29 April 1999 - No 4509

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<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 129, No. 4509: 29 April 1999<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

29 April 1999


The following supplement was published
with this Gazette:

Appointments


University Health and
Safety
information


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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 29 April 1999: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 26 April


Degree by Special Resolution

No notice to the contrary having been received under the
provisions
of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1995, p. 13),
the
following resolution is deemed to have been approved at noon on
26
April.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the
following:

STANLEY JAN ULIJASZEK, St Cross College

EILEEN WYATT, Lady Margaret Hall

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section



HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL 26 April


1 Decrees

Council has made the following decrees, to come into effect on
14
May.

List of the decrees:



Decree (1): Constitution of the
Committee on
Student Health and of the Executive Subcommittee for the
Management
of the University Counselling Service

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Committee
on
Student Health and with the concurrence of the Conference of
Colleges, introduces standard periods of office for certain
members
of the Committee on Student Health and introduces formal
provision
for the membership and terms of reference of the Executive
Subcommittee for the Management of the University Counselling
Service. Opportunity is taken also to make minor amendments to
the
provisions for the Committee on Student Health to reflect current
activities.

Text of Decree (1)

1 In Ch. III, Sect. LXXVII
(Statutes, 1997, p. 343), above cl. 1 insert:

`§ 1. Committee on Student Health'.

2 Ibid., delete cl. 2 and substitute:

`2. The periods of office of the members of the committee
appointed
by Council, the Conference of Colleges, and the Association of
Oxford
College Medical Officers shall be three years in the first
instance,
renewable for a further period of three years but not normally
renewable beyond a total period of six years; provided always
that
casual vacancies shall be filled for the unexpired period of
office
of the person being replaced. The periods of office of the
remaining
appointed members of the committee shall be determined at the
time of
their appointment by the bodies appointing them.'

3 lbid., insert new cl. 4 as follows and
renumber existing cll. 4–6 as cll. 5–7:

`4. The committee shall meet at least once in each term.'

4 lbid., delete cl. 5 (as renumbered) and
substitute:

`5. The committee shall have oversight of the provision of
arrangements for the health of students based on the college
doctor
system.'

5 Ibid., cl. 7 (as renumbered), delete
`the
Curators of the University Chest' and substitute `Council'.

6 lbid., delete existing cl. 7.

7 Ibid., insert § 2:

`§ 2. Executive Subcommittee for the Management of the
University Counselling Service

There shall be an Executive Subcommittee for the Management of
the
University Counselling Service consisting of:

(1) a member of the Committee on Student Health appointed by
the
committee to act as chairman of the subcommittee;

(2) the member of the Committee on Student Health appointed
by the
Association of Oxford College Medical Officers;

(3), (4) two other members of the Committee on Student Health
appointed by the committee;

(5), (6) two persons appointed by, but not necessarily being
members of, the Committee on Student Health who hold, or have
held,
tutorial or pastoral responsibilities in a college of the
University.

The chairman of the subcommittee shall hold office for an initial
period of three years, renewable for one further and final period
of
three years, and the periods of office of the appointed members
of
the subcommittee shall be three years, renewable for a further
period
of three years but not normally renewable beyond a total of six
years; provided always that casual vacancies shall be filled for
the
unexpired period of office of the person being replaced.

The Committee on Student Health shall, at the beginning of each
academic year, set policy objectives for the subcommittee,
including
those relating to the operation, staffing, and finances of the
University Counselling Service, and shall delegate responsibility
for
executive decisions to the subcommittee, save those which involve
a
requirement for additional funding. The subcommittee shall report
in
writing to the Committee on Student Health immediately after each
meeting; meetings shall be held at least once in each term.'

8 This decree shall be effective from 1
October 1999, provided that the introduction of standard periods
of
appointment for certain members of the Committee on Student
Health
shall be applied at the end of the current period of office of
each
relevant member. The initial periods of office of the members of
the
Executive Subcommittee for the Management of the University
Counselling Service shall be so varied as to procure a regular
rotation of subsequent appointments.

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section



Decree (2): Electors to statutory posts
who
wish to become candidates

Explanatory note

Under the existing legislation governing elections to statutory
posts, there is provision for an elector to be replaced if he or
she
wishes to become a candidate for the post concerned, but there
is
nothing to preclude an elector from resigning in order to become
a
candidate after he or she has seen the applications which have
been
submitted by other candidates before the published closing date.
Council thinks that such a situation would be undesirable and
that it
should be formally precluded. The following decree provides
accordingly.

Text of Decree (2)

In Ch. VII, Sect. I, § 1 (Statutes, 1997, p.
373),
delete cl. 6 and substitute:

`6. An elector may resign from an electoral board in order to
offer
himself or herself as a candidate for the vacant office, provided
either that he or she does so before the published closing date
for
the receipt of applications, or that he or she is invited after
that
date by the other electors to do so. If an elector resigns in
such
circumstances, Council shall nominate a person to act in his or
her
place for the remainder of the proceedings to fill the vacancy.'

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section



Decree (3): Vere Harmsworth Library
Acquisitions Endowment Fund

Explanatory note

The following decree accepts a most generous benefaction from
Nigel
and Helen Lovett for the support of the Vere Harmsworth Library
of
the Rothermere American Institute, to be used for the acquisition
of
library materials.

Text of Decree (3)

In Ch. IX, Sect. I, § 27 (Statutes, 1997, p.
606,
as renumbered by Decree (3) of 4 March 1999,
Gazette, p.
824), above `Winstedt Bequest' insert:

`Vere Harmsworth Library Acquisitions Endowment Fund

1. The University accepts with gratitude an endowment from
Nigel
and Helen Lovett, together with any further sums contributed for
the
same purpose, to establish a fund, to be known as the Vere
Harmsworth
Library Acquisitions Endowment Fund, the net income of which
shall be
used for the acquisition of library materials in the Vere
Harmsworth
Library of the Rothermere American Institute.

2. The fund shall be administered by the Curators of the
Bodleian
Library. [1] The curators shall have power to delegate
expenditure to
the Director of University Library Services and Bodley's
Librarian,
such delegation to be reviewed on an annual basis when the
director
shall report to the curators all exercises of his or her
delegated
authority.

3. Income not spent in any year shall be carried forward for
expenditure in subsequent years.

4. This decree may be altered from time to time, provided
always
that the main object of the fund, as defined in clause 1 above,
is
adhered to.'

[1] See Appendix to Title VIII.

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section



Decree (4): Responsibility for the
examination of graduate taught courses

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the General
Board, clarifies the responsibility for the examination of
graduate
taught courses (where this is not already clear) by listing
courses
and responsible bodies in the main part of the relevant decrees.

Text of Decree (4)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
540, l. 21, delete `:' and substitute `. The bodies specified
below
shall be responsible for the supervision of the examinations as
listed.'

2 Ibid, p. 717, l. 1, after `by
Coursework.'
insert `The examinations for the degree and the bodies
responsible
for the supervision of each examination are listed below.


Examination                               Body

Applied Social Studies                    Social Studies
Applied Statistics                        Mathematical Sciences
Archaeological Science                    Committee for        
                                            Archaeology
Biology (Integrative Bioscience)          Biological Sciences
Comparative Social Research               Social Studies
Computation                               Mathematical Sciences
Diagnostic Imaging                        Clinical Medicine
Economic and Social History               Modern History
Economics for Development                 Social Studies
Educational Research Methodology          Committee for        
                                            Educational
                                            Studies
Educational Studies                       Committee for        
                                            Educational
                                            Studies
Engineering Science                       Physical Sciences
Environmental Change and Management       Anthropology and
Geography
Evidence-based Health Care                Clinical             
                                           Medicine/Committee
                                           for Continuing      
                                           Education
Forestry and its Relation to Land Use     Biological Sciences
Geometry, Mathematical Physics,           Mathematical Sciences
  and Analysis
History of Science: Instruments,          Modern History
  Museums, Science, Technology
Human Biology Biological Sciences
Industrial Relations and Human            Management
  Resource Management
International Relations Research          Social Studies
Management Research                       Management
Material Anthropology and Museum          Anthropology and     
Ethnography                                  Geography      
Mathematical Modelling and                Mathematical Sciences
  Numerical Analysis
Mathematics and Foundations               Mathematical Sciences
  of Computer Science
Neuroscience                              Physiological Sciences/
                                          Psychological Studies
Politics Research                         Social Studies
Public Policy in Latin America            Committee for Latin-
                                          American Studies
Social Anthropology                       Anthropology and
Geography
Sociology                                 Social Studies
Software Engineering                      Mathematical Sciences/
                                            Committee for      
                                            Continuing
                                            Education
Theoretical Chemistry                     Physical Sciences'.

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section



Decree (5): Change of title of the
M.Phil.,
M.Sc., and Diploma in Ethnology and Museum Ethnography

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Anthropology
and Geography Board and with the concurrence of the General
Board,
replaces the title `Ethnology' for the relevant postgraduate
qualifications with the more contemporary designation `Material
Anthropology'.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in `Examinations
and
Boards' below.

Text of Decree (5)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
541, l. 4, delete `Ethnology' and substitute `Material
Anthropology'.

2 Ibid., p. 943, l. 10, delete `ETHNOLOGY'
and
substitute `MATERIAL ANTHROPOLOGY'.

3 Ibid., l. 14 and p. 944, ll. 16 and 19,
in
each case delete `Ethnology' and substitute `Material
Anthropology'.

4 This decree shall be effective from 1
October 1999.

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section



Decree (6): Establishment of M.St. and
M.Sc.
by Coursework in Archaeological Science

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Committee
for
Archaeology and with the concurrence of the General Board,
establishes a course in Archaeological Science for the Degree of
Master of Studies and for the Degree of Master of Science by
Coursework. These courses are intended to exploit Oxford's
strengths
in Archaeological Science. Examination will be by written papers,
thesis, and viva.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in `Examinations
and
Boards' below.

Text of Decree (6)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
653, after l. 23 insert:

`Archaeological Science     Committee for Archaeology'.

2 Ibid., p. 1037, l. 17, delete `.' and
substitute `;'.

3 Ibid., after l. 17 insert:

`in Archaeological Science for one examination.'

4 Ibid., p. 1041, l. 11, after
`Archaeology,'
insert `Archaeological Science,'.

5 Ibid., l. 14, delete `examination' and
substitute `examinations'.

6 Ibid., l. 15, after `Engineering
Science'
insert `and in Archaeological Science'.

7 This decree shall be effective from 1
October 1999.

Key to Decree (6)

Cl. 1 inserts Archaeological Science into the list of
examinations
for the degree of M.St.

Cll. 2--6 provide for the length of time examiners may serve.

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section



Decree (7): Rationalisation of graduate
degrees in Modern Languages

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Modern
Languages Board and with the concurrence of the General Board,
creates a single entry point for the majority of Modern Languages
graduate students, by abolishing the existing M.St. in Research
Methods in Modern Languages.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in `Examinations
and
Boards' below.

Text of Decree (7)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
654, delete ll. 34--5.

2 This decree shall be effective from 1
October 1999.

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section



Decree (8): Appointment direct to the
retiring age (Professor E. Sim)

Notwithstanding the provisions of Ch. VII, Sect. IV, § 3,
cl. 3
(i) (Statutes, 1997, p. 523), E. Sim, MA, D.Phil.,
Fellow of St Peter's College, Wellcome Lecturer in
Immunotoxicology,
and titular Professor of Pharmacology, is appointed as University
Lecturer in Pharmacology from 1 October 1999 to the retiring age.

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section



2 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts
under
the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. v, cl. 1 (Statutes,
1997,
p. 367) has been accorded to the following person who is
qualified
for membership of Congregation:

CHALOKA SYAKATUKULA BEYANI, D.PHIL., Wolfson College

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section



3 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been
added
to the Register of Congregation:

Beyani, C.S., MA status, D.Phil., Wolfson

Swain, S.C.R., MA, D.Phil., All Souls

Ulijaszek, S.J., MA, St Cross

Wyatt, E., MA, Lady Margaret Hall

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CONGREGATION 27 April

1 Declaration of approval of General Resolution

That this House:

1

(a) take note of the Proctors'
finding that a member of the University used unfair means in an
examination for the Degree of Master of Philosophy; and

(b) accept the Proctors' conclusion that the
appropriate
penalty in this case would be deprivation of the degree;

2 therefore agree to deprive the member
concerned of the Degree of Master of Philosophy, and instruct
Council
to determine by decree the procedure for de-gradation to be
followed
in this case.

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section


2 Approval of Special Resolution nemine
contradicente

That the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. III, cl. 7 and Sect. V,
cll. 6,
8, and 9 (Statutes, 1997, pp. 8, 11, 12;
Examination Decrees, 1998, pp. 1126, 1129) be
suspended;
and that a division be taken and a postal vote be subsequently
held
on each of General Resolutions (1)--(13) which are on the agenda
for
the meeting of Congregation on 11 May 1999 (Gazette,
p.
986), whether or not any notice of opposition or proposed
amendment
to the general resolution has been given by noon on 3 May 1999.

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section



BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect
on
14 May, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

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section





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 29 April 1999: University Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 3 May


Degree by Special Resolution

The following special resolution will be deemed to be approved
at
noon on 3 May, unless by that time the Registrar has received
notice
in writing from two or more members of Congregation under the
provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes,
1997,
p. 15) that they wish the resolution to be put to a meeting of
Congregation.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the
following:

LESLEY ELEANOR FORBES, St Cross College

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section



CONGREGATION 18 May 2 p.m.

¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that written
notice of
any intention to vote against, or any proposed amendment to, the
general resolution at item 1 below, or any intention to vote
against
the special resolution at item 2 below, signed in either case by
at
least two members of Congregation, must be given to the Registrar
by
noon on Monday, 10 May (see the Guide to Procedures in
Congregation
cited in the note below).

1 Voting on General
Resolution approving new
University Mission Statement

[See Gazette 2 April 1999]



2 Voting on Special Resolution
authorising
expenditure from the Higher Studies Fund

That the Curators of the University Chest be authorised to expend
from the unearmarked part of the Higher Studies Fund such sum,
initially estimated at £80K, as is necessary to cover the
cost
of a postdoctoral research assistant post in the Department of
Materials for a period of three years.

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section



DEGREE DAYS 1999–2001

Ceremonies will be held in the Sheldonian Theatre for the purpose
of
granting graces and conferring degrees on the days shown
below.

All ceremonies except those on 2 October 1999 and 30 September
2000
will be divided, the first part commencing at 11.30 a.m., and the
second part at 2.30 p.m. The ceremonies on 2 October 1999 and 30
September 2000 will commence at 2.30 p.m.

Trinity Term and Long Vacation 1999

1 May

22 May

12 June

17 July

31 July

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section


Michaelmas Term 1999

2 October (afternoon only)

23 October

6 November

27 November

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section


Hilary Term 2000

4 March

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section


Trinity Term and Long Vacation 2000

6 May

27 May

17 June

22 July

5 August

30 September (afternoon only)

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section


Michaelmas Term 2000

21 October

4 November

25 November

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section


Hilary Term 2001

3 March

Trinity Term and Long Vacation 2001

28 April

19 May

9 June

14 July

28 July

Special ceremonies will be held during the mornings of
2 October 1999 and 30 September 2000 for the purpose of granting
graces and conferring degrees on persons who have not been
matriculated by the University.

Names of candidates must be entered, through the authorities of
a
college or other society, with the Head Clerk, University
Offices,
Wellington Square, not later than 12 noon on the Wednesday ten
days
before the ceremony.

The doors of the Sheldonian Theatre will normally be open to
visitors
three-quarters of an hour before the commencement of the
ceremony.

Tickets will be required by visitors, and will be issued through
the
authorities of the colleges and other societies.

Degree days will also be deemed to have been held on 22 January
2000
and 20 January 2001 for the purpose of conferring degrees in
absence.
Names of candidates should be entered in accordance with the
usual
provisions for degree ceremonies.

Ceremonies will also be held, exceptionally, on Friday, 1 October
1999 at 11.30 a.m. and 2.30 p.m. for candidates from Exeter
College,
Keble College, Lady Margaret Hall, New College, Pembroke College,
and
St Hilda's College.

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section



MATRICULATION CEREMONIES 1999–2001

Trinity Term 1999

17 June

Michaelmas Term 1999

16 October

2 December

Hilary Term 2000

9 March

Trinity Term 2000

22 June

Michaelmas Term 2000

14 October

30 November

Hilary Term 2001

8 March

Trinity Term 2001

14 June

The times of the ceremonies on 16 October 1999 and 14 October
2000,
which will be held in the Sheldonian Theatre, will be sent to
colleges individually; other ceremonies will normally be held at
12.30 p.m. in Convocation House.

Mr Vice-Chancellor regrets that because of the large number of
candidates involved, visitors cannot be admitted to matriculation
ceremonies.

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section





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 29 April 1999: Notices<br />

Notices


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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ROUSE BALL PROFESSORSHIP OF MATHEMATICS

PHILIP CANDELAS, D.PHIL. (BA Cambridge), Professor, Department
of
Physics, University of Texas at Austin, has been appointed to the
professorship with effect from 1 September 1999.

Professor Candelas will be a fellow of Wadham College.

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section



ACTION RESEARCH PROFESSORSHIP OF
CLINICAL
NEUROLOGY

GEORGE CORNELL EBERS (MD Toronto), Professor, Department of
Clinical
Neurological Sciences, University Hospital, University of Western
Ontario, has been appointed to the professorship with effect from
1
August 1999.

Professor Ebers will be a fellow of St Edmund Hall.

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section



RECONFERMENT OF TITLE OF VISITING
PROFESSOR

On the recommendation of the relevant faculty board, the General
Board has reconferred the title of Visiting Professor in
Pharmacology
on L.L. IVERSEN (BA, PH.D. Cambridge), FRS, Director and Founder
of
Panos Therapeutics Ltd., for the period until 30 September 2003.

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S.E. WILSON SCHOLARSHIP IN FORESTRY

The Scholarship has been awarded to G. PFETSCHER, Linacre
College.

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section



UNIVERSITIES SUPERANNUATION SCHEME (USS)


Report and Accounts for the year ended
31
March 1998

The Report and Accounts for the year ended 31 March 1998 has been
published and copies of the full document, or an abridged version
in
leaflet form, may be obtained on application to the
Superannuation
Office, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD
(telephone: Oxford (2)70156/(2)80675).

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section



LANGUAGE CENTRE


Intensive weekend language courses

The Language Centre will be running weekend language courses in
Trinity Term 1999. Each course will consist of eight hours of
tuition
with an emphasis on speaking and listening to the language,
running
from 9 a.m. to 1.30 p.m., with a half-hour break, on both
Saturday
and Sunday. Some of the material to be studied will be taken from
Satellite TV, radio broadcasts, and newspaper articles. The
maximum
number of participants per group will be fifteen. A fee of
£26
will be charged to junior members of the University and other
full-time students, £34 to members of Congregation and
members
of staff, and £45 to non-members.

German

Teaching hours: Saturday, 22 May, 9 a.m.–1.30 p.m. (end of
week
four), and Sunday, 23 May, 9 a.m.–1.30 p.m. Classes at the
following levels: absolute beginners, intermediate.

Italian

Teaching hours: Saturday, 22 May, 9 a.m.–1.30 p.m. (end of
week
four), and Sunday, 23 May, 9 a.m.–1.30 p.m. Classes at the
following levels: absolute beginners, lower intermediate.

French

Teaching hours: Saturday, 5 June, 9 a.m.–1.30 p.m. (end of
week
six), and Sunday, 6 June, 9 a.m.–1.30 p.m. Classes at the
following levels: near/false beginners, lower intermediate, upper
intermediate.

Spanish

Teaching hours: Saturday, 5 June, 9 a.m.–1.30 p.m. (end of
week
six), and Sunday, 6 June, 9 a.m.–1.30 p.m. Classes at the
following levels: absolute beginners, lower intermediate.

Any member of the University who wishes to receive further
details
and a booking form for these courses should contact Angela
Pinkney,
Language Centre, 12 Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6HT (telephone:
(2)83360, e-mail: admin@lang.ox.ac.uk).

An application form is also downloadable from the Language
Centre's World Wide Web pages:
http://info.ox.ac.uk/departments/langcentre/courses/weekend_co
urses/.

The Language Centre, 12 Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6HT
(telephone: Oxford (2)83360, fax: (2)83366, e-mail:
admin@lang.ox.ac.uk, Internet:
http://units.ox.ac.uk/departments/langcentre).

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ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS AND SOCIAL
STUDIES FACULTY
LIBRARIES


Closure of the libraries during summer
1999

The Social Studies Libraries Committee wishes to advise members
of the
University that a new Economics Library will be opened on 31
August in the
ground floor of a building designed by Sir Norman Foster and
Partners. It
will be located off Manor Road next to the St Cross Building.
Stock from the
present Institute of Economics and Statistics Library as well as
the
economics collection from the Social Studies Faculty Library will
be
transferred to the new building.

Painting and reclassification work in the Main Reading room
of the
Social Studies Faculty library will necessitate its closure
during July
and August. The Periodicals Reading Room will continue to
be opened and
a book retrieval service will be offered to library users.
Normal
lending will be possible for all non-economics material
during July and
August. The economics stock will be available only for
short-loan
borrowing.

The Social Studies Faculty library will be completely shut
for four
days, 25--30 August, reopening on 31 August.

The Economics and Statistics Library will operate as usual
until 16
August. The library will then be shut for two weeks,
reopening as the
Economics Library in the new building on 31 August.

The Social Studies Libraries Committee apologises for any
inconvenience
which this closure may cause. Any member of the University
who has
specific queries or suggestions is invited to contact the
librarian,
Margaret Robb (telephone: (2)78709 or (2)71071, e-mail:
margaret.robb@socstud.ox.ac.uk).

An exhibition showing details of the new library can be
viewed in the
main reading room of the Economics and Statistics Library,
St Cross
Building, Manor Road.

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section



CIRCULATION OF THE GAZETTE
TO RETIRED
SENIOR MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY

It has been decided that any former member of Congregation over
the age of
seventy-five who is resident in Oxford may continue to receive
the
Gazette, if he or she so wishes, on application in
writing to
the Information Office, University Offices, Wellington Square,
Oxford OX1
2JD. Such applications must be renewed at the beginning of each
academic
year.

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DISCOUNT ON PERSONAL INSURANCE POLICIES
AVAILABLE
TO STAFF AND MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY

Sun Alliance Connections, the personal insurances division of the
main
insurer of the University, provides discounts for members, staff,
their
families, and pensioners of the University of Oxford. The
following savings
can be achieved:

Household (buildings and/or contents: 20 per cent;

Travel (including winter sports): 12.5 per cent;

Private medical expenses: 10 per cent;

Private car: 5 per cent.

