3 October 1996 - No 4411

Oxford University Gazette

3 October 1996


 


The following supplement was published with this Gazette:
Philanthropic Funding: Development Office Newsletter .

 


University Health and Safety information

 


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University Acts

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL 25 September

1 Decrees

Council has made the following decrees, to come into effect on 18 October.

List of the decrees:

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Explanatory note to Decree (1)

In the past, the salaries of the University's most senior officers, viz. the Vice-Chancellor, the Chairman of the General Board, and the Registrar, have normally been increased by the same average percentage as determined by settlements for non-clinical academic and academic-related salaries generally, although on rare occasions there has been an ad hoc review of such salaries. Council has decided that it would be appropriate in future for the salaries of these officers, and such other senior officers as Council may determine (e.g. as a result of the report of the current Commission of Inquiry), to be kept under regular review by a standing committee composed of disinterested members, including some external to the University. The following decree establishes such a committee and provides for triennial reviews, starting this year, with the possibility of interim reviews ad hoc at the request of Council. There is no underlying assumption on Council's part that the result of any review would be an increase in any of the salaries concerned over and above the average percentage of academic and related salary settlements: the intention is that the review committee should determine whether there have been any significant changes in the duties of, or any developments associated with, the offices in question since the previous review. At the same time opportunity is taken (see cl. 2 of the decree) also to expand the terms of reference of the Committee on Higher Appointments, which currently reports to Council on academic and academic-related posts carrying stipends (or maximum stipends) above the top of the salary scale for university readers. Council has agreed that it would be desirable for this committee to consider not only, as at present, the scales and rates to be paid to staff holding such posts but also, in future, questions concerning the honoraria paid to the chairmen of the main standing committees of Council and the General Board (such as the Buildings Committee and the Curators of the University Chest) and the salaries of officers such as the Proctors and Assessor. It is Council's intention that the committee should regularly undertake a general review of all the salaries falling within its purview.

The salary of the Vice-Chancellor, together with a table showing the numbers of the other members of staff receiving salaries in the highest salary ranges currently paid by the University, is, and will continue to be, published in the full version of the University's Annual Financial Statements which is available to any member of Congregation on request to the Secretary of the Chest at the University Offices, Wellington Square. The salaries of all the University's senior officers are, and will continue to be, included in the complete list of non-clinical academic and academic-related salaries which is available to any member of Congregation on request to the Head Clerk at the University Offices.

Council has agreed to appoint the following as the initial members of the review committee:

    Until
Chairman: Sir Patrick Neill, QC,
Honorary Fellow of All Souls and Magdalen Colleges
MT 1999
Head of House: Miss E.M. Llewellyn-Smith, CB,
Principal of St Hilda's College
MT 1997
Head of another institution: Sir Ronald Oxburgh, KBE, FRS,
Honorary Fellow of St Edmund Hall and University College,
Rector of Imperial College of Science,
Technology and Medicine, London, formerly President of Queens' College, Cambridge
MT 1998

Decree (1)

1 In Ch. II, Sect. I, § 12, cl. 1, concerning the Committee on Higher Appointments (Statutes, 1995, p. 212), before `consider' insert `, except as is otherwise provided in § 16 of this section,'.

2 Ibid., cl. 2, after `such staff' insert `, and on such other specific remuneration questions as may be referred to the committee from time to time by Council'.

3 Ibid., concerning committees of Council (p. 213), insert new § 16 as follows and renumber existing §§ 16–18 (pp. 213–14) as §§ 17–19: `§ 16. Committee to Review the Salaries of Senior University Officers

1. There shall be a Committee to Review the Salaries of Senior University Officers, which shall consist of:

(1) a person appointed by Council as chairman of the committee, who shall be a former Vice-Chancellor of the University;

(2) the Senior Proctor;

(3) the Chairman of the University's Audit Committee;

(4), (5) two persons appointed by Council, one of whom shall be the head of one of the colleges or other societies included in Title VII, and the other of whom shall be the head of another university or equivalent institution of higher eduction.

Appointed members of the committee shall serve for three years, or for as long as they hold the office by virtue of which they were eligible for appointment to the committee (whichever period shall be the shorter), except that casual vacancies shall be filled for the unexpired period of the member demitting office, and they shall be re-eligible provided always that no person shall serve on the committee for more than six years in total.

2. The committee shall in the calendar year 1996 and every three years thereafter review, and then make recommendations to Council on, the salaries to be paid to the Vice-Chancellor, the Chairman of the General Board, the Registrar, and such other senior officers of the University as Council may from time to time determine. The committee shall also carry out such reviews at any other time if requested by Council to do so.

3. In carrying out such reviews the committee shall consider whether there have been any significant changes in the duties of, or any significant developments associated with, the offices concerned since the salaries of the holders of the offices were last determined.'

4 This decree shall have immediate effect, provided that the initial periods of office of the first appointed members of the new committee shall be so phased as to ensure a regular subsequent rotation of appointments.

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Explanatory note to Decree (2)

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the International Committee and with approval on behalf of the General Board, provides for the Secretary of the Management Committees for the Soros/FCO Chevening Scholarships Scheme and the Oxford Colleges Hospitality Scheme to serve ex officio as a member of the International Committee.

Decree (2)

In Ch. II, Sect. II, § 6, cl. 1 (Statutes, 1995, p. 221), insert new item (10) as follows and renumber existing items (10) and (11) as items (11) and (12):

`(10) the Secretary of the Management Committees for the Soros/FCO Chevening Scholarships and the Oxford Colleges Hospitality Scheme, ex officio;'.

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Explanatory note to Decree (3)

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Law Board and with the concurrence of the General Board, provides that supervision of theses or dissertations in the Bachelor of Civil Law or Magister Juris in European and Comparative Law may take place over three terms, rather than (as in the past) being limited to two terms, since in practice it is desirable to provide for supervision over the longer of these periods.

Decree (3)

In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 851, l. 9, delete `two' and substitute `three'.

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Explanatory note to Decree (4)

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Literae Humaniores Board and with the concurrence of the General Board, provides for an increase in the number of examiners for taught graduate degrees under the board, to allow for the appointment of an external examiner in each case.

Decree (4)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 974, ll. 29-31, delete `Ancient History, Greek and Latin Languages and Literature,'.

2 Ibid., p. 975, after l. 2 insert: `Three in Ancient History and in Classical Archaeology.
Three or four as required in Greek and Latin Languages and Literature.'

3 Ibid., ll. 22 and 27, in each case delete `Classical Archaeology,'.

4 Ibid., p. 977, ll. 22–4, delete `Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature, in Greek and/or Roman History,'.

5. Ibid., after l. 35 insert: `Three in Greek and/or Roman History, and in Classical Archaeology.
Three or four as required in Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature.'

Key to Decree (4)

Cll. 1–3 provide for there to be three examiners in the M.Phil.s in Ancient History and in Classical Archaeology, and three or four as required in the M.Phil. in Greek and Latin Languages and Literature, and delete the existing provisions which refer to lower numbers of examiners.

Cll. 4 and 5 provide for there to be three examiners in the M.St.s in Ancient History and in Classical Archaeology, and three or four as required in the M.St. in Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature, and delete the existing provisions which refer to lower numbers of examiners.

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Explanatory note to Decree (5)

The following change in decree, made on the recommendation of the General Board, allows nominating committees for examiners to have four elected members where the multi-disciplinary nature of a course requires this.

Decree (5)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 982, l. 7, after `except that' insert `the number of members of the committee listed in clause 7 (vv) below shall be seven, and five shall be a quorum at any meeting, and that'.

2 Ibid., l. 9, delete `that'.

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Decree (6)

The consent of the University is given to the amendments to Statutes I, III, IV, VII, and XII of Lady Margaret Hall approved by the Governing Body on 12 June 1996, in so far as such consent is required by Section 7 (2) of the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923.

Note. The effects of the amendments are

(1) to provide for the appointment of Foundation and Visiting Fellows;

(2) to update the provisions relating to powers of investment;

(3) to provide for the appointment of an investment manager; and

(4) to make consequential amendments arising out of the introduction of the University Commissioners' statutes.

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Decree (7)

The consent of the University is given to the amendments to Statute II of Merton College approved by the Governing Body on 15 May 1996, in so far as such consent is required by Section 7 (2) of the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923.

Note. The effects of the amendments are

(1) to provide alternative provisions for the election of the Warden's successor;

(2) to provide for leave of absence; and

(3) to provide for a date upon which resignation takes effect.

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Decree (8)

The consent of the University is given to the amendments to Statutes II and IV of St John's College approved by the Governing Body on 17 July 1996, in so far as such consent is required by Section 7 (2) of the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923.

Note. The effects of the amendments are

(1) to bring the college's arrangements for initial probationary appointments of its Official Fellows into line with the University's arrangements for the initial probationary appointment of CUF lecturers, by the extension of the college's initial term of appointment to five years; and

(2) to enable the college to implement a scheme for the creation of Research Fellowships which would be distinct from its existing Senior Research Fellowships and Junior Research Fellowships.

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Decree (9)

Dispensation from prescribed duties is granted to M.R. Bridson, MA (MS, Ph.D. Cornell), Fellow of Pembroke College and Reader in Mathematics, for five years from 1 January 1997 to enable him to hold an EPSRC Advanced Fellowship.

Decree (10)

Dispensation from prescribed duties (apart from examining) is granted to I.W. Craig, MA (B.Sc., Ph.D. Liverpool), Fellow of St Catherine's College and Professor of Genetics, for three years from 1 January 1997 to enable him to participate in a major MRC-supported programme at the Institute of Psychiatry, London.

