insert:

`(vii) [(vi)] If a candidate whose name appears in the
Class List for the Honour School of Jurisprudence has
successfully completed Course 2 in accordance with the
regulations of the Board of the Faculty of Law, there
shall be added, in brackets after his or her name, the
word (French) or symbol (Fr) (or the adjective or symbol
appropriate to such other national law as the candidate
has studied), or, if the candidate has not studied the
national law of another European country, the word
(European) or symbol (Eur). At the foot of the list shall
appear an indication that (French) or (Fr) (or other
adjective or symbol) denotes English Law with French (or
appropriate adjective) Law.'

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section



Decree (8): Entry to the Violet Vaughan
Morgan Prizes
1998 (Miss P. Corson)

Notwithstanding the provisions of Ch. IX, Sect. I, §
353, cl. 4 (Statutes, 1997, p. 735), Miss P.
Corson, Mansfield College, may enter for the Violet
Vaughan Morgan Prizes 1998.

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section



2 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts under
the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. v, cl. 1 (Statutes, 1997,
p. 367) has been accorded to the following persons who are qualified
for membership of Congregation:

SHAFIQ ABOUZAYD, Christ Church

KEITH MALCOLM WILLETT, Nuffield Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

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3 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added
to the Register of Congregation:

Abouzayd, S., MA status, Christ Church

Brant, K.W.-G., MA, All Souls

Cook, T., MA, D.Phil., St Catherine's

Willett, K.M., MA status, Nuffield Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

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CONGREGATION 28 April

1 Declaration of approval of unopposed Statutes
promulgated on 24 March


No notice of opposition having been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor
declared the Statutes (1) excluding self-nomination at elections in
Congregation, (2) renaming the new Professorship of Economics after
Sir John Hicks, and (3) establishing a Nuffield Professorship of
Pathology (pp. 1023–4) approved.

2 Promulgation of Statutes

Forms of Statutes were promulgated. No notice of opposition having
been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor declared the preambles carried of the
proposed Statutes (1) revising Title XIII, (2) establishing an
Andreas Idreos Professorship of Science and Religion, and (3)
concerning the Vinerian Scholarship.

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CURATORS OF THE UNIVERSITY CHEST

For changes in financial regulations, to come into effect on 15 May,
see `Examinations and Boards' below.

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BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on
15 May, see `Examinations and Boards' below.





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 30 April 1998: University<br /> Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

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issue



CONGREGATION 4 May


Degree by Special Resolution

The following special resolution will be deemed to be
approved at noon on 4 May, unless by that time the
Registrar has received notice in writing from two or more
members of Congregation under the provisions of Tit. II,
Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1997, p. 15) that
they wish the resolution to be put to a meeting of
Congregation.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the
following:

RICHARD PEIRCE BRENT, St Hugh's College

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section



CONGREGATION 19 May 2 p.m.

¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that
written notice of any proposed amendment to, or intention
to vote against, the enacting parts of the statutes at
item 1 below, or of any intention to vote against the
preamble of the statute at item 2 below, or of any
proposed amendment to, or intention to vote against, the
general resolution at item 3 below, or of any intention
to vote against the special resolutions at item 4 below,
signed in each case by at least two members of
Congregation, must be given to the Acting Registrar by
noon on Monday, 11 May (see the Guide to Procedures in
Congregation cited in the note at the end of `University
Agenda').


2 Promulgation of Statute

Statute: Establishment of a Faculty of Management

Explanatory note

The following statute, and the decree to be made by
Council if the statute is approved, which are promoted on
the recommendation of the Committee for the School of
Management Studies and with the concurrence of the
General Board as part of the reorganisation of the
school, establish a Faculty of Management, abolish the
Committee for the School of Management Studies, which has
hitherto functioned in a similar way to a faculty board,
establish a Board of the Faculty of Management in its
place, and create a fourth Deputy Directorship of the
school. The composition of the proposed new faculty board
reflects the inclusion of external members in the
committee for the school, one of whom is appointed by the
school's major benefactor under arrangements approved by
Congregation in Trinity Term 1997 (see
Statutes, 1997, pp. 319, 351).

Associated changes in regulations have been approved by
the General Board and will be published if the statute is
approved.

WHEREAS it is expedient to establish a Faculty of
Management, THE UNIVERSITY ENACTS AS FOLLOWS.

1 In Tit. VI, Sect. I, cl. 1
(Statutes, 1997, p. 41), delete `sixteen'
and substitute `seventeen'.

2 Ibid., item (16), delete `.' and
substitute `;'.

3 Ibid., insert item (17):

`(17) the Faculty of Management.'


Decree to be made by Council if the Statute is
approved

In Ch. II, Sect. VI, § 1, cl. 1
(Statutes, 1997, p. 243), delete `Music' and
substitute `Management, of Music,'.

2 Ibid., cl. 2, delete `Section X'
and substitute `Section XI'.

3 Ibid., SCHEDULE (p. 246), under
Social Studies, delete `Management Studies (two) ...
Management Operations, American Standard Companies'.

4 Ibid., delete `School of Management
Studies,1 Peter Moores Director of' and
corresponding footnote.

5 Ibid., § 4, cl. 1 (p. 247),
after `Clinical Medicine,' insert `of Management,'.

6 Ibid., delete `Sectt. VIII--XI' and
substitute `Sectt. VIII–XII'.

7 Ibid. (p. 256), insert new Sect. IX as follows and
renumber existing Sectt. IX–XIII (pp. 256–8) as
Sectt. X–XIV:

`Section IX. Board of the Faculty of Management

The Board of the Faculty of Management shall be
constituted as follows:

(1)–(3) three persons elected by the Council for
the School of Management Studies from industry,
government, public service, and the sponsors of the
school, such persons not normally being members of
Congregation;

(4) a person appointed by the Benefactor of the School
of Management Studies in pursuance of clauses 15 and 16
of Decree (1) of 17 July 1997;

(5) the Director of the School of Management Studies;

(6)–(9) the Deputy Directors of the School of
Management Studies;

(10) a person elected by the General Board;

(11) the President of Templeton College;

(12)–(15) four persons elected by members of the
Faculty of Management in accordance with Sect. VI, §
5;

(16) the Chairman of the Faculty of Management.'

8 In Ch. III, Sect. LIII (p. 319, as
renumbered by Decree (1) of 19 March 1998,
Gazette, p. 930), delete cll. 2–3 and
renumber existing cll. 4–5 as cll. 2–3.

9 Ibid., cl. 2 as renumbered, delete
items (6)–(9) and substitute:

`(6)–(9) four persons elected by the Board of the
Faculty of Management;'.

10 Ibid., cl. 3 as renumbered, delete
`Committee for the School of Management Studies' and
substitute `Board of the Faculty of Management'.

11 Ibid., delete cll. 6–9 and
substitute:

`4. There shall be four Deputy Directors of the School of
Management Studies, who shall be responsible for the
areas of Research, Undergraduate Courses, Graduate
Courses, and Executive Courses respectively. Each Deputy
Director shall be appointed by the General Board for a
period of up to three years and may thereafter be
reappointed for a further consecutive period of up to two
years. No person shall be eligible for reappointment as a
Deputy Director after serving for a total period of five
years unless an interval of at least two years has
elapsed since the end of the last period of such service.
The duties and stipend of each Deputy Director shall be
as determined by the General Board from time to time.'

12 This decree shall be effective
from 1 October 1998, provided that on the occasion of the
first elections and appointment of members of the Board
of the Faculty of Management under the provisions of Ch.
II, Sect. ix, two of the persons elected under items
(1)--(3), the person appointed under item (4), and two of
the persons elected under items (12)--(15) shall serve
for a period of two years, and one of the persons elected
under items (1)--(3), the person elected under item (10),
and two of the persons elected under items (12)--(15)
shall serve for a period of one year, all being eligible
for re-election or reappointment thereafter (subject to
the provisions of Ch. II, Sect. vi, § 4, cl. 5,
Statutes, 1997, p. 248, and any other
statute, decree, or regulation of general application).

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section


Key to Decree

Cll. 1 and 2 add Management to the list of faculties.

Cll. 3 and 4 remove the statutory professors in
Management from the list of persons qualified to be
official members of the Social Studies Board.

Cll. 5–7 establish the Board of the Faculty of
Management.

Cll. 8–10 delete references to the Committee for the
School of Management Studies and adjust the membership of
the Council for the School.

Cll. 11 makes provision for a fourth Deputy Directorship
of the School of Management Studies and renames the
existing Deputy Directorships.

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section



4 Voting on Special Resolutions

Special Resolution (1): Conferment of Degree by
Diploma

That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Civil Law
by Diploma upon HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF THE JORDAN be
approved.

¶ If the Special Resolution is approved, the
degree will be conferred at a ceremony on a date to be
announced.


Special Resolution (2): Conferment of Honorary Degree

That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Civil Law,
honoris causa, upon ALAN JACKSON DOREY, MA,
D.PHIL., Emeritus Fellow of Linacre College and Honorary
Felow of Pembroke College, formerly Registrar of the
University, be approved.

¶ If the Special Resolution is approved, the
honorary degree will be conferred at the Encaenia on 24
June 1998.

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section





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 30 April 1998: Notices<br />

Notices


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

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issue



ROYAL ACADEMY OF ENGINEERING/AEA
TECHNOLOGY/INSS RESEARCH PROFESSORSHIP IN MICROANALYTICAL
TECHNIQUES FOR STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY PROBLEMS

JOHN MICHAEL TITCHMARSH, D.PHIL. (BA Cambridge), Philips
Professor in Materials Analysis, Materials Research
Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, has been
appointed to the research professorship for a period of
five years with effect from 1 September 1998.

Professor Titchmarsh will be a fellow of St Anne's
College.

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section



SCHOLARSHIPS FOR STUDY IN
GERMANY

Michael Foster Memorial Scholarship
1998–9
: JEREMY BROWN, Christ Church

Theodor Heuss Research Fellowship
1998–9
: MS JOSIE MCLELLAN, Mansfield
College

Hanseatic Scholarships 1998–2000: PAUL
PROBERT, St Antony's College, and MS LISA SARGEANT,
Christ Church

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section



L.W. WITTS PRIZE IN HAEMATOLOGY
OR GASTROENTEROLOGY 1997–8

The Prize has beena awarded to SUDARSHAN KUMARAN, Green
College.

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section



DEGREE DAYS 1998

The second part of the exceptional ceremonies on Friday,
2 October 1998 will be held at 2.30 p.m. (see
Gazette, 5 March, p. 868).

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section



APPOINTMENT OF ADDITIONAL PRO-PROCTOR

Acting in accordance with Tit. XI, Sect. vi, § 2,
cl. 2 (Statutes, 1997, p. 71), the Senior
Proctor nominated, and the Vice-Chancellor admitted to
office as an additional Pro-Proctor for a period of seven
days from 3 April 1998, TERENCE VALENTINE JONES, MA,
D.PHIL., Fellow of St Catherine's. This appointment was
made in order to allow documents to be formally signed
while the Senior Proctor and his regular deputies were
temporarily absent from the University.

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section



COMPOSITION OF ELECTORAL BOARD

The composition of the electoral board to the post below,
proceedings to fill which are currently in progress, is
as follows:

Dr Lee's Professorship of Chemistry


                                  Appointed by

The President of St John's
(chairman)                       Mr Vice-Chancellor[1]
The Rector of Exeter             ex officio
Professor D.A. King              Council
Professor R.M. Lynden-Bell       General Board
Professor G.R. Fleming           General Board
Professor K. Burnett             Physical Sciences Board
Professor W.G. Richards          Physical Sciences Board
Dr T.P. Softley                  Physical Sciences Board
Professor J.M. Brown             Exeter College

[1] Appointed by Mr Vice-Chancellor under the provisions
of Tit. IX, Sect. iii, cl. 2 (Statutes,
1997, p. 67).



COMMITTEE FOR THE SCIENTIFIC
COLLECTIONS IN THE UNIVERSITY MUSEUM


Annual Report 1996–7

The Annual Report for 1996–7 of the Committee for
the Scientific Collections in the University Museum has
recently been published, and a copy may be obtained by
any member of Congregation on request to the secretary of
the committee at the Oxford University Museum of Natural
History, Parks Road.

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section



CIRCULATION OF THE
GAZETTE TO RETIRED SENIOR MEMBERS OF THE
UNIVERSITY

It has been decided that any former member of
Congregation over the age of seventy-five who is resident
in Oxford may continue to receive the
Gazette, if he or she so wishes, on
application in writing to the Information Office,
University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD.
Such applications must be renewed at the beginning of
each academic year.

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section



DISCOUNT ON PERSONAL INSURANCE
POLICIES AVAILABLE TO STAFF AND MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY

Sun Alliance Connections, the personal insurances
division of the main insurer of the University, provides
discounts for members, staff, their families, and
pensioners of the University of Oxford. The following
savings can be achieved:

Household (buildings and/or contents: 20 per cent;

Travel (including winter sports): 12.5 per cent;

Private medical expenses: 10 per cent;

Private car: 5 per cent.

The University acts solely as an introducer of business
to Sun Alliance Connections, receiving no commission or
other remuneration, with all savings passed on to the
subscribing member. For further information, a brochure
may be obtained from Graham Waite (telephone: (2)80307),
or Gill Tombs (telephone: (2)70110) at the University
Offices. To obtain a quotation or receive specific
information on the covers available, telephone Sun
Alliance Connections' regional office on 0800 300 822, quoting
the appropriate reference: SCH266 for car insurance;
otherwise 34V0067.

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section



LANGUAGE CENTRE


Intensive weekend language
courses

The Language Centre will be running weekend courses in
Trinity Term. Each course will consist of eight hours of
tuition with an emphasis on speaking and listening to the
language, running from 9 a.m. to 1.30 p.m., with a half-
hour break. Some of the material to be studied will be
taken from satellite TV, radio broadcasts, and newspaper
articles. The maximum number of participants per group
will be fifteen. A fee of £25 will be charged to
junior members of the University and other full-time
students, £32 to members of Congregation and members
of staff, and £40 to non-members.

Courses will be offered as follows:

German, end of Week Four (Saturday, 23 May,
Sunday, 24 May), at the following levels: Absolute
Beginners, Lower Intermediate, Upper Intermediate.

Italian, end of Week Four (Saturday, 23 May,
Sunday, 24 May), at the following levels: Absolute
Beginners, Lower Intermediate.

French, end of Week Six (Saturday, 6 June,
Sunday, 7 June), at the following levels: False
Beginners, Lower Intermediate, Upper Intermediate.

Spanish, end of Week Six (Saturday, 6 June,
Sunday, 7 June), at the following levels: Absolute
Beginners, Lower Intermediate.

Anyone who wishes to receive further details and a
booking form for these courses should contact Angela
Pinkney, Language Centre, 12 Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2
6HT (telephone: (2)83360, e-mail: admin@lang.ox.ac.uk).
An application form is downloadable from the Centre's
World Wide Web pages:
http://info.ox.ac.uk/departments/langcentre/courses/weeke
nd_courses/.

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section



OLIS, OXFORD UNIVERSITY'S LIBRARY SYSTEM

OLIS, Oxford University's Library system, is an integrated library
system which offers online cataloguing, circulation, acquisitions and
periodicals registration. Seventy-nine Oxford libraries now catalogue
onto OLIS. See below for a complete list of member libraries with
information about when they began cataloguing and whether they also
use the Acquisitions Circulation or Periodical registration
modules.

OLIS is a union catalogue which contains cataloguing information
(i.e. bibliographic records) from all of the member libraries. This
enables a reader to search for any book held in any OLIS member
library from any terminal or microcomputer connected to OLIS. Copy
information (i.e. shelfmark) which is specific to a particular
library has been separated so that when searching for a book, you
will first be shown the copy information for the items held in the
library where you are conducting your search. If there are copies in
other libraries, for which there is information in the OLIS
catalogue, you will be given the chance to see the information about
them. It will still be necessary to check other catalogues in the
libraries concerned to find information about holdings not yet
catalogued on OLIS. In common with most other academic libraries in
the UK, the catalogue can be searched from any terminal capable of
connected to the University's network.

Retrospective conversion of card and other catalogues into
machine readable form so that they can be interrogated online has
been recognised by the University as a major priority. The OLIS
catalogue currently has over 4.1 million copies attached to 2.9
million individual titles. The Bodleian Library's Pre-1920 catalogue
comprising 1.2 million titles has been available on CD-ROM since
January 1994.

The University is funding the conversion of records in the Bodleian
Guard book catalogues, and in the card catalogues of Bodleian
dependent libraries. This project, using services provided by OCLC,
will be completed this academic year. A similar project to convert
the remaining printed catalogues in the Taylorian is also in process.

A project to produce machine readable records for early printed books
from the Inter-Collegiate Catalogue, funded by HEFCE are available on
OLIS. Details of the project are available at
http://www.lib.ox.ac.uk/icc/.

Online circulation (issuing, reservations, and fines) has been
introduced into 29 OLIS libraries. This allows readers registered in
these libraries to find out what they have on loan and to place
reservations from any terminal. Online acquisitions allows a reader
to find out when a book has been ordered and received by one of the
34 libraries now using the Acquisitions module. Ten libraries are now
using the periodicals registration module. This allows readers to
find out when a specific issue of a journal has been received or
declared missing.

Searching the OPAC (Online Public Access Catalogue) allows you
to access the items catalogued by any of these 79 libraries. There is
information about opening hours, admissions policies as well as
access to library guides on the University Information System at
http://www.lib.ox.ac.uk/libraries/.

The online catalogue is designed so that it can be used easily, but
guidance in how to use it is also provided via the online help
screens. Explanatory leaflets about basic searching procedures are
available in any OLIS library or from the Libraries Automation
Service (2-78170). Library staff are able to show readers how to use
the online catalogue and give advice on how to search the catalogue.
Assistance with problems is also provided by an Online Catalogue Help
Desk (2-77163), staffed by members of the Bodleian Library
Cataloguing Division. This is located in the Lower Reading Room of
the Bodleian Library.

