29 October 1998 - No 4489



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 129, No. 4489: 29 October 1998<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

29 October 1998



Publication of Appointments Supplement

The first three Appointments Supplements of the current
academic year - published with the Gazettes of 1 October,
15 October, and 29 October - can
now be found at
http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/as/
. It is hoped that future issues
of the Appointments Supplement will be made available at this
site on the publication day of the Gazette with which
they appear, or shortly thereafter.


Scholarships and Prizes Supplement

The Scholarships and Prizes Supplement is available at:

http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/prizes/




University Health and
Safety
information


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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 29 October 1998: University<br /> Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

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issue



CONGREGATION 22 October


Conferment of Degree by Diploma

The Degree of Doctor of Civil Law by Diploma, approved by
Special Resolution of Congregation on 17 June 1997, was
conferred upon HIS EXCELLENCY VÁCLAV HAVEL,
President of the Czech Republic.

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section



CONGREGATION 24 October


Conferment of Honorary Degree

The Degree of Master of Arts, honoris causa,
approved by Special Resolution of Congregation on 24
March 1998, was conferred upon CYRIL WILLIAM BAND.

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CONGREGATION 26 October


Degree by Special Resolution

No notice to the contrary having been received under the
provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6
(Statutes, 1997, p. 15), the following
resolution is deemed to have been approved at noon on 26
October.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the
following:

STEPHEN COLLINS, University College

JANE ANNE ENDICOTT, St Cross College

HAZEL ROSINA HAGGER, MA status, D.PHIL., St Cross
College

GEOFFREY JONES, Keble College

ANTHONY PHELAN, Keble College

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HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL 26 October


1 Decrees

Council has made the following decrees, to come into
effect on 13 November.

List of the decrees:

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section



Decree (1): Establishment of
Professorship of Marketing

Explanatory note

No notice of opposition having been given, Mr
Vice-Chancellor will declare carried, without holding the
meeting of Congregation on 3 November, the Statute
establishing a Professorship of Marketing, which was
promulgated on 13 October (see `University Agenda'
below). Council has accordingly made the following
decree, which gives effect to consequential changes.

Text of Decree (1)

[See decree annexed to Statute under Congregation 13 October in
Gazette,
24 September 1998.]

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section



Decree (2): General provisions
concerning the conduct of examinations

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Proctors and with the concurrence of the General Board,
aims to ensure that a candidate who presents himself or
herself for every paper, but is too ill to perform
adequately, should not be treated less favourably than a
candidate who stays away from at least one paper on
medical grounds. It also removes the need for two medical
certificates and for one medical practitioner to be
designated by the Vice-Chancellor: experience has shown
that such restrictions are unnecessary and that a single
certificate from a qualified medical practitioner is
sufficient. It further gives examiners the option of
imposing an academic penalty on students submitting
over-long theses or theses on unauthorised subjects.

Text of Decree (2)

1 In Examination
Decrees
, 1998, p. 1064, l. 11, after `duties.*'
insert `If the examination is one in which Honours may be
awarded the examiners may adopt one of the following
courses, taking account of the information passed to
them:

(a) if they consider the candidate has
submitted enough work to allow them to determine his or
her proper class, they may award the candidate the class
his or her performance merits;

(b) if they are unable to adopt course
(a) but consider, on the evidence of the work
submitted, that but for the illness or other urgent cause
affecting the candidate's performance, he or she would
have obtained classified Honours, they may deem the
candidate to have obtained Honours and publish his or her
name accordingly at the foot of the Class List. If the
cause affecting the candidate's performance was illness
the name shall appear under the word `aegrotat' (or
`aegrotant'), or, if the cause was something other than
illness, under the words `declared to have deserved
Honours';

(c) if they are unable to adopt course
(a) or course (b) but are nevertheless
satisfied with the work submitted, they may include the
candidate's name on the Pass List to show that the
candidate has satisfied the examiners;

(d) if they are unable to adopt course
(a), (b), or (c) they shall
fail the candidate.

Where the examiners have adopted course (b),
(c), or (d) above it shall be open to
the candidate to apply if necessary to Council for
consideration of his or her standing for Honours at a
future examination.'

2 Ibid., ll. 23–8, delete
`Where illness ... at the examination.' and substitute
`Where illness is pleaded, a medical certificate from a
qualified medical practitioner should be sent, and this
certificate must specify, with dates, the bearing of the
illness on the candidate's attendance at the
examination.'

3 Ibid., p. 1097, after l. 40
insert new cl. 10 as follows and renumber existing cll.
10–19 (pp. 1097–9) as cll. 11–20:

`Submission of Theses or other Exercises

10. Where a candidate for any written examination
(other than for the D.Phil, M.Litt., or M.Sc. by
Research) in which a thesis (or other exercise) may be,
or is required to be, submitted as part of that
examination presents a thesis (or other exercise) which
exceeds the word limit prescribed by the relevant
statute, decree, or regulation, the examiners, if they
agree to proceed with the examination of the work, may
reduce the mark by up to one class (or its equivalent).
Where a candidate submits such a thesis (or other
exercise), the title or subject matter of which differs
from that which was approved by the faculty board
concerned, the examiners may similarly reduce the mark by
up to one class (or its equivalent).'

4 Ibid., p. 1098, l. 35, delete
`clauses 7–10' and substitute `clauses 7–9 and
11'.

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Decree (3): Remission of
composition fees (Miss S. Cooray)

Notwithstanding the provisions of Ch. VIII, Sect. I,
§ 6, cl. 15 (Examination Decrees, 1998,
p. 1107), Miss S. Cooray, Wolfson College, shall be
required to pay fees at the `home' rate for her period of
postgraduate study.

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Decree (4): Remission of
composition fees (Mr M. Toledo-Viguero)

Notwithstanding the provisions of Ch. VIII, Sect. I,
§ 6, cl. 15 (Examination Decrees, 1998,
p. 1107), Mr Toledo-Viguero, Oriel College, shall be
required to pay fees at the `home' rate for his period of
postgraduate study.

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Decree (5): Remission of
composition fees (Mr K. Yamaguchi)

Notwithstanding the provisions of Ch. VIII, Sect. I,
§ 6, cl. 15 (Examination Decree, 1998, p. 1107), Mr
K. Yamaguchi, St Edmund Hall, shall not be required to
pay composition fees for the academic year 1998–9.

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2 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts under
the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. v, cl. 1 (Statutes, 1997,
p. 367) has been accorded to the following person who is qualified
for membership of Congregation:

MICHAEL GEORGE POPHAM, Computing Services

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3 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added
to the Register of Congregation:

Collins, S., MA, University

Endicott, J.A., MA, St Cross

Jones, G., MA, Keble

Phelan, A., MA, Keble

Popham, M.G., MA status, Computing Services

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BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on
13 November, see `Examinations and Boards' below.




<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 29 October 1998: University Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 2 November


Degree by Special Resolution

The following special resolution will be deemed to be approved
at noon on 2 November, unless by that time the Registrar has
received notice in writing from two or more members of
Congregation under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6
(Statutes, 1997, p. 15) that they wish the
resolution to be put to a meeting of Congregation.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the
following:

ERIK-CHRISTIAAN LANDIS, All Souls College

JAN-WERNER MUELLER, M.PHIL., All Souls College

THOMAS WYLIE SEAMAN, All Souls College

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CONGREGATION 3 November


Notice

The meeting of Congregation is cancelled. The sole business
comprises questions to which no opposition has been notified and
in respect of which no request for an adjournment has been
received, and Mr Vice-Chancellor will accordingly declare the
preamble adopted and the Vice-Chancellor's Oration presented
without a meeting under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. iii, cl.
11 (Statutes, 1997, p. 8).

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CONGREGATION 17 November 2 p.m.

Members of Congregation are reminded that written notice of any
intention to vote against the preamble of the statute at item 1
below, or of any proposed amendment to, or intention to vote
against, the general resolution at item 2 below, signed in either
case by at least two members of Congregation, must be given to
the Registrar by noon on Monday, 9 November (see the Guide to
Procedures in Congregation cited in the note at the end of
`University Agenda').


1 Promulgation of Statute

Statute: St Catherine of Alexandria Prize

Explanatory note

The Theology Board considers that it is desirable to change the
arrangements for the St Catherine of Alexandria Prize, which is
currently open only to eligible members of the Anglican
Theological Colleges (a category which has been substantially
reduced in size over recent years), in order to extend
eligibility for the prize to any member of the University reading
for the Honour School of Theology who is also engaged in training
for ordination either in the Church of England or in a church in
ecumenical relations with the Church of England.

The following statute, and the decree to be made by Council if
the statute is approved, provide accordingly.

WHEREAS the University in 1954 accepted a benefaction for
the endowment of the St Catherine of Alexandria Prize, and
WHEREAS it is now expedient to extend eligibility for the prize
in order to increase the number of candidates and thus maintain
the integrity of the prize, NOW THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD, in
exercise of the powers in that behalf conferred upon it by the
Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923, and of all other
powers enabling it, ENACTS, subject to the approval of Her
Majesty in Council, AS FOLLOWS.

In Tit. XV (Statutes, 1997, p. 165, as amended,
subject to the approval of Her Majesty in Council, by the Statute
approved by Congregation on 16 June 1998, Gazette,
Vol. 128, pp. 1353, 1380), insert Sect. LXIV:

`Section LXIV. Of the St Catherine of Alexandria Prize Fund

1. The income of the St Catherine of Alexandria Prize Fund
shall be used for the annual award of a prize by the examiners
for the best performance in the Honour School of Theology by a
candidate who is also engaged in training for ordination either
in the Church of England or in a church in ecumenical relations
with the Church of England, provided that his or her work is
deemed to be of sufficient merit.

2. Surplus income arising in any year shall be carried
forward for expenditure in subsequent years, for use in whole or
in part to augment the value of the prize on subsequent occasions
at the discretion of the examiners on each occasion.

3. Congregation may from time to time amend this statute,
provided that the main object of the fund, as defined in clause
1 above, is always kept in view.'

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Decree to be made by Council if the Statute is approved

1 In Ch. IX, Sect. I, delete § 311
(Statutes, 1997, p. 717) and renumber existing
§§ 312–36 (pp. 717–28) as §§
311–35.

2 This decree shall be effective from the
date on which Statute (...) approved by Congregation on ... is
approved by Her Majesty in Council.

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2 Voting on General Resolution
concerning the salaries of university lecturers and certain other
academic staff

Explanatory note

The Committee on Academic Salaries has begun a review of the
University's academic salary structure. It had been hoped that
more progress would have been made by now with a fundamental
review of that structure, but this has been delayed by the
uncertainties, such as those surrounding college fees, of the
last academic year. However, Council and the General Board have
now approved four specific proposals so far made by the
committee, one of which also requires the approval of
Congregation (and is reflected in the general resolution below),
and have encouraged the committee to consider other elements of
the current structure.

The four proposals approved by Council and the General Board
are as follows.

First, it has been agreed that all of those holding the post
of reader and who are not already on the top discretionary salary
point above the substantive scale should proceed to that point
by annual increments beginning on 1 October 1998. This will mean
that eventually there will be a single salary point for readers
(£37,257 per annum at current rates). Two-thirds of readers
are already on the discretionary points, awarded hitherto in
competitive triennial exercises. The decision of Council and the
General Board affects the twenty-two readers still paid on the
substantive scale, the top point of which is £34,464. The
decision reflects the fact that the substantive reader scale is
now equivalent to the upper reaches of the scale for university
lecturers without tutorial fellowships (ULNTFs), and thus that
all lecturers in Oxford now enjoy, at the top of the scale,
salaries which are equal to the basic reader scale. The recent
expansion of professorial distinction awards has also affected
relativities between readers and professors. This change will not
affect those who hold the title of reader following
recent exercises for the recognition of distinction (the new
policy on this having been approved by Congregation on the strict
understanding that the award of titles would not affect
salaries).

Second, the arrangements for the salaries of departmental
lecturers (previously known as departmental demonstrators) have
been adjusted, in order to ease problems of recruitment and
retention, and of comparabilities with academic-related grades.
The top of the substantive salary scale has been increased to
£20,867 per annum (from £20,107), and discretionary
points to £25,535 (rather than £21,815) have been
added. The use of the discretionary points is subject to
guidelines issued by the General Board.

The third point concerns the position of ULNTFs. Council and
the General Board have noted that this is one of the most
important and contentious issues relating to academic salaries
at the present time. New arrangements for this category of staff
were introduced in 1995–6, but the Commission of Inquiry
recommended further very large payments to them in order
effectively to equalise the income of all lecturers in Oxford at
the top of the scale by ensuring that ULNTFs received the joint
maximum plus the average housing allowance.

Council and the General Board have noted that this
recommendation raises serious issues about the obligation of the
University as employer to take into account payments made by
other employers (in this case the colleges) in determining its
own salaries; about funding (the Commission having envisaged
covering the cost of the change by the redeployment of funds
which currently provide faculty boards with the opportunity for
making short-term adjustments in the balance of lecturers'
duties); about comparabilities with readers and professors (the
Commission's proposals would see ULNTFs paid a higher university
salary than both readers on the top discretionary point and
professors on the basic stipend); about the definition of the
duties of all academic staff and the contractual arrangements for
them; and about the repercussions for the joint appointments
system (since the Commission's proposals would leave no financial
disincentive against resignation by tutorial fellows from their
college posts). The most serious issue, however, is one of
equity, and whether ULNTFs do in fact perform a range of duties
similar in scope and complexity to those performed by university
lecturers with tutorial fellowships.