Decree (11)

Dispensation from prescribed duties is granted to P.F. Roche, MA (B.Sc., Ph.D. London), Fellow of Hertford College and University Lecturer in Physics, for five years from 1 October 1996 to enable him to hold the post of UK Gemini Project Scientist.

Decree (12)

Dispensation from prescribed duties is granted to D.L. Wark, MA (BS Indiana; MS California; Ph.D. Caltech), Fellow of Balliol College and University Lecturer in Physics, for three years from 1 October 1996 to enable him to hold a PPARC Lecturer Fellowship.

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2 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts under the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. vi, cl. 1 (Statutes, 1995, p. 345) has been accorded to the following persons who are qualified for membership of Congregation:

 

VERA FEDOROVNA KONNOVA, M.LITT., St Hugh's College

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3 Status of Master of Arts for Resident Visitors

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts under the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. vi, cl. 2 (Statutes, 1995, p. 345) has been accorded to the following Visiting Fellows of All Souls College who will be in residence for part or all of the academic year 1996–7:

PROFESSOR GEOFFREY BRENNAN (Australian National)

DR EDWARD BROADBENT (Montreal)

PROFESSOR JERRY FODOR (Rutgers)

DR RAYMOND GILLESPIE (Ireland)

PROFESSOR SANFORD KATZ (Boston)

PROFESSOR CAROL SCOTT LEONARD (New York)

PROFESSOR RAY MACDONALD (Lancaster)

PROFESSOR JOY PARR (Simon Fraser)

PROFESSOR ERICA REINER (Chicago)

PROFESSOR GUY ROGERS (Wellesley)

PROFESSOR RENWEI ZHAO (Chinese Academy of Social Sciences)

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4 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of Congregation:

Donnelly, P.J., MA, D.Phil., St Anne's
Konnova, V.F., MA status, M.Litt., St Hugh's
von Clemm, F.M., MA, M.Litt., D.Phil., Templeton

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CONGREGATION 30 September

Degree by Special Resolution

No notice to the contrary having been received under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1995, p. 13), the following resolution is deemed to have been approved at noon on 30 September.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following: PETER JAMES DONNELLY, D.PHIL., St Anne's College

RENÉE CLAIRE FOX, Balliol College

BEAT GÄHWILER, Lincoln College

ROBERT LAWRENCE MIDDLEKAUFF, Queen's College

FREDRICK MICHAEL VON CLEMM, M.LITT., D.PHIL., Templeton College

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BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 18 October, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

University Agenda

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 22 October 2 p.m.

1 Promulgation of Statute

Explanatory note to Statute

The following statute, and the decree to be made by Council if the statute is approved, which are promoted on the recommendation of the Committee for the Nomination of Select Preachers and with the concurrence of Hertford College, modify the subject of the Macbride Sermon. At present the sermon must be preached upon `the application of the prophecies in Holy Scripture respecting the Messiah to our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, with an especial view to confute the arguments of Jewish commentators and to promote the conversion to Christianity of the ancient people of God'. By decree it is delivered in Hertford College on the second Sunday in Hilary Term by a preacher nominated by the Vice-Chancellor (see Ch. XI, Sect. I, § 4 (4), Statutes, 1995, p. 692).

WHEREAS it is expedient to modify the subject upon which the Macbride Sermon is preached to reduce the potential for causing offence, NOW THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD, in exercise of the powers in that behalf conferred upon it by the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923, and of all other powers enabling it, ENACTS, subject to the approval of Her Majesty in Council, AS FOLLOWS.

In Tit. XV (Statutes, 1995, p. 157, as amended, subject to the approval of Her Majesty in Council, by the statute approved by Congregation on 14 May 1996, Gazette, Vol. 126, pp. 1086, 1122), insert Sect. LXI:

`Section LXI. Of the Macbride Sermon

The income from the fund derived from an anonymous benefaction accepted by the University in 1848, now known as the Macbride Fund after J.D. Macbride, DCL, Principal of Magdalen Hall, shall be paid to the preacher of the annual sermon known as the Macbride Sermon. The Macbride Sermon shall be preached upon "the application of the prophecies in Holy Scripture respecting the Messiah to our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ".'

Decree to be made by Council if the Statute is approved

1 In Ch. XI, Sect. I, § 4 (Statutes, 1995, p. 692), delete footnote 22 This decree shall be effective from the date on which Statute (...) approved by Congregation on ... is approved by Her Majesty in Council.

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2 Voting on Special Resolution authorising expenditure from the Higher Studies Fund

1 That the Curators of the University Chest be authorised to expend from the unearmarked section of the Higher Studies Fund such sums, initially estimated at £423.5K, as are necessary to cover the costs of the following commitments:

(1) £56K to cover, for two years from the date of appointment, the cost of a research assistant for the Cookson Professor of Materials;

(2) up to £155K to cover the shortfall on accommodation costs (£105K) and two years of research support costs at RSIA for the Professor of the Physics and Chemistry of Minerals;

(3) £15K to cover, for three years from 1 July 1996, the research expenses of the Professor of Statistical Science;

(4) £70K to cover, for two years from 1 October 1998, the cost of an appointment to a post of University Lecturer in Zoology;

(5) £95K to cover for one year the cost of a research assistant to the Sedleian Professor of Natural Philosophy and, for two years from the date of appointment, the cost of an appointment to a post of University Lecturer in Applied Mathematics;

(6) £32.5K to cover, over three years, equipment and personal research expenses for the Sedleian Professor of Natural Philosophy.

2 That the Curators of the University Chest be authorised to expend from that part of the Higher Studies Fund which is earmarked for Social Studies such sums, initially estimated at £212K, as are necessary to cover the costs of the following commitments:

(1) £10K to cover, for two years from 1 October 1995, the research expenses of the Professor of Management Studies and Deputy Director of the School of Management Studies;

(2) up to £150K towards the cost of maintaining acquisitions in the Law Library over a period of three years from 1995-6;

(3) up to £52K to cover, over three years, a postgraduate studentship and research expenses for the Halford Mackinder Professor of Geography.

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Notices

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • *Notices of exhibitions, guided tours, etc.:

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    JESUS PROFESSORSHIP OF CELTIC

    THOMAS MOWBRAY CHARLES-EDWARDS, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Corpus Christi College and University Lecturer (CUF) in Modern History, has been appointed to the professorship with effect from a date to be arranged.

    Dr Charles-Edwards will be a fellow of Jesus College.

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    WARDENSHIP OF GREEN COLLEGE

    Under the provisions of Tit. VII, Sect. III, cl. 7 (Statutes, 1995, p. 45), Council, on the recommendation of the Governing Body of Green College, has appointed SIR JOHN HANSON, KCMG, CBE, MA, Wadham College, Director-General of the British Council, to be Warden of Green College with effect from 1 January 1998.

    Council has also, under the provisions of Tit. X, Sect I, proviso ( h) (ii) (ibid., p. 74), on the recommendation of the Governing Body, approved the extension from 1 October 1997 to 31 December 1997 of the appointment of the present Warden, SIR CRISPIN TICKELL, GCMG, KCVO, MA.

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    DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN ANATOMY

    Under the provisions of Ch. VII, Sect.I, § 3 (Statutes, 1995, pp. 355–6), the General Board, on the recommendation of the Physiological Sciences Board, has appointed H.M. CHARLTON, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Linacre College and Reader in Neuroendocrinology, as acting head of the department for one year from 1 October 1996.

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    SIR ALEC TURNBULL TRAVELLING SCHOLARSHIP 1996

    The Scholarship has been awarded to DR INEZ COOKE.

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    PASSMORE EDWARDS PRIZES FOR CLASSICS AND ENGLISH 1996

    The Prize for performance in the Final Honour School has been awarded to NICHOLAS D. SMITH, Lady Margaret Hall.

    The Prize for performance in Honour Moderations has been awarded to RUSSELL N. LYNCH, St Anne's College.

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    NATIONAL COMMITTEE OF INQUIRY INTO HIGHER EDUCATION

    The University has been sent a request for evidence by the National Committee of Inquiry into Higher Education, chaired by Sir Ron Dearing. It consists of the following thirty-two questions.

    1. The Definition and Purposes of Higher Education

    1. What should be the aims and purposes of higher education over the next twenty years?

    2. What features are, or should be, distinctive of higher education as opposed to other levels or forms of education or training?

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    2. Teaching and Research Within Higher Education

    3. What forms of higher education provision will students need access to over the next twenty years?

    4. What knowledge, skills and aptitudes will those leaving higher education need over the next twenty years and how can these be best delivered?

    5. How can effective teaching and learning be identified and how should they be encouraged?

    6. What is the place of scholarship (as opposed to teaching and research) in higher education?

    7. How can the standards of degrees and other higher education qualifications be assured and maintained?

    8. What proportion of higher education resources is it reasonable to use to verify standards of awards and the quality of provision?

    9. How should research carried out in higher education institutions fit with the wider spectrum of research undertaken in the UK?

    10. How should public funding for research in higher education institutions be distributed?

    11. How should the organisation of research activity be developed over the next twenty years?

    12. How can the quality of research in higher education best be maintained and enhanced?

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    3. The Size, Shape and Structure of Higher Education

    13. What should be the participation rate for higher education in the context of changes in society, the economy and the labour market over the next twenty years?

    14. What factors should determine the appropriate level of participation in higher education?

    15. How do you expect the student body over the next twenty years to differ in age, background, education, employment, experience and motivation, aptitude and lifestyle from today?

    16. What should be the requirements for entry in higher education?

    17. How should the admissions procedure be organised for entry into higher education?

    18. How diverse should the higher education sector be across institutions over the next twenty years?

    19. What should be the balance between different providers of higher education?

    20. How should higher education institutions themselves develop?

    21. How should the shape and structure of the higher education sector be determined?

    22. What requirements on internal governance in institutions of higher education should there be as a pre-requisite for receipt of public funds?