OLIS MEMBER LIBRARIES

          

                               (1)        (2)       (3)         (4)
Key:

(1) Cataloguing
(2) Circulation
(3) Acquisitions
(4) Periodicals Registration  
                                 
All Souls College             Feb 1990
Ashmolean                     Jun 1990             Aug 1991
Balfour Library 
   (Pitt Rivers)              Nov 1993                       Aug 1995
Balliol College               Sep 1989             Aug 1991
Biochemistry                  Jul 1994
Bodleian                      Sep 1988             Aug 1992
Bodleian Japanese Library     Jan 1988   Oct 1994  Aug 1993
Bodleian Law Library          Sep 1988             Aug 1992
Brasenose College             Aug 1993
Cairns Medical Library        Sep 1997   Sep 1997
Centre for Islamic Studies    Jan 1998
Clarendon Laboratory          Jan 1993   Oct 1995
Classics Lending              Oct 1992   Apr 1994
Computing Laboratory          Jun 1990   Oct 1994
Corpus Christi College        Aug 1989   Oct 1992  Aug 1990   Jan 95
Criminological Research       Feb 1995
Earth Sciences                Feb 1992             Aug 1993   Jan 95
Education Studies             Mar 1991   Aug 1995  Aug 1995
Engineering Science           Feb 1991   Oct 1997
English Faculty               Jan 1989   Apr 1990  Aug 1991
Exeter College                Oct 1997
Experimental Psychology       Jun 1990   Oct 1992
Geography                     Jan 1990   Jan 1995  Aug 1991
Harris Manchester             June 1998
Hertford                      June 1998
History Faculty               May 1991   Oct 1996
History of Art                Jan 1992             Aug 1993
History of Science            Feb 1996
Hooke                         Jan 1989   Oct 1989  Oct 1992    Jan 98
Indian Institute              Sep 1988   Oct 1997  Aug 1992 
Institute of Economics 
   & Statistics               Jan 1990
Jesus College                 Aug 1992
Keble College                 Jan 1993
Kellogg College/
  Continuing Education        Sep 1992    Oct 1994 
Lady Margaret Hall            Jul 1992             Oct 1993
Latin American Centre         Jan 1991             Nov 1991
Lincoln College               Jan 1992   Oct 1994
Magdalen College              Jan 1993   Oct 1997
Maison Francaise              Jan 1991
Materials Department          Jan 1993   Oct 1995
Mathematical Institute        May 1990
Merton College                May 1997
Middle East Centre            Jan 1991             Nov 1991
Modern Languages Faculty      Jan 1988   Apr 1990  Sep 1992
Music Faculty                 Jun 1990
New College                   Sep 1989
Nuffield College              Sep 1989   Oct 1994  Aug 1990   Jan 93
Oriental Institute            Jan 1988             Aug 1992
    Chinese Studies           Jan 1988             Aug 1992
    Eastern Art               Jan 1988             Aug 1992
Philosophy                    Nov 1990   Apr 1995  Sep 1992
Physics (Astro, Nuclear)      Jan 1993   
Physiology Departmental       Jun 1990   Oct 1997
Plant Sciences                Jan 1990   Oct 1993
Queen Elizabeth House         Jan 1990   Oct 1992  Aug 1991   Jan 95
Queen's College               Feb 1992             Oct 1997    Oct 97
Radcliffe Science             Sep 1988             Jan 1991     Jan
93
Regent's Park                 Nov 1997
Rhodes House Library          Sep 1988             Aug 1992   Jan 98 

Said Business School          Apr 1996   Oct 1996  Oct 1996
St Anne's College             Jan 1991             Sep 1992
St Antony's College           Jan 1991             Dec 1991
St Cross College              Oct 1993
St Edmund Hall                Jan 1992
St Hugh's                     Jul 1995
St John's College             Jan 1995
St Peter's College            Oct 1993   Oct 1997  Sep 1994
Social and Cultural 
   Anthropology               Jan 1992
Social Studies                Jan 1989   Jan 1990  Aug 1991   Jan 95
Socio-Legal Studies           Jul 1994
Staff Library                 Sep 1989             Jan 1993
Taylor Institution            Sep 1988
Theology                      Jan 1990   Oct 1994
Trinity College               Apr 1992
University Museum             Jan 1991
Wadham College                Apr 1992                       
Wellcome Institute            Oct 1993
Wolfson College               Jul 1990             Aug 1992
Zoology                       Jan 1990   Oct 1997            Jan 98
                              

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section



BODLEIAN LIBRARY


Summer visitor management scheme

From Monday, 4 May, a summer visitor management scheme will come
into operation at the Old Library in order to reduce the
congestion experienced by readers and university staff during the
peak tourist period.

Visitors will follow a route entering the buildings at
Chancellor’s Court, proceeding through Convocation House and the
Divinity School and leaving the building via Old Schools Quad.

The scheme will run between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. daily and
between 10 a.m. and 12 noon on Saturdays from May to the end of
September.

Visitors will be discouraged from entering Old Schools Quad
via the Great Gate, North or South passageways unless they are
shop or exhibition visitors. These entrances will be patrolled by
the summer scheme staff and there will be signage at these points
explaining the new routing.

Readers and those on university business will be able to use
whichever entrance to the Old Schools Quad they find most
convenient. It would greatly assist the smooth working of the
new system if readers and staff would announce themselves, if
necessary, to the summer scheme staff at these entry points.

Further information may be obtained from Dr Judith Thomas,
Assistant Secretary of the Library

(telephone: (2)77224,
e-mail: judith.thomas@bodley.ox.ac.uk).

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section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 30 April 1998: Lectures<br />

Lectures


Contents of this section:

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issue



INAUGURAL LECTURES


Regius Professor of Modern
History

PROFESSOR R.J.W. EVANS will deliver his inaugural lecture
at 5 p.m. on Monday, 11 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `The language of history and the
history of language.'

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section



Harold Vyvyan Harmsworth
Professor of American History

PROFESSOR ERNEST R. MAY will deliver his inaugural
lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 12 May, in the Examination
Schools.

Subject: `Shaping forces in American foreign
policy.'

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section



CYRIL FOSTER LECTURE

H.E. ROLF EKÉUS, Swedish Amabassador to the USA
and Chairman, UN Special Commission on Iraq, 1991–7,
will deliver the Cyril Foster Lecture at 5 p.m. on
Monday, 4 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `The UN Security Council and weapons
of mass destruction in Iraq.'

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section



CHERWELL--SIMON LECTURE 1998

SIR MARTIN WOOD, OBE, FRS, Deputy Chairman, Oxford
Instruments PLC, will deliver the Cherwell-Simon Lecture
at 4.30 p.m. on Friday, 8 May, in Lecture Theatre A,
Zoology/Psychology Building, South Parks Road.

Subject: `Superconductivity, eighty-seven
years on—where's it going?'

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section



HALLEY LECTURE 1998

PROFESSOR VERA C. RUBIN, Carnegie Institution of
Washington, will deliver the Halley Lecture at 5 p.m. on
Tuesday, 19 May, in the Lecture Theatre, the University
Museum.

Subject: `What Halley didn't know about the
universe.'

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section



ASTOR VISITING LECTURE

PROFESSOR H. FOLEY, Barnard College, will lecture at 5
p.m. on Thursday, 7 May, in the Garden Quad Auditorium,
St John's College.

Subject: `Clytemnestra's apology.'

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section



PROFESSOR OF POETRY

Three poets: D.H. Lawrence, Robert Lowell, Ted Hughes

PROFESSOR JAMES FENTON will lecture at 5 p.m. on
Thursdays in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building.

14 May: `D.H. Lawrence.'

21 May: `Robert Lowell.'

28 May: `Ted Hughes.'

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section



DAVID LEWIS LECTURE

PROFESSOR P. BRIANT, Toulouse, will deliver the third
annual David Lewis Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 20
May, in the Garden Quad Auditorium, St John's College.

Convener: Dr A.K. Brown, Christ Church.

Subject: `Greek epigraphy and Achaemenid
history: from Sardis to Xanthos.'

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section



CLARENDON LECTURES IN
MANAGEMENT STUDIES 1998

Managing innovation and change

PROFESSOR DAVID TEECE, Mitsubishi Bank Professor, Haas
School of Business, University of California, Berkeley,
will deliver the Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies
at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination
Schools.

Tue. 5 May: `The knowledge economy and
intellectual capital management.'

Wed. 6 May: `Innovation and business
organisation.'

Thur. 7 May: `Intellectual property,
technology strategy, and public policy.'

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section



THOMAS HARRIOT LECTURE 1998

DR J. ROCHE, Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies,
Oxford, will deliver the Thomas Harriot Lecture at 5 p.m.
on Thursday, 14 May, in the Champneys Room, Oriel
College.

Subject: `Harriot, Oxford, and twentieth-century
historiography.'

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section



INTER-FACULTY COMMITTEE FOR
AFRICAN STUDIES


African Studies Lecture 1998

DR PETER NYOT KOK, visiting professor at the Max Planck
Institute, Hamburg, will deliver the African Studies
Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 14 May, in the Oakeshott
Room, Lincoln College.

Subject: `Islam and the nation state in
Africa.'

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section



ANTHROPOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY

ESCR Research Programme in Transnational Communities:
Conceiving transnational activity

Amended notice

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Fridays
in the Upper Lecture Theatre, the School of Geography.

This replaces the notice published in the
Gazette of 23 April, p. 1034. Professor
Kevin Robins will now lecture in place of Professor
Strange on 15 May.

PROFESSOR M. ALBROW, Roehampton Institute

8 May: `Frames and transformations in
transnational studies.'

PROFESSOR K. ROBINS, Newcastle

15 May: `Spaces of global media.'

PROFESSOR L. SKLAIR, LSE

22 May: `Transnational practices and the
analysis of the global system.'

PROFESSOR A. PORTES, Princeton

29 May: `Globalisation from below: the
rise of transnational communities.'

PROFESSOR Z. BAUMAN, Leeds

5 June: `Ethic networks in a networked
world.'

PROFESOR S. CASTLES, Wollongong

12 June: `New migrations, ethnicity, and
nationalism in south-east and east Asia.'

PROFESSOR R. COHEN, Warwick

19 June: `Transnational social
movements: an appraisal.'

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section


Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology

Youth, fertility, and reproductive health

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on
Thursdays in the Lecture Room, 61 Banbury Road.

Conveners: Professor David Parkin and Dr
Soraya Tremayne.

DR N. PRICE, Wales

30 Apr.: `Young people's reproductive
health: concepts, issues, and a framework for
action.'

DR N. LOVELL, Kent

7 May: `Pruning the fertility tree. Some
Watchi case studies.'

DR S. FRANKLIN, Lancaster

14 May: `Cloning: reproductive change or
continuity?'

DR J. BOYDEN, social anthropologist; social policy
adviser

21 May: `Social and cultural definitions
of youth: some controversies and contradictions.'

DR A. RUSSELL, Durham

28 May: `Teenage pregnancy: social
problem or moral panic?'

DR I. SMYTH, Oxfam

4 June: `Alternative meaning of
reproductive health and rights.'

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section



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Department of Plant Sciences: research talks

The following talks will be given at 4 p.m. on Thursdays
in the Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Plant
Sciences.

PROFESSOR T. THOMAS, Texas A & M University

14 May: to be announced.

DR P. DUPREE, Cambridge

21 May: `Identification,
compartmentation, and targeting of endomembrane
proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.'

PROFESSOR G. WHITELAM, Leicester

28 May: `Antibody engineering and its
application to plant science.'

PROFESSOR C. KNOWLES, Oxford Centre for Environmental
Biotechnology

4 June: `The biodegradation of cyanide
and metal cyanides.'

PROFESSOR R. DOUCE, Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire
Végétable, Grenoble

11 June: `Plant subcellular metabolism
and the design of new herbicides.'

DR K. PYKE, Royal Holloway

18 June: `Chloroplast development in
Arabidopsis.'

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section


Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays
in the Department of Biochemistry. Dr Perutz's seminar (5
June) will take place in the Large Lecture Theatre; all
other meetings will be held in Lecture Theatre 1.

Convener: L.N. Johnson, MA, David Phillips
Professor of Molecular Biophysics.

DR T.J. RICHMOND, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology,
ETH, Zurich

1 May: `The X-ray structure of the
nucleosome core and its implications for
chromatin.'

DR D. LEAHY, Johns Hopkins

15 May: `Structure and function of the
development signalling molecule hedgehog.'

DR A.G. MURZIN, Cambridge

22 May: `Analysis and classification of
protein structures.'

DR P.E. GOODFORD

29 May: `The role of water in structure-
based drug design.'

DR M. PERUTZ, Cambridge

5 June: `Glutamine repeats and inherited
neurodegenerative diseases.'

DR S.J.H. ASHCROFT

19 June: `How sulphonylureas stimulate
insulin secretion.'

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section


Department of Zoology: departmental seminars

The following seminars will be given at 4.30 p.m. on
Mondays in Zoology Lecture Theatre B. Enquiries should be
directed to David Goldstein or Adrian Thomas.

Details of the 25 May seminar will be announced later.

PROFESSOR S. GREENFIELD

4 May: `From chemicals to
consciousness.'

PROFESSOR B. SPRATT

11 May: `The evolution of bacterial
populations.'

PROFESSOR P. HOLLAND, Reading

18 May: `Of genomes and germ layers:
animal evolution in leaps and bounds?'

DR S. GUPTA

1 June: `The evolution of strain
structure in antigenically diverse infectious
agents.'

DR E.J. MILNER-GULLAND, Warwick

8 June: `Bringing home the bacon: a
spatial model of wild pig harvesting in North
Sulawesi, Indonesia.'

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section



CLINICAL MEDICINE

Clinical endocrine and metabolic meetings

The following meetings will be held at 12.45 p.m. on
Wednesdays in the Committee Room, Green College.

PROFESSOR P. STEWART, Birmingham

6 May: `What is new in endocrine
hypertension.'

DR G. GIBBONS

13 May: `LDL: big is not beautiful.'

DR S. GRIFFIN, Aldermoor Health Centre, Southampton

20 May: `Diabetes care: hospital versus
community and screening for type 2 diabetes.'

DR F. ASHCROFT

27 May: `ATP-potassium channels: their
role in insulin secretion.'

DR T.J. AITMAN, Hammersmith Hospital, London

3 June: `Defects in lipolysis and
insulin action: a genetic approach.'

PROFESSOR SIR PHILIP RANDLE

10 June: `Glucose fatty acid cycle after
thirty-five years.'

PROFESSOR R. THAKKER, Hammersmith Hospital, London

17 June: `Update on MENI gene.'

DR P. PRIMATESTA, University College, London

24 June: `The Health Survey for England
as a monitoring tool for the nation's
health—data on cardiovascular conditions and
predisposing factors.'

DR G. CAREY

15 July: `Lipid metabolism.'
(Provisional title)

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section


Oxford Clinical Neurosciences Lectures

The following lectures will be given at 11.30 a.m. on
Fridays in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe
Infirmary.

DR D. STEVENS, Gloucestershire Royal Hospital

15 May: `Neurology services in the
twenty-first century.'

DR J. LAND, the National Hospital

12 June: `The mitochondrial electron
transport chain, the final common target in
neurodegenerative disease?'

DR M. ROSSOR, Institute of Neurology

19 June: `Recent advances in Alzheimer's
disease.'

DR G.D. SCHOTT, National Hospital

17 July: `Managing central pain.'

PROFESSOR R. DOLAN, Institute of Neurology

18 Sept.: `Neurobiology of human
emotion—perspective from functional imaging.'

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section



LITERAE HUMANIORES

Philosophy of Physics Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4.15 p.m. on
Fridays in the Lecture Room, the Sub-faculty of
Philosophy, 10 Merton Street, unless otherwise specified.
Details of the 19 June seminar will be announced later.

Conveners: G. Bacciagaluppi (M.Phil., Ph.D.
Cambridge), Junior Research Fellow in Philosophy, Balliol
College, H.R. Brown, MA, Reader in Philosophy, and S.W.
Saunders, MA, University Lecturer in the Philosophy of
Science.

PROFESSOR G. STEDMAN

1 May: `Conventionality of
Synchronisation, Gauge Dependence and Test Theories
of Relativity.'

DR J. CHRISTIAN

8 May: `Newton-Cartan Quantum Gravity:
What makes it largely unproblematic (unlike the
extremely problematic full quantum gravity), and what
implications does its exact solubility have for
Feynman-Penrose-type proposals of gravity-induced
quantum state-reduction mechanism.'

PROFESSOR A. ZEILINGER, VIENNA

15 May: `Quantum Entanglement and
Information: A Plea for Copenhagen.'

DR J. BUTTERFIELD

22 May: `What is the Problem of Time in
Quantum Gravity?'

DR A. VALENTINI, Rome

29 May, 4.15 p.m., and 30 May, 11 a.m. and
2.30
: p.m. titles to be announced.

DR N. GRANEAU

5 June: `The Role of Newtonian Physics
in the History of Electromagnetism.'

PROFESSOR P. CATTON

12 June: `How Newton Prefigured
Einstein's Empiricist Idea that Space-Time be
Regarded as merely a Structural Quality of Physical
Fields.'

PROFESSOR D. MALAMENT, Chicago

26 June: `Two Concepts of Rotation in
General Relativity.'

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section



LITERAE HUMANIORES AND CORPUS
CHRISTI CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF GREEK AND ROMAN ANTIQUITY

Common themes in ancient and modern philosophy

This colloquium will be held on Saturday, 6 June, in
Corpus Christi College. A buffet lunch will be provided
without charge. Those wishing to attend are asked to
notify Mr Taylor at Corpus Christi College as soon as
possible, and not later than Wednesday, 27 May,
indicating whether they wish to have lunch.

Convener: C.C.W. Taylor, B.Phil., MA, Reader
and University Lecturer (CUF) in Philosophy.

GAIL FINE

9.30 a.m.: `Reheated cabbage? Descartes
and ancient scepticism.'

BERNARD WILLIAMS

11.30 a.m.: `Virtues and morality: too
late for Aristotle?'

TERENCE IRWIN

2.15 p.m.: `A law of one's own: autonomy
in Kant and some predecessors.'

MYLES BURNYEAT

4.15 p.m.: `Plato on couches, song and
civic tradition.' (Bring a text of the
Republic)

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section



MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

DR REGINE OTTO, Stiftung Weimarer Klassik, will talk
about the history and work of the Weimar research
institutions at 8.30 p.m. on Monday, 11 May, in Worcester
College.

Convener: T.J. Reed, MA, Taylor Professor of
the German Language and Literature.


MR NOEL CLARK will lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 11 May,
in the Old Library, Hertford College.

Convener: G.C. Stone, MA, University Lecturer
in non-Russian Slavonic Languages.

Subject: `Translating Polish poetry (with
readings).'

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section



MODERN HISTORY

Seminar in medieval history

The following seminars will be held on Mondays in All
Souls College. The 11 May seminar will take place at 3
p.m. Seminar Room 3; all other meetings will be held at 5
p.m. in the Wharton Room.

Conveners: R.R. Davies, MA, D.Phil., Chichele
Professor of Medieval History, and J.R.L. Maddicott, MA,
D.Phil., University Lecturer (CUF) in Modern History.