The original working party on ULNTFs proposed that the
Commission should undertake a proper evaluation of the relative
responsibilities of university lecturers with and without
fellowships, but in the event the Commission did not pursue this.
The result is that the question whether the duties of ULNTFs
justify the payment of a university salary equal to the average
combined salary of tutorial fellows is still open. Council and
the General Board have therefore agreed that, as a first step
towards resolving this issue, external consultants should be
commissioned to analyse, on the basis of a job evaluation process
in which representatives of all interested parties would be fully
involved, the relative weight of the overall responsibilities of
university lecturers with and without tutorial fellowships.
Council and the General Board hope that swift progress can be
made on this.

Fourth, Council and the General Board are proposing, through
the general resolution below, that there should be more
flexibility as to the possibility of paying lecturers at points
within the normal scale but above the normal age–wage
relation: this would apply both on appointment and to those in
post.

When the age–wage link was first loosened in 1988, this
was on the basis of a change in legislation to provide that
lecturer salaries `shall have regard to, but shall not be bound
by, scales related to age' (Tit. X, Sect. I, proviso
(c), Statutes, 1997, p. 75), and
Congregation approved this on the basis that a maximum of two
points within the scale above the normal age–wage relation
would be permitted. This flexibility has been found to be useful
in the recruitment of new staff and its operation does not seem
to have caused significant difficulties. Appointments committees,
themselves often including lecturers on the normal age–wage
point, have been anxious to use whatever salary flexibility is
available, and the desirability of recruiting the favoured
candidate has far outweighed any concern about comparabilities
with existing staff.

The use of the two extra increments on appointment is now more
common in areas of special difficulty, being used in
approximately one-third of recent cases; however, it is
increasingly regarded as providing insufficient scope to secure
an appropriate range of applicants, and is normally of little
help in retaining existing staff contemplating a possible move
elsewhere. Since the introduction of this modest discretion in
lecturer salaries at Oxford very much more flexibility has been
introduced elsewhere in the University's salary
structure—for example for professors and for the
academic-related research staff who often form a considerable
proportion of the applicants for university lecturerships in the
sciences. Even more flexibility is available at other British
universities, and the current flexibility is therefore
increasingly seen as too limited to attract the best young
candidates in the United Kingdom and abroad to apply for
lecturerships at Oxford: experience of many recruitment exercises
has shown that more salary flexibility would significantly
enlarge the number of applicants of appropriate standing and
ensure the maintenance of the quality of appointees which, while
remaining high, is increasingly threatened by the attractiveness
of terms and conditions at other universities. Council and the
General Board are clear also that it is desirable to be able to
provide significant incentives to outstanding young staff to
remain in Oxford by offering substantial increases in salary to
staff in post in appropriate cases.

Council and the General Board therefore propose an extension
of the current arrangements for the salaries of lecturers on
appointment and in post to permit salaries within the scale up
to five points above the normal age–wage point, these
arrangements to apply to university, CUF, special non-CUF, and
faculty lecturers and academic research officers. The maximum
additional salary which the five-point flexibility would
represent is £6,419 per annum, compared with the current
figure of £3,495.

The criteria to be applied in considering requests for
departures from the age–wage norm would be as follows. In
the case of a new appointment, the Appointments Committee of the
General Board would require a case from the faculty board with
firm evidence that the normal stipend, plus all college income,
would be significantly below the candidate's current or
prospective salary; stating whether the candidate would be moving
from a fixed-term to a prima facie permanent position; stating
whether the extra increments were required to secure the
candidate's acceptance; and setting out the consequences should
the candidate decline (including comments on the difference in
quality between the favoured candidate and any
proxime). For existing staff, it would be necessary
for there to be evidence of outstanding academic merit and of
serious academic consequences were the lecturer to resign,
coupled with evidence of the likelihood of resignation. For both
incoming and existing staff, faculty boards would have to certify
that their proposals, if adopted, would not produce unacceptable
anomalies within subject areas and that they appreciated that the
granting of extra increments might affect decisions on the
numbers of posts released for refilling in the future.

Council and the General Board estimate that the maximum
additional cost of this change would be around £200K per
annum. It is envisaged that as time went on the General Board
would take account of the additional salary costs of the academic
staff in determining how many posts to release, and would thus
be able to absorb these if it wished by slightly reducing the
number of vacancies refilled.

Council and the General Board commend this resolution to
Congregation, against the background of the other decisions
described above.

There are of course many other pressing issues to be resolved
in the general area of the terms and conditions of employment of
academic staff. Following the Report of the Commission of
Inquiry, a series of complex and interrelated problems are being
actively considered by a working party with representatives of
the General Board and the colleges. The working party is inviting
faculty boards, in consultation with Senior Tutors, to review,
on a subject-by-subject basis, the current arrangements for the
organisation of teaching in the collegiate University, before
turning its attention to the question of appropriate contractual
formulations to underpin the improved systems which it is hoped
will emerge. Better organisation should hold the key to reducing
the general burden of duties on academic staff and to providing
a better balance between them.

While Council and the General Board have asked the Committee
on Academic Salaries to consider further elements of the
University's current academic salary structure, beyond the four
referred to above, the committee's consideration will need to be
co-ordinated with the developing approach and the likely outcome
of the discussions of the joint working party. These issues are
being actively pursued by collaboration between the joint working
party and the Committee on Academic Salaries.

Text of General Resolution

That this House endorse the proposals from Council and the
General Board, as set out in the explanatory note to this
resolution, to provide flexibility in the salaries of
university, CUF, special non-CUF, and faculty lecturers and
academic research officers of up to five increments within the
salary scale above the normal age–wage point.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 29 October 1998: Notices<br />

Notices


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CONFERMENT OF DEGREE BY DIPLOMA


The following Diploma of the Degree of Doctor of Civil Law was read
by the Public Orator when the degree was conferred in a Congregation
held on Thursday, 22 October 1998.

His Excellency VÁCLAV HAVEL, President of the Czech
Republic


CANCELLARIVS MAGISTRI SCHOLARES

VNIVERSITATIS OXONIENSIS

OMNIBVS AD QVOS PRAESENTES LITTERAE PERVENERINT

SALVTEM IN DOMINO SEMPITERNAM

CVM diu ex more nobis fuerit civitatum externarum
Praesides praecipuo aliquo honore quantum possumus insignire, eosque
praesertim qui propter morum praestantiam humanitatisque studium
inclaruerint:

CVMque Vir Excellentissimus VÁCLAV HAVEL, Rei Publicae
Bohemicae Praeses, civitati praesideat nobiscum firmissimis
societatis amicitiaeque vinculis coniunctae:

CVMque patriae suae temporibus iniquissimis, quibus ipse temporis
cursus haerere atque impediri videbatur, signifer exstiterit eorum
qui libertati civitatique populari desperare nolebant:

CVMque idcirco identidem magnis terroribus sit vexatus, in
iudicium vocatus, pravis legibus circumventus, in carcerem coniectus:

CVMque tyrannide ista conlabente aliquando et corruente unus
fuerit quem patriae suae conservatorem destinabant cives universi:

CVMque maximis impendentibus periculis rem tam sollerter gesserit
ut citra sanguinis effusionem nova rei publicae forma constitueretur,
mox civitas ipsa in duas partes divideretur:

CVMque Praeses omnium consensu primus creatus fidem confirmarit,
leges saluberrimas tulerit, libertatem atque iustitiam reduxerit,
inimicitias ultionisque voluptatem bono publico condonarit:

CVMque se Europae artius coniungendae conglutinandaeque fautorem
praestiterit acerrimum:

CVMque in orationibus tam foris quam domi habitis
gentibus dominatu impotenti laborantibus libertatis spem offerat,
totius orbis terrarum paci saluti valetudini consulat:

CVMque fabularum scriptor sit ingeniosissimus, quae ita vitae
humanae speculum praebent ut tyrannidis rationes exponant, tyrannorum
administros satellites tortores
irrideant:

NOS ERGO, tanti viri humanitatem fortitudinem prudentiam admirati,
in frequenti Congregationis Domo praedictum Praesidem DOCTOREM in
Iure Civili renuntiamus eumque omnibus iuribus et privilegiis
adficimus quae ad hunc gradum spectant.

Paraphrase


THE CHANCELLOR, MASTERS, AND SCHOLARS

OF THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD

TO WHOMSOEVER THESE PRESENTS SHALL COME

MAY THE LORD EVER PRESERVE

AND KEEP YOU

WHEREAS it has long been our custom to confer some
special honour on the Heads of foreign States, and in particular on
those who are distinguished for their character and their culture:

AND
WHEREAS His Excellency VÁCLAV HAVEL, President of the Czech
Republic, is the Head of a State linked with ours by the firmest ties
of alliance and good will:

AND
WHEREAS in a dark period of the history of his country, when time
itself seemed to have come to a standstill, he became the standard
bearer of those who kept alive the hope of democracy and
independence:

AND
WHEREAS he was on that account repeatedly threatened, brought to
trial, sentenced under those infamous laws, and imprisoned:

AND
WHEREAS when that tyranny finally began to collapse he was the one
man to whom all his fellow citizens turned as the saviour of their
country:

AND
WHEREAS in the midst of the gravest perils his handling of affairs
was so skilful that there was no violence as
a new constitution came into existence, and then as the nation
divided into two:

AND
WHEREAS when he was by general consent elected as the first President
he restored public confidence, passed excellent laws, established
freedom and justice, and abandoned enmities and the pleasure of
revenge for the good of the nation as a whole:

AND
WHEREAS he has proved himself to be a doughty champion of the unity
of Europe:

AND
WHEREAS by speeches delivered both at home and abroad he has brought
hope to peoples suffering under tyranny and has shown concern for the
environment and health of the world:

AND
WHEREAS he is a gifted playwright, whose work
reflects human life and holds up to satirical laughter the ways of
tyrants and the doings of their agents:

NOW THEREFORE WE, in admiration of the humanity, courage, and
wisdom of this great man, do here in this full House of Congregation
proclaim the aforesaid President
a DOCTOR in our Faculty of Civil Law, and by the power and force of
this Diploma do hereby invest him with all privileges and rights of
this Degree.



President Havel's address

HIS EXCELLENCY made the following reply:

Chancellor, Ladies and Gentlemen, the fact that I have
the honour to speak in such a famous centre of European education as
Oxford, and at such a renowned university, virtually impels me to
dwell here upon the theme of `the intellectual and politics'—a
subject that I have often had occasion to think about and to discuss.
So, to start with: who, in fact, is an intellectual?

Let me suggest one possible definition. An intellectual is a
person who—thanks to the range of his interests and his
education—perceives things in a broader context than is usual.
It is someone who attempts to get below the surface, to grasp the
deeper meanings, relations, causes, and effects, to recognise
individual items as part of larger
entities. And more than that: in my tentative definition, an
intellectual, conscious of the broader and deeper connections, also
derives from this awareness a broader or deeper sense of
responsibility for the world.

Does an intellectual who meets this definition belong in politics?
I would not go so far as to say that he belongs there. Putting it
that way would create the impression that I consider it the duty of
every intellectual to engage in politics. Claiming or demanding
something like that would, of course, be a nonsense. Politics also
involves a number of other special requirements, relevant to this
vocation only. Some people meet these requirements and others don't,
regardless of whether or not, or to what extent, they are
intellectuals. Furthermore, nobody can be forced to enter into
politics. Those who engage in it are, and will always be, people who
want to do so, and this is as it should be.

I would say something else. An intellectual of the kind I have
just defined should, as a matter of principle, be welcome in
politics. Politics should not disdain him and he should not disdain
politics. Never before has politics had a greater need for people who
recognise, understand, and, in one way or another, experience the
universal interconnections. For the first time in the history of the
human race, all people of this planet live in one global,
interconnected civilisation that is threatened by many serious,
equally interconnected dangers. When if not in such a situation does
politics call for people who are aware of their responsibility for
the world as a whole? Nowadays, almost every political decision, even
those that appear to be of a limited, partial or short-term nature,
and to affect only a few people, can indirectly influence the fate of
all humanity!

It is my profound conviction that the world requires today more
than ever truly enlightened and thoughtful politicians who are bold
and broad-minded enough to consider also those things which lie
beyond the scope of their immediate influence in both space and time.
We need politicians who would be truly willing and able to rise above
the horizon of their own power interests or of the particular
interests of their parties or states and to act
in accordance with the fundamental interests of today's
humanity—that is, to behave the way everyone should
behave, even though most of the others may fail to do so.

I am convinced that our globally connected and globally threatened
world badly needs this type of politician—all the more so since
the same world, through the various consequences of the development
of its civilisation, is
almost systematically destroying them. Probably never
before has a place in politics been so dependent on the given moment,
on the fleeting moods of the population or the media. Never before
have politicians been so impelled into the pursuit of short-lived,
and therefore often short-sighted concerns and interests! It often
seems to me that the life of many politicians has to proceed from the
evening news on television that presents their political
existence to the public to the morning opinion poll that, in turn,
affects their image on television the next evening. I am not sure
whether the present era of mass media
encourages the emergence and the growth of politicians of the
stature, for instance, of a Winston Churchill; I rather doubt it,
though there can always be exceptions.

