28 November 1996 - No 4419

Oxford University Gazette

28 November 1996


: The following supplement was published with this Gazette:
University's evidence to the Dearing Inquiry

 


University Health and Safety information

 


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University Acts

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 25 November

Degree by Special Resolution

No notice to the contrary having been received under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1995, p. 13), the following resolution is deemed to have been approved at noon on 25 November.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

MICHAEL LIAM MCQUILLAN, All Souls College

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HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL 25 November

1 Decrees

Council has made the following decrees, to come into effect on 13 December.

List of the decrees:

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Decree (1): Establishment of Sidney Truelove Prize in Gastroenterology

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Clinical Medicine Board and with the concurrence of the General Board, provides for the formal acceptance of a generous donation from Dr Sidney Truelove of £8,000 for the maintenance of a prize in Gastroenterology, to be awarded for an essay on a topic relating to diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.

Text of Decree (1)

In Ch. IX, Sect. I, § 227, concerning Medical Prizes for award by the Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine (Statutes, 1995, p. 614), after the decree governing the Tizard Prize in Paediatrics insert:

`Truelove Prize in Gastroenterology

(a) The University accepts with gratitude the sum of £8,000 from Dr S.C. Truelove, to form a fund, the net income from which shall be applied to the establishment of the Sidney Truelove Prize in Gastroenterology.

(b) The prize shall be open to clinical students working in Oxford for the Second Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Medicine, and shall be awarded annually (provided that candidates of sufficient merit present themselves) for an essay on a topic related to diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.

(c) Income which is not expended in any year shall be carried forward for use in subsequent years.

(d) Council shall be empowered from time to time to modify the provisions of this decree, provided that in any change of decree the object of the fund, as set out in sub-clause (a) above, shall always be kept in view.'

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Decree (2): Arrangements for award of Edgell Sheppee Prize

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Physical Sciences Board and with the concurrence of the General Board, provides for the Edgell Sheppee Prize, formerly awarded for performance in Management in the project in Part II of the Honour Schools of Engineering or Materials, Economics, and/or Management, henceforth to be awarded for an engineering project in the Honour School of Engineering, Economics, and Management, since Pilkington Prizes are now available for management projects in the two joint Honour Schools.

Text of Decree (2)

In Ch. IX, Sect. I, § 323, cl. 2 (a) (i) (Statutes, 1995, p. 654), delete `and on the recommendation of the examiners in the Honour Schools of Engineering, Economics, and Management ... Part II of those examinations' and substitute `and on the recommendation of the examiners in the Honour School of Engineering, Economics, and Management for performance in Engineering in the Part II project'.

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Decree (3): Composition of the Oxford Committee for the Maison Française

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Curators of the Taylor Institution, removes the requirement that the curators' appointee to the Oxford Committee for the Maison Française be one of their number.

Text of Decree (3)

In Ch. XI, Sect. III, cl. 4 (Statutes, 1995, p. 699), delete item (7) and substitute: `(7) one member appointed by the Curators of the Taylor Institution;'.

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Decree (4): Supervisory body for Certificates in Theology, B.Th., and M.Th.

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Theology Board and with the concurrence of the General Board, transfers supervisory responsibility under the Theology Board for the Degree of Master of Theology from the Supervisory Committee for the Master of Theology, the Bachelor of Theology, and the Theology Certificates, to the Master of Theology Studies Committee, and defines the composition and terms of reference of that committee. The M.Th. Studies Committee has until now been a subordinate committee of the Supervisory Committee. This change reflects current practice, as the M.Th. Studies Committee has been assuming a supervisory role as the M.Th. has developed as a distinctive degree in its own right, and removes duplication from the work of the two committees. This is an administrative change which does not affect the vested rights of students on the course.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in `Examinations and Boards' below.

Text of Decree (4)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 940, l. 27 and p. 959, l. 12, in each case delete `the Degree of Master of Theology,'.

2 Ibid., p. 961, delete ll. 26–9 and substitute : `There shall be a committee for the supervision of arrangements for the Degree of Master of Theology called the Master of Theology Studies Committee. This committee shall consist of two representatives of the Board of the Faculty of Theology (at least one of whom shall be a member of the board's Graduate Studies Committee) and one representative of each of the participating institutions, namely, Campion Hall; Greyfriars; Mansfield College; Regent's Park College; St Benet's Hall; Blackfriars; Ripon College, Cuddesdon; St Stephen's House; Wycliffe Hall; and Harris Manchester College. The committee may co-opt up to three additional members. The committee shall have such powers and duties in respect of the Degree of Master of Theology as may from time to time be prescribed by the Board of the Faculty of Theology.'

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Decree (5): Appointment of Delegate of Oxford University Press

Pursuant to the provisions of Tit. VIII, Sect. ii, cl. 3 (Statutes, 1995, p. 55), the appointment by Council and the General Board of Mr I.C. Butler, MA, Student of Christ Church, as a Delegate of the University Press for a third period of five years, with effect from 1 October 1997, is confirmed.

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2 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts under the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. vi, cl. 1 (Statutes, 1995, p. 345) has been accorded to the following persons who are qualified for membership of Congregation:

 

STAFFORD JOHNSON TAYLOR, University Offices

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3 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of Congregation:

Bodmer, Lady J.G., MA, D.Sc., Lady Margaret Hall
McQuillan, M.L., MA, All Souls
Taylor, S.J., MA status, University Offices

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BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 13 December, see Examinations and Boards below. |

University Agenda

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 2 December

Degree by Special Resolution

The following special resolution will be deemed to be approved at noon on 2 December, unless by that time the Registrar has received notice in writing from two or more members of Congregation under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1995, p. 13) that they wish the resolution to be put to a meeting of Congregation.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

SUZANNAH ELAINE CLARK, Merton College

HELEN WENDA SMALL, Pembroke College

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CONGREGATION 3 December

Notice

The meeting of Congregation is cancelled. The sole business comprises questions to which no opposition has been notified and in respect of which no request for an adjournment has been received, and Mr Vice-Chancellor will accordingly declare the statutes approved without a meeting under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. iii, cl. 11 (Statutes, 1995, p. 8).

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CONGREGATION 17 December 2 p.m.

¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that written notice of any opposition to the preambles of the following statutes, signed by at least two members of Congregation, must be given to the Registrar by noon on Monday, 9 December (see the Guide to Procedures in Congregation cited in the note at the end of `University Agenda').

Statute (1): Establishment of Jacques Delors Professorship of European Community Law

Explanatory note

The European Commission has made an extremely generous benefaction to the University towards the endowment of a Jacques Delors Professorship of European Community Law. The chair is to be partly funded also from university funds, the Higher Studies Fund, and the European Studies Fund. The following statute, and the decree to be made by Council if the statute is approved, formally establish the Jacques Delors Professorship of European Community Law accordingly. The Jacques Delors Professor will be eligible to hold the Directorship of the Centre for the Advanced Study of European and Comparative Law, and the Directorship of the Institute of European Studies (of which it is a constituent part). Changes in the decree governing the Clifford Chance Professorship of European Law, the holder of which is at present ex officio director of the centre, are also made to provide for either the Clifford Chance Professor or the Jacques Delors Professor to hold the directorship.

 

(1) WHEREAS it is expedient to establish the Jacques Delors Professorship of European Community Law, THE UNIVERSITY ENACTS AS FOLLOWS.

 

In Tit. XIV, Sect. II, cl. 1, concerning professorships (Statutes, 1995, p. 107) after `Clifford Chance Professorship of European Law' insert: `Jacques Delors Professorship of European Community Law'.

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Decree to be made by Council if the Statute is approved

1 In Ch. II, Sect. VI, § 1, SCHEDULE, concerning official members of faculty board, (Statutes, 1995, p. 230), under `Law', after `Law, European, Clifford Chance.' insert: `Law, European Community, Jacques Delors.'

2 In Ch. VII, Sect. I, § 5. B, SCHEDULE A, concerning professorships (p. 369), after `Clifford Chance Professor of European Law' insert: `Jacques Delors Professor of European Community Law'.

3 Ibid., Sect. III, § 178, concerning the Clifford Chance Professor of European Law (Statutes, 1995, p. 436), delete title and cl. 1 and substitute:

`§ 178. Clifford Chance Professor of European Law

1. The Clifford Chance Professor of European Law shall lecture and give instruction in European Law.'

4 Ibid. (p. 437), delete cl. 3 and substitute: `3. The Professor shall be a member of the Centre for the Advanced Study of European and Comparative Law, and shall have the obligation to accept the directorship of the centre if requested to do so under the provisions of Ch. VII, Sect. I, § 5. B, cl. 5. The centre shall be a constituent centre of the Institute for European Studies, and the director of the centre shall be eligible for appointment as director of the institute under the provisions of Ch. III, Sect. XXXVI, cl. 4.'

5 Ibid., insert new § 179 as follows and renumber existing §§ 179–86 (pp. 437–40, as renumbered by Decree (3) of 21 June 1996, Gazette, Vol. 126, p. 1282) as §§ 180–7:

`§ 179. Jacques Delors Professor of European Community Law

1. The Jacques Delors Professor of European Community Law shall deliver lectures and give instruction in European Community Law.

2. The professor shall be elected by an electoral board consisting of:

(1) the Vice-Chancellor, or, if the head of the college specified in (2) of this clause is Vice-Chancellor, a person appointed by Council;

(2) the head of the college to which the professorship shall be for the time being allocated by Council under any decree in that behalf, or, if the head is unable or unwilling to act, a person appointed by the governing body of the college;

(3) a person appointed by the governing body of the college specified in (2) of this clause;

(4) a person appointed by Council;

(5), (6) two persons appointed by the General Board;

(7)–(9) three persons appointed by the Board of the Faculty of Law.

3. The Professor shall be a member of the Centre for the Advanced Study of European and Comparative Law, and shall have the obligation to accept the directorship of the centre if requested to do so under the provisions of Ch. VII, Sect. I, § 5. B, cl. 5. The centre shall be a constituent centre of the Institute for European Studies, and the director of the centre shall be eligible for appointment as director of the institute under the provisions of Ch. III, Sect. XXXVI, cl. 4.