D. HUGHES

4 May: `Odo and Herman of Tournai.'

DR P. BRAND

11 May: `Rhetoric and reality: the
making and enforcement of thirteenth-century English
legislation.'

S. NIKOLOV

18 May: `The Bulgars and Christianity in
the pagan period (seventh to mid-eighth
centuries).'

DR J. DUNBABIN

25 May: `Charles of Anjou: familia et
familiares.'

K. GAZZARD

1 June: `The Vita Abbonis:
the biography of a thirteenth-century monk in
politics.'

PROFESSOR J. MASS, Stanford

8 June: `Men, women, and the law in
early medieval Japan.'

PROFESSOR W. BRANDMÜLLER

15 June: `Pope John
XXIII—Baldassare Cossa in historiography.'

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section


Social and economic history of the British Isles
1000–1600

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on
Wednesdays in the Hovenden Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: Professor R.R. Davies, Professor
R.J.W. Evans, R. Faith, N. Mayhew, and P. Nightingale.

A. BELL

6 May: `Public work, natural disaster,
and the economic ebb and flow of eastern England in
the Middle Ages.'

PROFESSOR P. HARVEY, Durham

13 May: `The twelfth-century reeve.'

DR P. BRAND

20 May: `Stewards, bailiffs, and the
emerging legal profession in the thirteenth
century.'

J. BOLTON, Queen Mary College, London

27 May: `King John and the money supply:
early thirteenth-century inflation revisited.'

D. STONE, Queen's College, Canterbury

3 June: `An ecological crisis?
Productivity and management on the demesne farm of
Wisbech 1314–1430.'

DR H. FOX, Leicester

10 June: `Fisheries, fishery folk, and
fishing villages along the south Devon coast
1100–1600. An illustrated talk.'

DR R. FAITH and DR M. RYAN (leading discussion)

17 June: `The "Feudal
Revolution" debate resumed.'

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section


Commonwealth History Graduate Seminar: empire and
environmental issues

This workshop will be held on Friday, 8 May, in the
Modern History Faculty. Each session will close with a
period of discussion.

Session I: Water

PROFESSOR G. CHAPMAN, Lancaster

10 a.m.: `Whose logic counts? Large-scale
irrigation in South Asia as contested knowledge.'

PROFESSOR W. ADAMS, Cambridge

10.30 a.m.: `Running water: irrigation and the
state in Kenya.'

Session II: Forests

V. DAMODORAN, Sussex

12 noon: `Gender, environment, and famine in
nineteenth-century Chota Nagpur.'

PROFESSOR M. WILLIAMS

12.30 p.m.: `Deforestation and biodiversity: the
social construction of a concept.'

Session III: Land Use

DR J. FAIRHEAD and DR M. LEACH, SOAS


2.30 p.m.
: `The deployment of scientific
rationality concerning soils, climate, and land use
in the politics of forced displacement: cases from
colonial French West Africa.'

PROFESSOR W. BEINART

3 p.m.: `Prickly pear in South Africa.'

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section


World History Seminar: the city as metropolis

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays
in the Danson Room, Trinity College.

A. SHERRATT

12 May: `The metropolis: origins.'

J. DE VRIES

19 May: `Early modern Amsterdam.'

D. KEENE, Centre for Metropolitan History, London

26 May: `Metropolitan systems before
1800: England and Japan compared.'

R. DRAYTON

2 June: `Bordeaux and the eighteenth-
century world.'

P. KIDAMBI

9 June: `The making of an Indian
metropolis: Bombay.'

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section


Seminar: east and central Europe

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on
Fridays in Oriel College.

Conveners: Professor R.J. Crampton, Professor
R.J.W. Evans, and Dr D. Rechter.

V. RIZESCU

1 May: `Ideological currents in Romania
around 1900.'

M. KIZILOV, Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies

8 May: `The ethnic situation in the
Crimea from the sixteenth to the eighteenth
century.'

PROFESSOR J. BREUILLY, Birmingham

15 May: `Understanding nationalism:
eastern and central Europe in the nineteenth
century.'

DR P. WEINDLING, Wellcome Unit

22 May: `Delousing eastern Europe: post-
World War I sanitary border controls.'

MS M. GOLOUBEVA, Cambridge

29 May: `The representation of the
dynasty in the reign of Emperor Leopold I.'

V. SMETANA

5 June: `The foreign policy of Edvard
Benes during World War II.'

MS D. GÖBEL

12 June: `Beyond party strife: Russian
public discourse on foreign policy, 1906–14.'

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section



ORIENTAL STUDIES

Topics in Ancient Near Eastern Studies and Egyptology

The following seminars will be given at 3 p.m. on
Tuesdays in Lecture Room 1, the Oriental Institute.

Conveners: J.R. Baines, MA, D.Phil.,
Professor of Egyptology, J.A. Black, B.Phil., MA,
D.Phil., University Lecturer in Akkadian, and S. Dalley,
MA, Senior Research Fellow, Somerville College.

D. BROWN

5 May: `Some fine detail in Ancient Near
Eastern weather records: cuneiform diaries, tree
rings, volcanoes and things.'

A. LEAHY, Birmingham

19 May: `Somtutefnakht of Heracleopolis:
the art and politics of self-commemoration in the
seventh century BC.'

L. MESKELL

2 June: `Evidence for social inequality
at the settlement of Deir el Medina.'

E. ROBSON

9 June: `Scribal education in Old
Babylonian Ur and Nippur: some preliminary
results.'

F. REYNOLDS, Birmingham

16 June: `What went on in Equlû?
Cultic practices in Babylon in the first millennium
BC.'

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section



PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Oxford Physics Colloquia

The following lectures will be held at 4.15 p.m. on
Fridays in the Lindemann Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon
Laboratory.

For details of the Cherwell–Simon Lecture, to be
given on 8 May, see above.

Conveners: R.J. Nicholas, MA, D.Phil.,
Professor of Physics, and G.G. Ross, MA, Professor of
Theoretical Physics.

DR J. ANNETT, Bristol

15 May: `Unconventional
superconductors.'

PROFESSOR A. BROWN, Michigan State

29 May: `Fifty years of the nuclear
shell model.'

PROFESSOR D. ANDERSON

5 June: `El Niño.'

PROFESSOR J. HOUGH, Glasgow

12 June: `Gravitational wave detection.'

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section


Dyson Perrins Colloquia

The following colloquia will be held at 4 p.m. on
Thursdays in the Dyson Perrins Lecture Theatre.

PROFESSOR G. DODSON, York

7 May: `The catalytic structures in the
penicillin-G and penicillin-V acylases.'

DR G. PRITCHARD

28 May: `Natural and unnatural
heterocyclic compounds, a challenge for organic
synthesis.'

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section


Dyson Perrins Laboratory: Robert Robinson Memorial
Lectures 1998

PROFESSOR P. SCHULZ, Berkeley, will deliver a series of
four Robert Robinson Memorial Lectures from Monday, 8
June, to Wednesday, 10 June. The times and subjects of
the lectures will be announced later.

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section


Dyson Perrins Laboratory: Andy Derome Memorial
Lectures 1998

PROFESSOR E.CARREIRA, California Institute of Technology,
Pasadena, USA, will deliver the Andy Derome Memorial
Lectures at 4 p.m. on the days shown in the Dyson Perrins
Lecture Theatre.

Mon. 29 June: `Asymmetric synthesis with
transition-metal reagents and catalysts.'

Tue. 30 June: `Studies in natural products
synthesis.'

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section


Theoretical Chemistry Group Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays
in the New Chemistry Seminar Room.

Convener: M.S. Child, MA, Coulson Professor
of Theoretical Chemistry.

PROFESSOR I.P. GRANT

4 May: `Molecular relativistic
calculations with BERTHA.'

J.R. KRUMRINE, Maryland

11 May: `Quantum Monte Carlo studies of
B atoms trapped in cryogenic H2.'

PROFESSOR W. NELLIS, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

18 May: `Metallisation of fluid hydrogen
at 1.4 Mbar.'

C.L. RUSSELL

25 May: `Quantum dynamics of the
N++H2 reaction.'

PROFESSOR D.J. TILDESLEY, Southampton

1 June: `Dissipative particle dynamics.'

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section


Theoretical Particle Physics Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on
Fridays in the Nuclear and Astrophysics Lecture Theatre.

Conveners: I.I. Kogan, MA, University
Lecturer in Physics, and S. Sarkar (Ph.D. Bombay),
Research Fellow, Wolfson College.

PROFESSOR E. RABINOVICI, CERN, Geneva

8 May: `Brane dynamics and
supersymmetric gauge theory.'

DR I. MONTVAY, DESY, Hamburg

22 May: `Gluinos on the lattice: an
algorithm and a simulation.'

DR J. EVANS, Cambridge

5 June: `Integrable Models.'

PROFESSOR J.-L. GERVAIS, ENS, Paris

19 June: `Developments in Liouville
Theory.'

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section


Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Planetary Physics Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4.15 p.m. on
Thursdays in the Dobson Lecture Room. Because on rare
occasions the arrangements need to be changed, anyone
intending to come to Oxford specially to attend should
check first by telephoning (2)72933.

DR F. MOLTENI, European Centre for Medium-Range Weather
Forecasting, Reading

7 May: `Predictability of snow depth
anomalies over Eurasia and influences on the Asian
summer monsoon.'

MRS S. BALLARD, Meteorological Office, Bracknell

14 May: `Developments in data
assimilation.'

PROFESSOR A. BREWER

21 May: `Meteorology and measurements,
an autobiography.'

DR A.J. SIMMONS, European Centre for Medium-Range Weather
Forecasting, Reading

4 June: `Stratospheric water vapour and
tropical tropopause temperatures in ECMWF analyses
and multi-year simulations.'

DR I. ROBINSON, Southampton Oceanography Centre, NERC

11 June: `Developments in ocean colour
remote sensing.'

DR G. BRIGGS, NASA Ames Research Center

18 June: `Robotic and human exploration
of Mars.'

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section


Nonlinear and geophysical fluid dynamics seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Mondays
in the Dobson Lecture Room, the Atmospheric Physics
Laboratory. Details of the 15 June seminar will be
announced later.

The conveners are Dr Peter Read and Dr Irene Moroz. The
organisers are Dr Sue Gray (telephone: Oxford (2)72342),
and Mr Michael Jameson.

DR S. GILLE, East Anglia

11 May: `An inverse model heat budget
for the Antarctic circumpolar current in the south-
eastern Pacific.'

DR S. COX, Nottingham

18 May: `Self-similar flow of a viscous
fluid in a channel, and solutions of the
Proudman–Johnson equation.'

DR L. GRAY, RAL

1 June: `Interannual variability in
middle atmosphere trace gas distributions.'

DR R. WILLIAMS, Liverpool

8 June: `Do float trajectories follow
potential vorticity contours in the ocean?'

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section


Physical Earth Science Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on
Fridays in the Earth Sciences coffee room.

Convener: P.J. Clarke, D.Phil., Junior
Research Fellow, Wolfson College.

S. BESEDIN

1 May: `Hydrogen in metals at high
pressures.'

LIPING ZHOU, Cambridge

8 May: `Palaeoenvironmental magnetism of
dust records from China.'

A. DENSMORE, Trinity College, Dublin

15 May: `Landslides and landscapes.'

D. RANDALL

22 May: `Central Andean crustal
rotations: a single model for the Arica
Deflection?'

P. BLONDEL, Southampton Oceanography Centre

29 May: `Black smokers and volcanoes:
exploration of mid-ocean ridges.'

M. KENDALL, Leeds

5 June: `Lower-mantle seismic
anisotropy.'

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section



SOCIAL STUDIES

Gender and the public/private divide

The following interdisciplinary seminars will be held at
5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Seminar Room, Nuffield
College.

S. MCKECHNIE, Which?, and A. ROWLATT, National Office of
Statistics

6 May: `The wider issue: representation
and experience of women in politics and business.'

DR I. ZWEINIGER-BARGIELOWSKA, Aberystwyth

13 May: `The citizen housewife: women
under austerity in the 1940s.'

DR SIN YE CHEUNG, Oxford Brookes

20 May: `The subject-choice of women in
education and its occupational consequences.'

H. CRAWLEY-LYONS

27 May: `Gender, persecution, and the
public/private dichotomy: refugee women and asylum in
the UK.'

DR D. COLE, Queen Mary and Westfield College, London

3 June: `Political theory'
(provisional title).

DR C. GARCIA-PENALOSA

10 June: `A rational learning model of
gender- segregation in labour markets.'

DR V. RANDALL, Essex

17 June: `The politics of child-care:
implications for the public/private debate.'

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section


African Studies Seminar

Unless otherwise stated, the following seminars will be
held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in St Antony's College.

Conveners: W. Beinart, MA, Rhodes Professor
of Race Relations, A.R. Mustapha, MA, D.Phil., University
Lecturer in African Politics, and G.P. Williams, MA,
M.Phil., University Lecturer (CUF) in Politics.

A. QUAYSON, Cambridge

30 Apr.: `Teaching literature; thinking
politics. A note on methods.'

K. MEAGHER, Arthur Bellow University, Zaria

7 May: `The Alzahai of modernity: cross-
border trade and northern Nigeria.'

DR P.N. KOK, Max Planck Institute

14 May, Oakeshott Room, Lincoln College:
`Islam and the nation state in Africa.'
(African Studies Lecture)

R. CLINE-COLE, Centre for West African Studies,
Birmingham

21 May: `Redefining forestry space:
threatened livelihoods and contrasting landscape
visions in colonial Northern Nigeria,
1939–50.'

M. GOULDING, Warden of St Antony's

28 May: `Peace-making and peace-keeping
in the post-Cold War Africa.'

R. MARSHALL, SOAS

5 June: `Mediating the global and the
local in Nigerian Pentecostalism.'

R. WATSON

12 June: `The Cloth of the Field of
Gold: material culture and civic politics in colonial
Ibadan.'

A. MAMA, Centre for Research and Documentation, Kano

19 June: `Khaki in the family: women's
responses to military authoritarianism in Nigeria.'

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section


Lecture

THE HON. DOUGLAS WILDER, former Governor of Virginia,
will lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 8 May, in Room C2,
Nuffield College.

Convener: B.E. Shafer, MA, Mellon Professor
of American Government.

Subject: `Party politics in Virginia and the
nation.'

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section



SAID BUSINESS SCHOOL

Interdepartmental finance seminars

The following seminars will be held at 12.30 p.m. on
Mondays in the Seminar Room, the Radcliffe Infirmary.
Enquiries may be directed to Elaine Durham, Said Business
School, 59 George Street, Oxford OX1 2BE (telephone:
(2)88650, e-mail: elaine.durham@obs.ox.ac.uk).

Conveners: Alexander Ljungqvist, Said
Business School, Hyun Shin, Economics, and Paul Wilmott,
Mathematics.

W. WILHELM, Boston College

11 May: `Human capital and the theory of
the firm.'

M. FREEMAN, Warwick Business School

18 May: `Resolving the Mehra and
Prescott puzzles for investors with highly positive
time preferences.'

A. BURASCHI, London Business School

1 June: `Pricing kernels implied in
option prices: unlocking the information from the
smile.'

W. BROWN, LSE

8 June: `R.&D. intensity and
finance.'

W. DE BONDT, Zurich

15 June: `Herding in analyst earnings
forecasts: evidence from the UK.'

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section



COMPUTING LABORATORY

Departmental seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4.15 p.m. on
Tuesdays in the OUCL Lecture Theatre.

The co-ordinators are Professor W.F. McColl (telephone:
(2)73829), and Professor L.N. Trefethen (telephone:
(2)73886).

PROFESSOR O. HAUGEN, Oslo

12 May: `TIMe for dialectic software
development.'

PROFESSOR J. DONGARRA, Tennessee

9 June: `High-performance computing,
numerical libraries, and trends.'

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section


Numerical Analysis Group

Computational mathematics and applications seminars

The following seminars will take place on Thursdays.
Unless otherwise indicated, they will be held at 3 p.m.
in the OUCL Lecture Theatre.

The co-ordinators are J.D.P. Donnelly and J. Scott (RAL).
Enquiries should be directed to Shirley Day (telephone:
(2)73885).

PROFESSOR A. NEWELL, Warwick

30 Apr.: `Semiconductor lasers and
Kolmogorov spectra.'

DR K.D. ANDERSEN, Dash Associates Ltd.

7 May, 2 p.m., RAL: `Parallelisation of
the XPRESS interior point optimiser for a shared-
memory multiprocessor using an OpenMP (like)
programming environment.'

PROFESSOR H.VAN DER VORST, Utrecht

14 May: `Hybrid iteration methods.'

DR C.L. FARMER, GeoQuest Ltd.

21 May: `An application of unstructured
grids to structured grid generation.'

PROFESSOR A. STUART, Stanford

28 May: `Statistical properties of
computations for large coupled systems of
oscillators.'

PROFESSOR M. GROTE, ETH-Zurich

4 June: `Numerical methods for time-
dependent wave propagation in unbounded domains.'

PROFESSOR G. STRANG, MIT

11 June: `The discrete cosine transform
and image processing.'

DR S. SHERWIN, Imperial College, London

18 June: `Spectra/hp element methods for
compressible and incompressible fluid dynamics.'

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section


Programming Research Group

Strachey Lecture

ANTHONY E. SALE, Museums Director, Bletchley Park, will
deliver the Strachey Lecture at 4.15 p.m. on Tuesday, 5
May, in the Computing Laboratory Lecture Theatre.

Subject: `World War II code-breaking with the
Bombe and the Colossus.'

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section



EUROPEAN HUMANITIES RESEARCH
CENTRE

Archive of performances of Greek and Roman drama

The following meetings will be held at 5 p.m. on the days
shown.

Conveners: O.P. Taplin, MA, D.Phil., Reader
in Greek Literature, and E.M. Hall, MA, D.Phil.,
University Lecturer (CUF) in Classical Languages.

PROFESSOR H. FOLEY, Columbia

Tue. 5 May,
EHRC, Golden Cross Court, 4 Cornmarket: `Some modern productions and
adaptations of Greek tragedy' (with video
illustrations
).

PROFESSOR DR H. FLASHAR, Munich

Wed. 10 June, Headley Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean
Museum: `Sophocles and
Mendelssohn—the Antigone of 1841'
(with visual and musical illustrations).

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section



INSTITUTE OF EUROPEAN STUDIES,
CENTRE FOR EUROPEAN POLITICS, ECONOMICS, AND SOCIETY, AND
THE CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES

Human rights in a European context: law and policy
dimensions

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays
in the European Studies Centre, St Antony's College, 70
Woodstock Road. Details of the 11 May seminar will be
announced later.