To sum up: the less the present time favours politicians who
practise long-term and truly global thinking, and the more such
politicians are needed now, the more should intellectuals—at
least those meeting my definition—be welcomed in politics, and
supported there. Such support could come, among others, from those
who—for whatever reason—never enter politics themselves,
but who agree with the former, or at least share the ethos underlying
their actions.

I hear an objection to this: a politician must be elected, and
people vote for the person who thinks the way they do. Consequently,
if someone wants to make progress in politics, he must pay attention
to the general condition of the human mind; he must respect the
so-called ordinary voter's point of view, share that perspective, and
develop it. So, a politician must, whether he likes it or not, be
mainly a mirror, or an embodiment, of the prevailing
sentiment or of particular short-term interests. He cannot be a
herald of unpopular truths or a propagator of something which, while
it may be in the interests of the future of humanity, most of his
electorate do not see as in their
interest at the present moment, or that they may even
regard as a threat to their current pursuits.

I do not think it would be right to accept this as an unquestioned
dogma. I even believe that doing so would, in a way, amount to
renouncing the original definition—the good definition of
politics. I am deeply convinced that
the purpose of politics does not consist simply in fulfilling the
short-term wishes of the people. A politician should also seek to win
people over to his own ideas, even when they are unpopular. He should
explain those ideas and defend them before the public. Indeed, I
think that politics
entails, among other things, convincing the voters that there are
things which the politician recognises or comprehends better than
they do, and that it is for this reason that they should vote for
him. People can thus delegate
to a politician certain issues which they—for a variety of
reasons—do not sense themselves, or do not want to worry about,
but which someone has to take upon himself on their behalf.
Of course, all seducers of the masses, potential tyrants,
or blind political fanatics have used precisely this argument to make
their case; the communists did the same when they declared themselves
the most enlightened sector of the population and, by virtue of this
alleged enlightenment, arrogated to themselves the right to rule
arbitrarily over everyone else.

I would therefore venture to offer for your consideration the
following thesis: the true art of politics is the art to win people's
support for a good cause even when the pursuit of that cause may
interfere with their particular interests at the moment. This,
however, should happen without impeding any of the many ways in which
we can continually check that the objective is truly in a good cause,
and ensure that trusting people are not led to serve a nonsense, and
suffer disaster as a consequence, in an illusory search for future
universal prosperity.

It must be said that there are intellectuals who possess a very
special ability for committing precisely this kind of evil. They tend
to elevate their own intellect arrogantly above everyone else's, and
themselves above all human
beings. They tell their fellow citizens that if they do not want to
understand the brilliance of the intellectual project offered to
them, it is solely because they are of dull mind, and have not yet
risen to the heights inhabited by the proponent of the project. After
all that we have gone through in the twentieth century, I think it is
not very difficult to recognise how dangerous is this intellectual,
or rather quasi-intellectual attitude in the historical context. Let
us remember how many intellectuals helped to create the various
modern dictatorships! Indeed, almost none managed without their
assistance or direct leadership.

Let me put it another way. A good politician of the future should
be able to explain without seeking to seduce; he should humbly look
for the truth of this world without claiming to be its professional
owner; he should alert
people to the good qualities in themselves, including a sense of the
values and interests which transcend the
personal, without giving himself an air of superiority
and imposing anything on his fellow humans; he should not yield to
the dictate of public moods or of the mass media, while never
hindering a constant scrutiny of his actions.

In the realm of such future politics, intellectuals should, to my
mind, make their presence felt in one of two possible ways: they
could—without finding it shameful or
demeaning—accept a political office and use that position to do
what they deem right, not just to hold on to power. Or they could be
the ones who constantly hold up a mirror to those in authority, to
make sure that the latter truly serve a good thing and that they do
not begin to use fine words as a cloak for evil deeds, as happened to
so many
intellectuals in politics in the past centuries.

Dear friends, Oxford is the home and the workplace of a brilliant
intellectual with whom I have been debating the subject of `the
intellectual and politics' for years. I am sure you will understand
that this, among other things, has led me to raise this question once
again today.

I thank you for the great honour you have accorded me today, as
well as for the attention you have given to these remarks despite the
fact that my pronunciation is a far cry from Oxford standards.

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SPEECH BY THE PUBLIC ORATOR

The following speech was delivered by THE PUBLIC ORATOR in a
Congregation held on Saturday, 24 October 1998, in presenting for the
honorary degree of MA

MR CYRIL BAND

Decem paene lustra sunt ex quo hic quem produco inlustri illi
opificum ingeniosorum catervae accessit sine quorum opera viri
physici nostri ne unum quidem pedem progredi possent, adeo subtilis
inusitatae formae machinas excogitant fabricantur procurant. nam
vehementer errat si quis hodie acutissimum quemque physicum sibi
fingit sub malo sedentem, nova inventa acumine tantum atque ingeni
viribus proferentem. sed hic cum non contigisset ut studiis
academicis adulescens vacaret, se ipsum instituere atque erudire tam
felici eventu coepit ut mox propriam sibi peritiam, propriam
scientiam vindicarit: princeps enim eorum factus qui lucis ope freti
imagines fingebant, omnium paene primus intellexit quantum hoc artis
genus proficere posset, quanta incrementa, quot novas provincias
posset acquirere. quid si hunc dicam in eo imaginum photographicarum
genere esse versatum quod imitatione nondum contentum ipsarum rerum
corpora, et quidem inauditarum, producit in luminis oras? insanire
scilicet viderer, nisi id hodie tritum esset quod hic cum paucis
aliis olim somniavit. machinas computatrices tamquam digitos suos
novit, digitalibus autem quae dicuntur ita abutitur ut imagines
producat quae si quid in rebus ipsis obscuritate delitiscebat id hac
luce
clarius reddunt. haud mirum igitur si homines physici Oxonienses hunc
honore quam maximo volunt insignire, qui cum erga professores ac
scientiae peritiores tum erga novissimum quemque tironem semper se
comem, adfabilem, officiosum praestiterit; sed omnium Musarum homo
non potest angustis unius disciplinae finibus contineri, qui cum
annalium scriptoribus picturarumque studiosis subvenerit, tum medicis
hominibusque aegrotantibus imagines utilissimas auxiliumque
praebuerit optatissimum. quem hodie togae nostrae honore adfectum
animo gratissimo salutamus.

Praesento virum de Academia optime meritum, ingenio inlustrem,
fide eximium, Cyrillum Gulielmum Band, ut admittatur honoris causa ad
gradum Magistri in Artibus.

Paraphrase

It is almost fifty years since Mr Band joined that invaluable group
of people, the technicians who make possible the work of our
department of physics. It would be a serious mistake if anyone were
to imagine that nowadays most physicists sit beneath an apple tree
and work out intellectual advances by brain power alone. He did not
have an academic education in science, but he set to work to educate
himself, and did so with such success that he soon possessed his own
area of expertise and became Head of the Physics Photographic Unit.
He was among the very first to realise the potential power of
photography and the wide range over which it could be applied. It
almost sounds like fantasy when one says that he creates photographic
images which do not remain simply copies but themselves form part of
newly created and unprecedented physical objects, but thanks to the
pioneering work of Mr Band and others this is now a familiar
procedure. Computers have no secrets from him, and he
exploits digital photography to produce images which present the
original objects in a novel light and so reveal unexpected
properties. Our physicists are naturally eager to honour a man who
has been consistently obliging, helpful, and good humoured to them
all, whether Professors or Freshers. But he is too versatile to be
limited to a single faculty. He has been of the greatest assistance
to many
researchers in the humanities, both archaeologists and scholars in
fine art; and he is responsible for applications of photography which
have been important to medical science and the treatment of the sick.
We are glad to honour him today in token of our gratitude.

I present an outstanding servant of the University, ingenious,
versatile, and devoted, Cyril William Band, for admission to the
honorary degree of Master of Arts.

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CANON HALL JUNIOR PRIZE

The Prize has been awarded to MICHAEL B. TAIT, St Benet's
Hall.

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section



LIBRARIES COMMITTEE


Consultation process on
proposals for the development of integrated library
services within the University: further report from the
Libraries Committee

The following report is made further to the notice which
appeared in the Gazette of 30 July.

Following from the recommendations of the Thomas
[1]

and Kenny [2]
Reports in 1995, and with the approval of
Council and Congregation, [3] NAME="3note">
the Libraries Committee of
Council and the General Board and the Director of
University Library Services and Bodley's Librarian have,
since January 1997, been working towards a greater degree
of integration of library services within the University
in the context of a three-year interim framework.

This activity has been independent of, but is now
being informed by, relevant aspects of the Report of the
Commission of Inquiry (the North Report) and the
resultant proposals of the joint working party on
governance now submitted for wider consultation within
the University.


1. The consultative process

With a certain amount of temporary restructuring having
taken place within the provisional remit of the Libraries
Committee (including the creation of a Library Services
Directorate and the implementation of a new subcommittee
structure), the committee approved the Director's
proposals for a wider and more detailed consultation
process with the relevant library authorities and
librarians within the University. This proceeded over the
Long Vacation with the involvement of the following
representative groups:

—The Librarians of the Libraries Committee
libraries

—The Library Committees of the non-Bodleian
Libraries Committee libraries

—Library staff across the University (including
appropriate departmental and college librarians) with
overtly subject-based responsibilities

—All interested parties, who have been invited to
comment.

In addition, the following groups have been consulted
by the Director:

—The Advisory Sub-committee of Librarians (AdLib)

—The Bodleian Senior Management Group (BSMG)

—The academic-related staff groups of the
Bodleian (PSALM and ALM), including the Librarians of the
Bodleian's dependent libraries.

Library users and external user representatives are
already in membership of the Libraries Committee; but
these constituencies will be more widely consulted as the
formal proposals for further restructuring of the
libraries sector emerge. Faculty Boards are being
formally consulted during the Michaelmas Term, with the
University authorities (Council and the General Board)
and Congregation being consulted at subsequent stages.
The Libraries Committee itself, the Sub-committee for the
Bodleian Library, and the University Library Services
Directorate will also continue to be involved at every
stage in the development of proposals for moving towards
a more integrated library service.


2. The timetable

Whilst the timetable for consultation on the proposals
for the development of integrated library services within
the University is laid out in the Gazette
notice of 30 July, it is envisaged that the proposals
themselves, following iterative discussions with all the
relevant constituencies during the remainder of 1998,
will be formally presented for discussion by the
University during the course of 1999, with a view to
implementation, if approved, beginning in the year 2000.


3. Progress report on consultations

With the completion of the sequence of consultation
meetings held over the Long Vacation, the Libraries
Committee is pleased to be able to report a large measure
of consensus on the part of those involved in the
discussions to date in relation to the Director's
proposals for the formal integration of the libraries
sector.

Discussions with librarians of Libraries
Committee libraries

Areas of agreement have included:

(i) That the consultation timetable is appropriate

(ii) That all proposals designed to move the library
system towards integration ought to satisfy the criterion
that they should result, either directly or indirectly,
in service benefits to library users

(iii) That it makes sense to recommend that all staff
in Libraries Committee libraries should become part of an
integrated staff structure, with line-management
responsibility to the Director

(iv) That it would be appropriate, in the context of
any proposals on revised arrangements for library
governance, to recommend that new library committees
should be formed for the Libraries Committee libraries,
which would report both to the Libraries Committee and to
the relevant Faculty Boards, and that these committees
should include in their remit a cross-sectoral
responsibility to advise the Libraries Committee and the
Director on subject-related library issues relevant to
the libraries concerned

(v) That the discussion of subject-related issues
represents a valuable way forward in the development of
an integrated system.

Discussions with representatives of the local
management committees of the non-Bodleian Libraries
Committee libraries

Meetings have been held with representatives of all of
the library management committees concerned in this
exercise. In each of them, there was agreement on the
following principal points:

(i) That it would be appropriate to propose that the
staff of each Libraries Committee library should be made
line-managerially responsible to the Director, and that
the library should be administered as part of an
integrated University Library Service

(ii) That the existing committee for each library
should be remodelled (with a Chairman nominated by the
relevant Faculty Board and appointed by the Libraries
Committee) as a joint committee of the Faculty Board and
the Libraries Committee.

Note: In the case of Social
Studies/Economics, the above arrangements are already
partially in place, and are in the process of being
implemented in consultation with the Faculty Board.

Discussions between subject-based library staff

Each of the four subject-groupings of library staff has
met at least once, and some intend to meet again shortly
to continue their discussions. In summary, the
conclusions reached so far suggest that there is a large
measure of support among library staff for at least an
element of subject emphasis in an integrated library
system, that there would be a very large agenda for more
formally co-ordinated subject groups to work through,
with clear benefits for readers, and that, although there
would need to be differences of emphasis in the different
broad subject areas, perhaps with smaller sub-groups
addressing the specific needs of certain users, there was
value in devising a common overall structure to enable
the emerging agenda to be addressed.