The University acts solely as an introducer of business to Sun
Alliance
Connections, receiving no commission or other remuneration, with
all savings
passed on to the subscribing member. For further information, a
brochure may
be obtained from Graham Waite (telephone: (2)80307), or Gill
Tombs
(telephone: (2)70110) at the University Offices. To obtain a
quotation or
receive specific information on the covers available, telephone
Sun Alliance
Connections' regional office on 0800 300 822, quoting the
appropriate
reference: SCH266 for car insurance; otherwise 34V0067.

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UNIVERSITY HOLIDAY PLAY-SCHEME

The University has provided an eighty-place play-scheme, to run
during the
next school half-term holiday, Monday, 31 May–Friday, 4
June, 8.15
a.m.–6.15 p.m. each day. Children can stay a whole or
half-day and will
have an exciting range of activities and play to choose from. The
launch of
the scheme will coincide with National Childcare Week, promoted
by the
Daycare Trust.

Children between the ages of five and fourteen years will be
catered for
with activities for the under-eights provided separately from
those for the
older children. Parents or guardians should be either a student
of the
University of an employee of the University or one of its
constituent
colleges. Any unsold places will be made available to other
parents after
these groups, but great demand is anticipated for the half-term
holiday.

The play-scheme will take place at Frideswide Middle School in
Marston Ferry
Road, Summertown, Oxford. The school is superbly equipped with
excellent
playing fields, tennis courts, playgrounds, and two indoor sports
halls. In
addition there is good access to the Ferry Pool. There will be
a free
minibus service from the centre of Oxford for those who need it.

A full day will be charged at £15, £7.50 for a
half-day,
£62.50 for the full week, and concessions for siblings and
student and
lone parents.

Details and booking forms are available from the Equal
Opportunities
Administrative Assistant (telephone: (2)70238, e-mail:
jenny.huxley@admin.ox.ac.uk). Alternatively telephone the
Childcare Officer
on (2)70567 or e-mail philippa.oconnor@admin.ox.ac.uk.

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section





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 29 April 1999: Lectures<br />

Lectures


Contents of this section:

Return to Contents Page of this issue



INAUGURAL LECTURES


Rhodes Professor of Race Relations

PROFESSOR W. BEINART will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m.
on
Thursday, 6 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `African history, environmental history, and
race
relations.'

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section



J.R.R. Tolkien Professor of English
Literature
and Language

PROFESSOR P. STROHM will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m.
on
Thursday, 13 May, in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `Chaucer's Troilus as
temporal
archive.'

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section



Harold Vyvyan Harmsworth Professor of
American
History

PROFESSOR A. BRINKLEY will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5
p.m. on
Tuesday, 18 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Imagining the twentieth century:
perspectives from
two fins-de-siècle.'

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section



Drue Heinz Professor of American
Literature

PROFESSOR R. BUSH will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m.
on
Thursday, 27 May, in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `American voice/American voices.'

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section



PROFESSOR OF POETRY

PROFESSOR JAMES FENTON will lecture at 5 p.m. on Fridays in
Lecture
Theatre 2, the St Cross Building.

30 Apr.: `Auden and Shakespeare's sonnets.'

7 May: `Auden's prose.'

14 May: `Auden's poetry.'

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section



CHERWELL-SIMON MEMORIAL LECTURE 1999

PROFESSOR CARL E. WIEMAN, University of Colorado, will deliver
the
Cherwell-Simon Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Friday, 11 June, in
Lecture
Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building, South Parks Road.

Subject: `Bose–Einstein condensation: revealing
the
quantum world using ultra-low temperatures.'

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section



O'DONNELL LECTURE 1999

DR PRYS MORGAN, Reader in History, University of Wales, Swansea,
will
deliver the O'Donnell Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 6 May, in
the Hall,
the Taylor Institution.

Subject: ` "Among our Ancient Mountains
..." (the
appreciation of Welsh mountainscape in the eighteenth and
nineteenth
centuries).'

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section



JAMES P.R. LYELL LECTURES IN
BIBLIOGRAPHY

PROFESSOR M.B. PARKES, James P.R. Lyell Reader in Bibliography
1998--9,
will deliver the Lyell Lectures at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in Trinity
Term in
Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building.

4 May: `Which came first, the reader or the scribe?
(The
function and the processes of handwriting).'

11 May: `The hasty scribe (cursive handwriting in
antiquity and the Middle Ages).'

18 May: `Set in their own ways (scribes and
bookhands
c.800--1200).'

25 May: `Features of fashion (scribes and style
c. 1200--1500).'

1 June: `In the eyes of scribes and readers
(handwriting
as image).'

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section



SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES ANNUAL LECTURE

PROFESSOR L. ROSEN, Professor of Anthropology, Princeton
University,
will deliver the fifth Annual Lecture in Socio-Legal Studies at
5.30
p.m. on Friday, 14 May, in the Examination Schools. The lecture
will be
followed by a reception at 6.30 p.m.

Subject: `Defending culture: the cultural defence
plea and
judicial uses of the concept of culture.'

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section



ILCHESTER LECTURE 1999

PROFESSOR R. MARSH, Bath, will deliver an Ilchester Lecture at
5 p.m. on
Thursday, 6 May, in the Taylor Institution Annexe, 47 Wellington
Square.

Convener: G.S. Smith, MA, D.Litt, Professor of
Russian.

Subject: `The literature of history in contemporary
Russia.'

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section



THOMAS HARRIOT LECTURE 1999

SCOTT MANDELBROTE, Cambridge, will deliver the Thomas Harriot
Lecture at
5 p.m. on Thursday, 20 May, in the Champneys Room, Oriel College.

Subject: `The religion of Thomas Harriot.'

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section



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in
Lecture
Theatre 1, the Department of Biochemistry.

Convener: L.N. Johnson, MA, David Phillips Professor
of
Molecular Biophysics.

PROFESSOR P.C. ENGELS, University College, Dublin

14 May: `Glutamate dehydrogenase and close
cousins:
specificity and regulation revisited with the help of
site-directed
mutagenesis.'

DR J. JAEGER, Leeds

21 May: `A common mechanism for all
polymerases.'

DR E. PEBAY-PEYROULA, Institut de Biologie Structurale, Grenoble

28 May: `Crystallisation in cubic phases,
bacteriorhodopsin and some new results on the
crystallisationn of
other membrane proteins (in progress).'

DR V. RAMAKRISHNAN, Utah

4 June: `A detailed look at the GTPase centre
of the
ribosome.'

DR J. OVERINGTON, Pfizer Central Research

18 June: `Protein kinase modelling from a drug
discovery and structure genomics perspective' (\title to be
confirmed\).

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section


Department of Zoology

The following departmental research seminars will be held at 4.30
p.m.
on Mondays in Lecture Theatre B, the Department of Zoology.

Convener: P. Harvey, MA, D.Sc., Professor of
Zoology.

DR C. DONNELLY

10 May: `BSE and vCJD.'

PROFESSOR R. PASSINGHAM

17 May: `A general associative learning
mechanism in
the human brain as revealed by functional brain imaging.'

DR S. HARDING, Schumacher College, Devon

24 May: `Gaia.'

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section


International Knowledge Partnership: Health and Environment

Sharing knowledge about malaria for greater impact
(health and
the environment: a multidisciplinary approach to knowledge
management
about malaria)

This meeting will be held from 2 p.m. on Wednesday, 19 May, in
the E.P.
Abraham Lecture Theatre, Green College. The meeting will end with
a
discussion panel of all the speakers, chaired by Dr Muir Gray,
5–5.30 p.m.

Admission is free; 100 places are available, to be allocated on
a first-
come, first-served basis. Application should be made to Miss Liz
Pearce,
Secretary to the Director, Oxford Forestry Institute, South Parks
Road,
Oxford OX1 3RB (fax: Oxford (2)75074, e-mail:
liz.pearce@plants.ox.ac.uk).

The meeting is organised in association with the University's
Environmental Liaison Group, Action for Safe Motherhood, and the
London
School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

DR C. PYPER, Honorary Chair, International Knowledge Partnership

2 p.m.: `Introduction—the International
Knowledge
Partnership.'

DR M. DOBSON, Wellcome Unit

2.05 p.m.: `Historical aspects—learning
from past
experience.'

PROFESSOR D. BRADLEY, London School of Hygiene and Tropical
Medicine

2.20 p.m.: `Medical perspective—where is
malaria
today?'

PROFESSOR C. NEWBOLD

2.35 p.m.: `Immunological
perspective—progress in
developing a malaria vaccine.'

PROFESSOR J. BURLEY

2.50 p.m.: `Information systems—the Global
Forest
Information System (an example from natural resources and
the
environment).'

D.J. ROGERS and S. HAY

3.05 p.m.: `Climatic change—improving
knowledge
management of vector borne diseases: are we in a position
to
predict malaria epidemics?'

DR T. DOWNING

3.20 p.m.: `Climatic change—climate
change,
sustainable development, and health: the large trends and
threats.'

DR G. BODEKER

3.50 p.m.: `Traditional
antimalarials—endogenous
and exogenous knowledge about malaria management.'

V. SMITH, Reading

4.05 p.m.: `Rural appraisal—gathering
knowledge
about rural resources.'

DR A.M. ALMEDOM, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

4.20 p.m.: `Maternal health and
malaria—using
participatory rural appraisal for improving maternal
health.'

DR D. TURTON

4.35 p.m.: `Refugee aspects—sharing
knowledge
about the management of displaced persons.'

DR M. GRAY, Director, Institute of Health Sciences

4.50 p.m.: `The future—the quality of
knowledge:
interpretation; storage and dissemination.'

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section



CLINICAL MEDICINE

University Department of Cellular Science: Haematology
Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 12 noon on Tuesdays in the
Haematology Seminar Room, the John Radcliffe Hospital.

DR J. BOULTWOOD

4 May: `Molecular basis of the 5q-syndrome.'

DR A.E. THOMAS, Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Edinburgh

11 May: `Haematological development in the
young
child.'

DR G. HALL

18 May: `Bone marrow failure syndromes.'

PROFESSOR J.P. ALLAIN, Cambridge

25 May: `Detection and epidemiology of new
blood borne
viruses (TTV and HHV-8).'

DR R. MANLEY

1 June: case presentation.

DR M. YUILLE, Institute of Cancer Research, Haddow Laboratories,
Sutton

8 June: `The role of ataxia telangiectasia gene
in
haematological malignancy.'

DR M. PLUMB, Medical Research Council, Harwell

15 June: `Radiation leukaemogenesis in the
mouse.'

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section


Nuffield Department of Surgery: Immunology Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
Seminar
Room, Level 6, the Nuffield Department of Surgery, the John
Radcliffe
Hospital.

DR L. TAAMS, Royal Free Hospital, London

4 May: `Anergic T cells as active regulators
of immune
responses.'

DR G. HALE

11 May: `Elimination of the immunogenicity of
therapeutic antibodies.'

DR D. ROBINSON, National Heart and Lung Institute, London

18 May: `IL-5 in asthma and receptor regulation
during
eosinophil development.'

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section


Nuffield Department of Surgery: Clinical Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
Seminar
Room, Level 6, the Nuffield Department of Surgery, the John
Radcliffe
Hospital.

MR T. HUSSEIN

25 May: `The results of phenol sympathectomy
in
peripheral vascular disease.'

MISS D. PHILLIPS

1 June: `Past, present, and future management
of the
claudicating patient.'

DR B. CASADEI

8 June: `Sympathectomy improves exercise
performance
and skeletal muscle bioenergetics in patients with
idiopathic
hyperhidrosis.'

DR A. BOLIA, Leicester Royal Infirmary

15 June: `Subintimal angioplasty: methods and
results.'

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section



COMMITTEE FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY AND
GENERAL LINGUISTICS

PROFESSOR R. LASS, Cape Town, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday,
6 May,
in the Centre for Linguistics and Philology, Walton Street.

Convener: A.E. Morpurgo Davies, MA, Professor of
Comparative
Philology.

Subject: `Reflections on (uni)directionality in
linguistics.'

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section



LAW, SOCIAL STUDIES

The Function of Law in the International Community

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held
at 5
p.m. on Tuesdays in the Habakkuk Room, Jesus College.

Conveners: M. Byers (Ph.D. Cambridge), Junior
Research
Fellow in Law, Jesus College, G.S. Goodwin-Gill, MA, D.Phil.,
Professor
of International Refugee Law, A.J. Hurrell, MA, M.Phil., D.Phil.,
University Lecturer in International Relations, and E.A. Roberts,
MA,
Montague Burton Professor of International Relations.

DR D. MALONE, President, International Peace Academy, New York

4 May, the Auditorium, Magdalen College: `The
Politics
of the International Criminal Court.'

PROFESSOR Y. GHEBALI, Professor of International Organisation,
Graduate
School of International Studies, Geneva

11 May: `Implementation of Human Dimension
Commitments
of OSCE: Case Study of Belarus.'

PROFESSOR J. JACKSON, Professor of Law, Georgetown University

18 May: `EU–US Trade Wars: The Role of
WTO.'

SIR ARTHUR WATTS, KCMG, QC

25 May: `Former Yugoslavia and State
Succession:
Reflections on a Mediation.'

MR M. GRIFFITHS, UN Office for the Co-ordination of Humanitarian
Affairs, New York (to be confirmed)

1 June: `Law, Politics, and Humanitarian
Action.'

DR BYERS

8 June: `Custom, Power, and the Power of
Rules.'

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section



LITERAE HUMANIORES

Archive of performances of Greek and Roman drama

PROFESSOR M. SMETHURST, Pittsburgh, will lecture at at 2.15 p.m.
on
Friday, 30 April, in the auditorium, Magdalen College.

Conveners: O.P. Taplin, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
Classical
Languages and Literature, and E.M. Hall, MA, D.Phil., University
Lecturer (CUF) in Classical Languages.

Subject: `The Japanese presence in Ninagawa's
Medea.' (With videotape of a production of
Yukio
Ninagawa's
cMedea\)

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section



MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

Portuguese Graduate Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in
Room T11,
47 Wellington Square.

Conveners: Professor T.F. Earle and Dr Madalena
Gonçalves.

M. GUTERRES, Liverpool

6 May: `Pepetela e a questþo da identidade.'

PROFESSOR F. MARTINHO, Lisbon

20 May: `Pessoa e a geraçþo de 1950.'

PROFESSOR W. GALVþO, Sþo Paulo

3 June: `Minima mimica—a propósito
de um
conto de Guimarþes Rosa.'

L. GOMES

17 June: `Os sonetos de Vasco Mousinho de
Quevedo.'

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section



MODERN HISTORY

Commonwealth History Seminar: workshop on gender, `race', and
empire

This workshop will be held on Friday, 14 May, 9.30 a.m.–4
p.m., in
the Modern History Faculty Building.

Conveners: J.M. Brown, MA, D.Phil., Beit Professor
of the
History of the British Commonwealth, and M.A. Vaughan, MA,
Professor of
Commonwealth Studies.

B. BUSH, Staffordshire University

9.30 a.m.: `Britain's conscience on Africa:
white
women, race, and imperial politics in interwar Britain.'

J. LONSDALE, Cambridge

10.10 a.m.: `Decolonisation as a cultural
revolution:
new genders for new citizens.'

R. O'HANLON, Cambridge

11.30 a.m.: `Military sports and the martial
body in
India, .1750–1900.'

D. GAITSKELL, SOAS

1.30 p.m.: `Christian womanhood and the
politics of
the personal: mission encounters in twentieth-century South
Africa.'

C. JANGBAHADUR

2.10 p.m.: `Remaking the Indian woman in
Trinidad.'

PROFESSOR VAUGHAN

2.40 p.m.: `Slavery and the family in
eighteenth-
century Mauritius.'

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section


Seminar in medieval history

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the
Wharton
Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: R.R. Davies, MA, D.Phil., Chichele
Professor of
Medieval History, and J.R.L. Maddicott, MA, D.Phil., University
Lecturer
(CUF) in Modern History.

A. PANTOS

3 May: `Motlow and Spelberwe: the names and
sites of
Anglo-Saxon assembly places.'

B. SMITH, Bristol

10 May: to be announced.

P. SARRIS

17 May: `Late antique manorialism.'

P. FOURACRE, Goldsmiths' College, London

24 May: `The killing of bishops: a peculiarly
Merovingian habit.'

E. ROBERTS

31 May: to be announced.

A. WILLIAMS, London

7 June: `Thegnly piety and ecclesiastical
patronage,
.950–1066.'

H. GITTOS

14 June: `Performing rites: the architectural
setting
of the Anglo-Saxon liturgy.'

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section


Social and economic history of the British Isles
1000–1600

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in
the
Wharton Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: Professor Rees Davies, Ralph Evans,
Ros
Faith, Nicholas Mayhew, and Pamela Nightingale.

J. GALLOWAY, IHR, London

5 May: `One market or many? London and the
grain trade
of England, \ c\.1300–1600.'

P. SCHOFIELD, Aberystwyth

12 May: `The social economy of the medieval
village:
Hinderclay at the beginning of the fourteenth century.'

YOKO MIYOSHI, Tokyo

19 May: `Orphans and widows in
fourteenth-century
London.'

G. VIRÁGOS

26 May: `Deduced from the artefact: what
archaeology
can add to the study of society.'

W. CHILDS, Leeds

2 June: `Medieval sea-fisheries and fishing
fleets \
c\.1300–\ c\.1500.'

S. JENKS, Erlangen

9 June: `The Hanse and urban revolts in the
Late
Middle Ages.'

R. FAITH and M. RYAN (leading discussion)

16 June: discussion session.

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section


Collection and comparison in the sciences

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in
the
History of Science and Technology Seminar Room, the Modern
History
Faculty Building.

Convener: J.A. Bennett, MA, Keeper of the Museum of
the
History of Science.

E. LEANEY

5 May: `The Museum of Irish Industry.'

PROFESSOR H. TORRENS, Keele

12 May: `Hidden history? Mineral prospecting
in
Britain.'

M. OLIVIER, Brigham Young University

19 May: `Binding the book of nature: microscopy
as
literature.'

C. HAYNES, East Anglia

26 May: `Comprehending diversity in a
"Temple of
Nature": Sir Ashton Lever's curatorial strategy at the
Holophusikon, 1775–86.'

S. WERRETT, Cambridge

2 June: `The politics of "Proba":
assaying
nature and the state in eighteenth-century Russia.'

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section



MODERN HISTORY, SOCIAL STUDIES

The South African War: its causes, course, and
consequences

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the
Jameson Room, Rhodes House.

Conveners: S. Trapido, MA, University Lecturer in the
Government of New States, and I.R. Phimister, MA, University
Lecturer in
Commonwealth History.

P. CAIN, Sheffield Hallam

29 Apr.: `J.A. Hobson and the war in South
Africa.'
(Discussant: M. Freeden)

J. DARWIN and A. KNIGHT

6 May:
(J.D.) `The international context.
"Oom Paul" and the Gouty Giant: South Africa
and
British World Policy.'

(A.K.) ` "Krugerism" in the New World:
imperialism and nationalism in the Americas,
1895–1914.' (Discussant: A.G.
Hopkins,
Cambridge)

S. SWART and J. BEAUMONT

13 May:
(S.S.) `The Afrikaner opposition
press in
the Zuid Afrikaansche Republiek, 1891–9.'


(J.B.) `The British press on South Africa,
December
1898– October 1899.' (Discussant:
H.
Callaway)

PROFESSOR J. BROWN

20 May: `The Boer War: an Indian perspective.'
(Discussant: D. Washbrook)

B. MBENGA, North West University, South Africa

27 May: `The Bakgatla's role in the South
African War
and its impact on the Pilansberg.' (Discussant:
P. la
Hausse de Lalouviere, Cambridge)

K. MORGAN

3 June: ` "Britain's Vietnam?" Lloyd
George,
Keir Hardie, and the importance of the
"pro-Boers".'
(Discussant: D.E. Torrance, Mount Allison
University,
New Brunswick)

MR PHIMISTER

10 June: `Brokers and Boers. The City of London
and
the coming of the war in South Africa, 1895–99.'
(Discussant: D. Kynaston)

DR TRAPIDO

17 June
: `Percy Fitzpatrick and the ABC of the South
African
War. (Where A is for "Afrikanders", B is for
British
Supremacy, C is for Capitalists, and W is for Workers, white
and
black.' (Discussant: S. Marks, SOAS, and G.
Williams)

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section



ORIENTAL STUDIES

Topics in Ancient Near Eastern Studies and Egyptology

The following seminars will be held at 3 p.m. on Tuesdays in
Lecture
Room 1, the Oriental Institute.

Conveners: J.R. Baines, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
Egyptology, and S. Dalley, MA, Senior Research Fellow, Somerville
College.

M. COENEN, Leuven

11 May: `Dating funerary papyri: an Oxford case
study.'

H. MUENCH, Goettingen

18 May: `Hetepheres' tomb: an archaeological
mystery.'

D. BROWN

25 May: `Cuneiform, astronomy, physics.'

J. LIGHTFOOT

8 June: `On the Syrian goddess.'

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section



PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Oxford Physics Colloquia

The following lectures will be given at 4.15 p.m. on Fridays in
the
Lindemann Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon Laboratory.

For details of the Cherwell-Simon Lecture (11 June), see above.

Conveners: R.J. Nicholas, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
Physics,
and G.G. Ross, MA, Professor of Theoretical Physics.

PROFESSOR J. MARCH-RUSSELL, CERN, Geneva

7 May: `New sub-millimetre dimensions and
quantum
gravity at the Te V scale.'

PROFESSOR J. ASHMORE, UCL

14 May: `The biophysics of hair cells: what is
really
going on inside the ear?'

PROFESSOR P. BELTON, Institute of Food Research, Norwich

28 May: `Non-invasive spectroscopy of
foodstuffs.'

PROFESSOR T. MULLIN, Manchester

4 June: `Patterns in the sand.'

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section


Seminars in Condensed Matter Physics

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Thursdays in
the
Simon Room, the Clarendon Laboratory.

DR R.W. MARTIN, Strathclyde

29 Apr.: `Localisation and light emission in
indium
gallium nitride.'

PROFESSOR C.M. DOBSON

6 May: `Protein folding—bringing together
theory
and experiment.'

DR J. GOFF

13 May: `Magnetism and superconductivity in
light
rare-earth superlattices.'

DR U. BOCKELMANN, École Normale Supérieure, Paris

20 May: `Force measurements on single DNA
molecules:
the mechanical opening of the double helix.'

DR N.J. JOHNSON

27 May: `Two's company, three's a crowd:
many-body
games in biological systems.'

DR D. SMITH

3 June: `Non-equilibrium dynamics of high
temperature
superconductors.'

DR D.H. COBDEN, Oersted Laboratory, Copenhagen

10 June: `One-dimensional transport in carbon
nanotubes.'

DR R. MURRAY, Imperial College, London

17 June: `Self-assembled quantum dots—will
they
be useful?'

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section


Materials Modelling Laboratory Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 12 noon on Fridays in
Lecture
Room 7, the Engineering and Technology Building.