Convener: G.S. Goodwin-Gill, MA, D.Phil.,
Supernumerary Fellow, Wolfson College.

A.B. JOHNSSON, Deputy Secretary General and Secretary
General elect, Inter-Parliamentary Union, Geneva

4 May: `Human rights and the democratic
imperative in Europe: the role of parliaments and
parliamentarians.'

D. DE JONG, Permanent Representation of the Netherlands
to the European Union, Brussels

18 May: `Europe, refugees, and migrants:
the hunt for harmony of law, policy, and
practice.'

O. ANDRYSEK, International Federation of Red Cross and
Red Crescent Societies, Geneva

1 June: `East and central Europe:
developing human rights and refugee protection in
newly democratic states.'

C. HAMILTON, Essex

8 June: `Movement of children across
state boundaries.'

C. EVANS

15 June: `Religion and state in
multicultural Europe.'

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section



QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE


Refugee Studies Programme

Seminars on Forced Migration

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on
Wednesdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen
Elizabeth House.

Further information may be obtained from the Education
Unit, Refugee Studies Programme, Queen Elizabeth House,
21 St Giles', Oxford OX1 3LA (telephone: Oxford (2)70723,
fax: (2)70721, e-mail: rspedu@ermine.ox.ac.uk, Internet:
http://www.qeh.ox.ac.uk/rsp/).

LOUIS GENTILE, UNHCR, London

6 May: `International protection: myth
or reality?'

DR D. JOLY, Warwick

20 May: `Temporary protection: the
cornerstone of a new asylum regime.'

DR P. WEIL, Institut d'études politiques, Paris

27 May: `Why was it necessary to reform
French policy on immigration, asylum, and
citizenship?'

DR L. MALKKI,, University of California, Irvine

3 June: `Children, futures, and the
domestication of hope.'

DR M. BERDAL

10 June: `The rise and fall of the safe
areas in Bosnia, 1993--5.'

DR J. KUPER, independent legal researcher, author of
International Law Concerning Child Civilians in
Armed Conflict


17 June: `The enforcement of
international law affecting children in armed
conflict.'

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section


Elizabeth Colson Lecture 1998

DR M. CERNEA, Senior Social Adviser, MNSED, World Bank
Group, will deliver the Elizabeth Colson Lecture at 5
p.m. on Wednesday, 13 May, in Rhodes House. The lecture
will be followed by a reception.

Subject: `Economics, the private sector, and
human rights: open issues in population resettlement.'

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section


Foundation Course

DR M. GIBNEY

Tue. 10 a.m.–12 noon, Library Wing
Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House
: `Forced
migration and liberal democratic states.'

DR A. SHACKNOVE

Wed. 11 a.m.–1 p.m., St Cross
Building
: `International human rights and
refugee law II.'

PROFESSOR S.N. MACFARLANE

Fri. 11 a.m.–1 p.m., Blackhall Seminar
Room, Queen Elizabeth House
: `Forced migration
and international organisations.'

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section


Short Course

NUALA MOLE, Director, the Aire Centre, London, will teach
this course, to be held on 27 and 28 September, in Queen
Elizabeth House. The fee is £100 (excluding
accommodation).

Subject: `Asylum in a frontier-free Europe.'

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section



CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES


Socio-Legal Studies Annual
Lecture 1998

PROFESSOR R. WEISBERG, Walter Floersheimer Chair in
Constitutional Law, Benjamin N. Cardozo Law School,
Yeshiva University, will deliver the fourth annual Socio-
Legal Studies Lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Friday, 8 May, in
Room 6, the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Vichy law and the Holocaust in
France.'

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section



WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY
OF MEDICINE

Body and culture: early anatomy through diverse
perspectives

The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on
Thursdays in the Wellcome Unit, 47 Banbury Road.

Convener: E. Savage-Smith (Ph.D. Wisconsin),
Research Associate of the Unit.

R. FLEMMING, Wellcome Institute, London

30 Apr.: `Acculturated anatomies: female
bodies in Roman imperial medical writing.'

DR SAVAGE-SMITH

7 May: `Islamic culture and anatomical
illustration.'

D. JACQUART, École Pratique des Hautes
Études, Paris

14 May: `Parisian anatomy during the
fourteenth and fifteenth centuries: some
reassessments.'

C. CULLEN, SOAS, London

21 May: `The Chinese body: substance and
function.'

A. CUNNINGHAM, Wellcome Unit, Cambridge

28 May: `The sacred ritual of anatomy.'

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section



BRASENOSE COLLEGE

Programme in Hellenic Studies: the Greek economy and
the European Community

PROFESSOR G. ALOGOSKOUFIS, Member of the Greek
Parliament, will speak at the seminar to be held at 5
p.m. on Friday, 8 May, in Lecture Room XI, Brasenose
College.

Convener: Professor C. Rozakis, Visiting
Fellow in Hellenic Studies.

Subject: `Greek economic convergence: nominal
and real.'

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section


Tanner Lectures on Human Values 1998

What money can't buy: the moral limits of markets

MICHAEL SANDEL, Harvard, will deliver the Tanner Lectures
on Human Values at 5 p.m. on the following days in the
Examination Schools.


Mon. 11 May: `Commodification,
commercialisation, and privatisation.'

Tue. 12 May: `Markets, morals, and the
public sphere.'

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section



EXETER COLLEGE


Marett Memorial Lecture

RUTH PADEL will deliver the Marett Memorial Lecture at 5
p.m. on Friday, 1 May, in the Saskatchewan Lecture Room,
Exeter College.

Subject: `How myth uses us: Greek
"Guyville" and women's rock music.'

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section



GREEN COLLEGE


Alan Emery Lecture

PROFESSOR V. DUBOWITZ, Emeritus Professor of Paediatrics,
University of London, will deliver the Alan Emery Lecture
at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, 20 May, in the Witts Lecture
Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

Subject: `The floppy infant: from the cradle
to the genes.'

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section



KEBLE COLLEGE


Eric Symes Abbott Memorial
Lecture

CANON ERIC JAMES will deliver the Eric Symes Abbott
Memorial Lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Friday, 8 May, in the
chapel, Keble College.

Subject: `Spirituality, Shakespeare, and
royalty: has the monarchy a future?'

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section



LADY MARGARET HALL


Medico-Legal ethics

SUZELLE SMITH and DON HOWARTH, Senior Partners in Los
Angeles law firm Howarth & Smith, will lecture at
5.15 p.m. on Wednesday, 6 May, in the Talbot Hall, Lady
Margaret Hall. Ms Smith and Mr Howard will be joined in
the programme by Professor A.E. Dick Howard, Professor of
Law, University of Virginia, and Mrs Ruth Deech,
Principal, St Anne's College. Those wishing to attend are
asked to contact Elizabeth Jubb (telephone: Oxford
(2)74302, e-mail: liz.jubb@lmh.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `The consequences of implied and
denied consent.'

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section



PEMBROKE COLLEGE


Blackstone Lecture

LORD NOLAN will deliver the twenty-second Blackstone
Lecture at 11.30 a.m. on Saturday, 16 May, in the
Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `Government, ethics, and the law.'

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section



ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

Modern Italian Studies

PROFESSOR P. POMBENI, Bologna, will lecture at 5 p.m. on
Thursday, 28 May, in the St Antony's College European
Studies Centre, 70 Woodstock Road.

Subject: `Comparing political histories.'

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section



ST JOHN'S COLLEGE


D.F. McKenzie Lecture

PROFESSOR J. VISCOMI, Lawrence Meyer Silfkin Professor of
Literature, University of North Carolina, will deliver
the third annual D.F. McKenzie Lecture at 5 p.m. on
Thursday, 7 May, in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross
Building.

Subject: `Blake's graphical imagination: the
technical and aesthetic origins of Blake's illuminated
books.'

Professor Viscomi will also give a seminar at 12 noon on
Friday, 8 May, in Seminar Room C, St John's College.

Subject: `Making Blake's books, The
Marriage of Heaven and Hell
, and the WWW Blake
archive.'

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section



TRINITY COLLEGE


Richard Hillary Memorial
Lecture

P.D. JAMES will deliver the Richard Hillary Memorial
Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 13 May, in the St Cross
Building.

Subject: `Mystery and mayhem: the craft of
the detective story.'

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section



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture
1998

JUSTICE STEPHEN BREYER of the Supreme Court of the United
States will deliver the H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture at 5
p.m. on Thursday, 7 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `The work of an American
constitutional judge.'

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OXFORD MEDIEVAL SOCIETY

DR C.M. MACROBERT will lecture at 8.30 p.m. on Thursday,
7 May, in the Lady Brodie Room, St Hilda's College. Wine
will be served from 8.15 p.m. New members are welcome.

Subject: `How did scribes learn to spell in
Cyrillic?'

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OXFORD ASIAN TEXTILE GROUP

DR J. BALFOUR-PAUL will lecture at 5.45 p.m. on Tuesday,
5 May, in the Pauling Centre for Human Sciences, 58
Banbury Road. Visitors are welcome (admission £2).

Subject: `Pursuit of indigo: Arabia
eastwards.'

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ASSOCIATION OF WOMEN IN SCIENCE
AND ENGINEERING (OXFORD BRANCH)

PROFESSOR ANN DOWLING, Cambridge, will lecture at 5 p.m.
on Thursday, 7 May, in the Oxford University Museum of
Natural History. The lecture, which is open to the
public, is sponsored by Esso Petroleum.

Tickets, including refreshments, cost £1.50. Tickets
will be available at the door, or may be booked by
contacting Dr Elizabeth Griffin (telephone: Oxford
(2)73345, e-mail: remg@astro.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `Singing flames that break jet
engines and power stations.'

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 30 April 1998: Grants and Funding<br />

Grants and Research Funding


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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RESEARCH AND COMMERCIAL SERVICES OFFICE

The Oxford University Research and Commercial Services Office
(RCSO) is based in the University Offices, Wellington Square,
(with a satellite office in the Medical School Offices, Level 3,
John Radcliffe Hospital). The RCSO is part of the finance
division of the University's central administration.

The office processes and approves all applications to outside
bodies for research grants and approves research related
agreements on behalf of the University. It also acts in an
advisory capacity for those seeking outside funding or requiring
information about specific initiatives (e.g. LINK, ROPA, Teaching
Company Schemes, EU research programmes etc.).

The RCSO produces a weekly bulletin on funding opportunities,
electronic Research and Industry News (eRIN), which is available
to members of the University via the World Wide Web at:
http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rcso/erin/current.

Research contracts with industry are negotiated through the RCSO,
which also deals, inter alia, with various intellectual
property matters, research- related work covered by purchase
orders, consultancy agreements, agreements covering clinical
trials and services, and services to industry.

The Manager of the RCSO is Dr Roger Pritchett (telephone:
2(80499), e-mail: roger.pritchett@admin.ox.ac.uk).

Other members of the RCSO from whom advice may be sought are as
follows:

Dr Michael Halsey, Assistant Registrar (telephone: (2)70011,
e-mail: michael.halsey@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Dr Richard Liwicki, Assistant Registrar, John Radcliffe Hospital
satellite office (telephone: 553 22604, e-mail:
richard.liwicki@admin.ox.ac.uk;

Mr Pierre-Manuel Espinasse, Research Grants and European Liaison
Officer

(telephone: (2)70043, e-mail:
pierre.espinasse@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Ms Fiona Anderson, Contracts Officer (telephone: (2)70142,
e-mail: fiona.anderson@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Ms Kathryn Dally, Administrative Officer (telephone: 2)80319,
e-mail: kathryn.dally@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Mrs Margaret Taylor, Administrative Officer (telephone: (2)80666,
e-mail: margaret.taylor@admin.ox.ac.uk).

Enquiries relating to day-to-day processing of research grant
applications should be addressed to the RCSO's Research Grants
Office, Room 330, the University Offices (telephone: (2)70146),
or, in the case of certain clinical departments, to the RCSO
satellite office, The Medical School Offices, Level 3, John
Radcliffe Hospital, Headington (telephone: 553 22544).

General enquiries may be addressed, in the first instance, to the
Manager's Personal Assistant, Mrs Jane Taylor (telephone:
(2)70143), who will be pleased to direct calls to the appropriate
member of staff.


Administrative procedures in respect of externally sponsored
research

Members of the University are reminded that it is a requirement
of the General Board that all applications for externally funded
support must be endorsed on behalf of the University through the
Research and Commercial Services Office before they are
dispatched to the sponsor, whether or not this is required by the
funding body. (This includes, for example, bodies such as the
Leverhulme Trust, and other charities and EU programmes which do
not specifically ask for administrative authorisation.)

The reason for the requirement is twofold: namely (i) to
ensure that the funds being requested are adequate for the
purpose and the costing rules of the funding body have been
applied correctly, and (ii) to ensure that the University would
be in a position to undertake the obligations arising from an
award and that these do not contravene University policy.

The detailed arrangements are as follows: applicants for
research grants should submit their applications, together with
a completed copy of the University's outside grant form (OG12),
to Room 330, Research and Commercial Services Office, University
Offices, Wellington Square, telephone (2)70146—leaving three
clear working days for them to be processed.

In connection with the acceptance of awards and signature
of contracts it should be noted that Statutes, Tit. X, cl. 2,
provides that `no official of the University or any other person
employed by the University or working in or in connection with
any department of or under the control of the University shall
in connection with any invention, discovery, or patent, or ...
process, or manufacture have authority to make any
representations on behalf of the University or to enter into any
contract on behalf of the University or to be concerned in any
transaction whatsoever in connection therewith on behalf of the
University except with the express consent of Council'.

The relevant officials in the Research and Commercial
Services Office have been given authority to approve applications
for external funds in support of research and the terms of
contracts in straightforward cases under this provision: in more
complicated cases, specific authority is necessary.

Enquiries related to any aspect of externally sponsored
research should be directed to the Research and Commercial
Services Office, whose staff would be pleased to help.

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SIR JOHN HICKS FUND

The Committee for the Sir John Hicks Fund invites applications
from members of the University for grants towards the costs of
research in economic history. Applications will be considered
from undergraduates, graduate students, and members of academic
staff, and may related to research into the economic history of
any period or country.

Applicants should (a) provide sufficient information
about the general nature of their research to establish that it
falls within the field of economic history; and (b)
specify the precise nature and cost of the expenditure for which
a grant is requested. They should also give the name of one
referee who might be consulted by the committee.

It is intended by the committee that grants should normally be
made for sums of up to £250, though this may on occasion be
exceeded. Retrospective grants will be made only in exceptional
circumstances.

The committee will consider applications twice in each year. The
closing date for the first round is Monday of the third week of
Hilary Term, and for the second round Monday of the third week
of Trinity Term. Applications should be sent to Mrs E.A.
Macallister, Secretary of the Committee for the Sir John Hicks
Fund, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD.

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section



STUDENT EXCHANGE PROGRAMME WITH THE
AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY

A small number of places will be available in 1998–9 for
current undergraduate or graduate students of the University who
wish to undertake a period of study at the ANU. Australian
nationals will not normally be eligible to apply. It is expected
that exchanges for graduates will begin in either October 1998
or February 1999 and undergraduate exchanges will begin at the
end of February 1999. Students would normally spend one
semester/two terms at the ANU. A British Airways Travel Bursary
will be available to provide return travel to Australia and a
small bursary may also be available towards other expenses.
Further information and an application form may be obtained from
the International Office, University Offices, Wellington Square
(telephone: (2)70241). The closing date is 22 May.

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section





<br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 30 April 1998: Examinations and Boards<br />

Examinations and Boards


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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ANNUAL ELECTIONS OF MEMBERS OF BOARDS
OF FACULTIES


Board of the Faculty of Clinical
Medicine (12 June): Vacancies

In 1997, Council amended the provisions of Ch. II, Sect. VI,
§ 5, cll. 2 and 5 (1) (Statutes, 1997, p. 249),
so that the timetable for the elections to the Board of the
Faculty of Clinical Medicine shall be varied as follows:
Nominations of candidates by six members of the faculty shall be
made fourteen clear days before the day fixed for the election
and voting papers shall be sent out not later than the eighth day
before the election day.

Notice is hereby given of vacancies for official and ordinary
members, as set out below. Qualification for official and
ordinary membership is set out in Ch. II, Sect. vi, §§
1 and 2 (Statutes, 1997, pp. 243–6). Those
entitled to nominate and vote in these elections are:

(a) For official members, all the members of the
faculty, and

(b) for ordinary members, the members of the faculty
exclusive of those qualified to be official members of the
faculty board.
Nominations in writing by two electors will be received by the
Secretary of Faculties at the University Offices up to 4 p.m. on
Tuesday, 19 May, and nominations in writing by six electors up
to 4 p.m. on Thursday, 28 May. There is no special form, but, in
addition to the signatures of nominators, nominations must state,
in block capitals, the name and initials, and colleges (or, if
no college, the department) of (1) each person nominated, (2)
each nominator.