[The Subject Groups were convened as follows:

Science: Dr Peter Leggate (Radcliffe Science Library)

Medicine: Dr Judith Palmer (Health Care Libraries
Unit)

Social Science: Ms Margaret Robb (Social
Studies/Economics)
Humanities: Ms Elizabeth Chapman
(Taylorian)]

4. The next steps

The following steps need to be taken before Christmas
1998:

(i) Presentation of outline proposals on integration
to the Michaelmas Term meetings of relevant faculty
boards and other appropriate bodies.

(ii) Ongoing cycle of meetings during Michaelmas Term
(AdLib; BSMG; PSALM/ALM; Directorate; Subject Groups;
Libraries Committee, etc.), to consider, as part of
their agenda, draft proposals on integration as they
emerge.

At a special meeting to be held on 28 January 1999,
the Libraries Committee will consider the formal
responses received, with a view to drawing up a report to
the University, for wider consideration.

Comments are welcomed at any stage from all interested
parties. Such comments, together with any requests for
further information, should be addressed to Mr L.C.C.
Reynolds at the University Offices (telephone: (2)70199,
e-mail: laurence.reynolds@admin.ox.ac.uk).

Footnotes

[1]
Report of Council's Working Party on Senior Library
Posts (Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4373,
21 September 1995, p. 37).

Return to text

[2]
Report of the Advisory Group on the Management
Structure for an Integrated Library System (Supplement
(1) to Gazette No. 4380, 13 November 1995,
p. 339).

Return to text

[3]
Gazette, Vol. 126, pp. 706, 728.

Return to text

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EDUCATIONAL RECORDING AGENCY


Survey of off-air recording

This notice is to inform members of the University
about a survey of educational recordings in which the
University is obliged to participate this year, and to
request co-operation in collecting the necessary
information.

The University (including its constituent colleges)
is covered by an Educational Recording Agency (ERA)
Licence to record radio and television broadcasts and
cable programmes for educational use, without infringing
copyright. The University pays about £24,000 per
annum for this licence.

It is a condition of the licence that institutions
may be required to maintain for a specified period of
time details of radio and television recordings made
under the licence and to return this information to the
ERA. Oxford University has been selected to take part in
ERA's survey during the period 1 September 1998
to 31 August 1999
and the University is
therefore asking all staff for assistance in collating
the information required.

In each department and college, and some faculty
offices, an individual has been nominated as the local
co-ordinator for the survey. All staff are asked to give
details to the most appropriate co-ordinator of all
recordings of radio and television programmes which they
make for educational purposes whether at home, in the
University, or elsewhere. The information required is the
title, date, and channel of the programme, and the
location where the recording was made. As statistics have
to be returned by the University at the end of every
month, it is important that a co-ordinator is informed as
soon as possible after a recording is made.

The identity of the local co-ordinator should be
publicised in each department, college, and (where
appropriate) faculty office. If it is not clear, the
departmental administrator, senior tutor, or faculty
office administrator should be able to identify the co-
ordinator. In cases of difficulty, details of recordings
can be passed instead to the University's central co-
ordinator, Miss Catherine Long, at the ETRC (telephone:
(2)70529, e-mail: catherine.long@etrc.ox.ac.uk). It is,
of course, necessary to pass information about recordings
only to one co-ordinator; there is no need, for example,
to inform both a college co-ordinator and a faculty co-
ordinator but simply the one which is most convenient.

Please note that ERA are likely to visit the
University at some stage during the survey period and to
monitor the information returned against recordings held
by the University. It is therefore important that the
required information is collected carefully and that
recordings are available for inspection if necessary. It
is also important to note the requirement (which is
general and not just for the period of the survey) that
each recording should be labelled with the date and time,
and with the statement that `This recording is to be used
only for educational purposes'.

It is hoped that the survey will not cause too much
inconvenience, and the full co-operation of members of
the University would be appreciated.

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FACULTY OF MUSIC


Recital

Lorca's Spain

NICHOLAS CLAPTON (counter-tenor) and TOM KERSTENS
(guitar) will give a recital of poetry and song-settings,
with works by David Bedford, Simon Holt, Federico Garcia
Lorca, Manuel de Falla, and others, at 8 p.m. on
Wednesday, 11 November, in the Holywell Music Room.
Tickets, costing £9 (£6 concessions) may be
obtained from the Playhouse, Beaumont Street, or at the
door.

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ORIENTAL INSTITUTE AND EASTERN
ART LIBRARIES

The Oriental Institute and Eastern Art Libraries will be
closed on Wednesday, 4 November, owing to essential
electrical work associated with the construction of the
Sackler Library. The librarian apologises for the
inconvenience to readers and asks them to refer any
particular problems to library staff. The Institute for
Chinese Studies Library in Walton Street is unaffected
and will be open as usual that day.

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section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 29 October 1998: Lectures<br />

Lectures


Contents of this section:

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INAUGURAL LECTURES


Professor of Statistical Science

PROFESSOR PETER DONNELLY will deliver his inaugural lecture at
5 p.m. on Monday, 7 December, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Modelling genes.'

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section



John M. Olin Visiting Professor of
American Government

PROFESSOR CHARLES O. JONES will deliver his inaugural lecture at
5 p.m. on Monday, 30 November, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `The speculative imagination in democratic
lawmaking.'

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section



JAMES FORD SPECIAL LECTURES IN BRITISH
HISTORY

The following James Ford Special Lectures will be given at 5 p.m.
on Fridays in the Examination Schools.

DR B. YORKE, King Alfred's College, Winchester

6 Nov.: `The secular context of early Anglo-
Saxon nunneries.'

PROFESSOR L. COLLEY, London School of Economics

13 Nov.: `Going native, telling tales:
captivities and collaborations in an age of empire.'

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FORD'S LECTURES IN BRITISH HISTORY

Use and delight: environmental history in Northern England
since 1600

PROFESSOR T.C. SMOUT, Historiographer Royal of Scotland and
Director, the Institute for Environmental History, University of
St Andrews, will deliver the Ford's Lectures in British History
at 5 p.m. on Fridays in Hilary Term, in the Examination
Schools.

22 Jan.: `Use and delight: continuity and change in
attitude to nature.'

29 Jan.: `Woods of imagination and reality.'

5 Feb.: `Making and using the soil.'

12 Feb.: `Commanding the waters.'

19 Feb.: `The fragile hill.'

26 Feb.: `The quarrel over the countryside.'

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MAURICE LUBBOCK LECTURE IN MANAGEMENT
STUDIES 1998

SIR PETER WILLIAMS, Chairman, Oxford Instruments PLC, will
deliver the third annual Maurice Lubbock Lecture in Management
Studies at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 26 November, in the Examination
Schools. The lecture will be followed by a reception at the
Schools.

Further information may be obtained from Georgina Denn, Said
Business School (telephone: Oxford (2)88654, e-mail:
george.denn@obs.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `Barriers to innovation.'

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section



CLINICAL MEDICINE

Geratology Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in
the Seminar Room, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

Convener: D.S. Fairweather, MA, University Lecturer
in Clinical Geratology.

DR J.B. SALMON

4 Nov.: `Interface between intensive care and
general medicine.'

PROFESSOR SIR JOHN GRIMLEY EVANS

18 Nov.: `The geriatrician in the first half of
the twenty-first century.'

MR J. SALMON

25 Nov.: `Cataracts and senile macular
degeneration.'

DR P. MAXWELL

2 Dec.: `Renal replacement treatment in the
elderly.'

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Annual Joint Gynaecology and Oncology Meeting

The following papers will be given at the Annual Joint
Gynaecology and Oncology Meeting, to be held on Wednesday, 11
November, in the Institute of Molecular Medicine. The meeting
will close at 4.30 p.m.

MR W.P. SOUTTER, Hammersmith Hospital

2 p.m.: `Critical review of surgery in vulval
cancer.'

DR I. STRATFORD, Manchester

2.25 p.m.: `Hypoxia and cancer—new
drugs.'

MR S. MANEK

2.50 p.m.: `Recent advances in cervical cancer
screening.'

DR B. JONES, Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Liverpool

3.15 p.m.: `Recent advances in brachytherapy in
cervical cancer.'

DR A. FIANDER, Llandough Hospital, Penarth

3.45 p.m.: `HPV directed vaccine therapy for
cervical cancer.'

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University Department of Clinical Pharmacology

The following seminars will be held at 4 p.m. on Mondays in the
Cairns Seminar Suite, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

DR N.M.J. RUPNIAK, Merck Sharp & Dohme Neuroscience Research
Centre, Harlow

16 Nov.: `Novel mechanism for antidepressant
activity by blockade of central substance P receptors.'

DR S. HUME, Hammersmith Hospital

7 Dec.: `in vivo imaging of rat brain
using PET.'

DR I. BERMUDEZ, Brookes University

14 Dec.: `An investigation of the relationship
between the convulsant and barbiturate site in the human
GABAA receptor.'

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CLINICAL MEDICINE, PHYSIOLOGICAL
SCIENCES

PROFESSOR RALPH STEINMANN, Rockefeller University, New York, will
lecture at 1 p.m. on Monday, 30 November, in the Lecture Theatre,
the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology.

Convener: S. Gordon, MA, Glaxo Professor of Cellular
Pathology.

Subject: `Antigen presentation by dendritic cells.'

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section



MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

PROFESSOR VALERIO MAGRELLI, Rome, will lecture at 5 p.m. on
Wednesday, 4 November, in the Ground-Floor Lecture Room, the
Taylor Institution Annexe, 47 Wellington Square. Jamie
Mackendrick, translator of Professor Magrelli's poetry, will also
take part.

Those wishing to attend are asked to note that the meeting will
take place in 47 Wellington Square, and not, as previously
notified, in the Taylor Institution.

Convener: D. Zancani, MA, Faculty Lecturer in
Italian.

Subject: `Tradizione dell'avanguardia o avanguardia
della tradizione.'

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section


Romance Linguistics Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in 47
Wellington Square. Anyone interested in Romance and/or general
linguistics—whether or not specialising in these
areas—is invited to attend.

Convener: Professor Martin Maiden (telephone:
(2)70488, e-mail: martin.maiden@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk).

DR M. WHEELER, Sussex

12 Nov.: `Syncope and apocope in the history of
Catalan: can optimality help?'

DR J. CREMONA, Cambridge

19 Nov.: `The Mediterranean lingua franca.'

PROFESSOR L. SCHOSLER, Copenhagen

26 Nov.: `Permanence and variation in verb
valency. Reflections on verb construction in Latin, Old
French, and Modern French.'

R. FOLLI

3 Dec.: `Causative/inchoative alternations in
Italian.'

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section


Commemorating the first voyage to India, 1498--1998

DR JOHN VILLIERS, Royal Asiatic Society, will lecture at 5 p.m.
on Thursday, 5 November, in the Ground Floor Lecture Room, 47
Wellington Square.

Subject: 'Prester John, the St Thomas Christians and
the Enterprise of the Indies.'

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section



MODERN HISTORY

Special Faculty Lecture

PROFESSOR CHRISTOPHER WICKHAM, School of History, University of
Birmingham, will deliver the annual Special Faculty Lecture at
5 p.m. on Friday, 27 November, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `An empire fragments: aristocratic wealth
and peasant autonomy in the post-Roman West, 450–750.'

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section


History and identity

The following lectures will be held at 2 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
Conduit Room, New College.

Conveners: Ruth Harris, MA, D.Phil., Fellow of New
College, and Megan Vaughan, MA, Ph.D., Professor of Commonwealth
Studies.

OLWEN HUFTON

3 Nov.: `Identity and the purse: Popes and
Cardinals as donors in early-modern Rome.'

ADRIAN LYTTLETON, Pisa

10 Nov.: `New reflections on Italian national
identity.'

RUTH WATSON

17 Nov.: `Chiefs, thieves, and strangers:
criminal identities in early colonial Ibadan.'

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section



ORIENTAL STUDIES

Medieval Studies Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in
Lecture Room 1, the Oriental Institute.

Conveners: J.S. Meisami, MA, University Lecturer in
Persian, and W.L. Treadwell, MA, Samir Shamma Lecturer in Islamic
Numismatics.

PROFESSOR R. BULLIET, Columbia

3 Nov.: `Ass symbolism in Mediterranean
culture.'

PROFESSOR B. LAWRENCE, Duke University

10 Nov.: `Revisiting the Ternary Myth: does the
classical–medieval-modern periodisation fit the
evidence of South Asian Sufism?'

PROFESSOR G.J.H. VAN GELDER

17 Nov.: `Arab buffoons: marginal people at the
centre.'

DR F.M. CORRAO, Naples

24 Nov.: `Laughter, festival, and rebirth in
the Early Mamluk Age: Ibn Daniyal's shadow plays.'

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section



ORIENTAL STUDIES, THEOLOGY

Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR D.J.A. CLINES, University of Sheffield, will deliver
a Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 9 November, in the
Examination Schools.

Subject: `Making waves gently: the contribution of
R.N. Whybray to Old Testament studies today.'

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section



PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Civil Engineering Colloquia

The following colloquia will be held at 2 p.m. on Fridays in
Lecture Room 8, the Engineering and Technology Building. Visitors
from outside Oxford are advised to telephone Oxford (2)73162
prior to travelling to confirm that there have been no late
changes and to book parking permits, if required.

Convener: G.T. Houlsby, MA, Professor of Civil
Engineering.