Conveners: A.P. Sutton, MA, Professor of Materials
Science,
and S.G. Roberts, MA, University Lecturer in Materials
Science.

PROFESSOR J.M. BALL

30 Apr.: `Homogenisation and other methods for
reconciling models at different length scales.'

DR J.M. YEOMANS

7 May: `Modelling of complex fluids.'

PROFESSOR R.W. EVANS, Swansea

14 May: `Process modelling in a metallurgical
environment.'

DR M.S.P. SANSOM

21 May: `Using simulations to explore the
dynamic
properties of membrane proteins.'

DR A.C. FOWLER

28 May: `Modelling mushy zones.'

DR P. LYNE

4 June: `Simulation of chemical reactions in
the
condensed phase.'

PROFESSOR C.B. BUCKNALL, Cranfield

11 June: `Modelling of dilatational yielding
in rigid
polymers containing a dispersed elastomeric phase.'
(Interdepartmental Polymer Seminar)

PROFESSOR A. WHEELER, Southampton

18 June: `Modelling microstructure with
phase-field
models.' (In association with OCIAM)

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section


Department of Materials

The following colloquia will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Thursdays
in the
Hume-Rothery Lecture Theatre, the Department of Materials.

Conveners: P.R. Wilshaw, MA, D.Phil., University
Lecturer in
the Electrical and Magnetic Properties of Materials, and G.A.D.
Briggs,
MA, Reader in Materials.

PROFESSOR B. DERBY, UMIST

29 Apr.: `High temperature neutron reflection
experiments: characterisation of liquid/solid
interfaces.'

PROFESSOR T. PAGE, Newcastle

6 May: `Uses and abuses of
nanoindentation—studies of ceramics and coated
systems.'
(Provisional title)

PROFESSOR A. EKART

13 May: `Quantum computation and communication,
theory
and experiments.' (Interdepartmental Condensed Matter
Seminar
)

PROFESSOR M. MILES, Bristol

20 May: `Force microscopy in polymers:
high-resolution
imaging, crystallisation, and properties.'
(Interdepartmental
Polymer Seminar
)

PROFESSOR M. LORETTO, Birmingham

27 May: `Processing properties and
microstructure of
some TiAl alloys.'

PROFESSOR B. TANNER, Durham

3 June: `X-ray scattering from magnetic
multilayers.'(Interdepartmental Condensed Matter
Seminar
)

DR J. VENABLES, Arizona State

10 June: `Epitaxial growth processes—what
do we
really want to know?'

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section


Interdepartmental Polymer Seminars

The following seminars will take place as shown.

Convener: C.P. Buckley, MA, D.Phil., University
Lecturer in
Engineering Science.

PROFESSOR M. MILES, Bristol, will give a seminar at 2.15 p.m. on
Thursday, 20 May, in the Hume-Rothery Lecture Theatre, the
Department of
Materials.


Subject: `Force microscopy of polymers: high
resolution
imaging, crystallisation, and properties.'

MR P. SODEN, University of Manchester Institute of Science and
Technology, will give a seminar at 1.10 p.m. on Monday, 24 May,
in
Lecture Room 8, the Engineering and Technology Building, the
Department
of Engineering Science.


Subject: `Strength of filament-wound polymer matrix
composite structures.'

PROFESSOR C. BUCKNALL, Cranfield University, will give a
seminar
at 12
noon on Friday, 11 June, in Lecture Room 7, the Engineering and
Technology Building, the Department of Engineering Science.


Subject: `Modelling of dilatational yielding in
rigid
polymers containing a dispersed elastomeric phase.'

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section



PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Pharmacology and Anatomical Neuropharmacology Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
Lecture
Theatre, the Department of Pharmacology.

DR E.P. SEWARD, Bristol

4 May: `Modulation of the Ca2+ regulated
exocytosis by
heterotrimetic G protein coupled receptors.'

PROFESSOR G. HENDERSON, Bristol

11 May: `P2X purinoceptors on CNS neurones.'

DR P. EMSON, Cambridge

18 May: `Calbindin: a memorable protein.'

PROFESSOR C. WILSON, Tennessee

25 May: `Convergence and divergence of
corticostriatal
connections: implications for information processing.'

PROFESSOR I. WILLIAMS, Bath

1 June: `Chronic hypoxia and lung
reactivity.'

PROFESSOR D. FITZGERALD, Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Royal
College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin

8 June: `Cyclo-oxygenase-2: good cop, bad
cop.'

PROFESSOR A. DOLPHIN, University College, London

15 June: `Neuronal voltage gated calcium
channels:
expression and G protein modulation.'

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section



PSYCHOLOGICAL STUDIES

Cognitive Science Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in
Room C113,
the Department of Experimental Psychology.

DR R. GOMEZ

29 Apr.: `What artificial grammar learning
tells us
about language acquisition.'

DR D. BISHOP

6 May: `Genes, sex, and memory: the state of
Turner
Syndrome.'

PROFESSOR P. BRYANT and S. SQUIRE

13 May: `The growth of children's mathematical
understanding.'

PROFESSOR L. WEISKRANTZ

20 May: `Pupil employment and di-vision of
labour.
Beta late than never.'

DR K. NOBRE

27 May: `Orienting attention in time.'

PROFESSOR P. HARRIS

3 June
: `Children's causal judgements: thoughts about
what
could have happened but didn't.'

PROFESSOR B. DE GELDER

10 June: to be announced.

PROFESSOR G. CLARIDGE

17 June: `The "two faces" of
psychology:
schizotypy as an example.'

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section



OXFORD CENTRE FOR ADVANCED MATERIALS
AND
COMPOSITES


Industrial Lecture

PROFESSOR C. BRADLEY, Sharp Laboratories Europe Ltd., will
deliver the
OCAMAC Industrial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 14 May, in Lecture
Room
1, the Thom Building, the Department of Engineering Science.

Subject: `Electronic innovations for the new
millennium.'

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section



RESEARCH LABORATORY FOR ARCHAEOLOGY

The following seminars will be held at 10.30 a.m. on Thursdays
in the
Library, the Research Laboratory for Archaeology and the History
of Art.

Convener: M.S. Tite, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
Archaeological Science.

M. PARKER-PEARSON, Sheffield

6 May: `Shipwreck and slavery: archaeology and
history
in eighteenth-century Madagascar.'

J. ROSENBAUM, Reading

27 May: `The City of David waterworks: a
geological
and engineering overview.'

R. BARNES

3 June: `Radiocarbon dating the Golden Goose:
Indian
trade textiles in the Indian Ocean?'

J. BLAIR

10 June: `Dating Anglo-Saxon burials after
grave
goods: the Bampton Churchyard Project.'

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section



ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM

William Cohn Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR R.W. BAGLEY, Princeton, will deliver the William Cohn
Memorial
Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 5 May, in the Headley Lecture
Theatre,
the Ashmolean Museum.

Subject: `Bells, scales, and pitch standards: the
archaeology of music in ancient China.'

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section


Public lecture

LORD ROTHSCHILD will lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 4 May, in
the
Taylor Institution Lecture Theatre. Admission is free.

Subject: `The creation of Waddesdon.'

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section


Other lectures

The following lectures will be given at 6.30 p.m. on Wednesdays
in the
Ashmolean Museum. Admission is free.

DR C. BROWN

30 June: `Dutch and Flemish paintings in the
Ashmolean.'

DR R. MOOREY

7 July: `Archaeological approaches to the Bible
in the
Ashmolean.'

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section



BATE COLLECTION OF MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

Cornucopia: a celebration of Oxford's musical collections

The following gallery talks will be held at 1.15 p.m. on
Tuesdays.
Admission costs £1.50. To book for the first two talks,
telephone
(2)78015; for the final talk, telephone (2)86261.

LISHA LI

4 May, Ashmolean Museum: `The Chinese lute in
the Tang
Period.'

AHMED ABDHALRANIM

1 June, Ashmolean Museum: `The lute, oud.'

J. SAVAN

6 July, Christ Church Picture Gallery: `Two
courtly
cornetts.'

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section



INSTITUTE FOR CHINESE STUDIES

China Research Seminar

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held
at 5
p.m. on Thursdays in room 207, the Institute for Chinese Studies
(the
Clarendon Press Institute).

LI MINGHUAN, International Institute of Asian Studies, the
Netherlands

29 Apr.: `Wenzhou people in the Netherlands and
their
home communities.'

CHAN WINGMING (Chen Yongming), Hong Kong Baptist University

6 May, room 206, CPI: `From Di to Tian: the
change in
the ancient Chinese concept of God.'

S. BRANDTST-DTER, Free University, Berlin

13 May: `Divergent trajectories:
state–village
relations and the moral economy of gender in China and
Taiwan.'

M. COHEN, Columbia

20 May, Lecture Theatre, Nissan Institute:
`Local
religion, lineage culture, and lineage organisations in late
imperial China: the Guangdong–Taiwan connection during
the
Qing dynasty.'

R. PHILLIPS, Auckland

27 May: `The failure in Rehe (Jehol):
resistance,
nationalism, and weakness in 1933.'

N. PÁL

3 June: `New Chinese migrants in Europe: the
case of
Hungary in the nineties.

J. BAYNE

10 June: `Consuming passions? The illustrated
wall
calendar in contemporary China.'

WU SONGDI, Fudan

17 June: `Three southward movements of the
northern
population and the formation and development of the south's
Han
Chinese.' (In Chinese)

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section



COMPUTING LABORATORY


Numerical Analysis Group

The following seminars will be held at 3 p.m. on Thursdays in the
OUCL
Lecture Theatre, unless indicated otherwise.

Co-ordinators: J.D.P. Donnelly/J. Scott (RAL). Further
information is
available from Shirley Day (telephone: Oxford (2)73885).

PROFESSOR C. JOHNSON, Utah

29 Apr.: `Interactive simulation and
visualisation:
applications to large-scale computational problems.'

DR E. SÜLI

6 May: `A posteriori error
analysis for
stabilised finite element approximations of transport
problems.'

DR L. TUCKERMAN, Paris

Tue. 11 May, 2 p.m.: `Stability analysis of
perturbed
plane Couette flow.'

PROFESSOR J. BUNCH, UCSD

20 May: `Least squares and total least
squares.'

DR J. GONDZIO, Edinburgh

27 May, 2 p.m., RAL: `Exploiting structure in
the
linear algebra of interior point methods.'

PROFESSOR M. BARNSLEY, Melbourne

3 June: to be announced.

PROFESSOR S. STRANG, MIT

10 June: `Partly random graphs and small world
networks.'

DR T. DRISCOLL, Colorado

17 June: `Staggered time integrators for wave
equations.'

PROFESOR R. GLOWINSKI, Houston

Mon. 21 June, 2.30 p.m.: `A wave-like equation
approach for incompressible viscous flow. Application to
Newtonian
and viscoelastic particulate flow.'

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section



CENTRE FOR EUROPEAN POLITICS,
ECONOMICS, AND
SOCIETY

The coherence of the EU as a polity

A workshop in this series will be held on Friday, 30 April,
2–5
p.m., in the Seminar Room, Nuffield College. All are welcome.

Further information is available from Jane Wyatt, Social
Studies Faculty, and from the Centre's Web site,
http://www.ssfc.ox.ac.uk/cepes/Seminar.html.

Convener: J. Richardson, Director of the Centre.

A. HERITIER, Max Planck Institute, Bonn, and European University
Institute, Florence

2 p.m.: `General interest services in the
European
Union.'

M. SMITH, Loughborough

3.30 p.m.: `European Union commercial policy:
between
coherence and fragmentation.'

Note: the seminars advertised for 7 May (Pollack) and
14 May
(Stone Sweet) have been postponed to Michaelmas Term.

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section



OXFORD INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RESEARCH
CENTRE

Intellectual property in the new millennium

The following seminars, continuing this theme, will be held at
5 p.m. on
Tuesdays in the Latner Room, St Peter's College.

Convener: D. Vaver, MA, Reuters Professor of
Intellectual
Property and Information Technology Law.

DR M. SPENCE

4 May: `Comparative advertising and the
law.'

PROFESSOR J.O. LANJOVW, Yale

11 May: `The introduction of pharmaceutical
product
patents in India: "heartless exploitation of the poor
and
suffering"?'

PROFESSOR C. TAPPER

18 May: `Intellectual property rights in
databases.'

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section



NISSAN INSTITUTE OF JAPANESE STUDIES

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the
Lecture
Theatre, the Nissan Institute.

DR M. REBICK

30 Apr.: `The Japanese labour market: can we
expect
significant change?'

DR R. GOODMAN

7 May: `Child protection and child abuse: the
changing
scene in Japan in the 1990s.'

DR S. DODD, SOAS

14 May: `The writer Kunikida Doppo and the
"furusato" (home village) ideal in the mid-Meiji
period
of the late nineteenth century.'

DR M. WILLIAMS, Leeds

21 May: `To adapt or not to adapt, that is (not
really) the question: Hamlet in Meiji Japan.'

PROFESSOR D. ROBINSON, Smith College, Massachusetts

28 May: `The origins of the Japanese
constitution: a
joint conspiracy.'

DR R. SIDDLE, Sheffield

4 June: `Being and becoming Ainu: the culture
of
Japan's indigenous people.'

PROFESSOR KAZUO SAKAMOTO, Kokugakuin University, Tokyo

11 June: `Transforming the Japanese monarchy
along
with the popularisation of society: Crown Prince Hirohito
and his
court in the late Taisho period.' (In Japanese, with
a
summary distributed in English
)

DR A.G. MULGAN, New South Wales

18 June: `Japan's leaderless state.'

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section



QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

South Asian History seminars

The following seminars will be held in Queen Elizabeth House.
Unless
otherwise indicated, they will take place at 2.15 p.m. on
Tuesdays.

Further information is available from the Secretary to the Indian
Studies Centre, St Antony's College (telephone: Oxford (2)74559,
e-mail:
collette.caffrey@sant.ox.ac.uk).

R. CHAKRAVARTI, Calcutta

4 May: `Nakhudas and Nauvittakas: ship owner
merchants
in the West India coast AD 1000–1500.'

K. VELUTHAT, Mangalore

Thur. 13 May, 5 p.m., Blackhall Seminar Room:
`Mahodayapuram-Kodungallur: a capital city as a sacred
centre in
medieval Kerala.'

F. AZIM, Dhaka and SOAS

18 May: `The poetry of Torudutt and a rewriting
of the
Indian woman.'

D. KUMAR, JNU

25 May: `Science–society interface: some
issues
in the context of colonial India.'

M. MINES, California and LSE; J.-L. RACINE, Paris; J. RACINE,
Paris; R.
O'HANLON, Cambridge; S. SUBRAHMANYAM, Paris; and D. WASHBROOK

Fri. 4 June, 11 a.m., Library Wing Seminar
Room
: `Life
histories.' (Workshop, in association with
SOAS
)

R. CHANDAVARKAR, Cambridge

8 June: `Class and the politics of identity in
twentieth-century India.'

M. RADHAKRISHNAN, Delhi

15 June: `Criminal tribes in colonia Madras:
problems
in writing alternative histories.'

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section



OXFORD CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES

Visitors' seminar series

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the
Centre
for Socio-Legal Studies.

DR M. STEINBERG, Smith College, Northampton, USA

30 Apr.: `The puzzle of master and servant law
in mid-
Victorian England.'

MS G. CENTINEO, Palermo

7 May: `A comparative study of marriage and the
Family
Law Act 1996 and the Italian Family Law Reform of 1975, with
specific reference to its affect on the role of the
lawyer.'

MS C. SAWYER, Bristol

21 May: `Individualism, parentalism, and the
legal
processes: the identity of the child in family proceedings
towards
the millennium.'

DR M. VOGEL, Michigan

28 May: `A comparative/historical study of the
role of
law in the process of democratic state formation in England,
France, and the United States.'

MR J. CORNWELL, Senior Partner, Dawson Cornwell & Co., London

4 June: `Pensions on divorce.'

PROFESSOR S. ZIFCAK, Deputy Chair, International Commission of
Jurists
(Australian Section), and Associate Professor, La Trobe
University

11 June: `Globalism or imperialism: analysing
the
International Commission of Jurists' human rights mission
to
Indonesia.'

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section


Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy

Contemporary research in media law and policy

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in
the
Centre for Socio-Legal Studies.

C. SHAW

5 May: `Regulation? What regulation? Quandaries
in
broadcasting.'

DR R. TSAGAROUSIANOU, University of Westminster

12 May: `Gone to the market? The development
of Asian
and Greek-Cypriot community media in Britain.'

K. BOEHRINGER, New South Wales

19 May: `Corporate responsibility in the
communications field.'

H. THORGEIRSDOTTIR, Lund

26 May: `International law and freedom within
the
press.'

M. HEINS, Cambridge

2 June: `What's wrong with ratings and filters?
An
argument for minors' free expression rights.'

F. BURNETT, University of Westminster

9 June: `Journal publishing in the electronic
era:
copyright practices and the dissemination of scientific
information.'

DR C. JONES, Oklahoma

1 June: `The evolution of media concentration
regulation in the US: pluralism and commercial
broadcasting.'

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section



BRASENOSE COLLEGE


Tanner Lectures on Human Values 1999

Representation: democratic theory and social surveys

PROFESSOR S. VERBA, Department of Government, Harvard University,
will
deliver the Tanner Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following days in
the
Examination Schools.

Mon. 10 May: : `Social theory and social
science: two
cultures?'


Tue. 11 May: `Citizens in democracies and
democratic
citizens.'

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section



KEBLE COLLEGE


Eric Symes Abbott Memorial Lecture

THE RT. HON. DAME ELIZABETH BUTLER-SLOSS will deliver the Eric
Symes
Abbott Memorial Lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Friday, 7 May, in the
chapel,
Keble College.

Subject: `Who is to judge? The role of the
judiciary in
ethical issues.'

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section



PEMBROKE COLLEGE


Blackstone Lecture

PROFESSOR P.B.A. BIRKS, Regius Professor of Civil Law, will
deliver the
twenty-third Blackstone Lecture at 11.30 a.m. on Saturday, 15
May, in
the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `Rights, wrongs, and remedies.'

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section



ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE


Asian Studies Centre

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
Buttery, St Antony's College.

PROFESSOR A. STOCKWIN

4 May: `Are the Japanese natural isolationists
in
Asia? The influence of the political system.'

PROFESSOR M. LEIFER, LSE

11 May: `Economic turmoil and political
outcomes in
East Asia.'

DR P. CAREY

18 May: `Indonesia: from financial crises to
political
revisions.'

DR A. FOSTER-CARTER, Leeds

25 May: `Intervening to free markets:
Thatcherism with
Korean characteristics.'

MR. L. GOODSTADT, former Head, Central Policy Unit, Hong Kong
Government

1 June: `China and Hong Kong: the unnecessary
crises.'

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section



ST CROSS COLLEGE


Visiting Fellow Lecture 1999

PROFESSOR DR H. RIKHOF, Catholic University of Utrecht, will
deliver the
Visiting Fellow Lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 10 May, in the
Examination
Schools.

Subject: `Changing perspectives: approaching the
Trinity.'

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section



TRINITY COLLEGE


Richard Hillary Memorial Lecture 1999

SEBASTIAN FAULKS will deliver the Richard Hillary Memorial
Lecture at 5
p.m. on Wednesday, 12 May, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the
St
Cross Building.

Subject: `Something happened: how narrative
helps tell
the time.'

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section



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

750th anniversary, 1249–1999


Builders of the Millennium Lecture
Series

LUCIANO VIOLANTE, President, the Italian Chamber of Deputies,
will
lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 1 June, in the Old Library, All
Souls
College.

Subject: `The fight against organised crime under the
rule
of law.' (H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture)

PROFESSOR HANS TIETMEYER, President, the Bundesbank, will
lecture
at 5
p.m. on Thursday, 3 June, in the Sheldonian Theatre.

Subject: `Economic convergence and monetary union.'

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section



OXFORD ITALIAN ASSOCIATION

Lectures

The following lectures will be held at 7.45 for 8 p.m. on the
days
shown. Admission is £1 for members, £2 for non-members
(students free). For further information, telephone Oxford
377479.

DR J. WILKS

Tue. 18 May, Pauling Centre for Human Sciences, 58
Banbury
Road
: `Italian battlegrounds in the Alps during World
War
One.'

DR N. DAVIDSON

Wed. 26 May, Mary Ogilvie Theatre, St Anne's:
`Patrons
or parasites? The cultural history of Renaissance
Venice.'

DR T. ROWLEY

Thur. 3 June, Mary Ogilvie Theatre, St Anne's:
`The
Normans in Sicily.'

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section


Other meetings

The following will be held at 7.45 for 8 p.m. on Thursdays.
Admission to
the film-showing is £1 for members, £2 for non-members
(students free); admission to the 6 May event is free.

29 Apr., Rewley House Theatre: showing of film
`Schermo a tre punti' (no subtitles).

6 May, No. 48 Common Room, St Anne's: conversazione
in
italiano, `La Calabria.'

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section





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 29 April 1999: Grants and Funding<br />

Grants and Research Funding


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or
recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



RESEARCH SERVICES OFFICE

The Oxford University Research Services Office (RSO) is based in
the
University Offices, Wellington Square (with a satellite office
in the Medical
School Offices, Level 3, John Radcliffe Hospital). The RSO is
part of the
Finance Division of the University's central administration.

The office processes and approves all applications to outside
bodies for
research grants and approves research-related agreements on
behalf of the
University. It also acts in an advisory capacity for those
seeking outside
funding or requiring information about specific initiatives (e.g.
LINK, ROPA,
Teaching Company schemes, EU research programmes, etc.).

The RSO produces a weekly bulletin on funding opportunities,
electronic
Research and Industry News (eRIN), which is available to members
of the
University via the World Wide Web at:
http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rcso/erin/.

Research contracts with industry are negotiated through the RSO,
which also
deals, inter alia, with various intellectual property
matters, including
other research-related agreements covering clinical trials and
services,
services to industry, confidentiality issues, material transfer
and consultancy.
Contact details for members of the RSO, from whom advice may be
sought are
as follows:

Ms Catherine Quinn, Director

(telephone: (2)70158, e-mail:
catherine.quinn@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Mr Pierre-Manuel Espinasse, Research Grants and European Liaison
Officer
(telephone: (2)70043, e-mail:
pierre.espinasse@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Dr Michael Halsey, Assistant Registrar - Senior Contracts
Officer (telephone:
(2)70011, e-mail: michael.halsey@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Dr Richard Liwicki, Assistant Registrar, John Radcliffe
Hospital
satellite
office (telephone: 553 22604, e-mail:
richard.liwicki@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Ms Kathryn Dally, Administrative Officer (telephone: (2)80319,
e-mail:
kathryn.dally@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Ms Grace Garland, Administrative Officer (telephone: (2)80666,
e-mail:
grace.garland@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Ms Linda Jones, Administrative Officer (telephone: 553 22131,
e-mail:
linda.jones@admin.ox.ac.uk).

