27 April 2000 - No 4545

Oxford University Gazette: 27 April 2000


University Acts

Contents of this section:

[ Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • CONGREGATION 27 March
    • Degree by Special Resolution
  • HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL
    • 1 Decree: change in title of Rhodes Professorship of Clinical Pharmacology
    • 2 Status of Master of Arts
    • 3 Register of Congregation
  • BOARDS OF FACULTIES

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CONGREGATION 27 March

Degree by Special Resolution

No notice to the contrary having been received under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1997, p. 15), the following resolution is deemed to have been approved at noon on 27 March.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

DAVID JOHN HUGH COCKAYNE, D.PHIL., Linacre College

ALISON EDWINA DENHAM, D.PHIL., St Anne's College


HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL

1 Decree

Council has made the following decree, to come into effect on 12 May.

Decree (1): Change in title of Rhodes Professorship of Clinical Pharmacology

Explanatory note

No notice of opposition having been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor will declare carried, without holding the meeting of Congregation on 2 May, the Statute changing the title of the Rhodes Professorship of Clinical Pharmacology, which was promulgated on 21 March (see `University Agenda' below). Council has accordingly made the following decree, which gives effect to consequential changes.

Text of Decree (1)

[For text see decree annexed to Statute from Gazette No. 4541, 2 March 2000.]


2 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts under the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. V, cl. 1 (Statutes, 1997, p. 367) has been accorded to the following persons who are qualified for membership of Congregation:

LINDA ARCH, University Offices

ROBERT RONALD ATKINSON, Surveyor's Office

FORREST JOSEPH BAKER, Security Services

HELEN CLARE CHRISTIAN, Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics

LYNN CAROL CLEE, Nuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

MARK DAVIES, Surveyor's Office

MASSIMILIANO DEMATA, M.ST., D.PHIL., Mansfield College

COLIN MICHAEL GEORGE, Surveyor's Office

THERESA MCCORD HAMPTON, University Offices

ANNE DANIELLE HARKNESS, University Offices

COLIN THOMAS HAYES, Surveyor's Office

DAVID DUFF FULTON HOLT, Surveyor's Office

FRANK ARTHUR HUNT, University Offices

STEPHEN ANDREW JOHNSTON, Museum of the History of Science

MELISSA SUSAN LEVITT, University Offices

PAUL MORCOMBE LEWIS, Nuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

DAVID MALCOLM MORRIS, University Offices

MAXIMILIAN NICHOLAS CLIVE MUNCASTER, Surveyor's Office

SHANTHI MUTTUKRISHNA, Nuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

FIONA MARGARET POWRIE, D.PHIL, Linacre College

SARAH POYNTING, Linacre College

GRAHAM ANDREW ROSS, D.PHIL., Wolfson College

CHRISTOPHER SHARPE, University Offices

DAVID JOHN SHIPWAY, University Offices

HELEN ELIZABETH SMITH, University Offices

LINDA JOY STANLEY, Surveyor's Office

SUSAN TOTTERDELL, Department of Pharmacology

GRAHAM CHRISTOPHER WAITE, University Offices

ANTHONY ALDOUS WALTON, Surveyor's Office

 


3 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of Congregation:

Arch, L., MA status, University Offices

Atkinson, R.R., MA status, Surveyor's Office

Baker, F.J., MA status, Security Services

Burrows, A.S., BCL, MA, St Hugh's

Christian, H.C., MA status, Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics

Clee, L.C., MA status, Nuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Cockayne, D.J.H., MA, D.Phil., Linacre

Collier, M.A., MA, All Souls

Davies, M., MA status, Surveyor's Office

Demata, M., MA status, M.St., D.Phil., Mansfield

Denham, A.E., MA, D.Phil., St Anne's

Duncan, S.R., MA, St Hugh's

Eve, E.C.S., MA, M.St., D.Phil., Harris Manchester

George, C.M., MA status, Surveyor's Office

Hampton, T.M., MA status, University Offices

Harkness, A.D., MA status, University Offices

Hayes, C.T., MA status, Surveyor's Office

Hinnells, D.K.W., MA, St Catherine's

Holt., D.D.F., MA status, Surveyor's Office

Hunt, F.A., MA status, University Offices

Johnston, S.A., MA status, Museum of the History of Science

Levitt, M.S., MA status, University Offices

Lewis, P.M., MA status, Nuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Lyons, T.J., MA, D.Phil., St Anne's

Morris, D.M., MA status, University Offices

Muncaster, M.N.C., MA status, Surveyor's Office

Muttukrishna, S., MA status, Nuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Norbury, C.J., MA, St Catherine's

Powrie, F.M., MA status, D.Phil., Linacre

Poynting, S., MA status, Linacre

Pugh, C.W., BM, MA, D.Phil., Keble

Richards, D.B., BM, MA, Merton

Ross, G.A., MA status, D.Phil., Wolfson

Sharpe, C., MA status, University Offices

Shipway, D.J., MA status, University Offices

Smith, H.E., MA status, University Offices

Stanley, L.J., MA status, Surveyor's Office

Taylor, J.W., MA, St Cross

Totterdell, S., MA status, Department of Pharmacology

Tracey, I.M.C., MA, D.Phil., Merton

Waite, G.C., MA status, University Offices

Walton, A.A., MA status, Surveyor's Office

White, L.M., MA, Nuffield


BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 12 May, see `Examinations and Boards' below.


University Agenda

Contents of this section:

[ Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • CONGREGATION 2 May 2 p.m.
    • Notice of cancellation
    • *1 Voting on Statute promulgated on 21 March
    • *2 Promulgation of Statutes
    • *3 Voting on Special Resolutions approving the conferment of Honorary Degrees
    • *4 Presentation of the Annual Review of the University
  • CONGREGATION 1 June
    • Elections
  • * Note on procedures in Congregation
  • * List of forthcoming Degree Days
  • * List of forthcoming Matriculation Ceremonies

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CONGREGATION 2 May 2 p.m.

Notice

The meeting of Congregation is cancelled. The sole business comprises questions to which no opposition has been notified and in respect of which no request for an adjournment has been received, and Mr Vice- Chancellor will accordingly declare the statute approved, the preambles adopted, the special resolutions carried, and the Annual Report of the University presented without a meeting under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. III, cl. 11 (Statutes, 1997, p. 8).


CONGREGATION 1 June

Elections

  Vacancies Retiring members Period from MT 2000
Benefices Delegacy Two The Revd P.J.M. Southwell (re-eligible); Dr R.W. Truman (not re-eligible) 6 years
Select Preachers Nominating Committee Two Provost of Oriel; The Revd C.M. Jones 4 years
University Library Curators One
One
One
One
(New body: see Statute (1) approved by Congregation on 22 February 2000, Gazette, pp. 797, 832) 4 years
3 years
2 years
1 year
Vice-Chancellorship Nominating Committee Two
Two
(None being members of Council)
(Reconstituted body: see Statute approved by Congregation on 29 June 1999, Gazette, Vol. 129, pp. 1323, 1482) 5 years
3 years
Visitatorial Board Panel Three (members of Congregation, or other MAs, of ten years' standing) Dr J.A. Black; Dr P.A.W. Bulloch; Professor R.G. Hood 4 years

¶ Nominations in writing by two members of Congregation other than the candidate will be received by the Head Clerk at the University Offices, Wellington Square, up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 8 May, and similar nominations by six members of Congregation other than the candidate up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 15 May.

Council has decided that nominations should show for each signatory the name and college or department in block capitals. Any names which are not so shown may not be published. At least one nomination in respect of each candidate must be made on an official nomination form. Copies of the form are obtainable from the Head Clerk (telephone:

(2)70190; e-mail: Philip.Moss@admin.ox.ac.uk).

In the event of a contested election, a brief biographical note on each candidate will be published in the Gazette dated 25 May, and voters may wish to wait until they have read these notes before returning their ballot papers (which will be sent out to members of Congregation as soon as possible after the closing date for nominations, and which, after completion, must be received by the Head Clerk not later than 4 p.m. on 1 June).

Notes on the bodies concerned

The Delegates of Benefices are responsible: (a) for selecting, subject to the approval of Council, the priests to be offered presentation to vacant benefices in cases in which the University becomes entitled to exercise the right of presentation; and (b) for advising the Vice-Chancellor on the appointment of suitable representatives of the University in connection with the exercise of presentation to vacant benefices, as required under the Patronage (Benefices) Measure 1986.

The Committee for the Nomination of Select Preachers is responsible for nominating the preachers to give the University Sermons. It also has general oversight of the form and content of all university church services.

The Curators of the University Libraries will replace the Libraries Committee, which in turn replaced the former Bodleian Curators and Libraries Board. The new body will be responsible to Council for ensuring that provision is made for the University's library and information requirements for teaching and research, and that the University's major research libraries are maintained as a national and international scholarly resource. It will have control of a substantial budget.

The Nominating Committee for the Vice-Chancellorship is responsible for making proposals to Congregation for appointments and reappointments to the Vice-Chancellorship. The next such proposal is due to be made not later than 2002-3 in respect of a Vice-Chancellor to serve from October 2004.

The Visitatorial Board is responsible for making recommendations to the Vice-Chancellor (or other appropriate officer) on serious disciplinary cases involving members of the academic or academic- related staff. (It does not have responsibility for dealing with incapacity on medical grounds, or complaints against the Vice- Chancellor himself or herself.) Four members of the board, as from time to time constituted to consider an individual case, are selected by lot from a panel of twelve persons elected by Congregation. The board is chaired by a person with professional legal experience who is appointed by the High Steward of the University.


Notices

Contents of this section:

[ Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • PROFESSORSHIP OF LAW
  • DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY
  • DEPARTMENT OF PAEDIATRICS
  • E.K. CHAMBERS STUDENTSHIP IN ENGLISH LITERATURE 2000–1
  • ARNOLD ANCIENT HISTORICAL ESSAY PRIZE 2000
  • SHELLEY-MILLS PRIZE 2000
  • SALARIES OF CLINICAL ACADEMIC STAFF
  • PROPOSALS FOR HONORARY DEGREES TO BE CONFERRED AT THE ENCAENIA IN 2001, AND DEGREES BY DIPLOMA
  • WIDOWS OF FORMER MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY'S PENSION SCHEMES
  • LANGUAGE CENTRE
    • Intensive weekend courses
  • LORD ALFRED DOUGLAS MEMORIAL PRIZE 2000
  • ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM
    • Vivien Leigh Prize
  • PITT RIVERS MUSEUM
    • Museums and Galleries Month (May 2000): Gallery Talks
  • CONCERTS
    • Faculty of Music
    • St John's College and Colin Carr

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PROFESSORSHIP OF LAW

EWAN GORDON MCKENDRICK, MA (LL.B. Edinburgh), Professor of English Law, University College, London, has been appointed to the professorship with effect from 1 October 2000.

Professor McKendrick will be a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.


DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY

The following appointments have been made for five years from 1 October 2000: PROFESSOR R.A. DWEK, MA, D.PHIL., D.SC., FRS, FRSC, Fellow of Exeter College, as Head of Department, with PROFESSOR I.D. CAMPBELL, MA (B.SC., PH.D. St Andrews), FRS, Fellow of St John's College, and PROFESSOR D.J. SHERRATT, MA (B.SC. Manchester, PH.D. Edinburgh), FRS, FRSE, Fellow of Linacre College, as Associate Heads of Department.


DEPARTMENT OF PAEDIATRICS

On the recommendation of the Clinical Medicine Board, the General Board has assigned the Department of Paediatrics to A.R. WILKINSON, MA, Fellow of All Souls College and Professor of Paediatrics, for a period of two years from 1 April 2000.


E.K. CHAMBERS STUDENTSHIP IN ENGLISH LITERATURE 2000–1

The Studentship has not been awarded.


ARNOLD ANCIENT HISTORICAL ESSAY PRIZE 2000

The Prize has been awarded to ALEX POLLEY, Merton College.


SHELLEY-MILLS PRIZE 2000

The Prize has been awarded to ADAM THIRLWELL, New College.


SALARIES OF CLINICAL ACADEMIC STAFF

Approval has been given for the implementation at Oxford of an increase in clinical academic salaries in line with the salary awards for 2000 decided by the Doctors' and Dentists' Review Body.

The new rates provide for a 3.3 per cent increase, with effect from 1 April 2000, on all salaries and scale points. Payment will be made in April.


PROPOSALS FOR HONORARY DEGREES TO BE CONFERRED AT THE ENCAENIA IN 2001, AND DEGREES BY DIPLOMA

Council's Advisory Committee for Degrees by Diploma and Encaenia Honorary Degrees gives preliminary consideration both to proposals received from members of Congregation for the conferment of degrees upon royal personages and heads of state on occasions other than Encaenia, and to proposals for the conferment of Encaenia honorary degrees. The current membership of the committee is: Dr P.A. Slack, Principal of Linacre College (Pro-Vice-Chancellor) in the chair; Mr L.N. Goldman, St Peter's College (Assessor 2000–1, ex officio); Professor R.A. Mayou, Nuffield College (Assessor 1999–2000, ex officio); Professor J. Griffin, Balliol College (Public Orator, ex officio); Professor I.C. Butler, Christ Church; Professor D.J.H. Cockayne, Linacre College; Sir Marrack Goulding, Warden of St Antony's College; Professor Sir John Grimley Evans, Green College; Professor N.J. Hitchin, New College; Professor S.D. Iversen, Magdalen College; Dr J.M. Rawson, Warden of Merton College; Professor A.J. Ryan, Warden of New College.

Members of Congregation who wish to make suggestions to the committee about honorary degrees to be conferred at the Encaenia in 2001 or degrees by diploma are asked to do so by sending in proposals which provide information under the following headings: name of nominee; brief biographical details; reason for nomination.

Proposals should be sent to Miss Noon, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD, under strictly confidential cover, not later than Friday, 12 May 2000.

Members of Congregation wishing to suggest candidates are asked in particular to note the following points:

(a) under Council's standing orders, no member of Council or of the advisory committee shall forward to that committee or propose directly to Council the name of any person for any honorary degree unless he or she is prepared personally to recommend that the conferment of such a degree be seriously considered;

(b) while informal soundings within the University on any proposal will often be desirable, every effort should be made to ensure that publicity is not at any stage given to any proposal for the conferment of an honorary degree.

The advisory committee will report to Council early in Michaelmas Term, submitting a short-list of candidates for further consideration. Council will then decide which proposals should be referred to its Committee on Honorary Degrees. The final list of proposed honorands, drawn up by Council in the light of the latter committee's report, will be submitted to Congregation for approval in accordance with the requirements of Tit. II, Sectt. VI and VIII (Statutes, 1997, pp. 14–16).


WIDOWS OF FORMER MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY'S PENSION SCHEMES

From time to time the attention of the University is drawn to individual cases of financial hardship among widows of former members of the Federated Superannuation System for Universities (FSSU) and the University of Oxford Employees Pension Scheme (EPS). Limited resources are available to alleviate proven cases of hardship and any enquiry should be addressed to the Superannuation Officer, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD. All cases are dealt with in the strictest confidence.


LANGUAGE CENTRE

Intensive weekend courses

The Language Centre is running four weekend language courses in Trinity Term. Each course will consist of eight hours' tuition and last from 9 a.m. to 1.30 p.m. on both Saturday and Sunday. The emphasis will be on speaking and listening. The courses are as follows:

20–1 May: German (Absolute Beginners and Intermediate)

20–1 May: Italian (Absolute Beginners and Lower Intermediate)

3–4 June: French (Near/False Beginners, Lower Intermediate and Upper Intermediate)

3–4 June: Spanish (Absolute Beginners and Lower Intermediate).

The fee will be £28 for junior members of the University and other full-time students, £36 for members of Congregation and £48 to non-members. An application form can be downloaded from the Centre's Web page at http://info.ox.ac.uk/departments/langcentre/courses/weekend_courses/.

Further details and a booking form for all intensive courses may be obtained from Angela Pinkney at the Language Centre, 12 Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6HT (telephone: Oxford (2)83360, e-mail: admin@lang.ox.ac.uk, Internet site: http://info.ox.ac.uk/departments/langcentre/).


LORD ALFRED DOUGLAS MEMORIAL PRIZE 2000

A prize of £880 will be awarded, providing there is an entry of sufficient merit, during Trinity Term 2000 for the best sonnet or other poem written in English and in strict rhyming metre. Any member of the University who is registered for a degree of the University, whether as an undergraduate or a graduate student, may enter for the prize. The prize shall not be awarded more than once to the same person. A copy of the winning entry shall be deposited in the Bodleian Library.

Poems (three copies) are to be sent under a sealed cover to the Head Clark, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD, on or before 16 May. Each author is required to conceal his or her name and to distinguish his or her composition by a motto, sending at the same time his or her name, college, and address in a separate envelope with the same motto inscribed upon it.


ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM

Vivien Leigh Prize

A prize of £200 is offered by the Ashmolean Museum from the Vivien Leigh Fund for a two-dimensional work of art on paper, not exceeding fifty-five by forty centimetres, by an undergraduate member of the University. The work will be chosen, if a work of sufficient merit is submitted, by the Keeper of Western Art in the Ashmolean Museum, from work submitted to the Print Room by Friday, 16 June, of work exhibited at the annual degree show at the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art. It is a condition of the award that the winning work be given to the Ashmolean.


PITT RIVERS MUSEUM

Museums and Galleries Month (May 2000): Gallery Talks

The following informal introductions to the museum and its collections will be held at 2.30 p.m. on the days shown in the Pitt Rivers Museum. The talks are given as part of Museums and Galleries Month. Admission is free.

Sat. 6 May: `Celebrating spring'—Pitt Stop family activity.

Sun. 7 May: `The Pitt Rivers is now unwrapped': caring for the collections during major building work.

Sat. 13 May: `Transformations—the art of recycling.'

Sun. 14 May: `Life and death in the Pitt Rivers': coping with poisons in the museum.

Sat. 20 May: `The General's gift.'

Sun. 21 May: `Tibet in the Pitt Rivers Museum.'

Sat. 27 May: `To honour the spirits: Native American clothing.'

Sun. 28 May: `Looking at historical photos.'


CONCERTS

Faculty of Music

THE ALLEGRI STRING QUARTET will perform Haydn's Quartet in G major, op. 77, no. 1, Schumann's Quartet in A, op. 41, no. 3, and Beethoven's Quartet in C minor, op. 18, no. 4, at 8 p.m. on Friday, 26 May, in the Holywell Music Room (tickets £10/£5 from the Playhouse Box Office or at the door).

THE ALLEGRI STRING QUARTET, with Aline Nassif, violin, and Thomas Wood, piano, will perform Haydn' quartet in B flat major, op. 103, and Chausson's Concert, op. 21, at 1 p.m. on Friday, 9 June, in the Holywell Music Room (tickets £5/£2.50 from the Playhouse Box Office or at the door).

THE BAND OF INSTRUMENTS, with the Choir of Christ Church (conductor, Stephen Darlington), will perform J.S. Bach's cantata `Ich bin ein guter Hirt' (BWV 85), at 6 p.m. on Sunday, 7 May, in Christ Church (part of Evensong service; free admission).

GARY COOPER will give the second of two harpsichord recitals from J.S. Bach's 48 Preludes and Fugues, at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, 28 June, in the chapel, New College (tickets £6/£4 available only at the door).

`Matthew Locke in Oxford'. THE BAND OF INSTRUMENTS, with members of the New Chamber Opera, will perform act odes, songs, and instrumental music by Matthew Locke, at 8.15 p.m. on Thursday, 1 June, in the chapel, New College (tickets £7/£5 from the Playhouse Box Office or at the door).

THE OXFORD GAMELAN SOCIETY will perform Javanese songs and instrumental music on the Bate Collection gamelan Kyai Madu Laras, at 7 p.m. on Saturday, 17 June, in the Wesley Memorial Church, New Inn Hall Street (tickets £6/£4 from the Playhouse Box Office or at the door).

THE JOAN CONWAY SCHOLARS 1999–2000. The following scholars will give a recital at 12 noon on Saturday, 20 May, in the Auditorium, Magdalen College. Linda Lacquière, piano, will perform Schubert's Sonata in B flat major, D.960. Catriona Caroline Scott, clarinet, will perform Schumann's Fantasiestücke for clarinet (op. 73) and Poulenc's Clarinet Sonata. Tickets should be obtained in advance by application to Steve Thompson, Secretary at the Faculty of Music (telephone: Oxford (2)76133).


St John's College and Colin Carr

PATRICIA ROZARIO (soprano), FRANCIS GRIER (piano), and COLIN CARR (cello) will perform the following works at 8 p.m. on Saturday, 6 May, in the Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's College: Beethoven, Sonata in A major for cello and piano, op. 69; Tavener, Akhmatova Songs, for soprano and cello; Britten, On This Island, song-cycle with words by Auden, for soprano and piano, op. 11; Francis Grier, Love without Hope, song-cycle with words by Robert Graves, for soprano, cello, and piano (commissioned with support from Southern Arts; world première).

Admission is by free programme, available from the Porter's Lodge, St John's College. Each programme will be valid as an admission ticket until ten minutes before the concert starts. Any vacant seats will then be filled from the door.

 




Lectures

Contents of this section:

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INAUGURAL LECTURES

Action Research Professor of Clinical Neurology

PROFESSOR G.C. EBERS will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 9 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Multiple sclerosis—a complex trait paradigm.'


Harold Vyvyan Harmsworth Professor of American History

PROFESSOR R.W. WINKS will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 18 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `To stimulate to some action: the Harmsworth Professorship, 1920–2000.'


Reuters Professor of Intellectual Property and Information Technology Law

PROFESSOR D. VAVER will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Wednesday, 17 May, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `Intellectual property: the state of the art.'


WEIDENFELD VISITING PROFESSOR OF EUROPEAN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 1999–2000

Literature and the gods

PROFESSOR ROBERTO CALASSO will lecture at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination Schools.

Wed. 3 May: `The pagan school.'

Thur. 4 May: `Mental waters.'

Wed. 10 May: `Incipit parodia.'

Thur. 11 May: `Musings of a serial killer.'

Wed. 17 May: `An abandoned room.'

Thur. 18 May: `Mallarmé in Oxford.'

Wed. 24 May: ` "Metres are the cattle of the gods" .'

Thur. 25 May: `Absolute literature.'


HALLEY LECTURE 2000

PROFESSOR SIR ALAN COOK, FRS, formerly Master of Selwyn College and Emeritus Professor of Natural Philosophy, Cambridge, will deliver the Halley Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 16 May, in the Lecture Theatre, the University Museum.

Subject: `Edmond Halley and the magnetic field of the Earth.'


CHERWELL–SIMON LECTURE 2000

PROFESSOR FRANCIS HALZEN, Director, Institute for Elementary Particle Physics Research, University of Wisconsin—Madison, will deliver the Cherwell–Simon Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Friday, 9 June, in the Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon Laboratory.

Subject: `Neutrino astronomy: Antarctic dreams.'


HENSLEY HENSON LECTURES IN THEOLOGY 1999–2000

Sacraments, Ceremonies, and Stuart Divines: sacramental theology and liturgy in England and Scotland, 1603–62

THE REVD DR BRYAN SPINKS, Professor of Liturgical Studies, Yale University, will deliver the Hensley Henson Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following Mondays in the Examination Schools.

1 May: `Lex ritualis, lex credendi? From Hampton Court to the Five Articles of Perth.'

8 May: `Calvinist consensus and Patristic Reformed Sacramentalism, and the débâcle of the 1637 Book of Common Prayer.'

15 May: `Baptismal controversy, the Westminster Assembly, and the Royal Episcopal Divines.'

22 May: `Keeping the mean and ignoring the theologians? Sacraments and the 1662 Book of Common Prayer.'


WILDE LECTURES IN NATURAL AND COMPARATIVE RELIGION

Evil and superfluity: two arguments against the existence of God

PROFESSOR P. VAN INWAGEN, John Cardinal O'Hara Professor of Philosophy, University of Notre Dame, Indiana, will deliver the Wilde Lectures in Natural and Comparative Religion at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination Schools.

Tue. 2 May: `Two arguments for the non-existence of God.'

Thur. 4 May: `The idea of God.'

Fri. 5 May: `God and science.'

Tue. 9 May: `God and evil.'

Thur. 11 May: `The vast amount of evil.'

Fri. 12 May: `Horrors.'

Tue. 16 May: `Belief and evidence.'

Thur. 18 May: `The presumption of atheism.'


O'DONNELL LECTURES IN CELTIC STUDIES 2000

DR N. EDWARDS, School of History and Welsh History, University of Wales, Bangor, will deliver two O'Donnell Lectures on the following subject, at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 11 May, and Friday, 12 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Early medieval stones and stone sculpture in Wales: context and connections.'


JAMES P.R. LYELL LECTURES IN BIBLIOGRAPHY

Set in print: the fortunes of an idea, .1450–1800

DR D. MCKITTERICK, Cambridge, will deliver the Lyell Lectures in Bibliography at 5 p.m. on the following days in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building.

Thur. 4 May: `The printed word and the modern bibliographer.'

Wed. 10 May: `Dependent skills.'

Thur. 11 May: `A house of errors.'

Wed. 17 May: `Perfect and imperfect.'

Thur. 18 May: `Re-evaluations.'


SIR JOHN HICKS LECTURE ON ECONOMIC HISTORY

PROFESSOR R. ALLEN, University of British Columbia, will deliver the Sir John Hicks Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 19 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Russia's first capitalist economy: economic growth and income distribution under the tsars.'


SIMONYI LECTURE

PROFESSOR R. GREGORY will deliver the second annual Simonyi Lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 18 May, in the Department of Zoology. The lecture will be introduced by Professor Richard Dawkins, Simonyi Professor of the Public Understanding of Science, and Dr Charles Simonyi is expected to be present.

Subject: `Shaking hands with the Universe.'


CLARENDON LECTURES IN MANAGEMENT STUDIES

The Internet galaxy: reflections on the Internet, business, and society

PROFESSOR M. CASTELLS, Professor of Sociology, University of California, Berkeley, will deliver the Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building. The lectures are open to the public, and admission is free.

The Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies are sponsored by the Oxford University Press and the Saïd Business School.

Mon. 12 June: `Internet and the network society.'

Tue. 13 June: `Internet and the new economy.'

Wed. 14 June: `The Internet as the socio-technical medium of the information age.' (Followed by discussion)

 


SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES ANNUAL LECTURE

PROFESSOR H.W. PERRY, University of Texas at Austin, will deliver the sixth annual lecture in Socio-Legal Studies at 5.30 p.m. on Friday, 12 May, in the Examination Schools. The meeting will be chaired by Professor Denis Galligan.

Subject: `Law and politics in America's Constitutional Court.'


CARLYLE CLASSES IN CLASSICAL POLITICAL THOUGHT

The politics of Plato's Republic

DR M. SCHOFIELD, Cambridge, will give the following lecture and seminars at 2 p.m. on the days shown in All Souls College. The series will end with a general discussion session, at 2 p.m. on Monday, 22 May.

Mon. 1 May: `The noble lie.' (Lecture)

Tue. 2 May: `Utopia and the idea of community.' (Seminar)

Mon. 8 May: `Rule by philosophers: knowledge, virtue, and power.' (Seminar)

Tue. 9 May: `Economic man: property and human nature.' (Seminar)

Mon. 15 May: `Plato the feminist?' (Seminar)

Tue. 16 May: `A city fit for Socrates: the politics of Quietism.' (Seminar)


ANTHROPOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY

School of Geography and the Environment: research seminars

The following seminars will be given at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Senior Common Room, the School of Geography and the Environment.

Conveners: C.G. Clarke, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Urban and Social Geography, G.L. Clark, MA, Halford Mackinder Professor of Geography, and A.S. Goudie, MA, Professor of Geography.

 

Tuesday, 2 May

C. MCCULLOCH: `Risk and blame: engineers, large dams, and reservoirs.'

S. HENDERSON: `Alien plants in the Galapagos Islands; are they all unwelcome.'

Tuesday, 9 May

D. PEDYNOWSKI: `The evolution and effectiveness of a transboundary biosphere reserve: a case study of the Glacier Waterton lakes biosphere reserves.'

C. BROOKE: `Climate change, regional vulnerability, and conservation in Cost Rica.'

Tuesday, 16 May

E. WRIGHT: `Timing and conditions of dune formation in Ras al Khaimah (UAE).'

M. CHOI: `Future rainfall intensity and soil erosion by water.'

Tuesday, 23 May

G. ZIERVOGEL: `Seasonal forecasts and small-scale farmers in Zimbabwe.'

Z. MORRISON: `Britain's shameful places: examining constructions of "social exclusion"—towards spaces beyond social divisions.'

Tuesday, 30 May

J. MATHEWS: `Gum Arabic and sustainable forestry in North Africa.'

J. BATTERSBY: `Between home, street, and school: the impact of education(s) on coloured identities in South Africa.'

Tuesday, 6 June

S. DARBY: `Out of sight, out of mind? Making energy consumption visible.'

C. FLUTTER: `The social market and regional unemployment: the thirty- five-hour week and the French problem.'

Tuesday, 13 June

D. WOJCIK: `The footprint of capital: the geographical consequences of the European capital market integration.'

C. VON DER HEYDEN: `Mine drainage and passive treatment systems.'

Tuesday, 20 June

T. PLANT: `Prospects for international free trade: the WTO, beef, and US hegemony.'

T. WHITEHEAD: `The economic impact of urban road pricing on central city areas: approaches to inform policy-makers.'


Oxford Seminars in Cartography

RALPH HYDE, London Guildhall Library, will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 25 May, in the School of Geography.

Subject: `Parish maps of London, 1686–1900: recording an overlooked source.'


ESRC Transnational Communities Research Programme: economic sociology of transnationalism

With the exception of the 15 June lecture (in the Linacre Lectures series), the following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the Clay Room, Nuffield College.

The 15 June lecture will be given at 5.30 p.m. in Lecture Theatre A, the Zoology/Psychology Building, South Parks Road.

Conveners: Dr Steven Vertovec, Oxford University, and Professor Alejandro Portes, Princeton University.

DR A. CAGLAR, Free University, Berlin
4 May: `Media corporatism and cosmopolitanism.'

PROFESSOR D. MILLER, University College, London
11 May: `Ethnographyh, the Internet, and diaspora nationalism.'

PROFESSOR A. BRYMAN, Loughborough
18 May: `The Disneyisation of society—continuities and discontinuities with McDonaldisation.'

PROFESSOR S. FRITH, Stirling
25 May: `World music—globalisation from above and below.'

DR R. BALLARD, Manchester
1 June: `The dynamcis of transnational process: some reflections on South Asian developments.'

DR C. DWYER, DR P. CRANG, University College, London, and PROFESSOR P. JACKSON, Sheffield
8 June: `Tracing transnationalities through commodity culture.'

PROFESSOR M. CASTELLS, Berkeley
15 June: `Global networks and local societies: cities in the information age.'

PROFESSOR PORTES
22 June: `Not anyone is chosen: segmented assimilation in the second generation.'


BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

The Genome Revolutions

The following seminars will be held at 12.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Biochemistry.

Conveners: J.A. Hodgkin (Ph.D. Cambridge), Professor of Genetics, and D.B. Roberts, MA, Reader in Genetics.

PROFESSOR M. ASHBURNER, Cambridge
4 May: `The Drosophila genome.'

PROFESSOR M. BEVAN, John Innes Institute, Norwich
18 May: `A flourishing weed: sequencing the Arabidopsis genome.'

DR I. JACKSON, Edinburgh
25 May: `The genome of the mouse.'

DR D. BENTLEY, Sanger Centre
15 June: `The human genome.'


Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in Lecture Theatre 1, the Department of Biochemistry.

Convener: L.N. Johnson, MA, David Phillips Professor of Molecular Biophysics.

PROFESSOR J. THORNTON, University College, London
19 May: `The evolution of protein function within homologous families.'

PROFESSOR M. KARPLUS, Eastman Visiting Professor
2 June: `Molecular recognition: free energy simulations and combinatorial ligand design.'

DR C. NORBURY
9 June: `Cell cycle checkpoint-overriding drugs and drug resistance; novel mechanisms conserved from fission yeast to human cells.'

DR S. CURRY, Imperial College, London
16 June: `Any which way you can: adventures in cryo-electron microscopy, NMR, and X-ray crystallography.'


CLINICAL MEDICINE

Oxford Clinical Neurosciences Lectures

The following lectures will be given at 11.30 a.m. on Fridays in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

DR A. ZEMAN, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh
12 May: `Consciousness.'

PROFESSOR A.J. THOMPSON, Institute of Neurology
9 June: `Neurorehabilitation in MS: does it work?'

DR R. KNIGHT, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh
14 July: `Update on CJD.'

DR J. MORROW, Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast
15 Sept.: `Epilepsy, drugs, and pregnancy.'


Uterine Contractility Symposium

This symposium will be held from 9.30 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 May, in the Nuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, the John Radcliffe Hospital. Further information may be be obtained from Dr Andrés López Bernal (telephone: Oxford 220982, e-mail: alb@ermine.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR S. THORNTON, Warwick
10 a.m.: `Oxytocin antagonists for tocolysis: clinical and scientific considerations.'

PROFESSOR S. WRAY, Liverpool
10.30 a.m.: `Physiological basis of contractility.'