DR S. JACKMAN

30 Oct.: `Combining electrokinesis and
bioremediation for the treatment of contaminated land.'

DR R. GONZALEZ

13 Nov.: `Consolidation of gassy solids.'

DR C.E. AUGARDE

20 Nov.: `Modelling tunnelling
processes—analysis using parallel methods.'

PROFESSOR HOULSBY

4 Nov.: `A thermodynamics basis for plasticity
theory.'

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section



PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Pharmacology and anatomical neuropharmacology seminars

The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on the days shown
in the Lecture Theatre, the Department of Pharmacology. They will
take place on Tuesdays, unless indicated otherwise.

DR S. HERING, Institute for Biochemistry and Pharmacology,
Innsbruck

Wed. 4 Nov.: `Common molecular determinants of
calcium channel block and inactivation: coincidence or key
for understanding?'

DR P. LANGTON, Bristol

10 Nov.: `Chloride transport and the myogenic
contraction of rat cerebral resistance arteries—what we
think we know and how to go forward.'

DR J. LACKIE, Director, Yamanouchi Research Institute, Oxford

17 Nov.: `Drug targets: are there many
left?'

PROFESSOR M. ASHFORD, Aberdeen

24 Nov.: `Oxidative stress activates a novel
non-selective cation channel: dire consequences for the
cell.'

DR B. ROBERTSON, Imperial College

1 Dec.: `Voltage-gated K channels: from
subtypes to synapses.'

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section



SOCIAL STUDIES

DR N.P. BOWLES will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 3
November, in the Chester Room, Nuffield College.

Convener: B.E. Shafer, MA, Mellon Professor of
American Government.

Subject: `The politics of Congressional conflict in
the Nixon presidency.'

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section



WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY OF
MEDICINE

History of tropical medicine and infectious diseases

The following seminars will be given at 1 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
Seminar Room, the Wellcome Unit, 47 Banbury Road.

Convener: Dr M. Malowany (telephone: (2)74600, e-
mail: maureen.malowany@wuhmo.ox.ac.uk).

DR R. PACKARD, Emory University, USA

10 Nov.: `Malaria eradication in Africa.'
(In association with St Antony's College)

DR M. HARRISON and DR M. WORBOYS, Sheffield Hallam University

24 Nov.: `Smallpox eradication in India.'
(In association with Green College)

EMERITUS PROFESSOR W. PETERS, Liverpool School of Tropical
Medicine, and DR H. POWER, Liverpool

8 Dec.: `Drug resistance in the tropics.'
(In association with Green College)

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section



GREEN COLLEGE


Radcliffe Lecture 1998

SIR RICHARD B. SYKES, D.SC., FRS, Chairman, Glaxo Wellcome PLC,
will deliver the Radcliffe Lecture at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, 3
November, in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

Subject: `Medicines, morals, and money: the high
ground and the bottom line.'

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section



ORIEL COLLEGE AND FACULTY OF LITERAE
HUMANIORES

PROFESSOR A.J. WOODMAN, Durham, will lecture at 5.15 p.m. on
Thursday, 12 November, in Lecture Room 2 (Staircase 18, Island
site), Oriel College.

Convener: C.S. Kraus, MA, University Lecturer (CUF)
in Classical Languages.

Subject: `Making history: the heading of the
Res Gestae.'

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section



ST ANNE'S COLLEGE


Hoskins Lecture

DR I. SCARGILL, University Lecturer in Geography and Fellow of
St Edmund Hall, will deliver the eighth Hoskins Lecture at 5.30
p.m. on Tuesday, 10 November, in the Mary Ogilvie Lecture
Theatre, St Anne's College.

The annual lecture, in honour of Professor William G. Hoskins,
on some aspect of local history, has been generously endowed by
the late Mrs Jean Duffield.

Subject: `The landscape of Oxford's Green Belt.'

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section



WOLFSON COLLEGE


Ronald Syme Lecture

PROFESSOR G. BOWERSOCK, School of Historical Studies, Institute
for Advanced Study, Princeton University, will deliver the annual
Ronald Syme Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 5 November, in the
Hall, Wolfson College.

Subject: `Tacitus and Pushkin.'

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section





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 29 October 1998: Grants and Funding<br />

Grants and Research Funding


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



OPPENHEIMER FUND

The Oppenheimer Fund provides grants to assist the academic
exchange of senior members between the University of Oxford on
the one hand and universities and similar institutions of higher
education in the Republic of South Africa on the other.
Applications are invited from senior members of the University
who wish either to visit one or more universities in South Africa
or to invite a staff member from a South African university to
Oxford. Grants may be awarded to assist with living expenses for
a maximum of six months, and travel costs. Visits for the sole
purpose of attending a conference will not normally be eligible
for support from the fund.

The maximum level of grants is likely to be up to £1,000
per month for subsistence and up to £700 for the cost of
travel between Oxford and South Africa. Applications for grants
from the fund should include a statement of the purpose of the
proposed visit (including an outline of any research to be
carried out during the visit), duration and estimated costs,
details of any other available sources of funding, and, in the
case of visits to Oxford, a curriculum vitae of the
staff member it is proposed to invite and a letter of support
from a senior member at Oxford. Applications should be sent to
the International Office, University Offices, Wellington Square,
by 20 November.

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section





<br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 29 October 1998: Examinations and Boards<br />

Examinations and Boards


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



LECTURE LISTS: HILARY TERM 1999


Timetabling arrangements

Faculties and departments are asked to supply their lecture-list
files for Hilary Term, by disk or e-mail, by Thursday, 3 December
(eighth week).

The printed lecture lists will be distributed shortly before the
start of term.

Disks, copy, and proofs relating to the Lecture Lists should be
forwarded to Miss E. Williamson, Gazette and Lecture
Lists Assistant, Press Office, Oxenford House, Magdalen Street,
Oxford OX1 3AB (telephone: (2)78121, fax: (2)78180, e-mail:
lecture.lists@admin.ox.ac.uk).

For arrangement concerning the Special Lecture List, see below.

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section


Entries shared between lists

Any faculty member who wishes to place an entry in the lecture
list of another faculty or department is asked to forward the
information as soon as possible, and directly to the
other faculty
.

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section



Special Lecture List

Hilary Term 1999

The Special Lecture List for Hilary Term 1999 will appear shortly
before term, at the same time as the ordinary Lecture Lists. It
will include all appropriate lectures for Hilary Term published
in the Gazette during Michaelmas Term, and also
lectures of which details are received by Monday, 7
December
(ninth week).

Those wishing to contribute to the Special Lecture List are
asked to note that this is a firm deadline, and that items
received after it are unlikely to be included.

Items for the Special Lecture List should be forwarded to Miss
E. Williamson, Gazette and Lecture Lists Assistant,
Press Office, Oxenford House, Magdalen Street, Oxford OX1 3AB
(telephone: (2)78121, fax: (2)78180, e-mail:
lecture.lists@admin.ox.ac.uk).

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section


Enquiries concerning proposed dates for special lectures

Those responsible for arranging lectures intended to be of
interest to a wide university audience may wish to consult the
editor of the Gazette (fax: 556646, e-mail:
gazette@admin.ox.ac.uk), or the Gazette and Lecture
Lists Assistant (details above), for information on any other
similar lectures, of which details have been received, due to be
given on the proposed date or dates.

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section


Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores

The Board of the Faculty recommends that lectures should be given
at the following hours:

Monday       9      Greek History/Latin Literature
            10      Philosophy
            11      Roman History/Greek Literature
            12      Archaeology/Philosophy
            5-7     Free

Tuesday      9      Archaeology
            10      Philosophy
            11      Literature
            12      History
            5-7     Free

Wednesday    9      Roman History/Greek Literature
            10      Philosophy
            11      Latin Literature/Greek History
            12      Archaeology/Philosophy
            5-7     Free

Thursday     9      Literature
            10      Philosophy
            11      Greek History/Latin Literature
            12      Archaeology
            5-7     Free

Friday       9      History
            10      Philosophy
            11      Roman History/Greek Literature
            12      Archaeology/Philosophy
            5-7     Free

Sub-faculty of Languages and Literature

It is recommended that lectures for Honour Moderations should be
given at the following hours whenever possible:

Homer               11 (Wednesdays, Fridays)
Virgil              11 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
Greek Authors       12 (Mondays, Wednesdays)
Latin Authors       11 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
Language Papers     10 (Fridays)
A                   11 (Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, TT;      
                     Mondays, Wednesdays, MT, HT)
C                   10 (Mondays, Wednesdays)
D                   10 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
E                   12
F                   12 (Tuesdays, Thursdays, HT, TT);
                    11 and 12 (Tuesdays, Thursdays, MT)

Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages

Timetable of introductory or survey lectures

The Board of the Faculty recommends that lectures should be given
at the following hours:

Monday      10      French
            11      German
            12      German
Tuesday      9      Italian
            10      Spanish
            11      Italian 
            12      Spanish
Wednesday    9      Russian
            10      French
            11      Linguistics
            12      Linguistics
Thursday     9      Spanish
            10      Russian
            11      Russian
            12      Italian
Friday      10      French
            11      German
            12      Linguistics

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section


Board of the Faculty of Social Studies

The Board of the Faculty recommends that:

(a) lectures for the Preliminary Examination for
Philosophy, Politics, and Economics should be given at the
following times:

Politics    10
Economics   11
Philosophy  12 noon (or a 10 o'clock period not occupied by
            Politics);

(b) courses of introductory lectures and lectures on
compulsory subjects for undergraduates in their first three or
four terms of work for the Honour School of Philosophy, Politics,
and Economics should normally be given at the following times:

Politics    12
Economics   11
Philosophy  10

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section


Board of the Faculty of Theology

To avoid clashes with Philosophy lectures members of the faculty
are asked not to offer Theology lectures of interest to those
reading for the Joint Honour School of Philosophy and Theology
at the following times:

Preliminary Examination

Monday to Saturday 12

Honour School

Monday 10 and 12

Tuesday 10

Wednesday 10 and 12

Thursday 10

Friday 10 and 12

Saturday 10

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section



CHAIRMAN OF EXAMINERS

The Vice-Chancellor desires to call the attention of all
examiners to the provisions of Ch. VI, Sect. ii.c, § 1,
clauses 1-3, which require examiners in all university
examinations to appoint one of their number to act as Chairman,
to notify the appointment to the Vice-Chancellor, and to publish
it in the University Gazette.

He desires that these appointments shall be notified to the
Clerk of the Schools who will inform the Vice-Chancellor and see
that notice of them is duly published in the University
Gazette
.

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section



CHAIRMEN OF EXAMINERS

TRINITY TERM 1998

Preliminary Examinations

European and Middle Eastern Languages (European):
C.M. MACROBERT, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall

Modern Languages: C.M. MACROBERT, MA, D.PHIL.,
Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall

Modern History and Modern Languages: C.M. MACROBERT,
MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall

Philosophy and Modern Languages: C.M. MACROBERT, MA,
D.PHIL., Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall

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section


Honour Schools

English Language and Literature: L.A. NEWLYN, MA,
D.PHIL., Fellow of St Edmund Hall

Jurisprudence Courses I and II: F.M.B. REYNOLDS,
DCL,, Fellow of Worcester

Music: R. STROHM, MA, Fellow of Wadham (address:
Faculty of Music)

Natural Science—Physics: R.A. TAYLOR, MA,
Fellow of Queen's (address: Clarendon Laboratory)

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section


Master of Science

Human Biology: R.H. WARD, MA, Fellow of Linacre
(address: Biological Anthropology)

Diploma

Legal Studies: F.M.B. REYNOLDS, DCL,, Fellow of
Worcester

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section



EXAMINATION SCHOOLS


Accommodation for Lectures

Hilary Term 1999

The Chairman of the Curators of the Schools would be grateful if
Professors, Readers, and University Lecturers who wish to lecture
at the Schools in Hilary Term 1999 could inform the Clerk of the
Schools at the end of the present term. It is necessary to know
whether a room suitable for an audience of more than one hundred
persons is required; only the three large writing-schools will
accommodate more than that number.

Leave for the use of rooms for lectures will expire at the
end of the seventh week of Hilary Term.

Afternoon lectures should normally finish by 6 p.m.

Attention is drawn to the fact that overhead projection
equipment and 35-mm projectors are available. When these
facilities are required the Clerk of the Schools should be
notified in advance.

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section



CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in
regulations made by boards of faculties will come into effect on 13
November.


1 Board of the Faculty of Mathematical
Sciences

M.Sc. in Mathematics and Foundations of Computer Science

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p.
762, delete from `The list' on l. 33 to `schedule II lists;' on l. 39
and substitute: `The list of courses shall be divided into two
sections: Section A (Mathematical Foundations) and Section B
(Applicable Theories). Each section shall be divided into schedule I
(basic) and schedule II (advanced). Candidates shall be
required to satisfy the examiners in at least three courses taken
from section B and in at least two courses taken from schedule II.'

2 Ibid., delete ll. 40–1 and `standing
committee' on l. 42 and substitute: `Candidates shall submit a short
dissertation on a topic selected by the candidate in consultation
with the supervisor and approved by the standing committee. The
dissertation must bear regard to course material from Section B, and
it must demonstrate relevance to some area of science, engineering,
industry, or commerce.'