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    4. The Wider Contribution of Higher Education to National Life

    23. What local and regional role should higher education institutions have over the next twenty years?

    24. How can UK higher education capitalise on the fact that higher education is an international activity?

    25. What should higher education seek to contribute to the social, cultural, moral and spiritual life of the nation?

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    5. Funding Issues

    26. How can institutions which offer higher education best ensure that they have an expert and effective workforce?

    27. What further measures may be available to increase the cost effectiveness of institutions of higher education without reducing the quality of teaching and research?

    28. What factors should be taken into account in determining the level and proportion of public expenditure spent on higher education?

    29. Who should pay the costs of tuition and of student maintenance?

    30. How should scholarship (as distinct from research or teaching) be supported?

    31. What is the most effective way of channelling public funds for teaching to higher education?

    32. To what extent is it practicable and desirable for facilities and services in higher education to be provided by the private sector outside higher education?

    A reply is being prepared by Council and the General Board which has to be submitted by 15 November 1996. If any member of Congregation wishes to express views on any of the above questions, in order to help in the drafting, please send them to the Secretary of Faculties, University Offices, Wellington Square by 28 October 1996. In the questionnaire, each of the above questions is followed by an indication of particular points on which comments may be thought desirable. If any member of Congregation wishes to have a copy of the full text, it is available from the Secretary of Faculties.

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    ACADEMIC AND ACADEMIC-RELATED SALARIES

    Council published in the Gazette dated 25 July (Vol. 126, p. 1431) the text of a letter sent on 26 June to the Prime Minister by the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Liverpool (Professor P.N. Love) in his capacity as Chairman of the Universities and Colleges Employers Association (UCEA). That letter addressed in particular the problems for universities of implementing in the case of their clinical academic staff the recent salary award determined by the Doctors and Dentists Review Board (DDRB) for equivalent staff in the National Health Service (NHS), but also referred to the increasingly disadvantageous salary position of non-clinical academic and academic-related staff in universities.

    Published below, for the information of members of Congregation and others concerned, are the texts of (a) the reply sent by a Minister of State, Mr Eric Forth, MP, on 22 July, (b) a further letter from Professor Love, dated 29 July, and (c) a reply to that letter sent by another Minister of State, Lord Henley, on 17 September.

    (a) Letter to Professor Love from Mr Forth

    22 July 1996

    Thank you for your letter of 26 June addressed to the Prime Minister about academic pay. It has been passed to me for reply, as I am the Minister responsible for higher education.

    You say that the Government made a 1 per cent cut in cash terms in the recurrent funding for higher education in 1996-7. In fact, the 1995 Budget confirmed plans for recurrent expenditure announced in the 1994 Budget. Total recurrent grants to the Higher Education Funding Council for England and the Teacher Training Agency remained broadly unchanged in cash terms between 1995–6 and 1996–7. It is against this background and within these available funds that university employers have to decide on pay increase in staff salaries. As you are no doubt aware, the Chancellor's statement of 18 September 1995 on public sector pay made clear that there would again be no access to the central Reserve to fund settlements this year.

    It remains the Government's view that the pay of clinical academics employed by universities should be linked to NHS doctors' pay as determined by the DDRB. This is the principle that UCEA has observed in previous years. While I note what you say about the particular difficulties that have arisen this year, I would urge you to reconsider very carefully your own cogent arguments for retaining the link.

    (Signed) ERIC FORTH

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    (b) Letter to Mr Forth from Professor Love

    29 July 1996

    On 22 June 1996, I wrote to the Prime Minister drawing attention to the need for an additional £4.8m in funding for University Medical and Dental Schools, so that they can implement the pay award determined by the Government for Clinical Academic Staff. You replied on 22 July and I would like to comment on some of the points you make.

    Funding for Higher Education was cut by 1 per cent this year relative to last, even if you prefer to describe this as recurrent grant `remained broadly unchanged in cash terms'. The cut in funding is the main reason why Universities and Colleges can afford a pay increase of only 1.5 per cent for all their staffs.

    You say it is `the Government's view that the pay of clinical academics employed by universities should be linked to the NHS Doctors' pay as determined by the DDRB'. As you know the increase involved is 3.85 per cent.

    You say too, that UCEA has observed this parity principle in previous years and so it has.

    Since the Clinical Academic Staff Salaries Committee was established, with government support, in 1979, the principle of parity has been maintained and underwritten by additional funds from the Government whenever a significant gap between NHS and University funding emerged, as it has again this year. Additional funds have been provided on several occasions.

    In 1986, the undertaking to provide additional funding was formalised and set out in a letter, dated 6 February 1986, from the then Secretary of State, Sir Keith Joseph, to the then CVCP Chairman. It is true that the promise was couched in relation to funding mechanisms which the Government has since changed, but the underlying principle is perfectly clear. I am afraid that it is not acceptable for the Government to abrogate this undertaking.

    I have to say again, that without additional funding, it will not be possible to implement the 1996 DDRB award in relation to Clinical Academic staff. It is ironic, to say the very least, that while the Government expects universities to make increases in staff salaries through so called `efficiency gains' (i.e. cuts) MPs and Government Ministers are, quite remarkably, sheltered from having to meet their salary increases out of efficiency gains effected in relation to the running of Parliament and the support staff involved. Furthermore, there is just as much a discrepancy in the value of university staff salaries today as has just been corrected so expeditiously in the case of MPs and Government Ministers.

    (Signed) PHILIP N. LOVE

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    (c) Letter to Professor Love from Lord Henley

    17 September 1996

    Thank you for your letter of 29 July to Eric Forth about clinical academic pay.

    You suggest that the principle of maintaining parity with NHS clinicians' pay has been maintained and underwritten by additional funds from Government since 1974. In fact the 1986 agreement to which you refer applies only where the National Health Service has obtained extra funds for the DDRB settlement and was last implemented in 1992–3. The NHS has obtained no additional funds for DDRB awards this year; and so the universities have been given no less favourable treatment in this respect.

    I know that the situation is difficult this year, but this is an issue that has been faced and overcome many times in the past. I hope therefore that, as suggested by Eric in his letter of 22 July, the UCEA will reconsider its position, particularly in view of the importance of maintaining the link between the pay of clinical academics and NHS doctors' pay.

    (Signed) HENLEY

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    HOUSING ASSISTANCE FOR INCOMING PROFESSORS

    Reference was made in the `Report of the Working Party on Statutory Posts', published in February 1994 (Gazette, Vol. 124, p. 801), to difficulties in regard to professorial recruitment, and some aspects of this problem were subsequently addressed in the `Report of the Committee on Academic Salaries' published in January 1996 (Gazette, Vol. 126, p. 671). In the former report it was noted that on occasion, given that the high cost of housing in the Oxford area had on occasion proved an additional obstacle, the Vice-Chancellor had from time to time authorised the provision in a particular case of a housing loan or similar arrangement tailored to the particular needs of the incoming professor.

    Subsequently Council decided that it was desirable to retain the ability to make some assistance available in the small number of cases where a professor moving to the Oxford area to take up appointment would otherwise face an insurmountable problem. Council also agreed, however, that the arrangements should be put on a more regular footing. The position has now been reviewed by an ad hoc working party, and Council has agreed that in future it will be made clear, in the `further particulars' of professorships which have been advertised, that where exceptional difficulty arises in regard to housing for a professor moving to the Oxford area to take up appointment (e.g. as may sometimes be the case where the move is from an area in which housing costs are substantially lower than in Oxford), the University may in certain circumstances be able to facilitate arrangements to assist house purchase. Holders of other posts at professorial level or above will in principle be eligible. Any such help will normally take the form of the University's bearing part of the cost of the house and retaining a proportionate share of the equity in respect of which share rent will be charged. In so far as the rent will be slightly below the normal return on capital investments there will be some net cost to the University; this cost will be charged to a small residue of the recurrent funding made available to the University some time ago for use only for discretionary payments to professors. Requests for assistance will be judged solely on the basis of need, assessed by reference to the personal resources of the incoming professor and the cost of a reasonable standard of housing in Oxford. The discretion to assist will be exercised by an independent panel appointed by Council, of which the current members are: Dr R.C. Repp, Master of St Cross College (Chairman); Dr R.P.H. Gasser, Brasenose College; and Professor P.C. Newell, St Peter's College.

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    CIRCULATION OF THE GAZETTE TO RETIRED SENIOR MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY

    The University Gazette is circulated on request to retired resident members of Congregation until they reach the age of seventy-five. However, it has been decided that any former member of Congregation over the age of seventy-five may continue to receive the Gazette, if he or she so wishes, on application in writing to the Information Office, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD. Such applications must be renewed at the beginning of each academic year.

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    Lectures

    Contents of this section:

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    CARLYLE LECTURES 1996

    Some aspects of political philosophy in the fourteenth century

    PROFESSOR J. QUILLET, formerly of the University of Paris XII, will deliver the Carlyle Lectures at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Examination Schools.

    15 Oct.: `Introduction—temporal power and spiritual power: their relationships.'

    22 Oct.: `Aspects of the political thought of St Paul. Political Augustinism and its repercussions in the fourteenth century.'

    29 Oct.: `The theological–political problem.'

    5 Nov.: `The Monarchy of Dante.'

    12 Nov.: ` (a) Sovereignty and citizenship in the political thought of Marsilius of Padua; (b) Marsilius of Padua and the Gospel.'

    19 Nov.: `Political thought during the reign of King Charles V of France and beyond: (a) the Book of Politics of Nicole Oresme; (b) the Dream of Vergier; (c) wisdom and power according to Christine de Pisan.'

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    BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

    Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics

    The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in Lecture Theatre 1, the Department of Biochemistry.