DR E. LINTON
11.30 a.m.: `CRH and parturition.'

DR N. EUROPE-FINER, Newcastle
12 noon: `Expression of CREB, CREM, and AFT Cyclic AMP Transcription Factors in the human myometrium during pregnancy and labour.'

DR R. TRIBE, St Thomas's Hospital, London
2 p.m.: `Calcium signalling in myometrial cells.'

DR M. TAGGART, Manchester
2.30 p.m.: `Caves, stores, and asphyxiation: E–C coupling in the myometrium.'

DR R. KHAN, Nottingham
3 p.m.: `Potassium channels in the human myometrium.'

PROFESSOR R. IVELL, Hamburg
3.30 p.m.: Oxytocin receptor gene regulation.'

PROFESSOR B. SANBORN, Texas at Houston
5 p.m.: `Hormones and calcium; mechanisms controlling uterine contractile activity.' (Litchfield Lecture)


CLINICAL MEDICINE, PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Unless otherwise indicated, the following research seminars will be given at 4.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology.

Convener: H. Waldmann, BM, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Pathology.

PROFESSOR S.A. PORCELLI, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York
27 Apr.: `Specialised roles of CD1 proteins in antigen presentation.'

PROFESSOR J.L. BRESLOW, Rockefeller University, New York
4 May: `Genetic risk factors for atherosclerosis; studies in humans and mice.'

DR M. WHITBY
Tue. 9 May: `Processing Holliday junctions in fission yeast.'

DR R.L. FERRERO, Institut Pasteur, Paris
18 May: `Host–bacterium interactions in gastric Helicobacter infection.'

PROFESSOR P. DONNELLY
25 May: `Some statistical challenges in modern genetics.'

PROFESSOR G. DOVER, Leicester
1 June: `Evolution beyond Darwin.'

DR S. MUNRO, Cambridge
8 June: `Targeting of proteins to the Golgi Apparatus.'


LITERAE HUMANIORES

PROFESSOR PETER BING, Emory University, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 3 May, in the Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College

Convener: E.L. Bowie, MA, Reader in Classical Languages and Literature.

 

Subject: `The unruly tongue: Philetas of Cos and the early history of the gloss.'


Philosophy of Physics seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: G. Bacciagaluppi, J.N. Butterfield, and S.W. Saunders.

DR M. LOCKWOOD
4 May: `Are black holes potential time machines?'

PROFESSOR A. SOKAL, New York
18 May: `Chromatic polynomials, Potts models, and all that: entertainment from mathematical physics.'

DR M. APPLEBY, Queen Mary and Westfield College, London
25 May: `The contextuality of approximate measurements.'

DR F. MARKOPOULOU, Imperial College, London
1 June: `Quantum causal histories.'

DR BACCIAGALUPPI
8 June: `Pilot-wave theory and the thermodynamic analogy in quantum mechanics and special relativity.'

PROFESSOR J. ANANDAN, South Carolina
15 June: `Laws, symmetries, and geometry.'

DR S. FRENCH, Leeds
22 June: `A phenomological approach to the measurement problem: Husserl and the foundations of quantum mechanics.'


David Lewis Lecture

PROFESSOR P.J. RHODES, Professor of Ancient History, University of Durham, will deliver the David Lewis Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 31 May, in the Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's College. The lecture will be followed by a reception.

Convener: Dr A.K. Bowman, Christ Church.

 

Subject: `Making and breaking treaties in the Greek world.'


MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

Russian Graduate Seminar

The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in Room S7, 47 Wellington Square.

Conveners: Professor G.S. Smith, New College (11 May and 25 May); Dr G. Tihanov, Merton College (8 June).

DR G. ROBERTS, Surrey
11 May: `Drink up, Comrades! The uses and abuses of alcohol in Soviet film.'

M. GAMSA
25 May: `California on the Amur: the Zheltuga Republic in Manchuria, 1883–6.'

PROFESSOR C. LOCK, Helsinki
8 June: `Bakhtin among the poets: theories of the word in revolutionary Russia.'


The Greek novel on film

MS S. PANAYIOTOPOULOS will lecture as follows at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in 47 Wellington Square. Each session will consist of a lecture followed by a film.

Convener: P.A. Mackridge, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Modern Greek.

4 May: Vios kai politeia tou Alexi Zorba (N. Kazantzakis); Zorba the Greek (M. Cacoyannis).

11 May: I timi kai to chrima (K. Theotokis); I timi tis agapis (T. Marketaki).

18 May: O teleftaios peirasmos (N. Kazantzakis); The Last Temptation of Christ (M. Scorsese).

25 May: I fanela me to 9 (M. Koumandareas; P. Voulgaris) .


Graduate seminar in Spanish studies

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Taylor Institution.

Conveners: I.D.L. Michael, MA, King Alfonso XIII Professor of Spanish Studies, and C.H. Griffin, MA, University Lecturer in Latin American Literature.

DR D. FLITTER, Birmingham
2 May: `Imagining Spain: Romantic aesthetics and casticista ideology in the construction of nation.'

SR. F. TORRENT, Valencian writer
9 May: `Las condiciones sociales en la narrativa catalana contemporánea: una visión de autor.' (Public lecture)

DR D. MORAN, London
23 May: `Carpentier's Stravinsky: rites and wrongs.'

J.L. BELLÓN
30 May: `Libro de buen amor.'

DR S. HART, London
6 June: `Changing images of Simón Bolívar.'

PROFESSOR T.N. CORDO, Puerto Rico
13 June: `Solidaridad entre morisco y conversos de judío: el Mancebo de Arévalo y La Celestina.'

C. PATTERSON
20 June: `North and south and "The Decline of the West": the Faustian landscape of an imagined Galicia.'


MODERN HISTORY

Special Faculty Lecture

PROFESSOR I. KERSHAW, Sheffield, will deliver the annual Special Faculty Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 5 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Why did Nazi radicalism not subside?'


Commonwealth History Seminar: Representations of empire

This seminar will be held on 18 and 19 May in Rhodes House.

 

Thursday, 18 May

PROFESSOR P. GREENHALGH, Victoria and Albert Museum, London
2 p.m.: `The object of exhibitions in late Victorian and Edwardian England.'

DR I. PHIMISTER
2.45 p.m.: `Commonwealth, colonialism, and the Central African Exhibition of 1953.' (Followed by discussion at 3.30 p.m.)

DR C. HARRIS
4.30 p.m.: ` "Compelled to purchase": colonial officers, materiality, and the representation of Tibet.' (Followed by discussion at 5.15 p.m.)

 

Friday, 19 May

PROFESSOR J.M. MACKENZIE, Lancaster
9.15 a.m.: `Representations and empire: from high art to the humble postcard.'

DR S. CONSTANTINE, Lancaster
10 a.m.: `Advertising posters and the selling of Empire, .1900–60.' (Followed by discussion at 10.45 a.m.)

PROFESSOR J. RICHARDS, Lancaster
11.40 a.m.: `Films and the British Empire.'

DR J. RYAN, Belfast
2.15 p.m.: `Picturing Empire: photography and the visualisation of the British Empire.'

J. PINFOLD, Rhodes House
3 p.m.: `The Transvaal War: a contemporary magic lantern slide show and commentary.'

 


MODERN HISTORY, SOCIAL STUDIES

East and East–Central Europe Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in Oriel College.

Conveners: R.J. Crampton, MA, Professor of East European History, R.J.W. Evans, MA, D.Phil., Regius Professor of Modern History, and D. Rechter (Ph.D. Jerusalem), Research Fellow, St Antony's College.

 

J. BERKOWITZ
5 May: `Avrom Goldfaden and the roots of modern Yiddish theatre in Eastern Europe.'

E. DAVIDOVA
12 May: `Nineteenth-century Bulgarian merchants.'

M. PROKOPOVYCH
19 May: `Architecture and legitimation of the state: municipal projects in Central European capitals around 1900—developing methodology.'

J. MILLER
26 May: `Urbanisation, redistribution, deurbanisation, and the problem of multifunctionality of the early modern city in East–Central Europe.'

K. KOCOUREK
2 June: `The definition of Czech nationality; lines of continuity from Hussite times to the Masarykian era.'

E. SCHMIDT
9 June: `Emancipation and culture: the modernisation of synagogue music in Austia-Hungary.'

M. FRANK
16 June: `Mid-twentieth-century population transfers: the Greco-Turkish model and the transfer of the Germans.'

J. ELLINGER
23 June: `Chamberlain, appeasement, and East–Central Europe.'


Graduate seminar in economic and social history

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: P.A. David, MA, Professor of Economic and Social History, N.H. Dimsdale, MA, University Lecturer (CUF) in Economics, K.J. Humphries, MA, Reader in Economic History, and A. Offer, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Recent Social and Economic History.

J. METZER, Hebrew University
2 May: `From the Jewish National Home to the State of Israel: some aspects of nation- and state-building.'

R. ALLEN, University of British Columbia
9 May: `Poverty and progress in early modern Britain.'

L. BRUNT
16 May: `Rethinking the Agricultural Revolution.'

A. SYME
23 May: `La France aux Français! Displacing the foreign worker during the Depression of the 1930s.'


MUSIC

Music of the Far East

The following public lectures will be given on Fridays in the Denis Arnold Hall, the Music Faculty. Unless otherwise indicated they will begin at 5 p.m.

DR C. HUEHNS
19 May, 4.30 p.m.: `Great composers for Erhu (the Chinese "violin"): Lin Tian-hua, A. Bing, and Jin Wei.'

19 May, 6 p.m: an Erhu recital, with music by Lin Tian- hua, A. Bing, and Jin Wei.

DR KAWORI IGUCHI
26 May: `Tradition and notation of Kyoto Gion Festival Music.'

DR C. HUMPHRIES
2 June: `Japanese music, neuroscience, and the semiotics of live performance.'

DR H.M. JOHNSON
9 June: `Japanese music notation and nationalism.'


Other public lectures

PROFESSOR R. HACOHEN will deliver a public lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 8 May, in the Holywell Music Room.

Subject: `Arnold Schoenberg's Moses und Aaron: a theological-political-aesthetic tractate.'

DR X. HASCHER will deliver a public lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 15 May, in the Denis Arnold Hall, the Music Faculty.

Subject: `A propos of the slow movement of Schubert's C major quintet, D.956.'


National Museums Month: lecture

PROFESSOR E. SWENSON will lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Thursday, 11 May, in the Bate Collection, the Music Faculty. This lecture is a National Museums Month event presented by the Friends of the Bate Collection of Musical Instruments.

Subject: `Piano manufacturing in mid-nineteenth-century America: a tour through the factories of Steinway & Sons, Chickering, and Boardman and Grey.'


Graduate Students' Colloquia

The following colloquia will be held at 5.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Denis Arnold Hall, the Music Faculty.

A. FAUSER, City University
2 May: `Rheinsirenen: Lorelei and other Rhinemaidens.'

E. SENICI
9 May: `Verdi's Falstaff and the Italian fin-de-siècle.'

S. RICE
16 May: `The relationship between Zarlino's modal theory and Willaert's compositional practice in the motets of the Music Nova.'

P. FINE, Buckingham
23 May: `Mozart in the mind: a tour of music through the brain.'

B. EARLE
30 May: `Dallapiccola's early synthesis: no. 1, "Vespro, tutto riporti", from Cinque frammenti di Saffo (1942).'

C. TROELSGAARD, Copenhagen
6 June: `From Palaeobyzantine to diastematic notation: a crucial process in the music-writing of Byzantium.'

H. POLLACK, Houston
13 June: `Aaron Copland the American landscape.'

P. BOHLMAN, Chicago
20 June: `On the new Europeanness of music.'


ORIENTAL STUDIES

Seminar on Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period

The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in Wolfson College.

Convener: M.D. Goodman, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Jewish Studies.

S. BERRIN, London School of Jewish Studies
2 May: `Another look at consecutive testimony at Qumran.'

DR E. HABAS, Beer-Shava
9 May: `The Qumranic nasi: linguistic and historical implications.'

DR J. CAMPBELL, Bristol
16 May: `4QMMTd and the scriptural canon.'

DR A. SHEMESH, Bar-Ilan
23 May: `King Manasseh and the halakha of the Sadducees.'

A. TROPPER
30 May: `The purpose of the Mishnaic tractate Aboth.'

E. PAPOUTSAKIS
6 June: `Jewish–Christian polemics on the use of leaven.'


PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Theoretical Physics Seminars

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in the Nuclear Physics Lecture Theatre.

Convener: D. Sherrington, MA, Wykeham Professor of Physics.

PROFESSOR D. PINES, Los Alamos
5 May: `Quantum protectorates in the cuprate superconductors.'

DR J. CHRISTIAN
19 May: `Why the quantum must yield to gravity.'

PROFESSOR P. BAK, Imperial College
2 June: `Forest fires, measles, and the structure of the universe.'

PROFESSOR W. KOHN, California, Santa Barbara
Mon. 19 June: `A broader view of Van der Waals Energies.'


Theoretical Chemistry Group Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the PTCL Lecture Theatre.

Convener: M.S. Child, MA, Coulson Professor of Theoretical Chemistry.

PROFESSOR G. CICCOTTI, Rome
1 May: `Wigner approach to mixed quantum-classical dynamics.'

PROFESSOR D. CHANDLER, Berkeley
8 May: `Finding transition pathways in complex systems: throwing ropes over rugged mountain passes.'

DR T. TODOROV, Belfast
15 May: `Spatial distribution of the electric current and field in atomic-scale conductors.'

PROFESSOR R.S. BERRY, Chicago
22 May: To be announced.

PROFESSOR H.S. TAYLOR, Southern California
29 May: `States of excited CHBrCIF with apparent C s, C 2v, and C symmetry.'


Oxford Physics Colloquia

The following lectures will be given at 4.15 p.m. on Fridays in the Lindemann Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon Laboratory. For details of the Cherwell–Simon Lecture (9 June), see above.

Conveners: P.G.H. Sandars, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Experimental Physics, and J.I. Silk, MA, D.Phil., Savilian Professor of Astronomy.

PROFESSOR A. SOKAL, New York
12 May: `Science and sociology of science: against war and peace.'

DR E. YABLONOVICH, California, Los Angeles
19 May: `Electromagnetic bandgaps at photonic and radio-frequencies.' (Clifford Patterson Lecture of the Royal Society)

PROFESSOR B. RICHTER, Stanford
2 June: `The future of particle physics.'

PROFESSOR W. KOHN, California, Santa Barbara
16 June: `Electronic structure of matter: wave functions and density functionals.'


PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics

The following research seminars will be given at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the Lecture Theatre of the department.

 

Convener: K.E. Davies, MA, D.Phil., Dr Lee's Professor of Anatomy.

PROFESSOR J. PARNAVELAS, University College, London
5 May: `The origin and migration of cortical neurons: new vistas?' (Jenkinson Seminar)

PROFESSOR A. SURANI, Cambridge
12 May: `Germ line, stem cells, and genomic imprinting.' (Jenkinson Seminar)

PROFESSOR G. BATES, King's College, London
19 May: `Insights into the molecular basis of Huntington's disease.'

PROFESSOR J. SECKL, Edinburgh
26 May: `Glucocorticoids and foetal programming of adult disease.' (Jenkinson Seminar)

DR M. VAN DEN HUEVEL
2 June: `How to interpret a morphogen gradient.'

DR S. MOSS, University College, London
9 June: `Assembly and functional modulation of GABAA receptors.'

PROFESSOR J. HEATH, Birmingham
16 June: `Receptor recognition by GP130 cytokines.'

DR P. HANDFORD
23 June: `Molecular pathology of the Marfan syndrome: a tall story.'


Pharmacology and anatomical pharmacology seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Lecture Theatre, the Department of Pharmacology. Details of the first meeting (2 May) are not available at the time of printing.

PROFESSOR N.B. STANDEN, Leicester
9 May: `Some cardiovascular roles for Katp channels.'

PROFESSOR D.G. GRAHAME-SMITH
16 May: ` "Keep on taking the tablets"—pharmacological adaptation during chronic drug therapy.'

DR A.J. HARWOOD, University College, London
23 May: `Lithium pharmacogenetics and Dictyostelium.'

PROFESSOR J.M. RITTER, St Thomas's Hospital, London
30 May: `Endothelial function in man.'

DR J.P.T. WARD, Guy's, King's, and St Thomas's School of Medicine, London
6 June: `Adrenoceptor-mediated activation of nitric oxide synthase.'

DR D.J. MACEWAN, Aberdeen
13 June: `Controlling life or death by TNF receptor subtype signalling.'

DR B. LISS
20 June: `Molecular mechanisms of selective neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disase: new evidence from single-cell molecular studies of mouse models.'


PSYCHOLOGICAL STUDIES

Department of Experimental Psychology

The following departmental seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Department of Experimental Psychology, as follows: 2 May, 9 May, 6 June, 13 June, in Weiskrantz Room C.113; otherwise in Lecture Theatre C.

Conveners: S.D. Iversen, MA, Professor of Psychology, and P.E. Bryant, MA, Watts Professor of Psychology.

PROFESSOR I. ROBERTSON, Trinity College, Dublin
2 May: `Pathologies of attention: ramifications and rehabilitation.'

DR S. SCOTT, University College, London
9 May: `PET studies of complexity, rate, and intelligibility in speech perception.'

PROFESSOR R. RAFAL, Bangor
16 May: `Hemispatial neglect and the gates of consciousness: stimulus and task determinants of visual extinction.'

PROFESSOR D. ABRAMS, Kent
23 May: `Group commitment—intergroup and intragroup dynamics of loyalty, conformity, and deviance.'

PROFESSOR D. WOLKE, Hertfordshire
30 May: `Psychological development of very pre-term infants: implications for theory and intervention.'

PROFESSOR A. YOUNG
6 June: `Recognition of emotion after brain injury.'

PROFESSOR N. CHATER, Warwick
13 June: `General principles of cognition: are there any?'


Cognitive Science Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Mondays in Room C.113, the Department of Experimental Psychology.

PROFESSOR G. HUMPHREYS, Birmingham
8 May: `Consciousness for a cognitive neuropsychological perspective.'

PROFESSOR N. BLOCK, New York
15 May: `What are experiments "about consciousness" really about?'

PROFESSOR C. PEACOCKE
22 May: `The content of perceptual experience.'

PROFESSOR J. HIGGINBOTHAM
29 May: `What is a theory of meaning?'

DR F. HAPPÉ, Institute of Psychiatry
5 June: `How the brain reads the mind: insights from autism, brain imaging, and acquired lesions.'

PROFESSOR G. CURRIE, Nottingham
12 June: `What should a theory-therapist object to in simulation theory?'

PROFESSOR G. MARCUS, New York
19 June: `Evidence from rule learning in infancy.'


SOCIAL STUDIES

Presidential selection 2000: the participants speak

The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Clay Room, Nuffield College.

Convener: B.E. Shafer, MA, Andrew W. Mellon Professor of American Government.

J. BARNES, National Political Reporter, National Journal
2 May: `The invisible primary 2000: selection politics before the first delegate contest.'

J. HARRIS, Foreign Affairs Correspondent, The Washington Post
9 May: `The cloudy shore: US foreign policy and the 2000 presidential election.'

R. SHOGAN, The Los Angeles Times
16 May: `Covering character—the double-edged sword of American politics.'

R. HEALEY, CEO Democratic National Convention
23 May: `Framing the choice: politicallyi programming the National Party Convention.'

A. FROM, Executive Director, Democratic Leadership Council
30 May: `The next politics: Democrats and Republicans, today and tomorrow.'

R. JOHNSTON, Annenberg School of Communication
6 June: `Dynamics of the 2000 presidential primaries: evidence from the Annenberg Study.'


THEOLOGY

Interdisciplinary seminars in the study of religions

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Blue Boar Seminar Room, Christ Church.

Conveners: J.S.K. Ward, B.Litt., MA, Regius Professor of Divinity, and W.M. Morgan, MA, Lecturer in World Religions, Mansfield and Westminster Colleges.

PROFESSOR N. ROBINSON, Lampeter
2 May: `Islamic studies in symbiosis with theology and religious studies.'

DR D. GELLNER, Brunel
9 May: `Why religious studies needs anthropology.'

DR J. LESLIE, SOAS, London
23 May: `Why religious studies needs gender studies.'


Robert Whyte Lecture in the Interdisciplinary Study of Religions

PROFESSOR N. SMART, Universities of Lancaster and Santa Barbara, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 16 May, in the Examination Schools.

Conveners: J.S.K. Ward, B.Litt., MA, Regius Professor of Divinity, and W.M. Morgan, MA, Lecturer in World Religions, Mansfield and Westminster Colleges.

 

Subject: `Religious studies: why Christian theology cannot do without it.'


Ian Ramsey Centre

Human consciousness

The following seminars will be held at 8.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the Hood Room, St Cross College.

Conveners: Professor J. Hedley Brooke and Dr Margaret Yee.

PROFESSOR B. BARDAKJIAN, Toronto
11 May: `Cues of consciousness in brain cells.'

PROFESSOR S. GREENFIELD
25 May: `How the brain generates consciousness.'

DR YEE
8 June: `Human life and consciousness: a multidisciplinary quest?'


INTERFACULTY SEMINAR

Restoration to Reform, 1660–1832: British, political, literary, intellectual, and social history

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Wordsworth Room, St Hugh's College.

DR J. RENDALL, York
8 May: ` "Ladies suspected of democratic principles": women's networks and Scottish Whiggism, .1790–.1830.'

PROFESSOR L. JORDANOVA, East Anglia
22 May: `Portraiture in the eighteenth century: possibilities and pitfalls.'

DR S. WISEMAN, Birkbeck College, London
5 June: `Catharine Macaulay and republican history.'

DR C. CAMPBELL ORR, Anglia Polytechnic University
19 June: `Queen Charlotte as patron: some intellectual and social contexts.'


RESEARCH LABORATORY FOR ARCHAEOLOGY AND THE HISTORY OF ART

The following seminars will be held at 10.30 a.m. on Thursdays in the Library, the Research Laboratory for Archaeology.

Convener: M.S. Tite, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Archaeological Science.

S. WOLF
11 May: `Medieval building bricks: an investigation into firing technology.'

A. SINCLAIR, SACOS, Liverpool
25 May: `Embedded technology in language and mind: some thoughts on prepared core technologies and the notion of planning depth.'

P. SIBELLA
8 June: `Scientific methods working for archaeology: the case of the Late Bronze Age Uluburun Shipwreck, Turkey.'


CENTRE FOR BRAZILIAN STUDIES

Occasional seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Latin American Centre, 1 Church Walk.

PROFESSOR MARTA DE SENNA, UFRJ
15 May: `Brasil 500 anos: affirmations of nationality in Brazilian literature.'

PROFESSOR R. KAUFMANN, Rutgers
5 June: `Latin America in the glocal economy, with special reference to Brazil and Mexico.' (Jointly with the LAC)

PROFESSOR H. TRINDADE, URFGS and Paris
Date to be announced: `Universidade em ruinas na republica dos professores.'

 


Conferences and workshops

5 May, Wadham College: `Tradition and modernity in twentieth-century Brazilian literature.' (Co-ordinators: Dr Claudia Pazos-Alonso and Professor Tom Earle)

26 May, St Antony's College: `Brazil's international relations in the twentieth century: history and theory.' (Co-ordinators: Dr Andrew Hurrell and Mr Eugenio Vargas Garcia)

2–3 June, Wadham College: `Brazilian cinema': Part I, `The Brazilian film industry'; Part II, `Brazilian cinema: roots of the present, perspectives for the future.' (Co- ordinator: Dr Lucia Nagib)

12 June, St Antony's College: `Structural reform and institutional change in the Brazilian financial sector.' (Co-ordinator: Dr Edmund Amann and Professor Harry Makler (Stanford))

27 May–10 June, Phoenix Cinema and Magdalen College: `From Cinema Novo to the New Cinema.' (Brazilian Film Festival)


SAÏD BUSINESS SCHOOL

Interdepartmental Finance Seminars

Unless othewise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 12.30 p.m. on Fridays in the Saïd Business School, 59 George Street.

Enquiries should be addressed to Elaine Durham, Saïd Business School, 59 George Street, Oxford OX1 2BE (telephone: Oxford (2)88683, e-mail: elaine.durham@sbs.ox.ac.uk).

Conveners: Clara Raposo (Saïd Business School), Hyun Shin (Economics), and Sam Howison (Mathematics).

D. LEECH, Warwick Business School
5 May: `Shareholder power and shareholder incentives: towards a theory of ownership control.'

V. NANDA, London Business School
12 May: `Industry structure and the conglomerate discount: theory and evidence.'

B. BIAIS, Toulouse I
Wed. 17 May: `Psychological traits and trading strategies.'

G. HUBERMAN, Columbia Business School
26 May: To be announced.

V. SAPORTA, Bank of England
2 June: `Costs of banking instability: some empirical evidence.'

A. BERNARDO, UCLA
9 June: `Capital budgeting and compensation with asymmetric information and moral hazard.'

P. HENRY, Stanford
16 June: `Do stock market liberalisations cause investment booms?'

B. CHOWDHRY, UCLA
23 June: `Real options and the diversification discount.'


BYZANTINE STUDIES

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the New Seminar Room, St John's College.

Conveners: E.M. Jeffreys, B.Litt., MA, Bywater and Sotheby Professor of Byzantine and Modern Greek Language and Literature, J.D. Howard-Johnston, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in Byzantine Studies, and M.C. Mundell Mango, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in Byzantine Archaeology and Art.

PROFESSOR A. CAMERON
2 May: `Constantinople and the Theotokos: the construction of a relationship, fourth to seventh centuries.'

Z. RUBIN, Tel Aviv
9 May: `Byzantium and the Christianisation of Ethiopia.'

E. ARGOV
16 May: `A church historian in search of identity: ethnicity and its use in Sozomen's account of the Byzantine Near East.'

DR S. KINGSLEY
23 May: `Marine archaeology as a text for long-term history in Late Antiquity.'

P. CATLING
30 May: `Landscape archaeology in Lakonia: the medieval period.'

DR M. PARANI
6 June: `Politics and artistic patronage: the foundations of Serbian king Milutin in Thessaloniki.'

DR I. CHRISTOFORAKI
13 June: `Encounter, symbiosis, or acculturation: the case of Lusignan Cyprus.'

PROFESSOR MANGO
20 June: `Welfare at Constantinople.'


COMPUTING LABORATORY

Departmental seminars

Unless otherwise stated, the following seminars will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Lecture Theatre, the Computing Laboratory.

Convener: Dr Oege de Moor.

L. LAMPORT, Compaq
2 May, 4.30 p.m.: `how to write a proof.' (Strachey Lecture)
Wed. 3 May, 2 p.m.: `Distributed state machines and disk paxos.'

J. SANDERS
9 May: `Quantum programming.'

M. MOSCA, Waterloo, Canada
16 May: `Quantum algorithims and finding hidden subgroups.'

R. BORNET, Queen Mary and Westfield College College, London
23 May: `Reasoning with pointers in Hoare logic.'

C. TAPPER
30 May: `From privacy to data protection.'

M. HENSON, Essex
6 June: `Program development and specification refinement in ${\mathcal}_{\lambda}$.'

A. BLAKE, Microsoft, Cambridge
13 June: `Getting computers to learn how to see.'

R. JOZSA, Bristol
20 June: `Counterfactual computation and other possibilities based on quantum effects.'

S. PULMAN, Cambridge
27 June: `Inductive logic programming and computational linguistics.'

SIR A. HOARE, Microsoft Cambridge
Fri. 30 June, room 347, 3 p.m.: `Unifying theories of logic programming.'


Numerical Analysis Group

Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays. Unless indicated otherwise they will take place in the OUCL Lecture Theatre.

The co-ordinators are L.N. Trefethen and J. Scott (RAL). Further information may be obtained from Shirley Day (telephone: Oxford (2)73885).

A symposium on `(Pseudo)spectra of nonhermitian random matrices' will be held on Friday, 30 June, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.

PROFESSOR N. HIGHAM, Manchester
4 May, RAL: `Analysis of the Cholesky method with iterative refinement for solving the symmetric definite generalised eigenproblem.'

DR J. PRYCE, Cranfield
11 May: `Exception-free arithmetic on the extended reals.'

DR KE CHEN, Liverpool
18 May: `An efficient Schur preconditioner based on modified discrete wavelet transforms.'

DR R. HAUSER, Cambridge
24 May: `Self-scaled barriers for semidefinite programming.'

DR P. JIMACK, Leeds
1 June: `An adaptive finite element algorithm for the solution of time-dependent free-surface incompressible flow problems.'

PROFESSOR W. GANDER, ETH, Zurich
8 June: `Adaptive quadrature—art or science?'

DR S. BENBOW, Quintessa Ltd.
15 June, RAL: `Augmented linear systems—methods and observations.'

DR M. ASCH, Paris XI
22 June: `Spectral asymptotics of the damped wave operator: theory, simulations, and applications.'


CENTRE FOR CRIMINOLOGICAL RESEARCH

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Old Library, All Souls College.

Convener: R.G. Hood, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Criminology and Director of the Centre.

PROFESSOR M. KILLIAS, Lausanne
3 May: `Alternatives to imprisonment: the benefits of experimental research.'

PROFESSOR HOOD and DR S. SHUTE, Birmingham
10 May: `Parole decision-making: weighing the risk to the public.'

MRS N. PADFIELD, Cambridge
17 May: `Discretionary lifer panels of the Parole Board: theory and practice.'

DR M. FITZGERALD, LSE
24 May: `Stop and search. Time to stop and think?'

M. NAREY, Director General, HM Prison Service
31 May: `Changing the Prison Service.'


DEPARTMENT OF THE HISTORY OF ART

Sir Isaiah Berlin Visiting Scholar in Italian Studies

The power of sarcophagi from Rome to Raphael

PROFESSOR SALVATORE SETTIS, Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, will deliver the following lectures at 5 p.m. on the days indicated in the Headley Lecture Theatre, the Ashmolean Museum.

Tue. 16 May: `Mythology and biography in Roman sarcophagi.'

Thur. 18 May: `The reuse of Roman sarcophagi in medieval Europe.'

Tue. 23 May: `The cradle in a grave: medieval artists and Roman sarcophagi.'

Thur. 25 May: `Ars moriendi, Giotto, and Raphael.'


MAISON FRANÇAISE

Lectures

Unless otherwise indicated, the following lectures will be given at 5.15 p.m. on the days shown in the Maison Française.

G. DUMENIL, CNRS—Université de Paris
Fri. 5 May, 5 p.m.: `The costs and benefits of neo- liberalism: a class analysis.'

J. GURY, Rennes
Mon. 15 May, 3 p.m., Room 3, Taylor Institution: `Voyageurs français Outre-Manche de Voltaire à Taine: en quête de ces étranges insulaires.'

P. FRANCE, Edinburgh
Mon. 15 May, 5 p.m, Lecture Hall, Taylor Institution: `Lost for words: travel and translation.' (Besterman Lecture)

A. GUNNY, OCIS
Thur. 18 May, 5 p.m., Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies: `The diffusion of Islamic culture by French scholars in the nineteenth century.'

F. CLAUDON, Université de Paris XII
Mon. 22 May: `Portrait d'un libéral réactionnaire: Stendhal en voyageur.'

M. CROSLAND, Kent
Tue. 23 May, 5 p.m.: `Challenge to cultural authority in nineteenth-century France.'

G. DENIS, Paris I
Fri. 26 May, 5 p.m: `L'art de l'agriculture, entre France et Grande-Bretagne, au 18e siècle, à l'origine des sciences agricoles.'

S. MARTINEZ, UNAM, Mexico
Tue. 30 May: `The old problem of determinism and the new philosophy of science.'

D. HOPWOOD
Wed. 31 May: `The lure of the Near East for European travellers.'

A. WILLIAMS, Kent
Mon. 5 June: `France and the new world order, 1940–7.'

A. VIALA, Paris III
Tue. 6 June: `Les débats présents sur la littérature et son enseignement en France, vus de Paris et d'Oxford.'

J.-Y. LE DISEZ, Brétagne Occidentale
Thur. 8 June: ` "Wildly sweet": how Victorian travellers (re)wrote Brittany.'

 


Seminar in Early Modern French Literature and Culture

The following seminars will be given at 5.15 p.m. on Thursdays in the Maison Française.

N. CRONK, Voltaire Foundation
4 May: `Reading La Fontaine in the eighteenth century: the problem of Voltaire.'

E. NYE
18 May: `Dance and literature: the eighteenth century.'

L. ASFOUR
1 June: `Sterne in France.'

G. DECLERCQ, Paris III
15 June: `La rhétorique galante dans les tragédies de Racine.'


Political societies and culture in late medieval France, the British Isles, and the Netherlands

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Maison Française.

J.-P. GENET, Paris I
8 May: `Political society and the public space in later medieval France and England.'

J.-P. BOUDET, Paris X
15 May: `La magie dans la société de la fin du Moyen Age.'

P. CONTAMINE, Paris IV
29 May, New Seminar Room, St John's: ` "Bastard feudalism": a tool for the study of the French nobility (and society) at the end of the Middle Ages.'