                    Vacancies      Retiring         Period from
                                   members           MT 1998


(a) 
Official members  Three            Professor Barlow      2 years
                                   Professor Bell
                                   Professor Moxon

(b) 
Ordinary members  Three            Dr Bunch               2 years
                                   Dr Donaghy
                                   Dr Lindsell

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

The following changes in regulations made by the Curators of the University Chest, and, with the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties and the Standing Committee for Economics and Management will come into effect on 15 May. 1 Curators of the University Chest Financial Regulations With effect from 1 June 1998 1 In Ch. VIII, Sect. XII, 6, cl. 2, concerning ethical policy (Statutes, 1997, p. 563), delete `Manager of the Research and Commercial Services Office' and substitute `Secretary to the Conflict of Interest Committee'. 2 Ibid., 10, cl. 3, concerning staff establishment (p. 567), delete `made' and substitute `carried out'. 3 Ibid., 11, concerning accounting records, etc., after the heading and before cl. 1 insert: `Advice on accounting matters may be sought in the first instance from the Deputy Chief Accountant in charge of Departmental Accounts.' 4 Ibid., delete cl. 2, and substitute: `2. Retention of Financial Documents. Prescribed periods and recommended guidelines have been published by the Internal Audit Section as set out in the Schedule below.' 5 Ibid., insert new cl. 4 as follows and renumber existing cll. 4--6 (pp. 567--8) as cll. 5--7: `4.Financially Related Software. Heads of departments and institutions are required to inform the Secretary of the Chest of any software packages with financial applications which they may be intending to acquire, in order to ensure that such projects have been properly planned and resourced, and that the software will provide the required functionality and be compatible with existing financial systems.' 6 Ibid., 12, cl. 1, concerning banking arrangements (p. 568), after `association with the University.' insert `All university income must be banked into a university bank account and properly accounted for, and all university expenditure must be paid from a university bank account.' 7 Ibid., delete cl. 6 (p. 569) and renumber existing cll. 7--9 as cll. 6--8. 8 Ibid., cl. 6 as renumbered, delete `under œ10' and substitute `under œ30'. 9 Ibid., 14, concerning petty cash (p. 570), delete `under œ10' and substitute `under œ30'. 10 Ibid., 17, cl. 3, concerning sales (p. 572), after `university company.' insert `Failure to do so may result in the activity being investigated by the Inland Revenue and the consequent payment of tax.' 11 Ibid., cl. 7, delete `The following have authority ... recover them' and substitute `Heads of departments and institutions and boards and committees must ensure that procedures are in place properly to monitor all debts and to follow up overdue accounts. A debt is created whenever a sale is made. The following authorities to write off bad debts after all reasonable steps have been taken to recover them apply to all debts'. 12 Ibid., insert new item (a) as follows and renumber existing items (a)--(c) as items (b)--(d): `(a) A head of department or institution or a board or committee may write off a bad debt up to œ5,000 against its own funds with the permission of the Secretary of the Chest.' 13 Ibid., delete `A head of department or institution or a board or committee with bad debts ... departmental, etc. funds will be considered by the curators'. 14 Ibid., 19, cl. 1, concerning expenditure (p. 574), after `Invoices must be properly recorded.' insert `Duties of staff should be segregated wherever possible so that more than one member records and processes each transaction. Where only one member of staff is available, procedures for regular independent checks of transactions should be in place.' 15 Ibid., 23, cl. 1, concerning salaries and staff appointments (p. 576), after `dismiss such non-academic staff,' insert `or to dismiss such academic-related staff in circumstances other than those which fall within the provisions of Title VIII or Title XVI, Parts II-- IV,'. 16 Ibid., item (b), delete `dismissal of non--academic staff' and substitute `dismissal of the member of staff concerned'. 17 Ibid., cl. 3 (p. 577), delete `Secretary of Faculties' and substitute `Secretary of the Appointments Committee of the General Board'. 18 Ibid., 25, cl. 3, concerning equipment and furniture (p. 578), delete `Equipment and furniture grant funds may be used only for approved purposes in accordance with HEFCE regulations, and departments' and substitute `Departments'. 19 Ibid., 29, concerning property (p. 581), insert cl. 3: `3. Advice on property matters may be obtained from the University Surveyor in respect of functional property and the Land Agent in respect of non--functional property.' 20 Ibid., 32, concerning personal consultancies (p. 581), after the heading and before cl. 1 insert: `Clauses 1, 2, and 5 below do not apply to CUF lecturers (Ch. VII, Sect. I, 5. A, cl. 10).' 21 Ibid., cl. 3 (p. 582), delete `by faculty board secretaries or the Secretary of the Appointments Committee of the General Board' and substitute `by the Secretary of Faculties'. 22 Ibid., delete 34, concerning university companies, and substitute: ` 34. University Companies `No university company may be set up to exploit any university activity to which the University has rights, or for any other purpose unless approved by Council. Advice should be obtained from the Secretary of the Chest.' 23 Ibid., 39, cl. 1, concerning Value Added Tax (p. 584), after `responsible for its own VAT affairs' delete `, and all' and substitute `including ensuring that it is adequately informed about VAT and related aspects of the matters with which it deals. All'. 24 Ibid., after `inclusion in the University's returns to Customs and Excise' insert `, as well as providing the information needed on invoices and other documents of costs incurred to allow the University to operate its VAT partial exemption scheme'. 25 Ibid., 41, concerning removal expenses (p. 584), delete cl. 3 and substitute: `3. Departmental, institutional, board, and committee funds may not be used to fund removal expenses nor to supplement the allowances paid by the Curators of the University Chest, except as allowed for by the scheme approved by Council.' 26 Ibid., 44, concerning sealing (p. 585), after `Regulations of the University.' insert `All documents for sealing should be sent to the office of the Secretary of the Chest.' 27 Ibid., after the note and before the Appendix to Chapter VIII insert Schedule: `SCHEDULE Time to hold Accounting Documents The period for retaining documents is a complex issue and it is a decision which must be taken by the management of each organisation. The most favourable retention period will allow for records to be kept only as long as they are really needed for legal and commercial purposes. A programme should be drawn up to select records which are to be retained or destroyed in order to keep the volume of records under control. The retention policy should be just one of the elements comprised in a much broader programme covering records management. In determining appropriate retention periods the following aspects need to be considered: (a) economy; (b) legal and related requirements; (c) potential demand within the organisation; (d) historical value. There are few firmly established regulations to follow in deciding how long to keep documents. However, this guideline covers recommended minimum retention periods for accounting records to discharge the University's legal and statutory obligations in respect of the various taxing authorities and audit requirements. 1. Purchase Invoices All paid invoices are retained at the University Chest for at least one year, until after the completion of the external audit. They are microfiched one month after receipt, and the microfiche records are retained for fourteen years. If departments take photocopies of the invoices, these are purely for departmental reference purposes and can be destroyed as judged appropriate. Supporting requisitions, purchase orders, and goods--received notes should be kept for three years. 2. Sales Copies of all sales VAT documents, which include sales invoices and daily till roles from shops, must be held for seven years, i.e. six years plus the current year. If a department has particular difficulty in keeping six years' worth of till rolls, it is possible to apply to Customs and Excise to request a shorter period of retention. 3. VAT Returns Copies of all VAT returns including the Instrastat and EC returns are kept at the Chest and therefore there is no requirement for departments to keep copies. However, as only the actual returns are held at the Chest, all supporting documentation used to compile the return should be retained by departments for a period of seven years, i.e. six years plus the current year. 4. Outside Grants The Research and Commercial Services Office holds the original contracts/agreements, related correspondence, and financial documents for at least six years after expiry of the grant. Should a department hold any further relevant original documentation then this should be held for a similar period. Any detailed records supporting charges against the grant, e.g. time sheets, should be retained for a period of three years after the expiry of the grant. Photocopies of any original documents sent to the Research and Commercial Services Office can be destroyed at the department's discretion. However, any specific terms within a particular contract relating to the retention of records will take precedence. If in doubt consult the Research and Commercial Services Office. 5. Banking The Chest keeps copies of all receipt records and as the daily banking sheets are not prime documents supporting individual sales transactions there is no need to keep these sheets beyond three years. Bank paying--in counterfoils should be kept for six years. 6. Payments to Personnel All documents relating to payments to personnel should be kept for at least seven years, i.e. six years plus the current year. Any supporting documentation held in the departments and not copied to the centre should be retained for a similar period. 7. Equipment Registers Equipment registers (i.e. Fixed Asset Registers) should be kept indefinitely. Copies of asset-disposal notes should be kept for three years. 8. Accounts Printouts Departments should keep monthly account printouts for one year plus the current year; these should be evidenced as having been checked by a senior officer from within the department. The Chest keeps microfilmed copies of the Accounts Nominal Ledger from 1976 onwards. 9. Payroll Printouts Departments should keep quarterly and monthly printouts for one year plus the current year; these should be evidenced as having been checked by a senior officer from within the department. The Chest retains all the past monthly and quarterly salary printouts. [Note. The above is not meant to be a comprehensive list of all the financial documents held in a department and does not imply that all other documentation can be destroyed. The Internal Audit Section, University Offices, Wellington Square, can provide guidance on the legal and related requirements for other accounting documentation if required, as well as further information or assistance in connection with any other aspects of these guidelines.]' Copies of the complete Financial Regulations, as amended, are being circulated to heads of departments and institutions and to faculty board and committee secretaries. They are available to other members and employees of the University from the Secretary of the University Chest, University Offices, Wellington Square, on request. 2 Board of the Faculty of Anthropology and Geography (a) Honour School of Geography With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001) 1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 227, l. 25, delete `Either'. 2 Ibid., delete l. 26. 3 Ibid., p. 228, delete ll. 15--22. 4 Ibid., l. 23, delete `V' and substitute `IV'. 5 Ibid., p. 231, l. 12, delete `VI' and substitute `V'. (b) Pass School of Geography With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001) 1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 232, l. 10, delete `Either.' 2 Ibid., ll. 10--11, delete `, or The United Kingdom and France'. (c) M.St.s in Ethnology and Museum Ethnography and in Social Anthropology With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999) 1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, delete from l. 18 on p. 685 to l. 34 on p. 686. 2 Ibid., delete from l. 1 on p. 716 to l. 2 on p. 717. (d) Degree of M.Sc. by course work in Ethnology and Museum Ethnography and in Social Anthropology With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999) 1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 764, after l. 15 insert: `Ethnology and Museum Ethnography 1. Candidates must follow a course of instruction in Ethnology and Museum Ethnography for at least three terms, and will, when entering for the examinations, be required to produce a certificate from their supervisor to this effect. 2. Candidates will be required to present themselves for written and oral examinations and to submit two copies of a dissertation in prescribed form on an approved topic as defined below. 3. The written examination will consist of four papers on the syllabus described in the Schedule. 4. Each candidate will be required to submit a dissertation of approximately 10,000 words, on a subject selected in consultation with the supervisor and approved by a person designated for this purpose by the faculty board. 5. Two typewritten copies of the dissertation, must be delivered not later than noon on the second Monday in September in the year in which the examination is taken, to the Chairman of Examiners, M.Sc. in Ethnology and Museum Ethnography/Social Anthropology, c/o Clerk to the Schools, Examination Schools High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG. The examiners shall retain one copy of the dissertation of each candidate who passes the examination for deposit in the departmental library. 6. The oral examination may be on the candidate's written papers, or dissertation, or both. 7. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination. 8. If it is the opinion of the examiners that the work done by a candidate is not of sufficient merit to qualify for the Degree of M.Sc. but is nevertheless of sufficient merit to qualify for the Diploma in Ethnology and Museum Ethnography the candidate shall be given the option of resitting the M.Sc. examination or being issued with a diploma in the form prescribed in Ch. VI, Sect. ii, Schedule E. Schedule Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in four papers as follows: I Ethnology and Museum Ethnography A (paper and syllabus shared with the M.Sc. in Social Anthropology). Candidates may be required to answer questions from different sections, as specified by the examiners. (A) History and development of the subjects. Relations to other subjects. Current theories in the subjects and modes of analysis. Application of the subjects. (B) Social ecology and modes of livelihood. Demographic factors. Settlement patterns. Cultural landscapes. (C) Kinship, marriage and gender. Social organisation. Economic organisation and modes of production. Transactions and modes of exchange and consumption. Property. Organisation of work and the division of labour. Urbanism. Ethnicity, nationalism, and transnationalism. Technology and social change. II Ethnology and Museum Ethnography B (paper and syllabus shared with the M.Sc. in Social Anthropology). Candidates may be required to answer questions from different sections, as specified by the examiners. (A) Political organisation. Rank and hierarchy. Forms and modes of social control. Legal and quasi-legal institutions. (B) Belief systems and religion in society. Ritual and myth. Notions of causation and medical anthropology. Symbolism and symbolic classification. Moral systems and social philosophy. Oral literature, oral history and literacy. (C) Linguistic and artistic modes of communication. Aesthetic anthropology. Methodological approaches to the study of arts and material culture. Materials and techniques. Form and style. Artist and society. III Methods (paper and syllabus shared with the M.Sc. in Social Anthropology). Candidates may be required to answer questions from different sections, as specified by the examiners. Fieldwork and data collection methods. Quantitative techniques. Use of film and sound recording. Preparing research proposals. Ethics. Documentation and analysis of museum collections. IV Prescribed subjects Each year, at the beginning of Michaelmas Term, candidates will be informed of the prescribed subjects from among which they must opt for one. The prescribed subject may be a Special Area or a Special Topic.' 2 Ibid., p. 783, after l. 32 insert: `Social Anthropology 1. Candidates must follow a course of instruction in social anthropology for at least three terms, and will, when entering for the examinations, be required to produce a certificate from their supervisor to this effect. 2. Candidates will be required to present themselves for written and oral examinations and to submit two copies of a dissertation in prescribed form on an approved topic as defined below. 3. The written examination will consist of four papers on the syllabus described in the Schedule. 4. Each candidate will be required to submit a dissertation of approximately 10,000 words, on a subject selected in consultation with the supervisor and approved by a person designated for this purpose by the faculty board. 5. Two typewritten copies of the dissertation, must be delivered not later than noon on the second Monday in September in the year in which the examination is taken, to the Chairman of the Examiners, M.Sc. in Ethnology and Museum Ethnography/Social Anthropology, c/o Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG. The examiners shall retain one copy of the dissertation of each candidate who passes the examination for deposit in the departmental library. 6. The oral examination may be on the candidate's written papers, or dissertation or both. 7. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination. 8. If it is the opinion of the examiners that the work done by a candidate is not of sufficient merit to qualify for the Degree of M.Sc. but is nevertheless of sufficient merit to qualify for the Diploma in Social Anthropology, the candidate shall be given the option of resitting the M.Sc. examination or being issued with a diploma in the form prescribed in Ch. VI, Sect. ii, Schedule E. Schedule Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in four papers as follows: I Social Anthropology A (paper and syllabus shared with the M.Sc. in Ethnology and Museum Ethnography). Candidates may be required to answer questions from different sections, as specified by the examiners. (A) History and development of the subjects. Relations to other subjects. Current theories in the subjects and modes of analysis. Application of the subjects. (B) Social ecology and modes of livelihood. Demographic factors. Settlement patterns. Cultural landscapes. (C) Kinship, marriage and gender. Social organisation. Economic organisation and modes of production. Transactions and modes of exchange and consumption. Property. Organisation of work and the division of labour. Urbanism. Ethnicity, nationalism, and transnationalism. Technology and social change. II Social Anthropology B (paper and syllabus shared with the M.Sc. in Ethnology and Museum Ethnography). Candidates may be required to answer questions from different sections, as specified by the examiners. (A) Political organisation. Rank and hierarchy. Forms and modes of social control. Legal and quasi-legal institutions. (B) Belief systems and religion in society. Ritual and myth. Notions of causation and medical anthropology. Symbolism and symbolic classification. Moral systems and social philosophy. Oral literature, oral history, and literacy. (C) Linguistic and artistic modes of communication. Aesthetic anthropology. Methodological approaches to the study of arts and material culture. Materials and techniques. Form and style. Artistic and society. III Methods (paper and syllabus shared with the M.Sc. in Social Anthropology). Candidates may be required to answer questions from different sections, as specified by the examiners. Fieldwork and data collection methods. Quantitative and qualitative techniques. Use of film and sound recording. Preparing research proposals. Ethics. Documentation and analysis of museum collections. IV Prescribed subjects Each year, at the beginning of Michaelmas Term, candidates will be informed of the prescribed subjects from among which they must opt for one. The prescribed subject may be a Special Area or a Special Topic.' 3 Ibid., p. 943, after l. 9 as amended by the Decree establishing the Diploma in Ethnology and Museum Ethno- graphy, insert: `(II) REGULATIONS 1. Candidates for admission must apply to the Board of the Faculty of Anthropology and Geography through the Admissions Secretary for Social and Cultural Anthropology. 2. Every candidate for examination must, before admission to the examination, have satisfied the Admissions Secretary for Social and Cultural Anthropology that he or she has been following a course of study in the subject for at least three terms in Oxford, unless the faculty board shall otherwise determine. 3. The registration of a candidate shall lapse on the last day of the Trinity Term in the year of his or her admission unless it shall have been extended by the faculty board. 4. Names for the examination must be entered with the Head Clerk, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford, not later than 12 noon on Friday in the fourth week of Hilary Term. (12te entries may be made under the provisions of Ch. VI. Sect ii D, cl. 7.) 5. The examination shall include written work and each candidate must attend an oral examination when requested to do so by the examiners. 6. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination. Syllabus Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in four papers as follows: I Ethnology and Museum Ethnography A (paper and syllabus shared with the Diploma in Social Anthropology). Candidates may be required to answer questions from different sections, as specified by the examiners. (A) History and development of the subjects. Relations to other subjects. Current theories in the subjects and modes of analysis. Application of the subjects. (B) Social ecology and modes of livelihood. Demographic factors. Settlement patterns. Cultural landscapes. (C) Kinship, marriage and gender. Social organisation. Economic organisation and modes of production. Transactions and modes of exchange and consumption. Property. Organisation of work and the division of labour. Urbanism. Ethnicity, nationalism, and transnationalism. Technology and social change. II Ethnology and Museum Ethnography B (paper and syllabus shared with the Diploma in Social Anthropology). Candidates may be required to answer questions from different sections, as specified by the examiners. (A) Political organisation. Rank and hierarchy. Forms and modes of social control. Legal and quasi-legal institutions. (B) Belief systems and religion in society. Ritual and myth. Notions of causation and medical anthropology. Symbolism and symbolic classification. Moral systems and social philosophy. Oral literature, oral history, and literacy. (C) Linguistic and artistic modes of communication. Aesthetic anthropology. Methodological approaches to the study of arts and material culture. Materials and techniques. Form and style. Artist and society. III Methods (paper and syllabus shared with the Diploma in Social Anthropology). Candidates may be required to answer questions from different sections, as specified by the examiners. Fieldwork and data collection methods. Quantitative and qualitative techniques. Use of film and sound recording. Preparing research proposals. Ethics. Documentation and analysis of museum collections. IV Prescribed subjects Each year, at the beginning of Michaelmas Term, candidates will be informed of the prescribed subjects from among which they must opt for one. The prescribed subject may be a Special Area or a Special Topic.' 4 Ibid., p. 946, after l. 27 as amended by the Decree establishing the Diploma in Social Anthropology, insert: `(11) REGULATIONS 1. Candidates for admission must apply to the Board of the Faculty of Anthropology and Geography through the Admissions Secretary for Social and Cultural Anthro- pology. 2. Every candidate for examination must, before admission to the examination, have satisfied the Admissions Secretary for Social and Cultural Anthropology that he or she has been following a course of study in the subject for at least three terms in Oxford, unless the faculty board shall otherwise determine. 3. The registration of a candidate shall lapse on the last day of the Trinity Term in the year of his or her admission unless it shall have been extended by the faculty board. 4. Names for the examination must be entered with the Head Clerk, University Offices, Wellington Square, not later than 12 noon on Friday in the fourth week of Hilary Term. (Late entries may be made under the provisions of Ch. VI. Sect. ii D, cl. 7.) 5. The examination shall include written work and each candidate must attend an oral examination when requested to do so by the examiners. 6. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination. Syllabus Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in four papers as follows: I Social Anthropology A (paper and syllabus shared with the Diploma in Ethnology and Museum Ethnography). Candidates may be required to answer questions from different sections, as specified by the examiners. (A) History and development of the subjects. Relations to other subjects. Current theories in the subjects and modes of analysis. Application of the subjects. (B) Social ecology and modes of livelihood. Demographic factors. Settlement patterns. Cultural landscapes. (C) Kinship, marriage and gender. Social organisation and modes of production. Transactions and modes of exchange and consumption Property. Organisation of work and the division of labour. Urbanism. Ethnicity, nationalism, and transnationalism. Technology and social change. II Social Anthropology B (paper and syllabus shared with the Diploma in Ethnology and Museum Ethnography).' Candidates may be required to answer questions from different sections, as specified by the examiners. (A) Political organisation. Rank and hierarchy. Forms and modes of social control. Legal and quasi-legal institutions. (B) Belief systems and religion in society. Ritual and myth. Notions of causation and medical anthropology. Symbolism and symbolic classification. Moral systems and social philosophy. Oral literature, oral history, and literacy. (C) Linguistic and artistic modes of communication. Aesthetic anthropology. Methodological approaches to the study of arts and material culture. Materials and techniques. Form and style. Artist and society. III Methods (paper and syllabus shared with the Diploma in Ethnology and Museum Ethnography). Candidates may be required to answer questions from different sections, as specified by the examiners. Fieldwork and data collection methods. Quantitative and qualitative techniques. Use of film and sound recording. Preparing research proposals,. Ethics. Documentation and analysis of museum collections. IV Prescribed subjects Each year, at the beginning of Michaelmas Term, candidates will be informed of the prescribed subjects from among which they must opt for one. The prescribed subject may be a Special Area or a Special Topic.' (e) M.Phil. in Ethnology and Museum Ethnography: changes consequent upon the introduction of the Diploma and M.Sc. in Ethnology and Museum Ethnography With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 2000) 1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 598, ll 11 and 16, delete `M.St.' and substitute `Diploma'. 2 Ibid., ll. 27--9, delete `divided into Parts A and B of which Part A will relate to methods in ethnology and museum ethnography, and Part B to' and substitute `in'. 3 Ibid., l. 50, delete `Degree of'. 4 Ibid., l. 51, delete `Master of Studies' and substitute `Diploma'. (f) M.Phil. in Social Anthropology: changes consequent upon the introduction of the Diploma and M.Sc. in Social Anthropology With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 2000) 1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 651, ll. 29 and 34, delete `M.St.' and substitute `Diploma'. 2 Ibid., p. 651, l. 45, delete `divided into Parts I and II of which Part I will relate to'. 3 Ibid., p. 652, l. 22, delete `Degree of'. 4 Ibid., l. 23, delete `Master of Studies' and substitute `Diploma'. 3 Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies M.St. in Modern Middle Eastern Studies With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999) In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 707, after l. 14, insert: `M.St. in Modern Middle Eastern Studies Only candidates with native fluency or who have satisfied the examiners in the Second Public Examination in Arabic or Hebrew or Persian or Turkish, or have passed a similar examination in another university, will be eligible to sit the Final Examination for the M.St. in Modern Middle Eastern Studies. 1. Candidates shall be required to attend for at least three terms such lecture courses and participate in such seminars as their supervisor shall specify, and to submit to the Clerk of the Schools not later than the end of the eighth week of the third term, or by such other time as the Graduate Studies Committee of the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies shall specify, a certificate (on a form available from the Oriental Studies Faculty) signed by the member of the academic staff responsible for the course or seminars concerned, confirming their attendance and participation. Final Examination 2. All candidates must offer (a) Two typed copies of a single piece of written work (presented in proper scholarly form) of no more than 10,000 words in length. The topic of the work must be approved by the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies at its first meeting in the Hilary Term preceeding the examination. Candidates shall submit their written work to the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG. (b) two papers from (1)--(11), provided that instead of one of these papers, a candidate may offer a paper on a subject not included in the list below, with the approval of the board, such approval to be given by Friday of fourth week of the Hilary Term. (1) History of the Middle East, 1860--1958. (2) Politics of the Middle East. (3) Economic history of the Middle East, 1800--1945. (4) Economics of the Middle East. (5) Geography of the Middle East. (6) Social anthropology of the Middle East. (7) Islam in the Middle East in the twentieth century. (8) International Relations of the Middle East. (9) Iranian history, 1797--1921. (10) Iranian history, 1921--79. (11) History of Turkey, 1908--60. Teaching for some options may not be available in every year. Applications for admission will be advised whether teaching will be available in the options of the choice. The subjects which candidates wish to offer for exam- ination must be submitted for approval by the Oriental Studies Faculty Board at its first meeting in the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examinations. 3. Candidates will be required to attend for oral examination on a date to be specified by the examiners or the assessors. 4. Entries for the examination must be made on the proper form, which may be obtained from the Head Clerk, University Offices, Wellington Square, and submitted on or before the Friday in the eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term following the candidate's admission.' 4 Standing Committee for Economics and Management (a) Honour School of Economics and Management With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000) 1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 164, delete ll. 35--50 and substitute: `(iii) Two subjects selected from Schedule A (iv) Four optional subjects selected from Schedule A, except that a candidate cannot offer a subject selected from Schedule A offered under (iii), and Schedule B.' 2 Ibid., p. 165, delete ll. 1--2. 3 Ibid., delete ll. 4--21 and substitute: `(1) Accounting Nature and regulation of financial reporting, analysis of company accounts. Nature of management accounting, including: cost behaviour, budgetary planning and control, capital budgeting, divisional performance. (2) Organisational Behaviour and Human Resource Management The individual in the organisation; motivation and job satisfaction: groups at work; socio-technical systems; organisational strategy and structure in its environment; managerial work and behaviour; leadership; culture; power, conflict, and change; contemporary and comparative approaches to the study of organisations and behaviour. Human resources strategy and style in union and non-union settings; methods of job regulation; pay systems; human resources management in its environment; trade union objectives and organisation; co-operation and conflict; employee involvement; human resource management and economic performance; contemporary and comparative approaches to the management of employees. (3) Finance Investment appraisal under conditions of certainty/uncertainty. Portfolio theory and capital asset pricing model. Sources of finance, debt capacity, dividends, and cost of capital. Financial market efficiency. Emerging issues in finance. Takeovers and mergers. (4) Strategic Management Theoretical foundations of strategic management. Structural analysis of industries and industry dynamics. The resource and capability based view of the firm. Strategy and Organisation. Nature and sources of competitive advantage and patterns of competition. Competitive and co-operative strategies. Corporate strategy and competitive advantage. International strategy. Strategic management in the public sector and not-for-profit organisations. Current issues in strategic management. (5) Marketing Exchange in a modern economy. The marketing concept; the marketing mix, its formulation and common components; the product life-cycle and new product development; segmentation and positioning. Buyer behaviour. Marketing information and the analysis of markets and competitors. Marketing planning and marketing strategies. Models for evaluating strategic marketing opportunities. (6) Information Management Information technology; information and information systems. Information technology applications, systems analysis and development, information technology in manufacturing, and engineering management of information technology, economic and social impact of information technology. (7) Technology and Operations Management Goods and service operations. Vertical integration, facilities location and capacity, volume/mix and process relationships, scale economies, automation. Goods/service design, facilities, process planning, aggregate capacity decisions, resource scheduling. Product/service quality assurance, facilities maintenance.' 4 Ibid., l. 31, delete `(9)' and substitute `(13)'. 5 Ibid., delete ll. 42--4 and substitute: `(10) Economics of Industry (11) Statistical Methods in Social Science (12) Econometrics (13) Labour Economics and Industrial Relations (14) Economic Decisions within the Firm As specified in Paper E3, Economic Decisions within the Firm, in the Honour Schools of Engineering, Economics, and Management and Materials, Economics, and Management.' 6 Ibid., p. 166, delete ll. 1--8 and substitute: `(v) Thesis Any candidate may offer a thesis instead of a subject from Schedule A or Schedule B under (iv) above, subject to the following provisions:'. (b) Pass School of Economics and Management With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000) In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 167, delete ll. 15--17, and substitute: `economics, together with two subjects chosen from Schedule A, and one further subject chosen from Schedules A and B as set out in the regulations for the Honour School.'


EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF
PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards and
committee give notice of oral examination of their candidates as
follows:

Biological Sciences

V.L. ADDY, St Hugh's: `The use of lipid hydrolases to target the
lipid components of ovine skin'.

Department of Biochemistry, Friday, 22 May, 2.30 p.m.


Examiners: J.S. Knowland, R. Roy

K. CHOBOTOVA, Wolfson: `Ligand binding determinants of LIF
receptor'.

Department of Biochemistry, Tuesday, 9 June, 2 p.m.


Examiners: A.J. Day, B. Gullick.

C. HALLIWELL, New College: `Genetic engineering of
metalloproteins'.

Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Tuesday, 16 June, 2.30 p.m.


Examiners: J.R. Dilworth, G. Gilardi.

T. MAL, Balliol: `Studies of 100 per cent deuterated protein (fyn
SH3) and of protein side chain interactions using
resolution NMR'.

Rex Richards Building, Tuesday, 12 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: C. Redfield, S.J. Matthews.

G.O. WILLIAMS, St Catherine's: `Mapping studies of the centromeric
region of the human Y chromosome'.

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Friday, 22 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: A.P. Monaco, N.A. Affara.

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Clinical Medicine

V.M. BARBOUR, Trinity: `Regulation of the human alpha globin genes by
their chromatin context'.

Institute of Molecular Medicine, Wednesday, 13 May,
2.30 p.m.


Examiners: S.L. Thein, N. Dillon.

R. MURTON, Keble: `Mechanisms associated with ethacrynic acid-induced
NA+, K+ pump upregulation in Epstein–Barr virus-induced
lympnocytes'.

University Laboratory of Physiology, Friday, 1 May, 11 a.m.


Examiners: J.C. Ellory, L. Ng.

English Language and Literature

B. HANLEY, New College: `Samuel Johnson and the "age of
authors": an analysis of Johnson's journalistic commentary on
authorship in mid-eighteenth-century England.
St Hugh's, Friday, 8 May, 2.30 p.m.


Examiners: I. Rivers, A. McDermott.

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Mathematical Sciences

N. BONE, Merton: `Models of programs and machine learning'.

Computing Laboratory, Friday, 1 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: G. Lowe, J. He.

R.E. WILSON, Lincoln: `Modelling, analysis, and simulation of road
traffic networks'.

Mathematical Institute, Friday, 22 May, 2.15 p.m.


Examiners: A.C. Fowler, D. Needham.

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Modern History

K. LEEMING, Queen's: `Byzantine hagiographies in Arabic: three
translations from a ninth-century manuscript copied at the monastery
of Mar Saba in Palestine (Vaticanus Arabicus 71)'.

Keble, Tuesday, 19 May, 10.30 a.m.


Examiners: A.M. Cameron, S. Griffith.

A. SLIWKA, Balliol: `Transplanting liberal education: higher
education in the nineteenth-century Bombay Presidency, India'.

St Antony's, Friday, 1 May, 2.15 p.m.


Examiners: D.A. Washbrook, G. Johnson.

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Physical Sciences

C.H.C. LO, St Cross: `MAE measurements and studies of magnetic
domains by electron microscopy'.

Department of Materials, Friday, 8 May, 10 a.m.


Examiners: G.D.W. Smith, D.J. Buttle.

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Physiological Sciences

T. FREEMAN, Magdalen: `Mechanism of binocular integration and their
development in the cat primary visual
cortex'.

Department of Physiology, Monday, 11 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: J. Stein, A. Bashir.

M. WISE, Lincoln: `Mechanisms of transplantation tolerance'.

Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, Tuesday, 19 May,
2 p.m.


Examiners: D.W. Mason, J.-F. Bach.

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Theology

R. CLARK, St Anne's: `duplex beneficium: Caspar Olevian's
Trinitarian, Protestant, Calvinist, Federal Theology'.

Wycliffe Hall, Thursday, 14 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: A.E. McGrath, P. Helm.

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Committee for Management Studies

M.J. O'SULLIVAN, Balliol: `An investigation into the relation
between corporate governance and firm value in the UK'.

Merton, Friday, 5 June, 5 p.m.


Examiners: A.P Ljungqvist, S. Thompson.

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section





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 30 April 1998: Colleges<br />

Colleges, Halls, and Societies


Contents of this section:

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issue



OBITUARIES


Exeter College

D. DAWES, 25 December 1997; matriculated 1956. Aged
62.

PROFESSOR F.W.J. HEMMINGS, 9 May 1997; open scholar 1938.
Aged 77.

A.L.E.H. HOTTOT, 1997; commoner 1932.

HECTOR G. JELF, 11 December 1997; commoner 1936. Aged
80.

THE REVD C.B. NUTTALL, 9 January 1998; commoner 1950.
Aged 67.

H.F. TOWNER, 10 January 1998; matriculated 1929. Aged
86.

JOHN COLLIVER WILLIAMS, 28 November 1997; commoner 1957.
Aged 60.

RAYMOND WOODALL, 9 December 1997; Stapleton Scholar
1954. Aged 61.

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section



St Hilda's College

SHEILA YARKER BRIGGS (née Morton), BA, 30
March 1998; exhibitioner 1928–31. Aged 88.

CECILIA MARY BAYLIS ROBERTS (née
Armitage), MA, 5 April 1998; commoner 1939–42. Aged
77.

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section



ELECTIONS


All Souls College

To the Bursarship and an Official Fellowship (with
effect from 1 October 1998):

THOMAS W. SEAMAN (BA
Yale)

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section



Magdalen College

To Visiting Fellowships:

PROFESSOR J. CORRIGAN (1 October–31 December
1998)

PROFESSOR R. GELUYKENS (1 October–31 December
1998
)

PROFESSOR P.J. CONRADI (1 January–31 March
1999
)

PROFESSOR W.E. FRIEDMAN (1 January–30 June
1999
)

PROFESSOR D.J. CARTWRIGHT (1 April–30 August
1999
)

To a Fellowship by Examination in Psychology (for
three years from 1 October 1998):

F.A. WICHMANN, St
Hugh's College

To a Fellowship by Examination in Modern History (for
three years from 1 October 1998):

DR T. VAN NOUHUYS,
University of Leiden

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section



NOTICE


Oriel College


The Eugene Lee-Hamilton Prize 1998

The Provost and Fellows of Oriel College offer a prize of £60
for the best Petrarchan Sonnet in English submitted by an
undergraduate of Oxford or Cambridge, on a subject to be chosen by
the candidate. Enjambment between the eighth and ninth lines will be
permitted.

No candidate may submit more than one sonnet, nor may the prize be
awarded more than once to the same person. The competing sonnets
should be sent to the Provost, Oriel College, Oxford OX1 4EW, not
later than Monday,
1 June. Each sonnet must be accompanied by a
certificate from the Head or a Fellow of the candidate's college,
stating that the candidate is an undergraduate.

The winner will have been deemed to have given permission to
publish his/her sonnet in the Oriel Record.

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section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 30 April 1998: Advertisements<br />

Advertisements


Contents of this section:



How to
advertise in the Gazette

"../../../stdg/conds.htm">

Terms and conditions of
acceptance of advertisements

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issue



Oxford Bach Choir

Spiritual Songs for Summer: Sat. 20
June, 7.30 p.m., at Keble College Chapel. Vocal and
choral music by Dvorak, Stanford, Howells, Kodaly,
Tchaikowsky, Bairstow, and Tippett. The programme
explores Eastern European sonorities and their English
echoes and will ensure that the Keble acoustics will be
heard at their best. David Lowe (conductor), Adrian
Partington (organist), Giselle Allen (soprano). Entry by
programme, available from choir members, at the door, or
from Oxford Bach Choir, PO Box 326, Oxford OX2 6UN
(s.a.e.).

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section



Tureck Bach Research Foundation

Third Annual International Symposium,
Sat. 9--Sun. 10 May 1998, at Worcester College. Sat. 10
a.m.--12.30 p.m.: Dr Rosalyn Tureck (`J.S. Bach's
Goldberg Variations: Structural Analysis and Musical
Illustration'), Dr Robert Sherlaw-Johnson (`Structure in
the Music of Messaien'); 3--5.30 p.m.: Prof. Stephen Jay
Gould (`Structural Laws as Constraints and Opportunities
in Science and Art'), Prof. Henk Barendregt (`Structure,
Intuition, and Mathematics'). Sun. 10 a.m.--1 p.m.: Dr
Tureck (`Situating Concept in Music'), Prof. Gould
(`Percepts without Concepts are Blind'), 3--5 p.m. Dr
Jeremy Ramsden (`Paracelsus, Concept, and Realisation'),
Prof. Robert Stevenson (`Challenges to Friends of
Authenticity'). For more information, tel.: Oxford
515760, fax: 512620, e-mail:
rosalyn.tureck@st-hildas.ox.ac.uk.

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section



Museums Week

Museums Week, 16–24 May:
conservation events in Oxfordshire. For the full
programme of open conservation studios and tours,
conservation exhibitions and lectures, see URL:
http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk.boris/conservation/oxuniv.musw
eek.htm.

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section



Faculty of Mathematics,
Cambridge

Mordell Lecture 1998. Prof. Johan de
Jong, Princeton, will lecture on `Curves over finite
fields and Galois representations' at 5 p.m. on Thur., 7
May, in the Winstanley Lecture Theatre, Trinity College,
Green Street, Cambridge.

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section



Tuition Offered

Summer Arts Course for 10 to 14
year-olds; range of media inc. photography, ceramics,
painting, drawing, computer graphics. Suitable for all
levels---beginner to advanced. Small groups and
experienced tutors. d'Overbroek's College, 1 Park Town,
Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 310000.

Piano lessons: experienced teacher.
Adults and children. All grades. Beginners welcome. Miss
P. Read, BA (Hons.), LRAM. Jericho. Tel.: Oxford 510904.

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section



Services Offered

Oxford University Newcomers' Club. The
club exists to welcome to Oxford the partners and
families of academic visitors and graduate students. Come
along to the Club rooms at 13 Norham Gardens, and sample
our programme of events and outings; we are open each
Wednesday morning, 10.30--12 noon, from the week before
term starts to the week after term, also throughout the
summer vacation.

Long established Oxford builder (25
years). Property maintenance, renovations, extensions.
Every aspect of the building trade covered. Free
estimates. Academic references available. Richard
Edwards, tel.: Oxford 343562.

Tax advice: ex-KPMG Chartered Accountant
specialised in assisting academics and other
professionals with their tax affairs, inc.
self-assessment. Convenient North Oxford premises. Tel.:
Oxford 513381, fax: 558064, e-mail:
100430.145@compuserve.com.