3 Ibid., p. 763, delete from `for each course' on
l. 14 to `each year.' on l. 17 and substitute: `There will be a
written assignment for each course. The topics in the assignment will
be suggested by the relevant lecturer not later than the Monday of
eighth week of the term during which the lectures are given. These
topics will be sufficient to offer options appropriate to the course.
The choice of topics will vary from year to year.'

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section



2 Board of the Faculty of Medieval and
Modern Languages

Degree of D.Phil.

With effect from 1 October 1999

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p.
877, ll. 25–6, delete `The board . . . D.Phil. status' and
substitute: `Each applicant for confirmation of D.Phil. status must
submit'.

2 Ibid., l. 31, after `chapter(s).' insert: `This
piece of work must be substantially different from that submitted on
application for admission to D.Phil. status. Each applicant must also
submit, at the time of application, three copies of a statement (of
not more than 1,000 words) of the title of the proposed thesis and of
the manner in which the subject will be treated, and of work achieved
on other parts of the thesis and work remaining to be done.'

3 Ibid., p. 878, ll. 6–9, delete `two copies
of . . . the chosen topic' and substitute: `three copies of a
statement (of not more than 1,000 words) of the title of the proposed
thesis and of the manner in which the subject will be treated, and of
the way in which the proposed treatment relates to existing work
relevant to the chosen topic, and of work achieved on other parts of
the thesis and work remaining to be done.'

4 Ibid., p. 878, l. 21, delete `100,000' and
substitute `80,000'.

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section



EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF
PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards and
committees give notice of oral examination of their candidates as
follows:

Biological Sciences

M. BRUCE, Wolfson: `Intra-host dynamics of human malaria
parasites'.

Welcome Trust Centre for the Epidemiology of Infectious Disease,
Department of Zoology, Monday, 9 November,
10 a.m.


Examiners: M. Pagel, N.J. White.

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section


Clinical Medicine

M.A. PURBHOO, Oriel: `Studies on T-cell receptor antagonism by
natural variant epitopes of the human immunodeficiency virus type
I'.

Institute of Molecular Medicine, Friday, 27 November, 2.30 p.m.


Examiners: A.J. McMichael, M.J. Owen.

J. WILSON, Green College: `Oligonclonal expansions of
T lymphocytes in viral infections'.

Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, Tuesday, 3 November, 2 p.m.


Examiners: W. James, P. Moss.

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section


English Language and Literature

D. HOROWITZ, St Hilda's: `Changing places: spatial configurations of
home in the English novel, 1900–39'.

St Hilda's, Tuesday, 15 December, 2.30 p.m.


Examiners: R. Bowlby, J. Montefiore.

C. ORAZEM, Wadham: `Political economy and fiction in the early works
of Harriet Martineau'.

Examination Schools, Tuesday, 17 November, 11.15 a.m.


Examiners: E.J. Jay, V. Sanders.

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section


Literae Humaniores

A.P. HARRINGTON, Queen's: `Understanding as dialogue and critique:
Jurgen Habermas and the philosophy of the human sciences'.

Philosophy Centre, Friday, 6 November, 2.30 p.m.


Examiners: H.R. HarrÄ, W. Outhwaite.

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section


Physical Sciences

C. HART, Queen's: `Novel approaches to sensor design'.

Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory,Wednesday, 11 November, 2.30 p.m.


Examiners: J.R. Dilworth, T. Cass.

G. RAU, Merton: `Theory of the electronic and optical properties of
GaAs 1 AlGaAs quantum wells under uniaseial stress'.

Clarendon Laboratory, Wednesday, 25 November, 11 a.m.


Examiners: R.A. Taylor, D. Whittaker.

J. UHLMANN, Jesus: `Dynamic map building and localisation: new
theoretical foundations'.

Department of Engineering Science, Friday, 13 November, 11 a.m.


Examiners: R.W. Daniel, C.J. Harris.

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Theology

A.J. MOORE, Worcester: `Realism and Christian faith: God, grammar,
and meaning'.

King's College, London (with the approval of the Proctors),
Wednesday, 4 November, 11.15 a.m.


Examiners: M. Banner, D. Fergusson.

S.A. NAHKOLA, Wolfson: `Double narratives in the Old Testament: their
methodological implications'.

Examination Schools, Tuesday, 1 December, 2 p.m.


Examiners: R.A. Mason, R.J. Coggins.

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Committee for Archaeology

K. PRENDERGAST, St Hugh's: `The celestial orientation of monuments
and social practice in neolithic Britain'.

Institute of Archaeology, Thursday, 26 November, 10.30 a.m.


Examiners: B.W. Cunliffe, J.S. Thomas.

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Committee for Educational Studies

A. TITCHEN, Linacre: `Professional craft knowledge in
patient-centred nursing, and the facilitation of its
development'.

Examination Schools, Wednesday, 18 November, 2 p.m.


Examiners: H.R. Hagger, B. Somekh.

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EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF
STUDIES IN LEGAL RESEARCH

The examiners appointed by the following faculty board give notice of
oral examination of their candidate as
follows:

Law

L. TORTELL, Wadham: `The monetary remedy for breach of the New
Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990'.

Exeter, Wednesday, 11 November, 2 p.m.


Examiners: S. Fredman, R. Bagshaw.

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section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 29 October 1998: Colleges<br />

Colleges, Halls, and Societies


Contents of this section:

Return to Contents Page of this
issue



OBITUARIES


Magdalen College

(PHILIP) ANTHONY (MAUNSELL) GELL, September 1998;
commoner 1940–1. Aged 77.

COLIN GRAHAM HARDIE, 17 October 1998; Fellow and Tutor
1936–73, Emeritus Fellow. Aged 92.

DAVID HAROLD JORDAN, CMG, MBE, 1 August 1998; commoner
1947–50. Aged 73.

SIR ROBERT JOHN SOUTHEY, AO, CMG, 29 September 1998;
commoner 1940–1 and 1946–8. Aged 76.

DR (FREDERICK) LEWIS THYER, 14 October 1998; Rhodes
Scholar 1924–6. Aged 95.

PROFESSOR (ARTHUR) PAUL STIRLING, 17 June 1998; Senior
Demy 1948. Aged 77.

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section



Pembroke College

JOHN RICHARD PERCIVAL O'BRIEN, B.SC., MA, 16 October
1998; commoner 1924–7, College Lecturer in Natural
Sciences 1939–54, Fellow 1954–74, Emeritus
Fellow 1974–98; Director, Nuffield Department of
Clinical Biochemistry, 1938–74.

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section



St Anne's College

SISTER MARY HELENA (MISS HELEN DESMOND); member of
Society of Oxford Home-Students 1929–32. Aged 88.

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section



St Edmund Hall

HUGH CHARLES MARSTON, BA, 5 October 1998; commoner
1935–9. Aged 82.

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section



St Peter's College and St
Antony's College

SIR ALEXANDER KIRKLAND CAIRNCROSS, KCMG, MA, FBA, 21
October 1998; Master, St Peter's College, 1969–78;
Honorary Fellow, St Peter's College and St Antony's
College.

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section



FUNERAL SERVICE


St Peter's College

The Funeral Service for SIR ALEC CAIRNCROSS, Master
1969–78, will take place at 11 a.m. on Friday, 6
November, in the college chapel.

A memorial service will be held in Glasgow at a later
date.

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section



ELECTIONS


Balliol College

To Prosser Scholarships:

LOUISE EVA LUCY ARCHER, formerly of Bedales School,
Hampshire

IAIN CHARLES LEVERETT, formerly of Saffron Waldon
County High School

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section


To Fletcher Scholarships:

ALEKSANDER ASKELAND, formerly of Lycée Pierre
Corneille, France

DAVID GEORGE HARMER BUTTERY, formerly of King's
School, Macclesfield

ROSEMARY ALICE FISHER, formerly of Prudhoe School,
Northumberland

LEO CORTLAND ALEXANDER FRANSELLA, formerly of King's
School, Canterbury

ANDREJ MACHACEK, formerly of Forest School, London

ROBIN CASPER WALKER, formerly of St Paul's School,
London

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section


To Theobald Scholarships:

SASHA BLACKMORE, formerly of City of London School for
Girls

DAVID COULLING, formerly of Tonbridge School, Kent

OLAF DUEMMER, formerly of Goetheschule, Germany

ANJOUM AZIZ NOORANI, formerly of Windsor Boys' School

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section


To Newman Scholarships:

MARTIN PATRICK CROTTY, formerly of John Hampden High
School, High Wycombe

LEON-CHIEW FOONG, formerly of Westminster School

MICHAEL KONTARATOS, formerly of Athens GCE Tutorial
College

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section


To Mouat Jones Scholarships:

NEVILLE JOSEPH EISENBERG, formerly of Haberdashers'
Aske's Boys' School

GEOFFREY CHARLES DOUGLAS SMITH, formerly of
Charterhouse

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section


To Goldsmith Scholarships:

CATHERINE MARY FREEMAN, formerly of the Perse School for
Girls, Cambridge

SARAH JOHNSON, formerly of Hills Road Sixth-form
College

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section


To a Reynolds Scholarship:

MIRA GRATIER,
formerly of European School, Brussels

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section


To a Jervis-Smith Scholarship:

SHUJI HACHISU,
formerly of Osaka International School

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section


To a Higgs Scholarship:

THOMAS RICHARD HAVELOCK,
formerly of Eton College

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section


To a James Gay Scholarship:

PHILIP BRUCE
JOCKELSON, formerly of King's College School, Wimbledon

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section


To Brackenbury Scholarships:

ANDREW STIRTON JONES, formerly of Westminster School

AAMIR IQBAL KHAN, formerly of Royal Grammar School,
High Wycombe

ANDREA THERESE LINDSAY STRUGO, formerly of the London
Oratory

CHARLES LONG, formerly of Harrow School

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section


To Hill Scholarships:

JAMES PETER MACKINTOSH, formerly of Marlwood School,
Bristol

JOE PERKINS, formerly of Nailsea School

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section


To a Lubbock Scholarship:

NEIL ROBERT MARSON,
formerly of Smestow School, Wolverhampton

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section


To a Markby Scholarship:

JACOB OWEN STEVENS,
formerly of Varndean Sixth-form College, Brighton

To a Williams Exhibition:

CLAUDIA MERCER,
formerly of Lycée Français Charles de
Gaulle, London

To an Elton Exhibition:

ALEXANDRA VICTORIA
MILLAR, formerly of Wycombe Abbey School, Buckinghamshire

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section



Brasenose College

To Open Scholarships:

ADAM J. ARMSTRONG, formerly of Coquet High School, Amble

BASILE BENOIT, formerly of Winchester College

PHOEBE R. BLACKBURN, formerly of Queen Anne's School,
Caversham

ALON G.N. CARMEL, formerly of Atlantic College

DARREN CHARLES, formerly of the Jews Free School

STEWART M. CHIRNSIDE, formerly of Eton College

GILES E. COFFEY, formerly of Whitgift School

JONATHAN P.M. CULVER, formerly of Alun School, Mold

THOMAS ELLIS, formerly of Eton College

IAN R. HENDERSON, formerly of Lymm High School

SIGRID F. HOLMWOOD, formerly of Atlantic College

ANDREW K. MACLEOD, formerly of the Royal Grammar School,
Newcastle

MARTIN T.L. SHIELDS, formerly of Banbridge Academy,
Northern Ireland

DAVID A. SIMPSON, formerly of Manchester Grammar School

NATHAN L. SMITH, formerly of Monmouth School

KATHARINE L. SYKES, formerly of Mount School, York

ROBERT J. WAY, formerly of Winchester College

MACIEJ WOZNICA, formerly of St Clare's College, Oxford

To a Junior Organ Scholarship:

CATHERINE A.
BRINDLEY, formerly of the King's High School for Girls,
Warwick

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section


To Open Exhibitions:

JOHN M. BINGHAM, formerly of Methodist College, Belfast

EMMA C. BROGAN, formerly of North London Collegiate
School

DIANA M.F. DE CABARRUS, formerly of King’s School,
Canterbury

GAVIN G.S. DHILLON, formerly of the Royal Grammar School,
Guildford

JEREMY O. HILL, formerly of Sherborne School

FENELLA A. HUNT, formerly of Stowe School

QUINTON R. MAYNE, formerly of Banbridge Academy

ALEX W. NOWACKI, formerly of Eton College

KINGSHUK PAL, formerly of Reigate Grammar School

ALEXANDRA H.V. PUMFREY, formerly of Cheltenham Ladies’
College

ELEANOR M. RADFORD, formerly of Simong Langton Girls'
School, Canterbury

RAVIV SHTAINGOS, formerly of the Jews Free School

HENRY M. TARR, formerly of Taunton School

ALEXANDER VOURLIDES, formerly of Athens GCE Tutorial
College

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section



Jesus College

To Honorary Fellowships:

THE HON. NEAL BLEWITT, AC, MA, D.PHIL., F.R.HIST.S.

SIR JOHN CARTER, MA

SIR GEOFFREY CASS, MA

PROFESSOR RICHARD J. EVANS, MA, D.PHIL., FBA,
F.R.HIST.S.