C. PRIGENT, Paris I
5 June: `Art et société en France au 15e siècle.'

F. COLLARD, Reims
12 June: `Le crime de poison: une autre psychose de la fin du Moyen Age?'

F. LACHAUD, Paris IV
19 June: `Taxation on movable goods in England, thirteenth to fourteenth centuries: why?'


Association for the Study of Modern and Contemporary France

This study-day will be held on Saturday, 6 May, 10 a.m.–4 p.m., in the Maison Française. Those wishing to attend should register in advance: telephone Oxford (2)74220.

T. CUSSON, European Parliament: `Le Royaume-Uni et l'euro: quelle cohabitation entre esprit anglo-saxon et modèle franco-allemand?'

K. NICOLAIDIS, St Antony's: `Euro-vaches, Euro-corps et Euro-monnaie: l'Europe appelle-t-elle à un axe anglo- française?'


Other meetings

Unless otherwise indicated, the following meetings will be held at the Maison Française.

Sat. 20 May, 9.30 a.m.–6.30 p.m.: `La Belle et la Bête: la naissance et les métamorphoses d'un conte' (in conjunction with the Voltaire Foundation).

Sat. 27 May, 10 a.m.–6.30 p.m.: `Interpretation in law, art, and science.'

Sun. 28 May, 9.30 a.m.–1 p.m.: `L'interprétation de l'image: médias, cinéma.'

Thur. 8 June, 9.30 a.m.–7 p.m.: `Études franco-brittaniques—archéologues et voyageurs' (study-day on Brittany).

Fri. 30 June–Sat. 1 July, Maison Française and Nuffield College: `La républicanisme' (in conjunction with Nuffield College).

Fri. 30 June–Sun. 2 July: `Crossing the Channel for Art's sake! Anglo-French attitudes to the pictorial arts in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries' (in conjunction with the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art and the Voltaire Foundation).

Mon. 3 July–Tue. 4 July, Nuffield College and the Maison Française: `Utilities regulation in Europe' (in conjunction with Nuffield College and the Commissariat Général du Plan).


OXFORD POLICY INSTITUTE

Issues in health sector regulation

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in Queen Elizabeth House.

L. HAWKINS, World Bank
5 May: `Issues in health sector regulation.'

DR D. COSTAIN, BUPA
12 May: `Regulating quality and price in private UK health markets.'

DR M. GRAHAM, Office of Fair Trading
19 May: `Health insurance regulation.'

D. DAWSON, York
25 May: `Rationing and regulation for a cost- effective NHS.'

A. TOWSE, Office of Health Economics
2 June: `Regulation for cost-effectiveness in pharmaceutical markets.'

L. KUMARANAYAKE, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
9 June: `Health sector regulation in developing countries.'

A. DURAN, Tecnicas de Salud, Spain
16 June: `Building a health service in transition economies.'

PROFESSOR C. PROPPER, Bristol
25 June: `The impact of financial incentives on the behaviour of GPs.'


QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

South Asia Day

This meeting will be held on Friday, 2 June, 9 a.m.–6 p.m., in the Blackhall Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

Conveners: Dr Nandini Gooptu, Professor Barbara Harriss- White, and Dr Judith Heyer.

S. MANI, United Nations University, Maastricht
9 a.m.: `An examination of India's efforts in integrating its economy with the rest of the world.'

G. MODY, Centre for Workers' Management, Delhi
10 a.m.: `Manufacturing governance: some historical aspects of Indian industry.'

S. BASU, SOAS, London
11.15 a.m.: `The Calcutta jute-mill strike of 1937 and its impact on Bengal politics.'

R. DASGUPTA
12.15 p.m.: ` "Progressive" literature and Marxism in Bengal in the 1930s.'

D. BHATTACHARYA, Jawaharlal Nehru University
2.15 p.m.: `Issues of hegemony, power, and governance: the Indian Left and its politics in West Bengal.'

V.R. MURALEEDHARAN, IIT, Madras
3.15 p.m.: `Malaria and anti-malarial policies in the Madras presidency: 1850s to 1940s.'

FAZAL-UR-RAHIM, Peshawar University
4.30 p.m.: `The role of Pakistan in conflict resolution in Afghanistan (1995–2000).'


Workshop: themes on labour in South Asia

This meeting will be held on Friday, 26 May, 9 a.m.–6 p.m., in the Blackhall Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

Conveners: Dr Nandini Gooptu, Professor Barbara Harriss- White, and Dr Judith Heyer.

Y. SAMAD, Bradford
9 a.m.: `Structural adjustment and the impact on organised labour in Pakistan.'

J. BANAJI
10 a.m.: `India: workers' rights in a corporate governance perspective.'

R. CHANDAVARKAR, Cambridge
11.15 a.m.: To be announced.

J. GAME, SOAS, London
12.15 p.m.: `The proletariat and the tiger: communal politics and trade unionism in Mumbai.'

J. PARRY, LSE
2.15 p.m.: `Sex, marriage, and industry in contemporary Chhattisgarh.'

P. PARTHASARATHI, Boston College
3.15 p.m.: `Colonialism and labour in early nineteenth century South India' (provisional title).

R. HENSMAN, Bombay
4.30 p.m.: `Organising women workers in the unorganised sector.'


Economic Development Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

Conveners: Professor B. Harriss-White and Professor F. Stewart.

J. BANAJI
4 May: `Investor capitalism and the reshaping of business in India.'

R. KAPLINSKY, Sussex
11 May: `Spreading the gains from globalisation: what can we learn from value-chain analysis?'

J. STEPANEK, Boulder
18 May: `Wringing success from failure in late- developing countries.' (Jointly with CSAE)

M. MOORE, Sussex
25 May: `Tax and political development.'


Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women

Women investigating cross-culturally—Canary Islands, China, Nigeria, South Africa

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House. Those wishing to attend are advised to confirm the arrangements by telephoning Oxford (2)73644.

Conveners: Dr Maria Jaschok and Cecillie Swaisland.

V. WILSON, Victoria and Albert Museum
4 May: `Dress, politics, and Chinese women's histories in the twentieth century.'

C. EMEAGWALI, Connecticut State University
18 May: `Nigerian female entrepeneurs in structurally maladjusted societies.'

R. CHAN
25 May: `Chinese women writers: on self, nationhood, and representations.'

C. SWAISLAND
1 June: `The concentration camps of the South African War—the work of E. Hobhouse and M. Fawcett compared.'

N. ROLDAN, Madrid
8 June: `Working women in Gran Canaria banana plantations: the invisibility of female labour.'

A. COLES
15 June: `Gender as an issue in development organisations: critiques and strategies.'

H. EVANS, Westminster
22 June: `Popular narratives on mothers and daughters: expectations of gender in contemporary China.'


CCRW Commemorative Lecture

S. TOUSSAINT, University of Western Australia, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 10 May, in the Taylor Institution.

Subject: `Interpreting cultural narratives: ethnography, biography, and the paradox of memory.'


Judy Kimble Memorial Lecture

B. GAWANAS, Parliamentary Commissioner, Namibia, will lecture at 5 p.m. Thursday, 15 June, in St Antony's College. This lecture is co- sponsored by the Judy Kimble Memorial Fund and the Professor of Race Relations.

Subject: `Women in political transformation in southern Africa.'


Refugee Studies Centre

Seminars on Forced Migration

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House. They are open to the public and are free of charge.

Enquiries should be directed to Dominique Attala, Refugee Studies Centre, Queen Elizabeth House, 21 St Giles', Oxford OX1 3LA (e-mail: rscedu@qeh.ox.ac.uk, Internet site: http://www.qeh.ox.ac.uk/rsc/).

DR G. BOWMAN, Kent
3 May: `The exilic imagination: the construction of homeland from its outside.'

J. HART, London
10 May: `Refugees or citizens? Children in a Palestinian camp in Jordan.'

M. CANDAPPA, London
24 May: `Extraordinary childhoods: the social lives of refugee children.'

DR J. PEARCE, Bradford
31 May: `Post-war reconstruction in Huehuetenango, Guatemala: by whom? For whom? And for what?'

J. GOODHAND, Manchester
7 June: `Researching under fire: the methodological and ethical challenges of conducting community focused research in war zones.'

DR T. BRINGA, Bergen
14 June: `The victim's witness: reflections on "being an anthropologist" in the midst of war in Bosnia.'

DR K. KOSER, University College, London
21 June: `Human trafficking: the asylum seeker's perspective.'


Elizabeth Colson Lecture

PROFESSOR JUN JING, Beijing, will deliver the Elizabeth Colson Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 17 May, in Rhodes House.

Subject: `Speaking bitterness, seeking justice: a memorial movement on the Yellow River.'


RUSKIN SCHOOL OF DRAWING AND FINE ART

Joseph Beuys Lectures

New media culture: we are the ghosts in the machine

TERRY BRAUN will lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Lecture Theatre, the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory. Admission is free, but numbers are limited. For reservations, telephone Oxford (2)76940.

The lectures are presented in collaboration with the Department of Chemistry, the Educational Technology Resources Centre, and the DA2 Digital Arts Development Agency, and with the support of the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation and Southern Arts.

All lectures will be broadcast simultaneously over the World Wide Web from http://www.ruskin-sch.ox.ac.uk/lab/symposia/beuys/beuys00.html. Instructions on the software required are given at this site.

2 May: `Predicting the past—3,000 years of media history.'

9 May: `Interacting in the present—click here and now.'

16 May: `Re-living the future—those who are prepared for their future can choose to re-live it.'


CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES

Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Wolfson College.

Conveners: Professor D.J. Galligan, Professor of Socio- Legal Studies and Director of the Centre, and Mavis Maclean, Fellow, Wolfson College, and Research Fellow of the Centre.

PROFESSOR M.J. CHURGIN, Texas
1 May: `Shifts in asylum adjudication in the United States and the United Kingdom.'

PROFESSOR J.E. SMITHBURN, Notre Dame
8 May: `The textbook-problems approach: a proposed family law pedagogy.'

DR J. SCHIRATZKI, Stockholm
15 May: `The best interest of the child in Swedish refugee law.'

C. SAWYER, Bristol
22 May: `Hitting people is wrong?'

I. SAUNDERS
29 May: `Damages for loss of earnings by injured women.'

W. HOLMES, Oklahoma City University
5 June: `E-commerce and the environment.'

T. GALLAGHER
12 June: `Compulsory licensing of intellectual property rights.'


WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Mondays in the Wellcome Unit.

Convener: M.H. Pelling, M.Litt., Reader in the Social History of Medicine.

DR S. KNOTT, London
1 May: `Sensibility, nervous theory, and American Revolution.'

DR H. KING, Reading
8 May: `Did Roman medicine exist? Nineteenth- century reconstructions of the Roman past.'

DR J. PATRICK
15 May: `The doctor's dossier: medicine, bureaucracy, and novelistic form in Zola, Huysmans, and George Eliot.'

L. VAUGHAN
22 May: `Torpor in the Fens? William Heberden and the Cambridge medical curriculum in the early eighteenth century.'

DR S. CAVALLO, London
29 May: `Constructing trust and reputation: barber- surgeons in seventeenth-century Turin.'

DR G. GENTILCORE, Leicester
5 June: `Counting charlatans in early modern Italy.'

DR U. RUBLACK, Cambridge
12 June: `How hearts move: embodied notions in early modern Europe.'


STANDING COMMITTEE FOR THE M.ST. IN WOMEN'S STUDIES

Annual Women's Studies Lecture

PROFESSOR T. LAQUEUR, Berkeley, will deliver the annual Women's Studies Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 26 May, in the Auditorium, St John's College.

Subject: `1712 in the history of sexuality and subjectivity.'


EXETER COLLEGE

Marett Memorial Lecture

DR P. VITEBSKY, Assistant Director of Research, the Scott Polar Research Institute, Cambridge, will deliver the Marett Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 5 May, in the Saskatchewan Lecture Room, Exeter College.

Subject: `Forgetting the ancestors: living without the dead.'


GREEN COLLEGE

Medicine: past and present

The following seminars will be held at 6 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Committee Room, Green College.

Conveners: Dr Irvine Loudon and Dr Maureen Malowany.

D. COOK, Whitefield Institute, and U. SCHMIDT, Wellcome Unit
2 May: `Medical ethics and euthanasia.'

M. MCAVAUGH, North Carolina, and T. PATTERSON
23 May: `The art of stitching wounds: suturing past and present.'

C. WEBSTER and J. HORDER
20 June: `From general practice to primary care.'


Alan Emery Lecture

J. NEWSOM-DAVIS, Professor Emeritus, will deliver the Alan Emery Lecture at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, 6 June, in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

Subject: `The myasthenias: an emerging multiplicity of disorders.'


KEBLE COLLEGE

Eric Symes Abbott Memorial Lecture

THE REVD CANON DR MARTYN PERCY, Director of the Lincoln Theological Institute, will deliver the Eric Symes Abbott Memorial Lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Friday, 5 May, in the chapel, Keble College.

Subject: `Knowledge of Angles: how spiritual are the English?'


MANSFIELD COLLEGE AND CHRIST CHURCH

Bonae literae

A one-day colloquium on current research on Renaissance Humanism, sponsored by the Society for Renaissance Studies, will take place on Saturday, 29 April, 10.45–6.30 p.m., in the Council Room, Mansfield College.

Further information may be obtained from Martin McLaughlin (Christ Church) or David Rundle (Mansfield College).

 

10.45 a.m.–1 p.m.

S. BOWD, Manchester Metropolitan: `A monogamous relationship? Christian Humanism and reform in Italy.'

S. AMOS, St Andrews: `New learning, old theology: Renaissance Biblical Humanism, Scripture, and the question of theological method.'

J. FLOOD, London: `The crisis in Greek teaching at the University of Heidelberg around 1530.'

 

2.30–4 p.m.

I. BEJCZY, Nijmegen: ` Historia praestat omnibus disciplinis: Juan Luis Vives and his theory of history.'

W. STENHOUSE, University College, London: `Georg Fabricius and inscriptions as a source of law.'

 

4.30–6 p.m.

D. MARSH, Rutgers: `Aesop and the Humanists: the Quattrocento apologue.'

R. CHAVASSE, Rowlands Castle: `The studia humanitatis and the making of a humanist career: M.A. Sabellico (1436?–1506).'


ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

European Studies Centre

The divided past: rewriting post-war German histories

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in 70 Woodstock Road.

Conveners: Professor C. Klessmann and Mr A.J. Nicholls.

PROFESSOR KLESSMANN, ZZF Potsdam
5 May: `Workers in the Workers' State: German traditions, the Soviet model, and the magnetic attraction of West Germany.'

DR T. LINDENBERGER, ZZF Potsdam
12 May: `Everyday history: new approaches to the history of the post-war Germanies.'

DR M. SABROW, ZZF Potsdam
19 May: `Confrontation and co-operation: relations between two German historiographies.'

DR D. WIERLING, Berlin
26 May: `Generation and generational conflicts in East and West Germany.'

PROFESSOR W. BENZ, Technical University, Berlin
2 June: `Antisemitism and philosemitism in the divided Germany.'

DR I. MERKEL, Humboldt University, Berlin
9 June: `Sex and gender in the divided Germany: approaches to history from a cultural point of view.'

PROFESSOR D. POLLACK, Europa University, Viadrina, Frankfurt/Oder
16 June: `Secularisation in Eastern and Western Germany after 1945.'

PROFESSOR K.H. JARAUSCH, ZZF, Potsdam
23 June: `Living with catastrophe: mending broken memories.'


Greek history and politics

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in 70 Woodstock Road.

Convener: R. Clogg, MA, Senior Research Fellow, St Antony's College.

DR N. DOUMANIS, Sydney
2 May: `Pluralism and stability in the late Ottoman Empire: Greeks, Turks, and communal co-existence.'

DR S. SEFERIADES, Cambridge
9 May: `The coercive impulse: state apparatus and labour repression in inter-war Greece.'

DR L.B. CHISACOFF, Institute for South-East European Studies, Bucharest
16 May: `Zagora and the Greek Enlightenment in the second half of the eighteenth century.'


Middle East Centre

Shell Conference on Iranian Foreign Policy

This conference will be held on 12 and 13 May in the Middle East Centre/New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

 

Friday, 12 May: Domestic sources of Iran's foreign policy

PROFESSOR M. MESBAHI, Florida International
2.30 p.m.: `Introduction: domestic factors and the genesis of the project.'

PROFESSOR F. RAJAEE, Carleton
3 p.m.: `Identity and foreign policy.'

DR H. MOSHIRZADEH, Tehran
3.30 p.m.: `Islam, ideology, and foreign policy.'

DR H. SEMATI, Tehran
4.15 p.m.: `Decision making institutions and foreign policy.'

DR N. HADIAN, Tehran
4.45 p.m.: `Factions, factionalism, and foreign policy.'

 

Saturday, 13 May: Iran's regional policy: the Caspian Basin and the Persian Gulf

PROFESSOR M. MESBAHI, Florida International
10 a.m.: `Iran's foreign policyi towards the post- Soviet space: a conceptual framework.'

DR N. GHORBAN, Caspian Studies, Tehran
10.30 a.m.: `Iran and the dynamics of the Caspian energy.'

DR E. HERZIG, Manchester
11 a.m.: `Iran and the Transcaucasus: Armenia and Azerbaijan.'

DR S. CHUBIN, Geneva Centre for Security Policy
2.30 p.m.: `Iran and security in the Persian Gulf.'

DR G. SICK, Columbia
3 p.m.: `Iran and the Persian Gulf: the US factor.'

DR F. BIN SALMAN AL-SAUD, King Saud University
3.30 p.m.: `Saudi–Iranian relations.'

DR K. SAJJADPOUR, Director, Institute for Political and International Studies (Iran's Ministry of Foreign Affairs)
5 p.m: `Iran's regional policy.' (Keynote lecture)


Hamid Enayat Lecture

DR H. KATOUZIAN will deliver the seventeenth Hamid Enayat Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 11 May, in the New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College. The lecture will be followed by a reception in the Middle East Centre.

Subject: `European liberalisms and modern conceptions of liberty in Iran.'


ST EDMUND HALL

Philip Geddes Memorial Lecture

JEREMY PAXMAN will deliver the Philip Geddes Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 5 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Surviving spin.'


ST HUGH'S COLLEGE

Henry Rowlatt Bickley Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR ROGER PARKER, Cambridge, will deliver the seventeenth Henry Rowlatt Bickley Memorial Lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 16 May, in the Mordan Hall, St Hugh's College.

Subject: `Elisabeth's last act: Verdian history and the close of Don Carlos.'


Becket Institute

The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Becket Institute, St Hugh's College.

DR J. ANDERSON
3 May: `National churches in time of change: the search for recognition in comparative perspective.'

DR A. O'MAHONEY, Heythrop College, University of London
10 May: `The Copts, politics, and Muslim–Christian relations in modern Egypt.'


TRINITY COLLEGE

Margaret Howard Lecture

THE HON. MICHAEL BELOFF, QC, President, Trinity College, will deliver the Margaret Howard Lecture at 5.45 p.m. on Thursday, 18 May, in the Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building. Admission is free.

Subject: `Advocacy as art.'


Chatham Lectures

Trinity Term

SEN. GARY HART will deliver the second Chatham Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 1 June, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building. Admission is free.

Subject: `The future of Anglo-American relations.'

Michaelmas Term

THE RT. HON. CHRISTOPHER PATTEN will deliver the third Chatham Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 26 October, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building. Admission is free.

Subject: `The future of East–West relations.'


WOLFSON COLLEGE

Isaiah Berlin Lecture

PROFESSOR ORLANDO FIGES will deliver the annual Isaiah Berlin Lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 25 May, in the Hall, Wolfson College. The lecture is open to the public.

Subject: `The cultural tradition of St Petersburg.'


FRIENDS OF THE BODLEIAN

The following thirty-minute lectures will be given at 1 p.m. on the days shown in the Cecil Jackson Room, the Sheldonian Theatre.

Wine and sandwiches will be served after the lectures at a cost of £2.50 per person, for which bookings should be made in advance with Mrs P.M. Sturgis, Membership Secretary, Friends of the Bodleian, Bodleian Library, Oxford OX1 3BG (telephone: Oxford (2)77234).

THE REVD PROFESSOR M.A. SCREECH
Wed. 17 May: `Montaigne's own copy of Lucretius.'

R. MCNEIL
Tue. 13 June: `The body in the library.'


FRIENDS OF THE PITT RIVERS MUSEUM

The following lectures will be given as shown. Visitors are welcome to attend, but are requested to make a contribution of £2 to the Friends' Purchasing Fund.

DR I. FINKEL, Assistant Keeper, Department of Western Asiatic Antiquities, British Museum
Wed. 17 May, Inorganic Chemistry Lecture Theatre, 7 p.m.: `Tales of the unexpected: board games ancient and modern.'

J. GILLOW, author and lecturer
Wed. 14 June, Pitt Rivers Research Centre (64 Banbury Road), 6 p.m.: `Hill tribes of south-western China.'


TURECK BACH RESEARCH FOUNDATION

Structure and embellishment

The fourth annual symposium of the Tureck Bach Research Foundation will be held on Saturday, 13 May, and Sunday, 14 May, in Worcester College. Admission is free to graduates and senior members of the University.

Details of the afternoon lecture on Sunday will be announced later.

Enquiries should be directed to Windrush House, Davenant Road, Oxford OX2 8BX (telephone: Oxford 515760, fax: 512620).

Saturday, 13 May: Embellishment

DR K. GOEBS
10 a.m.: `Structure and embellishment in Egyptian art.'

DR J. RAWSON
11 a.m.: `Chinese ornament, the Lotus and the Dragon.'

DR R. TURECK
2 p.m.: `Embellishment in Bach and Chinese and Indian music.'

PROFESSOR B. MANDELBROT, Yale
3 p.m.: `Fractal embellishment.'

 

Sunday, 14 May: Structure

DR A. WOOLFSON, Cambridge
10.30 a.m.: `Are living things computable?'

PROFESSOR R. STEVENSON, UCLA
11.30 a.m.: `Embellishment, the performer's glory in sixteenth-century Spain.'




Grants and Research Funding

Contents of this section:

[ Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue


RESEARCH AND EQUIPMENT COMMITTEE

Joint Research Equipment Initiative (JREI)

The closing date for applications to the 2000 JREI competition is Wednesday, 31 May. The competition rules have been published and are available with the application form at http://www.hefce.ac.uk/initiat/jrei. The Research and Equipment Committee is able to make available up to £550K to support applications and has circulated copies of the competition rules to heads and administrators of relevant departments, together with advice on university procedures for internal clearance of bids.

The deadline for receipt of drafts of bids to Competition A seeking Research and Equipment Committee support funds, and all bids to Competition B, was Friday, 24 March.

Remaining competition A bids should be sent to the committee's secretary, Dr Jane Sherwood, University Offices, by Friday, 12 May, for signature by the relevant university authorities.


RADHAKRISHNAN MEMORIAL BEQUEST

The trustees of the bequest may make small grants to students at Oxford who are citizens of the Republic of India, and who, because of unexpected difficulties, need financial assistance to complete the qualifications for which they are registered. Grants will not normally be awarded to those near to the beginning of their course of study. Application forms may be obtained from Mrs A. Slater, the Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE. the closing date for receipt of applications is Friday, 2 June.


SASAKAWA FUND

Applications are invited for grants from the Sasakawa Fund, to be applied to `the advancement within the University of knowledge and understanding of Japan by way of academic contact and exchange between members of the University and citizens of Japan'. Further details may be obtained from Mrs A. Slater, the Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE, to whom applications should be returned by the end of the fourth week in each term.


HAYTER FUND

Grants from the Hayter Fund are made to holders of established university posts for travel and research purposes connected with the languages and the economic, social, and political development of the following areas: the former Soviet Union and eastern Europe, the Middle East, Africa, south Asia, east Asia, and Latin America. Application forms and further details may be obtained from Mrs A. Slater, the Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE. The closing date for applications is the end of fifth week in each term.


GRIFFITH EGYPTOLOGICAL FUND

Applications are invited from graduate students registered for a degree of the University, and members of Congregation engaged in Egyptological research or publicaiton, for grants from the Griffith Egyptological Fund. The fund exists for `the promotion of research into the history and antiquities of Egypt and the Nile Valley and the anthropology of north-east Africa so far as it concerns the study of Ancient, Hellenistic, and Christian Egypt and the early pagan and Christian kingdoms of the Nilotic Sudan, including such linguistic, religious, and cultural survivals as may throw light upon these matters, but excluding special studies of Muhammadanism and Islamic art.' Funds may be awarded for research and field trips in Egyptology, attendance at conferences, and the preparation of publication materials.

Application forms and further details (which prospective applicants must consult before they apply) are available from Mrs Alix Slater, the Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE. They can also be found on the Near Eastern Studies Programme Web site, http://users.ox.ac.uk~nearest/grants.htm. The closing date for applications is the Friday of third week of each term.


BRITISH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE IN GERMANY SCHOLARSHIPS 2000–1

The Scholarship Foundation of the British Chamber of Commerce in Germany is offering a limited number of scholarships, of various amounts, for British nationals studying at graduate or undergraduate level, who intend to study at a German university for the 2000–1 academic year.

Application forms are available from the British Chamber of Commerce in Germany Foundation, Severinstrasse 60, D—50678 Cologne, Germany (telephone: 00 49 221 31 44 58, fax: 00 49 221 31 53 35). Completed application forms should be submitted between 1 April and 30 June.


THE ELIZABETH TUCKERMAN SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS 2000–1

A number of educational grants are available for residents of Wales, who have graduated from a university or college located in the UK or USA, to further their postgraduate education at a college or university located in the USA.

Each award will normally cover the cost of tuition, books, and living expenses for one semester, and travel from the UK to the US.

Further details and an application form can be obtained from the International Office, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: Oxford (2)70241). Completed applications must reach the International Office by 1 June at the latest.




Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[ Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue


ANNUAL ELECTION OF MEMBERS OF BOARDS OF FACULTIES (8 JUNE): VACANCIES

Notice is hereby given under Ch. II, Sect. VI, § 5 (Statutes, 1997, p. 243) of impending vacancies for official and ordinary members of boards of faculties, as set out below. Qualification for official and ordinary membership is as set out in §§ 1 and 2 of that section (pp. 243-6). Those entitled to nominate and vote in these elections are:

(a) for official members, all the members of the faculty concerned, and

(b) for ordinary members, the membership of the faculty concerned, exclusive of those qualified to be official members of the faculty board.

Nominations in writing by two electors will be received by the Head Clerk, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD, up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 15 May, and nominations by six electors up to 4 p.m. on Tuesday, 30 May. There is no special form but, in addition to the signatures of nominators, nominations must state, in block capitals, the name and initials, and college (or, if no college, the department) of (1) each person nominated, and (2) each nominator.

Note:

Under the provisions of Ch. Sect. VI, § 4, cl. 5, the electors of ordinary members of the following boards of faculties have directed by by-law that no ordinary member shall be eligible to serve for more than three successive periods of two years:

English Language and Literature, Law, Oriental Studies.

Faculty Board: Anthropology and Geography

Official members - vacancies: Four

Retiring members: Professor Goudie, Dr O'Hanlon, Professor Parkin, Professor Peach

Period from MT 2000: 2 years

Ordinary members - vacancies: Five

Retiring members: Dr Boyce, Professor Clark, Dr Preston, Mr Stokes, Dr Whittaker

Period from MT 2000: 2 years


Faculty Board: English Language and Literature

Official members - vacancies: Four

Retiring members: Professor Carey, Professor Godden, Dr O'Donoghue, Professor Strohm

Period from MT 2000: 2 years

Ordinary members - vacancies: Six

Retiring members: Dr Black, *Ms Johnson, *Dr Mapstone, Dr Newlyn, Mr Paulin, Dr Pitcher

Period from MT 2000: 2 years


Faculty Board: Law

Official members - vacancies: Four

Retiring members: Professor Ashworth, Professor Galligan, Professor Hood, Professor Markesinis

Period from MT 2000: 2 years

Ordinary members - vacancies: Six

Retiring members: Mr Child, Ms de Moor, Mr Gardner, *Mr Hackney, Dr Ibbetson, Mr Tur

Period from MT 2000: 2 years


Faculty Board: Literae Humaniores

Official members - vacancies: Five

Retiring members: Professor Frede, Professor Millar, Professor Wiggins, Professor Winterbottom, Professor J.P. Griffin

Period from MT 2000: 2 years

Ordinary members - vacancies: Six

Retiring members: Dr Atherton, Dr Avramides, Professor Ayers, Dr Bowie, Dr Lovibond, Dr Rutherford

Period from MT 2000: 2 years


Faculty Board: Management

Members - vacancies: Two

Retiring members: Dr Darbishire, Dr Dopson

Period from MT 2000: 2 years


Faculty Board: Modern History

Official members - vacancies: Four

Retiring members: Professor Brown, Professor Evans, Professor Kemp, Professor O'Neill

Period from MT 2000: 2 years

Ordinary members - vacancies: Six

Retiring members: Mr Davies, Dr Parrott, Dr Rubin, Dr Service, Dr Stevenson, Mr Wormald

Period from MT 2000: 2 years


Faculty Board: Music

Official members - vacancies: Three

Retiring members: Dr Franklin, Dr La Rue, Dr Marston

Period from MT 2000: 2 years


Faculty Board: Oriental Studies

Official members - vacancies: Four

Retiring members: Professor Dudbridge, Professor Thomson, Professor Sanderson, Professor Williamson

Period from MT 2000: 2 years

Ordinary members - vacancies: Six

Retiring members: Professor Gurney, Dr McMullen, *Dr Powell, Mr Richards, Dr Treadwell, one vacancy

Period from MT 2000: 2 years


Faculty Board: Social Studies

Official members - vacancies: Four

Retiring members: Dr Gambetta, Professor Klemperer, Professor Malcomson, Professor Shlaim

Period from MT 2000: 2 years

Ordinary members - vacancies: Six

Retiring members: Dr Bowles, Dr Ceadel, Mr Hay, Professor King, Professor Muellbauer, Dr Rosen

Period from MT 2000: 2 years


Faculty Board: Theology

Official members - vacancies: Three

Retiring members: Professor O'Donovan, Professor Rowland, Professor Swinburne

Period from MT 2000: 2 years

Ordinary members - vacancies: Five

Retiring members: Dr Cross, Professor MacCulloch, Mr Morgan, Mr Southwell, Dr Tuckett

Period from MT 2000: 2 years

*Ineligible for re-election having served three successive periods as an ordinary member.

 


GENERAL BOARD OF THE FACULTIES

Appointments by the Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Corrigendum

In the list of appointments by the Clinical Medicine Board, published in Gazette, p. 960 (16 March), delete `Pat L.N. Yudkin, BA, D.Phil.', and substitute `Patricia L.N. Yudkin, MA, D.Phil.'


BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF CLINICAL MEDICINE

The Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine has conferred the title of University Research Lecturer on the following:

MR TREVOR LAMBERT, Statistician and Study Co-ordinator, Unit of Health-Care Epidemiology;

DR JOHN LOUGHLIN, Arthritis Research Campaign Research Fellow, Institute of Molecular Medicine;

DR CHRISTOPHER NORBURY, ICRF Research Scientist, Institute of Molecular Medicine;

DR STEPHEN SMITH, Head of Image Analysis, FMRIB, Department of Clinical Neurology;

DR IRENE TRACEY, Head, Applications and Pain Group, FMRIB, Department of Clinical Neurology.


BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

The Board of the Faculty of Physiological Sciences has conferred the title of University Research Lecturer on the following:

DR DEBORAH CLARKE, Senior Departmental Teaching Assistant, Department of Human Anatomy;

DR PETER KOHL, Royal Society University Research Fellow, University Laboratory of Physiology;

DR ANANT BHIKHU PARESH, Wellcome Trust Career Development Fellow, University Department of Physiology;

DR SUSAN TOTTERDELL, Research Scientist, University Department of Pharmacology;

DR STEPHEN TUCKER, Wellcome Trust Research Career Development Fellow, University Laboratory of Physiology;

DR ROBERT WILKINS, Arthritis Research Campaign Research Fellow, University Laboratory of Physiology.


BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES: SUB-FACULTY OF BIOLOGY

Honour School of Natural Science—Biological Sciences 2001

Under the terms of the regulations for the above examination (see Examination Decrees, 1999, pp. 421–5), the Sub- faculty of Biology has approved the following topics for extended essays in Part A of the Honour School examinations for 2001.

Animal Biology

1. Discuss how Tinbergen's `four questions' have shaped the study of animal behaviour.

2. Discuss the key organisational principles of the nervous system.

3. Write an essay on the biomechanics of animal flight.

4. Write an essay on adaptive regulatory systems.

Plant and microbial biology

1. Review the advantages and disadvantages of hermaphrodite flowers. How have the disadvantages of such flowers been minimised in the evolution of modern angiosperms?

2. Discuss the ways in which the genetic modification of plants might be used to improve human health.

3. What are the implications of cellular compartmentation for the acquisition of carbon and nitrogen by terrestrial plants?

4. Which features of their cell biology make fungi important in nitrogen and phosphorus acquisition by plants?

5. What has mutant analysis told us about the establishment of the plant body?

Environmental biology

1. Is the Millennium seed bank a waste of £84 million?

2. You are given 250 seeds from the last remaining twenty-four plants of Euphorbia stygiana. What would you do with them and why?

3. Are small populations really under greater threat of extinction than large populations?

4. Is a active habitat management a better use of resources than spending millions trying to save one particular species?