4. The Professor shall be subject to the General Provisions of the decree concerning the duties of professors and to those particular provisions of the same decree which are applicable to this chair.'

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Statute (2): Amalgamation of Heygate-Soper Prize Fund and Mike Soper Bursary Fund

Explanatory note

The University in 1982 accepted a benefaction from Messrs Heygate and Sons Ltd for the provision of a prize to be awarded to the undergraduate who makes the most outstanding contribution to the academic and social life of members of the University studying agriculture and forestry within the University. It is now expedient, in consequence of changes to departmental structures and the phasing out of the Honour School of Agricultural and Forest Sciences, to transfer the benefaction to the Mike Soper Bursary Fund to be used to provide travel bursaries for members of the University studying Biological Sciences, preference being given to those whose studies relate to agriculture, forestry, or some other use of rural land. The following statute, and the decree to be made by Council if the statute is approved, which are promoted on the recommendation of the administering committee for the Mike Soper Bursary Fund and the Biological Sciences Board and with the concurrence of the General Board, effect the merger of the two trust funds.

 

(2) WHEREAS it is expedient to merge the Mike Soper Bursary Fund and the Heygate-Soper Prize Fund, NOW THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD, in exercise of the powers in that behalf conferred upon it by the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923, and of all other powers enabling it, ENACTS, subject to the approval of Her Majesty in Council, AS FOLLOWS.

In Tit. XV, Sect. LII, cl. 1 (Statutes, 1995, p. 153), after `to the University and to Agriculture,' insert `and including a gift from Messrs Heygate and Sons Ltd,'.

Decree to be made by Council if the Statute is approved

1 In Ch. IX, Sect. I, delete § 155, concerning the Heygate-Soper Prize (Statutes, 1995, p. 591), and renumber existing §§ 156–64 (pp. 591–5) as §§ 155–65.

2 This decree shall be effective from the date on which Statute (...) approved by Congregation on ... is approved by Her Majesty in Council.

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CONGREGATION 13 February

Elections

Libraries Committee

Notice corrected in Gazette 5 December 1996

Vacancies: four (from amongst those qualified for membership of a faculty under Tit. VI, Sect. I, cl. 2 (a) and (b))*

Period from HT 1997: 3 years

* I.e. the holders of all university posts approved for this purpose by the General Board the duties of which include research or teaching, and the holders of all posts in the colleges and other societies of the University the duties of which are certified by the head of the college or society to include research or teaching; but not such persons as may be made members of a faculty by a faculty board on account of the work being done by them in Oxford in the subjects with which the board is concerned (see Statutes, 1995, p. 39).

The above vacancies have been created by Decree (5) of 14 November 1996 (Gazette, p. 321), which suspends the Libraries Board and the Curators of the Bodleian Library and sets up the Libraries Committee in their place.

Nominations in writing by two members of Congregation will be received by the Head Clerk at the University Offices, Wellington Square, up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 20 January, and similar nominations by six members of Congregation up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 27 January.

Council has decided that nominations must show for each signatory the name and college or department in block capitals. Any names which are not so shown may not be published. At least one nomination in respect of each candidate must be made on an official nomination form. Copies of this form are available from the Head Clerk (telephone: (2)70190; e-mail: Philip.Moss@admin.ox.ac.uk).

Nominations

The following nominations were published in theGazettes of 16 January (1) and 23 January 1997 (2-4):

1. H.C.G. Matthew, MA, D.Phil., Fellow of St Hugh's

2. K.J. Wood, MA status, D.Phil., Wolfson

3. N.F. Palmer, MA, D.Phil., Fellow of St Edmund Hall

4. C.Y. Ferdinand, MA, D.Phil., Fellow of Magdalen

Notices

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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PROFESSORSHIP OF ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND IBM DIRECTORSHIP OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE UNIT

JAMES CHRISTOPHER BRIDEN, MA (PH.D., D.SC. ANU), NERC Research Professor and Visiting Professor, Department of Earth Sciences, has been appointed to the professorship with effect from 1 January 1997.

Professor Briden will be a fellow of Linacre College.

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NEWTON-ABRAHAM VISITING PROFESSORSHIP 2000–1

JOSE A. CAMPOS-ORTEGA, Chairman of the Institute for Developmental Biology, University of Cologne, has been elected to the professorship for the academic year 2000–1.

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COMMISSION OF INQUIRY

Plans for future work

This note briefly sets out the Commission's plans for completing its work and issuing a final report by Easter 1997.

Throughout this year, the Commission has been undertaking a range of consultation with individuals and bodies within and outside the University. In February, it issued a consultative paper on the University's future objectives, structure, size and shape, which was sent to all members of Congregation and others; this set out the working assumptions which the Commission was making, and then posed a series of questions on the future size of the University, the use of space and sites, the appropriate balance between teaching and research, the future role of the colleges, the future of the joint appointments scheme, and the role of international links in the life of the University. In March, the report of the consultants Coopers and Lybrand on University governance was issued for consultation, and a summary of the report was also distributed to members of Congregation and others.

Since the issue of those documents, a major consultative exercise has been conducted on behalf of the Commission by means of the surveys issued to all staff involved in teaching and research, and to a large sample of graduate and undergraduate students, during Hilary Term. The results of these surveys have now been analysed and will be available to the Commission in its final deliberations.

The Commission has also consulted bodies within the University on particular topics. Heads of departments, chairmen of faculty boards, and colleges have all been consulted about the organisation and support of research in Oxford; whilst colleges have been consulted about arrangements for their collective representation, and about the impact of differences in the resources available to different colleges.

The Commission is now aiming to complete its work and produce a final report to Congregation, Council, and the General Board, by Easter 1997. In view of this timetable, it will not now be possible to conduct any further consultation. Any members of the University who wish to make further representations to the Commission are now therefore asked to do so as soon as possible, and in any case by no later than 3 January 1997.

Any further submissions should be made to the Commission's secretary, Mr M.D. Sibly, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: Oxford (2)80303, e-mail: michael.sibly@admin.ox.ac.uk).

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COMMITTEE FOR THE ARCHIVES

Annual Report 1995-6

The Committee for the Archives was established by Council to replace, from 1 October 1994 onwards, the Delegates of Privileges who since 1769 had had oversight of the University Archives. Its terms of reference are contained in Ch. III, Sect. v of the University's Decrees (Statutes, 1995, p. 253). Its current membership is Mr Vice-Chancellor, the Senior Proctor, the Registrar, Mrs M. Clapinson (representing Bodley's Librarian), Dr G.E. Aylmer, Dr J.M. Roberts, Professor R. Fox, Ms R. Dunhill (County Archivist of Hampshire), Dr R. Palmer (Librarian, Lambeth Palace Library). It is chaired by the Principal of Linacre on behalf of the Vice-Chancellor. The committee held its first meeting on 4 February 1995, and subsequently appointed Mr David G. Vaisey as Keeper of the Archives for a period of five years with effect from 1 June 1995 to succeed Mr Jeffrey Hackney who had held the office since 1 October 1987. The committee holds three scheduled meetings per annum and at two of these meetings it receives a half-yearly report on the work of the Archives. In response to some requests the committee has decided to publish a short Annual Report in the Gazette. This is the first of these reports, covering the year from the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1995 to the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1996.

Staff: The established staff consists of the Keeper who is part-time, and two full-time employees: Mr Simon Bailey, archivist, and Ms Sarah Rawling, archives assistant. This last post is a fixed-term one-year appointment intended for someone who intends to apply at the end of the year for a place on an archives administration course. Ms Rawling replaced Mr Tim Gardner on 1 August 1996. Mr Gardner is now studying for the Diploma and M.Sc. Econ. in Archive Administration at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth.

Accounts: The Archives' income for the year 1995--6 was ú62,935 and its expenditure was ú55,081. The credit balance added to that built up over some years by the committee (and the delegates before it) has enabled the committee this year to initiate a conservation and preservation programme for the older materials in its care via the Oxford Colleges Conservation Consortium. It is anticipated that this programme will continue for several years.

Enquiries: During the year 507 enquiries have been dealt with, 373 of which were from the general public. Nine hundred and fifty-four items have been produced for consultation in Duke Humfrey's Library by readers, on subjects ranging from Elizabethan lute music to the influence of Oxford and Cambridge on American Society 1900--40; from humanism in fifteenth- century England to the life of Sir Roger Newdigate (1719--1806); and from seventeenth-century witchcraft to the shaping of the British Colonial Service, 1920--55.

Accessions: A total of fifty-three accessions from departments have been made during the year. These range in size from single items such as the ground plan of the proposed Examination Schools submitted by Thomas Jackson in 1876 as part of his entry for the competition for the building, to the entire archive of the Oxford side of the former Oxford and Cambridge Examination Board from 1873 to 1995.

Cataloguing: Catalogues have been completed of records of the former Delegacy of Local Examinations, the Departments of Physiology and Pharmacology, and the Computing Laboratory.

Premises: The Archives occupy the two rooms in the Tower of the Five Orders in the Old Schools Quadrangle, and basement rooms in the History Faculty building and the Examination Schools. The refurbishment of an extension to the Examination Schools accommodation is proceeding under the supervision of the University Surveyor's Office.

The Records of the Chancellor's Court: For many years these records, which cover the period from 1434 to 1968, have been undergoing listing and indexing by Mr Walter Mitchell. During the year Mr Mitchell reached the end of the main series of these papers and there now remain the last dozen boxes of miscellaneous papers. It is anticipated that in the course of the coming year this massive task will be completed. The committee intends then to explore ways to make this catalogue and index---of great value to those interested in many aspects of the University's history and life over many centuries---more widely available.

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INTENSIVE GERMAN CLASSES FOR ARCHAEOLOGISTS

Intensive German classes for archaeologists will be offered by the Institute of Archaeology in ninth week of Hilary Term (17–21 March 1997). The classes will teach relevant reading and basic conversational skills.