    Convener: L.N. Johnson, MA, David Phillips Professor of Molecular Biophysics.

    DR D.B. WIGLEY
    18 Oct.: `Structure of a DNA helicase.'

    DR R.L. WILLIAMS, Cambridge
    1 Nov.: `Catalysis on the membrane surface—a structural view of phosphoinositide- specific phospholipase C signalling.'

    DR C. ROBINSON
    8 Nov.: `Probing protein structure with mass spectrometry.'

    DR K. WATSON and M. O'REILLY
    15 Nov.: `E. coli maltodextrin phosphorylase: a sweet story.'

    DR B. SUTTON, King's College, London
    22 Nov.: `The structure of a rheumatoid factor complexed with its autoantigen IgG Fc.'

    DR C. SANDER, EMBL-EBI, Cambridge
    29 Nov.: `From genome sequence to protein function.'

    DR K. DRICKAMER
    6 Dec.: `Common features of diverse carbohydrate-recognition systems.'

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    Department of Biochemistry

    PROFESSOR W. NEUPERT, University of Munich, recipient of the Feldberg Foundation Prize 1996, will lecture at 4 p.m. on Friday, 11 October, in the Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Biochemistry.

    Subject: `Biogenesis of mitochondria: transport and folding of proteins.'

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    CLINICAL MEDICINE

    Oxford Clinical Neurosciences Lectures

    These lectures will be held on Fridays, as follows: the lecture on 11 October (Oppenheimer Memorial Lecture), at 12 noon in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary; other lectures at 11.30 a.m. in the New Lecture Theatre, ASC Building, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

    Convener: J. Newsom-Davis, DM, Action Research Professor of Clinical Neurology.

    SIR ROGER BANNISTER
    11 Oct.: `Disorders of the autonomic nervous system—the tip of an iceberg.' (Fifth David Oppenheimer Memorial Lecture)

    PROFESSOR S. SHORVON, Institute of Neurology, London
    18 Oct.: `Aspects of epilepsy.'

    PROFESSOR M. HARRISON, Middlesex Hospital, London
    1 Nov.: `Neurological complications of HIV infection.'

    DR R. WILL, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh
    20 Dec.: `Creutzfeld-Jakob disease: recent developments.'

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    Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology

    These lectures will be held at the times shown on Mondays, as follows: the lecture on 7 October will be given in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary; all other lectures will be given in the Lecture Theatre, the Oxford Eye Hospital.

    An Ocular Motility Clinic will be held at 2 p.m. on 7 October. Consultation Clinics will be held at 2 p.m. on 4 November and 2 December. A Medical Audit will be held at 5 p.m. on 11 November.

    Convener: A.J. Bron, MA, Head of Department, Clinical Professor, and Margaret Ogilvie's Reader in Ophthalmology.

     

    7 October

    MR A. CHANDNA, Alderhay Hospital, Liverpool
    5.30 p.m.: `Making sense of strabismus.'

     

    14 October

    MISS C. MOORMAN
    2.30 p.m.: Launch of revised doctors' handbook.

    MR J. ELSTON
    3.15 p.m.: `Neuro-ophthalmology.'

    DR P. FRITH
    4.15 p.m.: `Medical ophthalmology.'

    MR N. SARKIES, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge
    5.30 p.m.: `Pituitary tumours and the ophthalmologist.'

     

    21 October

    MR J. ELSTON, DR B. MCDONALD, and DR P. ANSLOW
    2.30 p.m.: `Neuro-ophthalmology, neuro- pathology, and neuro-radiology.'

    MR W. AMOAKU, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham
    5.30 p.m.: `Radiation retinopathy.'

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    28 October

    Oxford Eye Hospital orthoptist
    2.30 p.m.: Orthoptics lecture.

    MR J. ELSTON
    3.30 p.m.: `Neuro-ophthalmology.'

    MR C.K. PATEL
    4.15 p.m.: Journal Club review.

    MISS M.W. HOPE ROSS, Birmingham Eye Hospital
    5.30 p.m.: `Indocyanine green angiography.'

     

    4 November

    MR P. DORAN, Leeds General Infirmary
    5.30 p.m.: `Paediatric ophthalmology.'

     

    11 November

    MR J. TALKS
    2.30 p.m.: F.R.C.Ophth. teaching session.

    MR J. ELSTON
    3.30 p.m.: `Neuro-ophthalmology.'

    MR HUNG CHENG
    4.15 p.m.: `The treatment of diabetic retinopathy: some practical details.'

     

    18 November

    MISS C. MOORMAN
    2.30 p.m.: Journal Club review.

    MR J. ELSTON
    3.30 p.m.: `Neuro-ophthalmology.'

    MR HUNG CHENG
    4.15 p.m.: `The results of the National Audit on the Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy.'

    MR B.A. NOBLE, General Infirmary, Leeds
    5.30 p.m.: `Anterior segment reconstruction.'

     

    25 November

    MR SOMDUTT PRASAD
    2.30 p.m.: a case report.

    MR. J. ELSTON
    3.30 p.m.: `Neuro-ophthalmology.'

    DR P. FRITH
    4.15 p.m.: `Medical ophthalmology.'

    PROFESSOR C. KIRKNESS, Tennent Institute of Ophthalmology, Glasgow
    5.30 p.m.: `Acanthamoeba keratitis.'

     

    2 December

    MR J. DART, Moorfields Eye Hospital, London
    5.30 p.m.: `The inside story: bacterial biofilm, case contamination, and contact lens related keratitis.'

     

    9 December

    DR D. O'DUFFY
    2.30 p.m.: Journal Club review.

    MR J. ELSTON
    3.30 p.m.: `Neuro-ophthalmology.'

    MR J. SALMON
    4.15 p.m.: `Neovascular glaucoma.'

    MR S.A. VERNON, University Hospital, Nottingham
    5.30 p.m.: `Microtrabeculectomy.'

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    Department of Psychiatry

    The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Seminar Room, the Department of Psychiatry, the Warneford Hospital.

    Convener: M.G. Gelder, DM, Handley Professor of Psychiatry.

    DR J. HOLMES, North Devon District Hospital
    15 Oct.: `Psychotherapy and memory.'

    PROFESSOR D. GRAHAME-SMITH
    29 Oct.: `Synaptic homeostasis in depression and its treatment.'

    PROFESSOR J.F.W. DEAKIN, University of Manchester
    12 Nov.: `Genetic, developmental, and acquired components of schizophrenia.'

    DAME FIONA CALDICOTT
    26 Nov.: `The responsibilities of the consultant psychiatrist.'

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    Nuffield Department of Surgery

    The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Seminar Room, the Nuffield Department of Surgery, Level 6, the John Radcliffe Hospital.

    Convener: P.J. Morris, MA, Nuffield Professor of Surgery.

    R. LECHLER, Hammersmith Hospital, London
    15 Oct.: `The endogenous pathway of MHC class II antigen presentation.'

    N. JONES
    29 Oct.: `Adult tolerance induction in T cell receptor transgenic mice.'

    F. POWRIE
    5 Nov.: `Cytokines in inflammatory bowel disease.'

    M. WHITELEY
    12 Nov.: `Assessing the aorto-iliac segment.'

    G. AHRENDT, Johns Hopkins Medical School
    19 Nov.: `Colon anastomotic healing is impaired by sepsis.'

    A. FOX
    26 Nov.: `Current update of endovascular techniques for aneurysmal and occlusive vascular disease.'

    J. PERKINS
    3 Dec.: `Carotid stenosis and deep breathing.'

    N. YOUNG
    10 Dec.: `Killer cell inhibitory receptors.'

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    MODERN HISTORY

    Commonwealth History Graduate Seminar

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Modern History Faculty Building.

    PROFESSOR D. BIRMINGHAM, Kent
    18 Oct.: `Latin Africa in postcolonial perspective.'

    DR S. WEST, Birmingham
    25 Oct.: `Identity and alterity: representing "race" in Victorian art.'

    PROFESSOR C. BOLT, Kent
    1 Nov.: `Women, race, and empire.'

    DR P. RIVIÈRE
    8 Nov.: `Sir Robert Schomburgk and the carving out of British Guiana.'

    DR G. HEUMANN, Warwick
    15 Nov.: `Women and resistance in the post-emancipation Caribbean.'

    DR R. DRAYTON
    22 Nov.: `The American empire and the origins of (British) Caribbean nationalism, 1880–1930.'

    DR J. GILMORE, Centre for British and Comparative Cultural Studies
    29 Nov.: ` "Without any difference or distinctions of persons"? The Anglican Church and slavery in Barbados.'

    DR J.A. BENNETT
    6 Dec.: `Brass and glass: tools of Empire from British instrument workshops of the nineteenth century.' (Includes visit to Museum of the History of Science)

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    MODERN HISTORY, SOCIAL STUDIES

    Democracy and International Security

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Old Library, All Souls College.

    Conveners: R.J. O'Neill, MA, D.Phil., Chichele Professor of the History of War; E.A. Roberts, MA, Montague Burton Professor of International Relations, and A.J. Hurrell, MA, M.Phil., D.Phil., University Lecturer in International Relations.

    PROFESSOR J. SNYDER, Columbia University, New York
    18 Oct.: `Democratisation and nationalism.'

    DR H. SUGANAMI, Keele
    25 Oct.: `Democratic peace: history of an idea.'

    F. VENDRELL, Director, East Asia and Pacific Division, Department of Political Affairs, UN, New York
    1 Nov.: `The UN, elections, and the ending of civil wars.'

    PROFESSOR N. MACFARLANE
    8 Nov.: `Democratisation, state formation, and regional security in the Caucasus.'

    PROFESSOR J. CRAWFORD, Cambridge
    15 Nov.: `International law and democratisation.'