5. It has been proposed that the natural recovery of otter populations in the UK may save the water vole from extinction at the hands of the American mink. What general principles are involved in the interactions among these species, and how do you evaluate this proposal?

Cell and developmental biology

1. Simple organisms like yeast have proved to be useful for studying cellular processes. What areas of cell biology cannot be explained in such systems?

2. Increases in cytosolic free calcium occur in many cell types but with very different consequences. Why is this?

3. How are proteins transported across the nuclear membrane? Why is regulation of this process important?

4. How has determination of the three-dimensional structure of membrane proteins enlightened our understanding of ion transport?

5. How and why do cells manipulate the extracellular environment of themselves and their neighbours?

Biology of animal and plant disease

1. How would YOU design a future control strategy for bovine tuberculosis?

2. What impact do you think global warming will have on infectious disease?

3. Write a review on anti-schictosome immune responses in man. Show how using rodent experimental models complicated the understanding of these responses.

4. Does genetic modification offer an attractive prospect for the design of disease resistance in plants?

5. Discuss the evolution by the birth-and-death process in multigene families of the vertebrate and plant immune systems.


CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties and committees will come into effect on 12 May.

1 Board of the Faculty of English Language and Literature

M.Phil. English Studies

(i) With effect from 1 October 2000

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 585, ll. 36, 40, 45, replace `Friday' in each of the lines in question with `Thursday'.


(ii) With effect from 1 October 2001

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 584, delete from `He will be required' in l. 18 to the end of l. 21, and substitute:

`Any candidate may be examined viva voce, at the discretion of the examiners.'

2 Ibid., delete from `Candidates' in l. 41 to `compulsory' in l. 1 on p. 585, and substitute:

`Candidates will be required to offer a thesis of about 20,000 words, on some topic[1] approved by the board or by a person or persons to whom it may delegate the function of giving such approval, save that candidates in courses (i) and (ii) may be allowed, in exceptional circumstances, to offer a third paper in Group B instead of the thesis. A thesis involving the edition of a text may, if the candidate so wishes, exceed 20,000 words by not more than the length of the text.

3 Ibid., p. 585, delete from `All candidates' in l. 29 to `Group A' in l. 30 and substitute:

`Any candidate may be examined viva voce on the subjects of Group A.'

4 Ibid., delete from l. 32 to `exam in Eighth week' in l. 46 and substitute:

`5. The method of examination of the subjects of Group B will be by library paper. Candidates must offer two papers (or three if they are not offering an optional thesis), and answer two questions per paper. One list of questions for each B option they have selected will be delivered to candidates' colleges on the Friday of the Fifth Week of Trinity Term. After this date, candidates are prohibited from approaching their supervisors (or any other person) for advice or guidance. Candidates offering two B options must submit a completed library paper for each option to the Schools by noon on Friday of the Seventh Week of Trinity Term. Regulations for candidates offering three B options will be as above, except that in addition they must hand in a library paper for their third B option to the Schools by noon on Friday of Eighth week.'

5 Ibid., p. 586, delete ll. 5–6 and substitute:

`6. Any candidate may be examined viva voce about the extended essays and library papers.'

6 Ibid., after l. 9 insert:

`8. No candidate who has failed any of the above subjects will be awarded the degree in that examination. Candidates failing up to two subjects will be required to resit only those two; candidates failing more than two will be required to resubmit the written work specified for each of the above subjects.'


2 Boards of the Faculties of English Language and Literature and Literae Humaniores

Honour School of Classics and English

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 143, l. 2, insert `(v) Old and Early Middle Irish Language and Literature (Course II B23)'.

2 Ibid., ll. 5–6, re-letter existing entries (v)–(x) to (w)–(y).


3 Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores

(a) Final Honour School of Literae Humaniores

(i) With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 255, delete l. 41 and l. 44.

2 Ibid., p. 256, delete l. 13.

3 Ibid., l. 14, delete `I'.

4 Ibid., l. 15, delete `Life of Augustus'.

5 Ibid., delete ll. 16–17.

6 Ibid., l. 50, delete `Annals XIII–XVI'.

7 Ibid., delete l. 52.

8 Ibid., p. 259, delete ll. 13–14 and substitute:

`Optional passages for comment will be set from these texts in translation, and from In Catilinam I (Loeb) and De Finibus 1.1–12 (OCT) in Latin only'.


(ii) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 271, delete ll. 1–3 and substitute:

`4. Every thesis shall be the candidate's own work. Tutors may, however, assist candidates by discussing with them, for example, the field of study, the sources available, the bibliography, and the method of presentation, and may also read and comment on drafts. The amount of assistance'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 15–16 and substitute:

`6. No thesis shall exceed 10,000 words, the limit to include all notes and appendices but not including the bibliography.'

3 Ibid., l. 23, insert `firmly' before `bound'.

4 Ibid., l. 24, delete `or held firmly in a stiff cover'.

5 Ibid., delete the sentence beginning `Any candidate' on l. 25.


(iii) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 246, delete ll. 27–8.


(b) Honour Moderations in Classics

(i) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 34, delete ll. 5–8 and substitute:

`One paper (three hours). The paper will be divided into two main sections:

(a) part (i) exercises designed to test Greek accidence and syntax; part (ii) questions on selected passages from D.A. Russell, An Anthology of Greek Prose (OUP 1991), nos. 17, 18, 23, 24, 33, 40, 44, 66, 78;

(b) a passage for translation into Greek prose. Candidates will be required to offer either both parts of (a) or (b).'

2 Ibid., delete ll. 11–14 and substitute:

`One paper (three hours). The paper will be divided into two main sections:

(a) part (i) exercises designed to test Latin accidence and syntax; part (ii) questions on selected passages from D.A. Russell, An Anthology of Latin Prose (OUP 1991), nos. 7, 12, 22, 23, 34, 52, 63;

(b) a passage for translation into Latin prose. Candidates will be required to offer either both parts of (a) or (b).'


(ii) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 36, delete ll. 25–30 and substitute:

`One paper (three hours). The paper will consist of two main sections:

(a) part (i) exercises designed to test Greek accidence and syntax; part (ii) translation into Greek of a short passage of English;

(b) translation into Greek of a longer passage of English. Candidates are required to offer either both parts of (a) or (b). The passages set will be related, in their demands of vocabulary and syntax, to the Greek prose literature used in the elementary Greek instruction provided for the course.'

2 Ibid., p. 40, delete ll. 6–11 and substitute:

`One paper (three hours). The paper will consist of two main sections:

(a) part (i) exercises designed to test Latin accidence and syntax; part (ii) translation into Latin of a short passage of English;

(b) translation into Latin of a longer passage of English. Candidates are required to offer either both parts of (a) or (b). The passages set will be related, in their demands of vocabulary and syntax, to the Latin prose literature used in the elementary Latin instruction provided for the course'.


(iii) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 34, l. 15, delete `OR PROSE COMPOSITION'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 20–1 and also delete the footnote.

3 Ibid., l. 22, replace (c) with (b).

4 Ibid., p. 36, l. 33, delete `OR PROSE COMPOSITION'.

5 Ibid., p. 38, l. 4, delete `OR PROSE COMPOSITION'.

6 Ibid., p. 40, l. 12, delete `OR PROSE COMPOSITION'.

7 Ibid., p. 41, l. 23, delete `OR PROSE COMPOSITION'.


(c) M.Phil. in Greek and/or Roman History

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 610, delete ll. 35–40 and substitute:

`(b) For options in topics and techniques, Schedules B and C below, candidates will be required to pre-submit two essays of not more than 5,000 words in length, which between them display knowledge of more than a narrow range of the topic covered by the course.'

2 Ibid., l. 42, delete `submitted in lieu of written papers'.

3 Ibid., l. 46, delete the sentence beginning `Candidates who have not'.


(d) M.St. in Greek and/or Roman History

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 688, delete ll. 5–10 and substitute:

`(b) For options in topics and techniques, Schedules B and C below, candidates will be required to pre-submit two essays of not more than 5,000 words in length, which between them display knowledge of more than a narrow range of the topic covered by the course.'

2 Ibid., l. 12, delete `submitted in lieu of written papers'.

3 Ibid., l. 16, delete the sentence beginning `Candidates who have not'.


(e) Master of Philosophy in Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 607, ll. 38–9, delete `Graduate Studies Committee in Classics' and substitute:

`Administrator, Classics Centre, 67 St Giles', Oxford OX1 3LU'.


(f) Master of Studies in Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 684, after l. 2 insert:

`3. The choice of options for the examination will be subject to the approval of the candidate's supervisor and the Graduate Studies Committee in Classics, having regard to the candidate's previous experience, the range covered by the chosen options, and the availability of teaching and examining resources. The options which the candidate wishes to offer must be submitted to the Administrator, Classics Centre, 67 St Giles', Oxford OX1 3LU for approval not later than the Friday of the first week of Michaelmas Full Term. The title of any dissertation, if not already approved, should be submitted not later than the Friday of the fifth week of Michaelmas Full Term. Not all options may be available in any given year.' and renumber subsequent clauses 3–5 as 4–6.

2 Ibid., l. 8, before `The essays' insert `two of'.

3 Ibid., l. 9, delete `Graduate Studies Committee in Classics' and substitute:

`Administrator, Classics Centre, 67 St Giles', Oxford OX1 3LU'.

4 Ibid., l. 10, delete `Friday' and substitute `Monday'.

5 Ibid., after `Term' insert:

`Where a second set of two presubmitted essays are to be offered, candidates should forward titles of these through their supervisor to the Administrator, Classics Centre, 67 St Giles', Oxford OX1 3LU.'

6 Ibid., l. 16, after `below' insert:

`to the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG'.

7 Ibid., p. 687, delete ll. 37–45.


4 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and Mathematical Sciences

Honour School of Mathematics and Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 480, delete ll. 7–13 and substitute:

`In Part I, candidates are required to take subjects 102 and 122, and in addition are required to take at least one and not more than three subjects chosen from among subjects 101, 103–18, 120. A candidate who takes only three subjects in Philosophy in Part I cannot offer Option (i) Mathematics in Part II. A candidate who takes five subjects in Philosophy in Part I cannot offer Option (iii) Philosophy in Part II. In Part II, candidates who offer Option (ii) Mathematics and Philosophy are required to take two subjects, and candidates who offer Option (iii) Philosophy are required to offer four subjects, from among subjects 101, 103–18, 120, 198, 199, in conformity with the condition that no subject may be offered in both Part I and Part II.'


5 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and Modern Languages

(a) Preliminary Examination in Philosophy and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 100, after l. 29 insert:

`Provided that a candidate who fails one only of the papers in (1) above may offer in a subsequent examination or subsequent examinations, the paper in which he or she has failed.'


(b) Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 473, after l. 37 insert:

`Candidates who also offer paper 108, The Philosophy of Logic and Language, may not answer certain questions which will be starred'.

2 Ibid., p. 475, after l. 27 insert:

`Candidates may answer no more than one question on Kant's moral philosophy.'

3 Ibid., p. 478, l. 27, delete `a first draft' and substitute `drafts'.

4 Ibid., l. 44, delete `, and must be bound or held firmly in a stiff cover'.

5 Ibid., p. 480, delete ll. 24–9 and substitute:

`Where subject 199 is taken, every candidate shall submit his or her application for approval of the subject to the chairman of the Sub-faculty of Philosophy, c/o The Administrator, Philosophy Centre, 10 Merton Street, Oxford OX1 4JJ, not earlier than the first day of Trinity Full Term two years before the term of the written examination in the case of candidates planning to spend a year abroad.'


6 Board of the Faculty of Management

M.Sc. in Industrial Relations and Human Resource management

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 770, delete l. 32 and substitute:

`either 7a. European Employment Law or 7b. International Economic Law and Labour Rights'.

2 Ibid., p. 772, delete ll. 3–8 and substitute:

`7a. European Employment Law [as specified for the M.Phil. in Law], 7b. International Economic Law and Labour Rights [as specified for the M.Phil. in Law]'.


7 Boards of the Faculties of Management and Social Studies

Honour School of Economics and Management

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 164, delete ll. 36–46, and substitute:

`(2) Either

(a) Organisational Behaviour and Analysis The individual in the organisation; motivation and job satisfaction; groups at work; decision making; gender; organisational strategy and structure; the organisational environment; managerial work and behaviour; leadership; culture; power, conflict and change; contemporary and comparative approaches.

Or

(b) Employment Relations The structure and management of the employment relationship, including its environment, and economic and social consequences; human resource strategy and style; systems of collective representation; trade union objectives and organisation; pay systems and performance appraisal; explicit and psychological contracts; the management of co-operation and conflict; employee involvement, participation and team working; technology, work design and work organisation; job regulation; the utilisation of human resources; training and performance; contemporary and comparative approaches to the management of employees.'

2 Ibid., p. 166, l. 37, delete `and' and substitute `but not'.


8 Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences

(a) Honour School of Computer Science

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 157, ll. 23–4, delete `Section a and Paper b1' and substitute `Papers a1–a6, and b1'.

2 Ibid., p. 160, delete ll. 33–50, and substitute:

`Paper I.6: Numerical Analysis

No practicals. Papers of 3 hours.

Interpolation and approximation of functions: Language and Hermite interpolation, applications to quadrature, error analysis. Global polynominal approximation in the Lµ and L2 norms: inner product spaces; orthogonal polynomials, Gauss quadrature, trapezoidal rule for periodic functions. Piecewise polynominal approximation: linear and Hermite cubic splines, B-splines. Aitken and Richardson extrapolation, Romberg integration. Numerical linear algebra: Gaussian elimination, pivoting, and PA=LU decomposition; Cholesky factorisation. Householder reflectors, QR factorisation, least-squares problems. Eigenvalue decomposition, Gershgorin's theorem. Eigenvalue algorithms for symmetric matrices: tridiagonalisation, QR algorithm. Introduction to nonlinear systems and optimisation: Newton's method for systems of equations; Newton's method for multivariate minimisation; numerical approximation of Jacobian matrices; BFGS quasi-Newton iteration.'


(b) Honour School of Mathematical Sciences

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 279, l. 17, delete `six' and substitute `seven'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 24–36, and substitute:

`2 (a) Every candidate shall either take eight papers or take seven papers and submit an extended essay.

(b) Every candidate shall take Paper a1 and Paper a2 and at least two of Papers a3–a7.

(c) Every candidate shall take at least one but not more than three papers from Section b.

(d) Every candidate shall take at least one but not more than two papers from Section o.'

3 Ibid., l. 37, delete `Each paper from Section a' and substitute `Each of papers a1–a6'.

4 Ibid., p. 280, delete l. 1 and substitute `(c) Paper b8 will contain seven questions'.

5 Ibid., delete l. 5, and re-letter (f) as (e).

6 Ibid., l. 6, delete `Paper o1 and'.

7 Ibid., l. 14, delete `Eachɢ10' and substitute `Each paper from b1–b8'.

8 Ibid., delete ll. 16–18 and substitute:

`5. Each of papers a1–a6, b1–b7, b10 will be of three hours' duration; Paper b8 will be of two and a half hours' duration.'

9 Ibid., l. 19, delete `Papers b8, b9, and o1' and substitute `Paper b8'.

10 Ibid., l. 21, delete `Concerning Paper b8, the' and substitute `The'.

11 Ibid., delete ll. 24–6 and re-letter (c) and (d) as (b) and (c).

12 Ibid., l. 35, delete `and (b)' and delete `(c)' and substitute `(b)'.

13 Ibid., p. 284, after l. 40, insert:

`Paper a7: Numerical Analysis (as specified for paper I.6 of the FHS of Computer Science).'

14 Ibid., p. 288, l. 12, delete `Numerical Analysis' and substitute `Numerical Solution of Differential Equations'.

15 Ibid., delete ll. 13–34, and substitute `(as specified for paper b9 in FHS of Mathematics and Computer Science)'.


(c) Honour School of Mathematics

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first Part I examination in 2002 and first Part II examination in 2003)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 291, delete ll. 30–6 and substitute:

`2(a) Every candidate shall take eight papers in Part I.

(b) Every candidate shall take paper a1 and Paper a2 and shall also take three or four papers from Papers a3–a7.

(c) Every candidate shall take two or three papers from Section b.'

2 Ibid., p. 292, l. 3, delete `Papers b8 and b9' and substitute `Paper b8'.

3 Ibid., delete l. 6.

4 Ibid., l. 10, delete `Eachɢ10' and substitute `Each paper from b1–b8'.

5 Ibid., l. 12, delete `Papers b8, b9, and o1' and substitute `Paper b8'.

6 Ibid., delete ll. 19–22 and reletter (c) and (d) as (b) and (c).

7 Ibid., l. 30, delete `and (b)' and delete `(c)' and substitute `(b)'.

8 Ibid., p. 294, delete ll. 20–2 and substitute:

`8. The duration of papers in sections a, b, o shall be as prescribed for the FHS of Mathematical Sciences; each of papers c1–c4 will be of three hours' duration; Paper c5 will be of two hours' duration.'


(d) Pass School of Mathematics

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first Part I examination in 2002 and first Part II examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 294, l. 34, delete `and o'.


(e) Honour School of Mathematics and Computer Science

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 295, l. 33, delete `Sections a, b, I and II (MC)' and substitute `Sections a(MC), b(MC), I and II(MC)'.

2 Ibid., p. 295, ll. 33–5, delete `The papers of Sections a and bɍathematics.' and substitute `The papers of Sections a(MC) will be Papers a1–a6 of the Final Honour School of Mathematical Sciences. The papers of Section b(MC) will be Papers b1–b8 and b10 of the Final Honour School of Mathematical Sciences, together with those set out in the Schedule.'

3 Ibid., p. 296, l. 8, delete `Section a' and substitute `Section a(MC)'.

4 Ibid., l. 9, delete `Section b' and substitute `Section b(MC)'.

5 Ibid., p. 297, l. 9, delete `Section a and b' ans substitute `Sections a(MC) and b(MC)'.

6 Ibid., l. 10, delete `Mathematics' and substitute `Mathematical Sciences'.

7 Ibid., after l. 15, insert:

`Schedule

Paper b9: Numrical solution of differential equations No practicals. Paper of 3 hours.

Initial value problems for ordinary differential equations: Euler, multistep and Runge-Kutta methods; stiffness; error control and adaptive algorithms. Boundary value problems for ordinary differential equations: shooting, finite differences.

Boundary value problems for partial differential equations: finite difference discretisations; Poisson equation. Associated methods of sparse numerical linear algebra: sparse Guassian elimination, classical and conjugate gradient iterations, multigrid iterations.

Initial value problems for partial differential equations: parabolic equations, hyperbolic equations; explicit and implicit methods; accuracy, stability and convergence, Fourier analysis, CFL condition.'


(f) Pass School of Mathematics and Computer Science

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 297, delete `Section a' and substitute `Section a(MC)'.


(g) Honour School of Mathematics and Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first Part I examination in 2002 and first Part II examination in 2003)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 300 delete ll. 3–4 and substitute:

`Seventeen subjects a1–a7 and b1–b10, as prescribed for Papers a1–a7 and b1–b10 in the Honour School of Mathematical Sciences.'

2 Ibid., l. 12, delete `a1–a6' and substitute `a1–a7'.

3 Ibid., l. 39, delete `a1...o1' and substitute `a1–a7 and b2– b10'.


(h) Pass School of Mathematics and Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 303, l. 11, delete `a1–a6' and substitute `a1–a7'.


(i) M.Sc. in Computation

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 739, l. 42, delete `complete' and substitute `submit'.

2 Ibid., p. 740, l. 1, delete `listed in the schedule below' and substitute `for which he or she submitted a written assignment'.

3 Ibid., p. 741, ll. 1–2, delete from `has failed' to `as a whole' and substitute `fails the examination'.

4 Ibid., delete from `A revised' on l. 3 to `occasion' on l. 7 and substitute:

`Such a candidate whose dissertation has been of satisfactory standard may resubmit the same piece of work, while a candidate who has reached a satisfactory standard on the written assignments will not be required to retake that part of the examination.'

5 Ibid., l. 8, insert `exactly' before `four'.

6 Ibid., delete ll. 17–21 and substitute:

`(ii) Formal Program Design

(iii) Concurrency

(iv) Functional Programming

(v) Architecture

(vi) Procedural Programming'.

7 Ibid., delete ll. 31, 34, and 40–2, and renumber existing (vi) and (vii) as (v) and (vi), existing (ix) to (xiii) as (vii) to (xi), and existing (xvii) as (xii).


9 Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages

(a) M.St. in Slavonic Studies

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 708, delete ll. 11–18 and substitute:

`i. Russian Literature before Pushkin.

ii. Pushkin and Romanticism.

iii. Gender and Representation in Russian Culture from 1800.

iv. The Rise of the Russian Novel.

v. Russian Drama in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries.

vi. The Russian Experience of Modernity, 1905–45.

vii. Eurasianism and Russian Cultural Identity.

viii. The Gulag and the Russian Literary Process.

ix. Joseph Brodsky and His Contemporaries.

x. Post-Soviet Russian Literature.'

2 Ibid., delete ll. 24–30 and substitute:

`i. Russian Social and Political Thought, 1825–1917.

ii. The History of Russia, 1861–1917.

iii. The Russian Revolution and the Civil War.'


(b) M.Phil. in Slavonic Studies

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

As for the M.St. in Slavonic Studies (see (a) above).


10 Board of the Faculty of Music

(a) Honour Moderations and the Preliminary Examination in Music

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 65, delete ll. 42–5 and substitute:

`Candidates will be required to submit two compositions, totalling between 10–12 minutes in performance, as follows:

(i) a work for either solo voice and piano or for four unaccompanied voices (SATB);

(ii) a work for one of the following: string quartet (two violins, viola, and cello); wind quintet (flute, oboe, clarinet, horn, and bassoon); mixed ensemble, with or without piano but without percussion.'


(b) Honour School of Music

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 411, delete ll. 15–40 and substitute:

`Each candidate will be required to offer papers (1) and (2) from List A, any two of papers (3), (4), and (5) in that list, and four other papers, always provided that of these four at least one be chosen from each of Lists B and C. Candidates may always offer both List A (3) and B (1); but certain other combinations of papers may from time to time be disallowed, always provided that notice of such disallowance be communicated to candidates not later than the third week of Michaelmas Full Term in the academic year preceding that of examination.

Candidates must inform the Registrar, not later than Friday of the fourth week of Michaelmas Full Term in the academic year of examination, of the eight papers they propose to offer.

Candidates may also be examined viva voce.

List A (core subjects)

(1) History of Western Music I: c.800–c.1630 (one three-hour paper)

(2) History of Western Music II: c.1600 to the present day (one three-hour paper)

The Board of the Faculty of Music shall approve, and publish each year by notice in the Faculty of Music, not later than the eighth week of Trinity Full Term, a list of specified areas in study in (1) and (2) above for the examination six terms thence.

(3) Either Techniques of Composition I (one three-hour paper)

Candidates will be required to complete or continue in the appropriate style a piece of music from which at least one part will be given. One question must be answered from four set as follows:

(a) later sixteenth-century continental vocal polyphony in four parts;

(b) aria in three parts (voice, obbligato instrument, and basso continuo) from the period c.1700–c.60;

(c) four-part texture, of the period c.1760–c.1830;

(d) nineteenth-century song accompaniment for piano, in the Austro-Germanic tradition.

or Techniques of Composition II (portfolio submission): see under List B (1)

(4) Musical Analysis and Criticism (one three-hour paper) Analytical and critical comment on one musical work (or movement of a work), normally from the late eighteenth or nineteenth century. The score will be provided but the music will not be heard in performance.

(5) Musical Thought and Scholarship (one three-hour paper)

A paper on the history, criticism, and philosophy of music. Candidates may choose to answer either one or two questions.'

2 Ibid., delete from 1. 2 on p. 412, to 1. 33 on p. 414 and substitute:

`List B (Portfolio submissions; practical tests)

(1) Techniques of Composition II (portfolio submission) Candidates will be required to write, at their choice and on material set by the examiners in the eighth week of Hilary Full Term in the academic year of examination, one of the following:

(a) a fugue;

(b) a sixteenth-century motet or Mass movement in five parts;

(c) an eighteenth-century (Baroque style) aria or other ritornello-based movement;

(d) a sonata movement (not necessarily the first) from the period from Haydn to Brahms;

(e) a movement in a twentieth-century idiom (questions requiring familiarity with indeterminate or electronic techniques will not be set);

(f) such other form of music as the examiners may offer, provided that the examiners shall always offer material on each of (a)–(e). Papers will be available for collection in the Music Faculty Library from 12 noon on Friday in the eighth week of Hilary Full Term in the academic year of examination. The portfolio, accompanied by a declaration in the form prescribed in the schedule annexed to these regulations, must be submitted by candidates not later than noon on Friday of the first week of Trinity Full Term in the academic year of examination, to the Chairman of the Examiners, Honour School of Music, Examination Schools, Oxford.

This option may not be selected under List B(1) if it has already been selected under list A(3).

(2) Orchestration (portfolio submission)

Candidates will be required to submit one piece of orchestration, the style and technique of the orchestration being appropriate to the material set. A choice of pieces, taken from the period 1750 to the present day, will be set. Papers will be available for collection in the Music Faculty Library from 12 noon on Friday in the eighth week of Hilary Full Term in the academic year of examination. The portfolio, accompanied by a declaration in the form prescribed in the schedule annexed to these regulations, must be submitted by candidates not later than noon on Friday of the fourth week of Trinity Full Term in the academic year of examination, to the Chairman of the Examiners, Honour School of Music, Examination Schools, Oxford.

(3) Solo Performance, instrumental or vocal (practical test)

Candidates shall prepare a programme of works in varying styles and submit it for the approval of the examiners, not later than Friday in the fourth week of Hilary Full Term in the academic year of examination, addressed to the Chairman of the Examiners, Honour School of Music, Examination Schools, Oxford. They may indicate a single work or a complete movement which they would like to play in full. The time each piece takes to play must be stated. The programme shall be timed to last between 35–40 minutes, including breaks and pauses. If the programme significantly exceeds 40 minutes the examiners are entitled to curtail or interrupt the performance. Candidates must provide for accompaniment, where required.

Candidates are required to provide for the examiners one copy of each piece to be performed, in the edition used. The copies shall be presented to the examiners at the beginning of the examination and collected from them at the end.

(4) Composition (portfolio submission)

Candidates will be required to submit a portfolio of four original compositions as follows:

(a) a work of approximately five minutes' duration for solo instrument and piano;

(b) three of the following:

(i) a work of 8–10 minutes' duration for mixed choir (SATB) in up to eight parts;

(ii) a work for mixed ensemble (with or without vocal soloist) of 8–10 minutes' duration and scored for up to fourteen players (including one percussionist playing several instruments);

(iii) a work of 8–10 minutes' duration for one `live' performer and electronic resources, demonstrating both technical skill in the use of studio techniques and compositional imagination in dealing with the transformation of live and computer-generated sound;

(iv) a work (which may be of a partly or wholly electro-acoustic nature) at the candidate's pleasure.

Candidates intending to use the electronic studio in connection with this option are required to have attended the preliminary courses offered to undergraduates in their first year.

(5) Dissertation (portfolio submission)

Candidates must submit a dissertation of between 8,000 and 10,000 words (exclusive of bibliography) which has not been previously submitted for a degree of another university. The subject and title must be approved by the Board of the Faculty of Music. Details relating to approval and submission are given in the general note below.

(6) Edition with commentary (portfolio submission)

Candidates must submit an edition with commentary. Editions previously submitted for the Honour School of Music may be resubmitted. No edition will be accepted if it has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another Honour School or degree of this University, or a degree of any other institution. The work or works to be edited must be approved by the Board of the Faculty of Music. Details relating to approval and submission are given in the general note below.

(7) Analysis (portfolio submission)

Candidates must submit an analytical study of not more than 10,000 words which has not been previously submitted for a degree of another university. The subject and title must be approved by the Board of the Faculty of Music.

Details relating to approval and submission are given in the general note below.

List C (written papers; further practical tests)

The Board of the Faculty of Music shall approve, and publish each year by notice in the Faculty of Music, not later than the eighth week of Trinity Full Term, a list of subjects for the examination six terms thence. General Note on approval of subjects for List B (5), (6), and (7); and the submission of written work for List B (4)–(7).

(a) Approval of subjects

Candidates intending to submit any of B(5), (6), or (7) must obtain prior approval of the subject and title from the Board of the Faculty of Music. They are urged to seek early guidance from their college tutor on whether the subject is likely to be acceptable and must submit the proposed subject and title, together with the signed approval of the tutor, to the Chairman of the Board of the Faculty of Music, Faculty of Music, St Aldates, not earlier than the beginning of Trinity Full Term in the academic year preceding that of examination, and not later than noon on Friday of the first week of Michaelmas Full Term in the academic year of examination. The faculty board shall decide whether or not to approve the subject and title and shall advise the candidate as soon as possible.

(b) Submission of written work

Candidates must also submit one copy of the written work related to the examination of subjects B(4)–(7) by noon on Friday of the second week of Trinity Full Term in the academic year of examination. It must be addressed to the Chairman of the Examiners, Honour School of Music, Examination Schools, Oxford. Each submission must be accompanied by a declaration in the form prescribed in the schedule annexed to these regulations. In the case of B(5–7) the text of the work must be presented in typescript.'


11 Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies

(a) Diploma in Jewish Studies

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 973, after l. 16 insert:

`2. Except where otherwise indicated, all material submitted for examination (dissertation, extended essays, etc.) shall be accompanied by a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that it is the candidate's own work.'

2 Ibid., l. 17, delete `2' and substitute `3'.

3 Ibid., l. 21, delete `All'.

4 Ibid., delete ll. 22–44 and substitute:

`Each module is to be offered for examination in Noughth Week fo the term following that in which the module was taken. Each module may be examined, at the candidate's choice, either by a written examination in Noughth Week of the term following that in which the module is taken or by the submission before 12 noon on the Friday of Noughth Week of the term following that in which the module is taken of a piece of written work of not more than 4,000 words on a subject set by the examiners. Candidates will be notified of the essay topic/s at 12 noon on the Friday of Eighth Week of the term in which the module is taken.

1. Introduction to Hebrew Bibliography

2. Introduction to Jewish Religion and Culture

3. Introduction to Judaism

4. Jewish and Christian Bible Translation and Interpretation, 100–600 ce

5. Jewish History 200 bce to 70 ce

6. Modern Jewish History

7. Sociology of Yiddish

8. Introduction to Maimonides

9. Modern Hebrew Literature

10. Dead Sea Scrolls

11. American Yiddish Culture

12. Modern Jewish Thought

13. Introduction to Talmud

14. Israeli Government and Politics

15. Judaism and Islam: An Encounter of Religions in the Middle East

16. The Holocaust: The Destruction of the Jews in Europe

17. Such other modules as may be approved by the Tutorial Committee, which shall define its scope and inform both the candidate and the teacher of this definition in writing.'

5 Ibid., l. 46, delete `25,000' and substitute `10,000'.

6 Ibid., p. 974, l. 1, delete `fifth' and substitute `sixth'.

7 Ibid., l. 2, delete `The dissertation shall have the weight of three modules.'

8 Ibid., l. 4, delete `3' and substitute `4'.

9 Ibid., l. 5, delete `4' and substitute `5'.


(b) M.Phil. in Oriental Studies

(i) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 624, l. 38, before `(a)' insert `(v)'.

2 Ibid., l. 41, after `Institute.' insert:

`Instead of one or two of numbers 1(i), 1(ii), 2(i), 3(iii), 3(iv), and 3(v), candidates may propose their own list(s) of texts. No more than one substitution may be made in any single paper. The choice of texts must be approved by the Board in each case.'


(ii) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 628, after l. 43, insert:

`A Qualifying Examination

Candidates must pass a qualifying examination in Sanskrit not later than the end of the second term of the academic year in which the candidate's name is first entered on the register of M.Phil. students unless exempted by the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies.

B Final Examination'.

2 Ibid., p. 630, after l. 23, insert:

`A Qualifying Examination

Candidates must pass a qualifying examination in Jewish Studies not later than the end of the third term after that in which the candidate's name is first entered on the register of M.Phil. students unless exempted by the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies.

B Final Examination'.

3 Ibid., l. 47, delete `in the academic year' and substitute `not later than the end of the third term after that'.

4 Ibid., ll. 48–9, delete `or with the approval of the faculty board, in a subsequent year, which' and substitute `unless exempted by the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies. The examination'.

5 Ibid., p. 631, l. 8, after `language examination' insert `in Arabic or Persian or Turkish'.


12 Board of the Faculty of Social Studies

(a) Preliminary Examination in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 102, delete ll. 37–48 and substitute:

`The paper will contain two sections.

(a) The Politics and Government of:

France from 1946 (including instability during the Fourth Republic; and stabilisation during the Fifth Republic, with particular reference to the constitution, legislature, executive, parties and party systems, state and welfare, and centre–pheriphery relations);

Germany from 1928 (including the collapse of the Weimar republic; the Nazi regime; and the German Federal Republic, with particular reference to the constitution, legislature, executive, parties and party systems, state and welfare, and centre–periphery relations);

Russia (and the Soviet Union) from 1917 to 1991 (including the leaderships of Lenin, Stalin, Khrushchev, Brezhnev, and Gorbachev, with particular reference to political violence, the party-state system, and attempts at reform); United Kingdom from 1945 (including the ebb and flow of political consensus; the constitution; legislature; executive; parties and party systems, state and welfare, and centre–periphery relations);

United States from 1932 (including the New Deal; the acquisition of civil rights by African-Americans; and the American political system since 1945, with particular reference to the constitution, legislature, executive, parties and party systems, state and welfare, and centre–periphery relations).'