Wise Owl Educational Software: the only
UK children's shareware library, est. 1991. Specialising
in educational programs and games (DOS, Windows 3.1 and
95) for all PCs (XTs to Pentiums). 800+ titles for ages
2--16+. 3.5" and 5.25" media. Free newsletter and advice.
Tel.: 01235 529808 (Mon.--Fri., 9 a.m.--5 p.m.), e-mail
wiseowlsw@aol.com, Web site
http://members.aol.com/wiseowlsw/index.html.

Simple Kitchens and Furniture: kitchens,
free-standing and fitted furniture made to suit you.
Using traditional furniture-making techniques and the
finest materials, our work is built to last. Our
friendly, personal service is second to none. Contact
Thomas Heidkamp, tel.: 01844 353338, for a no-obligation
consuatation.

J.A. Neil Building, established in
Oxford since 1981. Construction, restorations, and new
projects using traditional materials. Quality
stonewalling, masonry, brickwork, paving, and repointing.
Tel.: Oxford 761581.

Cross Counties Counselling and
Psychotherapy Service. Offices: Oxford,
Stratford-upon-Avon, Cirencester. Individuals, couples,
families, groups. Psychoanalytically trained,
holistically oriented, eclectic approach; specialising in
trauma (PTSD), depression, life crisis, relationships,
stress, anxiety, eating disorders, abuse, school-related
problems. Free half-hour consultation with treatment (see
brochure). Barbara A. Martino BA, MSW, CTS,
(licensed/trained UK, USA), tel.: 01386 438010.

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section



Domestic Services

Italian girl (21), driver, non-smoker,
speaks English, experienced with children, seeks au
pair
employment for part or all of summer period
1998 (available June--Sept. and flexible). I know her
well and recommend her unreservedly. Please tel.: Oxford
557789 to discuss, or contact her directly on e-mail:
autoborgo@mail.arcadiatel.it (subject: Fabrizia
Duchini).

Paulina (19), a first-year student of
Economics at Prague and daughter of Prof. V. Ptak of
Prague University, would appreciate spending her summer
vacation (22 July--31 Aug.) as an au pairin
the family of an Oxford academic. The opportunity to
practise (in moderation) on the piano would be
appreciated, but is not essential. Contact address:
Horovice, Ticha Ulice 489, 16800 Czech Republic, e-mail:
ptak@math.cas.cz.

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section



Situations Vacant

Horse (and pony if needed) for
restricted use in return for horse-care and love;
weekdays, at Hampton Poyle (approximately 5 miles from
Oxford). Horse is not a novice ride. Tel.: Oxford
557932.

Christ Church, Oxford: Clerk/Typist.
Full time vacancy within the Treasury department, 8.45
a.m.--5 p.m., in a friendly but professional environment.
Applicants should be computer literate, with good
word-processing skills. Salary
£9,117--£10,881 depending on qualifications
and experience; 5 weeks annual leave, plus bank holidays
and free lunches. Applications with up-to-date c.v.
should be addressed to the Assistant Treasurer, Christ
Church, Oxford OX1 1DP. Closing date Fri., 17 Apr.

Group 4 in association with Jesus
College, Oxford is looking to recruit 2 full-time
security officers to work nights and Sundays. £5
per hour for 48 hours p.w. You will display excellent
communication skills and a professional manner. Reception
skills an advantage. You must also be aged 21--64 and
have a 10 year checkable work record. To apply, please
contact Katherine Jones, tel.: Oxford 244999.

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section



Houses to Let

An Englishman's home is his castle---so
the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many
castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental
accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be
able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost
letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics,
medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to
offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford.
Visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view
details of all the properties that we have currently
available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or
e-mail us with details of your requirements and we will
do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: Oxford
764533, fax: 764777, e-mail: info@qbman.co.uk.

Small, comfortable house with large
garden and parking, near shops, restaurants and bus
route, in Woodstock (just north of Oxford). Fully
equipped for visitors, with dishwasher, etc., but
suitable for couple or single only, with Unversity
references or similar. 8 months minimum let, longer
preferred. Dates flexible. £500 p.m. Tel.: 01933
813127 or (USA) 217 488 3680.

Comfortable, semi-detached house in
Marston, available May. Newly refurbished. Fully
furnished to a high standard. Three bedrooms, 2 reception
rooms, fitted kitchen, gas c.h., bathroom with power
shower, garden. Quiet position with views of central
Oxford; close to JR Hospital and cycle track across Parks
to city centre; good bus route. £750 p.c.m., plus
bills and Council Tax. Tel.: Oxford 874310, e-mail:
mark.chapman@ripon-cuddesdon.ac.uk.

Luxury, unusual, spacious modern house
in quiet road in North Oxford within ring road, close to
bus route. Stunning views to open countryside. Open plan
design with separate double bedroom and 2 bathrooms.
Small patio garden; off-street parking. Suit visiting
academic or professional couple; regret no children,
pets, or smokers. £895 p.m., inc. Council Tax.
Available June 1998. Tel.: Oxford 515085.

House available for rent next academic
year. Large sitting-room, dining-room, modern kitchen, 2
double bedrooms, 2 studies, 1.5 bathrooms, walled garden,
c.h., washer-drier, dishwasher, fridge, china, linen,
etc. Bottom of Headington Hill, 15--20 minutes' walk from
Bodleian. Available late Aug. 1998--late May 1999.
£900 p.m. Contact Prof. Grundy, 11 Cherwell St,
Oxford OX4 1BG. Tel.: Oxford 242966, e-mail
isobel.grundy@ualberta.ca.

Oxford Waterside, Jericho: brand new
house on prestigious development. Two bedrooms, 1 en
suite shower room, family bathroom, living/dining-room,
beautifully-fitted kitchen with ceramic tiled floor,
downstairs cloakroom. Furnished to high standard. Small
garden; views over Port Meadow. Allocated off-street
parking. Ten minutes' walk to Radcliffe Infirmary and
many University departments, also shops, theatres, etc.
Available for weekly lets or longer as required,
sometimes at short notice. Tel.: Oxford 311124, fax:
311125, e-mail: anae0002@nda.ox.ac.uk.

Central Oxford, Rewley Park, near rail
station (London--Paddington 52 minutes), bus station
(Heathrow 70 minutes), and city centre. Brand new
5-bedroom town house, built to high specification; 3
bathrooms (2 en-suite), 2 reception rooms, modern
kitchen, downstairs w.c., conservatory, small garden,
parking, river/canal view. Available from June.
£2,000 p.c.m. Tel.: 01844 208315, fax: 201511,
e-mail: 100574.451@compuserve.com.

Furnished central North Oxford house to
let for one year or less from 15 Sept. Walk to colleges,
rail and bus station; near Port Meadow; c.h.; recently
redecorated; desks; filing cabinets, several large
closets; secluded garden; 2 ½ bathrooms,
washing-machine, drier, telephone, linen, dishes, 2
bicycles. Suitable for visiting academics. 2 bedrooms,
£950 p.m.; 3 bedrooms, £1,250 p.m. (inc.
bedsit with separate entrance). Contact: J. Mackrell,
Oxford 775567 (27 May--1 June: 553679); or A. Gaston,
Canada: tel. 613 745 1368, fax: 613 745 0299, e-mail:
Tony.Gaston@EC.GC.CA.

Superb, modern, architect-designed house
in North Oxford: 4 bedrooms; fully equipped. On bus
routes; 25 minutes' walk to town. Available July and Aug.
Tel.: Oxford 511825 (eve. or Sun.), e-mail:
l.lyons1@physics.ox.ac.uk.

Headington: available 1 Aug.--end Dec.
1998. Comfortable 4-bedroom family house. Kitchen,
dining-room, sitting-room, downstairs cloakroom, 2
bathrooms, box room, large garden, off-street parking.
£950 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 762450, e-mail:
c.foot@physics.ox.ac.uk.

Luxury, unusual, modern house in quiet
road in North Oxford, within ring road, close to bus
route. Stunning views to open countryside. Open plan
design with separate double bedroom and 2 bathrooms.
Small patio garden, off-street parking. Suit visiting
academic/professional couple; regret no children, pets,
or smokers. £1,000 p.m., plus services. Tel.:
Oxford 515085.

Make finding accommodation a pleasure,
not a chore. Finders Keepers is dedicated to making it
easy for visitors to Oxford to find the right property.
Browse through our Web site for up-to-date detailed
information on properties available and make use of our
interactive database, priority reservation service
(credit cards accepted), welcome food pack, personal
service, and much more. Call us and you will not need to
go elsewhere. For further information contact Finders
Keepers, 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE. Tel.: Oxford
311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk;
Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

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Flats to Let

Central North Oxford, 10 minutes' walk
from city centre, available mid-May for short/long let:
exceptionally well-furnished second-floor flat in quiet,
civilised Victorian family house with large, light, airy
rooms. Double bedroom, drawing room, kitchen, bathroom.
Off-street parking, large secluded garden. Regret no
children or pets. Tel./fax: Oxford 552400.

Wolvercote: comfortable ground floor
flat, overlooking small shared garden and millstream. One
bedroom; newly refurbished. Conveniently located near
regular bus service to city centre. Suit either single
person or couple. £550 p.c.m. Available now. Tel.:
Oxford 514328, e-mail:
kate.field@continuing-education.oxford.ac.uk.

Modern city centre flat, convenient for
University. Two bedrooms, large sitting-room, kitchen,
bathroom, ample cupboard/storage space. Available for
eight week let, 4 July--29 Aug. £650 p.m., inc.
heating and lighting. Tel.: Oxford 433146 or 430595.

Luxury, unusual, spacious modern house
in quiet road in North Oxford within ring road, close to
bus route. Stunning views to open countryside. Open plan
design with separate double bedroom and 2 bathrooms.
Small patio garden; off-street parking. Suit visiting
academic or professional couple; regret no children,
pets, or smokers. £895 p.m., inc. Council Tax.
Available June 1998. Tel.: Oxford 515085.

Upper Wolvercote: spacious 2-bedroom
flat with lovely rural views in quiet location yet on
regular bus route to city centre. Fully furnished, with
well-equipped kitchen, c.h., garage, etc. Non-smokers
preferred. Available 1 June for long-term let.
£650 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 559802.

Central North Oxford: spacious 1-bedroom
flat in quiet road. Shared garden. Suit postdoc. couple
or similar. Available now. Tel.: 0171-794 8965.

Park Town, available mid-July:
semi-basement, comfortably furnished; double bedroom,
sitting room, kitchenette with electric cooker and
fridge, tiled bathroom with shower; c.h. throughout;
telephone available. Very quiet house. Prime location, 1
mile from Carfax. Tel. for appointment: Oxford
557400.

North Oxford: available 1 Sept. 1998--31 May 1999,
£550 p.m., fully-equipped ground-floor flat
suitable for 2 adults; dining-room/study;
living-room/study, double bedroom, shower-room, kitchen;
dish-washer, washing/drying machine, electric stove;
c.h., car-port, small garden. Stone, 266 Moore Street,
Princeton, NJ 08540, USA. Tel.: 609 921 2717.

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section



Summer Lets

Sunny Victorian terrace house, Iffley
Fields: 2 reception (period fireplaces), modern kitchen,
bathroom, second w.c., large double bedroom,
bedroom/study (double sofa-bed), utilities cellar,
antiques, stripped bannisters, sanded floors, nice
garden. Mid-June--Oct., £725 p.m. inc. council
tax. Tel.: Oxford 798069 or 01873 810982; e-mail:
ayers@wadham.ox.ac.uk.

City centre house with view of Thames
available for 4 months, June--Sept. Fully equipped, 3
bedrooms (2 double, 1 single), 2 bathrooms, gas c.h.,
garden, garage. £975 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford
250462.

Very attractive semi-detached house in
north Summertown; 3 bedrooms, 2 studies, 2 living-rooms
plus kitchen and large conservatory; generous garden with
play equipment. Easily sleeps 5. Ideal for children. Easy
access to Summertown shops and central Oxford. Use of 2
adult and 2 child bicycles. All modern conveniences.
Available 18 Aug.--2 Sept.; some flexibility over dates.
£325 p.w. inc. utilities. Tel.: Oxford 556655.

Summer let in Oxford, live in comfort
near the Thames; c.h.; 4 bedrooms; large split-level
living-room, south-facing garden, dining-room,
fully-equipped kitchen; bathroom with bidet and w.c.;
shower-room with w.c. Available 6 weeks, 22 July--2 Sept.
Price negotiable. Tel.: Oxford 725193.

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Accommodation Offered

Stylish, but basic, loft room to rent in
a separate period building in the garden of our house in
North-central Oxford. Ideal as artist's or writer's
studio; own entry, tiolet, and large sink. Not living
accommodation. Rent negotiable (£175--£200
p.c.m.). Tel.: Oxford 557932.

Very spacious west-facing room with
balcony, Woodstock Road. Ideal for city centre, Radcliffe
Infirmary, and University. Non-smoker. Available now
until 30 June 1998. £80 p.w. Tel./fax: Oxford
513688.

Available now, 2-bedroom home on the
riverside. River views from most rooms. Large
sitting-room, newly-fitted kitchen, auto washing machine,
microwave. Suit non-smoking couple. £735 p.c.m.
plus deposit. Tel.: Oxford 245563.

Walton Manor: tastefully-modernised
2-bedroom period house in Plantation Road, a short walk
from the University departments. £950 p.c.m. Also
available: brand new 2-bedroom, 2-bathroom, unfurnished
apartment with spacious drawing room. £1,000
p.c.m. Contact Finders Keepers, tel.: Oxford 311011,
e-mail: oxford@finders.uk.co.

College-owned properties, available 15
July--11 Sept., centrally located near to university,
well equipped, serviced by college scouts. Can be let as
single properties or individual rooms, sharing
facilities. Tel.: Oxford (2)79082, e-mail:
janet.mead@seh.ox.ac.uk.

Bed-and-breakfast available in the warm
comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple in
exclusive central North Oxford; within easy walking
distance of the city centre and all main university
buildings; a stone's throw from the river, parks,
excellent pubs and restaurants and a 9--9 corner shop.
All rooms have colour TV, microwave, tea- and
coffee-making facilities, c.h., and independent heating.
Refrigerators available. Very moderate terms. Tel./fax:
Oxford 557879, mobile: 0374 434489.

Superb new hotel, 1.5 miles from city
centre. 16 en suitebedrooms; telephone, TV
with Sky, fridge, kitchenette, mini-bar. Parking. Tourist
Board---highly commended; RAC---highly acclaimed; AA---4
Qs. Single £59.50, double/twin £69.50, per
room per night. Discounts for long-stay guests.
Marlborough House Hotel, 321 Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2
7NY, tel.: Oxford 311321, fax: 515329, e-mail:
enquiries@marlbhouse.win-uk.net, Web site:
http://www.oxlink.co.uk/oxford/hotels/marlborough.html.

>

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Accommodation Sought

Going abroad? Or just thinking of
letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's
foremost letting agents and property managers. We
specialise in lettings to both academic and professional
individuals and their families, and have a constant flow
of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property
in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our
services, or if you simply need some informal help and
advice without obligation, telephone us: Oxford 764533,
fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk.
Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site
at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be
marketing your property.

Accommodation needed for July by US law
professor, teaching at Magdalen. Wife and 2 boys (7 and
10) will accompany for part of stay. Pleasant family
setting is most important. Please reply to Prof. Weiner,
tel.: 517 339 1751, fax: 334 5714, e-mail:
weinerw@cooley.edu.

Three-bedroom furnished flat or house
sought by academic couple with 2 children (11 and 9),
visiting Wolfson College; early Aug.--mid Jan. 1999.
Preferably North Oxford. Reply to Prof. David Wood, Law
Faculty, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria
3052, Australia. Tel.: +61 3 9344 6192, fax: 9347 2392,
e-mail: d.wood@law.unimelb.edu.au.

Visiting academic seeks 2-bedroom
furnished flat to rent, 22 June--5 Aug., preferably close
to Pembroke/St Peter's. Wife and child (3 years) visiting
part time. Non-smokers, local references available. James
Basker, Columbia University, tel.: 212 531 3732, fax: 663
9169, e-mail: oxbadmin@interport.com.

Finders Keepers specialises in managing
your home or investment. We have celebrated 25 years in
Oxford letting and managing properties---try us first!
Many of our landlords have remained with us since we
opened and are delighted with our service---why not pop
in and read their comments? Contact Finders Keepers, 73
Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE. Tel.: Oxfordd 311011, fax:
556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk, Internet site:
http://www.finders.co.uk.

American visiting fellow, spouse, and
boys 12 and 14 seek fully-furnished 3- or 4-bedroom house
in Oxford or environs, from 19 June through 20 Aug. 1998.
Children will be present for 3 weeks only. Please contact
in USA: D. Matthews, 6514 Kalama Road, Kapaa, Hawaii
96746, tel.: 808 821 0479, fax: 808 821 1193, e-mail:
dbm@aloha.net.

Visiting US Law professor seeks
furnished accommodation 26 June--7 Aug. for self and 2
quiet, well-behaved daughters (5 and 9). Local references
available. Jane Winn, SMU School of Law, Dallas, TX
75275, tel.: 214 768 2583, fax: 768 4330, e-mail:
jwinn@mail.smu.edu.

Mallams Residential Letting is well
placed to help with your letting and management
requirements. Based in Summertown, we offer a
professional service tailored to your individual
requirements. If you are thinking of letting your
property, please call us. Tel.: Oxford 311006, fax:
311977.

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Accommodation Exchange

Vancouver family (Univ of British
Columbia professor, wife, and 5-year-old daughter) seeks
to trade houses with another (non-smoking) family for
approx. 3-month period, Apr.--Aug. 1999. We have a
lovely, spacious California-style house, 5 minutes from
UBC, 15 minutes from the downtown, 20 minutes from
Vancouver International Airport, and a short block to a
beautiful sandy beach (Spanish Banks) and other
recreational amenities. We would need a house or large
flat, in Oxford or close by, with reasonably good access
to public transport. Dr T.A. Hutton, 4554 Belmont Avenue,
Vancouver, V6R 1C4, British Columbia, Canada. Tel.: 604
228 9592, fax: 604 822 6164.

Toronto exchange: spacious 2-bedroom,
2-bathroom flat. Centrally located, fully equipped,
tastefully furnished, light and heat included. Seeking to
exchange for house/flat in North or central Oxford for
18--24 months, beginning July/Sept. 1998. Fax (Moscow): 7
095 921 9491 or (Toronto): 416 972 9179, e-mail:
ioccmoscow@glas.apc.org.