Beginners' classes will be held from 9.30 to 11 a.m.; intermediate classes will be held from 11.30 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. All classes will be held at the Institute of Archaeology. The tutor will be Gertrude Seidmann, Research Associate of the institute.

Those wishing to attend should register with the receptionist at the institute (telephone: (2)78240).

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GAZETTE PUBLICATION ARRANGEMENTS

The remaining Gazettes of this term will appear on 5, 12, and 19 December. Publication will resume on 16 January.

Appointments Supplements will appear with the Gazettes of 12 December and 23 January.

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EXAMINATION SCHOOLS

Visitors to the Examination Schools are asked to note that work is currently in progress on the installation of a lift in the Examination Schools which will improve accessibility for students with disabilities.

Work will necessarily continue throughout Michaelmas Term but every attempt will be made to avoid disturbance to users of the Schools.

Members of the University are asked to be as tolerant as possible of any difficulties which this work may cause.

Lectures

Contents of this section:

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JAMES FORD'S LECTURES IN BRITISH HISTORY

A land of lost content? Visions of civic virtue from Ruskin to Rawls

PROFESSOR J. HARRIS will deliver the Ford's Lectures in British History at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Examination Schools.

24 Jan.: ` "Citizens and strangers": the language of citizenship since the late nineteenth century.'

31 Jan.: `The nation as "moral community" or "business firm"?'

7 Feb.: `What to do with the "sleeping partner": the incorporation of women.'

14 Feb.: `Morality and "social welfare".'

21 Feb.: `War and peace.'

28 Feb.: ` "Civic virtue" without "society"?'

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SLADE LECTURES 1996–7

Art and uncertainty: technical studies, art history, and conservation

PROFESSOR DAVID BOMFORD, Slade Professor 1996–7, will deliver the following lectures at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Lecture Hall, the Taylor Institution.

22 Jan.: `Material paintings: limits of deduction.'

29 Jan.: ` "The Invention of Painting in Oyle" .'

5 Feb.: `Trompe l'oeil, perspective, and illusion.'

12 Feb.: `Authenticity and authorship.'

19 Feb.: `Pentimenti.'

26 Feb.: `Impressionist trajectories.'

5 Mar.: `Supporting roles: episodes from a history of conservation.'

12 Mar.: `Positivism and picture cleaning.'

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ANTHROPOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY

Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology

Ethnicity and Identity Seminars: the significance of kinship

DR R. PARKIN will give the final seminar in this series at 11 a.m. on Friday, 6 December, in the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology.

Conveners: Shirley Ardener, Tamara Dragadze, Robert Parkin, and Jonathan Webber.

 

Subject: `Caste, kinship, and identity in India.'

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CLINICAL MEDICINE

Oxford Immunology Group

DR BERND ARNOLD, German Cancer Research Centre, Tumour Immunology Programme, Heidelberg, Germany, will lecture at 6 p.m. on Monday, 2 December, in the Lecture Theatre, the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology. The meeting will be chaired by Dr A. Neil Barclay.

Subject: `Tolerance induction in mature T lymphocytes.'

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CLINICAL MEDICINE AND PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Alteration to time of meeting

The seminar to be given by DR HUGH PELHAM, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, on Thursday, 5 December, will be held at 4 p.m., and not, as previously notified, at 4.30 p.m.

Convener: H. Waldmann, BM, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Pathology.

 

Subject: `SNAREs and the organisation of the secretory pathway.'

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MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

DR DAVID BROOKSHAW, Bristol, will give a seminar on Thursday, 5 December, in Room T11, 47 Wellington Square

Conveners: T.F. Earle, MA, D.Phil., King John II Professor of Portuguese Studies, and S.R. Parkinson, MA, University Lecturer in Portuguese Language and Linguistics.

 

Subject: `Narrating the nation: the Angolan fiction of Pepetela.'

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PROFESSOR ROMANO LUPERINI, University of Siena, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 4 December, in the Massey Room, Balliol College.

Convener: D. Zancani, MA, Faculty Lecturer in Italian.

 

Subject: `Note sull'allegoria in Montale.'

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ORIENTAL STUDIES

Seminar in Jewish–Muslim Relations

PROFESSOR A. COHEN, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Monday, 2 December, in the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, 45 St Giles'.

Conveners: D. Frank (Ph.D. Harvard), and R.L. Nettler (MA McGill), Research Fellows, Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, and A. Tanenbaum.

 

Subject: `The Jewish community of Ottoman Jerusalem during the sixteenth century: new materials and findings.'

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PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory: departmental seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Mondays in the Lecture Theatre, the Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory.

PROFESSOR Y. HAAS, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
27 Jan.: `Molecules trapped in cryogenic matrices: spectra, reactions, and simulations.'

DR D.A. NICHOLS, Liverpool University and Northern Examination Board
3 Feb.: `Chemistry A level—present and future.'

PROFESSOR K. BURNETT
10 Feb.: `Bose–Einstein condensation and molecular physics.'

DR J.H.D. ELAND
17 Feb.: `Molecular explosions.'

DR G.A. ATTARD, Cardiff
24 Feb.: To be announced.

DR J.W. ESSEX, Southampton
3 Mar.: `The computer simulation of organic and biological systems.'

DR S.D. PRICE, University College, London
10 Mar.: `Interactions of molecular dictations with atoms, molecules, and photons.'

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PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Pharmacology and anatomical neuropharmacology seminars

Amended notice

The title of the seminar to be given by PROFESSOR A.D. SMITH at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 3 December, in the Lecture Theatre, the University Department of Pharmacology, has been altered. The new title will be: `The ageing brain; is cognitive decline inevitable?'

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INTERDEPARTMENTAL GRADUATE LECTURES IN SCIENCE

The new microscopies—from molecules to man

The following lectures will be given at 12 noon on Thursdays and Fridays in the Lindemann Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon Laboratory.

Convener: G.A.D. Briggs, MA, Reader in Materials Science.

 


Week 1: the renaissance in optical microscopy

DR DAVID SHOTTON, Lecturer in Zoology.

23 Jan.: `Seeing the invisible.'
24 Jan.: `Seeing molecules.'


Week 2: acoustic microscopy

DR OLEG KOLOSOV, EPSRC Advanced Fellow.

30 Jan.: `Seeing in the darkness.'
31 Jan.: `Beyond the wavelength limits.'


Week 3: electron microscopy

DR AMANDA PETFORD-LONG, Royal Society University Research Fellow.

6 Feb.: `Using electrons to see atoms.'
7 Feb.: `Watching atoms move.'


Week 4: the Atom Probe Field Ion Microscope

DR ALFRED CEREZO, Lecturer in Materials.

13 Feb.: `Using atoms to see atoms.'
14 Feb.: `An atomic-scale body scanner for metals.'


Week 5: scanning tunnelling microscopy

DR ANDREW BRIGGS, Reader in Materials Science.

20 Feb.: `Studying atoms and bonds on surfaces.'
21 Feb.: `Observing and manipulating molecules.'


Week 6: biomolecular scanning probe microscopy

DR SAUL TENDLER, Reader in Biophysical Chemistry, Nottingham University.

27 Feb.: `Biomolecules under the microscope.'
28 Feb.: `Probing biomolecular interactions.'


Week 7: scanning electrochemical microscopy

PROFESSOR ALLEN HILL, Professor of Bioinorganic Chemistry.

6 Mar.: `Studying modified electrodes by scanning probe microscopy.'

Magnetic resonance imaging

DR PETER STYLES, Acting Unit Director, MRC Biochemical and Clinical Magnetic Resonance Unit.

7 Mar.: `MRI—a tool kit for imaging structure, physiology, and biochemistry.'


Week 8: imaging thought

DR PAUL MATTHEWS, Clinical Research Reader in Neurology.

13 Mar.: `Monitoring local changes in the brain.'
14 Mar.: `Changes in brain state during cognitive processes.'

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MAISON FRANÇAISE AND MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

Fiftieth anniversary of the Maison Française

PROFESSOR JACQUES DERRIDA, Directeur d'Études à l'École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 28 November, in the Examination Schools.

Convener: M.M. Bowie, MA, Marshal Foch Professor of French Literature.

 

Subject: `State of the lie, lies of state.'

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CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES

Comparative research in law and society

PROFESSOR MICHAEL TOLLEY, Northwestern University, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 2 December, in the Buttery, Wolfson College.

Subject: `Assessing the field of comparative judicial studies.'

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MANSFIELD COLLEGE

Radical theologies

The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Fridays in Mansfield College. The lectures are open to all.

The course co-ordinators are Andrew Linzey and Charles Brock. For further information, telephone Oxford (2)70983 or (2)70999.

PROFESSOR D. MARQUAND
24 Jan.: `Political theology.'

D. TOMLINSON, Leader of the Holy Joes and author of The Post-Evangelical
31 Jan.: `Post-evangelical theology.'

THE REVD PROFESSOR ANDREW LINZEY
7 Feb.: `Animal theology.'

THE REVD MICHAEL VASEY, St John.'s College, Durham
14 Feb.: `Gay theology.'

DR M.-H. KEANE
21 Feb.: `Feminist theology.'

PROFESSOR M. GREY, Southampton
28 Feb.: `Green theology.'

PROFESSOR D. TURNER, Birmingham
7 Mar.: `Mystical theology.'

THE REVD PROFESSOR JOHN HICK, Birmingham
14 Mar.: `Multi-faith theology.'

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NUFFIELD COLLEGE

PROFESSOR JAMES FISHKIN, University of Texas at Austin, will give a seminar at 2 p.m. on Thursday, 5 December, in the Lecturer Room, Nuffield College.

Conveners: Dr A.F. Heath and Dr D.L. Miller.

 

Subject: `Bringing deliberation to democracy: deliberative polling in the UK and the US.'

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ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

Asian Studies Centre

Huang Hsing Foundation Distinguished Lecture in Asian Studies: postponement of lecture

The Huang Hsing Foundation Distinguished Lecture in Asian Studies has been postponed from 2 December to 28 January. DR PER FISCHER, Mainz, formerly German Ambassador to Beijing, will now lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 28 January, in the Latin American Centre Library, 1 Church Walk.