(b) M.Phil. and M.Sc. in Sociology

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 643, l. 31, after `in' insert `(i)'.

2 Ibid., l. 33, after `data' insert `, and (ii) methods of data collection, including questionnaire design, interviewing, and coding'.

3 Ibid., delete from p. 643, l. 43, to p. 644, l. 3, and sub- stitute:

`(b) Candidates will be required to produce an essay of up to 2,500 words evaluating the research design, methods of data collection and analysis, and any ethical or philosophical issues that arise in a specified research paper. The Director of Graduate Studies shall publish a list of research papers not later than noon on Monday of the first week of the second term; candidates will be required to select one from this list of papers as the subject for their essay.

Candidates shall submit their essay to the Clerk of the Schools by 12 noon on Monday of the first week of the third term of the course, accompanied by a statement that it is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated.'

4 Ibid., p. 644, delete ll. 24–30, and substitute:

`Sociology of Politics. Models of political partisanship and voting behaviour. The social bases of political organisation and partisanship including class, religion, ethnicity, and gender. The emergence of new social movements. The social and political processes involved in democratisation. The concept and explanatory role of political culture. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with the main theoretical approaches to the explanation of political behaviour, and must show knowledge of more than one society.'


(c) M.Phil. in International Relations

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 614, l. 33, delete `international'.

2 Ibid., delete from p. 614, l. 36, to p. 615, l. 30, and substitute:

`(b) The Politics of the United Nations and its Agencies. Examines the evolving role of the United Nations in world politics. After a theoretical and historical introduction, the option examines the role and significance of the United Nations system in five functional areas: development, human rights, security, humanitarian action, and forced migration.

(c) The USSR and Russia in International Relations since 1945. The evolution of Soviet foreign policy under Stalin and Khrushchev; the rise and fall of dÄtente; the USSR and the Third World; ideology and Soviet foreign policy; the role of the military and military factors; the emergence of Russian foreign policy; the making of Russian foreign policy and the role of domestic factors; NATO enlargement and relations with Europe; policy in the `near abroad', including Ukraine, Central Asia, and the Caucasus.

(d) Strategic studies. The development of strategic thought and practice, and the place of strategic factors in international relations, since the early nineteenth century, with main emphasis on the period since the First World War. The course, which is varied from year to year in accordance with the research interests of the graduate students participating, encompasses the following: security concerns as motives of state behaviour; the phenomenon of civil war and international responses to it; the military implications of technological changes, including in weapons, delivery systems, information management and communications; strategic doctrine and practice in specific states, including the major powers, and in different regions of the world; the emergence of doctrines of deterrence, limited war, and peacekeeping; the roles of alliances and international organisations (including the United Nations) in the authorisation and management of force; aspects of international law relating to armed conflict; the attempts to develop alternatives to reliance on national armaments; negotiations about, and measures of, arms limitation and disarmament; the role of guerrilla warfare and non-violent forms of pressure in international relations; political assumptions of strategic thought.

(e) The United States in International Relations since 1945. This course examines the foreign policy of the United States since the end of the Second World War. Special emphasis is placed on the forces and factors that have shaped US foreign policy such as political culture, coalitions, the bureaucracy, and cognitive schemas and on the theories used by political scientists to explain the sources and the making of US foreign policy.

(f) The International Relations of the Middle East. This course covers the international politics of the Middle East and of the Persian Gulf with an emphasis on the period since 1945. There are three main elements: the foreign policies of the Arab states and the relations between them; the Arab–Israeli conflict; and external involvement in the affairs of the region. The course also examines a number of issue areas such as the impact of economic power, the role of Islam, secular ideologies, security, and the causes and consequences of war.

(g) International Political Economy. The interrelationship between the world economy and the international political system, including the principal theories regarding international political economy. The course seeks to integrate readings and discussions on theory and methodology and analysis of contemporary issues in IPE. Topics will include: the reconstruction of the international economy after 1945; the role of the US in the post-war period and theories of hegemonic stability; the politics of international trade and the evolution of the GATT/WTO system; the development of regional economic arrangements and the relationship between regionalism, multilateralism and globalisation in the world economy; the political economy of the European Single Market; the European Monetary Union; current issues in transatlantic economic relations.

(h) The Function of Law in the International Community. This course examines the basic aspects of the international legal system, including the sources of international law, the relationship between national law and international law, jurisdiction, state responsibility, and human rights. A central focus is the role of law in international politics, that is, in the day-to-day relations between states, between states and international organisations, and between states and individuals. The study of the theoretical and analytical aspects of international law, through the literature, is complemented by a practical focus on current issues, including the use of force, international humanitarian law, dispute management, economic conflict, and the role generally of international organisations, particularly the United Nations.

(i) The International Relations of East Asia. The Yalta settlement in 1945 and its contributions to establishing a durable security order in the region; the origins and impact of the cold war in the region, in particular through an examination of the Korean War, the transformation of the American occupation of Japan, and the onset of Sino-American hostility; the fracturing of the cold war system examined via the sub-regional organisation, ASEAN, the onset of the Sino-Soviet and Sino-Vietnamese conflicts, and Sino-American rapprochement; the features of the post-Cold War era, including an examination of newly- established institutions such as the ASEAN regional Forum (ARF) and Asia Pacific Economic Co-operation Forum (APEC). The course also examines a number of issues, such as the international causes and consequences of the economic rise of the regional states, of democratisation, and the impact of nuclear weapons. The course content varies to some degree from year to year in accordance with the research interests of those taking this option.

(j) Classical Theories of International Relations. This option provides an advanced understanding of the history of thought on International Relations in the period of the classical European state system, with particular emphasis on the period 1750–1939. Topics will include: theories of the state and the development of the concept of sovereignty; nationalism and national self-determination; international institutions (including international law, international organisation, the balance of power, and diplomacy); war and the use of force (including the evolution of strategic thought, doctrines of intervention, and ideas arising from the rise of the peace movement); liberal, marxist and mercantilist approaches to international political economy; imperialism and the expansion of international society; revolution and its impact on international relations; theories of progress and of historical change. The works bearing on these subjects by, inter alia: Rousseau, Herder, Mill, Mazzini, Hegel, Vattel, Hume. Kant, Burke, Castlereagh, von Gentz, Oppenheim, Clausewitz, Smith, Cobden, Bentham, List, Marx, Lenin, Angell, Wilson, Nietzsche, Carr, Zimmern. Candidates will also be expected to demonstrate knowledge of the principal methodological approaches to the history of political thought.

(k) The International Relations of the Developing World. The paper analyses the international relations of developing countries from 1945 to the present day. The focus is on the characteristics of developing states and their interaction with the political, economic, and military arrangements in the international system. The paper will address topics including: decolonisation and the emergence of the Third World; the nature of the state and problems of state building in developing countries; the political and economic forces which have shaped international arrangements for trade and finance since 1944; political and economic constraints on growth in the world economy; the international financial institutions and their political impact; the new politics of global investment; intervention, conflict, and their consequences; security and the politics of alliance formation; regionalism and `regimes'.

(l) The International Relations of Latin America. The recent history of US-Latin American relations, including the regional significance of the Cold War, impact of the end of the Cold War, and the making of US policy towards the region. Relations between the major European states and the European Union and the sub-continent. Foreign and security policies of the principal Latin American states, including interstate alliances, rivalries within the region and the international aspects of internal conflicts. Latin American perspectives on non-interventionism, international law, dispute settlements, the international human rights and regional and international organisations. Regional and sub-regional co-operation and integration schemes, including the Andean Community, Mercosur, NAFTA, and the proposed Free Trade Area of the Americas. The political economy of the multinational corporation, and international flows of capital, of labour (including undocumented migrants remittances), and narcotics. Theories of dependency and underdevelopment; liberalism; realism and foreign policy making. Interactions between domestic and international policy, including the international dimensions of democratisation.'


13 Board of the Faculty of Theology

Honour School of Theology

With effect from l October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, delete from l. 19 on p. 517, to l. 23 on p. 530, and substitute:

`1. All candidates will be required to offer eight papers, as specified below, from the Schedule of Papers. There shall be four compulsory papers, taken by all candidates, covering the Old and New Testaments and the development of Christian Doctrine in its historical context. In addition to these compulsory papers, candidates will be required to offer four further papers chosen according to the schedules in either Track I, Track II, or Track III. Examination regulations applying to all Tracks

2. With the permission of the Board of the Faculty of Theology, any candidate may offer an essay either in place of one of the eight papers, or in addition to the eight required papers. The regulations governing essays are set out below.

3. Candidates not offering either paper (25) or (29) as optional papers may, in addition to their eight papers, also offer the Optional Translation papers in Old Testament Hebrew and/or New Testament Greek.

4. In papers (8) to (40), teaching may not be available every year on every subject.

5. Any candidate may be examined viva voce.

6. In the following regulations, the English version of the Bible used will be the Revised Standard Version. The Greek text used will be the text of the United Bible Societies, fourth edn., but in paper (3), The Synoptic Gospels, parallel texts will be taken from K. Aland, Synopsis Quattuor Evan- geliorum (fifteenth edn., Stuttgart, Deutsche Bibel Gesellschaft, 1997). The Hebrew text used will be the Biblia Hebraòca Stuttgartensia (Stuttgart, 1977). All candidates must offer eight subjects, as specified below, from the Schedule of Papers.

TRACK I

(i) Paper (1) or Paper (2)

(ii) Paper (3)

(iii) Paper (5)

(iv) Paper (6)

(v) Paper (7)

(vi) EITHER Paper (1) or Paper (2) (whichever paper is not offered under (i) above)

OR one paper chosen from Papers (23), (24), (25), (26), < p>(27), or (30).

(vii) One further paper.

(viii) One further paper.

Candidates may not offer Paper (4).

TRACK II

(i) Paper (1) or Paper (2)

(ii) Paper (3) or Paper (4) (candidates choosing Paper (3) must choose Paper (7) under (viii) below)

(iii) Paper (5)

(iv) Paper (6)

(v) One paper chosen from Papers (8), (9), or (10).

(vi) Paper (11).

(vii) EITHER Paper (12) or Paper (13)

OR a further option from Paper (11).

(viii) One further paper.

Candidates may not offer the following combination of options: Paper (3) and Paper (4), Paper (4) and Paper (7).

TRACK III

(i) Paper (1) or Paper (2)

(ii) Paper (3) or Paper (4) (candidates choosing Paper (3) must choose Paper (7) under (viii) below)

(iii) Paper (5)

(iv) Paper (6)

(v) Paper (14)

(vi) and

(vii) EITHER Papers (15) and (16) OR Papers (17) and (18) OR Papers (19) and (20) OR Papers (21) and (22).

(viii) One further paper.

Candidates may not offer the following combination of options: Paper (3) and Paper (4), Paper (4) and Paper (7).

Regulations concerning essays

1. Candidates may offer an extended essay either in place of the paper to be chosen under clause (viii) of Tracks I–III, or in addition to the eight required papers. Candidates should in general aim at a length of 10,000 words, but must not exceed 15,000 words (both figures inclusive of notes and appendices, but excluding bibliography).

2. Prior approval of the subject of the essay must be obtained from the Board of the Faculty of Theology. Such approval must be sought not later than Friday in the fourth week of Trinity Full Term in the year preceding the examination. The request for approval should be addressed to the Secretary of the Board of the Faculty of Theology, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford. The request must be accompanied by a letter from the tutor stating that this subject has his or her approval. The application should include, in about 100 words, an explanation as to how the topic will be treated, and a brief bibliography.

3. The candidate's application for approval of title should be submitted through and with the support of his or her college tutor or the tutor with overall responsibility for his or her studies, from whom he or she should seek guidance on whether the subject is likely to be acceptable to the Board.

4. The candidate is advised to have an initial discussion with his or her supervisor regarding the proposed field of study, the sources available, and the method of presentation. He or she should have further discussions with his or her supervisor during the preparation of the essay. His or her supervisor may read and comment on drafts of the essay.

5. The subject of the essay need not fall within the areas covered by the papers listed in the Honour School of Theology. It may overlap any subject or period on which the candidate offers papers, but the candidate is warned against reproducing the content of his or her essay in any answer to a question in the examination. Subject to the provisions of cl. 4 above, every candidate shall sign a certificate to the effect that the essay is his or her own work and that it has not already been submitted (wholly or substantially) for a final honour school other than one involving Theology, or another degree of this University, or a degree of any other institution. This certificate shall be presented together with the essay. No essay shall, however, be ineligible because it has been or is being submitted for any prize of this University.

6. The candidate must submit one typed copy of the essay (bound or held firmly in a stiff cover), addressed to the Chairman of the Examiners, Honour School of Theology, Examination Schools, Oxford, not later than noon on the Friday of the eighth week of Hilary Term in the academic year in which he or she is presenting himself or herself for examination. The certificate signed by the candidate in accordance with cl. 5 above must be submitted separately in a sealed envelope addressed to the Chairman of the Examiners at the above address at the same time as the essay is submitted.

7. The provisions of clauses 2–4 and clause 6 of these regulations will also apply to candidates submitting an extended essay as part of paper (40).

SCHEDULE OF PAPERS

(1) Israel to the end of the Exile

The paper will include historical, literary, and theological questions, and candidates will be required to comment on passages from the following texts in English, showing knowledge of at least three of the five groups of texts:

(a) Exodus 1–3; 6; 12–15; 19; 20; 24.

(b) Isaiah 1–12; 28–32.

(c) Psalms 2; 18; 45–8; 72; 74; 77; 89; 93; 110; 132; 137.

(d) 2 Kings 18–25.

(e) Ezekiel 1–18.

There will be an opportunity to comment on passages in Hebrew from:

Exodus 20; 24.

Psalms 45–8.

Credit will be given to candidates demonstrating competence in Biblical Hebrew.

(2) Israel from the beginning of the Exile to 4 BC

The paper will include historical, literary, and theological questions, and candidates will be required to comment on passages from the following texts in English, showing knowledge of at least three of the five groups of texts:

(a) Job 1–14; 38–42.

(b) Nehemiah 1:1–11:2; 13.

(c) Jonah; Ruth.

(d) Daniel.

(e) Isaiah 40–55.

There will be an opportunity to comment on passages in Hebrew from:

Nehemiah 4–5.

Isaiah 40–1.

Credit will be given to candidates demonstrating competence in Biblical Hebrew.

(3) The Synoptic Gospels

Candidates will be expected to show a general knowledge of the Synoptic Gospels, their theology and ethics, literary and historical problems, and historical research concerning Jesus, and to comment on a passage in Greek from Matthew, and on a passage in Greek with English supplied from Matthew 3–13 inclusive with parallels in Mark and/ or Luke. Candidates may restrict their comment to English texts if their other papers include translation and/or comment on at least two passages of Hebrew.

(4) The Theology and Ethics of the New Testament (with special reference to the gospels of Matthew and John, Romans, and 1 Corinthians) Questions will be set on the theology of the individual gospels (not just those specified), Pauline theology, the historical Jesus, the ethics of the New Testament, and the different methods of New Testament interpretation.

There will be a compulsory question containing passages for comment from Matthew, John, Romans, and 1 Corinthians, printed in both Greek and English. Candidates will be required to comment on at least three of the set texts. Candidates who have not passed either paper 6 (New Testament Greek) or paper 7 (Biblical Hebrew) in the Preliminary Examination for Theology will have to translate and comment on passages from Matthew 5–7, 26–8 and John 1–6 which will be printed only in Greek, unless their other papers include translation and/or comment on at least two passages of Hebrew. The passages printed only in Greek will be optional for all other candidates.

(5) The Development of Doctrine in the Early Church to AD 451

Candidates will be expected to explain how early Christian thinkers undertook to clarify the teachings of the primitive Church and formulate a coherent system of thought in their cultural context. The paper will not only concern itself with formal pronouncements on the doctrines of the Trinity and Incarnation, but also with other controversies and the contributions of particular theologians.

Questions relevant to the Gnostic, Arian, Nestonian, and Pelagian controversies will always be set; other questions may relate, wholly on partly, to such topics as anthropology, soteriology, hermeneutics, ecclesiology, political theology, and the doctrine of creation and the fall. Candidates will be required to comment on a passage from one of the following texts or group of texts:

The Nicene Definition, Arius' Letter to Eusebius, Arius' Letter to Alexander (from E.R. Hardy, Christology of the Later Fathers, Library of Christian Classics).

Gregory of Nyssa, That there are not Three Gods (in Hardy, op. cit.).

Cyril's Second Letter to Nestorius (in R.A. Norris, The Christological Controversy, Philadelphia: Fortress Press).

The tome of Leo and the Chalcedonian Definition (in Norris op. cit.).

Credit will be given to candidates who show knowledge (where appropriate) of the other texts contained in Norris.

(6) Christian Doctrine and Interpretation

The paper will consist of questions on the major themes of Christian Doctrine and the norms and methods of Christian Theology.

Candidates will be expected to show a critical understanding of twentieth-century theological discussion, and its use of the Bible and traditional formulations, and of some of the problems posed for such discussions by modern intellectual developments.

(7) Paul and John

Candidates will be expected to show a knowledge of the theological, ethical, literary, and historical issues posed by (a) the Gospel of John, and (b) Romans and/or 1 Corinthians. They will be required to comment on passages from these texts in English, and will have the opportunity to translate and comment on John 1–10; Romans 3–8; and 1 Corinthians 1–7; 15 in Greek.

(8) The History and Theology of Western Christianity, 1050–1350 The paper will consist of questions on the thought of the leading theologians (especially Anselm, Peter Abelard, Aquinas, Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham), and of questions on the main developments in the western church. It will be so set that any period of 150 years, with its theological writers, will provide sufficient coverage.

(9) The History and Theology of Western Christianity, 1500–1619

The subject includes the work and thought of the leading reformers, especially Luther, Zwingli, and Calvin, together with the radicals, and the development of the Reformation in European society. Questions will be set both on renewal in the Roman Catholic Church, and on religious change in England from the Henrician reforms to the reign of James I.

(10) EITHER

A. Christian Life and Thought In Europe, 1789–1914

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the life and thought of the Christian Church (with special reference to Britain) and the development of Christian theology in its historical context. Candidates will be given opportunity to demonstrate knowledge of the following texts:

F.D.E. Schleiermacher, Speeches on Religion.

L. Feuerbach, The Essence of Christianity.

S. Kierkegaard, Philosophical Fragments.

J.H. Newman, Lectures on the Prophetical Office.

A. Ritschl, Justification and Reconciliation, vol. III.

OR

B. Christology from Kant to Troeltsch 1789–1914

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the impact of modern philosophy and of cultural and historical criticism on Christology, as reflected in some of the following writers: Kant, Schleiermacher, Hegel, Strauss, Baur, Kierkegaard, Thomasius, Ritschl, Kähler, Nietzsche, Harnack, Wrede, Schweitzer, Kautsky, and Troeltsch. Candidates will be required to comment on a selection of the following texts:

I. Kant, Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone (Harper Torchbooks, 1960), pp. 85–138.

F.D.E. Schleiermacher, The Christian Faith (T. and T. Clark, 1956), pp. 374–475.

G.W.F. Hegel, Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion, ed. P.C. Hodgson (University of California Press, 1985), vol. III, pp. 310–47.

D.F. Strauss, The Life of Jesus Critically Examined, ed. P.C. Hodgson (Fortress, 1972), pp. 40–63 and 757–84; The Christ of Faith and the Jesus of History ed. L.E. Keck (Fortress, 1977), pp. 19–37 and 159–69.

C. Thomasius, Christ's Person and Work, Part 2: The Person of the Mediator, in God and Incarnation in Mid-Nineteenth Century German Theology, ed. C. Welch (Oxford University Press, 1965), pp. 31–88.

A. Ritschl, Justification and Reconciliation (T. and T. Clark, 1900, reprint 1966), vol. III, pp. 385–484.

M. Kähler, The So-Called Historical Jesus and the Historic Biblical Christ, ed. C.E. Braaten (Fortress, 1964), pp. 46–97.

E. Troeltsch, `The Significance of the Historical Existence of Jesus for Faith' in Ernst Troeltsch: Writings on Theology and Religion, ed. R. Morgan and M. Pye (Duckworth, 1977), pp. 182–207.

(11) Further Studies in History and Doctrine

Candidates will be expected to study one major theologian in relation to the situation and problems of the time, with special attention to certain texts. In the Trinity Term of each year the Board of the Faculty of Theology will publish a list of theologians (with texts) on which teaching will be provided in the following academic year and on which the examination will be based. In the event of a candidate's opting to take a year out after having studied a chosen theologian, the examiners will set questions on that theologian in the year of that candidate's examination, even if that theologian is not available for study that year. Texts will be studied in English. One or two optional questions may be set which will require knowledge of the texts in original languages when these are other than English.

A candidate may offer a second major theologian from amongst those available in the year of his or her examination. In the event that a candidate does choose to offer a second major theologian, that candidate will offer paper 11 as two papers. To facilitate this, separate papers (11(a), 11(b) etc.) will be set for each major theologian.

(12) Philosophy of Religion

The subject will include an examination of claims about the existence of God, and God's relation to the world: their meaning, the possibility of their truth, and the kind of justification which can or needs to be provided for them, and the philosophical problems raised by the existence of different religions. One or two questions may also be set on central claims peculiar to Christianity, such as the doctrines of the Trinity, Incarnation, and Atonement.

(13) Christian Moral Reasoning

Candidates will be expected to elucidate and assess themes in the Christian tradition of ethical teaching and their contribution to contemporary moral and social debates. The paper will consist of four sections: (a) Christian Moral Concepts; (b) Government and its tasks: (e) Medical Ethics: (d) Sexual Ethics. Candidates will be required to answer three or four questions, of which at least one question must be answered from section (a), and at least one from another section.

(a) Christian Moral Concepts

The major moral concepts in Christian thought, such as: love, natural and revealed law, the supreme good, conscience, virtues, sin, justification, and grace; and contribution to contemporary discussions. Candidates may treat questions on these subjects primarily with reference to their sources in the Bible, if they so wish.

(b) Government and its Tasks

Theological interpretations of: justice, law and authority; forms of government, local, national, and international; government, society, and the church; the coercive use of force in punishment and war, responsibilities for education, employment, economy, and environment.

(c) Medical Ethics

Such topics as: the doctor–patient relationship and its social context; planned parenthood, contraception, and abortion in both personal and social contexts; artificial reproduction, genetic manipulation; experimentation on humans; organ transplantation; priorities in treatment and research; the prolongation of life, terminal care, and the ending of life.

(d) Sexual Ethics

Such topics as celibacy, the goods of marriage, the sacramentality of marriage, divorce, polygamy, homosexuality, the sexual sins, the social differentiation of the sexes, the connection of body and soul in sexual contexts, erotic affection.

(14) The Nature of Religion

The paper will consist of questions on the main classical and contemporary approaches to the study of religions; the main attempts to define religion; differing approaches to the study of religion in anthropology, sociology, philosophy, and theology; and the major explanations that have been offered for religious belief. Candidates should be aware of issues involved in claims for religious truth and rationality, and of twentieth-century discussions of religious conflict and diversity.

(15) Judaism I: The Formation of Rabbinic Judaism

The paper will include the study of:

(a) Judaism in the first century. Rabbinic Judaism's emergence from matrix of movements (Sadducees, Essenes, Samaritans, Christians) laying claim to the authority of the Hebrew Scriptures.

(b) Primary sources of rabbinic Judaism: Mishna/Tosefta; Targum; Midrash; liturgy. Acceptance of the Mishna as authoritative code. The `eclipse' of the Alexandrine Jewish intellectual tradition of Philo.

(c) Development of the primary sources in the Talmudim of Babylonia and the Land of Israel, noting the Zoroastrian and Pagan/Christian environments respectively.

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of such texts (in English translation) as are prescribed by the Board of the Faculty of Theology in the Michaelmas Term of the academic year preceding the examination.

(16) Judaism II: Judaism in History and Society Candidates will be expected to answer questions on two out of the following three sections covered by the paper:

(a) The Gaonic period in Islamic Babylonia. Final redaction of the classical texts. Development of the liturgy. Internal Jewish debates on the calendar and between Rabbinates and Karaites. Confrontation with other faiths, with rationalist philosophy, with serious critiques of both scripture and the rabbinic tradition. The following will be set for special study: Saadia Gaon; the impact of Geniza studies.

(b) From Maimonides to the Zohar; tensions between rationalist philosophers and kabbalists in the High Middle Ages. The shift of the `centre of gravity' in Judaism from Babylonia to the West. Effects of the Crusades, the Inquisition, and the Renaissance on Judaism.

(c) The impact on Jewish thought and society of the Enlightenment and the Emancipation. The growth of Hasidism in the eighteenth and Reform in the nineteenth century will be studied as a preliminary to an examination of the range of Jewish sects or denominations today. The contemporary Jewish scene; responses to the Holocaust, to the establishment of the State of Israel, to the women's movement. This paper may only be offered by candidates also offering paper 15.

(17) Islam I: the Formative Period of Islam

This paper examines the Islamic tradition as it emerged from the seventh to the twelfth centuries, paying particular attention to the issue of religious authority. Topics include: scripture, Islamic law, sectarianism, and political thought. Students will be required to read primary sources in English translation (Qur'an, Hadith; law, political thought) and critical secondary literature. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of such texts (in English translation) as are prescribed by the Board of the Faculty of Theology in the Michaelmas Term of the academic year preceding the examination.

(18) Islam II: Islam in the Modern Middle East

This paper examines the development of Islam as a religion in the modern Middle East. Special attention is paid to Islamic religious thought. Topics include: the historical and political contexts; new interpretations of traditional sources; Islamic movements; Islamic modernism. Students will be required to read English translations of primary texts as well as secondary sources. This paper may only be offered by candidates also offering paper 17.

(19) Buddhism I: Early Buddhist Doctrine and Practice

The earliest Buddhist doctrine is studied against the background of the early Upanishads and other religious movements in north-east India about the fifth century BC. Practice includes both meditation and monastic life. The primary source is the Pali Canon supplemented by the commentarial literature of the Theravadin tradition. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of such texts (in English translation) as are prescribed by the Board of the Faculty of Theology in the Michaelmas Term of the academic year preceding the examination.

(20) Buddhism II: Buddhism in History and Society

The paper falls into two main parts. The first part covers the history of Buddhism's diffusion through Asia, beginning with the emperor Asoka (third century bc); what forms of Buddhism have dominated which states and societies (and when), and their main similarities and differences; the development of Buddhist institutions. The second part deals with Buddhism in modern Asia. This paper may only be offered by candidates also offering paper 19.

 

(21) Hinduism I: Brahmanism

The paper will include the study of the traditions of practice and belief that are held to rest on the authority of Vedic revelation, namely the Vedas proper (including the Upanishads), the Dharmasastras, the Epics, and the Puranas. Candidates will be expected to understand the difference between the Srauta, Smarta, and Paurnnika domains of observance, the manner of their coexistence, and the relevant aspects of the Brahmanical institutions of the joint family, caste, and the stages or alternative forms of the religious life. In the field of doctrine candidates will be examined on the soteriologies of the Mimamsaka ritualists and the principal traditions of Upanishadic exegesis, namely the Advaita of Sankara and his followers, the Visistadvaita of the Srivaisnavas, and the Dvaita of the Madhvas.

 

(22) Hinduism II: Saivism, Vaisnavism, and Modern Hindu Movements

The paper will include the study of the practices and beliefs of those who based their religious life on the authority of scriptures which they held to have been revealed by Siva or Visnu as teachings above the level of the Vedas. In the field of Saivism candidates will be expected to know the essentials of the observances and theologies of the Pasupatas and Saiddhantika Saivas, the practices of the Bhairava and Sakta (Kaula) systems, the doctrines of the Kashmirian exegetes of the cults of Bhairava and Kali, the Tamil tradition of Saiva devotion, and Virasaivism. In the field of Vaisnavism candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the Pancaratra and the traditions of devotion to Krsna. They will also be expected to be familiar with the major Hindu religious movements of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This paper may only be offered by candidates also offering paper 21.

 

(23) Selected topics (Old Testament) I

Candidates will be required to show detailed knowledge of one of the following topics. They will be required to comment on passages from the prescribed texts in English (Revised Standard Version), and will be given an opportunity to comment upon the Hebrew text of certain specified chapters and sections.

(i) Prophecy

l Samuel 9; 10

2 Samuel 7

l Kings 13; 18; 22

Isaiah 1; 5–8; 10; 40; 42–4; 49; 51–3; 55

Jeremiah 1–5; 7–9; 11; 12; 26–8; 31

Ezekiel 1–4; 8-11; 14; 18; 20; 23; 36; 37

Amos 1–5; 6–9

Zechariah 1–8; 13

Among these the following may be offered in Hebrew:

l Kings 13; 18; 22

Isaiah 42–4

Amos 1–5

(ii) Apocalyptic

Isaiah 24–7

Daniel

Zechariah

l Enoch 1–16 (ed. H.F.D. Sparks, The Apocryphal Old Testament, OUP, 1984)

2 Esdras 3–14

Revelation

Among these the following may be offered in Hebrew:

Isaiah 24–7

Zechariah 9–14

 

(24) Selected topics (Old Testament) II

Candidates will be required to show detailed knowledge of one of the following topics. They will be required to comment on passages from the prescribed texts in English (Revised Standard Version), and will be given an opportunity to comment upon the Hebrew text of certain selected chapters and sections.

 

(i) Wisdom

Proverbs 1–9; 22:17–31:31

Job 1–19; 38–42

Ecclesiastes

Wisdom of Solomon 1–9

Ecclesiasticus (Sirach) Prologue; 1:1–25:12; 36:18–43:33; 51

Among these the following may be offered in Hebrew:

Proverbs 1–9

 

(ii) Worship and Liturgy

Exodus 12–15; 19; 20; 24

Leviticus 1–7; 16

Deuteronomy 12–18

l Kings 5–8

l Chronicles 16

Psalms 2; 18; 24; 27; 47–51; 68; 72; 78; 89; 95–100; 110; 113–18; 122; 124; 126; 128; 130–2

A.E. Cowley, Aramaic Papyri of the fifth Century bc (OUP, 1923), nos. 21; 30–4

Among these the following may be offered in Hebrew:

Exodus 19; 20; 24

Leviticus 16

Psalms 24; 95–100

 

(25) The Hebrew of the Old Testament

Candidates will be required to show a general knowledge of the language, with a special study of the following prose texts from which passages will be set for translation and comment:

Genesis 6–9

Exodus 20; 24

l Kings 17–2 Kings 2

Nehemiah 4–6

Candidates will also be given an opportunity to show knowledge of Hebrew verse, and especially of the following texts, from which passages will be set for translation and comment:

Joel

Psalms 1; 23; 24; 45–8; 96

Isaiah 40–5

Candidates who do not offer Hebrew verse will not thereby be penalised.

 

(26) Archaeology in relation to the Old Testament

The subject includes the geography of Palestine and of the neighbouring lands; the history of the development of Canaanite, Hebrew, and Jewish social life and culture; the history of places of worship and their furniture; and the general results of recent archaeological research in the Ancient Near East, insofar as they throw light on these subjects.

 

(27) Religions and Mythology of the Ancient Near East

The paper will include a wide range of questions. The following texts are prescribed for special study:

(a) Akkadian Myths and Epics: The Epic of Gilgamesh (standard version) and the Creation Epic, in S. Dalley, Myths from Mesopotamia (OUP, 1989), pp. 50–125, 233–74.

(b) Hittite Myths: The disappearance of Telepinu (version 1), The Song of Kumarbi, in H.A. Hoffner, Hittite Myths (Scholars Press, 1990), pp. 14–17, 40–3.

(c) Egyptian Myths, Hymns, and Prayers: in M. Lichtheim, Ancient Egyptian Literature (Berkeley, University of California Press, 1975–80), vol. I, pp. 51–7, 131–3; vol. II, pp. 81– 132, 197–9, 203–23.

(d) Ugaritic Myths: Baal and Yam, The Palace of Baal, Baal and Mot, in J.C.L. Gibson, Canaanite Myths and Legends (2nd edn., T. and T. Clark, 1978)

(e) The Sefire Inscriptions, in J.C.L. Gibson, Textbook of Syrian Semitic Inscriptions, vol. II (OUP, 1975) pp. 18–56.

(f) Philo of Byblos' Phoenician History, in H.W. Attridge and R.A. Oden, Philo of Byblos, The Phoenician History (Catholic Biblical Association of America, 1981).

 

(28) Luke—Acts, Epistles, and Apocalypse

Candidates will be expected to answer questions on two out of the following three sections, including comment questions on the English passages selected, where the text will be that of the Revised Standard Version. The Greek texts also set for translation and comment (from United Bible Societies, fourth edn.) are optional.

(a) Luke–Acts, with Luke 19–24 and Acts 1–15 set in English for comment, and Luke 19–24 set in Greek for optional translation and comment.