Enquiries relating to day-to-day processing of research grant
applications
should be addressed to the RSO's Research Grants Office, Room
330, the
University Offices (telephone: (2)70146), or, in the case of
certain clinical
departments, to the RSO satellite office, the Medical School
Offices, Level 3,
John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington (telephone: 553 22544).

General enquiries may be addressed, in the first instance, to Mrs
Jane Taylor
(telephone: (2)70143), who will be pleased to direct calls to the
appropriate
member of staff.


Administrative procedures in respect of externally sponsored
research

Members of the University are reminded that it is a requirement
of the
General Board that all applications for externally funded support
must be
endorsed on behalf of the University through the Research
Services Office
before they are despatched to the sponsor, whether or not this
is required
by the funding body. (This includes, for example, bodies such as
the
Leverhulme Trust, and other charities and EU programmes which do
not
specifically ask for administrative authorisation.)

The reason for the requirement is twofold: namely (i) to ensure
that the funds
being requested are adequate for the purpose and the costing
rules of the
funding body have been applied correctly, and (ii) to ensure that
the
University would be in a position to undertake the obligations
arising from an
award and that these do not contravene University policy.

The detailed arrangements are as follows: applicants for research
grants
should submit their applications, together with a completed copy
of the
University's outside grant form, to Room 330, Research Services
Office,
University Offices, Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70146),
leaving three clear
working days for them to be processed.

In connection with the acceptance of awards and signature of
contracts it
should be noted that Statutes, Tit.X, cl. 3, provides that `no
official of the
University or any other person employed by the University or
working in or
in connection with any department of or under the control of the
University
shall in connection with any invention, discovery, or patent, or
... process, or
manufacture have authority to make any representations on behalf
of the
University or to enter into any contract on behalf of the
University or to be
concerned in any transaction whatsoever in connection therewith
on behalf of
the University except with the express consent of Council'.

The relevant officials in the Research Services Office have been
given
authority to approve applications for external funds in support
of research
and the terms of contracts in straightforward cases under this
provision; in
more complicated cases, specific authority is necessary.

Enquiries related to any aspect of externally sponsored research
should be
directed to the Research Services Office, whose staff would be
pleased to help.

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section



BRITISH ACADEMY


Research Professorships 1999–2000

The British Academy has announced details of the first
competition for a new
series of Research Professorships in the Humanities and Social
Sciences.
Awards are for three years, starting between 1 October 1999 and
1 October
2000.

Applications should be submitted through the college (for CUF and
special
non-CUF lecturers); or through the University (for other
university academic
staff). However, approval for all applications from academic
staff holding joint
appointments must be obtained from the faculty board in question,
the General
Board, and the college before they are forwarded to the British
Academy.

Further details about the scheme may be found in the Research
Services
Offices electronic bulletin (http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rcso/erin)
and are also
available, together with application forms, from the appropriate
faculty board
secretaries. The academy's closing date for receipt of
applications is 21 May.

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section



SIR JOHN HICKS FUND

The Committee for the Sir John Hicks Fund invites applications
from members
of the University for grants towards the costs of research in
economic
history. Applications will be considered from undergraduates,
graduate
students, and members of the academic staff, and may relate to
research into
the economic history of any period or country.

Applicants should (a) provide sufficient information
about the
general nature of their research to establish that it falls
within the field of
economic history; and (b) specify the precise nature and
cost of the
expenditure for which a grant is requested. They should also give
the name
of one referee who might be consulted by the committee.

It is intended by the committee that grants should normally
be made for
sums of up to £250, though this may on occasion be exceeded.
Retrospective grants will be made only in exceptional
circumstances.

The committee will consider applications twice each year. The
closing date
for the first round is Monday of the third week of Hilary Term,
and for the
second round Monday of the third week of Trinity Term.
Applications should
be sent to the Secretary of the Committee for the Sir John Hicks
Fund,
University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford.

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section



OPPENHEIMER FUND

The Oppenheimer Fund provides grants to assist the academic
exchange of
senior members between the University of Oxford and universities
and similar
institutions of higher education in the Republic of South Africa.
Applications
are invited from senior members of the University who wish either
to visit one
or more universities in South Africa or to invite a staff member
from a South
African university to Oxford. Grants may be awarded to assist
with living
expenses for a maximum of six months, and travel costs. Visits
for the sole
purpose of attending a conference will not normally be eligible
for support
from the fund.

The maximum level of grants is likely to be up to £1,000 per
month for
subsistence and up to £700 for the cost of travel between
Oxford and
South Africa. Applications for grants from the fund should
include a statement
of the purpose of the proposed visits (including an outline of
any research
to be carried out during the visit), duration, and estimated
costs, details of
any other available sources of funding, and, in the cast of
visits to Oxford,
a curriculum vitae of the staff member it is
proposed to invite and
a letter of support from a senior member at Oxford. Applications
should be
sent to the International Office, University Offices, Wellington
Square, by 1
June.

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section





<br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 29 April 1999: Examinations and Boards<br />

Examinations and Boards


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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LECTURE LISTS: MICHAELMAS TERM 1999


Timetabling arrangements

Faculties and departments are asked to forward their lecture-list
files as soon as possible after the finalisation of their
arrangements. Details of the dates by which the files are
expected to be supplied have been circulated to faculties and
departments.

The printed lecture lists will be distributed shortly before the
start of term.

Disks, copy, and proofs relating to the Lecture Lists should be
forwarded to the Gazette and Lecture Lists
Assistant, Oxenford House, Magdalen Street, Oxford OX1 3AB
(telephone: (2)78121, fax: (2)78180, e-mail:
lecture.lists@admin.ox.ac.uk).

For arrangements concerning the Special Lecture List, see below.

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section



Entries shared between lists

Any faculty member who wishes to place an entry in the lecture
list of another faculty or department is asked to forward the
information as soon as possible, and directly to the
other faculty
.

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section



Special Lecture List

Michaelmas Term 1999

The Special Lecture List for Trinity Term 1999 will appear
shortly before term, at the same time as the ordinary Lecture
Lists. It will include all appropriate lectures for Hilary Term
published in the Gazette during Michaelmas Term, and
also lectures of which details are received by Monday,
15 March
(ninth week).

Those wishing to contribute to the Special Lecture List are
asked to note that this is a firm deadline, and that items
received after it are unlikely to be included.

Items for the Special Lecture List should be forwarded to the
Gazette and Lecture Lists Assistant, Oxenford House,
Magdalen Street, Oxford OX1 3AB (telephone: (2)78121, fax:
(2)78180, e-mail: lecture.lists@admin.ox.ac.uk).

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section



Enquiries concerning proposed dates for
special lectures

Those responsible for arranging lectures intended to be of
interest to a wide university audience may wish to consult the
editor of the Gazette (fax: 556646, e-mail:
gazette@admin.ox.ac.uk), or the Gazette and Lecture
Lists Assistant (details above), for information on any other
similar lectures, of which details have been received, due to be
given on the proposed date or dates.

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section



Board of the Faculty of Literae
Humaniores

The Board of the Faculty recommends that lectures should be given
at the following hours:

Monday       9      Greek History/Latin Literature
            10      Philosophy
            11      Roman History/Greek Literature
            12      Archaeology/Philosophy
            5–7    Free

Tuesday      9      Archaeology
            10      Philosophy
            11      Literature
            12      History
            5–7    Free

Wednesday    9      Roman History/Greek Literature
            10      Philosophy
            11      Latin Literature/Greek History
            12      Archaeology/Philosophy
            5–7    Free

Thursday     9      Literature
            10      Philosophy
            11      Greek History/Latin Literature
            12      Archaeology
            5–7    Free

Friday       9      History
            10      Philosophy
            11      Roman History/Greek Literature
            12      Archaeology/Philosophy
            5–7    Free

Sub-faculty of Languages and Literature

It is recommended that lectures for Honour Moderations should be
given at the following hours whenever possible:

Homer               11 (Wednesdays, Fridays)
Virgil              11 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
Greek Authors       12 (Mondays, Wednesdays)
Latin Authors       11 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
Language Papers     10 (Fridays)
A                   11 (Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, TT;      
                     Mondays, Wednesdays, MT, HT)
C                   10 (Mondays, Wednesdays)
D                   10 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
E                   12
F                   12 (Tuesdays, Thursdays, HT, TT);
                    11 and 12 (Tuesdays, Thursdays, MT)

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section



Board of the Faculty of Medieval and
Modern Languages

Timetable of introductory or survey lectures

The Board of the Faculty recommends that lectures should be given
at the following hours:

Monday      10      French
            11      German
            12      German
Tuesday      9      Italian
            10      Spanish
            11      Italian 
            12      Spanish
Wednesday    9      Russian
            10      French
            11      Linguistics
            12      Linguistics
Thursday     9      Spanish
            10      Russian
            11      Russian
            12      Italian
Friday      10      French
            11      German
            12      Linguistics

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section



Board of the Faculty of Social Studies

The Board of the Faculty recommends that:

(a) lectures for the Preliminary Examination for
Philosophy, Politics, and Economics should be given at the
following times:

Politics    10
Economics   11
Philosophy  12 noon (or a 10 o'clock period not occupied by    
            Politics);

(b) courses of introductory lectures and lectures on
compulsory subjects for undergraduates in their first three or
four terms of work for the Honour School of Philosophy, Politics,
and Economics should normally be given at the following times:

Politics    12 
Economics   11
Philosophy  10

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section



Board of the Faculty of Theology

To avoid clashes with Philosophy lectures members of the faculty
are asked not to offer Theology lectures of interest to those
reading for the Joint Honour School of Philosophy and Theology
at the following times:

Preliminary Examination

Monday to Saturday 12

Honour School

Monday 10 and 12

Tuesday 10

Wednesday 10 and 12

Thursday 10

Friday 10 and 12

Saturday 10

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section



CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes
in regulations made by boards of faculties and committees will
come into effect on 14 May.


1 Board of the Faculty of Anthropology
and Geography

(a) M.Phil. in Ethnology and Museum Ethnography

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
586, l. 38,
delete `Ethnology' and substitute `Material
Anthropology'.

2 Ibid., l. 45, delete `Ethnology' and
substitute `Material Anthropology'.

3 Ibid., p. 587, l. 11 and l. 13,
after `himself' insert `or herself'.

4 Ibid., l. 15, delete `(i)a' and
substitute `A.
A'.

5 Ibid., delete `general field of ethnology'
and
substitute `theoretical field of material
anthropology'.

6 Ibid., l. 16, delete `(ii)a' and substitute
`B.

A paper consisting of two Parts: Part I relating to the
research methods in material anthropology and museum
ethnography and Part II to'.

7 Ibid., l. 16, after `area' insert `and'.

8 Ibid., l. 19 and l. 23, in each case,
delete `his' and substitute `the'.

9 Ibid., l. 25, after `his' insert `or
her'.

10 Ibid., l. 28, delete `fifth' and
substitute `second'.

11 Ibid., l. 31, after `Library' insert `If
the
thesis is superseded by a D.Phil. thesis by the same student
partly using the same material, the Board of the Faculty of
Anthropology and Geography may authorise the withdrawal of the
M.Phil. thesis from the Balfour Library.'

12 Ibid., l. 35, after `him' insert `or
her'.

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section


(b) Diploma in Material Anthropology and Museum
Ethnography

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 945, delete ll.
5þ39, and
substitute:

`I Social and Cultural Anthropology A: History and Development

(paper and syllabus shared with the Diploma in Social
Anthropology)

The scope of this paper includes the following topics: history
and development of the subject, and the relation between
academic research, museums, and the imperial context of
anthropology's past; relations to other subjects, including
archaeology and history. Key authors and debates in the
development of anthropology, with particular reference to:
kinship, marriage, gender, and sexuality; space, place, and
culture; environment and cultural landscapes in transition;
land and property rights; production and consumption;
transactions and modes of exchange; the division of labour
and the comparative anthropology of work; technology and
social change; the colonial process and its legacy;
nationalism, ethnicity, migration, and transnationalism;
urbanism.

II Social and Cultural Anthropology B: Theory and Methods

(paper and syllabus shared with the M.Sc. in Material
Anthropology and Museum Ethnography)

The scope of this paper includes the following topics:
concepts of the individual, society and the person in
anthropological perspective; issues of the body, theories of
practice, phenomenology; theories of power, order and law;
aspects of disorder and violence in society; systems of
knowledge and belief; ritual and myth; symbolism and symbolic
classification; moral systems and the world religions; oral
literature and historical memory; linguistic and artistic
modes of communication; aesthetic anthropology; methodological
approaches to the study of arts, performance, and material
culture; museums, written texts and representation. Fieldwork
and data collection methods; quantitative and qualitative
techniques; cultural property and indigenous rights;
applications of film and sound recording; preparing research
proposals; ethical problems.

III and IV Optional Papers

Candidates must choose two optional papers. Titles of
available options will be made known at the beginning of each
academic year. They will be divided into three lists, as
follows:

List A: The Social Anthropology of a Selected Religion.

List B: Topics in Material Anthropology.

List C: Anthropology and Practical Issues.

Candidates for the degree of Diploma in Material Anthropology
and Museum Ethnography must select at least one of their
options from List B.'

(c) M.Sc. in Material Anthropology and Museum
Ethnography

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
746, l. 29,
delete `Ethnology and Museum Ethnography' and
substitute `Material Anthropology and Museum
Ethnography'.

2 Ibid., ll. 30–1, delete `Ethnology and
Museum Ethnography' and substitute `Social and Cultural
Anthropology'.

3 Ibid., l. 34, delete `two' and
substitute `three'.

4 Ibid., l. 40, delete `a person designated
for
this
purpose by the faculty board' and substitute `the
Chairman of Examiners. The proposed title of the dissertation,
together with a paragraph describing its scope and the
supervisor's written endorsement, must be submitted to the
Chairman of Examiners by Monday of the first week of Trinity
Term'.

5 Ibid., l. 41, delete `Two' and
substitute `Three'.

6 Ibid., after `dissertation' delete `,'.

7 Ibid., l. 43, delete `Ethnology' and
substitute `Material Culture'.

8 Ibid., p. 747, l. 4,
after `Ethnography' insert `,'.

9 Ibid., delete ll. 9–42 and substitute
syllabus as for the
Diploma in Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography (see
(b) above).

(d) M.Sc. in Social Anthropology

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
768, l. 2,
after `Social' insert `and Cultural'.

2 Ibid., l. 6, delete `two' and
substitute `three'.

3 Ibid., l. 12, delete `a person designated
for
this
purpose by the faculty board' and substitute `the
Chairman of Examiners. The proposed title of the dissertation
together with a paragraph describing its scope and the
supervisor's written endorsement, must be submitted to the
Chairman of Examiners by Monday of the first week of Trinity
Term'.

4 Ibid., l. 13, delete `Two' and
substitute `Three'.

5 Ibid., ll. 15–16, delete `Ethnology
and
Museum Ethnography/'.

6 Ibid., l. 16, after `Social
Anthropology' insert `/Material Cultural and Museum
Ethnography'.

7 Ibid., delete from p. 768, l. 30 to p. 769,
l. 17, and
substitute:

`I Social and Cultural Anthropology A: History and Development

(paper and syllabus shared with the M.Sc. in Material
Anthropology and Museum Ethnography)

The scope of this paper includes the following topics: history
and development of the subject, and the relation between
academic research, museums, and the imperial context of
anthropology's past; relations to other subjects, including
archaeology and history. Key authors and debates in the
development of anthropology, with particular reference to:
kinship, marriage, gender, and sexuality; space, place, and
culture; environment and cultural landscapes in transition;
land and property rights; production and consumption;
transactions and modes of exchange; the division of labour
and the comparative anthropology of work; technology and
social change; the colonial process and its legacy;
nationalism, ethnicity, migration, and transnationalism;
urbanism.

II Social and Cultural Anthropology B: Theory and Methods

(paper and syllabus shared with the M.Sc. in Material Anthro-
pology and Museum Ethnography)

The scope of this paper includes the following topics:
concepts of the individual, society and the person in
anthropological perspective; issues of the body, theories of
practice, phenomenology; theories of power, order and law;
aspects of disorder and violence in society; systems of
knowledge and belief; ritual and myth; symbolism and symbolic
classification; moral systems and the world religions; oral
literature and historical memory; linguistic and artistic
modes of communication; aesthetic anthropology; methodological
approaches to the study of arts, performance, and material
culture; museums, written texts and representation. Fieldwork
and data collection methods; quantitative and qualitative
techniques; cultural property and indigenous rights;
applications of film and sound recording; preparing research
proposals; ethical problems.

III and IV Optional Papers

Candidates must choose two optional papers. Titles of
available options will be made known at the beginning of each
academic year. They will be divided into three lists, as
follows:

List A: The Social Anthropology of a Selected Religion.

List B: Topics in Material Anthropology.

List C: Anthropology and Practical Issues.

Candidates for the degree of M.Sc. in Social Anthropology must
select one of their options from List A, and the other from
List B or List C.'

(e) Diploma in Social Anthropology

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
950, l. 34,
before `Candidates' insert `1.'

2 Ibid., p. 951, delete ll. 9–44, and
substitute the
newSyllabus which is identical to the new Schedule for the
M.Sc. in Social Anthropology (see (d) 7 above).

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section



2 Board of the Faculty of Anthropology
and Geography and the Committee for Archaeology

Honour School of Archaeology and Anthropology

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 135, ll. 48–9,
delete `First week of Trinity Term' and
substitute `Ninth week of Hilary Full Term preceding the
examination'.

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section



3 Board of the Faculty of English
Language and Literature

Honour School of English Language and Literature

(a) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first
examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
196, l.
23, `after `he' insert `or she'.

2 Ibid., l. 24 after `if he' insert `or
she'.

3 Ibid., l. 24 after `subjects he' insert `or
she'.

4 Ibid., l. 27 after `whether he' insert `or
she'.

5 Ibid., l. 27 after `subjects he' insert `or
she'.

6 Ibid., l. 30 after `he' insert `or she'.

7 Ibid., l. 38 after `his insert `or her'.

8 Ibid., l. 39 after `his insert `or her'.

9 Ibid., p. 197, l. 1, delete `not exceed
6,000
words*' and substitute `contain no fewer than 5,000
nor more than 6,000 words'.

10 Ibid., delete footnote.

11 Ibid., l. 26, after `to be' insert `either
too
short or'.

12 Ibid., p. 199, l. 11, after `of
not' insert `fewer than 5,000 nor'.

13 Ibid., delete ll. 22–4 and
substitute:

`Candidates may offer any one of the following, provided that
they may not offer in the Final Honour School any author they
offered in Paper 3 of Moderations in English Language and
Literature.

(a) (i) Chaucer, or (ii) Mergery Kempe, or
(iii) The York
Cycle.

(b) (i) Donne, or (ii) Milton, or (iii)
Marlowe.

(c) (i) Pope, or (ii) Defoe, or (iii) Behn.

(d) (i) Wordsworth, or (ii) Austen, or (iii)
Johnson.

(e) (i) R. Browning, or (ii) G. Eliot, or
(iii) Wilde.

(f) (i) Yeats, or (ii) Woolf, or (iii)
Beckett.

(g) (i) Plath, or (ii) Rushdie, or (iii)
Pinter.

Named authors will be replaced in order, in rotation, in
three groups (first: a, d, g; second: b, e, h; third: c, f) in
cycles of three years, the first replacement to occur in 2002,
for first examination in 2003. Notice of new named authors will
be published in the University Gazette by the
beginning of the
fifth week of Trinity Term two years before first examination.þ

14 Ibid., p. 201, l. 7, after `of
not' insert `fewer than 5,000 nor'.

15 Ibid., l. 21, after `one of
the' insert `syndicated'.

16 Ibid., after l. 24 insert:

` "Syndicated" and Course II Special Topics shall
be:

(i) Dissident Writing, c.1381–c.1414.

(ii) The Art of Biography.

(iii) Language and the Media.

(iv) Anglo-American Film.

(v) Linguistic Theory (as specified for Course II, paper
B.4).

(vi) Medieval and Renaissance Romance (as specified for Course
II, paper B.10.f).

(vii) Scottish Literature pre-1600 (as specified for
Course
II, paper B.10.g).

(viii) Old Norse (as specified for Course II, paper C.5).

(ix) Old French Literature (as specified for Course II, paper
C.10.

(x) Medieval Welsh (as specified for Course II, paper C.11).

(xi) Medieval Latin (as specified for Course II, paper C.12).þ

17 Ibid., p. 204, l. 19, delete `Genes' and
substitute `Genres'.

(b) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first
examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 199, in ll.
22–4 as amended
by cl. 14 in section (a) above, insert new item
(a) as follows
and renumber existing items (a)–(g) as
(b)–():
'(a) (i) The Beowulf Poet, or (ii) Alfred, or
(iii)
Aelfric'.

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section



4 Boards of the Faculties of English
Language and Literature and Modern History

Honour School of Modern History and English

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in
2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 363, delete l. 24
and
substitute:

'(a) Literature and the Public in England,
c.1350–1430'.

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section



5 Board of the Faculty of Literae
Humaniores

Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools including
Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 2000(for first examination in
2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
460, delete l. 8, and
substitute `105. Philosophy of Science and Philosophy of
Psychology and Neuroscience'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 13–16 and
substitute:

'Part B: philosophical issues arising from the history and
practice of psychology and neuroscience.'

3 Ibid., p. 464, l. 40, after `111' insert
`in
the same year'.

4 Ibid., l. 41, after `112' insert `in the
same
year'.

5 Ibid., l. 44, after `106' insert `in the
same
year'.

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section



6 Boards of the Faculties of Literae
Humaniores and Physical Sciences

Honour School of Physics and Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in
2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 494, delete ll.
15–17 and
substitute:

`5. For the Physics papers, candidates are restricted to
models of calculators included in a list provided by the
Chairman of Examiners not later than Wednesday of the fourth
week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination.'

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section



7 Board of the Faculty of Medieval and
Modern Languages

Honour School of Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in
2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1988,
p.
383, delete ll. 13–21 and
substitute:

`Modern Spanish. Candidates will be required to show knowledge
of the descriptive analysis of the structure of the
contemporary language, as used in Spain and in the Americas.'