Subject: `Is democracy a panacea? Problems of transition in the PRC.'

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ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE (MIDDLE EAST CENTRE) AND THE CENTRE FOR CROSS-CULTURAL RESEARCH ON WOMEN, QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

MRS SUZANNE MUBARAK, wife of the President of Egypt, will lecture at 8.30 p.m. on Wednesday, 4 December, in the New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

Subject: `Peace and the role of women in development in the Middle East.'

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WESTMINSTER COLLEGE

Hans Urs von Balthasar Lecture

JACQUES SERVAIS, SJ, Casa Balthasar, Rome, will deliver the second annual Hans Urs von Balthasar Lecture at 6 p.m. on Friday, 29 November, in the Theatre, Westminster College.

The lecture will be preceded at 5 p.m. by the formal opening of the G.K. Chesterton Library. Further information may be obtained from Stratford Caldecott (telephone: Oxford 247644, ext. 3222).

Subject: `The vocation of the Christian in the world.'

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OXFORD INNOVATION SOCIETY

Oxford Innovation Society Winter Lecture

PROFESSOR HERMAN WALDMANN, FRS, will give a talk to the society at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 12 December, in the Department of Pharmacology.

Admission is by ticket only, obtainable from Isis Innovation (telephone: Oxford (2)72413).

Subject: `Reprogramming the immune system.'

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ASSOCIATION FOR WOMEN IN SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING (OXFORD BRANCH)

Oxford Science Lecture Series

PROFESSOR SUSAN GREENFIELD will lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 4 December, in the University Museum of Natural History.

Tickets, including refreshments, cost £1.50. Tickets are available at the door, but those wishing to attend are asked to book places by contacting Dr Elizabeth Griffin, Department of Astrophysics (telephone: (2)73345, e-mail: remg@astro.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `How could the brain generate consciousness?'

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Grants and Research Funding

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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SUB-FACULTY OF PHYSICS

In accordance with the regulations for the Honour School of Natural Science (Physics), the following syllabuses are published by the Sub-faculty of Physics.

HONOUR SCHOOL OF NATURAL SCIENCE (PHYSICS)

Syllabuses for Part B of the Second Public Examination of the

Four Year Course (Trinity Term 1998) Two written papers of three hours chosen from the following subjects 1. to 6.

1. Astrophysics

Stellar physics. Theory of stellar photospheres; continuous and absorption-line spectra; chromospheres and coronae; emission-line formation; physics of stellar interiors; structure of main-sequence stars; post-main-sequence evolution; degenerate stars; supernovae.

Normal galaxies. Kinematics of our own Galaxy, globular clusters; galaxy morphology and luminosity functions; mass estimates; groups and clusters of galaxies.

High-energy astrophysics: basic physics of interactions between high energy particles and radiation; interacting binary stellar systems, black holes; active galactic nuclei and relativistic jets.

2. Atomic and Laser Physics

The option includes the essential features of experimental techniques and important practical considerations in addition to theoretical concepts. A knowledge of atomic physics at the level of the A-papers is assumed e.g. Normal and Anomalous Zeeman effect.

The three subject areas within the option are each divided into two parts:

Atoms I: Atomic and molecular spectra and structure: Hydrogen and hydrogen-like systems, alkali atoms, helium and atoms with two electrons outside closed shells.Diatomic molecules. Selection rules and techniques of spectroscopy.

Lasers I: The theory of the laser with some important examples of gas and solid-state lasers: Einstein coefficients for the treatment of the interaction of radiation and atoms. Linewidths and lineshapes. Amplification by stimulated emission and the laser oscillator. Cavity effects. Gas lasers (He-Ne, He-Cd+ argon-ion and copper vapour). Solid state lasers (ruby and Nd:YAG).

Optics I: Diffraction and other phenomena related to lasers: Gaussian beams and their propagation. Cavity eigenfunctions. Thin films. Electro-optic effect. Second harmonic generation.

Atoms II: Atomic and molecular spectroscopy and manipulation of atoms. Homonuclear molecules. Hyperfine structure including effects of external magnetic fields. Optical pumping. Doppler-free laser spectroscopy. Laser cooling and trapping of atoms and ions. Elementary treatment of quantum optics and the physical basis of quantum-electrodynamic effects in atoms.

Lasers II: Survey of laser systems: High power infrared molecular lasers. Lasers operating in the ultraviolet. Dye lasers. Semiconductor lasers. Diode pumped solid-state lasers. Use of lasers in chemical physics.

Optics II: Advanced optics: Fourier transforms. Coherence. Optical fibres. Holography. Nonlinear optics (third-order effects in atoms and molecules and their applications).

In the examination candidates will be expected to be able to answer questions on Atoms I, Lasers I and II and Optics I together with either Atoms II or Optics II.

3. Condensed Matter Physics

Crystal structures. Reciprocal lattices, Brillouin zones. Structure determination - X-ray, neutron and electron diffraction. Symmetry.

Acoustic and optic phonons: measurements of phonon dispersion. Anharmonicity: thermal properties. Structural phase changes.

Electrons in a periodic potential. Band gaps: electron dispersion: effective mass. Fermi surfaces. Semiconductors. Low dimensional structures.

Transport of heat and electrical current in metals and semiconductors. Landau quantisation. Effective mass renormalisation.

Interband optical transitions and excitons. Plasmons. Infra-red absorption/reflectivity and Raman scattering from phonons. Nonlinear optical properties. Applications.

Diamagnetism. Crystal field theory: paramagnetism. Magnetic ordering and phase transitions. Low dimensional magnetism. Spin waves. Magnetic resonance. Critical phenomena. Domains. Applications.

Bose condensation and superfluids. Conventional, organic and high Tc superconductors: thermodynamics, London and BCS theories. Josephson effects. Applications.

No more than one question may be set on experimental work performed as part of this subject.

4. Particle Physics

Experimental Techniques. Physics of accelerators. Colliders and fixed targets. Event rates and luminosity. Triggers and signal and background processes. Physics of particle detectors. Applications to real experiments. Wire chambers, silicon detectors, calorimeters and muon chambers. Quark Structure of Hadrons. Structure of hadrons. Deep inelastic scattering, the quark-parton model and QCD. Light hadron masses, magnetic moments and EM decays. Heavy quark states.

Theoretical Principles. Breit-Wigner resonance. Elementary introduction to relativistic quantum mechanics. Matrix elements. Discrete and continuous symmetries. Applications of gauge symmetries.

Applications to the Standard Model. Charged current (CC) weak interactions. V-A theory. Universality of CC. 2 and 4 component neutrino theory. Oscillations in the Ko and bb system. Discovery of the top quark. Electroweak symmetry breaking. The Z resonance and number of neutrino species.

5. Physics of Atmospheres and Oceans

Structure and composition of the Earth's atmosphere and oceans. Atmospheric thermodynamics. Energy sources, sinks and transport. Cloud physics.

Fluid motions on a rotating planet. Scale analysis, hydrostatic and geostrophic balance. Inertio-gravity waves. Conversion of potential energy to kinetic energy. Vorticity, Rossby waves. Boundary layers. Boundary currents. Weather forecasting. Predictability and chaos.

The atmospheric radiation budget. Solar radiation. Radiative transfer. Radiative equilibrium. The Greenhouse Effect. Molecular spectra and line shapes.

Atmospheric chemistry, ozone. Catalytic cycles. The Ozone Hole.

Remote sounding of atmospheres. Absorption and emission spectroscopy. Techniques and data interpretation. Satellite and ground-based instrumentation. Current measurement programmes.

Climate and climate variability. Paleoclimates.

Physics and dynamics of planetary atmospheres.

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6. Theoretical Physics

Statistical physics: statistical mechanics of interacting systems, cooperative ordering, mean field theory, numerical approaches, scaling and criticality, renormalization group ideas. Stochastic processes, random walks, Brownian motion, Markov processes, Langevin and Fokker-Planck equations.

Quantum mechanics: scattering theory for non-relativistic particles; relativistic quantum mechanics; many-particle systems; path-integral formulation.

Classical fields: covariant formulation of electrodynamics, gauge invariance, retarded potentials, dipole radiation. General Relativity, the equivalence principle, Einstein's equations, geodesics, perihelion of Mercury, simple applications to cosmology.

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One written paper of 1½ hours

The Syllabuses for this paper, topics A-G, are as published for the Honour School of Natural Science (Physics) Three Year Course Part B published in the Gazette (Ref No.4404 , Vol.126, page 1239 ). Candidates offering option 2 may not answer questions on topic B.

Candidates may replace the 1½ hour paper by an assessed course in a foreign language as specified in the regulations for the three year course.

Candidates may propose to the Chairman of the Sub-faculty of Physics or deputy, not later than the first week of the Trinity full term of the academic year preceding that in which the examination is taken, another subject paper or papers to replace the written paper of 1½ hours.

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JOINT COMMITTEE FOR PHYSICS AND PHILOSOPHY

HONOUR SCHOOL OF PHYSICS AND PHILOSOPHY

Syllabuses for Part B of the Second Public Examination (Trinity Term 1998)

(a) One written paper of three hours chosen from the following Major Option subjects 1. to 6., and

(b) either: one written paper of one and a half hours from the Minor Option topics,

or: an essay or a project in Physics [subject to the proviso that no candidate may offer both an essay or project on Physics and Subject 199 in Philosophy].

 

(a) Major Options

Subject 1. Astrophysics

Stellar physics. Theory of stellar photospheres; continuous and absorption-line spectra; chromospheres and coronae; emission-line formation; physics of stellar interiors; structure of main-sequence stars; post-main-sequence evolution; degenerate stars; supernovae.

Normal galaxies. Kinematics of our own Galaxy, globular clusters; galaxy morphology and luminosity functions; mass estimates; groups and clusters of galaxies.

High-energy astrophysics: basic physics of interactions between high energy particles and radiation; interacting binary stellar systems, black holes; active galactic nuclei and relativistic jets.