(b) The Pauline corpus (13 epistles), with Galatians, Philippians, and Ephesians set in English for comment, and Galatians set in Greek for optional comment.

(c) Hebrews to the Apocalypse, with Hebrews and l John set in English for comment and Hebrews 1–2 and l John set in Greek for optional comment.

 

(29) The New Testament in Greek

Candidates will choose passages for translation from amongst a number taken from the Greek New Testament and will be required to show a knowledge of the critical and theological issues involved in some of the passages they translate. The text used will be that of the United Bible Societies, fourth edn. The selection of passages set will allow this detailed knowledge to be limited to the following texts and chapters: Acts 20–6, Colossians, l and 2 Thessalonians, Hebrews 7–10, James, l and 2 Peter, Revelation 1–12. But there will also be opportunity to show such detailed knowledge outside these specified chapters.

 

(30) Varieties of Judaism 100 bc–ad 100

The paper will include a number of general questions and the following texts are prescribed for special study:

Set texts in English:

Qumran Community Rule, Commentary on Habakkuk, in G. Vermes, The Dead Sea Scrolls in English (second edn., Pelican Books, 1975).

Josephus, Jewish War II (Loeb, 1956); Antiquities XVIII, 1–119 (Loeb, 1965); Against Apion II, 145–296 (Loeb, 1956).

IV Ezra, ed. B.M. Metzger in J.H. Charlesworth, ed., The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha (Darton, Longman, and Todd, 2 vols., 1983, 1985).

Testament of Moses, ed. J. Priest, in Charlesworth, op. cit.

Wisdom of Solomon (Revised Standard Version).

Philo, Migration of Abraham, Life of Moses 1,1–84 (Loeb, 1958)

Joseph and Aseneth, ed. C. Burchard, in Charlesworth, op. cit.

Psalms of Solomon VIII, IX, XVII, tr. S.P. Brock in H.F.D. Sparks (ed.), The

Apocryphal Old Testament (OUP, 1984).

l Enoch 37–71, tr. M.A. Knibb in Sparks, op. cit.

Sibylline Oracles III, ed. J.J. Collins, in Charlesworth, op. cit.

Any or all of the following texts may be offered in the original languages:

Qumran Community Rule 1–4, in E. Lohse (edn.), Die Texte aus Qumran, Hebräisch und Deutsch (second ed., Darmstadt, Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1971).

Qumran Commentary on Habakkuk, ed. E. Lohse, op. cit.

Josephus, Antiquities XVIII, 1–28, 63–4, 109–19 (Loeb, 1965).

Philo, Life of Moses I, 1–44 (Loeb, 1958).

Joseph and Aseneth, in M. Philonenko ed., Joseph et Aséneth (E.J. Brill, 1968).

 

(31) The Beginnings of the Church and its Institutions to AD 170

Candidates will be expected to show a knowledge of the history, worship, and institutions of the church in this period, including baptism, eucharist, forms of ministry, models of the church, house-churches, heresy and orthodoxy, apostolic tradition, appeals to scripture, relations with the synagogue, marriage, communications, diet. They will be required to comment on passages from the following texts in English translation:

Set Texts:

Ephesians, l and 2 Timothy, Titus, Jude, l Clement (Loeb Apostolic Fathers I, 1912) Chs. 1–6, 36–65.

Epistles of Ignatius (Loeb Apostolic Fathers I, 1912) to The Ephesians, Smyrneans, Philadelphians.

The Didache (Loeb Apostolic Fathers I, 1912).

The Epistle of Barnabas (Loeb Apostolic Fathers I,1912).

Ptolemy's Letter to Flora. New Eusebius ed. J. Stevenson

(revised ed., 1983).

Shepherd of Hermas, Vision 3 (Loeb Apostolic Fathers II, 1913).

Justin first Apology 31–41, 61–7 (1997) L.W. Barnard in Ancient Christian Writers Vol. 56 (Paulist N.Y., 1997)

Justin Dialogue with Trypho 47, 90–111 (Ante-Nicene Fathers, reprinted 1989).

The following may also be offered in Greek:

l Timothy, 2 Timothy, Titus, Ignatius to the Ephesians (Loeb): Didache 7–16 (Loeb); Justin first Apology 61, 65–7 (ed. M.Marcovich 1994).

 

(32) Early Liturgy

Candidates will be expected to study the rites of initiation and the eucharist with the development of the Christian liturgical year up to ad 451 and the theology of liturgical worship in the light of anthropological, sociological, artistic and linguistic considerations.

The following texts are set for special study:

E.C. Whitaker, Documents of the Baptismal Liturgy (second edn., SPCK, 1970), pp. 1–19, 30–41, 44–50, 83–5, 127–33.

R.C.D. Jasper and G.J. Cuming, Prayers of the Eucharist. Early and Reformed (third edn., Pueblo, 1987), pp. 7–12, 20–44, 52–81, 88–113, 129–37, 143–67.

E.J. Yarnold, The Awe-Inspiring Rites of Initiation (second edn., T. and T. Clark, 1994) pp. 70–97.

J. Wilkinson, tr. and ed., Egeria's Travels (SPCK, 1971), pp. 123–47 (section 24 to the end).

 

(33) Early Syriac Christianity

Candidates will be expected to show a general knowledge of symbolism in the theology of the early Syriac Church.

The following texts are prescribed for special study:

Odes of Solomon 6, 11, 17, 19, 21, 24, 30, 36, 42, tr. J.A. Emerton in H.F.D. Sparks. The Apocryphal Old Testament (OUP, 1984).

Acts of Thomas, secs. 1–29, 108–14, tr. A.F.J. Klijn (E.J. Brill, 1962).

Aphrahat, Demonstrations 1, 4, 6, 12 (Dem. l and 6 tr. in J. Gwynn, ed. Select Library of Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers II.13 [1898, repr. W.B. Eerdmans, 1956], Dem. 4, tr. S.P. Brock, The Syriac Fathers on Prayer and the Spiritual Life [1987], ch. 1; Dem. 12, tr. in J. Neusner, Aphrahat and Judaism [E.J. Brill, 1971]).

Ephrem, Sermon on Our Lord, tr. in E. Mathews and J. Amar, St Ephrem the Syrian.

Selected Prose Works (1994);

Hymns on the Nativity, nos. l and 2, tr. K. McVey, St Ephrem the Syrian.

Hymns (Classics of Western Spirituality, 1989);

Hymns on Faith, no. 10, Hymns on the Church, no. 36; Hymns on Epiphany, nos. l and 6; tr. S.P. Brock in T. Finn, Early Christian Baptism and the Catechumenate (1992);

The Hymns, tr. S.P. Brock, The Harp of the Spirit: Eighteen Poems of St Ephrem (Fellowship of St Alban and St Sergius, second edn. 1983);

Letter to Publius, tr. S.P. Brock, Le MusÄon (1976);

Book of Steps, Homily 12, tr. R. Murray, Symbols of Church and Kingdom (CUP, 1975).

 

(34) Backgrounds to Early Christianity 30–529 AD

Candidates will be expected to answer questions from two of the following sections, showing detailed knowledge of aspects of life and thought in the Roman Empire which are relevant to the understanding of the New Testament and early Christianity. Passages for comment will be set in English from the prescribed texts in all five sections. Texts will be read in the Loeb Classical Library edition, unless otherwise indicated.

(a) Exegesis. Jewish, Christian, and pagan forms of exegesis. The distinction between literal, tropological, and psychagogic approaches. Theories of translation. Formation of canons.

Philo of Alexandria, Who is the Heir of Divine Things?

Augustine, On Christian Doctrine, Book II. ed. and trans. R.P. Green (Glarendon Press 1995)

(b) Philosophy. The doctrines of the major schools. Philosophy and life. Relations between Christians and philosophers. The place of apologetic and polemic in philosophy.

Epictetus, The Enchiridion (in vol. 2 of the Loeb edition)

Plotinus, Enneads I.8

(c) Religion. Personal, ethnic, civil and mystery religions. The place of religion in life.

Rituals and images. Hierarchy and gender. Attitudes of political authorities to religion. Apuleius, Metamorphoses (Golden Ass), Book 11.

Aristides of Athens, Apology. Ed. and trans. J. Armitage Robinson, Texts and Studies 26–44, 1891.

(d) Literature. Rhetoric and education. Genre in pagan and Biblical literature. Christian knowledge of Greek and Latin classics. The production, circulation, and readership of ancient books.

Quintillian: selections in D.A. Russell and M. Winterbottom, Ancient Literary Criticism (OUP, 1972), pp. 372–422.

Basil of Caesarea, On how a young man ought to read Greek literature (Letters, vol. 4 in Loeb edition).

(e) Society. Labour and wealth. Ethnicity and gender.

Attitudes to the body and sexuality. Hellenisation and Romanitas.

Clement of Alexandria, On the Rich Man's Salvation (in vol. 2 of the Loeb edition).

Tertullian, De Spectaculis.

 

(35) History and Theology of the Church in the Byzantine Empire from ad 1000 to AD 1453

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the constitution and worship of the Church; monasticism; the development of mystical theology; the relations between Church and state and with the Western Church.

 

(36) English Church and Mission 597–754

Candidates will be expected to study the main lines of the history of the English Church in this period, and some aspects of its theology. There will also be an opportunity to study works of art. Candidates will be expected to have studied the texts in Group I, on which alone gobbets will be set, and in at least one of sections (a), (b), (c) in Group II.

Group I

(a) Bede, Ecclesiastical History of the English People, Preface, Bks I, 23–4; II; III; IV; V, 9–10, 19. (trans. L. Sherley-Price, revised R.E. Latham, with introduction and notes by D.H. Farmer, Penguin Classics, 1990) pp. 41–3, 72–265, 278–82, 300–6.

(b) Bede's Letter to Egbert, trans D.H. Farmer, ibid., pp. 337–51.

(c) Bede, On the Temple, trans. S. Connolly, in J. O'Reilly (Liverpool University Press: Translated Texts for Historians 21, 1995), Prologue and Book I to I, 8.4, pp. 1–33; Book II, 18.8 to 20.9, pp. 76–100.

(d) Eddius Stephanus, Life of Wilfrid in The Age of Bede, (ed. D.H. Farmer , trans. J. Webb, Penguin Classics 1988) pp. 105–82.

(e) `The Dream of the Rood' , in A Choice of Anglo-Saxon Verse, ed. and trans. R. Hamer (Faber, 1970), pp. 161–71.

Group II

(a) Adomnan of lona, Life of St Columba, ed. and trans. R. Sharpe, (Penguin Classics, 1995).

(b) Bede, Life of Cuthbert, in The Age of Bede (Penguin Classics, 1988), pp. 41–102. Bede, Lives of the Abbots of Wearmouth and Jarrow, ibid., pp. 185–208.

Bede's Homily on the Gospel for the Feast of St Benedict Biscop, in Bede, Homilies on the Gospels, trans. L.T. Martin and D. Hurst, Preface by B. Ward, (Cistercian Studies Series, 110, 1991), pp. 125–32.

Letters of Aldhelm, in Aldhelm, The Prose Works, trans. M. Lapidge and M. Herren (Boydell and Brewer, 1979), pp. 152–70.

(c) Willibald's Life of St Boniface and The Correspondence of St Boniface, in C.H. Talbot, The Anglo-Saxon Missionaries in Germany (Stead and Ward, 1954), pp. 25–62, 65–149.

 

(37) Christian Spirituality

Candidates will be expected to discuss Christian prayer in its theological, psychological, and historical aspects, paying particular attention to contemplation and mystical prayer. There will be four groups of texts, and candidates will be expected to have studied two of them.

(a) Patristics

Gregory of Nyssa, The Life of Moses, Book 2, tr. A.J. Malherbe and E. Ferguson, The Classics of Western Spirituality (SPCK/ Paulist Press, 1978) pp. 55–137.

Ps.-Macanius, Homilies 1, 5, 15, tr. G.A. Maloney, The Classics of Western Spirituality (SPCK/Paulist Press, 1992).

Evagrius Ponticus, The Praktikos and Chapters on Prayer. (Translations available in Faculty Library).

Ps.-Dionysius the Areopagite, The Mystical Theology. (Translations available in Faculty Library).

(b) English Fourteenth-century Mysticism

The Cloud of Unknowing, tr. J. Walsh, The Classics of Western Spirituality (SPCK/Paulist Press, 1981).

Julian of Norwich: Revelations of Divine Love, tr. E. Colledge and J. Walsh, The Classics of Western Spirituality (SPCK/ Paulist Press 1978).

(c) Spanish Mysticism

Teresa of Avila, The Interior Castle, tr. Allison Peers in Complete Works, vol. II (Sheed and Ward, 1946), pp. 199–351.

John of the Cross, Living flame of Love, second redaction, tr. Allison Peers in Complete Works, vol. III (3 vols in one, Anthony Clarke, 1978) pp. 103–95.

(d) The Wesleys and William Law

Texts in A.C. Outler, ed., John Wesley, Library of Protestant Theology (OUP 1964), pp. 197–231, 251–98 (i.e. Sermons on Justification by Faith and on The Witness of the Spirit; Discourse II on The Law Established by Faith; Sermon on Christian Perfection; The Scripture Way of Salvation, Thoughts on Christian Perfection).

E.H. Sugden, ed., The Standard Sermons of John Wesley, vol. 11(seventh edn. Epworth Press, 1968). Sermons 32 (The Nature of Enthusiasm), 34 (Catholic Spirit), 39 (New Birth), 40 (Wilderness State).

H.A. Hodges and A.M. Allehin, A Rapture of Praise. Hymns of John and Charles Wesley (Hodder and Stoughton, 1966). The following hymns: 3, 9, 22, 27, 38, 54, 55, 81, 84, 90, 105, 118, 124, 126, 131.

William Law: The Spirit of Prayer: Part 1, ed. S. Spencer (James Clarke, 1969).

 

(38) The Sociology of Religion

The paper will consist of two parts. Candidates will be expected to answer at least one question from each part.

(a) Texts

Candidates will be expected to know at least two of the following in detail:

(i) K. Marx, Theses on Feuerbach and The German Ideology ch. 1, ed. C. Arthur (Lawrence and Wishart, 1985), together with Capital, chapters l and 13 (Penguin Books, 1990).

(ii) E. Durkheim, The Elementary Forms of the Religious Life (Allen and Unwin, 1976).

(iii) M. Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism (Harper Collins, 1991).

(iv) E. Troeltsch, The Social Teaching of the Christian Churches (2 vols., J. Knox, 1992).

(v) Religion and History, ed. Adams (T. and T. Clark, 1991).

(vi) Talcott Parsons, Action Theory and the Human Condition (New York, 1978).

(b) Themes

Candidates will be expected to be able to discuss the following issues in their relation to religious formations: class, gender, race, legitimation, power structures, violence, sects and cults. Questions will be set on sociological readings of other parts of the Theology syllabus, includ- ing Biblical studies, doctrine, and Church history. Familiarity with contemporary sociological discussion will be assumed.

 

(39) Psychology of Religion

The paper will cover theories about aspects of behaviour or experiences relevant to religion and the empirical evidence on these theories. Psychological research methods and their applicability to different aspects of religion such as conversion, prayer, worship. Cognitive and non-cognitive (i.e. psychoanalytic and affective) accounts of religion. Normal and abnormal religious behaviour. Origin and development of religious concepts. Moral development. Constructs of theological psychology (e.g. soul; conscience, sin, and guilt; repentance; forgiveness; mercy) and their status in contemporary psychology. Psychology applied to pastoral concerns: religious education; marriage; health; death and bereavement; substance abuse.

 

(40) The Bible: Its Use and Influence

Candidates for this paper will be expected to have an understanding of the authority and role of the Bible in theological and ethical discussion and in Christian practice and liturgy. There will also be an opportunity to consider theories of interpretation, the use of the Bible in non-academic as well as academic contexts, and visual, dramatic and musical, as well as literary explorations of the Bible. A wide range of questions will be set, allowing candidates to concentrate on particular periods and issues. The Board (through the Handbook for Students in the final Honour School of Theology) may prescribe for more detailed study the interpretation of one or more biblical texts. The paper will be examined by three hour written examination and short essay of not more than 3,000 words.

 

(41) Any other subject that may be approved by the Board of the Faculty of Theology from time to time by regulation published in the Gazette and communicated to college tutors by the end of the first week of the Trinity Full Term in the academic year preceding the examination in which the option will be available.

Optional translation papers (2 hours each)

The translation components of papers (25), The Hebrew of the Old Testament, and (29), The New Testament in Greek, may be offered individually as optional extra papers by candidates who are not taking one or both of the full papers.'


14 Committee for the History of Art

M.St. in History of Art and Visual Culture

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 692, delete ll. 29–53 and substitute:

`(See also the general notice at the commencement of these regulations.) The regulations of the Committee for the History of Art are as follows:

1. Every candidate must follow for at least three terms a course of instruction in the History of Art, and must, upon entering for the examination, produce from his or her society a certificate to this effect.

2. Syllabus

The course shall comprise: I, one compulsory paper; II, one optional paper chosen by the candidate; and III, a dissertation. I The compulsory paper entitled `History and Visual Forms: an Introduction to Art Historiography and Methods' is taken in Michaelmas Term and will comprise course work and a written examination in Trinity Term. II Optional papers covering topics and issues of art history and visual culture from the later Middle Ages to the present, as approved from time to time by the Committee of the History of Art, are taken in Hilary Term. A definitive list of the optional papers available in any one year will be posted on the notice boards of the Department of the History of Art and of the Faculty of Modern History by Friday of Fourth Week of Michaelmas Term at the latest. Optional papers will be examined by two extended essays of between 3,000 and 4,000 words. III A dissertation of not more than 15,000 words on a topic in the history of art, to be approved by the candidate's supervisor and the Professor of the History of Art prior to the submission of essay and dissertation titles to the Chairman of Examiners for the degree.

3. Candidates shall make written application for the approval of the titles of their extended essays in their optional paper, and also notify the examiners of the title of their dissertation, by Friday of Fourth Week of Hilary Term. Communications with the examiners should be addressed to the Chairman of Examiners for the M.St. in History of Art and Visual Culture, c/o the Departmental Secretary, Department of the History of Art, 59 George Street, Oxford OX1 2BE.

4. Two typewritten or printed copies of the extended essays must be sent to the Chairman of the Examiners at the address above by noon on Friday of Week Nine of Hilary Term. Two typewritten or printed copies of the dissertation must be sent to the Chairman of Examiners at the same address by noon on Friday of Week Seven of Trinity Term. The dissertation must include a short abstract which concisely summarises its scope and principal arguments, in about 300 words. Both the essays and the dissertations must be (individually) securely and firmly bound in either hard or soft covers; and the presentation and footnotes should comply with the requirements specified in the Regulations of the General Board for the degrees of M.Litt. and D.Phil. and follow the Conventions for the presentation of dissertations and theses of the Board of the Faculty of Modern History.

5. Candidates must present themselves for an oral examination if required to do so by the examiners.

6. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.

7. A candidate who fails the examination will be permitted to retake the examination on one further occasion only, not later than one year after the initial attempt. Such a candidate whose dissertation has been of satisfactory standard will not be required to resubmit the dissertation, while a candidate who has reached a satisfactory standard on both the extended essays and the written examination papers will not be required to retake those parts of the examination.'


14 Committee on Continuing Education

(a) Postgraduate Diploma in Professional Archaeology

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 981, ll. 21–3, delete `together with four periods of practical experience each of three months in approved professional archaeological agencies'.

2 Ibid., l. 24, after `three years.' insert: `Full-time students will be seconded to approved professional archaeological agencies for four periods of three months. Part-time students must normally be employed within approved relevant organisations to register for the Diploma, and their place of work should perform the same function as the placements.'

3 Ibid., delete ll. 28–9 and substitute:

`(a) submission of a portfolio of placement work (or in the case of part-time students, in-house project work);'.

4 Ibid., l. 31, delete `eight' and substitute `five'.

5 Ibid., delete ll. 32–3 and substitute:

`(d) presentation of a project at an induction course;

(e) ten critical reports, not exceeding 2,000 words in length on each of the modules specified in the schedule below (with the exception of the induction course);'

6 Ibid., l. 34, renumber cl. 2(e) as 2(f).

7 Ibid., ll. 36–7, delete `the critical report under (c) and assessments under (e)' and substitute: `the critical reports under (e) and assessments under (f)'.

8 Ibid., l. 45, delete `2(d)' and substitute `2(e)'.

9 Ibid., p. 982, delete ll. 1–10 and substitute:

`Schedule

(i) Candidates are required to attend the following modules:

(i) induction course

(ii) survey

(iii) photography

(iv) conservation

(v) health and safety

(II) Candidates are required to attend six module courses, each of either one or two days chosen from a schedule published annually at the start of the academic year.'


(b) Master of Studies in Professional Archaeology

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 704, l. 46, delete `over a period of four days'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 49–50 and substitute: `The dissertation must be delivered not later than noon on the third Friday in September of the year of the course to the Chairman of Examiners for the Degree of M.St. in Professional Archaeology, c/o Registry, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford.'

3 Ibid., p. 705, ll. 10–11, delete `, successful completion of which is a condition of entry to the M.St.'.


(c) Master of Studies in Psychodynamic Practice

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, l. 13, before `Applicants' insert `1.'.

2 Ibid., p. 705, delete ll. 16–18 and substitute:

`2. Course

The course will consist of research methodology lectures, group research seminars and group clinical seminars, individual tutorials, and continuing personal therapy and supervised practice. The course will be taken on a part-time basis for a period of one year's duration.'

3 Ibid., delete ll. 19–29 and substitute:

`3. Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in the following:

(a) attendance at weekly classes, group seminars, individual tutorials, and personal therapy and placement sessions;

(b) submission of a dissertation of no more than 15,000 words on a topic selected by the student in consultation with the research tutor and course director and agreed by the external examiner. The dissertation must be forwarded to the examiners c/o Registry, Department for Continuing Education, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA, for receipt not later than noon on the last Friday of September in the year in which the course is studied. Material already submitted for the Postgraduate Diploma in Psychodynamic Practice may not be included;

(c) participation in a minimum of twelve placement supervisions and at least 100 hours of client/patient contact, and submission of an end-of-year report by a candidate's placement supervisor;

(d) participation in a minimum of forty hours of personal therapy;

(e) submission of termly reports from both research and clinical tutors;

(f) a viva voce examination at the end of the course of study.'

4 Ibid., ll. 30–4, renumber cll. 3–5 as 4–6.


16 Inter-faculty Committee for Chinese Studies

M.Phil. in Modern Chinese Studies

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 623, after l. 44, insert:

`(xi) Modern Chinese Studies.'

2 Ibid., p. 624, l. 7, after `Persian.' insert: `For subject (xi), Modern Chinese Studies, candidates wishing to offer papers from Group A (Economics) shall normally have a first degree in Economics or a closely related discipline; those wishing to offer papers from Group B (Modern History, International Relations and Politics) shall normally have a first degree in a relevant discipline; and those wishing to offer papers from Group C (Social Anthropology) shall normally have a first degree in Social Anthropology or a closely related discipline. In all cases, candidates must satisfy the person appointed to interview them by the Oriental Studies Board on the recommendation of the Inter-faculty Committee for Chinese Studies that they possess the necessary disciplinary knowledge to profit from the M.Phil. in Modern Chinese Studies.'

3 Ibid., p. 633, after l. 12 insert:

`(xi) Modern Chinese Studies

I Qualifying Examination

Every candidate must pass a qualifying examination before the end of the third term from commencement of the course. The qualifying examination shall be set and administered by the examiners appointed in Michaelmas Term by the Oriental Studies Board, on the recommendation of the Inter-faculty Committee for Chinese Studies, to examine for the M.Phil. in Modern Chinese Studies. This examination shall consist of two parts, as follows:

(1) General paper on Modern China

A single, three-hour examination paper on topics on Modern China, which all candidates are required to study in the first and second term from commencement of the course. Details of the chronological two-term course shall be provided in the course handbook available from the Course Co-ordinator.

The qualifying examination shall take place during the Noughth Week of Trinity Term, the exact date and time to be decided by the examiners. Conventions indicating the format of the examination, including the number of questions and range of choice, shall be communicated to candidates by the end of the first week of Hilary Term.

Entries for part 1 of the qualifying examination must be made on the appropriate form, obtainable from the University Offices, by Friday of the first week of the Hilary Full Term following the candidate's admission. Candidates who fail part 1 of the qualifying examination shall be allowed to retake it in the Eighth Week of Trinity Term.

(2) Two Chinese language papers

All candidates must offer one written language paper in Chinese and one oral test. Both parts of the Chinese language qualifying examination shall take place during the final (Eighth) Week of Trinity Term, the exact dates and times to be decided by the examiners. Details of the examination shall be provided in outline in the course handbook and in detail in the examination conventions, the latter to be communicated to candidates by Course Coordinator by the end of the First week of Trinity Term. Entries for part 2 of the qualifying examination must be made on the appropriate form, obtainable from the University Offices, by Friday of the first week of the Trinity Full Term following the candidate's admission. Candidates who fail part 2 of the qualifying examination shall be allowed to retake it in the Noughth Week of the following Michaelmas Term.

II Final Examination

No candidate shall enter the final examination unless he or she has already passed the two parts of the first-year qualifying examination. In the final examination, every candidate must offer:

(a) A dissertation of not more than 30,000 words on a subject in the candidate's chosen discipline approved by the committee, to be delivered to the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford, by noon on the Monday of the Second Week of Trinity Term. The thesis must be accompanied by a statement that it is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated. Successful candidates will be required to deposit one copy of the thesis in the Bodleian Library, and to sign a form stating whether they give permission for it to be consulted.

(b) Two papers in one of the three designated disciplines, that is to say economics (group A), or modern history/ politics/international relations (combined) (group B), or social anthropology (group C), to be taught in the third and fourth terms from the commencement of the course.

Since all disciplines may be not be available every year, candidates must confirm with the course co-ordinator that the discipline they intend to offer will be available before application.

Group A: Economics

(i) Chinese Economics

This paper is designed to provide candidates with the `minimum kit' necessary for gaining competence in understanding and analysing Chinese economic policies, institutions, reform, and development outcomes since the founding of the People's Republic. It is divided into two parts, Chinese Economic Developments in the Pre-Reform Period (1949–78), which will concentrate on topics concerned with Development Strategies and topics relating to the Command System and Economic Institutions, and The Chinese Economy in Transition (1978–present), which will concentrate on topics relating to the following: Models and Strategies of Transition; De-collectivisation of Agriculture; the Non-state sector; Fiscal Decentralisation and Central–local Relations; Enterprise Reform; Corporatisation and Corporate Governance; Financial Sector Reforms; Macroeconomic Stability and Control; China and the International Economy. Details of the topics to be covered, of the form in which the paper will be delivered, and of its detailed objectives are set out in the course handbook.

(ii) The Chinese Economy in Comparative Perspective

This paper is designed to examine aspects of the Chinese economic development and reforms in comparison with other transition economies and less developed countries (LDC)/emerging markets, focusing on issues which are generic to transition economies and developing countries but with special reference to China. Teaching for this paper will involve: (a) attendance at lectures, seminars, classes for the Command and Transitional Economies paper (paper (j) for the M.Phil. in Economics); (b) classes and tutorials, as appropriate, with members of the Sub-faculty of Economics, on Transition and Development Economics dealing specifically with China. Details of the topics to be covered are set out in the course handbook.

Group B: Modern History/Politics/International Relations

Candidates will be introduced to some of the current controversies and debates in the literature on twentieth-century China organised around those themes that best define this period. Full details are provided in the course handbook. Topics may include the following:

Paper 1

The role of the Party, political ideology; the military; regime and state security; the rise of China and its challenge to the global system; human rights and legal culture.

Paper 2

The politics of modern enterprise; peasant society; radicalism and radical social movements; ethnicity; gender.

Group C: Social Anthropology

(1) Theory and Methods of Social and Cultural Anthropology (Paper shared with the M.Sc. in Social Anthropology and the M.Sc. in Material Anthropology and Museum Ethnography).

The scope of this paper includes the following topics: concepts of the individual, society and the person in anthropological perspective; issues of the body; theories of practice, phenomenology; theories of power, order, and law; aspects of disorder and violence in society; systems of knowledge and belief; ritual and myth; sybolism and symbolic classification; moral systems and the world religions; oral literature and historical memory; linguistic and artistic modes of communication; aesthetic anthropology; methodological approaches to the study of arts, performance, and material culture; museums, written texts, and representation. Fieldwork and data collection methods, quantitative and qualitative techniques, cultural property and indigenous rights; applications of film and sound recording; preparing research proposals; ethical problems.

(2) Anthropology of China

The scope of this paper includes the following topics: anthropology and China; family; birth control; kinship; gender; sexuality; religion; ritual; systems of representation and classification; marketing systems and village communities; bureaucracy, nation, and the state; face and social relations; migration and urbanisation; the politics of cultural difference and ethinicity; the overseas Chinese; popular culture and consumerism; China in the world. Details of the topics listed above will be provided in the course handbook. Candidates shall be required to offer two papers, as follows:

(1) Anthropological thoery and methods

The topics to be covered will be as follows:

(i) introduction: anthropology and China

(ii) family and birth control

(iii) kinship

(iv) gender and sexuality

(v) and (vi) folk religion

(2) Anthropology of China

The topics to be covered will be as follows:

(i) principled particularism, connections, nepotism

(ii) marketing systems and village communities

(iii) internal migration and urbanisation

(iv) the nation and nationalism

(v) the overseas Chinese

(vi) popular culture and consumerism

(vii) Greater China?

Full details of the topics listed above will be provided in the course handbook.

(c) two Chinese language papers (one oral, one written)

The Oral examination will consist of two parts: a comprehension group test and an individual test. Full details of the oral examination will be provided in the course handbook. The written language paper will be of a duration of three hours and will comprise a translation into Chinese, comprehension exercise, and translation into English. Full details will be provided in the course handbook and in the examination conventions.

The papers under (b) and (c) above will be taken in the Eighth Week of Trinity Term of the final year. The examiners may examine any candidate viva voce. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'


17 Inter-faculty Committee for Queen Elizabeth House

M.Phil. in Development Studies

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 575, after l. 45, insert:

`(k) Gender and Development

Key concepts in Gender and Development relating to: Population; Land-use and the environment; Employment, assess, markets, and credit; social issues; Civil society; violence and conflict; Political organisation and theories of power.'


18 Standing Committee for Engineering and Computing Science

(a) Honour School of Engineering and Computing Science

(i) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first Part I examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 176, after l. 37, insert:

`The examiners will not provide calculators, but will permit the use of one hand-held pocket calculator as specified in the Honour School of Engineering Science.'


(ii) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first Part II examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 178, delete ll. 49–50 and substitute:

`The examiners will not provide calculators, but will permit the use of one hand-held pocket calculator as specified in the Honour School of Engineering Science.'


(b) Pass School of Engineering and Computing Science

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 179, delete ll. 28–9 and substitute:

`The examiners will not provide calculators, but will permit the use of one hand-held pocket calculator as specified in the Honour School of Engineering Science.'


19 Standing Committee for Engineering, Economics, and Management and Related Schools

(a) Honour School of Engineering, Economics, and Management

(i) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first Part I examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 184, delete ll. 32–40.

2 Ibid., p. 1122, delete ll. 34–42.


(ii) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 184, delete ll. 4–5.


(iii) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 184, insert after l. 9:

`In the case of written papers in Engineering Science, candidates are restricted to the use of one hand-held pocket calculator as specified in the Honour School of Engineering Science. For all other written papers, the examiners will permit the use of any hand-held calculator subject to the conditions set out on p. 1074.'


(iv) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first Part II examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 184, insert after l. 47:

`In the case of written papers in Engineering Science, candidates are restricted to the use of one hand-held pocket calculator as specified in the Honour School of Engineering Science. For all other written papers, the examiners will permit the use of any hand-held calculator subject to the conditions set out on p. 1074.'


(b) Pass School of Engineering, Economics, and Management

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 186, delete ll. 28–9 and substitute:

`In the case of written papers in Engineering Science, candidates are restricted to the use of one hand-held pocket calculator as specified in the Honour School of Engineering Science. For all other written papers, the examiners will permit the use of any hand-held calculator subject to the conditions set out on p. 1074.'


20 Standing Committee for Engineering (Materials), Economics, and Management and Related Schools

Honour School of Materials, Economics, and Management

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first Part I examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 276, delete ll. 26–9, and substitute:

`In the case of written papers in Metallurgy and the Science of Materials, candidates are restricted to models of hand-held calculators approved by the Sub-faculty of Materials. For all other written papers, the examiners will permit the use of any hand-held calculator, subject to the conditions set out on p. 1074.'

2 Ibid., p. 276, delete ll. 43–6.

3 Ibid., p. 277, delete ll. 1–5.


21 Standing Committee for Physics and Philosophy

Moderations in Physics and Philosophy

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 72, l. 42, delete `and B'.

2 Ibid., delete l. 43, and substitute:

`and Frege, Foundations of Arithmetic trans. J.L. Austin, Blackwell, 1980.'


EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Biological Sciences

L.M.A. BARTLEY, Merton: `The transmission dynamics of Dengue infections'.
Department of Zoology, Friday, 28 April, 10 a.m.
Examiners: T.R.E. Southwood, J. Noakes.

A. DAVISON, Merton: `Phospholipid metabolism in hepatic lymphoma'.
Institute of Molecular Medicine, Wednesday, 31 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: A.L. Harris, S. Ronen.

P.F. DONALD, Wolfson: `The ecology and conservation of skylarks Alauda arvensis on lowland farmland'.
Department of Zoology, Friday, 12 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: J.R. Krebs, G.R. Potts.

A. MACDOUGALL, New College: `Receiver psychology and the design of protective coloration'.
Department of Zoology, Thursday, 22 June, 10 a.m.
Examiners: M. Berdoy, J. Allen.

 


Clinical Medicine

R. AUBREY, St Hilda's: `Phase variation of lipopolysaccharide in Haemophilus influenzae'.
Nuffield Department of Pathology, Friday, 28 April, 2 p.m.
Examiners: S. Peacock, D. Maskill.

J.W. FRY, Exeter: `Delivery of a donor MHC class I gene using a recombinant adenovirus to induce immunological unresponsiveness'.
Nuffield Department of Surgery, Thursday, 4 May, 3 p.m.
Examiners: V.E.F. Marshall, A. George.

 


English Language and Literature

S. POYNTING, Linacre: `A critical edition of Walter Montagu's The Shepherd's Paradise, Acts 1–3'.
University, Friday, 28 April, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: E.H. Cooper, M. Butler.

 


Medieval and Modern Languages

E. PENNEBAKER, St Anne's: `"Ideas instead of bombs": the Austrian Cold War novel'.
Examination Schools, Thursday, 18 May, 11 a.m.
Examiners: K.J. Leeder, A.W. Barker.

 


Modern History

E. ALBANIS, St John's: `German-Jewish cultural identity from 1900 to the aftermath of the First World War'.
St Antony's, Monday, 8 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: A.J. Nicholls, A. Gotzmann.

 


Physical Sciences

B.R. BALMER, Oriel: `Processing studies on bismuth 2212 superconducting thick films'.
Department of Materials, Wednesday, 10 May, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: R.I. Todd, P. Regnier.

I. BOZTOSUN, Pembroke: `Coupled-channels calculations for the scattering of deformed light heavy-ions: a challenge to the standard approach'.
Nuclear and Astrophysics Laboratory, Tuesday, 2 May, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: A.G. Merchant, M.A. Nagarajan.

J. CADMAN, Merton: `Redox- and proactive receptors for anion recognition in water'.
St Anne's, Tuesday, 2 May, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: J.R. Dilworth, P. Moore.

R.W. EVESON, Wolfson: `Geminate free radical processes and magnetic field effects'.
Corpus Christi, Monday, 8 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: P.J. Hore, B.C. Gilbert.

A.C. NICOL, Oriel: `Aspects of copper precipitation and irradiation hardening in Fe–Cu alloys'.
Department of Materials, Wednesday, 10 May, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: I.P. Jones, J.M. Titchmarsh.

J.V.A. OUZMAN, Wolfson: `The chemistry and structure of diketopiperazines'.
Dyson Perrins Laboratory, Monday, 8 May, 10 a.m.
Examiners: G.W.J. Fleet, L.M. Harwood.

 


Psychological Studies

N. CLIFTON, Nuffield: `Women, work, and family in England and France: a question of identity'.
New College, Monday, 15 May, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: E.J. Frazer, E. Apfelbaum.

 


Social Studies

V.A.A. KAMSLER, Wolfson: `The art of judgement'.
Nuffield, Thursday, 4 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: P.L. Miller, A.D. Mason.

L.J. LE RENDU, Lady Margaret Hall: `The positive management of dependency: Jersey's survival as a microstate in the modern world'.
Examination Schools, Friday, 28 April, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: G. Marshall, A. Lee.

 


Theology

A. MARETT-CROSS, St Benet's Hall: `Seeing the Lord: rapture and the knowledge of God in scholasticism up to Thomas Aquinas'.
Harris Manchester, Wednesday, 17 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: L.J. Smith, D.A. Turner.

 


EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE

The examiners appointed by the following faculty board give notice of oral examination of their candidate as follows:

Mathematical Sciences

KWONG-CHEONG WONG, Hertford: `lp-provability based on the lme"-calculus'.
Computing Laboratory, Tuesday, 2 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: C.-H.L. Ong, D.J. Pym.

 




Colleges, Halls, and Societies

Contents of this section:

Note: college vacancies will also be found in the Gazette's Appointments Supplement.

Return to Contents Page of this issue


OBITUARIES

Christ Church

DR ROBERT SYDNEY SMITH, Rhodes Scholar 1930.


Corpus Christi College

PETER JOHN URNES, MA (PH.D. Harvard), 7 February 2000; Rhodes Scholar 1951–3. Aged 70.


Lincoln College

GEOFFREY CHANTLER, 11 August 1999; commoner 1947–9. Aged 72.

GORDON ALDRIDGE DUGGAN, 1999; commoner 1958–63. Aged 62.

RODNEY NOEL EXTON, 22 December 1999; commoner 1948–51. Aged 71.

R.R.A. KERN-MARTIN, 6 November 1999; commoner 1947. Aged 75.

EDWARD OSCAR GUTHRIE PAIN, 6 January 2000; commoner 1952–5. Aged 74.

DAVID GEORGE PECK, 1999; commoner 1951. Aged 88.

ARTHUR JOHN TURNER, MBE, 14 February 2000; commoner 1935. Aged 83.


Oriel College

NORMAN OLIVER KENDAL, MA, 5 December 1999; 1938. Aged 79.

DR ALISTAIR DUNCAN, MA, 4 August 1999; 1944. Aged 72.

HENRY ST JOHN MILDWAY GULLET, MC, 1999; 1934. Aged 85.

DR DAVID KENDALL, MA, DM; 1930.

LAKSHAMRAO RAJWADE, 1999; 1936. Aged 87.

FRANCIS LEWIS, BA, 1999; 1933. Aged 85.

WILLIAM ARTHUR EDWARDS, B.SC., MA, 1999; 1924. Aged 94.

RONALD GORDON CANT, MA, 31 December 1999; 1929. Aged 91.

PHILIP GORDON BALKWILL; 1958.

LORD DUNROSSIL, MA, CMG, March 2000. Aged 73.

THOMAS JOSEPH PICKVANCE, MA, 25 February 2000; 1937. Aged 88.

JOHN NICHOLSON MATSON, MA, 25 January 2000; 1938. Aged 85.


St Anne's College

MISS CAROLINE CARLYLE; Member of the Society of Oxford Home Students 1934–7. Aged 84.

MISS MOIRA DUNBAR; Member of the Society of Oxford Home Students 1936–9. Aged 81.

MISS WINIFRED JACKSON; Member of St Anne's Society 1946–8. Aged 97.

MISS MARION PASCOE; Member of the Society of Oxford Home Students 1932–5. Aged 86.


St Edmund Hall

THE REVD PHILIP PENROSE BLOY, MA, 27 March 2000; commoner 1938–9 and 1947–8. Aged 80.

MICHAEL CLIFFORD FOSTER, MA, 27 February 2000; commoner 1946–9. Aged 80.


St Hugh's College

VIOLA MARY CAIRD (née Newport), 23 March 2000; scholar 1942–4. Aged 77.

VERA JOYCE DANIEL, MA (BA, PH.D. London), 4 March 2000; Tutorial Fellow and University Lecturer in French 1957–86, Emeritus Fellow 1986–2000. Aged 78.

EVELINE BARBARA DEAN, 1999; commoner 1936–9. Aged 81.

RUTH MARY GRINDROD (née Orgill), 7 February 2000; commoner 1939–42. Aged 87.

MARIE LEWIS, 3 September 1999; commoner 1945–8. Aged 74.

MARGARET EDITH LONG, 15 January 2000; commoner 1933–6. Aged 86.

 

PATRICIA PARSONS (née Beer), 15 August 1999; commoner 1941–4. Aged 79. LUC MERIOL TREVOR, FRS, 12 January 2000; commoner 1938–41. Aged 82.


MEMORIAL CELEBRATION

Brasenose College

A Celebration of the life of LEIGHTON REYNOLDS, formerly Fellow of the college, will be held at 3 p.m. on Saturday, 13 May, in the Examination Schools, followed by tea in the college.


MEMORIAL MEETING

Jesus College

A Memorial Meeting for DON PAUL FOWLER, MA, D.PHIL., will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 6 May, in the Examination Schools, followed by tea in the college.


MEMORIAL SERVICES

St Catherine's College

A Memorial Service for PETER LEVI, formerly Fellow of the college and Professor of Poetry (1984–9), will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 16 May, in the University Church of St Mary the Virgin, followed by tea in the college.

St Hilda's College

A Memorial Service for JANET HIDDLESTON, formerly Fellow of the college, will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 29 April, in the Jacqueline du Pré Music Building, St Hilda's College, followed by tea in the senior common room.


ELECTIONS

Green College

To a Fellowship by Election:

ANN MCPHERSON, MB, BS, D.CH., FRCGP

To an Emeritus Fellowship:

MICHAEL GEORGE WILDMAN KETTLEWELL, MB, MA, M.CHIR. (MA Cambridge)

To an Honorary Fellowship:

IRVINE STEWART LEES LOUDON BM, B.CH., DM, FRCGP, DRCOG, RE

To Graduate Awards:

SIMON WILLIAM CLEMENTS (BA Trinity, Dublin)

RAYMOND ALDRIN DANIELS (B.SC. Western Cape)

DEBORAH HAY, BA

NEEL PATEL (BA Cambridge)

FENELLA GEORGETTE PIKE, BA

SOLANGE GOODRICH TAYLOR (BA Yale, M.ED. Oklahoma)

KENLEY THOMAS (B.SC. Brunel)

JOHANNA KATHERINE WARNKE (BA Cambridge)


To Computer Scholarships:

MONA CHUNG (BA McMaster, MA Toronto)

FRANZ JOEL WEN-MING LEONG (MB, BS Adelaide)


Magdalen College

To an Honorary Fellowship (from 10 November 1999):

JAMES FENTON

To an Emeritus Fellowship (from 1 December 1999):

K.P. WILLS

To an Official Fellowship as Senior Bursar (for three years from 1 December 1999):

C.G. YOUNG, MA (MBA Harvard)

To a Supernumerary Non-stipendiary Fellowship (with effect from 27 January 2000, for so long as he remains University Development Director):

M. SMITHSON (MA Cambridge)

To Visiting Fellowships:

DR M. BRYDEN, University of Reading (1 October 2000–1 January 2001)

PROFESSOR M.A. STONES, University of Pittsburgh (c1 January–30 June 2001)

PROFESSOR EMILIO PASQUINI, University of Bologna (1 April–30 June 2001)


To a Fellowship by Examination in Engineering Science (for three years from 16 February 2000):

B. BYRNE, Balliol College

To a Fellowship by Examination in Art History (for three years from 1 October 2000):

MS C. LEVER, Department of the History of Art

To a Fellowship by Examination in Philosophy (for three years from 1 October 2000):

MS I. DICKIE, St Catherine's College


Mansfield College

To an Honorary Fellowship (with immediate effect):

JOHN CAIRD, writer, director, and Honorary Associate Director, the Royal Shakespeare Company

To Scholarships (from MT 1999):

BENJAMIN LLOYD, formerly of Stamford School

PETER SIDGWICK, formerly of Ampleforth College

REBECCA LODWICK, formerly of Stanground College

RICHARD CARROLL, formerly of St Paul's School

KHAI FOK, formerly of Maktab Sains Mara Kuala Lumpur

BENJAMIN FRANCIS, formerly of King George V College


Nuffield College

To the Sub-Wardenship (as Acting Warden 2000–1):

PROFESSOR BYRON SHAFER

To an Official Fellowship:

RICHARD BREEN (MA, PH.D. Cambridge), FBA, Professor of Sociology, European University Institute, Florence

To a Professorial Fellowship:

DAVID MAYHEW (BA Massachusetts, PH.D. Harvard), Professor of Political Science, Yale University, and John M. Olin Visiting Professor in American Government 2000–1

To Postdoctoral Research Fellowships:

ERIK EYSTER (BA Columbia), University of California, Berkeley

STEPHEN FISHER, BA, D.PHIL., Nuffield College

STUART SOROKA (BA Queen's University, Kingston), University of British Columbia

HERMAN VAN DE WERFHORST (Master's degree, Nijmegen), University of Nijmegen

JAMES ENGLE-WARNICK (BSEE, Akron), University of Pittsburgh


To a Guardian Research Fellowship:

ROSALIND YARDE (BA Warwick), Senior Broadcast Journalist, BBC World Service

To a Visiting Fellowship:

SIR CHRISTOPHER BLAND, BA, Chairman, NFC, and Board of Governors, the BBC

To non-stipendiary Research Fellowships:

KATE FISHER, M.SC., D.PHIL. (BA Cambridge), Department of Social Policy and Social Work (in association with a Wellcome Research Fellowship)

HANS-MARTIN KROLZIG (MA Bielefeld, PH.D. Humboldt University, Berlin), Research Officer, Department of Economics

ADAM SWIFT, MA, D.PHIL., Balliol College (for two years from 1 October 2000; in assocation with a British Academy Fellowship)

To Associate Memberships:

BRIAN HENRY, MA (B.SC., M.SC. LSE), Department of Economics

ROBERT ANDERSEN (MA Western Ontario, PH.D. McMaster), Department of Sociology


St Hilda's College

To an Honorary Fellowship (with immediate effect):

JUDITH WEIR, CBE (MA Cambridge)


St Hugh's College

To a Hodgson Scholarship:

ROHAN RISHI, formerly of King Edward VI Five Ways School


Trinity College

To an Official Fellowship in Economics (with effect from 1 October 2000):

CHRISTOPHER WALLACE, D.PHIL. (B.SC., M.SC. London School of Economics), Open Prize Research Fellow

To a Junior Research Fellowship in English (with effect from 1 October 2000):

CARL EDWARD THOMPSON, M.PHIL., Pembroke College

To a Titley Exhibition in Biochemistry:

JENNIFER LOUISE GALLOP

To Woodruff Exhibitions in Theology:

FLORENCE RUSHTON

CHARLOTTE ELIZABETH TIMSON


PRIZES

Mansfield College

Collections Prizes (MT 1999):

RACHEL JOHN

ISABEL THOMAS

GRAHAM MARTIN


Collections Prizes (HT 2000):

HOWARD CHAPMAN

REBECCA GRIFFITHS

ELEANOR BURN

SIMON WICKS

College Prize:

(Joint award)

DAVID YOUNG

PAUL SIMON


NOTICES

BALLIOL COLLEGE

Six-hour Stipendiary Lecturership in Ancient History

Balliol College proposes, if a suitable candidate applies, to appoint a six-hour Stipendiary Lecturer in Ancient History for Michaelmas Term 2000 and Hilary Term 2001. The lecturer will be required to teach up to six hours of Ancient History in both Greats and Ancient and Modern History, and to take responsibility for the organisation of these two courses (including admissions), and for pastoral care of students; teaching for the historical and other options in Literae Humaniores Honour Moderations will also be expected. The lecturer will receive a stipend of £3,519 and certain common room rights. The college wishes to appoint someone whose main specialism is in a central period of either Greek or Roman history; and applicants will be free to make exchange arrangements with other colleges in respect of the options which they are unable to cover.

Applicants should provide a letter of application supported by a curriculum vitae, and should state which of the standard subjects they are able to teach. They should give the names of two referees whom they should ask to write directly to the Senior Tutor. Applications and references must reach the Senior Tutor, Balliol College, Oxford OX1 3BJ, by Friday, 12 May. Balliol College is an equal opportunities employer.


CHRIST CHURCH

College Lecturership in Geography

Christ Church proposes to appoint a lecturer in Physical Geography to provide six hours' tutorial teaching per week, for three years from 1 October 2000. The lecturer will be expected to teach for the Honour Moderations in Physical Geography (hydrology, climatology, ecology, and geomorphology), Ideas in Geography, and Techniques in Geography; and for the Honour School, Paper I (The Geographical Environment—Physical), and Paper III (Philosophy, Practice, and Nature of Geography). The successful candidate will also be expected to supervise work for the geography dissertation for those undergraduates choosing physical geography topics and to contribute to the teaching of any optional subjects in which he/she has specialist knowledge. The successful candidate will also be expected to help organise in-college seminars for geography undergraduates and assist with admissions and pastoral care.

The salary will depend on circumstances, but will be in the range £4,353–£7,681 per annum. Other benefits are also offered. Further particulars may be obtained from the Censors' Administrator, Christ Church, Oxford OX1 1DP, and may be viewed on the college's Web site, http://www.chch.ox. ac.uk/jobs/geography.html. The closing date for applications is 10 May.

Christ Church is an equal opportunities employer.


CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE

Corpus Christi Visiting Fellowship(s) 2001–2

Corpus Christi College proposes, if suitable candidates offer themselves, to elect to a Corpus Christi Visiting Fellowship for each term in the academic year 2001–2. The fellowship is intended for persons of high academic distinction, either from abroad or from the UK, who wish to pursue academic study and research as a member of the year. Preference will be given to candidates whose work is close to the academic interests of one or more fellows of the college.

A Visiting Fellow is entitled to free luncheon and dinner during all periods when the kitchen is open and to full membership of the senior common room. The college will provide the fellow with shared study accommodation and will provide practical aid in finding accommodation in Oxford. Applicants should write to the President's Secretary, Corpus Christi College, Oxford OX1 4JF, before 1 November, enclosing a curriculum vitae, a list of publications, a programme of work, and the names of three referees. It is their responsibility to ask their referees to send their references direct by the same date.

Supernumerary Visiting Fellowship 2001–2 in Business and Industry

Corpus Christi College proposes from time to time to advertise a Visiting Fellowship to be held by a person of distinction in the non-academic sphere who wishes to undertake some programme of research (e.g. a book) or advanced study in the college. It is intended that the fellowship should be open to those in the public sector, business, industry, communications, trade unions, NGOs, and similar fields.

In the academic year 2001–2 the college invites applications from persons in the field of business and industry. The fellowship will be tenable for any one of the three eight-week terms of the academic year (October–December, January–March, April–June). Preference will be given to those who are willing to contribute to college life by holding occasional seminars, by being available to students for discussions, etc.

The fellowship will be non-stipendiary. The fellow will be entitled to free luncheon and dinner during all periods when the kitchen is open and to full membership of the senior common room. The college will provide working space and will assist with the provision of accommodation if desired (e.g. by the occasional use of a guest room).

Applicants should write to the President's Secretary, Corpus Christi College, Oxford OX1 4JF, before 1 November, enclosing a curriculum vitae, a description of the programme of study or research to be undertaken during the tenure of the fellowship, and the names of three referees. It is their responsibility to ask their referees to send their references direct to the President's Secretary by the same date. Candidates should indicate the term in which they would wish to hold the fellowship.

Corpus Christi College exists to promote excellence in education and research and is actively committed to the principle of equality of opportunity for all suitably qualified candidates.


JESUS COLLEGE

Lecturership in Philosophy

Jesus College wishes to appoint a temporary lecturer in Philosophy. The appointment will be for the academic year 2000–1. The successful applicant will be required to teach (on average) twelve hours per week in Philosophy for PPE, Literae Humaniores, and any joint school with Philosophy, to set and mark Collections, and to assist in the admissions exercise.

The college's principal teaching requirements are in the following papers: Mill's Utilitarianism and Descartes' Meditations for Mods and Prelims; Ethics, History of Philosophy from Descartes to Kant, Knowledge and Reality, Philosophy of Religion, and Philosophy of Mind for Finals.

Remuneration will be within the scale £15,332–£18,915 per annum (subject to review from 1 April 2000). The lecturer will be provided with a room for residence and teaching, will be entitled to lunch and dine free of charge at common table, and will receive an entertainment and book allowance.

Further particulars may be obtained from the Tutorial Administrator, Jesus College, Oxford OX1 3DW (telephone: Oxford (2)79720, e-mail:dprice@jesus.ox.ac.uk) and can be found on the Internet at http://www.jesus.ox. ac.uk. Applications should include a curriculum vitae and the names of two referees and should be sent to the Senior Tutor, Jesus College. There is no application form. The closing date for applications is Friday, 26 May. Applicants should ask their referees to send references direct to the Senior Tutor by that date.


LINACRE COLLEGE

A.J. Hosier Studentship

The Board of Management of the A.J. Hosier Fund proposes to make election to an A.J. Hosier Studentship which will be tenable at Linacre College for the academic year 2000–1 and will have a maximum value of £4,000. Candidates must be Honours graduates of a university in the United Kingdom and be citizens of the UK, and must either have commenced reading or intend to commence reading in October 2000 for an advanced degree at Linacre College in one of the following subjects: (i) husbandry; (ii) agricultural economics or agricultural statistics; (iii) applied agricultural science. Applications should be made by letter to the Principal, Linacre College, Oxford OX1 3JA. Candidates are asked to submit a curriculum vitae and to ask two referees to write directly to the Principal by the closing date for applications, 31 May.


Appointment of Principal's Secretary (part-time)

Linacre College wishes to appoint a Secretary to the Principal. The hours of work are twenty-five per week, and the post is on the University's ALC grade 3 (salary £11,689– £13,532, pro rata). Applications, in writing, giving the names of two referees, should be sent to the College Secretary, Linacre College, Oxford OX1 3JA, by 2 May. Further particulars and application forms may be obtained by telephoning Oxford (2)71650).

Linacre College is an equal opportunities employer.


MERTON COLLEGE

Research Fellowship in Pure Mathematics

Applications are invited for this fellowship, tenable for three years from 1 January 2001, for research in Pure Mathematics including its applications in computing.

Although this is primarily a Research Fellowship, the fellow will be expected to give sixteen lectures a year at the Mathematical Institute and a limited amount of undergraduate teaching. The scale of stipends is from £17,238, at age twenty-six or under, to £20,811 at age thirty or above. In addition, the fellow will hold a part-time consultancy at GCHQ, Cheltenham, for two months each summer, with a supplementary stipend of £3,000 a year. Funding will also be available from GCHQ, up to £2,000 per year for travel expenses. Appointment is restricted to British nationals (and is open to both men and women).

Further details and application forms can be obtained from the Warden's Secretary, Merton College, Oxford OX1 4JD (telephone: Oxford (2)76352, fax: (2)76282, e-mail: moira.wise@merton.ox.ac.uk), The closing date for applications is 5 May.


NEW COLLEGE

J. Arthur Rank and C.A.W. Manning Junior Research Fellowship in Social Studies

New College invites applications for this fellowship, tenable for three years from 1 October 2000. The person appointed will be expected to engage in advanced research in any branch of social studies. Applicants must have completed at least two years of postgraduate research by 1 October 2000. Application forms and further particulars, giving full details of the terms and conditions of the fellowship, are available from the Senior Tutor, New College, Oxford OX1 3BN (telephone: Oxford (2)79596, fax: (2)79590, e-mail: tuition@new.ox.ac.uk), and may also be found at http:// new.ox.ac.uk/appointments. The closing date for applications is 12 May.


Sir Christopher Cox Junior Fellowship

Applications are invited for this fellowship, tenable for three years from 1 October 2000. The successful candidate will be expected to carry out advanced study or research (with no restriction on subject area), to act as a link between senior and junior members of the college, and to perform certain student welfare duties. Applicants must not have exceeded four years from completion of their first degree at 1 October 2000. The fellowship carries a stipend of £12,372 (subject to review). In addition, the fellow will be entitled to free rooms and meals in college, and entertainment, research, and book allowances.

An application form and further particulars are available from the Senior Tutor, New College, Oxford OX1 3BN (telephone: Oxford (2)79596, fax: (2)79590, e-mail: tuition@new.ox.ac.uk), or from http://www.new.ox.ac.uk/ appointments. The closing date for applications is Friday, 26 May.

New College is an equal opportunities employer.


ST CROSS COLLEGE

E.P. Abraham Junior Research Fellowship

St Cross College proposes to make an election to an E.P. Abraham Junior Research Fellowship in some branch of the medical, biological, or chemical sciences, tenable for two years from 1 October 2000 and renewable for one further year. The fellowship is open to men and women and carries a stipend of £16,286 per annum, together with common table rights (five lunches a week). It is assumed that applicants will have found a place with an appropriate Oxford department and will not be in receipt of another substantial stipend or other source of funding. Applicants should have submitted their doctoral dissertations by the date of taking up the appointment or have obtained the D.Phil./Ph.D. or equivalent within the last five years, but the college will exercise flexibility in the case of applicants whose academic careers have been interrupted.

Applications (marked E.P. Abraham JRF) should include details of the candidate's academic record, proposed subject of research and research programme, together with the names of two referees, and should be sent to the Master, St Cross College, Oxford OX1 3LZ, by 19 May. Applicants should ask their referees to send references direct to the Master by that date. It is expected that interviews will be held on 8 June.


ST HUGH'S COLLEGE

Tutorial Fellowship in Law

Applications are invited for the post of Fellow and Tutor in Law with effect from 1 October 2000, or as soon as possible thereafter. The title of University Lecturer (CUF) may be conferred upon the holder of the fellowship. The full stipend associated with such a lecturership will be met by the college. The title may at a later date be converted to a stipendiary university lecturership (see the further particulars). The post will be subject to the same terms as to renewal and review as other tutorial fellowships. Further particulars of the post and application forms may be obtained from the Senior Tutor, St Hugh's College, Oxford OX2 6LE (fax: Oxford (2)74912, e-mail: barbara. kennedy@st-hughs.oxford.ac.uk), to whom applications, including a full curriculum vitae and the names of three referees, should be returned by Friday, 12 May. Applicants should ask referees to write direct to the Senior Tutor by the same date.

The college and the University are equal opportunities employers.


ST JOHN'S COLLEGE

Lecturership in Psychology

Applications are invited from suitably qualified men and women for a one-year Stipendiary College Lecturership in Psychology from 1 October 2000, with the possibility of renewal for a further year. The lecturer will be required to give up to six hours of undergraduate teaching a week, mainly in developmental psychology. The salary will be on the university lecturer scale, £9,093–£9,935, together with certain benefits and allowances.

Further particulars are available from the Academic Administrator, St John's College, Oxford OX1 3JP (fax: Oxford (2)77435, e-mail: college.office@sjc.ox.ac.uk). It is hoped that interviews will be held in late May.

Applications (original plus four copies), with details of teaching experience, career, research, publications, and the names and addresses and e-mail addresses of two referees, should be sent to the Academic Administrator at the above address by Tuesday, 16 May. Applicants should ask their referees to write directly to, or e-mail, the Academic Administrator by this date

St John's College is committed to equal opportunities.


SOMERVILLE COLLEGE

Appointment of Junior Dean for the academic year 2000–1

Somerville College is seeking to appoint a Junior Dean for the forthcoming academic year. The appointed person will work alongside one other Junior Dean who has been in post since Michaelmas Term 1998 and is expected to continue in office for one or more further terms. The Junior Deans assist the Dean (a fellow of the college who is responsible for the maintenance of good order among junior members) in the day-to-day execution of administrative, disciplinary, and pastoral duties.

The post is residential and involves evening and weekend duties. Applicants will normally be expected to be graduate students engaged in research. Benefits include free year-round accommodation, and seven free meals per week whenever the college is open. The annual stipend is currently £2,238.56 (reviewed October 2000); and a research grant to the maximum value of £1,500 may also be payable if no other grant or stipend is held.

Further particulars and an application form may be obtained from the Personnel Manager, Ms Susan White, Somerville College, Oxford OX2 6HD (telephone Oxford (2)80620, e-mail: susan.white@somerville.ox.ac.u.k). The closing date for applications is Monday, 9 May. Interviews will be held in third week of Trinity Term (week commencing 15 May). Applicants should also ask two referees to write directly to the Personnel Manager by that date.

Somerville College is committed to achieving equal opportunities.


TRINITY COLLEGE

Appointment of Administrative Assistant

An adaptable Administrative Assistant is required for the busy College Office. Working with the Academic Administrator, the Assistant will be expected to provide a wide range of secretarial and administrative support for the Senior Tutor and fellows.

Experience of Windows-based programmes is essential. The salary will be on the University's clerical and library grade 4 scale (£13,532–£15,664 per annum).

Further particulars may be obtained from the Academic Adminstrator, Trinity College, Oxford OX1 3BH (e-mail: katie.andrews@trinity.ox.ac.uk), to whom applications should be sent by Friday, 5 May.


WOLFSON COLLEGE

Appointment of Temporary Academic Secretary

Wolfson College wishes to appoint an Academic Secretary from June 2000 to February 2001, whilst maternity leave is taken. This is a key post involving all administration in connection with graduate students from admission to completion. The Academic Secretary also provides secretarial support to the Senior Tutor. Good secretarial, computing, and numeracy skills are essential. Wolfson College is a graduate college in pleasant modern buildings close to the River Cherwell in North Oxford.

Hours of work are 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Free parking and lunches in Hall. Salary in the region of £15,000 per annum.

Further particulars are available from the College Secretary, Wolfson College, Oxford OX2 6UD (telephone: Oxford (2)74103, e-mail: jan.scriven@wolfson.ox.ac.uk), to whom applications should be sent by Friday, 12 May.


WORCESTER COLLEGE

Directorship of Junior Year Abroad Programme with Postdoctoral Research Fellowship

Applications are invited for the above post, tenable from 1 August 2000.

The person appointed will serve as Director of the College's Junior Year Abroad Programme, and will be expected to pursue a programme of research. The Director is responsible for the administration of the programme, which has a maximum of fifteen American students in residence in Oxford during any one term; responsibilities include the selection of students and monitoring their progress. The Director is not required to undertake any teaching. The appointment will be for three years, with the possibility of renewal for a further three years, and is on an incremental scale (Research Staff 1A), commencing on the sixth point, currently £20,811; free housing is also provided.

Further particulars and application forms may be obtained from the College Secretary, Worcester College, Oxford OX1 2HB (telephone: Oxford (2)78342, fax: (2)78303, e-mail: college.secretary@worc.ox.ac.uk), to whom applications and three references should be sent by 12 May.




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Musica Humana Oxford

Dana T. Marsh, Director, will offer the programme `Splendours of Tudor Polyphony: Music for the Sarum Rite', featuring the Cantate Mass of John Sheppard, with additional motets and responds by Thomas Tallis and Sheppard. Sat., 13 May at 8.15 p.m. in the Chapel of Queen's College. Tickets £6 (£4 concessions, £2 students) at the door.

 


Language Weekend Courses

Intensive language weekend courses are being held at Oxford Brookes University as follows: French and Spanish weekend 24 and 25 June; Italian weekend 1 and 2 July. Fees: £40 for full-time students, £50 for non-students, to include 7 1/2 hours' tuition and all teaching materials. For further information and enrolment forms contact: Jackie Brumwell, Oxford Brookes Language Services, Oxford Brookes University, Headington Oxford OX3 0BP. Tel.: Oxford 483692; e-mail: Jackie@sol.brookes.ac.uk.


Oxford Bach Choir

An evening of American and English music: Bernstein (Chichester Psalms, I Hate Music, and Suite from West Side Story); Copland (Old American Songs); Britten (Rejoice in the Lamb and Cabaret Songs). Principle conductor, Nicholas Cleobury. Friday, 23 June at the Sheldonian Theatre, Oxford at 8 p.m. Tickets: £30, £24, £20, £16, £12 (£6 for students), from the Oxford Playhouse Booking Office. Tel.: Oxford 798600.

 


Oxfordshire Youth Mentoring Scheme

Mentoring has a major role to play with young people in difficulty, struggling to become accepted members of their community. If you feel you could spare some free time to make a difference in a young person's life as their mentor, please contact Maxine on Oxford 848181, or e-mail: maxine.dancy@btinternet.com.


Bodleian Shop

See our full range of postcards, greetings cards, and stationery with a difference! Our `Oxford Views' writing paper, using engravings from the John Johnson Collection of Printed Ephemera, is printed in the Bodleian on high quality conservation paper; A4 size, 16 sheets and 16 envelopes, ?5.95. Shop open Mon.--Fri., 9 a.m.--5 p.m., Sat., 9 a.m.--12.30 p.m.

 


Oxford University Newcomers' Club

This club exists to welcome to Oxford the partners and families of academic visitors and graduate students. Come along to the Club Room at 13 Norham Gardens any Wednesday morning between 10.30 a.m.and 12 noon, from the week before term starts to the week after term, and throughout the Summer vacation, and sample our programme of events and outings.

 


The Friends of Oxford Botanic Garden

Grand, millenium plant sale, organised by The Friends of oxford Botanic Garden, to be held in the Oxford University Parks, South Parks Road, on Sunday 7 May 2000 at 2.30 p.m. Good plants from Friends' gardens, both celebrated and less well-known, also from nurseries and colleges. There will be free horticultural advice from top-notch gardeners, as well as teas and secondhand gardening books. Parking in the St Cross Building, Manor Road. All proceeds go to the fund set up by the Friends of Oxford Botanic Garden to put the work of our Education Officer on to a firm footing for the future. The Plant Sale is one of many efforts to raise the £350,000 needed to establish the education post.