2 Ibid., p. 388, after l. 16, insert:

`(1) Garcilaso de la Vega, Poesías castellanas
completas (ed.
E.L. Rivers, Clásicos Castalia, 3rd edn, 1996).'

3 Ibid., ll. 17, 19, 30, and 36
renumber `(1)', `(2)', `(3)', `(4)' as `(2)', `(3)', `(4)', `(5)'
respectively.

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section



8 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval
and Modern Languages and English Language and Literature

Honour School of English and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in
2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 7 above).

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section



9 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval
and Modern Languages and Literae Humaniores

(a) Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages

(b) Honour School of Philosophy and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in
2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 7 above).

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section



10 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval
and Modern Languages and Modern History

Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in
2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 7 above).

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section



11 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval
and Modern Languages and Oriental Studies

Honour School of European and Middle Eastern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in
2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 7 above).

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section



12 Board of the Faculty of Medieval
and Modern Languages

Honour School of Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in
2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
delete from p. 381, l. 38 to
p. 382, l. 7 and substitute:

`The history of the Russian language with the following texts
prescribed:

(1) for linguistic comment:

(a) Marginalia to Novgorod service books (V.V. Ivanov
et al.,
Khrestomatiya po istorii russkogo yazyka, Moscow, 1990, pp.
26'7).

Novgorod birchbark texts nos. 247, 644, 605, 424, 724, 717,
731, 531, 705, 142, 370, 363, 361, 125, 43, 49, 154 (A.A.
Zaliznyak, Drevnenovgorodskii dialekt, Moscow, 1995, pp.
223–4, 244–5, 246–8, 295–300, 325–9,
344–7, 349–51, 440–1,
494–5, 508–9, 514, 536, 542–3, 562–4).
Vkladnaya Varlaama (Zaliznyak, pp. 374–7).

Treaty of Alexander Nevsky and Novgorod with the Germans,
1262–3 (S.P. Obnorsky and S.G. Barkhudarov, Khrestomatiya
po
istorii russkogo yazyka, part 1, 2nd ed., Moscow, 1952, pp.
51–2).

Novgorod First Chronicle, s.a. 6738–9 (ed. A.N. Nasonov,
Novgorodskaya Pervaya letopis' starshego i mladshego
izvoda, Moscow-Leningrad, 1950, pp. 69–71).

(b) Afanasy Nikitin, Khozhenie za tri morya (Ivanov
et al.,
pp. 322–5).

Dukhovnaya gramota I. Yu. Gryaznogo (Ivanov et al., pp.
279–80).

Letter of T.I. Golitsyna to V.V. Golitsyn (S.I. Kotkov et al.,
Moskovskaya delovaya i bytovaya pis'mennost' XVII veka,
Moscow, 1968, p. 20).

Letters of D.V. Mikhalkov to M.I. Mikhalkova and P.D.
Mikhalkov (Kotkov et al., pp. 39–40 (17b'v), 41 (18b)).

Letters of U.S. Pazukhina to S.I. Pazukhin and E. Klement'ev
to F.M. Chelishchev (S.I. Kotkov and N.P. Pankratova,
Isochniki po istorii narodno-razgovornogo yazyka XVII-nachala
XVIII veka, Moscow, 1964, pp. 169–70, 233).

Letters of Peter I to Tsaritsa Natal'ya Kirillovna, to F.M.
Apraksin, to B.P. Sheremetev (S.P. Obnorsky and S.G.
Barkhudarov, Khrestomatiya po istorii russkogo yazyka, part
2:1, Moscow, 1949, pp. 83, 96–7, 99–100).

Evidence of A. Turcheninov on fire of 29 May 1737 (A.I. Sumkina
and S.I. Kotkov, Pamyatniki moskovskoi delovoi pis'mennosti
XVIII veka, Moscow, 1981, pp. 159–60).

Letters of V.B. Golitsyn to Vl.B. Golitsyn, M.D. Kurakina to
B.I. Kurakin, M.M. Shcherbatov to D.M. Shcherbatov (Sumkina
and Kotkov, pp. 24–6, 49–50 (50), 73–4).

(2) for translation and linguistic comment:

(a) Colophon to Ostromir Codex (Ivanov et al., pp.
15–16).
Mstislavova gramota (Ivanov et al., pp. 39–41).

Colophon to Mstislav's Gospel Book (Ivanov et al., pp.
49–50).

Treaty of Novgorod with Grand Prince Yaroslav Yaroslavich,
1264 or 1265 (Obnorsky and Barkhudarov, part 1, pp. 52–4).

Russkaya Pravda(Ivanov, et al., pp. 67–73).

Novgorod First Chronicle, s.a. 6633–8, 6675–7, 6700,
6712,
6777–80 (Nasonov, pp. 21–2, 32–3, 40, 46–9,
87–90).

(b) Sudebnik of 1497 (Ivanov et al., pp.
169–72).

Domostroi (Ivanov et al., pp. 255–60).

Ulozhenie Alekseya Mikhailovicha, Chapter 10 (Ivanov et al.,
pp. 380–1).

G. Kotoshikhin, O. Rossii v tsarstvovanie Alekseya
Mikhailovicha, Chapter 4, Section 24, Chapter 13, Sec-tion
1–4 (ed. A.E. Pennington, Oxford, 1980, pp. 65–7,
159–63).

Stateinyi spisok P.A. Tolstogo (Obnorsky and Barkhudarov, part
2:1, 1949, pp. 72–5).

Candidates will be required to show knowledge either of the
texts listed under (1) (a)–(b), or those
listed under (1) (a)
and (2) (a), or of those listed under (i)
(b) and (2) (b).'

2 Ibid., p. 383, delete ll. 31–8 and
substitute:

`(1) The development of the Church Slavonic language, with the
following texts prescribed:

(a) for linguistic comment:

Kiev Missal and Euchologium Sinaticum (R. Auty, Handbook of
Old Church Slavonic, London, 1968 and subsequent reprints, Pt.
ii, Texts andGlossary, passages IV, pp. 52–7, and VI, pp.
64–9).

Luke x:25–37 (Auty, passage XIV, pp. 97–106; ed.
L.P.
Zhukovskaya et al., Aprakos Mstislava Velikogo, Moscow, 1983,
p. 131).

Psalm liv (ed. S. Sever'yanov, Sinaiskaya Psaltyr', Petrograd,
1922, pp. 67–9; ed. E.V. Cheshko et al., Norovskaya
psaltyr'. Srednebolgarskaya rukopis' XIV veka,
Sofia, 1989, Pt. ii, pp. 387–91; Psaltir s posljedovanjem

`Durd'a Crnojeviïca 1494, reprinted Cetinje, 1986; the Synodal
Bible of 1751 and subsequent editions, e.g. Moscow, 1815, St
Petersburg, 1820).

(b) for translation and linguistic comment:

Vita Constantini, xiv–xv, xvii–xviii, Vita Methodii,
v–xvii,

the Treatise on Letters, the Acrostich Prayer (A. Vaillant,
Textes vieux-slaves, Paris, 1968, Pt. i, Textes et glossaire,
passages I, pp. 30–3, 37–40, II, pp. 46–55, III,
pp. 57–61,
IV C, pp. 68–70).

Kniga Konstantina filosofa i grammatika o pismenex, sections
4'9 (V. Jagiïc, Codex slovenicus rerum grammaticarum, Berlin,
1896, reprinted Munich, 1968, V, pp. 108–13).

Zhitie sv. Stefana episkopa Permskogo (ed. V. Druzhinin, St
Petersburg, 1897, reprinted The Hague, 1959, pp. 69–74).

V.F. Burtsov's Bakvar' (V.V. Ivanov et al., Khrestomatiya
po istorii russkogo yazyka, Moscow, 1990, pp. 369–74).

Candidates will be required to show knowledge of the texts
listed under (1) (a) and (1) (b).'

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section



13 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval
and Modern Languages and English Language and Literature

Honour School of English and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in
2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 12 above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



14 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval
and Modern Languages and Literae Humaniores

(a) Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages

(b) Honour School of Philosophy and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in
2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 12 above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



15 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval
and Modern Languages and Modern History

Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in
2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 12 above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



16 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval
and Modern Languages and Oriental Studies

Honour School of European and Middle Eastern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in
2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 12 above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



17 Board of the Faculty of Medieval
and Modern Languages

Honour School of Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in
2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 392, delete ll.
44–7 and
substitute:

`1. A candidate may offer one of the Special Subjects from the
list below. Fuller details, including the method of
examination for each Special Subject, will be published in the
University Gazette by the beginning of the fifth
week of the
Trinity Term two years before the examination.

Depending on the availability of teaching resources, not all
Special Subjects will be available to all candidates in every
year.

Modern literary theory.

European cinema.

Syntax.

Semantics.

Phonetics and Pholology.

Sociolinguistics.

Translation Theory.

Romance philology and linguistcs.

Anglo-Norman language and literature.

Old Provençal.

The Old French epic.

The twelfth- and thirteenth-century GrailRomances.

French historical writing to 1515.

French poetry of the mid-sixteenth century.

Dramatic theory and practice in France 1605–60.

Jean-Jacques Rousseau.

French satire from Rabelais to Beaumarchais.

Honoré de Balzac.

French poetry 1870–1918.

French literature and the First World War.

Marcel Proust.

Surrealism.

The `Nouveau Roman'.

Literature and the visual arts from Diderot to Zola.

French women writers.

Advanced French translation: theory and practice.

Old Norse.

Old High German, with either Gothic or Old Saxon or Old
English.

The German Minnesang.

Wolfram von Eschenbach.

Mechthild von Magdeburg and women's writing in German
1150–1300.

Martin Luther.

German poetry and drama of the seventeenth century.

Eighteenth-century German aesthetics from Baumgarten to
Schiller.

Hölderlin, Hyperion, Empedokles (ed. M.B. Benn, Clarendon
German Series) and the poetry written after 1797.

Weimar Classicism 1794–1805.

The Bildungsroman.

German Political Thought 1780–1830.

Expressionism and Dada in literature and the visual arts.

Shorter modernist prose fiction 1901–27.

The poetry of Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Stefan George, and Rainer
Maria Rilke.

German poetry from 1945.

The German novel from 1945.

Literature in the GDR.

Advanced German translation.

Italian lyric poetry of the thirteenth century.

Dante's minor works.

`Questione della lingua'.

Women writers of the Italian Renaissance.

The aesthetics and literary criticism of Croce.

The works of Carlo Emilio Gadda.

Sicilian literature 1950–90.

Italian women writers 1950–90.

The civilisation of Muslim Spain.

Spanish drama before Lope de Vega.

The Spanish Erasmians.

The discovery and conquest of Mexico and the Antilles.

Spanish devotional and mystical writing 1577–88.

Federico García Lorce.

Modern Catalan literature.

Modern Galician literature.

Modern Catalan.

Modern Galician.

Bilingualism: Spanish and English.

The work of Alfonso the Wise as author and patron of litera-
ture and learning.

Spanish and Portuguese prose romances of the fifteenth and
sixteenth centuries.

Latin American fiction from 1940.

The Galician-Portuguese Cancioneiros.

The chronicles of the Portuguese expansion in Asia.

The Brazilian novel of the North-East 1880–1960.

Twentieth-century Portuguese and Brazilian women writers.

The literature of Portuguese-speaking Africa.

Old Church Slavonic in relation to Common Slavonic and
Russian.

Comparative Slavonic Philology.

The structure and history of one of the following languages:
Bulgarian, Czech, Macedonian, Polish, Serbo-Croat, Slovak,
Slovene, Sorbian, Ukrainian, White Russian.

Language and style in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century
Russian literature.

Russian narrative fiction from 1917.

Modern Russian poetry.

Russian religious philosophy in the late nineteenth and early
twentieth centuries.

Russian women's writing.

The School of the Ionian Islands 1797–1912, with special
reference to the works of Solomos, Kalvos, Laskaratos,
Matesis, Valaoritis, and Mavilis.

The New Athenian School of Poetry 1880–1912, with special
reference to the works of Palamas, Drosinis, Gryparis,
Krystallis, Malakasis, and Hadzopoulos.

The Greek novel 1918–40, with special reference to the works
of K. Theotokis, G. Theotokas, Karagatsis, Myrivilis, Venezis,
K. Politis, and G.N. Abbot.

Greek women writers.

Medieval Welsh tales and romances.

The poets of the Welsh princes.

The poetry of Dafydd ap Gwilym.

The Ulster Cycle of tales.

The classical Irish bardic tradition.

The structure and history of the Welsh language.

The structure and history of the Irish language.

Hebrew poetry and prose of medieval Spain and Provence.

Early twentieth-century Hebrew literature.

The literature of the State of Israel.

Yiddish linguistics.

Modern Yiddish literature.

Any other subject approved by the Modern Languages Board.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



18 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval
and Modern Languages and English Language and Literature

nour School of English and Modern Languages

th effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 17 above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



9 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval
and Modern Languages and Literae Humaniores

(a) Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages

(b) Honour School of Philosophy and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in
2001)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 17 above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



20 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval
and Modern Languages and Modern History

Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in
2001)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 17 above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



21 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval
and Modern Languages and Oriental Studies

Honour School of European and Middle Eastern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in
2001)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 17 above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



22 Board of the Faculty of Medieval
and Modern Languages

(a) Honour School of Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in
2002)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 385, delete ll.
15–23 and
substitute:

`Das Nibelungenlied, ed. K. Bartsch et al. (Reclam 1997),
avent. 1, 14–17, 23–30, 36–9.

Wolfram von Eschenbach, Parzival, books 3, 5, and 9.

Frauenlieder des Mittelalters, ed. I. Kasten (Reclam 1990),
nos. 1–47.

Der Stricker, Erzählungen, Fabeln, Raden, ed. O. Ehrismann
(Reclam 1992).'

Return to List of Contents of this
section


(b) M.St. in Research Methods in Modern Languages/
M.St. in
European Literature

With effect from 1 October 1999

1 In Examination Decrees, 1988,
delete from l. 21, p. 696 to
l. 22, p. 697.

2 Ibid., p. 864, ll. 50–1, p. 865,
delete
all references to

`Master of Studies in Research Methods in Modern
Languages' and substitute in each case `Master of
Studies in European Literature'.

3 Ibid., l. 21, l. 40, delete `piece of
written
work' and substitute `dissertation'.

Return to List of Contents of this
section


(c) M.Phil. in European Literature

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in
2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
589, delete ll. 24–7.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 28–37, including the
section as amended by
the Gazette, vol. 129, p. 333, column 2, and
substitute:

`(a) to offer either one or two literatures:

(i) A candidate who offers one literature shall
select it from
the following: French, German,Italian, Spanish (including
Latin-American), Portuguese (including Brazilian), Russian,
Czech, Slovak, Byzantine and Modern Greek, Celtic, and
Medieval Latin.

(ii) A candidate who offers two literatures shall select them
from the following: French, German,Italian, Spanish (inc-
luding Latin-American), Portuguese (including Brazilian),
Russian, Czech, Slovak, Byzantine and Modern Greek, Celtic,
and English. Candidates may, as one of their literatures,
offer classical Latin or Classical Greek, provided that the
other literature selected is not English; and they may, as one
of their literatures, offer Medieval Latin, provided that the
other literature selected is not Classical Latin or Classical
Greek or English.

Any candidate may, with the approval of the Modern Languages
Boards, offer the literature of any other language falling
under the direction of that Board.'

3 Ibid., delete l. 42.

4 Ibid., l. 43, delete `(d)' and
substitute `(b)'.

5 Ibid., insert on the following line:

`(c) To offer A, B, and C as defined in 2 below.'

6 Ibid., delete l. 45 and substitute:

`2. The examination shall consist of the following:'.

7 Ibid., on the following line, insert:

`(a) either'.

8 Ibid., l. 46, delete `(a)' and
substitute `(i)'.

9 Ibid., p. 590, l. 7, after `The
essay' insert `, which shall be written in
English'.

10 Ibid., ll. 8–9, delete `ther
term'seminar
paper' and substitute:

`Hilary Term of the candidate's first year as a student for
the
examination.'

11 Ibid., on the following line, insert:

`Or'.

12 Ibid., l. 10, delete `(b)' and
substitute `(ii)'.

13 Ibid., l. 12, delete `(which must be
written
in
English)'.

14 Ibid., l. 14,
after `palaeography' insert `with textual
criticism'.

15 Ibid., l. 14, as amended by
Gazette, vol. 129, p. 333,
delete `the language or'.

16 Ibid., ll. 14–15, delete `in one of
the
languages'is
being offered'.

17 Ibid., ll. 15–16, delete `between the
date'examinations' and substitute:

`by the end of the ninth week of the second term as a student
for the examination.'

18 Ibid., l. 20, delete `submit the
transcription' and substitute `undertake a practical
transcription test'.

19 Ibid., l. 21, delete `of' and
substitute `on'.

20 Ibid., l. 22, insert: `The test should
take
place by
the end of the fourth week of the Trinity Term in which the
examination is to be taken. The mark should be sent by the
supervisor to the chairman of Examiners.'

21 Ibid., on the following line, insert:

`The work submitted under (i) must be written in
English; the
work submitted under (ii) may be written in English or,
subject to the approval of the Faculty Board, in a language
appropriate to the literature concerned.

Approval must be sought for the choice of options in
(a) by
the end of the fourth week of the Michaelmas Term of the
candidate's first year as a student for the examination.'

22 Ibid., l. 23, delete `(c) A
thesis'
and
substitute:

`(b) A thesis, which may be written in English or,
with the
approval fo the Faculty Board, in the language appropriate to
the literature concerned,'.

23 Ibid., l. 26, delete `2(a) or
2(b)' and
substitute `(a) (i) or (ii)'.

24 Ibid., l. 27, delete `2(d)' and
substitute `(c)'.

25 Ibid., after l. 30, on the following line,
insert:

`Candidates shall seek approval (by application to the Modern
Languages Graduate Office, 37 Wellington Square, Oxford) for
the proposed subject of their thesis by the end of the fourth
week of Trinity Term in their first year.

The thesis must be presented in proper scholarly form. Two
copies, typed in double-spacing on one side only of quarto or
A4 paper, each copy bound or held firmly in a stiff cover, must
be delivered to the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools,
High Street, Oxford by noon on Thursday of the sixth week of
the Trinity Term in which the examination is to be taken.

[Add footnote] See the general regulation concerning the
preparation and dispatch of theses. Candidates are reminded
that work submitted for the Degree of M.Phil. may subsequently
be incorporated in a thesis submitted for the Degree of
D.Phil.

Successful candidates will be required to deposit one copy of
their theses in the Bodleian Library.

[Add footnote] Such candidates will also be required to sign
a form stating whether they give permission for their theses
to be consulted.'

26 Ibid., l. 31, delete `(d)' and
substitute `(c)'.

27 Ibid., delete ll. 32–52 and
substitute:

`Candidates shall offer two Special Subjects. These may
either be chosen from the Special Subjects proposed by
members of the Modern Languages Faculty and listed in
the `Graduate Studies in Modern
Languages' prospectus, or be Special Subjects of their
own devising, provided that each subject has the written
support of the candidate's supervisor and is approved by or on
behalf of the Modern Languages Board. A proposal for a
Special Subject of the candidate's own devising shall be
accompanied by a statement (of approximately 100 words) of the
character and scope of the Subject proposed. Approval of all
Special Subjects must be sought, by application to the Modern
Languages Graduate Office, 37 Wellington Square, by the end of
the fourth week of the Trinity Term of the candidate's first
year as a student for the examination. Approval of Special
Subjects proposed will be dependent on the availability of
teaching and examining resources at the relevant times.

Candidates will be examined on a portfolio of work (which may
be written in English, or, with the approval of the Faculty
Board, in the language appropriate to the literature
concerned) on topics they have agreed with their supervisor
within each Special Subject. The portfolio shall be submitted
to the supervisor by Friday of the first week of Hilary Term of
the candidate's second year as a student for the examination.

The essay or essays shall be marked, signed, and dated by the
supervisor for that Special Subject. It is expected that
essays will normally be submitted to the examiners in
unrevised form. However, in cases where an essay submitted for
examination represents a revised version of an earlier essay,
the date and supervisor's mark should refer to the revised
version, and the supervisor's comments should indicate the
nature and extent of the revisions which have been made and
the reasons for submitting a revised version.

The essay or essays contained within the portfolio for each
Special Subject should be of approximately 9,000 words in
total, though where the subject or approach requires
greater length, candidates shall not be penalised for
exceeding this guideline.

The essays shall be examined by the examiners who shall, in
deciding the marks they award, take account of the stage at
which each essay was completed.'

28 Ibid., delete from p. 591, l. 1, to p.
594,
l. 14.

29 Ibid., p. 594, l. 24, as amended by
Gazette, Vol. 129, p.
333, delete `4'.

30 Ibid., l. 31, as amended by
Gazette, Vol. 129, p. 333,
delete `sixth.

31 Ibid., delete ll. 24–33.

32 Ibid., l. 34, as amended by
Gazette, Vol. 129, p. 333,
delete `5'.

33 Ibid., delete p. 594, l. 34 to p. 595, l.
2
and associated
footnote.

34 Ibid., p. 595, l. 3, as amended by
Gazette, Vol. 129, p.
333, delete `6' and substitute `3'.

35 Ibid., l. 5, as amended by
Gazette, Vol. 129, p. 333,
delete `7' and substitute `4'.

36 Ibid., after l. 10, on the following line,
insert:

`5. In the case of resubmission, candidates shall be required
to resubmit all the material by noon on Thursday of the sixth
week of the first Trinity Term following their first
examination. Candidates may resubmit on one occasion only.'

37 Ibid., l. 11, as amended by
Gazette, Vol. 129, p. 333,
delete `8' and substitute `6'.

(d) M.St. in European Literature

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
670, delete ll. 34–40, and
substitute:

`a) to offer either one or two literatures:

(i) To offers one literature to be selected from the
following: French, German,Italian, Spanish (including Latin-
American), Portuguese (including Brazilian), Russian, Czech,
Slovak, Byzantine and Modern Greek, Celtic, and Medieval
Latin.'

2 Ibid., delete l. 46.

34 Ibid., l. 47, delete `(d)' and
substitute `(b)'.

4 Ibid., insert on the following line:

`(c) To offer A, B, and C as defined in 3 below.'

5 Ibid., p. 671, delete ll. 1–38 and
substitute:

`3. The examination shall consist of the following:

(a) either

(i) Methods of Criticism and the Theory of
Literature.

[2(a)(i)
for the M.Phil. in European Literature]

or

(ii) Methods of Scholarship.

2(a)(ii) for the
M.Phil. in
European Literature]

or

(iii) A methodological essay of not more than 6,000 words in
length on a topic or issue related to the candidate's Special
Subject or dissertation, to be submitted in two typed copies
to the Modern Languages Graduate Office (37 Wellington Square)
by the fourth week of Trinity Term.