Subject 2. Atomic and Laser Physics

The option includes the essential features of experimental techniques and important practical considerations in addition to theoretical concepts. A knowledge of atomic physics at the level of the A-papers is assumed e.g. Normal and Anomalous Zeeman effect.

The three subject areas within the option are each divided into two parts:

Atoms I: Atomic and molecular spectra and structure: Hydrogen and hydrogen-like systems, alkali atoms, helium and atoms with two electrons outside closed shells. Diatomic molecules. Selection rules and techniques of spectroscopy.

Lasers I: The theory of the laser with some important examples of gas and solid-state lasers: Einstein coefficients for the treatment of the interaction of radiation and atoms. Linewidths and lineshapes. Amplification by stimulated emission and the laser oscillator. Cavity effects. Gas lasers (He-Ne, He-Cd+ argon-ion and copper vapour). Solid state lasers (ruby and Nd:YAG).

Optics I: Diffraction and other phenomena related to lasers: Gaussian beams and their propagation. Cavity eigenfunctions. Thin films. Electro-optic effect. Second harmonic generation.

Atoms II: Atomic and molecular spectroscopy and manipulation of atoms. Homonuclear molecules. Hyperfine structure including effects of external magnetic fields. Optical pumping. Doppler-free laser spectroscopy. Laser cooling and trapping of atoms and ions. Elementary treatment of quantum optics and the physical basis of quantum-electrodynamic effects in atoms.

Lasers II: Survey of laser systems: High power infrared molecular lasers. Lasers operating in the ultraviolet. Dye lasers. Semiconductor lasers. Diode pumped solid-state lasers. Use of lasers in chemical physics.

Optics II: Advanced optics: Fourier transforms. Coherence. Optical fibres. Holography. Nonlinear optics (third-order effects in atoms and molecules and their applications).

In the examination candidates will be expected to be able to answer questions on Atoms I, Lasers I and II and Optics I together with either Atoms II or Optics II.

Subject 3. Condensed Matter Physics

Crystal structures. Reciprocal lattices, Brillouin zones. Structure determination - X-ray, neutron and electron diffraction. Symmetry.

Acoustic and optic phonons: measurements of phonon dispersion. Anharmonicity: thermal properties. Structural phase changes.

Electrons in a periodic potential. Band gaps: electron dispersion: effective mass. Fermi surfaces. Semiconductors. Low dimensional structures.

Transport of heat and electrical current in metals and semiconductors. Landau quantisation. Effective mass renormalisation.

Interband optical transitions and excitons. Plasmons. Infra-red absorption/reflectivity and Raman scattering from phonons. Nonlinear optical properties. Applications.

Diamagnetism. Crystal field theory: paramagnetism. Magnetic ordering and phase transitions. Low dimensional magnetism. Spin waves. Magnetic resonance. Critical phenomena. Domains. Applications.

Bose condensation and superfluids. Conventional, organic and high Tc superconductors: thermodynamics, London and BCS theories. Josephson effects. Applications.

No more than one question may be set on experimental work performed as part of this subject.

Subject 4. Particle Physics

Experimental Techniques. Physics of accelerators. Colliders and fixed targets. Event rates and luminosity. Triggers and signal and background processes. Physics of particle detectors. Applications to real experiments. Wire chambers, silicon detectors, calorimeters and muon chambers.

Quark Structure of Hadrons. Structure of hadrons. Deep inelastic scattering, the quark-parton model and QCD. Light hadron masses, magnetic moments and EM decays. Heavy quark states.

Theoretical Principles. Breit-Wigner resonance. Elementary introduction to relativistic quantum mechanics. Matrix elements. Discrete and continuous symmetries. Applications of gauge symmetries.

Applications to the Standard Model. Charged current (CC) weak interactions. V-A theory. Universality of CC. 2 and 4 component neutrino theory. Oscillations in the Ko-K and bb system. Discovery of the top quark. Electroweak symmetry breaking. The Z resonance and number of neutrino species.

Subject 5. Physics of Atmospheres and Oceans

Structure and composition of the Earth's atmosphere and oceans. Atmospheric thermodynamics. Energy sources, sinks and transport. Cloud physics.

Fluid motions on a rotating planet. Scale analysis, hydrostatic and geostrophic balance. Inertio-gravity waves. Conversion of potential energy to kinetic energy. Vorticity, Rossby waves. Boundary layers. Boundary currents. Weather forecasting. Predictability and chaos.

The atmospheric radiation budget. Solar radiation. Radiative transfer. Radiative equilibrium. The Greenhouse Effect. Molecular spectra and line shapes. Atmospheric chemistry, ozone. Catalytic cycles. The Ozone Hole.

Remote sounding of atmospheres. Absorption and emission spectroscopy. Techniques and data interpretation. Satellite and ground-based instrumentation. Current measurement programmes.

Climate and climate variability. Paleoclimates.

Physics and dynamics of planetary atmospheres.

Subject 6. Theoretical Physics

Statistical physics: statistical mechanics of interacting systems, cooperative ordering, mean field theory, numerical approaches, scaling and criticality, renormalization group ideas. Stochastic processes, random walks, Brownian motion, Markov processes, Langevin and Fokker-Planck equations.

Quantum mechanics: scattering theory for non-relativistic particles; relativistic quantum mechanics; many-particle systems; path-integral formulation.

Classical fields: covariant formulation of electrodynamics, gauge invariance, retarded potentials, dipole radiation. General Relativity, the equivalence principle, Einstein's equations, geodesics, perihelion of Mercury, simple applications to cosmology.

Minor Options

For the written paper of one and a half hours, candidates will be required to answer two questions from any one section, each section being set on the following separate topics. Such background knowledge as is required for study of the topic will be assumed.

Topic A (Condensed Matter Physics)

Basic physics of transport and optical properties of semiconductors relevant to the operation of semiconductor devices. Principles of operation of bipolar and field effect devices. Semiconductor light emitters and detectors with applications in communication and information processing technology. Physics of low-dimensional structures with applications to electronic and optoelectronic devices.

Topic B (Atomic and Laser Physics)

Emission of optical radiation. Interaction of radiation and matter. Laser principles; inversion in gas and solid state laser systems. Optical cavities and eigenmodes. Time and frequency control of lasers.

Lasers in fundamental research.

Optical fibres and laser communication systems.

Medical, engineering and industrial applications of lasers.

Application of lasers to environmental monitoring.

Topic C (Applied Nuclear Physics)

Variations of isotopic abundances, their causes and measurement. Applications to dating and provenancing. Trace element analysis by proton induced X-ray emission and Rutherford back scattering. Interaction of radiation and matter. Application to radiation and particle detectors. Health Physics. The radiation environment. Cosmic rays. Nuclear fission. The Physics of fission reactors. Nuclear fusion. The Physics of fusion reactors including the Sun. Nucleosynthesis in the stars and the early Universe.

Topic D (Electronic circuits)

Analogue electronics: Low and high frequency characteristics of bipolar and field effect transistors. Linear amplifier design, negative feedback, compensation and stability. Non-linear and positive feedback circuits, mixers, oscillators. Noise and recovery of signals from noise.

Digital Electronics: Combinational logic and sequential logic. Programmable logic. Registers, data transfer, the microprocessor. Codes, error detection and correction. Sampling. Analogue to digital interface.

Topic E (Physics of fluid flows)

Fluids as continua; Navier-Stokes equations; conservation of mass. Poiseuille flow, Couette flow. Very viscous flows. Vorticity; inviscid, irrotational flows. Water waves. Nonlinear effects. Instability, turbulence.

Topic F (Astrophysics)

Introduction to cosmology. Observational constraints, expanding Universe, background radiation, primordial abundancies, mass density of the Universe, the Hot Big Bang model. The very early Universe, inflation, topological defects, evolution of irregularities, large scale structure of the Universe.

Topic G (Chaos)

Linear vs non-linear systems, phase plane, notions of stability. Parametric and forced oscillators, birfurcation to chaos. Iterative maps, universality. Static and dyanamic bifurcations. Simple and strange attractors. Poincare maps. Lyapunov exponents, fractals. Applications, fluid dynamics, semiconductors.

There may also be two computer experiments for Topic G and questions may be set on these.

Note:

(i) Candidates offering Subject 2 under (a) above may not answer questions on Topic B under (b) above.

(ii) The proposed nature of the essay or project under (b) above and its duration shall be submitted for approval to the Chairman of the Sub-faculty of Physics or deputy with, in the case of a project, the agreement of the Chairman of Physics or deputy.

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties and committees will come into effect on 13 December.

1 Board of the Faculty of Biological Sciences

(a) Honour Moderations in Biological Sciences

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 29, l. 7, concerning the Honour Moderations in Biological Sciences, insert after regulation 3:

`4. Candidates are required to carry out fieldwork, as specified by the Sub-faculty of Biology, as an integral part of this course.'

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(b) M.Sc. in Biology (Integrative Bioscience)

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 714, ll. 30–1, after `3,000 words' insert `(excluding bibliography, tables, figures and appendices)', delete `specified by the organising committee', and substitute `agreed by the course organisers'.

2 Ibid., l. 38, after `bibliography' insert `, tables, figures'.

3 Ibid., l. 40, delete `a public oral presentation on a subject' and substitute `two public oral presentations on subjects', and in l. 41 delete `date' and substitute `dates'.

4 Ibid., l. 42, delete `organising committee' and substitute `examiners'.

5 Ibid., l. 47, delete `and the Programme organisers'.

6 Ibid., delete cl. 6 and substitute:

`The required written submissions must be sent to the Chairman of Examiners, M.Sc. in Biology, c/o Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by 12 noon on the following dates:

The extended essays and practical notebooks relating to the first two subjects selected from the approved list must be submitted by Friday of Ninth Week of Hilary Term of the year in which the candidate is examined.

The dissertation on the first research project must be submitted by Friday of Noughth Week of Trinity Term of the year in which the candidate is examined.