    PROFESSOR A. STEPAN
    22 Nov.: `Democratisation and state formation: the role of international institutions.'

    DR J. GOW, King's College, London
    29 Nov.: `Former Yugoslavia: elections of 1990 and 1996.'

    L. WHITEHEAD
    6 Dec.: `Pariahs, ostracism, and democratisation.'

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    Seminar in Economic and Social History

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

    Conveners: C.H. Feinstein, MA, Chichele Professor of Economic History, A. Offer, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Recent Social and Economic History, and J.S. Foreman-Peck, MA, University Lecturer in Economic History.

    PROFESSOR A. RITSCHL, Universitat Pompeu, Fabra, Barcelona
    16 Oct.: `Reparations, foreign debts, and the course of the Great Depression in Germany, 1930–3: a reappraisal.'

    DR K. O'ROURKE, University College, Dublin
    23 Oct.: `The European grain invasion, 1870–1913.'

    DR C.S. LEONARD
    30 Oct.: `Farm enterprise survival strategies during the transition in Russia.'

    E. BUTCHART
    6 Nov.: `Unemployment in Britain during the 1930s.'

    PROFESSOR J. CHARTRES, Leeds
    13 Nov.: `English brandy as good as French? Taste and import substitution in English distilling, 1650s–1730s.'

    PROFESSOR J. CANTWELL, Reading
    20 Nov.: `The diversification and internationalisation of corporate technology from a strategic choice historically to a complementary combination today.'

    P. FEARON, Leicester
    27 Nov.: `New Deal farm policy: Kansas, a case study.'

    DR A. BOOTH, University of Exeter
    4 Dec.: `Institutions and British economic growth since 1945: the British worker question revisited.'

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    PHYSICAL SCIENCES

    Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory: departmental seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Mondays in the Lecture Theatre, the Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory.

    Convener: J.P. Simons, MA, Dr Lee's Professor of Chemistry.

    DR A. ORR-EWING, Bristol
    14 Oct.: `Pre-dissociation dynamics studied by cavity ring-down spectroscopy.'

    PROFESSOR C.A. ANGELL, Arizona State
    21 Oct.: `Polymorphism in glasses, liquids, and biopolymers—implications for protein folding and BSE.' (Astor Lecture)

    DR C. WHITHAM, PTCL
    28 Oct.: `Spectroscopic probes of open shell molecules in a supersonic jet.'

    PROFESSOR B. WIDOM, Cornell
    4 Nov.: `Reptation model of the electrophoresis of charged polymers.'

    DR A. RODGER, Warwick
    11 Nov.: `Spectroscopy and bio- molecules: DNA/drug systems and steroids.'

    PROFESSOR K. SHOWALTER, West Virginia
    18 Nov.: `Non-linear chemical dynamics: oscillations, patterns, and chaos.'

    DR N.J.B. GREEN, King's College, London
    25 Nov.: To be announced.

    DR C. HALL, Schlumberger, Cambridge
    2 Dec.: `Synchrotron diffraction of rocks and cements: chemistry in oilfield engineering.'

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    Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory: Theoretical Chemistry Group Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Seminar Room, the New Chemistry Laboratory.

    Convener: M.S. Child, MA, Coulson Professor of Theoretical Chemistry.

    DR J.J. HANNAY, Bristol
    14 Oct.: `Classical holonomy chemistry.'

    PROFESSOR J.B. PENDRY, Imperial College, London
    21 Oct.: `Photonic crystals: the interaction of light with structure.'

    PROFESSOR M.A. ROBB, King's College, London
    28 Oct.: `The role of surface crossings in photochemistry: CASSCF computations and semi- classical dynamics.'

    DR R.J. WHEATLEY, Nottingham
    4 Nov.: `Intermolecular potentials for large molecules (such as water).'

    DR M. HEGGIE, Sussex
    11 Nov.: `Density functional total energy calculations in materials science.'

    M.P. EASTWOOD,
    18 Nov.: `The Hubbard model in infinite dimensions.'

    PROFESSOR J.M. HUTSON, Durham
    25 Nov.: `Intermolecular forces involving CO2: van der Waals complexes and atmospheric modelling.'

    PROFESSOR R. SCHINKE, MPI, Göttingen
    2 Dec.: `Non-adiabatic effects in the dissociation of polyatomic molecules: application to HCO and O2.'

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    EUROPEAN HUMANITIES RESEARCH CENTRE

    1996 International Colloquium: Philosophical Dialogues in Performance

    This colloquium will be held on 18 October (in the Taylor Institution), and on 19 and 20 October (in the Maison Française).

    Further information is available from the European Humanities Research Centre, 37A St Giles', Oxford OX1 3LD (telephone: Oxford (2)80742, fax: (2)80740).

    Friday, 18 October

    BERNARD WILLIAMS, interlocutor, with JOHN SEARLE, JERRY FODOR, and MARTIN DAVIES
    8.15 p.m.: `Mind and machine'.

     


    Saturday, 19 October

    MALCOLM BOWIE and JOHN FORRESTER
    9.30 a.m.: `Psychoanalysis as a theory of dialogue.'

    DOMINIQUE LECOURT, interlocutor, with JEAN-JACQUES LECERCLE and SANDRA LAUGIER; GRAHAM LOCKE, interlocutor, with SABINA LOVIBOND, ALAN MONTEFIORE, and NICK BUNNIN
    2 p.m.: `French v. English epistemological traditions.'

    THE GREAT ESCAPE THEATRE COMPANY
    8 p.m.: performance of Beyond all Certainty: Wittgenstein and Turing, a play by Bo Göranzon and Anders Karlqvist.

     


    Sunday, 20 October

    GABRIEL JOSIPOVICI and ELINOR SHAFFER, interlocutors, with BO GÖRANZON, MAGNUS FLORIN, and KRISTER HENRIKSSON
    9.15 a.m.: `Philosophy in performance.'

    IAN CHRISTIE
    11.15 a.m.: `Philosophy and film: Freud, Wittgenstein, and others'— extracts from films by Derek Jarman, Hugh Brody, Raul Ruiz, and Hollis Frampton.

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    QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

    Refugee Studies Programme

    Foundation Course Modules, Michaelmas Term

    Introduction to the Study of Forced Migration

    DR HARRELL-BOND will teach this course on Tuesdays, 10 a.m.–12 noon, in the Blackhall Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

    The experience of forced migration from a cross- cultural perspective

    DR JANE MOCELLIN will teach this course on Tuesdays, 4–6 p.m., in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

    Forced migration and international organisation

    PROFESSOR S.N. MACFARLANE will teach this course on Wednesdays, 10–11.30 a.m., in the Social Studies Seminar Room, George Street.

    Field Methods Course

    DR DAWN CHATTY will teach this course on Wednesdays, 2–4 p.m., in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

    International Human Rights and Refugee Law I

    DR ANDREW SHACKNOVE will teach this course on Thursdays, 10 a.m.–12 noon, in the Law Faculty Board Room, the St Cross Building.

     


    Seminars on Forced Migration

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House. Seminars and lectures are open to the public.

    Further information is available from the Education Unit, Refugee Studies Programme, Queen Elizabeth House, 21 St Giles', Oxford OX1 3LA (telephone: Oxford (2)70723, fax: (2)70721, e-mail: rspnet@vax.ox.ac.uk, Internet site: http://www.qeh.ox.ac.uk/rsp/).

    DR GEORGE KANYEIHAMBA, Adviser to the President of Uganda on Human Rights and International Affairs
    16 Oct.: `Rights for refugees: Uganda.'

    P. BAKER, solicitor, Hong Kong
    23 Oct.: `Who will be a refugee in Hong Kong?'

    R. CARVER
    30 Oct.: `Refugee protection in Africa.'

    DR C. SMITH, Senior Research Fellow, Centre for Defence Studies
    6 Nov.: `Do anti-personnel landmines still have a military utility?'

    DR N. MOLE, Director, the AIRE Centre, London
    13 Nov.: `Recent developments in asylum in Europe.'

    PROFESSOR M. BEISER, Toronto
    20 Nov.: `The resettlement of south-east Asian refugees in Canada: a ten-year story.'

    JUDGE D. PEARL, Chief Adjudicator, Immigration Appellate Authority
    27 Nov.: `The new Asylum Act and Rules: conflicts and tensions experienced by the IAA.'

    DR S. BARANYI, LSE
    4 Dec.: `Bridging the gaps between verification, peace-building, and conflict resolution in central America.'

    MS F. NICHOLSON, Nottingham
    11 Dec.: `Carrier sanctions: another brick in the wall of Fortress Europe.'

     


    Round Table

    A Round Table discussion will be held on Saturday, 19 October, 9 a.m.–5 p.m., in the Church of St Philip and St James, Woodstock Road.

    Subject: `The challenge of the new asylum legislation for religious leaders.'

     


    Annual Human Rights Lecture

    PROFESSOR ALBIE SACHS, Justice of the Constitutional Court of South Africa, will deliver the Annual Human Rights Lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 28 October, in the Examination Schools (East School). The meeting will be chaired by Mr Joel Joffe, Chairman of Oxfam and defence lawyer for Nelson Mandela.

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    RUSKIN SCHOOL OF DRAWING AND FINE ART

    Joseph Beuys Lectures 1996

    PROFESSOR R. GREGORY, Emeritus Professor of Neuropsychology, University of Bristol, will deliver a Joseph Beuys Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Monday, 21 October, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `Pictures as paradoxical objects.'

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    GREEN COLLEGE

    Radcliffe Lecture 1996

    DR C. STRINGER, Natural History Museum, will deliver the Radcliffe Lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 7 November, in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

    Subject: `African exodus: the origins of modern humanity.'