The work submitted under (i) must be written in
English; the
work submitted under (ii) or (iii) may be written in English
or, subject to the approval of the Faculty Board, in a
language appropriate to the literature concerned.

Candidates must seek approval for their choice of option in

(a) by the end of the fourth week of the Michaelmas
Term.

(b) A dissertation of between 8,000 and 10,000 words
and
written in English, or, with the approval of the Faculty
Board, in the language appropriate to the literature
concerned, on a topic connected with that offered in
(a)(i) or

(a)(ii) above or (c) below, but distinct
from those covered by
the essays submitted under (a) or (c), and
approved by the
Modern Languages Board. Candidates shall seek approval (by
application to the Modern Languages Graduate Office, 37
Wellington Square, Oxford) for the proposed topic of their
dissertation by the end of the fourth week of Hilary Term.

The dissertation must be presented in proper scholarly form.
Two copies, typed in double-spacing on one side only of quarto
or A4 paper, each copy bound or held firmly in a stiff cover,
must be delivered to the Clerk of the Schools, Examination
Schools, High Street, Oxford, by noon on Thursday of the sixth
week of the Trinity Term.

(c) One Special Subject. The regulations will be as
in 2(c)
for the M.Phil. in Euroepan Literature, except that candidates
shall offer one Special Subject instead of two. Candidates
must, however, seek approval of their Special Subjects by the
end of the fourth week of Michaelmas Term. The portfolio of
work shall be submitted to the supervisor by Friday of the
first week of Hilary Term.

Unless indicated to the contrary above, other arrangements
for the above papers and subjects shall be as specified for the
M.Phil. in European Literature.

[Add footnote] [Until 1 October 2000] The regulations
governing the M.Phil. in European Literature that will apply
to the examination for the M.St. in European Literature in
Trinity Term 2000 shall be those that take effect from 1
October 2000.

In the case of resubmission, candidates shall be required to
resubmit all the material by noon on Thursday of the sixth
week of the first Trinity Term following their first
examination. Candidates may resubmit on one occasion only.'

6 Ibid., l. 39, delete `distinction' and
substitute `Distinction'.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



23 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval
and Modern Languages and English Language and Literature

Honour School of English and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in
2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 22 (a)
above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



24 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval
and Modern Languages and Literae Humaniores

(a) Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages

(b) Honour School of Philosophy and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in
2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 22 (a)
above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



25 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval
and Modern Languages and Modern History

Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in
2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 22 (a)
above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



26 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval
and Modern Languages and Oriental Studies

Honour School of European and Middle Eastern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in
2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 22 (a)
above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



27 Board of the Faculty of Modern
History

Honour Moderations in Modern History

With effect from 1 October 1999

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
51, l. 37,
delete `Society and Politics in the United States
1870–1921' and substitute `Age of Empire, Age of
Reform: American Politics and Society, 1880–1927'.

2 Ibid., p. 59, delete ll. 17–46, and
substitute:

`13. AGE OF EMPIRE, AGE OF REFORM: AMERICAN POLITICS AND
SOCIETY, 1880–1927

The Politics of Reform

Walter Lippmann, Drift and Mastery (New York, 1914), pp.
172–97 (Drift), 264–76 (Mastery), 277–88 (Modern
Communion).
Herbert Croly, The Promise of American Life (Boston, 1989),
pp. 1–51 (What is the promise of American life?, The
Federalists and the Republicans.)

Ida Tarbell, History of the Standard Oil Company (London,
1905), Vol. 1, pp. 38–69 (The Rise of the Standard Oil
Company), Vol. 2, pp. 231–5 (The Legitimate Greatness of the
Standard Oil Company).

W. Bryan, `Cross of Gold', in G. Tindall, (ed.) A Populist
Reader (New York, 1966) pp. 198–91.

W. White, `What's the matter with Kansas?', in Tindall,
op. cit., pp. 192–9.

S. Gomper, `Organised Labor', in Tindall, op. cit., pp.

203–11.

David Starr Jordan, The Human Harvest (Boston, 1907), pp.

39–46 (Blood determines history, History determines blood,
Men
and beasts under the same laws, Selective breeding,Meaning of
progress).

Randolph Bourne, War and the Intellectuals (New York, 1964),
pp. 107–23 (The Twilight of Idols).

William Hard, `Efficiency and the 'He-man'' in The New
Republic 14:175 (9 March 1918), pp. 165–7.

Political Economy

W.G. Sumner, `Sociology', in David Hollinger, ed. The
American Intellectual Tradition, (New York, 1997), vol. 2, pp.

30–8.

T. Veblen, `Theory of the Leisure Class', in David
Hollinger, op. cit., vol. 2, pp. 128–41.

Jacob Riis, How the Other Half Lives (New York, 1890), pp.

5–9, 46–57, 82–102 (Introduction, The Bend,
Chinatown,
Jewtown, the Sweaters of Jewtown).

William Dean Howells, A Traveller from Altruria, ed. David W.

Levy (Boston, 1894), pp. 29–166.

Black Activism

Booker T. Washington, Up from Slavery (New York, 1901), pp.

71–85, 105–15 (Making Bricks without Straw, Making
their Beds,
The Atlanta Exposition Address).

W.E.B. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk (New York, 1903), pp.

1–190.

American Expansion

Colin Calloway, ed., Our Hearts Fell to the Ground (Boston,
1996), pp. 150–204 (The End of Freedom, The White Man's
Schools, Sitting Bull, Killing the Dream).

Thomas Paterson, ed., Major Problems in American Foreign
Relations (Lexington, 1995), vol. 1, pp. 385–95 (The
Spanish-
American-Cuban-Filipino War), 454–62 (The Open Door Policy
and
China), 497–509 (Theodore Roosevelt, the Big Stick, and US
Hegemony in the Caribbean).

Mark Twain, A Pen Warmed-up in Hell, ed. Frederick Anderson
(New York, 1972), pp. 74–106.

The New Woman

Mary Beth Norton and Ruth Alexander, eds., Major Problems in
American Women's History (Lexington, 1996), pp. 254–61,
285–97, 322–33 ('The New Woman', Work Culture, Women
and
Politics in the 1920s).

Charles Beard and Mary R. Beard, American Citizenship (New
York, 1927), pp. 21–33 (The Family).

Wesley Clair Mitchell, The Backward Art of Spending Money
(1937), pp. 3–20.

Christopher Lasch, ed., The Social Thought of Jane Addams

(Indianapolis, 1965), pp. 28–43 (The Subjective Necessity
of
Social Settlements), 151–62 (The Larger Aspects of the
Woman's
Movement), 231–49 (Peace and Bread in Time of War).

C.P. Gilman, `Women and Economics', in David Hollinger,
ed., The American Intellectual Tradition (New York, 1997),
vol. 2, pp. 55–60.

Immigration and Assimilation

Jon Gjerde, ed., Major Problems in American Immigration and
Ethnic History (Boston, 1998), pp. 171–85, 205–19,
239–52,
274–90 (Emigration and Return, Industiral Immigrants,
WomenImmigrants, Racialisation of Immigrants, Responses to
Immigration).

Randolph Bourne, War and the Intellectuals (New York, 1964),
pp. 107–33 (Trans-National America, The Jew and
Trans-National
America).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



28 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
History and Literae Humaniores

Honour Moderations in Ancient and Modern History

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

As for the Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 27
above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



29 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
History and English

Honour Moderations in Modern History and English

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

As for the Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 27
above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



30 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
History and Social Studies

Honour Moderations in Modern History and Politics

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

As for the Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 27
above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



31 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
History and Modern Languages

Preliminary Examination in Modern History and Modern
Languages

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

As for the Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 27
above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



32 Board of the Faculty of Modern
History

Honour School of Modern History

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
330, delete l. 4 and
substitute:

`The Acts of the Process of Canonisation, and Bull of
Canonisation of St Clare, in R.J. Armstrong (ed.), Clare of
Assisi: Early Documents, cit., pp. 133–85 and 238–45.'

2 Ibid., after l. 30, insert:

`23. The frescoes of the life of St Francis, attributed to
Giotto, in the upper church of the basilica of San Francesco
in Assisi, reproduced (in their undamaged state) in E.
Lunghi, The Basilica of Saint Francis of Assisi. The frescoes
by Giotto, his predecessors and followers (Thames and Hudson,
London, 1996) pp. 62–99.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



33 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
History and English Language and Literature

Honour School of Modern History and English

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 32 above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



34 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
History and Literae Humaniores

Honour School of Ancient and Modern History

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 32 above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



35 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
History and Medieval and Modern Languages

Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 32 above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



36 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
History and Social Studies

(a) Honour School of Modern History and Economics

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 32 above).

(b) Honour School of Modern History and Politics

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in
2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 32 above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



37 Board of the Faculty of Modern
History

Honour School of Modern History

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in
2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
302, l. 10 and p. 309, l.
41, delete `1600' and substitute `1610'.

2 Ibid., delete from p. 309, l. 42 to p. 310,
l. 34, and
substitute:

`Candidates will be required to study the social, political,
economic, and religious developments in France from 1610 to
1715, and will only be required to show such knowledge of
external affairs as is necessary for the understanding of the
internal history of France during this period.

R. Bonney (ed.), Society and Government in France under
Richelieu and Mazarin, 1624–61 (1988).

R. Mettam (ed.), Government and Society in Louis XIV's France
(1977).

Charles Loyseau, A Treatise of Orders and Plain Dignities, ed.
H.A. Lloyd (1994), p. 48–55 (chapter III, paras 1–27),
90–112
(chapter V, paras 33–110), 161–5 (chapter VII, paras
91–105),
166–8 (chapter VIII, paras 1–10).

Mathieu Molé, Mémoires, ed. A. Champollion-Figeac
(Paris,
1855–7), i, pp. 99–102, ii, pp. 1–4, 498–510.
Franc et veritable discours sur la revocation du droit annuel
(Paris, c.1615).

Testament politique du Cardinal de Richelieu, ed. L. André

(Paris, 1947), pp. 218–23, 230–55, 379–400.
Les papiers de Richelieu, ed. P. Grillon (Paris, 1975–85),
vol. i, documents 86, 87, 89 of 1625, document 342 of 1626;
vol. ii documents 31, 500, 688, 862; vol. iii, document 197,
pp. 202–4 only; vol. iv, documents 72, 292, 409, 455; vol.
v,
documents 224, 375, 592, 603; vol. vi, document 10.

Lettres et mémoires adressés au chancelier
Séguier, ed. R.
Mousnier (Paris, 1964), vol. i, documents 68, 94, 141, 165,
168, 188, 201, 210, 224; vol. ii, documents 256, 311, 340,
351, 363, 364, 368, 381, 395; appendix 2, i. vi–vii, xii;
appendix 3, iv, vii.

Y.-M. Bercé, Histoire des Croquants (Geneva, 1974), vol.
ii,
documents 29, 31, 42, 68.

Choix de Mazarinades, ed. C. Moreau (Paris, 1853), vol. i, pp.
277–89 (Catéchisme des Partisans), 358–407
(Lettre d'Avis à
Messieurs du Parlement de Paris, escrite par un Provincial);
vol. ii, pp. 230–4 (Requête de la Noblesse),
406–38 (La Vérité
toute nue).

Les articles de la paix, conclus et arrestez à Ruel, le
xi
mars 1649 (Paris, 1649).

Lettres, Instructions et Mémoires de Colbert, ed. P.
Clément

(Paris, 1861–82), vol. i, document 210; vol. ii, document
38;
vol. vii, document 15.

Correspondance des Contrôleurs-Généraux des
Finances, ed. A.
de Boislisle (Paris, 1883), vol. i, documents 207, 209, 211,
256, 333 and appendix 2; vol. ii, appendix 4, pp. 476–86
(line
3).

Locke's Travels in France, ed. J. Lough (1953), pp. 114–65,
228–37.

François de Salignac de la Mothe-Fénelon, A Louis
XIV:
Remonstrance à ce prince (1694).
Plans de gouvernement concertés avec le duc de Chevreuse
(1711).

Mémoire sur la situation déplorable de la France
en 1710.
Louis de Rouvroy, duc de Saint-Simon, Mémoires, ed. G.
Truc
(Paris, 1948–58), vol. iii, pp. 1238–79 (Lettre
anonyme au
roi).

Alexandre Dubois, Journal d'un curé de campagne au xviie
siècle, ed. H. Platelle (Paris, 1965), pp. 61–149,
160–2,
174.

Documents relatifs aux rapports du clergé avec la
royauté de
1682 à 1705, ed. L. Mention (Paris, 1893), pp. 114–34
(Édit du
roi sur la juridiction ecclésiastique).'

3 Ibid., p. 325, delete ll. 10–41, and
substitute:

`All texts will be studied in translation. Where a published
translation is not specified, a specially made translation will
be available in the History Faculty Library. Where pagination
is given for facing page translations, only those pages giving
the text in English need be studied.

Julian, `Letter to the senate and people of Athens',
trans. by W.C. Wright, The works of the Emperor Julian, vol.
II, Loeb Classical Library (London, 1913), pp. 243–91.

——Fragment of a letter to a priest', ibid., pp.
297–339.

——Misopogon', ibid., pp. 421–511.

——Letters', nos. 8, 15, 19–23, 36–41, 51,
56–8, ibid., vol.

III, pp. 21–7, 35–7, 49–75, 117–35,
177–81, 191–209.
Augustine, Confessions, trans. H. Chadwick (Oxford, 1991),
Books I–IX, pp. 1–178.

—-Letters 16–17, trans. J.H. Baxter, Select Letters,
Loeb
Classical Library (London, 1930), nos. 5–6, pp. 17–31.

Ammianus Marcellinus, The Later Roman Empire [Res Gestae],
trans. W. Hamilton (London, 1986), Book 14,6; 20,4; 21,1–2;
22,1–7, 9–14; 23,1; 25,1–4; 27,9, 11; 28,1, 4;
30,5–6.

The Theodosian Code, trans. C. Pharr (Princeton, 1952), Book
IX. Title 16. paras 4–11; IX. 17.5–7; XII.
1.49–56, 63, 77,
87, 94, 98, 104, 110, 112, 116, 120, 122; XIV. 9.1; XVI.

1.2,4; XVI. 2.20; XVI. 5.3, 6–7, 9; XVI.
10.4–13.

Eunapius, The lives of the philosophers and sophists, trans.
W.C. Wright, `Philostratus and Eunapius. The lives of the
sophists.', Loeb Classical Library (London, 1921), pp.
421–61,
477–513, 519–27, 539–65.

Ausonius, Poems commemorating the professors of Bordeaux,
trans. H.G.E. White Ausonius vol. 1, Loeb Classical Library
(London, 1919), pp. 97–139.

Symmachus, Letters, Book I; 3, 10, 12, 14, 20, 23, 32, 43,
47–9, 51–3, 58–9, 61.

—-The Relationes of Symmachus, trans. R.H. Barrow (Oxford,
1973) Relationes 3, 10–12, pp. 33–47, 73–81.

Ambrose, Letters, trans. M.M. Beyenka (Washington, 1954)
Letters 7(17), 8(18), 60(20), 61(22), pp. 31–51,
365–84.

Jerome, Select letters, trans. F.A. Wright, Loeb Classical
Library (London, 1933) Nos. XXII, XLV, LIV, CVII, pp.
53–159,
177–79, 229–65.

—-Letter 70, trans. W.H. Freemantle, Letters and select
works
(Oxford, 1893)–available with special translations.

Libanius, Autobiography and selected letters, trans. A.F.
Norman, Loeb Classical Library (London, 1992) Vol. I,
Autobiography, pp. 53–337.

—-Selected works, trans. A.F. Norman, Loeb Classical Library
(London, 1969) Vol. I, Oration 18, pp. 279–487.

—-Selected works, trans. A.F. Norman, Loeb Classical Library

(London, 1977) Vol. II, Oration 30, pp. 101–51.

Dessau, Inscriptiones Latinae Selectae, nos. 754, 1258–61,
1265, 2946–7, 2951. Available in special translation.

Diehl, Inscriptiones Latinae Christianae Veteres, no. 63.
Available in special translation.'

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section



38 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
History and English Language and Literature

Honour School of Modern History and English

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in
2001)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 37 above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



39 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
History and Literae Humaniores

Honour School of Ancient and Modern History

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in
2001)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 37 above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



40 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
History and Medieval and Modern Languages

Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in
2001)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 37 above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



41 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
History and Social Studies

(a) Honour School of Modern History and Economics

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in
2001)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 37 above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section


(b) Honour School of Modern History and Politics

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in
2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 37 above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



42 Board of the Faculty of Modern
History

(a) Honour Moderations in Modern History

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 51, delete ll.
12–13 and
substitute:

`1. History of the British Isles: any one of the following
periods:

(i) c.300–1087; (II) 1042–1330; (III)
1330–1550; (IV) 1500–
1700; (V) 1685–1830; (VI) since 1830.'

(b) Honour School of Modern History

(i) With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 321, after l. 37
insert:

`The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, trans. T.
Parsons (1930, 2nd edn., repr. 1989, ed. A. Giddens (London,
1975)), pp. 13–183'.

Return to List of Contents of this
section


(ii) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination
in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
300, l. 6,
delete `Period (i)' and substitute `Periods (i)
or (II)'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 9–11, and substitute

`(i) c.300–1087;

(II) 1042–1330;

(III) 1330–1550;

(IV) 1500–1700;

(V) 1685–1830;

(VI) since 1830.'

3 Ibid., l. 21, after `any paper.' insert:

`Candidates who offer British History papers (i) and
(II),
or (III) and (IV), or (IV) and (V), for the Final Honour
School, must not substantially duplicate material in those
two papers.'

4 Ibid., l. 36, delete `British History to
1330,' and substitute `British History c.300–1087;
1042–1330;'

5 Ibid., l. 38, delete `British History to
1330–1685,' and substitute `British History
1330–1550; 1500–1700;'

6 Ibid., l. 40, delete `British History since
1685,' and substitute `British History 1685–1830;
since 1830;'

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section



43 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
History and English Language and Literature

(a) Honour School of Modern History and English

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 61, l. 31,
delete `School of' and substitute `Moderations
in'.

(b) Honour School of Modern History and English

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in

2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 42 (b)
(ii)
above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



44 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
History and Literae Humaniores

Honour School of Ancient and Modern History

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in
2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
126, l. 29,
delete `three'.

2 As for the Honour School of Modern History
(see 42 (b) (ii)
above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



45 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
History and Medieval and Modern Languages

(a) Preliminary Examination in Modern History and
Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in

2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 86, l. 31,
delete `School of' and substitute `Moderations
in'.

(b) Honour School of Modern History and Modern
Languages

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in
2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 42 (b)
(ii)
above).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



46 Boards of the Honour School of
Modern History and Social Studies

(a) Honour School of Modern History and Economics

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in
2002)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 42 (b)
(ii)
above).

(b) Honour Moderations in Modern History and
Politics

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
62, ll. 20 and 26,
delete `three'.

2 Ibid., l. 28, after `Examination.' insert:

`Candidates who take British History paper VI for Honour
Moderations or the Final Honour School may not also take
Politics core paper 202 for the Final Honour School.'

(c) Honour School of Modern History and Politics

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in
2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
371, l. 32,
delete `three'.

2 Ibid., l. 38, after `(xiii)', insert `;
candidates
who have taken British History VI at Honour Moderations or who
are also taking it for the Final Honour School cannot also
take Politics paper 202'.

3 Ibid., p. 372, delete ll. 3–5.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



47 Board of the Faculty of Physical
Sciences

Honour School of Natural Science (Metallurgy and Science of
Materials, and Physics)

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in
2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
407, after l. 36, insert
new paragraph:

`For the General Subjects Metallurgy and Science of Materials
and Physics candidates are restricted to models of calculators
included in a list provided by the Chairmen of the Examiners
not later than Wednesday of the fourth week of the Michaelmas
Full Term preceding the examination.'

2 Ibid., delete l. 44.

3 Ibid., delete ll. 47 and 48.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



48 Board of the Faculty of Social
Studies

(a) Preliminary Examination for Philosophy,
Politics, and Economics

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 99, delete ll.
15–40 and
substitute:

`Introduction to Politics

The paper will contain questions on:

(a) the politics and government of France from 1946,
Germany
from 1928/German Federal Republic from 1949, Soviet Union from
1917/Russia from 1991, United Kingdom from 1945, the United
States from 1932. In particular it will focus on the following
comparative topics: constitution, legislature, executive,
parties and party system, state and welfare, centre-periphery
relations. Questions will also be set on the following
historical events and processes: the New Deal, the acquisition
of civil rights by Black people in the USA, the rise and
decline of political consensus in Britain, political
instability inthe French Fourth Republic, political
stabilisation in the French Fifth Republic, the collapse of
the Weimar Republic, the Nazi Regime, political violence under
Stalin, political stability under Brezhnev, Perestroika
1985–91.

(b) Political Theory: democracy, liberty, and
ideology.

Questions will be set on the following texts: J.J. Rousseau,
The Social Contract; J.S. Mill, On Liberty; Alexis de
Toqueville, Democracy in America; Karl Marx and Friedrich
Engels, The Communist Manifesto; The German Ideology;
Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Napoleon; Critique of the Gotha
Programme; and on the following topics: theories of democracy;
non-democratic politics including the idea of totalitarianism;
the concept and theories of ideology; the concept andtheories
of liberty.

Candidates must answer four questions. They are required to
answer at least two questions from section (a), showing
knowledge of at least two countries, and at least one question
from section (b).'

(b) Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and
Economics

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 482, delete ll.
48–52 and
substitute:

`Welfare-economic foundations; the measurement of well-being;
taxation and incentives; taxation, debt and behaviour over
time; commodity taxation; taxation of persons; taxation of
companies; cost-benefit analysis; health; education; social
security; jurisdictional issues; public good, externalities
and market failure; policy towards natural resources and the
environment.'

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section



49 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
History and Social Studies

Honour Moderations in Modern History and Politics

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
62, ll. 36–7,
delete `either section (a) or from sections (a)
and

(c)' and substitute `section (a)'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 39–42 and substitute
`Candidates must
show knowledge of three countries.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



50 Board of the Faculty of Theology

(a) Preliminary Examination for Theology

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p.
116, delete ll. 2–4 and
substitute:

`Candidates will be expected to show a general knowledge of
the history of the Church, and its relation to the Roman
empire, from the late first century to the death of Constantine
in 337 AD. Questions will be set on some but not necessarily
all of the following topics: the growth of the church and the
meaning of conversation; the causes, scope, and effects of
persecution; patterns of ministry and the threefold hierarchy;
ecclesiastical discipline and the beginnings of monasticism;
schisms caused by Judaizers, Gnostics, Montanists,
Novatianists and Donatists; the development of orthodoxy and
synodical government; the evolution of the Biblical canon; the
role of Christianity in the Constantinian Empire.'