The extended essays and practical notebooks relating to the second two subjects selected from the approved list must be submitted by the Second Friday of August in the year in which the candidate is examined.

The dissertation on the second research project must be submitted by the First Friday of September in the year in which the candidate is examined.

Each submission must be accompanied by a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that it is the candidate's own work.'

7 Ibid., p. 715, delete cl. 9 and substitute:

`9. The examiners shall retain one copy of each extended essay and both copies of each dissertation of each successful candidate, the essays and one copy of each dissertation for deposit in the most appropriate departmental library and the other dissertation to be given to the project supervisor.'

8 Ibid., in Schedule, l. 18, after `four' insert `or more', delete `practical courses' and substitute `practicals, demonstrations'.

9 Ibid., l. 19, delete `and methodologies' and substitute `methodologies and results'.

10 Ibid., ll. 27–8, delete `providing comprehensive training in research skills in the three areas' and substitute `providing training in transferable core research skills in the following areas'. 11 Ibid., after l. 28 insert:

`(i) Safety and good research practice

(ii) Research Techniques'

and renumber.

12 Ibid., delete ll. 33–8 and substitute:

`To provide transferable personal skills for a career in scientific research, this programme will consist of taught classes with interactive discussions and practical assignments in the following areas:

(i) Creativity, teamwork, and leadership

(ii) Time management and learning skills

(iii) Presentation skills, verbal and written

(iv) Career planning, assessing personal skills and values, CVs and interview techniques

(v) Exploitation of science: getting ideas to the marketplace, patents, intellectual property rights

(vi) The relationship between academic and industrial research

(vii) Government science policy, research funding, grant applications.'

13 Ibid., l. 39, delete `Laboratory'.

14 Ibid., l. 40, delete `submit two laboratory research projects' and substitute `undertake two research projects'.

15 Ibid., l. 41, after `each', insert `involving original laboratory, museum, or field research'.

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2 Boards of the Faculties of Mathematical and Physical Sciences

Honour School of Engineering and Computing Science

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 188, delete ll. 13–20 and substitute:

`Candidates will be required to take three papers as follows: at least one of:

IE1, Information Engineering I

IE2, Information Engineering II

plus one or two papers chosen from a selection of those available for Section II of the Honour School of Computation. Specification of which Section II papers may be taken will be published in the University Gazette by the Standing Committee for Engineering and Computing Science two years in advance of the relevant examination. The subjects of papers IE1 and IE2 are specified in the appended schedule. The subjects of Section II shall be published in the University Gazette.

Performance in papers from Section II of the Honour School of Computation will be taken to include performance both in the written paper and any practical work associated with the papers. The examiners will consider all papers as having equal weight. Any practical work associated with papers from Section II of the Honour School of Computation must'.

2 Ibid., p. 188, l. 44, delete `and IE3'.

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3 Board of the Faculty of Theology

(a) Master of Theology

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 963, ll. 14 and 23, and p. 965, l. 28, delete `Supervisory Committee' and substitute `Master of Theology Studies Committee'.

(b) Master of Theology in Applied Theology

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 965, after l. 25 insert:

`12. Science and Faith in the Modern World

Candidates will explore the methodology of science and theology; the development of science since the Enlightenment in the fields of physics, biology, and geology; the paradigm shifts in scientific understanding of creation, which have taken place in the twentieth century; and the contribution of biblical interpretation and natural theology to the doctrine of creation. Using the insights gained from pastoral experience and from an understanding of the doctrine of God candidates will study appropriate apologetic responses of the science–faith debate.'

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4 Committee for Educational Studies

Master of Science by Coursework

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 735, l. 29, delete `Teaching, Learning, and Teacher Development' and substitute `Teacher Education and Development'.

2 Ibid., p. 736, l. 3, delete `Teacher, Learning, and Teacher Development' and substitute `Teacher Education and Development'.

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5 Inter-faculty Committee for Latin American Studies

M.Phil. in Latin American Studies

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 600, after l. 4 insert:

`A candidate who fails the examination will be permitted to re-take it on one further occasion only, not later than one year after the attempt. Such a candidate whose dissertation has been of a satisfactory standard may re-submit the same piece of work, while a candidate who has reached a satisfactory standard on the written papers will not be required to retake that part of the examination.'

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Biological Sciences

S. HAY, Green College: `An investigation of the utility of remote sensing imagery for predicting the distribution and abundance of the tsetse fly (Diptera: Glossinidae)'.
Department of Zoology, Tuesday, 3 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: P. Curran, T.R.E. Southwood.

Clinical Medicine

G.A. ROSS, Wolfson: `An investigation into the biological basis of lake effect end-points in the rectum of rats after irradiation'.
Department of Clinical Oncology, Churchill Hospital, Tuesday, 3 December, 10.30 a.m.
Examiners: N.P. Rowell, J. Coggle.

 

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Literae Humaniores

E. FISCHER, St John's: `Dissolving problems of linguistic creativity'.
Trinity, Tuesday, 17 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: B.B. Rundle, C. Travis.

C. GREEN, Somerville: `Causation and the mind–body problem'.
Examination Schools, Friday, 6 December, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: T.W. Child, S. Clark.

P. TSELEKAS, St Cross: `The coinage of Acanthus'.
Corpus Christi, Monday, 16 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: N.K. Rutter, R.G. Osborne.

Mathematical Sciences

T. FIELD, New College: `The quantum complex structure'.
Mathematical Institute, Thursday, 12 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: D.C. Robinson, N.M.J. Woodhouse.

S. GALBRAITH, St Cross: `Equations for modular curves'.
Mathematical Institute, Monday, 9 December, 1 p.m.
Examiners: R.G.E. Pinch, A.F. Jarvis.

A.C. SIMPSON, St Hugh's: `Safety through security'.
Computing Laboratory, Wednesday, 4 December, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: J.W.M. Davies, J.E. Barnes.

 

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Medieval and Modern Languages

N.J. LUCKHURST, St John's: `Science and structure in Proust's À La Recherche'. 41 Wellington Square, Thursday, 12 December, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: E.J. Hughes, R.E. Goldthorpe.

D. PINFOLD, St Hugh's: `The child's view: a study of perspective in and after the Third Reich'.
Examination Schools, Wednesday, 18 December, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: K.J. Leeder, M. Butler.

Modern History

D.T. SUNDERLAND, Wolfson: `Agents and principals: the Crown Agents for the Colonies 1880–1914'.
Linacre, Friday, 13 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: C.W. Newbury, P.J. Cain.

Physical Sciences

M.N. ARMSTRONG, Lincoln: `Self-calibration from image sequences'.
Department of Engineering Science, Wednesday, 4 December, 10 a.m.
Examiners: R. Horaud, I. Reid.

A.P. BURDEN, Queen's: `Electron microscopy techniques to further the understanding of conductive polymer composites'.
Department of Materials, Wednesday, 18 December, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: J.R. Fryer, M.J. Goringe.

P.J. CLARKE, Exeter: `Tectonic motions and earthquake deformation in Greece from GPS measurements'.
Department of Earth Sciences, Friday, 6 December, 1.30 p.m.
Examiners: S. Das, G. Blewitt.

KIN YIP, St John's: `Calibration of the LEP collision energy during the 1995 Zo resonance scan and measurement of the inclusive leptonic decays of the Zo with the Delphi detector'.
Nuclear and Astrophysics Laboratory, Friday, 29 November, 1.30 p.m.
Examiners: C.M. Buttar, R.C.E. Devenish.

Physiological Sciences

S. CRAGG, Lincoln: `Electrochemical studies of somatodladritic dopamial release in mid-brain'.
New Chemistry Building, Thursday, 19 December, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: V. Leviel, M. Fillenz.

K. TARCZY-HORNOCH, Green College: `Physiology of synaptic inputs to layer IV of cat visual cortex'.
St John's, Friday, 20 December, 10.30 a.m.
Examiners: A.M. Sillito, A.J. Parker.

 

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Social Studies

C. LABORDE, St Antony's: `State, groups, and individuals. Pluralist thinking in Britain and France, 1900–25'.
Social Studies Faculty Centre, Monday, 2 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: J.W. Burrow, J. Jennings.

C. LAKE, Nuffield: `Egalitarianism and responsibility'.
Examination Schools, Wednesday, 18 December, 10 a.m.
Examiners: R. Plant, J. Horton.

 

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Mathematical Sciences

M. UDDIN, St Anne's: `Multivariate density estimation by projection pursuit methods'.
Department of Statistics, Monday, 2 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: I.G. Vlachonikolis, R.W. Hiorns.

 

Physical Sciences

J. BERG, St Catherine's: `The nonlinear dynamics of intermittent–contact mode atomic force microscopy'.
Department of Materials, Tuesday, 3 December, 11.15 a.m.
Examiners: A.C. Skeldon, J.B. Pethica.

 

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Colleges, Halls, and Societies

Contents of this section:

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OBITUARIES

Christ Church

JAMES MURRAY CARNEGIE, 1996; commoner 1927–9.

GEOFFREY DAVID KENNARD, D.PHIL., 21 August 1996; commoner 1968–71. Aged 46.

DAVID JOHN PALMER, MA, 17 October 1996; commoner 1942–5. Aged 72.

DOUGLAS ROAF, D.PHIL., 27 October 1996; Duke of Westminster Research Student 1935–78.

THE RT. HON. THE LORD SHERFIELD, GCB, November 1996; commoner 1922–5.

ANTHONY NAPIER STURT, MA, June 1996; commoner 1930–3. Aged 84.

H.G. WESTMORE, MA; commoner 1937–9.

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Lincoln College

KEITH OLDHAM BUTTERFIELD, 23 October 1996; commoner 1951–4. Aged 65.

P. PANDAY, 11 June 1996; commoner 1913. Aged 101.

B.W. RICHARDS, 5 August 1996; commoner 1949–52.

CHARLES HENRY VEREKER, 22 July 1996; commoner 1932–5. Aged 83.

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St Edmund Hall

DR FREDERICK B. BROCKHUES, 2 November 1996; Honorary Fellow 1986–96.