PROFESSOR NIGEL J. HITCHIN, MA, D.PHIL., FRS

DAVID T.R. LEWIS, MA

EDWIN M. YODER, MA

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section



Merton College

To Postmasterships:

EUGENE CHERN CHEE GOH, formerly of Raffles Junior College

JAMES WILLIAM REGINALD HATT, formerly of Wimbledon
College

MATTHEW DAVID NOAR, formerly of Winchester College

MISS CATHERINE TUCKER, formerly of Oxford High School

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section


To an Exhibition:

MISS CLARE CECILIA HORSMAN,
formerly of Bootham School

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section



Oriel College

To an Emeritus Fellowship:

D.J. MORRIS, MA,
D.PHIL., Fellow and Tutor in Economics 1971–98

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section


To Scholarships:

EDWARD JOHN ARGAR, formerly of the Harvey Grammar School,
Kent

DAVID LAWRENCE BREWIS, formerly of Durham Johnston
Comprehensive School, Durham

DANIEL JOHN CRISPIN, formerly of Mangotsfield
Comprehensive School, Bristol

GEOFFREY HARRISON FERRARI, formerly of the King's School,
Bruton

DAVID IAN FOLLOWS, formerly of Danum School, Doncaster

MARCUS THOMAS PIUS GILBERT, formerly of Bryanston School

BOON LENG HO, formerly of Victoria Junior College,
Singapore

KATHERINE ELIZABETH HULME, formerly of Haberdashers'
Aske's School for Girls

DAMIEN FABRICE ISLAM-FRENOY, formerly of Lycée
François, Fontainebleau, France

RICHARD ALAN JOHNSON, formerly of Bolton School, Bolton

NEIL ANTHONY KING, formerly of Charterhouse School

ANTONIA LIAN SIM LIM, formerly of Haileybury

JACOB BENEDICT LOTINGA, formerly of Bilborough College,
Nottinham

TOBY EDWARD GABRIEL MORRISH, formerly of Winchester
College

ALEXANDER STEPHEN MORRISON, formerly of Sevenoaks School

ISABELLA MARIA COELHO PEREIRA, formerly of the Grange
School, Cheshire

ALEXANDER EDWARD CHRISTIAN PICK, formerly of Radley
College

ANDREW TOBY RIGBY, formerly of King's College School,
Wimbledon

KATHARINE ELEANOR SAUNDERS, formerly of King Henry VIII
School, Abergavenny

REBECCA ROSE SAXE, formerly of Branksome Hall, Toronto,
Canada

DECLAN GERARD CHRISTOPHER SMITHIES, formerly of Canford
School, Dorset

LUCY PARMA TALLON, formerly of Downe House School

JAMES STUART WEBB, formerly of Salesian College,
Hampshire

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section


To Exhibitions:

RICHARD OLIVER LANE, formerly of Chislehurst and Sidcup
Grammar School

YEONG HEOK PNG, fomerly of Raffles Junior College,
Singapore

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section



St Hugh's College

To Bursaries:

I-CHUN SHIH (B.SC. Soochow)

JIAN XU (BA Peking, MA Princeton)

QIN JIE YANG (B.EC. Shanghai Jiao Tong)

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section


To a Dame Catherine Fulford Senior Scholarship:

EDWARD THOMAS GRAY, BA

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section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 29 October 1998: Advertisements<br />

Advertisements


Contents of this section:



How to advertise
in the Gazette

"../../../stdg/conds.htm">

Terms and conditions of
acceptance of advertisements

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issue



The Bodleian Shop

The Bodleian Christmas cards have
arrived! Six new cards and some old favourites, as well
as a big range of book-ish gifts—many
exclusive—on sale now in the Bodleian Shop, open:
Mon.–Fri., 9a.m.–6 p.m., and Sat. 9
a.m.–12.30 p.m. Find us in the entrance to the Old
Library, access from Radcliffe Square, Broad Street and
Catte Street.

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section



Oxford University Newcomers'
Club

Oxford University Newcomers' Club. The
club exists to welcome to Oxford the partners and
families of academic visitors and graduate students. Come
along to the Club rooms at 13 Norham Gardens, and sample
our programme of events and outings; we are open each
Wednesday morning, 10.30 a.m.–12 noon, from the week
before term starts to the week after term.

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section



Allotments

Marston Ferry and Blackhall Allotment
Society. Four recently-cleared allotment plots available
for cultivation in Marston Ferry Road, North Oxford.
Contact the Secretary, tel.: Oxford 556291.

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section



Tuition Offered

Piano tuition. Experienced teacher of
adults and children. All grades, beginners welcome. Contact
Miss P. Read BA (Hons) LRAM; Jericho. Tel.: Oxford
510904.

French tuition and conversation based on
grammar offered by experienced teacher. All ages, all
levels; exam-orientated or otherwise. Walton Street.
Tel.: Oxford 511897.

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section



Services Offered

Business Plan Development. If you are in
the process of setting up a new company and you believe you
could benefit from analytical support and opportunity
appraisal in the development of a high quality business
plan, a team of MBA students may be available to help you
between Jan. and Mar. 1999. In recent years, a number of
local and spin-out companies have been helped in this way.
Please contact Dr Peter Johnson at Balliol College, tel.:
Oxford (2)77754, e-mail: peter.johnson@balliol.ox.ac.uk for
information.

Woodstock bookshop: 3 Market Place,
Woodstock. Open 7 days a week. Second hand and review
copies, academic books, literature, literary criticism, and
others.

Dial A Fare Travel (Oxford): we offer a
highly-customised service on all aspects of travel;
flights, ferry, hotel, and villa holiday accommodation.
Business or leisure, we are here to take the stress out of
travel arrangements. Group bookings are a speciality.
Retail agents for ATOL holders. TTA No. T7378. Tel./fax:
Oxford 847357, e-mail: DialAFare@cwcom.net.

Oxford Booksearch: out-of-print titles, no
advance fee required, no obligation to buy. Tel.: Oxford
553501, e-mail: hensa@btinternet.com.

Translations: English–French or
English–German, by talented multi-linguist. Any text
accepted including technical. Tel.: 01993 850658, e-mail:
mallagui@yahoo.com.

Frederick and Sudabeh Hine have top
quality hand-knotted Persian carpets for disposal at
exceptionally low prices. Old Afghan carpets, marvellous
reds in classic elephant's foot design, approx. 3m x 2m and
upwards from £475. Some rugs from Iran, both old and
new, starting at £89. Distinctive Baluch runners from
around £275. Call 16 Linton Road, North Oxford, but
please ring first, tel.: Oxford 559396.

Shipping? Abyssinia to Zanzibar, New
York to Newmarket. Today, tomorrow, next week? All the
best options are at Mail Boxes Etc. Will collect from
college, home, factory, or elsewhere. Also 24-hour
photocopying, secure mailboxes, computer workstation,
high-grade colour photocopying, faxing, laminating,
binding, etc. 266 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2
7DL. Contact Justin Brookes. Tel.: Oxford 514655, fax:
514656, e-mail: summertown@020.mbe.uk.com.

Tax advice. Ex-KPMG Chartered Accountant
specialises in assisting professionals and small
businesses with tax problems including self-assessment.
Convenient North Oxford premises. To receive further
information please tel.: Oxford 513381, e-mail:
100430.145@compuserve.com.

Oxuniprint, Oxford University
Press—the University Printers: specialising in
booklet and publicity material, typesetting, printing,
and finishing. Output Bureau provides high-quality output
from disc from all major DTP programs onto paper,
bromide, colour-separated positive or negative film;
high-quality specialist colour copier service. For
service, quality, and competitive prices contact
Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press, Great Clarendon
Street, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 514691, fax: 514010.

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section



Domestic Services

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by
Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work,
competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also
carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy
cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning.
For free estimates and friendly advice, call
Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford 726983 or Abingdon 555533.

Nanny: central Oxford. Live-out,
experienced, mature nanny required for two-family job
share. No overlap between families. Potential for part-
or full-time work. Contact Mrs Fischer for details, tel.:
Oxford 514894.

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section



Situations Vacant

St Clare's, Oxford: Alumni Relations
Assistant (part-time, to begin as soon as possible). Hours
approximately 8 p.w., timing can be to suit the person
appointed (school terms only may be arranged). Work will
involve keeping the database up-to-date. Good
organisational skills, initiative, and ability to work
independently required. Pay negotiable. For frther details,
please contact Maria Andews, Office Manager, St Clare's,
Oxford, 139 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 7AL. Tel.: Oxford
552031, fax: 310002, internet:
http://www.stclares.ac.uk.

The Bodleian Library offers daily tours of
its historic buildings by volunteer guides. Full training
is given. If you have up to 2 hours p.w. to give, please
contact Dr Judith Thomas, Assistant Secretary to the
Library. Tel.: Oxford (2)77224 or (2)77188, fax: (2)77189,
e-mail: judith.thomas@bodley.ox.ac.uk.

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section



Houses to Let

Fully-furnished Victorian house, with
c.h., close to the centre. Five bedrooms, sitting-room,
dining-room, bathroom, 2 showers; available now. Contact
Mrs Ann White, tel.: Oxford 512865, fax: 310264.

Charming 18th-c. cottage, 7 miles north
Oxford. Two double bedrooms. Living room, open fire.
Bathroom, w.c., bath, shower. Utility room, washing
machine, tumble drier. Kitchen, microwave, fridge/freezer,
dishwasher. Secluded garden, off-street parking. £850
p.m. Tel.: 0181 248 6434 (evenings).

Attractive 3-bedroom furnished house with
attic study, c.h., and garden, south of Hinksey Park and 20
minutes' walk from Carfax, for rent from mid-November.
£850 p.c.m. plus utilities. Tel.: Oxford 240673 or
0171 8329211.

Fully-furnished, large, 4-bedroom family
house on side of road in North central Oxford. Available
for rental for whole/part period Jan.–Mar. 1999.
£1,200 p.c.m. For more details, tel.: Oxford 553247
(evenings).

Summertown: 4-bedroom partly-furnished
detached house, available immediately until mid-April 1999
(negotiable). Convenient location, garage, garden. Suit
couple with 1 or 2 children. No smokers or groups. Rent
£950 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 283504, e-mail:
rpb@comlab.ox.ac.uk.

Short let, central North Oxford. Lovely
detached house, light and spacious, furnished with all mod.
cons including c.h. Four bedrooms, 2 reception,
kitchen/dining room, 2 off-street parking spaces, large
private garden. Walking distance to shops, community
centre, university buildings, and indoor pool. Available 14
Dec. 1998–10 Jan. 1999. Tel.: Oxford 513321 (home) or
284238 (work).

Two-bedroom Victorian terrace, Iffley
Fields. House with great character and interesting decor,
owned by two artists. Two reception rooms, large kitchen,
large bathroom, c.h., garden. Quiet, friendly
neighbourhood. Available 18 Dec. 1998–25 Mar. 1999.
£675 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 727269.

Converted period farm cottage: 3 bedrooms,
garages, beautiful 1.8 acre garden with small orchard and
own wood and brook, adjacent to fields and woodland, 400
yards from the Headington roundabout. Very well maintained,
fully furnished; c.h. Ideal for visiting academic. Rent
£1,000 p.m. Please contact Jeanne Packer, tel.: Oxford
220970.

Make finding accommodation a pleasure,
not a chore. Finders Keepers is dedicated to making it
easy for visitors to Oxford to find the right property.
Browse through our Web site for up-to-date detailed
information on properties available and make use of our
interactive database, priority reservation service
(credit cards accepted), welcome food pack, personal
service, and much more. Call us and you will not need to
go elsewhere. For further information contact Finders
Keepers, 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE. Tel.: Oxford
311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk;
Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

An Englishman's home is his
castle—so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we
have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking
quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding
area we may be able to help. QB Management is one of
Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in
lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other
professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and
most helpful service in Oxford. Visit our Web site at:
http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the
properties that we have currently available to let.
Alternatively, telephone, fax, or e-mail us with details
of your requirements and we will do whatever we can
without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 764533, fax: 764777, e-
mail: info@qbman.co.uk.

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section



Flats to Let

Central North Oxford: 10 minutes' walk
from city centre, all main university buildings, and parks,
and very close to the river. Available Dec. for short/long
let, 2 exceptionally well-furnished and comfortable flats
in extremely quiet, civilised, large Victorian house in
this exclusive, leafy, residential Victorian suburb, with
large, light, airy rooms. (1) First-floor: double bedroom,
drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom; (2) ground-floor: 1
double, 1 single bedroom, drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom.
Off-street parking; large secluded garden. Regret no
children or pets. Tel./fax: Oxford 552400.

Large, 1-bedroom, modern, ground-floor
flat, close to Summertown. Fully furnished with well-
equipped kitchen, gas c.h., and shower. Off-street parking.
Would suit single person or couple. £595 p.c.m. Tel.:
Oxford 514340 (day or evening).

Pleasant and peaceful flat to rent in
Great Milton for one or two people. One bedroom, bathroom,
large living area, kitchen, w.c. Available Jan. 1999. Suit
visiting scholar, quiet tenant essential. Regret no
children or pets. Non-smokers please. Tel.: 01844 279202
(evenings).