    Brian Walker Lecture 1996

    SIR SHRIDATH RAMPHAL, Co-Chairman, Commission on Global Governance, will deliver the Brian Walker Lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 28 November, in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

    Subject: `Must the poor be always with us? Global politics for a sustainable future.'

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    OXFORD SIGNALLING GROUP

    The following meetings will be held at 5.30 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Department of Pharmacology.

    Wednesday, 9 October

    DR K. KNOX: `Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase triggers apoptosis in B lymphocytes.'

    DR J. GIBBINS: `Collagen signalling in platelets from mice lacking syk and Fc receptor [gamma] chain.'

     

     


    Wednesday, 27 November

    DR D. GARNETT: `Tyrosine kinase dependent signalling by glycolipid anchored receptors.'

    DR J. WINGFIELD: `Isolation and identification of novel SH3 domain-containing proteins.'

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    OXFORD ITALIAN ASSOCIATION

    The following talks will be given at 8 p.m. on the days shown, as follows: the talks on 8 October and 12 November will be given in the Pauling Human Sciences Centre, 58 Banbury Road; the talk on 6 November will be given in St Anne's College.

    Further information on the association may be obtained by sending a s.a.e. to Mrs G. Cooper, Membership Secretary, TOIA, 2 Chadlington Road, Oxford OX2 6SY. DR CHRISTOPHER LLOYD
    Tue. 8 Oct.: `The Tribuna of the Uffizi by Johann Zoffany.'

    DR ROSA SALINAS WROTH
    Wed. 6 Nov.: `The life and work of Arrigo Boito.'

    GERTRUDE SEIDMANN
    Tue. 12 Nov.: `The Grand Tourists' favourite souvenir: cameos and intaglios.'

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    FRIENDS OF REWLEY HOUSE

    DR JESSICA RAWSON will lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Friday, 25 October, in the lecture theatre, Rewley House. Entry is free to members, £2 to others. Tickets are available from Rewley House or at the door.

    Subject: `The British Museum's "Chinese Treasures" exhibition'.

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    FRIENDS OF THE PITT RIVERS MUSEUM

    The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Pauling Centre for Human Sciences, 58 Banbury Road.

    Visitors are welcome, but are asked to make a contribution to the Friends' purchasing fund.

    For details of a fund-raising event to be held at the museum on Thursday, 10 October, see `Notices' above. DR A.G. SHERRATT, Ashmolean Museum and the Institute of Archaeology
    9 Oct.: `Wine, cheese, and olives: the origins of civilisation as we know it.'

    R. RACE, maker of moving toys and simple automata
    13 Nov.: `Materials, mechanisms, and magic: culture and technology through toys.'

     

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    Grants and Research Funding

    Examinations and Boards

    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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    THE LEVERHULME TRUST

    Leverhulme Personal Research Professorships 1997–8

    The Leverhulme Trust proposes to support the appointment of a small number of personal research professors in UK universities. Each chair will be held for five years.

    Eligible applicants: either (a) academics who have been regularly employed in the UK for at least seven years and who have spent at least three out of the past five years in the UK; or (b) academics of UK nationality. Candidates must be under sixty-one on 30 September 1998. There is no other age limit, but the trustees have agreed to give some, although not exclusive, preference to well-established scholars.

    Eligible fields: any field in the humanities or social sciences.

    Support offered: at the scheme's inception, a stipend of £41,000 (1995 figure) uprated in the light of national agreements, for the academic year starting 1 October 1997, plus London allowance where appropriate. The employer's national insurance and superannuation contributions and some research expenses will also be covered.

    Closing date for applications: 4.30 p.m. on Friday, 6 December 1996. Results by April 1997.

    Starting date: as early as possible during the 1997–8 academic year.

    Further particulars, including details of method of application and documentation required, may be obtained from the Leverhulme Trust, 15–19 New Fetter Lane, London EC4A 1NR, by sending a self-addressed C5 envelope stamped for 60g. These requests must be received by 29 November 1996.

    Applications from those who wish to hold these awards at Oxford require approval on behalf of the General Board. This should be sought from the Secretary of Faculties, University Offices, Wellington Square.

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    Examinations and Boards

    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue


    CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

    With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties and the Committee for Archaeology will come into effect on 18 October.

    1 Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages

    (a) M.Phil. in European Literature

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 580, delete ll. 8–11 and substitute:

    `(b) Methods of Scholarship.

    Each candidate shall be required to offer either (1) the history of the book, or (2) palaeography with textual criticism. Candidates will be examined on three essays (which must be written in English) on topics agreed by them with their supervisor relating either to the history of the book (for (1)) or to palaeography (for (2)) in one of the languages whose literatures is being offered. The essays shall be submitted to the supervisor between the date of approval of the choice of papers and the beginning of the examinations, and shall be marked, signed, and dated by the supervisor. The essays shall be examined by the examiners who shall, in assessing the marks they award, take account of the stage at which each essay was completed. For (2), candidates will in addition be required to submit the transcription, made without reference to dictionaries or handbooks, of a short manuscript text selected by the supervisor, who will also mark, sign, and date the candidate's work.'

    2 Ibid., p. 584, l. 3, delete `paper and practical examination'.

    3 Ibid., delete ll. 4–7 and substitute:

    `The Methods of Scholarship option will be confined to one of the modern languages whose literatures are being offered by the candidate.'

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    (b) M.St. in Research Methods in Modern Languages

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 687, l. 41, delete `a Methods of Scholarship paper' and substitute `the Methods of Scholarship option'.

    2 Ibid., p. 688, l. 4, delete `or the Methods of Scholarship paper, if one of these is offered' and substitute `if offered'.

    3 Ibid., ll. 8–9, delete `of the Methods of Scholarship paper'.

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    2 Board of the Faculty of Modern History

    M.Phil. in Economic and Social History

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 556, l. 40, after `skill' insert `or sources or methods'.

    2 Ibid., p. 564, l. 19, after `skill' insert `or sources or methods'.

    3 Ibid., p. 564, after l. 47 insert:

    `4. One of the papers specified below: Co-operation and conflict: conceptual approaches to economic and social history Sources and methods for early modern social history.'

    4 Ibid., l. 48, renumber cl. 4 as 5.

    5 Ibid., p. 725, l. 3, after `skill', insert `or sources or methods'.

    6 Ibid., p. 726, after l. 3 insert:

    `4. One of the papers specified below: Co-operation and conflict: conceptual approaches to economic and social history
    Sources and methods for early modern social history.'

    7 Ibid., l. 4, renumber cl. 4 as 5.

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    3 Boards of the Faculties of Physiological Sciences and Psychological Studies

    M.Sc. in Neuroscience

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 752, l. 28, delete `two weeks' and substitute `one week'.

    2 Ibid., ll. 45–50, delete `The dissertation on the first research project . . . coursework for that module.' and substitute:

    `The dissertation on the first research project must be submitted by noon on Friday of Second Week of Trinity Term of the year in which the candidate is examined. The dissertation on the second research project must be submitted by noon on the first friday of September in the year in which the candidate is examined. The essays or the practical notebooks for each module must be submitted within two weeks of the completion of the coursework for that module.'

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    4 Board of the Faculty of Social Studies

    Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

    With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

    Corrigendum

    In the changes in regulations printed in Gazette No. 4408 (11 July 1996), p. 1376, last line of second column, delete `nursing' and substitute `housing'.

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    5 Committee for Archaeology

    Probationer Research Students

    With effect from 1 October 1996

    In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 810, l. 3 delete `(of up to 30,000 words)' and substitute `(of between 5 and 10,000 words)'.

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    EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

    The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

    Modern History

    O. GUTMAN, Exeter: `Liber celi et mundi. Introduction and critical edition'.
    University, Saturday, 5 October, 10.30 a.m.
    Examiners: A. Murray, R.W. Sharples.

    N.A. HALL, Mansfield: `The development of the Liverpool Cotton Market to 1914'.
    Merton, Friday, 25 October, 2 p.m.
    Examiners: P.J. Waller, S. Chapman.

    Physical Sciences

    P.D. GROVES, Jesus: `A study of the 2s lamb shift of one-electron ions in an electrum beam ion trap'.
    Clarendon Laboratory, Saturday, 12 October, 10 a.m.
    Examiners: C.J. Foot, E.G. Myers.

    J. JAMES, New College: `Hydrazido and alkonylimido complexes of the early transition metals'.
    Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Thursday, 10 October, 2.15 p.m.
    Examiners: P. Mountford, D. O'Hare.

    Social Studies

    K. ENDO, St Antony's: `Political leadership in the European Community: the role of the Commission Presidency under Jacques Delors 1985–95'.
    Social Studies Faculty Centre, Friday, 18 October, 2.15 p.m.
    Examiners: J.E.S. Hayward, R. Morgan.

    R. LAYTE, Nuffield: `Gendered equity? The material and cultural determinants of the domestic division of labour'.
    Nuffield, Friday, 11 October, 3 p.m.
    Examiners: D. Gallie, L. Morris.

    D.R. SQUIRES, Nuffield: `The logical foundations of game theory'.
    Nuffield, Friday, 11 October, 3 p.m.
    Examiners: H.S. Shin, T. BÜrgers.

     

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    EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF LETTERS

    The examiners appointed by the following faculty board give notice of oral examination of their candidate as follows:

    English Language and Literature

    R.B. EGAN, St Peter's: `Violence, protest, and the melodramatic imagination in the plays of Tom Murphy'.
    Wadham, Friday, 11 October, 2 p.m.
    Examiners: J.B. O'Donoghue, G. Watson.

     

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    Colleges, Halls, and Societies

    Contents of this section:

    • OBITUARIES
    • ELECTIONS

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      OBITUARIES

      Corpus Christi College

      JOHN DOUGLAS HARROP, MA (PH.D. California), 9 September 1995; scholar 1957–60. Aged 64.