DAVID JAMES CLIFTON, MA, 22 September 1996; commoner 1953–7. Aged 63.

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St Hugh's College

SUSAN PEASE (née Spickernell), 5 November 1996; commone 1949–52. Aged 65.

MARGARET POWER (née Chilton), 10 June 1996; commoner 1918–21. Aged 96.

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ELECTIONS

Brasenose College

To Open Scholarships:

SIMON W. BEGG, formerly of Westminster School

SOPHIA A. CAMPBELL, formerly of Chelmsford County High School

BENJAMIN T.K. HASSELL, formerly of Solihull School

KATHERINE L. HERALD, formerly of Downe House

CIARAN J. KELLER, formerly of Cheadle Hulme School

MATHEW LEE, formerly of St Paul's School

GARETH D. PRIOR, formerly of Whitgift School

MOHD I.Z. MOHAMED RAWI, formerly of Monmouth School

PHILIP M. SINGER, formerly of Winchester College

To Open Exhibitions:

DAVID BEECROFT, formerly of Hirst High School, Ashington

JOHN M.H. BENNETT, formerly of Stamford School

DANIEL M. BENTHAM, formerly of Stamford School

(DANIEL) THOMAS BRADLEY, formerly of Leys School, Cambridge

DANIEL M. BROCKLEBANK, formerly of Radley College

ANGUS W. COULTER, formerly of City of London School

SARAH F. GODWIN, formerly of Godalming College

RUTH M. GREEN, formerly of City of London School for Girls

ALISON INGOE, formerly of Woking Sixth-Form College

DUNCAN W.L. JOHN, formerly of Dulwich College

RACHEL M. PALIN, formerly of Parliament Hill School

ANDREW A. PIPER, formerly of Portsmouth Grammar School

APARNA PIRAMAL, formerly of South Hampstead High School

(JOHN) IRFON REES, formerly of Ysgol Gyfun Bro Myrddin

To a Heberden Exhibition:

HENRY J. MAXEY, formerly of Harrow School

To a Somerset Iver Exhibition:

RICHARD H. CHAPMAN, formerly of Manchester Grammar School

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To an Exhibition:

SHARIF K. FARRAG, formerly of Portsmouth Grammar School

To a Junior Organ Scholarship:

MAXWELL G. KENWORTHY, formerly of Bradford Grammar School

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Christ Church

To a Lecturership in English (with effect from 1 October 1996):

DR C. MORGAN

To a Lecturership in History (with effect from 1 October 1996):

DR D.L.L. PARRY

To a Lecturership in Italian (with effect from 1 October 1996):

MS N. SIMBOROWSKI

To a Lecturership in Law (with effect from 1 October 1996):

MS J.K. MILES

To a Lecturership in Philosophy (with effect from 1 October 1996):

S. OKASHA

To a Lecturership in German (with effect from 1 January 1997):

DR D.J. BARNETT

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St Antony's College

To a Senior Research Fellowship in Tibetan and Himalayan Studies (for five years from 1 October 1996):

MICHAEL VAILLANCOURT ARIS (BA Durham, PH.D. London)

To a Fellowship (for five years from 1 January 1997):

CAROL SCOTT LEONARD (BA Minnesota, PH.D. Indiana), University Lecturer in Regional Studies in Post-Communist States

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St Hugh's College

To an Additional Fellowship:

MRS SHEILA VAINKER, MA (BA London)

To a Jubilee Scholarship:

BENJAMIN THOMAS PARKER, formerly of Moulton School

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PRIZES

Corpus Christi College

Christopher Bushell Prize:

PAUL RAMSBOTTOM

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Mansfield College

Worsley Prize for Law 1996:

EDWIN BORRINI

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Mason Lowance Prize in English 1996:

YOLANDE KNELL

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NOTICE

St John's College

Opening of collection of medieval vestments

St John's College intends to open to the public its collection of medieval vestments on Saturday, 30 November, 2–5 p.m. The collection is displayed in the Garden Quadrangle and entrance, free of charge, will be via the Parks Road Lodge or the Main Lodge.

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Advertisements

Contents of this section:


How to advertise in the Gazette

Terms and conditions of acceptance of advertisements

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Tuition Offered

Jonathan Hill, LRAM, ARCM. Clarinet and guitar tuition to all levels. Tel.: Oxford 375526 (mainly available in evenings).

English language. Academic writing, grammar, pronunciation, etc., flexible timetables including evenings, Saturdays. Conversation hour, Cambridge exams., general English are best value in Oxford. Writing up? Private tuition available with experienced tutors. Free test/advice from the Director of Studies Mon.--Fri. 1--5 p.m. Oxford Language Training, 9 Blue Boar Street (off St Aldate's by Christ Church), Oxford. Tel. Oxford 205077, e-mail: OLT@dial.pipex.com.

 

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Retail services

The Ashmolean Museum Shop: extended hours in Dec. (until 22 Dec.), in line with Café opening hours: 10 a.m.--5 p.m. weekdays inc. Sat.; Sun. 2--5 p.m.; Mon. 16 Dec., open all day. The shop stocks Christmas cards (inc. charity cards), calendars, diaries, gift-wrap, books for all ages, jewellery, and general giftware. Reopens after Christmas on 28 Dec. Tel.: Oxford (2)78010, fax: (2)78018.

Bodleian shop: new `Arts End' gift-wrap for books, 75 pence; jolly animal woodcuts boxed rubber-stamps set, from early children's books, £14.95; medieval cats `post-it' notes, £2.99; and of course our new Christmas cards. Open 9 a.m.--6 p.m. Mon.--Fri., 9 a.m.--12.30 p.m. Sat.

Oxford University Museum of Natural History: bat- and bird-boxes, gems, nuggets, lenses; salamanders for the stocking; terracotta for the tree. A different and inexpensive choice at the OUM shop. Open during museum hours, Mon.--Sat., 12 noon--5 p.m.; admission free.

 

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Services Offered

Town and Country Trees: professional tree surgery, orchard and shrub pruning, planting, and hedges. Quality work at competitive prices. Fully insured. Locally based. For a free quotation, please call Paul Hodkinson. Tel.: 01993 811115.

Oriental rugs update: we have increased our range of top-quality Eastern hand-knotted woollen rugs, runners, carpets, and floor-cushions plus kilims, silks and antique pieces. Recently arrived are contemporary Turkish Kars rugs and mini-carpets with antique Caucasian designs realised in light pastel colours to suit modern interiors. Also some 1920s Old Chinese small rugs in timeless blue-on-blue and blue-and-white. In transit from Iran are older Persian tribal and village rugs and runners 25--60 years and ageing gracefully. Frederick and Sudabeh Hine, Old Squash Court, 16 Linton Road, Oxford OX2 6UL. Visit without notice in business hours, 10 a.m.- -6 p.m., Mon.--Sat. Tel./fax: Oxford 559396.

Anthony Reid, furniture designer and maker. Beautiful hand-crafted furniture made and designed by an experienced and qualified craftsman. All furniture is made from sustainable timber, predominantly English hardwoods. Commissions taken on free-standing and fitted furniture. Free home consultation available to discuss your personal design requirements. Clients are welcome to visit my workshop to see example pieces and experience the craft environment. Tel.: 01844 218929.

A La Carte? Finders Keepers' latest idea to enhance service to their tenants. If you seek a property to rent, call us first. Our 24 Oxford staff are dedicated to offering exceptional service. Finders Keepers, 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE (tel.: 311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk); also 27 St Clement's, Oxford OX4 1DJ (tel.: 200012, fax: 204844, e-mail: stclements@finders.co.uk); Internet: http://www.finders.co.uk.

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford 726983 or Abingdon 555533.

Get a headstart with your research project. Let me do bibliographic searches on the Internet and if need be in person I will present you with documented (so you know where I searched and what keywords I used), printed lists to choose from. Refs. available. D. Hermans. Tel.: Oxford (2)89104.

Furniture: individual pieces and fitted furniture designed and made by Richard Kay and Piers Roberts from local workshops. From tables, chairs, cabinets, desks, to fitted bedrooms, kitchens, studies. For the home, office, or garden. Tel.: 01844 238112.

 

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Situation Vacant

Non-stipendiary (part-time) administrator. All expenses, subsistence, and remission of fees for course, if required. Apply to Monkfield College, Lewis Close, Headington, Oxford OX3 8JL. Tel.: Oxford 308233.

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Houses to Let

Riverside house, 5 minutes' walk from Carfax: 3 double bedrooms, living-room, kitchen-cum-dining-room, c.h., fully equipped, own garage. Available until Aug. £895 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford (2)74704 (day) or 735446 (evening).

House available to rent in Charlbury, 15 miles north-west of Oxford by road or railway. This 200-year-old stone cottage has a large kitchen/dining-room, separate dining-room, large lounge, 3 double bedrooms, each with en-suite bathroom. Behind is a small courtyard garden with space for parking. £695 p.c.m. Tel.: 0181-959 4176.

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Charming central North Oxford house, only one street from St Giles' and Radcliffe Infirmary. Just exended and refurbished to highest standards, luxuriously furnished. Two upstairs bedrooms, downstairs study or guest-room, living-room leading to large, light conservatory, dining-room/kitchen, basement study or bedroom; bathroom with shower and w.c. plus separate w.c.; pleasant garden; gas c.h.; fully carpeted; washing-machine, drier, dish-washer; burglar alarm system; 3 telephones; parking space at back of garden. Rent to include various services. £1,500 p.m. Available now. Tel.: Oxford 559614.

Three-bedroom house north of Summertown to let for the a.y. 1997--8 (Oct.--June); 30-ft lounge, separate dining-room, downstairs closet, separate bathroom, kitchen with microwave, dish-washer, washer-drier; front and rear gardens; car parking space; gas c.h. Suit visiting academics. Refs. essential. £800 p.c.m. Tel./fax: Oxford 559421.

Charming luxury cottage, 12 miles north-west of Oxford; beams; inglenook fire; lots of character; 1 double bedroom, 1 spare bedroom/study; furnished with country antiques; c.h.; garage; walled garden. Suit careful, caring non-smoking couple. Tel./fax: Oxford 510542.