(b) Course for the Degree of Bachelor of Theology
and Diploma
of Higher Education (Theology) at Westminster College

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 1001, l. 18,
delete `Personal Research Focus' and
substitute `Guided Study'.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



51 Committee for Archaeology

(a) M.St. in Archaeological Science

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 659, after l. 16
insert:

`Archaeological Science

1. Candidates for admission must apply to the
Committee for

Archaeology.

2. Candidates must follow a course of
instruction in Archaeological Science for at least three terms
and for a substantial
part of the first two subsequent vacations, as determined by
the course timetable, and will, when they enter their names
for the examination, be required to produce a certificate from
their supervisors to this effect.

3. The registration of candidates will lapse
at
the end of
Trinity Term in the academic year of their admission, unless
it shall have been extended by the committee.

4. The written examination, which will be
taken
in the second
week of Trinity term, will consist of three papers on the
syllabus described in the Schedule.

5. Each candidate will be required to submit
a
report of
approximately 5,000 words, on a practical project selected
in consultation with the supervisor and approved by a person
designated for this purpose by the Committee for Archaeology.

6. Three typewritten copies of the report on
the
practical
project must be sent, not later than noon on the Friday of
ninth week of the Trinity Term in the year in which the
examination is taken, to the M.St. Examiners (Archaeological
Science), c/o Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford.

7. The examiners may require to see the
records
of practical
work carried out during the first two terms of the course.

8. Candidates must present themselves for an
oral examination
as required by the examiners. This may be on the candidate's
written papers, or practical work, or both.

9. The examiners may award a distinction for
excellence in the
whole examination.

Schedule

(i) Principles and practice of scientific dating

The principles of scientific dating methods including radio-
carbon, luminescence, uranium series and dendro-chronology.
The practical aspects of these methods and the problems
encountered in their application. The statistical analysis of
chronological information in the study of archaeological sites
and cultures.

(ii) Bio-archaeology

Scientific methods for the study of biological remains from
archaeological sites; introduction to the analysis of plant
and faunal remains including indicators of disease and
artefactual analysis; theoretical and practical aspects of
quantitative methods for diet reconstruction by isotopic
analysis; introduction to ancient DNA studies; residue
analysis.

(iii) Materials analysis and the study of technological change

Introduction to the history of technology; theoretical and
practical aspects of materials analysis methods—SEM,
microphobe, TIMS, ICP, ICP-MS, XRF, XRD, PIXE, FTIR, and NAA;
application of analysis to different material types—stone,
ceramics, vitreous materials, and metals; provenance of raw
materials; case studies of application to archaeological
problems.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section


(b) M.Sc. by coursework in Archaeological Science

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 721, after l. 9,
insert:

`Archaeological Science

1. Candidates for admission must apply to the Committee for
Archaeology.

2. Candidates must follow a course of
instruction in Archaeological Science for at least three terms
and for a substantial
part of the three subsequent vacations, as determined by
the course timetable, and will, when they enter their names
for the examination, be required to produce a certificate from
their supervisors to this effect.

3. The written examination, which will be
taken
in the second week of Trinity Term, will consist of three papers
on the syllabus described in the Schedule.

4. Each candidate will be required to submit
a
dissertation of
approximately 15,000 to 20,000 words, on a research area selected

in consultation with the supervisor and approved by a person
designated for this purpose by the Committee for Archaeology.

5. Three typewritten copies of the
dissertation
must be sent, not later than noon on 30 September of the year in
which the
examination is taken, to the M.Sc. Examiners (Archaeological
Science), c/o Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford.

6. The examiners may require to see the
records
of practical
work carried out during the course.

7. Candidates must present themselves for an
oral examination
as required by the examiners. This may be on the candidate's
written papers, or dissertation, or both.

8. The examiners may award a distinction for
excellence in the
whole examination.

Schedule

(i) Principles and practice of scientific dating

The principles of scientific dating methods including radio-
carbon, luminescence, uranium series and dendro-chronology.
The practical aspects of these methods and the problems
encountered in their application. The statistical analysis of
chronological information in the study of archaeological sites
and cultures.

(ii) Bio-archaeology

Scientific methods for the study of biological remains from
archaeological sites; introduction to the analysis of plant
and faunal remains including indicators of disease and
artefactual analysis; theoretical and practical aspects of
quantitative methods for diet reconstruction by isotopic
analysis; introduction to ancient DNA studies; residue
analysis.

(iii) Materials analysis and the study of technological change

Introduction to the history of technology; theoretical and
practical aspects of materials analysis methods—SEM,
microphobe, TIMS, ICP, ICP-MS, XRF, XRD, PIXE, FTIR, and NAA;
application of analysis to different material types—stone,
ceramics, vitreous materials, and metals; provenance of raw
materials; case studies of application to archaeological
problems.'

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section



EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR
OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give
notice of oral examination of their candidates asfollows:

Biological Sciences

HYUN JI KIM, St Hugh's: `Development and signal
transduction in dictyostelium'.

Department of Biochemistry, Monday, 17 May, 1 p.m.


Examiners: J.P. Armitage, J. Williams.

A. WRIGHT, Wolfson: `The molecular basis of perception and
transduction of mechanical signals in plants'.

Department of Plant Sciences, Tuesday, 11 May, 11 a.m.


Examiners: M.M. Campbell, A. Trewavas.

English Language and Literature

N.C. VICKERS, Balliol: `Coleridge and medicine, 1795–
1806'.

St Edmund Hall, Saturday, 1 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: L.A. Newlyn, K. Everest.

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section


Literae Humaniores

N. MATTHEWS, Magdalen: `Settlement change in southern Gaul
c.150 bc–ad 100, and the development of Gallia
Narbonensis'.

Christ Church, Friday, 14 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: A.K. Bowman, J.J.Wilkes.

G.I.C. ROBERTSON, Corpus Christi: `Evaluative language in
Greek lyric and elegiac poetry and inscribed epigram to the
end of the fifth century bce'.

Christ Church, Thursday, 13 May, 10.45 a.m.


Examiners: D. Obbink, P.E. Easterling.

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section


Physical Sciences

J.R. CLARKSON, Keble: `A study of protein damage in
foam'.

Department of Engineering Science, Friday, 21 May, 2.15 p.m.


Examiners: P.B. Whalley, C.R. Thomas.

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section


Social Studies

J.I. NUNEZ, St Antony's: `Four essays on reputation and
self-regulation'.

Nuffield, Thursday, 20 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: M.A. MEYER, T.J. BESLEY.

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section





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 29 April 1999: Colleges<br />

Colleges, Halls, and Societies


Contents of this section:

Return to Contents Page of this issue



OBITUARIES


St Edmund Hall

THE REVD ROGER BAGNALL, MA, 31 March 1999; commonere 1934–7.
Aged 83.

JOHN SEYMOUR GODDEN, MA, March 1999; commoner 1952–4 and
1962. Aged 68.

TADASHI UENO, B.PHIL, 1999; commoner 1975–7. Aged 48.

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section



St Hilda's College

JOYCE ANNE BARRETT (née Common), MA, 10 March
1999;
commoner 1942–4.

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section



MEMORIAL SERVICE


St John's College

A Memorial Service for ROBERT WILLIAM TORRANCE, formerly Fellow
of
the college, will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 15 May, in
the
college chapel. Tea will be served afterwards in the college
hall.

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section



ELECTIONS


Nuffield College

To Prize Research Fellowships:

MS OLA ELERIAN, B.SC., Nuffield College

PAUL MARTIN, M.PHIL., Nuffield College

VOLKER NOCKE, M.SC., London School of Economics

RAN SPIEGLER, MA, University of Tel Aviv

MEIR YAISH, D.PHIL., Nuffield College

JACOB LEVY, MA, Princeton University

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section


To a Faculty Fellowship:

DR KURT GAUBATZ (PH.D.),
Temporary
University Lecturer in American Foreign Policy

To a Professorial Fellowship:

PROFESSOR JAMES CEASER
(PH.D.), John M. Olin Visiting Professor in American Government
1999–2000

To the Acting Wardenship (2000–1):

DR GORDON
MARSHALL

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section



St Hugh's College

To a Smith Rippon Scholarship:

MICHAEL KONARIS, formerly
of
Athens College

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section



NOTICE


Oriel College


Eugene Lee-Hamilton Prize 1999

The Provost and Fellows of Oriel College offer a prize of
£60
for the best Petrarchan sonnet in English submitted by an
undergraduate of Oxford or Cambridge, on a subject to be chosen
by
the candidate. Enjambment between the eighth and ninth lines will
be
permitted.

No candidate may submit more than one sonnet, nor may the prize
be
awarded more than once to the same person. The competing sonnets
should be sent to the College Secretary, Oriel College, Oxford
OX1
4EW, not later than Monday, 31 May. Each sonnet must be
accompanied by a certificate from the Head or a Fellow of the
candidate's college, stating that the candidate is an
undergraduate.

The winner will be deemed to have given permission to publish
his/her sonnet in the Oriel Record.

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section





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 29 April 1999: Advertisements<br />

Advertisements


Contents of this section:



How to advertise in the
Gazette


Terms and
conditions of acceptance of advertisements

Return to Contents Page of this issue



Medieval Latin

Seeking tutor or study group for graduate student
with no previous experience of Classical Latin. If possible, non-
classical excercises and readings, (and historical rather than
theological sample readings, ie. Bede, Guibert de Nogent, etc.).
Seeking knowledge of Latin basics that are most useful for medieval
usage and conventions, rather than comprehensive Classical Latin
background. Willing to work intensively, third term and through
summer. Welcome calls from others wishing to do same. Contact Pam,
tel.: 01993 813424.

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Concert

Oxford Chamber Music Society: 9 May, 8 p.m.,
Vellinger String Quartet. Works bu Haydn, Hugh Wood, Mendelssohn.
Holywell Music Room. Tickets £10; in advance from the Oxford
Playhouse Box Office (tel.: Oxford 798600), concessions £4.50.

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Lectures

`Public Diplomacy—International Relations Today'
by Terry Toney, British Council Officer about to take up office as
Director in Japan. Mon. 3 May, 7 p.m., in the Morris Room, Oxford
Union. Organised by Fureai Network.

`Mock modular forms, Maass modular forms, and true
modular forms', by Professor Don Zagier, Max Planck Institute, Bonn,
at 4.30 p.m. on Tues., 11 May, in Room 3, Mill Lane Lecture Rooms,
Mill Lane, Cambridge. Enquiries: s.lowe@dpmms.cam.ac.uk.

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Tuition Offered

Piano lessons. Experienced teacher. Adults and
children. All grades. Beginners welcome. Contact Miss P. Read, BA
(Hons), LRAM. Jericho, tel.: Oxford 510904.

Pallas: Inter-University Postgraduate Curriculum,
LL.M. in European Business Law, 1999/2000.The Pallas LL.M.
programme in European Business Law is a postgraduate full-time
course of 1 year. This programme has been set up by the law
departments of the universities of Barcelona (Spain), Bologna (Italy),
Essex (Great Britain), Konstanz (Germany), LUISS Guido Carli (Italy),
Jean Moulin Lyon 3 (France) and Nijmegen (The Netherlands) in 1995.
The team of lecturers consists of leading professors and practising
lawyers from various European countries. In Sept. 1999 and Sept.
2000 this course will be organised again. Host University: University
of Nijmegen, the Netherlands. Working language: English. Tuition
costs: EURO 8,865 (approx. NLG 19,500) for 1999/2000 year. Living
expenses (accommodation included for 11 months of study in
Nijmegen): approximately NLG 1,200 (550 EURO) per month for a single
student. Further information available from Centre for Postgraduate
Legal Education, University of Nijmegen, Faculty of Law, PO Box
10520, 6500 MB Nijmegen, the Netherlands (attn. Ms Mariëlle
Cornielje). Tel.: + 31 24 3613090, fax: + 31 24 3615838, e-mail:
cpo@jur.kun.nl.

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Services Offered

Typing/word-processing service. Offered by a
conscientious, accurate, efficient, computer-literate secretary. Many
years work experience of typing reports and tables, audio typing,
and proofreading. References available. £9 p.h. Tel.: Oxford
226456 or 556465.

Efficient medical secretary offering an efficient,
personal, and reliable secretarial support for professional and medical
personnel. With fully-equipped home office (conputer, printer, e-mail,
Internet). Any job undertaken, copy or audio work. For further
details, please contact Jackie Webster, tel./fax: Oxford 882499.

Town and Country Trees: professional tree
surgeons. All aspects of arboriculture undertaken including orchard
and shrub pruning, planting, hedge trimming, stump grinding, etc.
Quality work at competitive prices. We are fully insured. For a free
quotation, call Paul Hodkinson. Tel.: 01869 351540.

Software training: I can offer training and help
with many Windows applications (Windows 95, Word, e-mail, etc), one-
to-one or in small groups. If you are struggling to get started, or
want to get the best possible use from your PC resources, contact me
and we can see where I can help with filling knowledge gaps,
suggesting short cuts, and turning software use into an enjoyable
and meaningful activity. Janet Caldwell, Oxford Software Training, 23
Squitchey Lane, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 511566, e-mail:
janet.caldwell@virgin.net.

Tax advice. Ex-KPMG Chartered Accountant
specialises in assisting professionals and small businesses with tax
problems including self-assessment. Convenient North Oxford premises.
To receive further information please tel.: Oxford 513381, e-mail:
100430.145@compuserve.com.

West Country artist of national reputation is
available to take commission for portraits in oil at reasonable prices.
For more details, tel.: Oxford 726124.

Research 4 Hire. For details, see
http://www.research4hire.com.

Windows, doors, and conservatories installed with
craftsmanship and care by Oxford's longest-established double glazing
company. A third-generation family firm, we believe in giving clear
practical advice without pressure or obligation. Proud to have served
over 30 university colleges. Oxford Double Glazing, tel.: Oxford
248287.

Shipping? Abyssinia to Zanzibar, New York to
Newmarket. Today, tomorrow, next week? All the best options are at
Mail Boxes Etc. Will collect from college, home, factory, or elsewhere.
Also 24-hour photocopying, secure mailboxes, computer workstation,
high-grade colour photocopying, faxing, laminating, binding, etc. 266
Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7DL. Contact Justin Brookes.
Tel.: Oxford 514655, fax: 514656, e-mail:
summertown@020.mbe.uk.com.

Personal Computer Consultants: we offer expert
advice and tuition for both hardware and software. On-site service at
home or in the office. We provide upgrades for most computers, or
alternatively we now supply our range of personally-built to your
own specifications K Tec computers. We will also supply or source
software to match your requirements. For a quality service matched
with competitive prices, contact Chris Lewis, tel.: Oxford 461222, fax:
461333.

Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press—the
University Printers: specialising in booklet and publicity material,
typesetting, printing, and finishing. Output Bureau provides high-
quality output from disc from all major DTP programs onto paper,
bromide, colour-separated positive or negative film; high-quality
specialist colour copier service. For service, quality, and competitive
prices contact Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press, Great Clarendon
Street, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 514691, fax: 514010.

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Domestic Services

Au pair or mature student required by family in
Kidlington, 1 June–15 July (our Au Pair has to leave early). You
have your own flat. Experienced driver essential. Must like cats.
Children aged 16, 15, 12. For more details, tel.: Oxford 513816 (day),
842103 (evening/weekend).

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters,
your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic,
commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-
occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For
free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford
726983 or Abingdon 555533.

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Situations Vacant

Part-time PA to Chairman of educational foundation.
Some basic book-keeping required. Prefered hours 9 a.m.–1 p.m.
£6–£10 p.h. depending on experience. Send c.v. to dr
Richardson, flat 8, Tennyson Lodge, Paradise Square, Oxford OX1 1UD.

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Houses to Let

North Oxford (Summertown), self-contained, ground-
floor, furnished flat, for non-smoking couple or single person.
Separate entrance hall, sitting-room, double bedroom, kitchen,
bathroom, Available immediately. £450 p.c.m. including c.h.
(electricity extra). Tel.: Oxford 512959 or (2)77281.

Old Marston village. convenient for Oxford and
Headington. Quaint but centrally-heated 1-bedroom cottage. Available
1 June for 1 year. £580 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 511967.

North Oxford family house to let for at least a year
from 1 July 1999. Five bedrooms, sitting-room, large kitchen, attic,
parking for 2 cars, long south-facing garden. Prized locality, close to
schools, hospital, station, and University. Tel.: Oxford 790640.

Fully-furnished 3/4-bedroom house in North Oxford
to let from Sept. for 1 year. Gas c.h. Pleasant garden. Convenient for
schools. Suit visiting academic family. £750 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford
(2)79182 or 559827 for details.

Beautiful and unusual cottage; 2 bedrooms, with
en suitebathrooms; spacious living-room; fitted galley
kitchen. Unfurnished. Set in formal garden of small country house, 8
miles west of Oxford, with access to swimming pool. Academic
preferred. Rent c. £700 p.c.m.

North Oxford , attractively-furnished 3-bedroom
house in very quiet street, suit professional family. Available from
end July 1999. Equipped with satellite TV, fridge, freezer, washer-
drier, microwave. Garage with parking space, fishpond. Close to
schools, cycling distance to University science area, colleges, city
centre. Excellent bus service. Rent £790 p.m. contact +44 1732
454269 or +44 777 5715128, e-mail: w.j.wang@sussex.ac.uk.

Woodstock: small period cottage in quiet location
close to Blenheim Park and town centre. Delightfully furnished and
fully equipped. One double and 1 single bedroom, bahtroom and
separate w.c., sitting/dining-room, kitchen. Gas c.h. Telephone.
Conservatory area leading to small walled garden. Suit visiting
academic/professional couple/single. Available immediately for up to 1
year by agreement. £675 p.c.m. Tel.: 01993 812639.

Victorian terraced house situated in a quiet cul-de-
sac off the Abingdon Road. Two reception rooms and 3 bedrooms.
Downstairs bathroom and w.c. Fully furnished, c.h., fitted carpets.
Small back garden. £800 p.c.m. Available from July for 1 year.
Please tel.: 01639 844285.

Family holiday accommodation, central North Oxford:
three-quarters of Victorian terrace house (self-contained); sleeps
6–7; attractive, well-equipped rear courtyard; street parking; 10
minutes from city centre; 3 minutes from water meadows and scenic
canal route. £400 p.w. inclusive. Tel.: Oxford 559911.

Walk to colleges: North Oxford house available from
1 Sept. 1999, for 1 year or less. Walk to colleges, train/bus stations;
near Port Meadow. C.h., recently redecorated, desks, filing cabinets,
several large closets, secluded garden, 2.5 bathrooms, washing
machine, drier, telephone, linen, dishes, 2 bicycles. Quiet; suit visiting
academics. Two bedrooms: £950 p.m., 3 bedrooms: £1,250 p.m.
(includes bedsit with separate kitchen and entrance). Contact J.
Mackrell (evenings), tel.: Oxford 775567, or A. Gaston (Canada), tel.:
613 745 1368, fax: 613 745 0299, e-mail: gaston@cyberus.ca.

Two-bedroom, semi-detached house, Harcourt Hill.
Available for short to medium term let. Fully furnished and equipped
following recent modernisation. Large open-plan living/dining-room,
fitted kitchen, utility room, study, c.h., parking. Both bedrooms
en suite. For details, contact Ann Rowcliffe at Westminster
College Conference Centre. Tel.: Oxford 253358, e-mail: a.rowcliffe@ox-
west.ac.uk.

City centre house with views of Thames, available
for 4 months, June–Sept. Fully equipped, 3 bedrooms (2 double,
1 single), 2 bathrooms, gas c.h., garden, garage. £1,000 p.c.m.
inclusive of charges except telephone calls. Tel.: Oxford 250462.

Old Boars Hill. Available full/part academic year
1999–2000. Four miles city centre. Hourly bus service. 2/3
bedrooms, 2 reception, gardens. £750 p.m. Tel. (before 8 May;
USA) 219 287 1449, (after 8 May): Oxford 735305.

Large 4-bedroom North Oxford House in quiet cul-
de-sac ending in park. Fully furnished. Available mid-Oct.–27
Dec. £1,400 p.m. including utilities. Spacious accommodation
includes loft, dining-room/sun room, and 2.5 bathrooms. Tel.: Oxford
454274.

Headington: 4-bedroom house. sitting-room, dining-
room, large kitchen, garage, gardens. Convenient for schools and
hospitals. Available 15 Aug. 1999–31 July 2000. £950 p.c.m.
Tel.: Oxford (2)76202 or 761316, e-mail: alan.bowman@christ-
church.oxford.ac.uk.

West Osney: very quiet terrace house, available 3/4
months early May–late Aug. Situated near meadows and river.
One double bedroom, large kitchen with washing machine, new gas
cooker, fridge, freezer, dining-room, lounge, sitting-room/study, 40'
garden and patio, gas c.h. Fifteen minutes' walk from town centre.
£650 p.m. including Council Tax and utility bills. Tel.: Oxford
728743.

Make finding accommodation a pleasure, not a chore.
Finders Keepers is dedicated to making it easy for visitors to Oxford
to find the right property. Browse through our Web site for up-to-
date detailed information on properties available and make use of our
interactive database, priority reservation service (credit cards
accepted), welcome food pack, personal service, and much more. Call
us and you will not need to go elsewhere. For further information
contact Finders Keepers, 226 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2
7BY. Tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk;
Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

An Englishman's home is his castle—so the
saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on
offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford
or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB Management is
one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to
academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to
offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Visit our Web
site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the properties
that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax,
or e-mail us with details of your requirements and we will do
whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 764533, fax: 764777,
e-mail: info@qbman.co.uk.

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Flats to Let

Central Headington, available June: beautifully
converted, spacious, 2-bed first-floor flat; tastefully furnished; large
living-room, fully-fitted kitchen with washing-machine, bathroom with
bath and separate pumped shower, gas c.h., d.g., off-street parking.
Professionals and academics only. £650 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 768504
(evenings).

Very pleasant, well-furnished, self-contained,
ground-floor flat, in quiet area of Marston. Double bedroom, living-
room with study area, kitchen/dining-room, bathroom. Own phone.
Own entrance, patio/car port, and use of garden. Close to J.R., and
within easy walking distance of Science Area and Bodleian. Suit
careful academic couple (non-smokers only). Available now. Rent
£100 p.w. (includes c.h.). Tel.: 241224 (6–9 p.m.).

Newly-converted self-contained basement studio with
private entrance, in St Clements area of Oxford, short walk to city
centre. Bed/sitting-room with cooking facilities, gas coal-effect fire,
shower room. Fully furnished. Suit professional/academic/graduate.
£450 p.c.m. including gas, electricity, Council Tax. Tel.: Oxford
436381.