Two separate flats available unfirnished
in wing of country house, 7 miles from Oxford. Each has 2
bedrooms and large living-room, with well-fitted kitchen.
Lovely outlook and use of common gardens. Rent £695
and £895 p.c.m. respectively. Please tel.: 01869
350236 and leave message, or fax: 351119.

High-quality, fully-furnished, ground-
floor flat. One double and 1 single bedroom/study.
Sitting/dining room, kitchen, bathroom, c.h., garage.
£725 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 331289.

Summertown: modern self-contained first-
floor flat. Two bedrooms, third bedroom/study/dining-room,
large sitting-room, bathroom with separate shower cubicle,
kitchen/diner, all mod. cons. Double glazed, fully
carpeted, linen provided, parking space, gardens all round.
Available now. Tel.: Oxford 515301.

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Accommodation Offered

Non-smoking female professional to share
large furnished period house in centre of Woodstock, with
existing female tenant. Available immediately. Rent
£415 p.c.m. plus bills. Tel.: 01993 813929.

Stanton St John. Spacious and interesting,
newly-converted, self-contained annexe, with own front
door, parking, garage (possible), c.h. One double bedroom,
living-room, dining area, kitchen, bathroom, separate study
area, no garden. Suit single mature student(s)/couple; no
children or pets. Rent £600 p.c.m. plus gas. Tel.:
Oxford 351566 for details.

Bed-and-breakfast available in the warm
comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple in
exclusive, leafy, central North Oxford; within easy
walking distance of the city centre and all main
university buildings; a stone's throw from the river,
parks, excellent pubs and restaurants and a 9–9
corner shop. All rooms have colour TV, microwave, tea-
and coffee-making facilities, c.h., and independent
heating. Refrigerators available. Very moderate terms.
Tel./fax: Oxford 557879, mobile: 0374 434489.

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section



Accommodation Sought

Academic family seeks furnished 4-bedroom
North Oxford/Summertown or other Oxford area home for 3
months, Apr.–June 1999. Please reply to Steve
Mashnick, tel. (USA): 734 647 2406, e-mail:
meshnick@umich.edu.

House wanted for rent for 1 week only by
a professional family of 5 during the Christmas holidays.
Either in Oxford or the surrounding countryside. References
provided. Tel.: 01628 418647.

Mallams Residential Letting is well
placed to help with your letting and management
requirements. Based in Summertown, we offer a
professional service tailored to your individual
requirements. If you are thinking of letting your
property, please call us. Tel.: Oxford 311006, fax:
311977.

Finders Keepers specialises in managing
your home or investment. We have celebrated 25 years in
Oxford letting and managing properties—try us first!
Many of our landlords have remained with us since we
opened and are delighted with our service—why not
pop in and read their comments? Contact Finders Keepers,
73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE. Tel.: Oxford 311011,
fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk, Internet site:
http://www.finders.co.uk.

Going abroad? Or just thinking of
letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's
foremost letting agents and property managers. We
specialise in lettings to both academic and professional
individuals and their families, and have a constant flow
of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property
in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our
services, or if you simply need some informal help and
advice without obligation, telephone us: Oxford 764533,
fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk.
Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site
at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be
marketing your property.

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section



Holiday Lets

France: Entre-deux-Mers, St Emilion 15 km.
Chambres d'hôtes (B&B) in renovated 18th-c. wine-
growing property. Three rooms all with en
suite
bathroom. Anglo-French hosts, open all year.
Evening meal by arrangement. Morris, tel./fax: 00 30 557 84
69 08.

Windrush valley: detached garden cottage
available next to Minster Lovell Church. Holiday lets.
Tel.: 01993 775630.

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section



House for Sale

Upper Wolvercote, Oxford: sunny house in
elevated position with garage and large pretty garden.
Semi-detached with 3 bedrooms and small study. Upstairs
bathroom and w.c.; kitchen/dining-room, living-room,
conservatory, downstairs w.c. Extremely convenient location
on bus route, in village atmosphere close to Port Meadow
and city with its amenities. Tel.: Oxford 451770.

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section



Properties for sale at Oxford
Waterside

Central North Oxford/Jericho.
Classically styled homes built by nationally renowned
quality house-builders, Berkeley Homes. Properties
available include: 2-bedroom apartments from
£118,500; 3-bedroom, 2-bathroom houses from
£169,500; 4-bedroom, 3-storey houses with garages
from £275,000. Marketing suite and show homes open
daily, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 311449, or
726000/515000 (joint selling agents, Savills and Thomas
Merrifield).

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section






<br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette: Diary, 30 October<br /> - 10 November

Diary


Contents of this section:

Academic Staff
Development Seminars
: places should be booked in advance
through
the Staff Development Office, University Offices,
Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

For the full list of courses, see the HREF="http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/training/">Staff Development
ProgrammeWeb site.

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Contents Page of this issue



Friday 30 October

MAISON FRANÇAISE meeting, 9.30 a.m.: `Action
collective et intégration européenne'
(continues tomorrow; tel. for details: (2)74220).

DR M. YOUNG: `Insider/covert research in the police'
(Ethnicity and Identity Seminar: `The identity of the
fieldworker—"me" and
others' "me" '), Institute of Social and Cultural
Anthropology, 11 a.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Some saints for All
Saints Day', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for
bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

LORD BINGHAM OF CORNHILL: `The future of the common
law' (Chatham Lecture), Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St
Cross Building, 5 p.m.

M. LEIGH (European Commission): `European Union
enlargement---prospects and problems: the Czech
Republic', European Studies Centre (70 Woodstock Road), 5
p.m.

THE ALLEGRI STRING QUARTET perform works by Beethoven,
Stravinsky, and Schubert, Holywell Music Room, 8 p.m.
(tickets, £8 (£6/£4 concessions), from the
Playhouse, Beaumont Street, or at the door).

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section



Sunday 1 November

DR JANET WILLIAMS preaches, University College, 10 a.m.

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section



Monday 2 November

PROFESSOR AMOS OZ (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor): `On
the beginning of The Autumn of the Patriarch
by G. Garcia Marquez' (lecture series: `The story begins:
studying the opening sections of masterpieces in
literature'), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR W.H. JACKSON: `Name and culture in the Tristan
Romances: Gottfried and Thomas' (lecture), Taylor
Institution, 5 p.m.

DR B. WREN MAINE: `Hymns as theological poetry: the
heritage of Isaac Watts (1674--1748)' (Isaac Watts
Memorial Lecture), St Columba's Church, Alfred Street, 8
p.m.

MAISON FRANÇAISE meeting, 8.15 p.m.:
`Connaissance du Périgord--- présentation
et dégustation' (with Jean Roux, Etienne Roux,
Jonathan Hill, and Professor Denis Noble) (tel. for
details: (2)74220).

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section



Tuesday 3 November

THE MEETING of Congregation, due to take place today, is
cancelled.
s

ACADEMIC STAFF Development Seminar: `Time management',
9.30 a.m. (see information
above
).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Gunpower, treason, and
plot', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings:
(2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

CLINICAL MEDICINE Faculty Board election, 12 November
(one ordinary member): nominations by six electors to be
received at the University Offices by 4 p.m.

MUSIC Faculty Board election, 12 November (one
ordinary member): nominations by six electors to be
received at the University Offices by 4 p.m.

PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES Faculty Board election, 12
November (one ordinary member): nominations by six
electors to be received at the University Offices by 4
p.m.

SOCIAL STUDIES Faculty Board election, 12 November
(one official member): nominations by six electors to be
received at the University Offices by 4 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. COLEMAN: `Pragmatism, naturalism, and
coherentism in legal theory' (Clarendon Law Lectures:
`Legal philosophy at the end of the millennium'),
Schools, 5 p.m.

DR J. PISCATORI: `Religion in the study of politics'
(interdisciplinary seminars: `Methodological approaches
to the study of religions'), Christ Church, 5 p.m.

R. LÖFSTEADT: `The social dimension of risk
management' (Oxford Centre for the Environment, Ethics,
and Society seminar), Council Room, Main Building,
Mansfield, 5 p.m.

J.-P. SARRAZAC: `Comment écrivent les auteurs
de thêatre en France aujourd'hui?' (lecture series:
`Thêatre et littérature, mots et images'),
Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

SIR RICHARD B. SYKES: `Medicines, morals, and money:
the high ground and the bottom line' (Radcliffe Lecture),
Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 6 p.m.

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Wednesday 4 November

ASHMOLEAN LIBRARY closed (today only).

TAYLOR INSTITUTION LIBRARY closed (today only).

INSTITUTE OF ARCHAEOLOGY closed (today only).

ORIENTAL INSTITUTE and Eastern Art Libraries closed
(today only).

PROFESSOR G. GILBERT: `The Northern Ireland Peace
Agreement: minority rights and self-determination'
(Refugee Studies Programme: Seminars on Forced
Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth
House, 5 p.m.

JUDITH WEIR: `Is contemporary music still possible?'
(public lecture series: `The composer speaks'), Denis
Arnold Hall, Music Faculty, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. MOMMAERS: `Jan van Ruusbroec and
Christocentric mysticism' (Martin D'Arcy Lectures: `The
riddle of Christian mystical experience: the role of the
humanity of Jesus'), Schools, 5 p.m.

VALERIO MAGRELLI: `Tradizione dell'avanguardia o
avanguardia della tradizione' (poetry reading, with Jamie
Mackendrick), ground-floor lecture room, 47 Wellington
Square, 5 p.m. (Note: meeting to be held in
47 Wellington Square—not in Taylor Institution.)

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Thursday 5 November

ANN DUMMETT: `Nationality and human rights' (Centre for
Cross-Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Gender,
change, and human rights'), Library Seminar Room, Queen
Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

DR S. PATTIE: `New homeland for an old diaspora? The
Armenian world in transition' (ESRC Research Programme on
Transnational Communities—seminars: `Globalisation
and the "old" diasporas'), Senior Common Room, School of
Geography, 2 p.m.

R. MCKECHNIE: `Ageing, fertility, and
sexuality---personal meanings of menstrual losses'
(Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology seminars:
`Youth, fertility, and reproductive health'), Lecture
Room, 61 Banbury Road, 4.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR AMOS OZ (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor): `On
the beginning of Nobody Said Anything by
Raymond Carver' (lecture series: `The story begins:
studying the opening sections of masterpieces in
literature'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR G. BOWERSOCK: `Tacitus and Pushkin' (Ronald
Syme Lecture), the Hall, Wolfson, 5 p.m.

THE RT. HON. BARONESS YOUNG OF FARNWORTH, DL: `Is half
the population underrepresented? A look at local
government and Parliament' (St Hilda's College Lectures:
`Women in Westminster'), Jacqueline du Pré
Building, St Hilda's, 5.30 p.m.
(Note: details of time and place,
given in current Special Lecture List, are
incorrect
.)

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Friday 6 November

PROFESSOR J. OKELY: `The fieldworker—age, ethnicity,
and era' (Ethnicity and Identity Seminar: `The identity
of the fieldworker—"me" and others' "me" '),
Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `East meets West:
Greece and Ganhara', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel.
for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

DR B. YORKE: `The secular context of early Anglo-Saxon
nunneries' (James Ford Special Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

H.E. F. NORDMANN (Swiss Ambassador): `European Union
enlargement---prospects and problems: Switzerland',
European Studies Centre (70 Woodstock Road), 5 p.m.

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Saturday 7 November

DEGREE CEREMONIES, Sheldonian, 11.30 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.

MAISON FRANÇAISE meeting, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.:
`Les enjeux de La Parité aujourd'hui' (Association
for the Study of Modern and Contemporary France) (tel.
for details: (2)74220).

TRANSLATION RESEARCH in Oxford meeting: `Translating
the text and context: vernacular, dialect, minority
language, and the stage', St Hugh's, 9.15 a.m.–5
p.m. (tel. Edith McMorran for details: (2)74996 or
(2)74222; e-mail: maison@sable.ox.ac.uk).

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Sunday 8 November

THE REVD ANGELA TILBY preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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Monday 9 November

ACADEMIC STAFF Development Seminar: `Information
overload: beat the bumph', 9.15 a.m. ( HREF="#seminars">see information above).

EDWARD SAID: `The political and moral consequences of
1948' (Middle East Centre seminar series:
`1948—founding myths and original sins'), Schools, 5
p.m.

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Tuesday 10 November

THE REVD JOHN DAVIES preaches the Court Sermon,
Cathedral, 10.15 a.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The Pre-Raphaelites',
1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015,
9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

ACADEMIC STAFF DEVELOPMENT SEMINARS: `Improving
students' study skills', 9.30 a.m.; `Funding and
finance', 2 p.m. (see information
above
).

J. KENNETH BLACKWELL: Lecture to celebrate the
fiftieth anniversary of the University Declaration of
Human Rights, Schools, 5 p.m.

S. SHACKLEY and E. Darier: `Climate encounters: focus
group discussions on climate change and its relation to
local environmental issues in the north- west of England'
(Oxford Centre for the Environment, Ethics, and Society
seminar), Council Room, Main Building, Mansfield, 5 p.m.

D. BRADBY: `News from the front: five new French
playwrights' (lecture series: `Thêatre et
littérature, mots et images'), Maison
Française, 5.15 p.m.

DR I. SCARGILL: `The landscape of Oxford's Green Belt'
(Hoskins Lecture), Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, St
Anne's, 5.30 p.m.

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