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      Exeter College

      E.G. LETOCQ, CMG, 30 August 1996; scholar 1936. Aged 78.

      THE REVD D.G. NICHOLLS, 17 August 1996; Chaplain and Fellow 1973–8; Vicar of Littlemore Church from 1978.

      HIS HONOUR JUDGE JAMES ROSS, 17 August 1996; matriculated 1931; Appointed Circuit Judge 1971–87. Aged 83.

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      Lincoln College

      ROBERT FRANCIS SARJEANT BAYLIS, 29 July 1996; commoner 1922–6. Aged 93.

      ROY MOORE, 2 April 1996; commoner 1944–7. Aged 70.

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      ELECTIONS

      All Souls College

      The following will be in residence for Michaelmas Term 1996 as Visiting Fellows of the college:

      DR EDWARD BROADBENT, International Centre for Human Rights and Democratic Development, Montreal

      PROFESSOR JERRY FODOR, Rutgers University

      DR RAYMOND GILLESPIE, St Patrick's College, National University of Ireland

      DR JILL HARRIES, St Salvator's College, St Andrews

      PROFESSOR HAROLD KOH, Yale Law School

      PROFESSOR CAROL SCOTT LEONARD, State University of New York

      PROFESSOR JOY PARR, Simon Fraser University

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      St Antony's College

      To a Governing Body Fellowship:

      ARMAND MENON, BA, D.PHIL.

      To Kirk-Greene Junior Research Fellowships in Tropical African Studies:

      SIMON D.H. HEAP (MA London, PH.D. Ibadan)

      OBI PATIENCE IGWARA (BA, M.SC., PH.D. LSE)

      To Research Fellowships:

      BERNARD MOMMER, MA (B.SC., PH.D. Tübingen)

      CATHERINE PATTILLO (BA Harvard, M.PHIL., PH.D. Yale)

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      To Volkswagen Area Studies Visiting Fellowships:

      SUSAN ARNDT (MA London)

      ANDREAS CHRISTMANN (MA Leipzig)

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      To Visiting Parliamentary Fellowships:

      JANET ANDERSON, MP

      EDWARD GARNIER,MA, QC, MP

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      To an Israeli Junior Visiting Fellowship:

      PROFESSOR REVEN AMITAI-PREISS (BA Pennsylvania, MA, PH.D. Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

      To a Max Hayward Fellowship:

      SVETLANA CARSTON (MA Voronezh)

      To a Deakin Visiting Fellowship:

      PROFESSOR CHICOT EBOUE (PH.D. Bordeaux)

      To an Alistair Horne Fellowship:

      DAVID GILMOUR, BA

      To an Inchon Memorial Fellowship:

      PROFESSOR YONG-HO KIM (MA Seoul, PH.D. Pennsylvania)

      To an Israeli Senior Visiting Fellowship:

      PROFESSOR RUTH LAPIDOTH (LL.M., PH.D. Paris)

      To a British Council Visiting Fellowship in Modern Italian Studies:

      DR ANTONIO MISSIROLI (MA, PH.D. Pisa)

      To a Golestaneh Fellowship:

      PROFESSOR HOSSEIN T. MODARRESSI, D.PHIL. (MA Tehran)

      To a Stifterverband Visiting Fellowship:

      PROFESSOR HANS MOMMSEN

      To a Swire Cathay Pacific Fellowship:

      PROFESSOR KYOSHI NAKAMURA (MA Waseda, MA Cornell)

      To a European Investment Bank Visiting Fellowship:

      CHRISTOPHE NÈGRE

      To an Andrés Bello Visiting Fellowship:

      DR MARIA ELENA PLAZA DE PALACIOS (M.SC. Simon Bolivar, M.PHIL. LSE, PH.D. Andrés Bello)

      To Visiting Fellowships:

      PROFESSOR GEORGE THOMAS SCANLON (MA, PH.D. Princeton)

      DR DIEGO BAUTISTA URBANEJA (PH.D. Venezuela)

      To a Korea British Society Fellowship:

      PROFESSOR CHUNG HYUN SIK (BA Yonsei, MA, PH.D. West Virginia)

      To a Nissan Visiting Fellowship:

      PROFESSOR KÔTARÔ SUZUMURA (DR (ECON.) Hitosubashi)

      To a Qaid-i-Azam Fellowship:

      DR MUHAMMAD WASEEM (MA, PH.D. London)

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      Advertisements

      Contents of this section:


      How to advertise in the Gazette

      Terms and conditions of acceptance of advertisements

      Return to Contents Page of this issue


      Oxford Humanists

      Oxford Humanists meet regularly to discuss a wide range of topical social and moral questions from a non-religious viewpoint. For details and current programme, contact Jean Woodman, 57 Delbush Avenue, Oxford OX3 8EA. Tel.: Oxford 60520.

       

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      Tuition Offered

      The Alexander Technique can help relieve stress and tension. Jan Steele, BA, and Janet Sherbourne, MA, both STAT qualified teachers of the Technique, offer lessons in Oxford. Please telephone for brochure and further information. Tel.: Oxford 770272.

       

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      Services Offered

      Carpentry, joinery, fitted cupboards, doors, etc., undertaken. Prompt, efficient, and sympathetic service at competitice prices. R.H. Sprot. Tel.: 01869 345060.

      Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford 726983 or Abingdon 555533.

      Counselling/Psychotherapy. British Association for Counselling Approved Member, Accredited Counsellor (Oxford graduate, 1959, woman working in North Oxford) offers counselling/psychotherapy. Fee normally £25 per session. Some concessionary places. Tel.: Oxford 554438.

      Frederick and Sudabeh Hine, Persian carpet importers. Dealers in hand-made eastern rugs and runners generally. We sell only the genuine article and at prices which are at probably the lowest anywhere for comparable quality. Visit our warehouse and browse undisturbed. Home trial and exchange. Free buyer's guide for all new customers. Usual opening hours: 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Mon.–Sat. Old Squash Court, 16 Linton Road, North Oxford. Tel./fax: Oxford 559396.

      Furniture: individual pieces and fitted furniture designed and made by Richard Kay and Piers Roberts from local workshops. From tables, chairs, cabinets, desks, to fitted bedrooms, kitchens, studies. For the home, office, or garden. Tel.: 01844 238112.

      Town and Country Trees: professional tree surgery, orchard and shrub pruning, planting, and hedges. Quality work at competitive prices. Fully insured. Locally based. For a free quotation, please call Paul Hodkinson. Tel.: 01993 811115.

       

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      Domestic Services

      Beech Tree Nursery School at Rye St Antony School: set in idyllic surroundings on Headington Hill; places for boys and girls from 2½ to 5 years old. Tel. for further information: Oxford 62802/229215, fax: 63611.

       

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      Volunteer needed to coach basketball

      Oxford University Women's Basketball Club is currently seeking a coach for the coming (1996–7) academic year. The season encompasses both the Michaelmas and Hilary Terms. Contact Michelle Teo, Queen's College, Oxford OX1 4AW. E-mail: michelle.teo@queens.oxford.ac.uk.

       

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      Houses to Let

      North Oxford , Wolvercote (Meadow Prospect), immaculate 2/3-bedroom semi-detached house; fully furnished; en-suite shower; on Port Meadow; two gardens; off-street parking; washer/drier; on bus line (15 minutes to city centre). No pets. Long lease preferred. Available early Nov., £640 p.m. Mr Brugger. Tel.: Oxford 556017.

      Cottage to let on Old Boar's Hill, 4 miles from Oxford; 3 bedrooms; c.h. plus Aga; fully equipped; large, natural garden in peaceful surroundings. Tel.: Oxford 735318 or 00 39 444 324729.

      North Oxford house-sit from 1 Nov. Quiet street about a mile from Carfax. Fully-furnished house with dedicated staff; 1 bedroom, study, bath, kitchen-cum-solarium, garden; includes utilities except phone/taxes; daily newspaper, dairy delivery; parking permit can be arranged. Prefer single, visiting fellow, or mature, married couple. Non-smokers only. With regrets, no children or pets. £850 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 559029.

      North Oxford house in quiet location 2 miles north of city centre; 3/4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, modern kitchen, c.h., garden and lock-up garage. Professional family preferred, but sharers also considered. Available 1 Nov. Tel.: Oxford 310844 (evenings).

      South Oxford with river frontage: 3 bedrooms, 2 living-rooms, kitchen, utility; off-street parking x 1; c.h.; 1 mile to city centre, on bus routes. Available 1 Nov. £800 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 727555.

      Furnished central North Oxford for rent from end Apr. 1997. Walk to colleges, train and bus station, near Port Meadow, c.h., recently redecorated, 3 desks, filing cabinets, several large closets, secluded garden, garden furniture, terrace, 3 bedrooms, 1½ bathrooms, washing-machine, drier, telephone, linen, dishes, 2 bicycles. Suitable for visiting academics. £800 p.m. Tel.: (1) Oxford 775567 (J. Mackrell, evenings); (2) tel.: 613 745 1368, fax: 613 745 0299 (A. Gaston, Canada).

      Witney: period cottages, 2/3-bedroom, fully furnished and well equipped. Short, i.e. weekly lets and longer lets up to 6 months. No smokers or pets. Good bus service to Oxford. Tel.: 01993 703035, fax: 01993 771014.

      Attractive converted barn with pretty garden in quiet village 10 miles west of Oxford. Fully furnished. Large galleried living-room. Study. Kitchen/breakfast room. 4 bedrooms (2 en-suite). Cleaning and some gardening included. Viewable and available for 1 year from 23 Sept. £1,250 p.c.m. Tel.: 0171-402 4330 (answer-phone).