St Clements/East Oxford borders. Spacious, modern,
ground-floor, 2-bedroom apartment with private parking. Large
lounge/diner, fitted kitchen with appliances including washer. Double
bedroom, single bedroom, bathroom with power shower, gas c.h.,
communal drying room, courtyard. Available 1 May. £675 p.c.m.
Tel.: Oxford 798737.

Oxford central, Jericho, off Walton Street. Purpose-
built studio flat, recently refurbished and equipped to a high
standard. Kitchen, bathroom with shower, bed/sitting-room, suit single
professional. £550 p.c.m. For this or your Oxford rental
requirements, tel.: Oxford 372227, fax: 460882.

Elegant 1-bedroom ground-floor flat in St
Margaret's Road, central North Oxford. Double bedroom, large sitting-
room, kitchen, bathroom. Fully furnished, newly decorated, washing
machine and gas c.h. Use of charming shared garden. £725 p.c.m.
plus bills. Available now. Let of 6 months or longer preferred. Tel.:
Oxford 343384.

Central North Oxford: 10 minutes' walk from city
centre, all main university buildings, and parks, and very close to
the river. Available for short/long let. Two exceptionally well-
furnished, comfortable flats in extremely quiet, civilised, large
Victorian house in this exclusive, leafy, residential Victorian suburb,
with large, light, airy rooms. (1) First-floor (available now): double
bedroom, drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom. (2) Ground-floor (available
now): 1 double, 1 single bedroom, drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom.
Off-street parking; large secluded garden. Tel./fax: Oxford 552400.

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Summer Let

Central North Oxford: attractively-furnished 4-
storey Victorian house in very quiet street, 15 minutes' walk from
city centre, quarter mile from river Thames and Port Meadow. Two
double bedrooms and 1 single. Two bathrooms (1 with shower, 1 with
bath, both with w.c.). Double reception room with stripped pine floor,
oriental rugs, and desk. Modern pine kitchen/diner with large table.
Dishwasher, fridge, freezer, gas c.h., linen, washing machine, drier,
TV, 4 bicycles. Free street parking. £965 p.c.m. inclusive of
charges except phone calls. Exchange considered for house near sea.
Available 24 July–4 Sept. Dr Josephine Reynell, tel.: Oxford
516615, fax: 516616.

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Accommodation Offered

Bed-and-breakfast available in the warm comfortable
home of a semi-retired academic couple in exclusive, leafy, central
North Oxford; within easy walking distance of the city centre and all
main university buildings; a stone's throw from the river, parks,
excellent pubs and restaurants and a 9–9 corner shop. All rooms
have colour TV, microwave, tea- and coffee-making facilities, c.h., and
independent heating. Refrigerators available. Very moderate terms.
Tel./fax: Oxford 557879, mobile: 0374 434489.

St Clements: single room in small attractive house.
£250 p.c.m. plus bills. Vegetarian, non-smoker prefered. Tel.:
Oxford 246158.

Elderly doctor in Headington living alone has
comofortable self-contained furnished accommodation available and
would like to find a responsible person who could use this and in
exchange provide accessibility in an emergency together with some
minor home-care housekeeping (local shopping, some light cooking,
etc.). Arrangements could be quite flexible and open to experiment
but the home-care element might involve 10–12 hours p.w. An
incumbent could therefore also, if desired, take on other part-time
home care (or nursing?) activities, whether nearby, or at some
distance. Might also suit retired person who could use furnished
accommodation and has some time to spare, or possibly somone with
some writing to do. No cleaning. Occasional driving might be useful.
To discuss options, please tel.: Oxford 768925.

Two properties, North Oxford, well within ring road.
Both quiet, with lovely views to open countryside, near bus route. (1)
Self-contained, luxury, open plan accommodation with patio. Suit
visiting academic, single/couple. Available from end Apr. £650
p.m. (single), £700 p.m. (couple), including electricity. (2)
Beautiful, unusual, open-plan, fully-furnished modern house. Off-
street parking and small patio garden. Suit visiting
academic/professional couple. £895 p.m. including Council Tax and
water rates. Available from July 1999. Regret no children, pets, or
smokers. Tel.: Oxford 515085, e-mail: trishaboyd@hotmail.com.

Available from June 1999: family accommodation in
central North Oxford—excellent schools; three-quarters of
attractive Victorian well-equipped house; 28-ft. sitting-room; 3 double
bedrooms, etc; courtyard garden; parking; 10 minutes' walk to city
centre; close to water meadows and scenic canal. £1,100 p.c.m.
(excluding bills). Tel.: Oxford 559911.

Single room in quiet, modern, city centre flat,
available immediately. Two-minute walk from Oxford station; off-street
parking available. Would suit young professional/academic female,
non-smoker. Weekday let preferred. £300 p.c.m., including bills
(except phone). Tel.: Oxford 722783 (after 7 p.m.).

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Accommodation Sought

Long-term board arrangement sought in a private
home in the Oxford area. I am a 52-year-old New Zealand woman
working as a live-in carer for an agency based in Oxford. I require a
room, somewhere nice to use as a base and as a home-away-from-
home when I am between jobs and travels—this may be for only a
few days each month. If you think you could help, please leave a
message for Anne, tel.: 0171 8906157.

Academic married couple (Medicine/English) seeks
flat/house to rent or house sit in Oxford area, 1 July–30 Sept.
1999 during fellowship. No children or pets (although happy to look
after pets), non-smokers, references provided. Tel.: Oxford 240384, e-
mail: clark.lawlor@ehrc.ox.ac.uk.

Visiting academic couple (non-smokers) and small
well-behaved dog seek two-month rental of furnished house or flat,
preferably with garden, 1 July–31 Aug. 1999. Please contact Dr
F. Robertson, Department of English Studies, University of Durham,
Durham DH1 3JT. Tel.: 0191 374 2732 or 01748 826441.

Academic couple and adult daughter seek
accommodation 18–30 July as guests, tenants, house-sitters, or
exchange for apartment in New York City (West side, Riverside Drive).
Tel.: 01223 572265/355294 x.810, e-mail: sally.butterfield@mrc-
cbu.cam.ac.uk.

Visiting academic and family seek 3/4-bedroom house
close to city centre to rent for 2-week period, 6 July–6 Aug.
Willing to pay up to £800 p.w. Non-smokers, local references
available. James Basker, Columbia University, tel.: 212 531 3732, e-
mail: jgbassist@aol.com.

Academic couple with child (2 years) and baby,
planning research stay in Oxford Aug. 1999–July 2000/2001, seeks
unfurnished house/flat with small garden (2 bedrooms). Monthly
rental up to £650. Contact Florian Theil, Im Langen Feld 8, D-
30880 Laatzen. Tel.: +49 341 9959 709 (office), 511 221393 (home), fax:
9959 658, e-mail: ftheir@mis.mpg.de.

Visiting professor and wife need 2-bedroom fully-
furnished apartment/flat, c.h. laundry facilities, parking garage, near
University, for period 1 July–30 Nov. 1999. Responses to Dr H.T.
Debas, 240 St Francis Blvd, San Fransisco, CA 94127, USA. Fax: 415
502 0317, e-mail: kdebas@medsch.ucsf.edu.

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your
property? QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents
and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and
professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow
of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property in the
Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you
simply need some informal help and advice without obligation,
telephone us: Oxford 764533, fax us: 764777, or e-mail us:
info@qbman.co.uk. Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web
site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing
your property.

Mallams Residential Letting is well placed to help
with your letting and management requirements. Based in
Summertown, we offer a professional service tailored to your
individual requirements. If you are thinking of letting your property,
please call us. Tel.: Oxford 311006, fax: 311977.

Finders Keepers specialises in managing your home
or investment. We have celebrated 25 years in Oxford letting and
managing properties—try us first! Many of our landlords have
remained with us since we opened and are delighted with our
service—why not pop in and read their comments? Contact
Finders Keepers, 226 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY.
Tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk, Internet
site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

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Accommodation Sought to Rent or
Exchange

Visiting professor requires accommodation for 2
adults and 2 children for May and June. Strong preference for North
Oxford, but will consider others within walking distance of city cente.
Will consider house swap, current residence is a 4-bedroom house in
Concord, Massachusetts (suburban Boston), and is well suited for
small children. Contact Bill Wilhelm. Tel. (USA): 001 617 552 3990, e-
mail: william.wilhelm@bc.edu.

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Accommodation Offered to Rent or
Exchange

Academic couple would like to let out sunny,
antique-furnished apartment (2 bedrooms, dining-room, sitting-room,
kitchen, workroom, 1.5 bathrooms), in northern Chicago (Evanston,
near Northwestern University). Let or exchange for accommodation
in/near Oxford/London/Cambridge etc. June–Aug. 1999. Beach,
shops, downtown trains, restaurants, services—3 minutes by foot.
Contact Calvert-Lee/Kahane, tel.: 1-847/475-7410; e-mail:
aka120@nwu.edu.

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Holiday Lets

Annual multi-trip holiday insurance. From as little
as £26 per year, you can travel as many times as you like. This
insurance is arranged by Affinity Groups Advantage Limited, an
independent intermediary for selling of general insurance. For
further details, tel.: 0345 660453.

Mainland Spain, Costa del Sol, Andalusia style
English Riviera maisonette, £75 p.w.; double bedroom, double
salon, grand terrace, kitchen, bathroom, well-equipped, view over sea,
large swimming pool by step of maisonette, residential shops and
laundry all week. 15 km Marbella, 80 km Gibralter. Tel.: Oxford
511657.

Andalucia: house, or part, to let; Gaucin. Pool.
Charming, magical, medieval white village. Panoramic views from
house. Morocco. Stunning landscape. Butterflies, birds, and fun. Visit
Granada, Ronda, Cordoba, Seville, Morocco, Cadiz, Jerez, Arcos. From
£85 p.w. Reduction long let. Dr Campbell. For brochure, tel./fax:
Oxford 513935, e-mail: l.lustgaten@soton.ac.uk

Cornwall: Lizard Peninsula. Self-contained
accomodation in delightful 18th-c. house. Sleeps 5, garden, barbecue
area, close to the sea. Easy access to all the attractions of West
Cornwall. For brochure, please tel.: 01326 280216, e-mail:
marco@autiero.freeserve.co.uk.

Holidays in Falmouth, Cornwall. Five minutes' walk
from boats and town centre, 10 minutes' drive from safe sandy
beaches. Luxurious house, panoramic views over the harbour. Nice
quiet garden with barbecue and palm tree! Three/four bedrooms
(sleeps up to 7). Easy modern well-equipped kitchen. From £300
p.w. For full details and booking, contact Clarissa, tel.: 01326 317965
or 373492, fax: 319119.

Alpine chalet in farming hamlet at 3,000 ft., Haute
Savoie, France. Sleeps 2–7; garden, wild flowers, cowbells.
Mountain walking, winter skiing, or just unwinding. Not far from Lake
Geneva, Annecy, Chamonix. Local swimming pool, tennis, riding. Jackie
Becker, tel./fax: 0030 450 357412, e-mail: jlbecker@compuserve.com.

Northumberland, between the Cheviots and the sea.
A stone-built cottage in a small unspoilt village 5 miles from Alnwick
castle, within easy reach of half a dozen more, and miles of beautiful
sea shore. Two double bedrooms and a third with bunk beds. Sitting-
room, kitchen, bathroom. For details, tel.: 01665 579292.

Burgundy (Morvan National Park): 19th-c. stone
cottage in quiet hamlet. Sleeps 5+. Enclosed front and rear gardens
backing onto meadow with stream. Spacious sitting-room, 2 double
bedrooms, study, bathroom, fully-equipped kitchen, washing machine,
c.h., telephone, log fires. Ideal for peace and quiet, walking,
swimming in nearby lakes, wine-tasting, and sight-seeing in
Burgundy (half hour from Vézelay and Avallon. Available all
dates except 19 July–14 Aug. inclusive. £225–£275
p.w. Tel.: Oxford 721539.

Paris: lovely well-appointed 1-bedroom apartment,
suit couple, in 17e; excellent transport, available from 1 July for
short or long-term stay. Rate depends on lngth of stay. Tel.: 00 1 607
257 3567, e-mail: price@law.mail.cornell.edu.

Greece: charming old village house to let on the
beautiful island of Skopelos. Tel.: 01280 847849.

French Alps, 1 hour Geneva. Peaceful sunny
location, 1 km centre Morzine, newly-equipped chalet. Sleeps 7/8.
Fantastic for summer holidays. Swimming, walking, riding, paragliding,
white water rafting, climbing, plus tourist attractions galore.
£400 p.w. Book now for 2000 skiing. Tel.: 01295 810063.

Skopelos, Skiathos, Alonissos. Lovely island houses
available for rent. Town, country, seaside locations, sleeping 2–8
persons, prices from £39 per person p.w. For brochure, tel.:
003042422947, fax: 003042423057, e-mail: thalpos@otenet.gr.

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Houses for Sale

Greece, Spetses: beautiful island, no cars, 1 hour 50
minutes from Piraeus. Charming house in quiet residential area, in
excellent condition. 400 sq. metre detached plot, 120 sq. metre living
area. Three bedrooms, 2 bathrooms. Large cross-ventilated kitchen,
living-room with fireplace. Plenty of shelving, wall-seating, and built-
in cupboards. Terrace with open view, awnings. Garden with cypress
and olive trees. Beach 5 minutes' walk. Near supermarket. Perfect for
vacations, retirement, sabaticals. £180,000. Tel.: Oxford 284722.

Two 4-storey Victorian houses (31/32 Kingston Road)
separated by driveway allowing shared use of the
grounds—parking for 5 cars. This adds £30,000 to the value
of each flat, for which £50,000 is estimated value of each floor,
fully furnished. Flat 31 comprises 3 floors equipped for multi-
occupation. 31A is lower ground-floor facing west. Lawns and garden.
Flats 32 and 32A have 2 floors each. Property value: £520,000.
Tel.: Oxford 556460 (preferably before noon).

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For Sale

1955 Citroën Light 15 (Traction Avant). Right-
hand drive with wood dash and leather interior trim. In beautiful
condition and a please to drive subsequent to complete body and
mechanical restoration. To view, tel.: Oxford 284274, e-mail:
hugh.forsyth@yahoo.com.
n

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<br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette: Diary, 30 April<br /> - 11 May

Diary


Contents of this section:

Academic Staff
Development Seminars
: places should be booked in advance
through
the Staff Development Office, University Offices,
Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

For the full list of courses, see the HREF="http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/training/">Staff Development
ProgrammeWeb site.

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Contents Page of this issue



Friday 30 April

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Camille Pissarro', 1.15 p.m.
(Cost:
£1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

INTERNATIONAL STUDY-DAY (various speakers): `Is there a
European
"Third Way"?' (Research Programme: `Culture et
sociétés: comportements politiques'), Maison
Française, 10 a.m.–8.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. FENTON: `Auden and Shakespeare's sonnets' (first
in a
series of three lectures), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building,
5
p.m.

PROFESSOR M. GOODMAN: `Explaining religious change' (Marett
Memorial Lecture), Saskatchewan Lecture Room, Exeter, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR A. GOUDIE: `The geomorphology of the Oxford region'
(School of Geography Centenary Lectures), School of Geography,
5 p.m.

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Saturday 1 May

DEGREE CEREMONIES, Sheldonian, 11.30 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.

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Sunday 2 May

LORD HABGOOD: `Varieties of unbelief—moral autonomy'
(fourth
Bampton Lecture), St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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Monday 3 May

DR R. INGHAM: `Variations in sexual risks amongst young people
in
Europe' (Fertility and Reproduction seminars), Institute of
Social
and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

PROFESSOR A. BROWN: `The study of Soviet politics and the
politics
of Soviet studies in Britain' (lecture series: `Russian politics
and
society: Soviet and post-Soviet'), Lecture Theatre, New Building,
St
Antony's, 5 p.m.

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Tuesday 4 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The Chinese lute', 1.15 p.m.
(Cost:
£1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

CONGREGATION meeting, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR M.B. PARKES: `Which came first, the reader or the
scribe? (The function and processes of handwriting)' (Lyell
Lectures
in Bibliography: `Their hands before our eyes: a closer look at
scribes'), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J.Y. CAMPBELL: `Who should buy long-term bonds?'
(Clarendon Lectures in Economics: `Strategic asset allocation:
portfolio choice for long-term investors'), Gulbenkian Lecture
Theatre, Institute of Economics and Statistics, St Cross
Building, 5
p.m.

G. HOWARD: `The next time you see Paris' (lecture), Maison
Française, 5.15 p.m.

LORD ROTHSCHILD: `The creation of Waddesdon' (Ashmolean
Education
Service public lecture), the lecture theatre, Taylor Institution,
5.30 p.m.

DR T. GAVIN: `Iban textiles from Sarawak' (Oxford Asian
Textile
Group lecture), Pitt Rivers Research Centre, 64 Banbury Road,
5.45
(admission £2 for visitors; for details, tel. 554281 or
(2)78076).

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Wednesday 5 May

PROFESSOR N. FRIEDMAN: `The origin of photosynthesis and how
Earth
turned green' (Waynflete Lectures: `Seminal events in the
evolutionary history of plants'), Grove Auditorium, Magdalen, 5
p.m.

PROFESSOR J.Y. CAMPBELL: `Is the stock market safer for
long-term
investors?' (Clarendon Lectures in Economics: `Strategic asset
allocation: portfolio choice for long-term investors'),
Gulbenkian
Lecture Theatre, Institute of Economics and Statistics, St Cross
Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R.W. BAGLEY: `Bells, scales, and pitch standards:
the
archaeology of music in ancient China' (William Cohn Memorial
Lecture), Headley Lecture Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean, 5 p.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM evening tour: `Eighteenth-century
entertaining',
5.30 p.m. (Admission £1.50. Places must be booked: tel.
(2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

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Thursday 6 May

PROFESSOR P. VAN DER VEER: `Cosmopolitanism, secularism, and
transnational religion' (ESRC Research Programme on Transnational
Communities: `Transnational religious communities: Muslim and
Hindu
movements and networks'), Seminar Room, School of Geography, 2
p.m.

CHIKAKO OZAWA: `Gendered enlightenment? Ideology and practice
in a
Japanese indigenous psychotherapeutic movement' (Centre for
Cross-
Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Gender and health: healers,
carers, and patients'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen
Elizabeth
House, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR W. BEINART (Rhodes Professor of Race Relations):
`African history, environmental history, and race relations'
(inaugural lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR P. MORGAN: ` "Among our Ancient Mountains ..." (the
appreciation of Welsh mountainscape in the eighteenth and
nineteenth
centuries)', O'Donnell Lecture, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J.Y. CAMPBELL: `Investing for retirement' (Clarendon
Lectures in Economics: `Strategic asset allocation: portfolio
choice
for long-term investors'), Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, Institute
of
Economics and Statistics, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

J. HARWOOD: `An institutional landscape in transition: German
science c.1900' (Maison Française seminar
series:
`Science and the new century: Britain, France, and Germany
.1900'), History of Science Seminar Room, Modern
History
Faculty Building, 5 p.m.

D. FOUGEYROLLAS-SCHWEBEL and S. Condon: `Surveys of violence
against women in France: presentation of the problematic of a
quantitative approach' (seminar, chaired by Cathie Lloyd), Maison
Française, 5 p.m.

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Friday 7 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `East meets West: the world of
tea',
1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9
a.m.--1
p.m.)

SIR JOHN HOUGHTON: `Global climatic change' (School of
Geography
Centenary Lectures), School of Geography, 2.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR A. SCOTT: `Global economic change' (School of
Geography
Centenary Lectures), School of Geography, 3.45 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. FENTON: `Auden's prose' (second in a series of
three
lectures), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

DR P. NURSE: `Life and the reproduction of cells' (Ian Woolf
Lecture), Auditorium, St John's, 5.15 p.m.

DAME ELIZABETH BUTLER-SLOSS: `Who is to judge? The role of the
judiciary in ethical issues' (Eric Symes Abbott Memorial
Lecture),
the chapel, Keble, 5.30 p.m.

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Sunday 9 May

LORD HABGOOD: `Varieties of unbelief—all or none' (fifth
Bampton
Lecture), St Mary's, 10 a.m.

JANE APPEL and Lynton Appel: piano and cello recital of works
by
Schubert, Bartok, Schumann, and Brahms, Wolfson College, 6.30
p.m.
(admission £5, or family ticket £12; proceeds to
African
and Medical Research Foundation).

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Monday 10 May

DR O. CAMPBELL: `The shifting paradigm for safe motherhood
programmes
in developing countries' (Fertility and Reproduction seminars),
Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

PROFESSOR S. VERBA: `Social theory and social science: two
cultures?' (Tanner Lectures on Human Values: `Representation:
democratic theory and social surveys'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR M. ROE: `The determinants of corporate governance'
(first of three Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies),
Schools, 5
p.m.

DR O. RACKHAM: `Trees and timber in Greek history' (Myres
Memorial
Lecture), McGregor-Matthews Room, New College, 5 p.m.

J.-P. DE BEAUMARCHAIS delivers the Besterman Lecture, Taylor
Institution, 5 p.m. (meeting chaired by the Chancellor).

PROFESSOR DR H. RIKHOF: `Changing perspectives: approaching
the
Trinity' (St Cross College Visiting Fellow Lecture), Schools, 5
p.m.

J. KAHN: `A federal façade: Russia's republics in
transition' (lecture series: `Russian politics and society:
Soviet
and post-Soviet'), Lecture Theatre, New Building, St Antony's,
5 p.m.

MAISON FRANÇAISE/VOLTAIRE FOUNDATION soirée
marking
bicentenary of death of Beaumarchais: `Main droite, main gauche'
(dialogue between Beaumarchais and Voltaire, by J.-P. de
Beaumarchais, created by M. Favier and P. Vion), Maison
Française, 8 p.m.

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Tuesday 11 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Greek pots: their origins and
uses',
1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9
a.m.--1
p.m.)

PROFESSOR S. VERBA: `Citizens in democracies and democratic
citizens' (Tanner Lectures on Human Values: `Representation:
democratic theory and social surveys'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR M. ROE: `The determinants of corporate governance'
(second of three Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies),
Schools,
5 p.m.

PROFESSOR M.B. PARKES: `The hasty scribe (cursive handwriting
in
antiquity and the Middle Ages)' (Lyell Lectures in Bibliography:
`Their hands before our eyes: a closer look at scribes'), Lecture
Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

J. TAVENER: `Hymn of entry' (Hussey Lecture on the Church and
the
Arts), Schools, 5 p.m.

J. WHITELEY: `Daubigny et le Dauphiné' (lecture series:
`Grenoble et sa région'), Maison Française, 6 p.m.

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