 

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Furnished central North Oxford for rent from 29 Apr. Walk to colleges, train and bus station, near Port Meadow, c.h., recently redecorated, 3 desks, filing cabinets, several large closets, secluded garden, garden furniture, terrace, 3 bedrooms, 1½ bathrooms, washing-machine, drier, telephone, linen, dishes, 2 bicycles. Suitable for visiting academics. £890 p.m. Tel.: (1) Oxford 775567 (J. Mackrell, evenings); (2) tel.: 613 745 1368, fax: 613 745 0299, e-mail: gastont@msm1s6.sid.ncr.doe.ca (A. Gaston, Canada).

Finders Keepers, winners of the UK Best Letting and Management award for the second consecutive year, are dedicated to making it easy for visitors to Oxford to select accommodation. Up-dated, detailed information on the Internet, priority reservation system, welcome food pack, personal service, and much more---call us and you will not need to go elsewhere. Finders Keepers, 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE (tel.: 311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk); also 27 St Clement's, Oxford OX4 1DJ (tel.: 200012, fax: 204844, e-mail: stclements@finders.co.uk); Internet: http://www.finders.co.uk.

An Englishman's home is his castle—so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Please telephone or fax us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 64533, fax: 64777.

 

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Flats to Let

Spacious, well-furnished 2-bedroom flat in Richmond, west London. Heating, hot water inc. in rent, lift, entry-phone, 24-hour emergency cover. Available mid-Feb. Tel.: Oxford 554532.

Beautiful, spacious, ground-floor flat in prestigious North Oxford. Suit non-smoking professional couple. Two double bedrooms, one with shower, bathroom, double drawing-room, modern kitchen, conservatory, large garden. Available Apr.--Oct. 1997. £1,400 p.m. Armitage, 9 Northmoor Road, Oxford OX2 6UW. Tel.: Oxford 558068.

Spacious 2-bedroom flat with garage and car-parking, set in quiet gardens, but close to city centre. To let furnished from Jan., £550 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford (2)72258 (day), 723482 (evening); e-mail: frueh@atm.ox.ac.uk.

 

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Accommodation Offered

Premier: properties to let. All areas of the city. From 1-bed flats to large family houses and houses for sharers. Tel.: Oxford 792299, fax: 798087.

Bed-and-breakfast available in the comfortable home of a semi- retired academic couple in leafy, exclusive central North Oxford. Within easy walking distance of all main university buildings, town centre, parks, river, excellent pubs and restaurants. All rooms have colour TV, tea- and coffee-making facilities, microwaves. Very moderate terms. Tel.: Oxford 557879.

 

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Accommodation offered to rent or exchange

Oxford--Berkeley house exchange: attractive family house in convenient location offered in exchange for similar in Berkeley area, July--Dec. 1997; 3 bedrooms, all appliances, south-facing garden; non-smokers; car exchange possible. Tel.: Oxford 726919, e-mail: p.haves@lboro.ac.uk.

 

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Accommodation Sought

Mature professional seeks 1/2-bedroom flat or house, in North Oxford, from Jan.; unfurnished or will house-sit. Tel.: Oxford 514488 (evenings).

Visiting academic seeks studio flat-let, or room with en-suite facilities, for 12 months: Jan.--Dec. 1997. Tel.: Oxford 281180 (day). Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management are one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us. Tel.: Oxford 64533, or fax: 64777. n

 

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Accommodation sought to rent or exchange

Oscar-winning film director seeks 4-bedroom family house, swap or rental, Oxford area, for 1 year from July. Prefer house near primary school and railway. Our home is on a British Columbian island--- mildest climate in Canada; unique house has 2,000 sq. ft. of decks; magnificent Pacific Ocean, mountain views; easy ferry access to Victoria and Vancouver; primary and secondary schools and hospital locally. Perfect for academic or creative work. Tel./fax: 001 604 653 4502.

 

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Holiday Let

Ambert, France: farmhouse with fireplace and apartment in small hamlet in the mountains of Livradois Forez. Prices from £145 (stg.) p.w. inc. heating. Also 2 farmhouses with pool in Gozo, Malta, from £185 p.w. Tel.: Malta 561392, fax: Malta 559313.

 

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Houses for Sale

House, 10 years old, 4 beds, in quiet close near river Thames; Oxford 20 minutes' cycle ride on towpath; level garden, patio, detached double garage. £155,000. Boat negotiable. Tel.: Oxford 718828.

Substantial detached house in no-through-road just north of Summertown; 2 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast-room and sun-room on ground floor, 5 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms on first floor; south-facing 100-ft rear garden; includes carpets, curtains, and appliances. £300,000. Tel.: Oxford (2)75406 (office hours).

 

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Flat for Sale

Ritchie Court, North Oxford: spacious south-facing studio flat in co-ownership housing scheme for sale; living area approx. 16 by 12 ft., bed recess 9 by 9 ft., inc. fitted wardrobes, fitted kitchen 9 by 9 ft., hall, bathroom, walk-in cupboard. Facilities inc. restaurant, guest rooms, and laundry. Tel.: Oxford 510334.

 

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Early Wireless Sets Sought

Collector/restorer seeks to purchase pre-war wireless sets and scientific apparatus, particulary items marked `W G Pye & Co Eng Cambridge'. Contact Dr G. Peskett. Tel.: Oxford (2)72901, or 247971 (evenings).

 

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Diary

Contents of this section:

Academic Staff Seminars: places should be booked in advance through the Staff Development Office, University Offices, Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

For the full list of courses, see the Staff Development Programme supplement.

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Friday 29 November

DR J. LLOBERA: `Aspects of Catalan kinship, identity, and nationalism' (Ethnicity and Identity seminars: `The significance of kinship'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

 

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Modern Chinese painting' (related to current exhibition), 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

 

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Saturday 30 November

DEGREE conferments, Sheldonian, 11.30 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.

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Sunday 1 December

THE VERY REVD JOHN DRURY preaches the Advent Sermon, Cathedral, 10 a.m.

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Monday 2 December

DR J. CORBETT: `Losers and gainers in the transition to sustainability: equity issues in Local Agenda 21 initiatives in Europe' (Environmental Change Unit seminar), Main Lecture Theatre, School of Geography, 2.15 p.m.

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Tuesday 3 December

THE MEETING of Congregation, due to take place today, is cancelled.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Medieval crafts: part 2', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

 

 

T. DALYELL: `The environmental implications of the abuse of the UN and abuse of sanctions' (Oxford Centre for the Environment, Ethics, and Society seminars), Council Room, Mansfield, 5 p.m.

 

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Wednesday 4 December

DR S. BARANYI: `Bridging the gaps between verification, peace-building, and conflict resolution in central America' (Refugee Studies Programme Seminars on Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR SUSAN GREENFIELD: `How could the brain generate consciousness?' (Association for Women in Science and Engineering: Oxford Science Lecture Series), University Museum of Natural History, 5 p.m. (tickets £1.50—see details in `Lectures' above).

MRS SUZANNE MUBARAK: `Peace and the role of women in develoment in the Middle East' (lecture), New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 8.30 p.m.

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Thursday 5 December

DR E.N. MCKAY: `Writing Schubert's biography' (lecture), Music Faculty, 12 noon.

MATRICULATION ceremony, Convocation House, 12.30 p.m.

Y.N. YASHIN: `Gender, religion, and public culture in Turkey' (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Gender, identity, and religion'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

 

PROFESSOR G. JOSIPOVICI (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor): `Kinetic melodies' (lecture series: `On trust'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR I. ARMSTRONG: `The transformations of glass: technology and text in nineteenth-century culture' (Linacre Lectures: `Culture and environment'), Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building, 5.30 p.m.

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Friday 6 December

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Nineteenth-century landscape paintings', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

 

 

DR R. PARKIN: `Caste, kinship, and identity in India' (Ethnicity and Identity seminars: `The significance of kinship'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

 

 

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Saturday 7 December

MICHAELMAS FULL TERM ends.

PITT RIVERS MUSEUM `Pitt Stop' event for children: `Snow, stories, and sledges', 2 p.m. (telephone for information: (2)70927).

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Tuesday 10 December

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM exhibition opens: `Drawings by the Carracci from British collections' (until 31 March).

 

ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Tutorial teaching—sciences', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

 

 

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Glass through the ages', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

 

 

G. WELLS: `Assessing and valuing antique wind instruments' (Friends of the Bate Collection lecture), Music Faculty, 5.30 p.m.

UNIVERSITY CLUB wine-tasting (`Wines for Christmas'), 5.45 p.m. (admission £2).

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Wednesday 11 December

MS F. NICHOLSON: `Carrier sanctions: another brick in the wall of Fortress Europe' (Refugee Studies Programme Seminars on Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

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Thursday 12 December

ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Lecturing skills practice—sciences', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

PROFESSOR HERMAN WALDMANN: `Reprogramming the immune system' (Oxford Innovation Society Winter Lecture), Department of Pharmacology, 6 p.m. (admission by ticket only, from Isis Innovation: (2)72413).

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Friday 13 December

ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Writing research papers, abstracts, and posters', 9.15 a.m. (see information above).

 

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Eighteenth-century paintings: the "Grand Tour" ', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

 

 

 

 

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Tuesday 17 December

MICHAELMAS TERM ends.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The arts of Byzantium', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

 

 

CONGREGATION meeting, 2 p.m.

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Friday 20 December

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `A Christmas feast', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

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Tuesday 31 December

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Dressing for warmth', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

 

 

 

 

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Friday 3 January

DR H. CLIFFORD: `Oxford college silver' (Ashmolean Museum: Sir David Piper New Year Lecture), Lecture Theatre, Taylor Institution, 11 a.m. (admission free).

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Saturday 4 January

PITT RIVERS MUSEUM `Pitt Stop' event for children: `Cat's-cradles from around the world', 2 p.m. (telephone for information: (2)70927).

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Tuesday 7 January

ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Appraisal', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

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