      An Englishman's home is his castle—so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Please telephone or fax us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 64533, fax: 64777.

       

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      Flat to Let

      New York City: 2-bedroom furnished flat near Columbia University to let for up to 4 months from 20 Oct. 1996 and from mid-Apr. 1997. Tel.: Oxford 247660, e-mail: joseph.raz@balliol.ox.ac.uk.

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      Accommodation Offered

      Room available in nice house close to river, few minutes' walk from city centre. £50 p.w. Would suit cat-friendly, non-smoking postgraduate. Tel.: Oxford 248542.

      Idyllic rustic furnished studio flat/lodge, 6 miles from city centre; separate bathroom, kitchen; suit academic single. £300 p.c.m. Beckley. Tel.: Oxford 351418 (evenings).

      North Oxford houses and flats available from Sept. Premier. Tel.: Oxford 792299, fax: 798087.

      Bed-and-breakfast available in the comfortable home of a semi- retired academic couple in leafy, exclusive central North Oxford. Within easy walking distance of all main university buildings, town centre, parks, river, excellent pubs and restaurants. All rooms have colour TV, tea- and coffee-making facilities, microwaves. Very moderate terms. Tel.: Oxford 557879.

      Alternative medicine centre. Space available. Therapy and treatment rooms. Consulting and counselling rooms. Every facility. Very moderate rates. Central North Oxford. Tel. for further details: Oxford 54326 (9 a.m.–12 noon).

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      Accommodation Sought

      Mature couple seek fully-furnished flat or small house for the 4 months Dec.--Mar., ideally close to £500 p.c.m. North Oxford preferred, but any part of town near bus route to centre will do. Fax (Arvidson): 0064 7 838 4722, e-mail: arvidson@waikato.ac.nz.

      Required as soon as possible: visiting female doctor from Sir Lanka needs self-contained or shared accommodation at a reasonable rental, preferably in Headington area, for approx. 6 months. Contact Centre for Tropical Medicine, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford OX3 9DU. Tel.: Oxford 220968/220970.

      Writer migrating from London seeks studio/workshop to rent or buy anywhere in or near Oxford. I may also need a small unfurnished flat, not necessarily near the studio. Andrew Duncan. Tel./fax: 0181-969 8332.

      Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management are one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us. Tel.: Oxford 64533, or fax: 64777.

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      Holiday Lets

      Winter in the South of France? Village mansion in Languedoc sleeps 20, full c.h. and open fires, huge garden; £70 per head per week, min. let: £300 per week. Tel.: Oxford 511065/512470. n

       

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      Flats for Sale

      Retirement flat, Eynsham. Modern, purpose- built 1-bedroom apartment, in quiet location but close to all amenities; Economy 7 heating; 24-hr. emergency call system; communal gardens and many other benefits. £35,000. Tel.: Oxford 791910.

      Modern immaculate 2-bedroom first-floor apartment in east Oxford; one of 15 two-storey flats in attractive courtyard with communal gardens; fitted kitchen, curtains, carpets; low-cost energy and maintenance; off-street parking for 2 cars. £68,500. Fax/telephone: Oxford 723281, e-mail (Compuserve): 101716.721.

       

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      Diary

      Contents of this section:

      Academic Staff Seminars: places should be booked in advance through the Staff Development Office, University Offices, Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

      For the full list of courses, see the Staff Development Programme supplement.

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      Friday 4 October

      ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Admissions interviewing', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

      ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Dutch seventeenth- century paintings', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

       

       

       

       

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      Saturday 5 October

      DEGREE conferments, Sheldonian, 2.30 p.m.

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      Sunday 6 October

      CHRIST CHURCH Picture Gallery exhibition opens: `Nick Schlee—Unpeopled Landscapes' (until 30 October).

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      Monday 7 October

      ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Induction programme for academic staff—Session I (Vice-Chancellor's welcome)', 2 p.m. (see information above).

       

      CONGREGATION elections, 24 October: nominations by two members of Congregation to be received at the University Offices by 4 p.m.

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      Tuesday 8 October

      ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Lecturing skills practice—general', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

       

      CONGREGATION meeting, 12 noon (Vice-Chancellor's Oration).

      ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Painting in the Renaissance', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

      ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Lecturing skills practice—arts', 2 p.m. (see information above).

       

       

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      Wednesday 9 October

      DR A.G. SHERRATT: `Wine, cheese, and olives: the origins of civilisation as we know it' (Friends of the Pitt Rivers Museum lecture), Pauling Centre for Human Sciences (58 Banbury Road), 5 p.m.

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      Thursday 10 October

      THE REVD KENNETH MACNAB celebrates Holy Communion (Latin), St Mary's, 8 a.m.

      PITT RIVERS MUSEUM fund-raising event, with Loyd Grossman: `Food for thought: food for funds'—enjoy delicious tastes from around the world (tickets £15, from the museum).

      Friday 11 October

      ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Reflections on lustreware', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

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      Sunday 13 October

      MICHAELMAS FULL TERM begins.

      THE REVD CANON JOHN WHITE preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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      Monday 14 October

      CONGREGATION elections, 24 October: nominations by six members of Congregation to be received at the University Offices by 4 p.m.

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      Tuesday 15 October

      CONGREGATION meeting, 2 p.m.

      ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Rococo silver', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

       

       

       

       

      PROFESSOR J. QUILLET: `Introduction—temporal power and spiritual power: their relationships' (Carlyle Lectures: `Some aspects of political philosophy in the fourteenth century'), Schools, 5 p.m.

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      Wednesday 16 October

      ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM study-day: `Classical origins of European art: coins, sculpture, and pots', 10 a.m.–4 p.m. (telephone for cost and bookings: (2)78015).

      DR GEORGE KANYEIHAMBA: `Rights for refugees: Uganda' (Refugee Studies Programme Seminars on Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

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      Friday 18 October

      COLLOQUIUM: `Philosophical dialogues in performance' (until Sunday) (for information and registration, contact the European Humanities Research Centre: (2)80742).

      ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The Pre-Raphaelites and the nineteenth century', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

       

       

       

       

      PROFESSOR A. MILWARD: `Europe, empire, and dominion: Britain and the EEC 1961–3' (Sir Alec Cairncross Lecture), the chapel, St Peter's, 5 p.m.

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      Saturday 19 October

      MATRICULATION ceremony, Sheldonian (time to be announced).

      REFUGEE STUDIES PROGRAMME Round Table meeting: `The challenge of the new asylum legislation for religious leaders', St Philip and St James' Church, Woodstock Road, 9 a.m.–5 p.m.

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      Sunday 20 October

      MR BRUCE KENT preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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      Monday 21 October

      PROFESSOR R. GREGORY: `Pictures as paradoxical objects' (Joseph Beuys Lecture), Schools, 4.30 p.m.

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      Tuesday 22 October

      ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Induction programme for academic staff—Session II', 12 noon (see information above).

       

      ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The arts of Byzantium', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

       

       

       

       

      CONGREGATION meeting, 2 p.m.

      PROFESSOR J. QUILLET: `Aspects of the political thought of St Paul. Political Augustinism and its repercussions in the fourteenth century' (Carlyle Lectures: `Some aspects of political philosophy in the fourteenth century'), Schools, 5 p.m.

      UNIVERSITY CLUB wine-tasting (`Recent additions to the wine list'), 5.45 p.m. (admission £2).

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      Wednesday 23 October

      ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM study-day: `Medieval arts and the development of collecting', 10 a.m.–4 p.m. (telephone for cost and bookings: (2)78015).

      ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Introduction to financial managment I', 2 p.m. (see information above).

       

      P. BAKER: `Who will be a refugee in Hong Kong?' (Refugee Studies Programme Seminars on Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

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      Thursday 24 October

      PROFESSOR B. CUNLIFFE: `Landscapes with people' (Linacre Lectures: `Culture and environment'), Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building, 5.30 p.m.

      PROFESSOR G.H. PETERS: `Starvation or plenty in 2020?' (public lecture), the Hall, Wolfson, 5.30 p.m.

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      Friday 25 October

      ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `A walk through eastern art', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

       

       

       

       

      DR J. RAWSON lectures on the British Museum's `Chinese Treasures' exhibition (Friends of Rewley House lecture), the Lecture Theatre, Rewley House, 4.30 p.m. (admission £2; free to members).

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      Saturday 26 October

      DEGREE conferments, Sheldonian, 11.30 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.

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      Sunday 27 October

      THE REVD CHRISTOPHER JONES preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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      Monday 28 October

      PROFESSOR ALBIE SACHS delivers the Refugee Studies Programme's Annual Human Rights Lecture, Schools, 5 p.m.

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      Tuesday 29 October

      ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `English furniture', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

       

       

       

       

      ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Tutorial teaching—general', 2 p.m. (see information above).

       

      PROFESSOR J. QUILLET: `The theological–political problem' (Carlyle Lectures: `Some aspects of political philosophy in the fourteenth century'), Schools, 5 p.m.

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      Wednesday 30 October

      ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM study-day: `Renaissaince painting, sculpture, and decorative arts', 10 a.m.–4 p.m. (telephone for cost and bookings: (2)78015).

      ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Introduction to financial managment II', 2 p.m. (see information above).

       

      R. CARVER: `Refugee protection in Africa' (Refugee Studies Programme Seminars on Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

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      Saturday 2 November

      THE RT. HON. GARY HART: `Reform or realignment: campaign 1996 (USA)' (R.B. McCallum Memorial Lecture), Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 11 a.m.

      CHRIST CHURCH Picture Gallery exhibition opens: `Four Foundations'—archive material illustrating the four institutions which have occupied the Christ Church site (until 1 December).

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      Sunday 3 November

      THE RT REVD ROBERT HARDY preaches, Lincoln College, 10 a.m.

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