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Accommodation Sought to Rent or
Exchange

Visiting academic (with children 9 and
13) seeks 2/3-bedroom furnished house or flat, inside
ring road, central preferred. Sept. 1998--Mar. 1999. Can
exchange 4(+)-bedroom luxury home with large private pool
and amenities in Phoenix, Arizona. Fax: 0101 602 5436004,
e-mail john.corrigan@asu.edu.

Professional academic couple seeks house
or flat with minimum 2 bedrooms in central Oxford, for 1
year sabbatical from Sept. 1998. No children, no pets,
non-smokers; mature and responsible adults. Would also
consider house/car exchange with persons coming to the
Chapel Hill/Durham area of North Carolina for similar
period of time. Contact Dr Valerie King, 1624 Hadley Mill
Pittsboro, NC 27312, USA. Tel.: 919 542 2328, fax: 966
3811, e-mail: vking@med.unc.edu.

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Accommodation Offered to Rent
or Exchange

Summertown: lovely 3-bedroom Victorian
terrace house, fully furnished/equipped, to let or
exchange from summer 1998, for academic year minimum.
Dates/length of let flexible. Two double bedrooms,
office/3rd bedroom, eat-in kitchen overlooking pretty
garden, 2 reception rooms, 1.5 bathrooms, gas c.h.
Hardwood floors; even a Steinway piano. Near shops, bus,
excellent schools, university, hospitals, etc. Family
owners (professional mother, 2 children) ideally seeking
exchange with New York City academic; require minimum 1
bedroom plus/doorman apartment in Manhattan. Otherwise
£1,100 p.c.m. plus bills. Tel.: Oxford 512847,
fax: 515335, e-mail: 101642.2251@compuserve.com.

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Holiday Lets

Enjoy a holiday in a charming villa or
cottage on the islands of Skopelos, Skiathos, and
Alonissos. Many with enclosed yards and close to the sea.
Weekly prices start from £76 per person in May.
For brochure, tel.: 0030 424 22947, fax: 424 23057,
e-mail: thalpos@otenet.gr.

Burgandy (Morvan National Park): 19th-c.
stone cottage in quiet hamlet. Sleeps 5+. Enclosed front
and rear gardens backing onto own large meadow with
streams. Spacious sitting-room, 2 double bedrooms, study,
bathroom, fully-equipped kitchen, washing machine, c.h.,
telephone, log fires. Ideal for peace and quiet, walking,
swimming in nearby lakes, wine-tasting and sight-seeing
in Burgandy (half hour from Vezelay and Avallon).
Available 9 Aug.--3 Sept. £250 p.w. Tel.: Oxford
556626.

Fisherman's cottage on the saewall at
Newport, Pembrokeshire. A family holiday home, child- and
dog-friendly; the front door opens onto the coastal path
and beach with wonderful views across the estuary. Good
for sailing, walkin, and golf. Electric heaters and open
fires. Sleeps 6. Good local shops and restuarants. Rates
(inc. electricity) from £115--£290 p.w. or
£25 per night off-season. Tel.: Oxford 714943.

Alentejo, Portugal: traditional
farnhouse situated on hilltop with splendid views over
surrounding countryside and the nearby seashore. A few
minutes' drive from a number of unspoiled beaches and 2
hours' drive from Lisbon (nearest town Santiago do
Cacem). Recently refurbished and fully equipped. Sleeps
4. £200 p.w. Contact F. Figueira, tel.: 351 1
7584322, fax: 351 1 2189259, e-mail:
fugueiraf@yahoo.com.

Delicious Donegal cottage; open fires,
Aga. Sleeps 4--6, overlooking lough, surrounded by
mountains. Ideal for families or couples. Rowing boat,
canoes, and bicyles included; within easy reach of golf
courses, fishing, sandy beaches, horse riding and much
more. From £200. Tel.: Oxford 390402.

France, Lot region. Comfortable,
spacious house in Medieval village; sleeps 6, all
en suite. Magnificent views over Cele
valley; 5 miles main town Figeac. Mar.--Sept.,
£300--£450 p.w. Same village: 1-bedroom
cottage, available same period, £150--£225.
Tel.: 01295 276156.

Umbria, Italy: luxury flat in tranquil
rural setting. Sleeps 2--4. Large terrace, private
garden, stunning views. Perugia 15 minutes, Assisi 30
minutes, Florence and Siena 2 hours. Tel.: 01252 877155
(eve.).

Provencal fortified farmhouse in tiny
rural village surrounded by lavender fields offers B&B or
half-board. There is also a 3-bedroom apartment with
kitchenette and sitting-room---ideal for writer/artist or
academic on sabatical leave; short or long stays
possible. Contact Karolyn Kauntze, Montsalier, 04150
Banon, France. Tel./fax: 00 33 4 92 73 23 61.

Cadouin, Dordogne. Large village house,
sleeps 12+. Not luxurious, but comfortable. All
amenities. Suitable for 2 families. Beautiful scenery;
perfect swimming nearby. £150--£250 p.w.
Tel.: 01743 359726.

Verona outskirts: in exceptionally
beautiful 15th-c. villa, self-contained ground-floor
flat; large double bed-sitting, kitchen/dining and bath
rooms; garden area; parking; frequent buses from door to
city centre. £300 p.w., inc. services and weekly
cleaning. Available from 1 May, except Aug. Tel.: 00 39
452 6499, or (Moore) 01844 238247.

Fethiye, Turkey: new apartments 5
minutes to beach sleeping max. 4; pool, bar/restaurant,
entertainments; English/Turkish owners. From only
£140 p.w. per apartment. Tel./fax: 01202
737202.

Greece: Skopelos Island. Old house to
let in quiet area of Skopelos village, 2 minutes' walk
from the waterfront, with secluded terrace and lovely
courtyard opening out from the kitchen. Two bathrooms.
Sleeps 6--8 comfortably. From £50 per day. Tel.:
01280 848 250 or 847 849.

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Houses for Sale

Three-bedroom Victorian terrace house in
East Oxford, close to city centre and near bus route.
Sitting-room, kitchen-diner, large cellar and roof space.
Gas c.h. with new boiler. Good decorative condition.
£110,000. Tel.: 01404 841591 (eve.).

Cottage for sale in France: Montsoreau,
near Saumur. Superb view over the Loire in an attractive
small village near shops. Downstairs: large
living-room/kitchen, bedroom, washroom/toilet, shower,
workroom/storage space. Upstairs: large bedroom with
study area, en suite bathroom/shower/toilet. Attic (could
be developed); double cellar cut into hillside. Vacant
possession. £30,000 o.n.o. Contact Prof. and Mrs
B. P. Reardon, 6 Impasse des Jonquilles, 14780
Lion-sur-Mer. Tel./fax: +33 2 31 36 08 56, e-mail:
bryan.reardon@wanadoo.fr.

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Properties for sale at Oxford
Waterside

Central North Oxford/Jericho.
Classically styled homes built by nationally renowned
quality house-builders, Berkeley Homes. Properties
available include: 2-bedroom apartments from
£118,500; 3-bedroom, 2-bathroom houses from
£169,500; 4-bedroom, 3-storey houses with garages
from £275,000. Marketing suite and show homes open
daily, 10 a.m.--5 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 311449, or
726000/515000 (joint selling agents, Savills and Thomas
Merrifield).

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section






<br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette: Diary, 1 May<br /> - 13 May

Diary


Contents of this section:

Academic Staff
Development Seminars
: places should be booked in advance through
the Staff Development Office, University Offices,
Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

For the full list of courses, see the HREF="http://admin.ox.ac.uk/training/">Staff Development
ProgrammeWeb site.

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Contents Page of this issue



Friday 1 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The founders of the
Ashmolean', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for
bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--1 p.m.)

DR S. VERTOVEC: `Three meanings of diaspora and
Hinduism outside India' (seminar series: `Transnational
communities, diasporas, and globalisation'), Lecture
Room, Christ Church, 2 p.m.

MAISON FRANÇAISE/VOLTAIRE FOUNDATION round
table on Montesquieu (to mark the publication of the
first volume of the Complete Works of
Montesquieu), Maison Française, 2.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR A.E. ROTH: `Learning and fairness'
(Clarendon Lectures in Economics: `Game theory,
experimental economics, and theoretical computation'),
Gulbenkian Theatre, Institute of Economics and
Statistics, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

R. PADEL: `How myth uses us: Greek "Guyville" and
women's rock music' (Marett Memorial Lecture),
Saskatchewan Lecture Room, Exeter, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. SCRUTON: `Criticising pop' (public
lecture), Denis Arnold Hall, Music Faculty, 5.15 p.m.

OPERA performance: The Minister, by
Professor Roger Scruton, Holywell Music Room, 8.30 p.m.
(tickets £15/£12/£5, from Blackwell's
Music Shop or at the door).

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section



Sunday 3 May

THE REVD DR RALPH WALLER preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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section



Monday 4 May

UNIVERSITY OFFICES closed (today only).

SHELDONIAN THEATRE closed (today only).

UNIVERSITY MESSENGER SERVICE suspended (today only).

DR J. ASHTON: `Paul the charismatic' (Wilde Lectures:
`The religion of the apostle Paul'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR G. THEISSEN: `The two basic values of the
primitive Christian ethic: love of neighbour and
renunciation of status' (Speaker's Lectures in Biblical
Studies: `Theory of primitive Christian religion'),
Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. FRYKENBERG: `Sepoys, Naukars, and Sawars:
military contributions to India's conquest'
(Radhakrishnan Memorial Lectures: `India's Raj:
indigenous components and the imperial construction of
India'), Schools, 5 p.m.

H.E. ROLF EKÉUS: `The UN Security Council and
weapons of mass destruction in Iraq' (Cyril Foster
Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

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section



Tuesday 5 May

CHRIST CHURCH Picture Gallery exhibition opens: `Drawings
for the decorative arts' (until 10 July).

ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Management of change' (last
of three meetings for research team leaders), 9 a.m. ( HREF="#seminars">see information above).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Japanese prints'
(special exhibition), 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel.
for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--1 p.m.)

CONGREGATION meeting, 2 p.m.

A.E. SALE: `World War II code-breaking with the Bombe
and the Colossus' (Strachey Lecture), Lecture Theatre,
Computing Laboratory, 4.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR G. THEISSEN: `Dealing with power and
possessions in primitive Christianity' (Speaker's
Lectures in Biblical Studies: `Theory of primitive
Christian religion'), Schools, 5 p.m.

SIR MICHAEL HOWARD: `Fin de siècle: reflections
at the close of the twentieth century' (A.B. Emden
Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. TEECE: `The knowledge economy and
intellectual capital management' (Clarendon Lectures in
Management Studies: `Managing innovation and change'),
Schools, 5 p.m.

J. CLATWORTHY: `Theology and the value of the world'
(Oxford Centre for the Environment, Ethics, and Society
seminars: first of three seminars on Ecology and
Theology), Council Room, Mansfield, 5 p.m.

DR J. BALFOUR-PAUL: `Pursuit of indigo: Arabia
eastwards' (Oxford Asian Textile Group lecture), Pauling
Centre for Human Sciences, 5.45 p.m. (admission for
visitors: £2).

DR M. LAVEN: `Nuns and sex in Counter-Reformation
Venice' (Seminar in Social and Cultural History,
1500--1800), Hovenden Room, All Souls, 8.30 p.m.

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section



Wednesday 6 May

PROFESSOR G. THEISSEN: `Dealing with wisdom and holiness
in primitive Christianity' (final lecture in series of
Speaker's Lectures in Biblical Studies: `Theory of
primitive Christian religion'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. TEECE: `Innovation and business
organisation' (Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies:
`Managing innovation and change'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR L. SKLAR: `On what there isn't' (John Locke
Lectures: `Philosophy within science'), Gulbenkian
Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

C. TREVETT: `From the women of the Cainites to
Firmilian's ecstatic female: questions of authority and
heresy' (Centre for the Study of Christianity and
Culture), Regent's Park College, 5 p.m.

DR M. WINTROUB: `Museum genealogies and rituals of
power' (seminar series: `Collection and comparison in the
sciences'), Museum of the History of Science, 5 p.m.

LOUIS GENTILE: `International protection: myth or
reality?' (Refugee Studies Programme: Seminars on Forced
Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth
House, 5 p.m.

S. MCKECHNIE: `The wider issue: representation and
experience of women in politics and business'
(interdisciplinary seminars: `Gender and the
public/private divide'), Seminar Room, Nuffield, 5 p.m.

T. HUNKELER: `La paille des mots et le grain des
choses: stratégies de dévalorisation chez
Beckett' (lecture), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

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Thursday 7 May

DR C. AWLL-DAVIES: `Women in management in Wales' (Centre
for Cross-Cultural Research on Women seminars), Queen
Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

JUSTICE STEPHEN BREYER: `The work of an American
constitutional judge' (H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture),
Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. TEECE: `Intellectual property, technology
strategy, and public policy' (Clarendon Lectures in
Management Studies: `Managing innovation and change'),
Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. VISCOMI: `Blake's graphical imagination:
the technical and aesthetic origins of Blake's
illuminated books' (D.F. McKenzie Lecture), Lecture
Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

THE REVD DR ALAN TORRANCE: `Christ and the question of
criteria' (Hensley Henson Lectures in Theology: `The
Christ of history and the open society'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR H. FOLEY: `Clytemnestra's apology' (Astor
Visiting Lecture), Garden Quad Auditorium, St John's, 5
p.m.

DR D. MIDGLEY: `The poet in Berlin: Brecht's city
poetry of the later 1920s' (The Brecht Centenary in
Oxford—Streit und Gelächter: a
seminar on Brecht's poetry), Lecture Room 6, New College,
5.15 p.m.

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Friday 8 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM study-day: `Exploring the Baroque: the
Weldon Gallery redesigned', 9.30 a.m.--4 p.m. (Cost:
£16. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--12.30
p.m.)

PROFESSOR J. VISCOMI: `Making Blake's books, The
Marriage of Heaven and Hell
, and the WWW Blake
archive' (seminar, related to McKenzie Lecture), Seminar
Room C, St John's, 12 noon.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `A birdwatcher's guide
to the Ashmolean', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for
bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--1 p.m.)

DR G. TER HAAR: `The African religious diaspora in
Europe: migration and identity' (seminar series:
`Transnational communities, diasporas, and
globalisation'), Lecture Room, Christ Church, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR M. ALBROW: `Frames and transformations in
transnational studies' (ESRC Research Programme in
Transnational Communities: `Conceiving transnational
activity'), Upper Lecture Theatre, School of Geography, 2
p.m.

SIR MARTIN WOOD: `Superconductivity, eighty-seven
years on—where's it going?' (Cherwell–Simon
Lecture), Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building,
4.30 p.m.

CANON ERIC JAMES: `Spirituality, Shakespeare, and
royalty: has the monarchy a future?' (Eric Symes Abbott
Memorial Lecture), the chapel, Keble, 5.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. WEISBERG: `Vichy law and the Holocaust in
France' (Socio-Legal Studies Annual Lecture), Room 6,
Examination Schools, 5.30 p.m.

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Sunday 10 May

DR JANET MARTIN SOSKICE preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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Monday 11 May

PROFESSOR R.J.W. EVANS (Regius Professor of Modern
History): `The language of history and the history of
language' (inaugural lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR J. ASHTON: `Paul the possessed' (Wilde Lectures:
`The religion of the apostle Paul'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR M. SANDEL: `Commodification,
commercialisation, and privatisation' (Tanner Lectures on
Human Values: `What money can't buy: the moral limits of
markets'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. FRYKENBERG: `Nayakas, Rayats, and
Zamindars: political contributions to India's
constitution' (Radhakrishnan Memorial Lectures: `India's
Raj: indigenous components and the imperial construction
of India'), Schools, 5 p.m.

R. RASHED: `Arab science and classical modernity'
(lecture), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

STEVEN ISSERLIS and

THOMAS ADES perform works for cello and piano by Bach,
Suk, Janacek, Kodaly, and Barber, Garden Quadrangle
Auditorium, St John's, 8.30 p.m. (admission by free
programme, available from the Porters' Lodge, St John's;
for college members only until 2 May).

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Tuesday 12 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Illustrators of the
1860s' (special exhibition), 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50.
Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--1 p.m.)

PROFESSOR E.R. MAY (Harmsworth Professor of American
History): `Shaping forces in American foreign policy'
(inaugural lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR M. SANDEL: `Markets, morals, and the public
sphere' (Tanner Lectures on Human Values: `What money
can't buy: the moral limits of markets'), Schools, 5 p.m.

R. ATTFIELD: `Environmental sensitivity and the
critiques of stewardship' (Oxford Centre for the
Environment, Ethics, and Society seminars: second of
three seminars on Ecology and Theology), Council Room,
Mansfield, 5 p.m.

R. RASHED: `Descartes entre al-Khayam et Newton'
(lecture), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR F. LENGER: `Unwelcome traditions: the debate
about the "Völkish" roots of social history in
Germany' (public lecture), New Lecture Theatre, St
Antony's, 8.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. DE VRIES: `Did a consumer culture emerge
before the Industrial Revolution?' (Seminar in Social and
Cultural History, 1500--1800), Hovenden Room, All Souls,
8.30 p.m.

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Wednesday 13 May

C. FRANKLIN: `The Bowdlers and their family Shakespeare'
(Friends of the Bodleian thirty-minute lecture), Cecil
Jackson Room, Sheldonian, 1 p.m.

ACADEMICIAN M.L. GASPAROV: `Russian language and
Russian verse: the linguistics of poetry' (Taylor
Institution Sesquicentennial Lectures: `Languages and
literatures of Europe'), the Lecture Hall, the Taylor
Institution, 5 p.m.

P.D. JAMES: `Mystery and mayhem: the craft of the
detective story' (Richard Hillary Memorial Lecture), St
Cross Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR L. SKLAR: `Idealisation and representation'
(John Locke Lectures: `Philosophy within science'),
Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

DR M. CERNEA: `Economics, the private sector, and
human rights: open issues in population resettlement'
(Refugee Studies Programme: Elizabeth Colson Lecture),
Rhodes House, 5 p.m.

DR I. ZWEINIGER-BARGIELOWSKA: `The citizen housewife:
women under austerity in the 1940s' (interdisciplinary
seminars: `Gender and the public/private divide'),
Seminar Room, Nuffield, 5 p.m.

DR S. MUELLER-WILLE: `Collectors, system-builders and
world-wide commerce: the epistemic functions of
collection in Linnaean botany' (seminar series:
`Collection and comparison in the sciences'), Museum of
the History of Science, 5 p.m.

D. RIBARD and

A. VIALA: `Fontenelle au carrefour: histoire,
philosophie, sciences et littérature' (first of
three meetings: `Histoire et littérature:
France—Ancien Régime'), Maison
Française, 5 p.m.

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