 


Tuition Offered

Psychoanalytic Observational Studies. Applications are now invited for the October 2000 intake for the Tavistock-model Oxford Observation Course. Modules include a 2-year infant observation, a 2-year young child observation, ongoing work discussion, and theoretical seminars. This part-time, largely evening-based, modular course is conducted in small groups, and can lead to a Postgraduate Diploma/MA from the Tavistock Clinic/University of East London. For details and application form please contact Andrea Watson, 12 Rectory Road, Oxford OX4 1BW, tel.: Oxford 243491. Application should be made before 31 May.

 


Services offered

Cordon Bleu cook now provides organic fayre for dinner parties or other social events. Tel.: Oxford 556994.

Personal computer consultants, offering expert advice and tuition for both hardware and software. On site service at home or in the office. We provide upgrades for most computers, or alternatively, we also supply our range of personally built, to your specification, KTec computers. We will also supply or source software to match your requirements. For a quality service, matched with competitive prices, tel.: Chris Lewis on Oxford 461222, fax: 461333, email: info@kristontec.co.uk.

Town and Country Trees, arboricultural contractors. Tree surgery, felling, planting, hedges, orchard and shrub pruning, stump removal. Fully qualified, fully insured. Tel.: 01869 351540, or 01993 811115.

Weight Loss? Improved health? Are you having difficulties in losing weight or improving your health and fitness? Paul Hornsby offers professional advice and personal training to clients on a one-to-one basis, or in groups. Call Oxford 773021/ 07715 584292, or email: pjh_personaltraining@yahoo.com, and make a difference!


Domestic Services

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford 726983 or Abingdon 555533.

Do you need a nanny? All Counties Nannies, qualified and experienced staff. Full and part-time, permanent and temporary. Newborn, toddlers, school age. Our aim is to provide the best possible care for your family. Tel.: Lynda on 01235 524462, mobile: 0402 068165.

 


Situations Vacant

The Examination Schools: Invigilators. We are looking for people to add to our Register of Invigilators. Work is on a temporary basis during the exam periods and involves laying out of question papers and invigilating during the examination session. Each session is approximately 4 hours. If you are interested please send a c.v. and covering letter to the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG. For further information phone the Deputy Clerk (Exams) on Oxford (2)76911.

The Examination Schools: Room Assistants. We are looking for people to work full time, including some Saturdays, for a 6 week period in Trinity term to cover the exam season (22 May--30 June 2000). The duties include setting up examination rooms, tidying up between sessions, laying out script booklets and exam materials, and delivering packages in central Oxford. If you would like to apply please send a c.v. and covering letter to the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG. For further information phone the Deputy Clerk (Building) on Oxford (2)76905.

Information Assistant (part time). Salary £533 p.m. (approx. £5.80 per hour) for 20 hour week. Academic office in central Oxford requires an assistant for 6 months (4 hours per day), to deal with information enquiries and cover general secretarial/clerical duties, research and project work. Applicants must have organisational experience, and be familiar with e-mail and the web. Interpersonal skills and a confident telephone manner are essential. For further details contact: Emma Neufeld, Oxenford House, Magdalen Street, Oxford OX1 3AB. Tel.: Oxford 278128, fax: 01865 288086.

St Catherine's College, Administrative Assistant. An adaptable Administrative Assistant is required for our busy Development and Alumni Office. The successful candidate will have excellent administrative skills, be well-organised, and pay meticulous attention to detail. The postholder will provide general secretarial support to both the Head of Development and Alumni Relations Officer, and be responsible for the day-to-day management of the office. S/he will assist with maintaining the alumni database and financial records, and help with the administration of a busy programme of events. Good computer skills are essential; previous experience of databases an advantage. A pleasant telephone manner and excellent communication skills are important as you will be the first point of contact for a wide range of enquiries. Salary will be in the range £10,830--£12,536, with 25 days' holiday. Free lunches and a staff car park are provided. Interested applicants should e-mail Margaret Simon, Head of Development at St Catherine's, as soon as possible, and no later than Wed., 10 May (e-mail: margaret.simon@stcatz.ox.ac.uk). Please include a brief c.v., and the reasons for your interest in the post.

University Drama Officer 2000--1; salary: £10,400 p.a. Applications are invited for a fixed-term post of University Drama Officer from self-motivated, recent graduates, or soon to be graduates. Applicants should have extensive experience of university student theatre and a broad range of theatre skills. Priority will be given to applications from candidates who have experience of Oxford University drama. Duties include assisting in programming the 3 major venues for student productions (the Old Fire Station, the Burton Taylor Studio Theatre, and the Playhouse); helping students to plan and publicise their productions, and arranging drama workshops. The duration of the post is 12 1/2 months, from 1 Sept., 2000--14 Sept. 20001. Further particulars can be obtained from Ms Samantha Jones, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (tel.: Oxford 270563, e-mail: Samantha.Jones@admin.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for receipt of applications is Fri., 12 May. It is anticipated that interviews will be held in the week beginning 26 June. The University exists to promote excellence in education and research. The University is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

A small Scientific Instrument company is seeking to appoint immediately a new product/service engineer. The job involves the assembly and testing of state-of-the art mass spectrometric analysis equipment, installation at customer laboratories and after sales service. A good first degree in physics or electrical engineering would be an advantage, and a clean driving licence and freedom to undertake extensive travel are necessary. A competitive salary will be offered to the right candidate. For further details, please contact Mrs J. Smith, Kindbrisk Limited, 8 Tilgarsley Road, Eynsham, Witney, Oxfordshire OX8 1PP.


Houses to Let

Woodstock: spacious 2 bedroom property in private and quiet residential setting, comprising 2 double bedrooms, bathroom, dining room, cloakroom, large lounge with French windows leading to conservatory, opening into large garden. Fully fitted kitchen. Garage. Part furnished with carpets and curtains, new cooker, fridge, washing machine, new gas fired boiler for c.h. On bus route. Available from 1 June. £626 p.c.m. Contact Jean, Dept. of Clinical Pharmacology, daytime, tel.: Oxford 241091, or home evenings: 01295 730311.

Excellent location close to schools and all North Oxford recreational facilities: house with 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 3 reception rooms, and large enclosed garden. Available May/June for 6 months or 1 year. £850 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 556994.

Marston. Fully furnished, well equipped 3 bedroom house in quiet cul-de-sac (Colterne Close). Large, through sitting room, conservatory, small garage, gardens. Short cycling distance to city via University Parks. Available mid-June. £775 p.c.m. Non-smokers please. Tel.: Oxford 557980, or e-mail: kjm.int@tesco.net.

Wheatley Annexe Cottage. Five miles city centre, frequent bus service. Large bedroom and sitting room, kitchenette, bathroom. Rent negotiable. Enquiries Oxford 873464.

Fully furnished 2 bedroom semi-detached house. Sitting/dining room. Kitchen with all domestic appliances. Central heating. Small gardens. Parking for 2 cars. Close to Kidlington shopping and bus stops to Oxford. Non-smoker. Available from June. £700--£800 p.c.m. Please contact: Valerie Barso, Oxford 227621. E-mail: valerie.barso@noc.anglox.nhs.uk.

Fully furnished house to let: very quiet street in East Oxford, bookshelves galore, 2 bedrooms, new bathroom, gas c.h., garden, easy walking distance from university and city centre. Available Sept.--May or Sept.--Aug. £675 p.c.m. E-mail: dn44@umail.umd.edu.

Available from Aug./Sept., for 9 months. Edwardian house with pretty garden, within 15 mins. walk of Oxford city centre. Three bedrooms, 2 living rooms, large dining kitchen, bathroom and shower room. £950 p.c.m. exc. bills. Tel.: 00 44 (0) 1865 251580; e-mail: jane.carltonsmith@virginnet.co.uk.

Central North Oxford. Delightful Victorian house, 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, pretty sitting room, kitchen/dining room, overlooking easily maintained garden, attic study, dishwasher, washer/drier, extremely well-equipped and furnished. Available 1 Sept. 2000--30 June 2001. Suit visiting academic. £950 p.c.m. Tel: 212 260 6535 (USA), or e-mail: megmovshon@aol.com.

Victorian terrace house, imaginatively modernised and freshly decorated, 15 mins. walk south of city centre. One large double bedroom, second bedroom/studie facing south, luxury bathroom with power shower, spacious open plan ground floor, fully fitted kitchen with dishwasher, south facing rear garden. Crockery and linen available if needed. £850 p.c.m. Unusual and inviting, ideal for a professional couple. Sorry no smokers or pets. Available now. Tel.: Oxford 721297, or e-mail: 106740.76@compuserve.com.

A beautifully converted old village bakery, in a peaceful relaxed environment, set in a village 15 mins. drive from Oxford. Double bedroom en suite, living room leading to sunroom, overlooking a secluded walled garden; kitchen with dishwasher, cooker, microwave, fridge/freezer, washing machine/drier. C.h., TV's, video, telephone. Short or long term let (6--12 months) would be considered. £850 p.m. inc. electricity/heating. Tel.: 01869 350017.

Central North Oxford. Elegantly furnished, Victorian style house in landscaped surroundings, overlooking canal. Four bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, kitchen/breakfast, utility, dining room, sitting room. Short walk from city centre. Reserved parking. £1,900 p.c.m. Non-smokers. Available from 6 Aug. E-mail: vballeny@callnetuk.com.

Charming, well equipped, family accommodation, overlooking River Thames in Oxford. Friendly neighbourhood, convenient for trains and city centre. Two/three double bedrooms. Available mid-Sept., for 1 year. Non-smokers only. £1,000 p.c.m. exc. bills and local tax. Tel.: Oxford 244480, or e-mail: maukie@dtn.ntl.com.

Pretty 4 bedroom house in quiet side road in Summertown. Quarry tiled kitchen, gas c.h., alarm system, garden, easy parking. Fully furnished. £1,100 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 556005, or e-mail: rachel@raku.demon.co.uk.

Jericho: ideally located, fully furnished 2 bedroom house. First floor bathroom/shower, large lounge/dining room with period open fireplace and courtyard garden. To let from 1 Aug. £800 p.c.m plus all bills. Tel.: Oxford 278334 or 554507.

East Oxford: excellent, 3/4 bedroom furnished/unfurnished house, large kitchen/diner, lounge, bath and power shower, utility room, bedrooms carpeted, ground floor wood floors, garden, side entrance, near amenities. Please tel.: 0181 568 5390 or Oxford 278180.

Make finding accommodation easy. Finders Keepers have a dedicated approach to helping you find the right property. Browse through our website for up-to-date detailed information on properties available and make use of our interactive database, priority reservation service (credit cards accepted), personal service and professional advice. For further information please contact Finders Keepers at 226, Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: Oxford 311011. Fax: Oxford 556993. Email: oxford@finders.co.uk. Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

North Oxford house available from 15 Aug., 2000 for one year or less. Walk to colleges, train station, and bus station, near Port Meadow, c.h., recently redecorated, desks, filing cabinets, several large closets, secluded garden, 2 1/2 bathrooms. washing machine, drier, telephone, linen, dishes, 2 bicycles. Suitable for visiting academics. Two bedrooms, £960 p.m.; 3 bedrooms, £1250 p.m (inc. bedsit with separate entrance). Tel.: J. Mackrell (eves.), Oxford 775567, or Canada: A.Gaston, 613 745 1368, fax. 613 745 0299. Email: Tony.Gaston@EC.GC.CA or Gaston@cyberus.ca.

Fully-furnished, 2-bedroom house in Marston. Living room, gas c.h., gardens, kitchen, microwave, telephone, TV, washing machine. Short cycling distance to city via University Parks. £625 p.c.m. No smokers, no pets. Available 1 Apr., initially for at least 6 months, preferably for 1 year. Email: ahmet.oral@materials.ox.ac.uk. Tel.: ++ 90 312 290 1965.

An Englishman's home is his castle---so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Visit our web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or email us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 7611533, fax: 764777, email: info@qbman.co.uk.

Temple Cowley, Oxford. spacious, 3-bedroom, newly built, fully carpeted and curtained, town house (unfurnished) with conservatory, available for yearly rental from 1 Apr., for non-smokers. Integral garage, and parking space for 1 other car. Excellent bus service (1 min. walk) to city and railway station (approx. 15 mins.). Generously proportioned sitting room; 3 double bedrooms; 2 bathrooms (1 en suite); separate cloakroom/WC; large fitted kitchen with washer/drier, built-in oven and hob, fridge-freezer; French doors leading to dining room/conservatory. ?950 p.c.m. For more information please contact Katie Enock on + 44 (0) 7940 308765, or Martyn Laycock on + 44 (0) 961 883407; email: beekeeper@bee.co.uk.

Pretty Edwardian house, newly refurbished to mix classic features with modern amenities. Central location in quiet residential area, close to University and riverside meadows. Three bedrooms, large study, lounge, dining room, completely new kitchen, bathroom, and garden. Furnished and equipped to high standard; bed linen provided. Rent: £1,250 p.c.m. excl. bills. Available from September. Tel.: 00 44 (0) 1865 251003 or e-mail:mpaehoney@aol.com.

 


Flats to Let

Woodstock Road, 2 miles from city centre: modern, self-contained, ground floor flat, fully furnished. Open-plan, living room with view and access to large rear garden, double bedroom, kitchen, bathroom. Very close to bus stops; car parking. Available immediately, 12 month let preferred. £550 p.c.m. plus services. Tel.: Oxford 557684 (eves).

Pleasant studio flat. Own entrance, bathroom and telephone. Centrally heated. Share washing machine etc., and parts of main house if required. Lovely garden, car parking and close to Summertown shops. Long-term let, and non-smoking female preferred. £375 p.c.m. inc. bills. Contact Gabriel Dover on Oxford 554300.

To let from 8 April, an attractive flat, comprising a sitting room with French door opening onto sheltered garden, bedroom (double bed), kitchen (electric cooker), and bathroom. Car essential as this is a country flat 5 miles outside Oxford. Parking for 2 cars outside door in the property. If interested please tel.: Oxford 735203.

Two bedroom furnished flat in South of France, for long let. £100 p.w. Available now until end Sept., 2001. Ample terrace with lovely views. Suit academic on sabbatical. Tel.: 01732 351009.

Self catering, short break apartment in Oxford. Situated on the beautiful tree lined Woodstock Road, 2--2½ miles from the City centre. This 1 bedroom apartment is ideal for business, academic, or holiday visits to Oxford. Kitchen, lounge/diner, double bedroom, and bathroom. Sleeps 2 people (3/4 if you take advantage of the sofa/bed in the lounge). £295 per week. Off-street parking and maid service are available. Tel.: Oxford 310782, or e-mail: john@g.c.pipkins.freeserve.co.uk.

Two bedroom furnished flat, in new development very close to River Thames, within 5 mins. walking distance of the city centre, with parking. Available any time Apr.--Sept. £350 p.w. inc. linen and weekly cleaning. Please tel.: 01628 591246 (day) or 01628 773326 (eves.).

Luxury 2-bedroom, ground floor flat, near St. Clements. Located in beautiful, quiet, mature grounds next to South Park. Five mins. into central Oxford. Would suit professional/academic couple. Furnished, with all mod. cons. Large rooms and kitchen; second bedroom as study or child's room. French windows onto lawn, separate garage with additional forecourt parking. Available late Aug./Sept., for minimum one calendar year. £780 p.c.m. Contact: Oxford 244336; e-mail: duncan.mccombie@exeter.ox.ac.uk.

Central North Oxford, 4 mins. walk from University Parks and easy walking to University Science Area, libraries and city centre. Charming and spacious garden flat in quiet residential street, incl. sitting-room, double bedroom, kitchen with washing machine, bathroom with bath and shower, plentiful storage space. Gas central heating. Suit single person or couple. No smokers. Available from July. £740 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 512138; e-mail:mdy@bioch.ox.ac.uk A luxury, self-catering, 1 bedroom apartment is available for short lets, minimum 1 week. ideal for visiting academics, business people, or for holidays. Next to the River Thames, yet only 5 mins. walk to the city centre, it is an ideal location. Recently refurbished to a very high standard it consists of: 1 double bedroom, a newly fitted bathroom, lounge/diner with T.V. Video, sofa/bed etc.; new kitchen with dishwasher, fridge, washer/drier and microwave. By taking advantage of the sofa/bed it will accommodate up to 4 people. The price is ?500 p.w. incl. fresh linen, and cleaning once a week, heating and electricity. Oxford Riverside Apartments, tel.: Oxford 310782, fax: Oxford 310649, or: www.oxfordcity.co.uk/accom/pembrok.

 


Accommodation Offered

Two very large, sunny, well-furnished single rooms available in comfortable home in south-east Oxford; shared use of bathroom/shower, kitchen and sitting/dining room; all mod. cons. available. Non-smokers only. Would consider a couple for the 2 rooms. Easy access to city centre by frequent buses (journey time 15 mins); parking unrestricted. £280 and £260 p.c.m. inc. bills (except phone calls). Tel.: Oxford 711030 or e-mail: eliz@bioch.ox.ac.uk Two comfortable rooms are available from end Apr., in lovely home in Divinity Road. These can either be 2 beds, and shared bathroom or, 1 bedroom and study for 1 occupant. £300 p.c.m. inc. bills (or £500 for 1 person). There is a pretty garden and a peaceful view. Tel.: Oxford 251019 or 728760.

Maison Francaise d'Oxford. Rooms available for post-graduates at the Maison Francaise d'Oxford, Norham Road, for the 2000--1 academic year. For further information please tel.: Oxford 274220.

Finders Keepers specialises in managing your home and investment. With our 27 years' experience we assure you of a high level of service from dedicated and professional letting and management teams. Many of our landlords have remained with us since we opened and are still reaping the benefits of our high standards of property management. if you would like details of our services please contact Finders Keepers at 226 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: Oxford 556993, email: oxford@finders.co.uk. Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

Delightful rooms, North Oxford. smallest room ?30 p.w., telephone, shower, c.h., all mod. cons. Available now, short stay up to 3 months. Located near Woodstock Road roundabout. Tel.: Oxford 511657.

Summer House-sit. Family home available from 8 July until middle to end Sept., North Oxford, within ring road. Fully furnished, 4 bedrooms, off-street parking for 2 cars. Interested in having 1 person or couple house-sit. For further information telephone or fax Oxford 553617.

Paying guests, visiting academics, welcomed for short or long stays in the comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple, in exclusive, quiet, leafy central North Oxford, within walking distance of all main university buildings, town centre, parks, river, good shops and restaurants. All rooms have colour TV, tea-/coffee-making facilities, microwave, and refrigerator and/or refrigerator and deep-freeze availability, c.h., and independent heating. Breakfast included in the very moderate terms. Tel./fax: Oxford 557879.

Folly Bridge, 6 brand new 1/2 bedroom flats, on the banks of the River Isis, available from mid-May onwards, either for the Summer, or for the academic year from Sept. Accommodation consists of 1 double bedroom, 1 study/single bedroom, sitting room, kitchen, and bathroom. All flats are fully furnished and have magnificent river and Christ Church Meadow views. £900 or £950 p.c.m. Further details from the Bursar, Hertford College, tel.: Oxford 279414, or email: peter.baker@hertford.ox.ac.uk.

 


Accommodation Sought

Small furnished house or flat required, within easy reach of the city, for non-smoking couple for the month of Aug. Please contact: husson@qatar.net.qa.

Australian academic visiting Oxford University would like to rent or house-sit a 1 bedroom apartment near to the centre of Oxford, for 3 months from beginning July--end Sept. Please call Oxford 275268 (day) or e-mail: eliz@bioc.ox.ac.uk Moving to or leaving Oxford? Andrews may be the answer. If you are moving to Oxford we can offer good quality accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area with our professional and helpful team. If you are leaving Oxford and thinking about letting your property, we can offer competitive rates and top quality service of property management. If you would like more information about Andrews and what we can offer you please contact us on: tel.: Oxford 200401, fax us: 791343, or e-mail us at: oxford.lets@andrews.org.uk. Or alternatively visit our website at: www.andrews.org.uk.

Visiting American academics are looking for a 3/4 bedroom house to rent in Wolvercote, from 1 Sept. 2000--June 20001. Furnished, washer/drier, and ideally with view of meadows. Please contact Matthew Sparke (sparke@u.washington.edu; tel.: 001 206 526 5363) or, locally, Dr Peter Bull at Hertford College.

Visiting academic couple (non-smokers) and small, well-behaved dog, seek rental of a furnished house or flat, preferably with garden, from 3 July--19 Aug. (precise dates negotiable). Please contact Dr Fiona Robertson, Department of English Studies, University of Durham, Durham DH1 3JT. Tel.: 0191 374 2732 (work), 01748 826441 (home); e-mail: fr.rocket@virgin.net.

International Copyright Lawyer from continental Europe, frequently travelling abroad, is looking for a centrally located base in Oxford, ideally consisting of either a small self-contained flat, or a single bedroom plus study, or a very large room in a shared house or flat. Please contact: Brigitte_Lindner@Compuserve.com, or tel.: 020 7837 3927.

Canadian Professor and wife require accommodation in Oxford, preferably with easy access to Bodleian Library, from 25 July--20 Aug. Please contact Professor Nicholas Hudson, Department of English, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z1, Canada. Tel.: (604) 822 4084. Fax: (604) 822 6906. E-mail: nhudson@interchange.ubc.ca.

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us: Oxford 7611533, fax us: 764777, or email us: info@qbman.co.uk. Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.

Swiss visiting scholar and partner wish to house-sit, or rent a furnished 1-bedroom apartment or studio for 1 or 2 years, commencing 1 Sept., 2000. £500--£650 p.c.m. Non-smokers. Laundry facilities required. Contact: Dr S. Besson, email:sbesso2@law.columbia.edu, fax: 0041 26 666 14 66.

Professional couple and 1 year old daughter, require fully furnished and equipped 1 or 2 bedroom accommodation, in central Oxford, from early June for 8–10 weeks. Please contact: Dr H. Johnson, fax: + 81 75 365 0493; e-mail: henry@kcua.ac.jp.

 


Accommodation Exchange

Academic family want to exchange 3 bedroom house with study, in North Oxford, for a house in Sydney, Australia. We wish to exchange for the month of November 2000. Contact: Jane Kaye on Oxford 557017, e-mail: jane.kaye@law.ox.ac.uk. n

 


Accommodation offered to rent or exchange

Exchange: fully equipped flat in New York City (convenient location: Queens) for house/flat in London or Oxford, 15--31 June; To let in Edinburgh, 3 bedroom fully equipped semi-detached house from 1 July through the Edinburgh Festival season to 15 Sept., £1,500 plus gas and electricity; To let in Oxford, 2 bedroom, fully equipped semi-detached house, 1--31 Aug., £600. Please contact Oxford 725770/310714, or e-mail: owerd@werd.demon.co.uk


Summer Lets

Spacious famaily house, Summertown, North Oxford. Edwardian detached house, available from 27 July--31 Aug., situated within minutes of Oxford's Summertown shopping area; buses to Oxford city centre, swimming pool, tennis courts, and countryside walks. Fully equipped and attractively furnished, contains all modern service facilities inc. washing machine, dryer, dishwasher, microwave, TV, video, hi-fi. Four bedrooms, bathroom with toilet, shower room, toilet room, 2 reception rooms, a large dining room, and a very spacious kitchen leading into a conservatory-living room which leads into a large garden. Price negotiable. Tel.: Oxford 270490 (day); fax: 270757.

Seventeenth century house in beautiful countryside, 10 miles NW of Oxford. Available 30 June--21 July. Sleeps 6--8. Large garden. Rent £1,500 for 3 weeks. Tel.: 01993 881332, or e-mail: weekse@oup.co.uk.

North Oxford , near St Antony's College and Port Meadow , 15 mins. walk from city centre, fully furnished Victorian house. One double and 2 single bedrooms, 2 living rooms, 2 bathrooms, kitchen, study. Nice garden. Small friendly cat. Available to non-smokers 30 July--26 Aug. £1,100 for whole 4 weeks. Tel.: Oxford 515077. E-mail: mollison@40leck.fsnet.co.uk City centre house, with view of Thames, available for 4 months, June--Sept. Fully equipped, 3 bedrooms (2 double, 1 single), 2 bathrooms, gas c.h., garden, garage. £1,000 p.c.m. inc. of charges except telephone calls. Tel.: Oxford 250462.

 


Holiday Lets

Pembrokeshire coast near Fishguard. Comfortable cottage in peaceful setting, with stove, books, garden. Coast path 1 km. Ideal for walking, studying, relaxing. Sleeps 3 +. Children and pets welcome. Accessible by public transport. Reasonable rates esp. May/June. Tel.: 01348 872080.

Self-catering accommodation 5 minutes walk to city centre. We have 4-bedroom self-contained flats to let from July to Sept., fully equipped kitchens for groups or families. Close to shops, restaurants and buses. A 24-hour lodge with CCTV. Pleasant gardens in tranquil surroundings. Use of the adjacent sports ground. Washing machines on site. Free off-road parking. For rates tel./fax Oxford 725364.

Share a beautifully modernised flat in a quiet corner of central Florence with 3 sociable cats. On the third floor (no lift), it sleeps 4/5 (1 double bedroom, 1 single room and double sofa bed in the sitting room). Also large kitchen, 2 bathrooms, large furnished terrace (with view), washing machine, dishwasher. Available from Sat., 22 July--Sat., 26 Aug.---minimum let 1 week. The rent (£300 p.w.) inc. utilities (not phone), bed linen, etc., and kitchen equipment. Cat supplies are provided. Phone Walsh on: 0039055 2398759; e-mail: phwalsh@tin.it.

France, southern Auvergne, in the Parc Regional des Volcans. Charming, self-contained ground floor studio flat in a traditional 19th.-c. stone house in hamlet, in a magnificent unspoilt valley; recently restored; generous sized room furnished with country antiques (2 single beds), plenty of storage space, well-appointed kitchenette, fully tiled bathroom with large shower; use of delightful gardens, full of roses and laid to terraces; splendid views. Would suit middle-aged couple, keen walkers, and lovers of unspoilt countryside. £100 p.w., £150 in July and Aug. All linen, cleaning and electricity inc. Contact Margaret Rubel, tel.: 0033 1 4887 1933 or 0033 4 7147 9617.

Crete. A traditional Cretan house in old town Rethimno, superbly renovated to provide space and comfort in beautifully furnished surroundings. Elevated, vine-covered, sitting area with brick barbecue---perfect for alfresco dining. It is in a quiet area, and close to long, sandy beach, taverns, shops, and the many interesting sights in and around this historic area. Sleeps 4 (1 double, 1 twin). Available all year round. £280 p.w., £1000 p.m. All linen, electricty and cleaning inc. Tel./fax: Nikolaos Glinias, 0030 831 56525, email: nglynias@ret.forthnet.gr.

Italy, Umbria. Twelfth-century San Orsola, a short distance Perugia, Todi. Combines charm and comfort in a beautiful setting of sunflowers, and rolling Umbrian hills. Bed and breakfast, or self-catering. Fresh eggs and veg. Tel.: Maria McCourt 0039 075 8748997.

French Riviera, ground floor, 2 bedroom flat, between St Raphael and Cannes. Five mins. walk from the beach, pool, shops, restaurants. Tennis and golf nearby. South-facing private patio; parking alongside. Linen provided. Reasonable rates. Tel.: Epsom, 01372 744246.

Dordogne and Rome holiday rentals. Stone house in an acre of garden in the Dordogne, France, with a fabulous 270 degree panorama (sleeps 8/10). Also Rome, Italy, marble floored flat (4/5) and 19th-c., country farmhouse with lovely views, 115 mins. from Rome and 2 hrs to Florence (sleeps 4 with downstairs rooms available to sleep 4 more). Prices vary from £250--£550 p.w. Private owner. Tel.: 01223 353603 for details.

Pembrokeshire Coast: Farmhouse (4 bedrooms) and Barn (3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms). Log fires, panoramic views, spectacular cliff walks. National Trust beaches. £100--£440 p.w. Tel.: Isobel Cox on 01923 856114, or see the photos and other details at: http://gl.home.dhs.org.

Tuscany. Family-owned Wine Estate, producing highly recognised wines, olive oil and cheese, offers ancient farmhouse and apartments, accommodating 2 up to 12 plus. Pool, secluded rural setting, half hour central Florence. Tel./fax: (0039) 055 824 9120, email: pgklpoggio@ftbcc.it. `Fattoria Corzano and Paterno'.

Umbria/Tuscany border. Delightfully restored, spacious farmhouse for rent, 2 double bedrooms sleeping 4. Also cottage nearby sleeping 2. For colour brochure tel.: 01923 4978115, fax: 01923 354174.

 


Houses for Sale

Sought after West Oxford location. Exceptional Victorian, bay fronted, 3 bedroom, terrace house, extended over 3 floors. Two reception rooms with wooden floors and original fireplace. Large kitchen with quarry tiled floor. Two bedrooms, separate W.C., bathroom with tiled power shower cubicle. Double bedroom in loft conversion. Mature, maintenance free garden. Easy access to both the city centre and the railway station. Viewing a must. O.I.R.O. £245,000. Tel.: Oxford 722965.

Spacious 2 bedroom house with large L-shaped sitting room/dining room in Witney (12 miles from Oxford). Upstairs bathroom and downstairs w.c. Generous cupboard space, gas c.h. Secluded walled garden. In excellent condition. No chain. Price: £115,000. For further information tel.: Oxford 554684.

\High quality 2 bedroom house on Oxford Waterside development. Built in 1998, condition as new with high ceilings, gas c.h. and luxury fittings. Master bedroom with en suite shower, bathroom, gardens, allocated parking. Available now. Guide £190,000. Tel.: 0370 753915.

 


For Sale

Cello---full size. Made by Herbert Tipon circa 1950. Rosewood fingerboard. Offers in the region of £1,100 sterling. Contact: Keith Thomas on Oxford (2)76905, or e-mail: keith.thomas@admin.ox.ac.uk, if interested.

Human Instincts Explained, by Nils K. Oeijord. Price $10.95, paperback, 144 pp. Published by Vantage Press, Inc., New York. ISBN: 0-533-13127-8. Human Instincts Explained explains and makes a list of the human instincts—for the first time in history.

 




Diary

Contents of this section:

Academic Staff Development Seminars: places should be booked in advance through the Staff Development Office, Littlegate House, St Ebbe's, Oxford OX1 1PT (telephone: (2)86803).

For the full list of courses, see the Staff Development ProgrammeWeb site.

Return to Contents Page of this issue


Friday 28 April

ACADEMIC STAFF Development Programme seminars: `Gender in teaching', 9.30 a.m., and `Memory skills', 1.30 p.m. (see information above).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Seventeenth- and eighteenth-century dress', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)


Sunday 30 April

TRINITY FULL TERM begins.


Monday 1 May

PITT RIVERS MUSEUM exhibition opens: `Collectomania' (at the museum annexe, 60 Banbury Road; until the autumn).

DR M. SCHOFIELD: `The noble lie' (Carlyle Classes in Classical Political Thought: `The politics of Plato's Republic'), All Souls, 2 p.m.

DR S. KNOTT: `Sensibility, nervous theory, and American Revolution' (Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine seminar series: `Historical perspectives on medicine and culture'), Wellcome Unit, 2 p.m.

THE REVD DR BRYAN SPINKS: `Lex ritualis, lex credendi? From Hampton Court to the Five Articles of Perth' (Hensley Henson Lectures in Theology: `Sacraments, Ceremonies, and Stuart Divines: sacramental theology and liturgy in England and Scotland, 1603–62'), Schools, 5 p.m.


Tuesday 2 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The Fisherman of Aphrodisias' (special exhibition), 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

DR M. SCHOFIELD: `Utopia and the idea of community' (Carlyle Classes in Classical Political Thought: `The politics of Plato's Republic'), All Souls, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR PAUL MULDOON (Professor of Poetry): `The end of the poem: "The Mountain" by Robert Frost' (lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. VAN INWAGEN: `Two arguments for the non-existence of God' (Wilde Lectures in Natural and Comparative Religion: `Evil and superfluity: two arguments against the existence of God'), Schools, 5 p.m.

A. FAUSER: `Rheinsirenen: Lorelei and other Rhinemaidens' (Faculty of Music: Graduate Students' Colloquia), Denis Arnold Hall, Music Faculty, 5.15 p.m.


Wednesday 3 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk (Dr A. Sherratt): `The world in 2000 BC', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

DR J. ANDERSON: `National churches in time of change: the search for recognition in comparative perspective' (Becket Institute Lectures), Becket Institute, St Hugh's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. CALASSO (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor of European Comparative Literature): `Literature and the gods' (first of eight lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR G. BOWMAN: `The exilic imagination: the construction of homeland from its outside' (Refugee Studies Centre: Seminars on Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth house, 5 p.m.


Thursday 4 May

V. WILSON: `Dress, politics, and Chinese women's histories in the twentieth century' (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Women investigating cross-culturally—Canary Islands, China, Nigeria, South Africa'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. VAN INWAGEN: `The idea of God' (Wilde Lectures in Natural and Comparative Religion: `Evil and superfluity: two arguments against the existence of God'), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR D. MCKITTERICK: `The printed word and the modern bibliographer' (Lyell Lectures in Bibliography: `Set in print: the fortunes of an idea, c.1450–1800'), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. CALASSO (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor of European Comparative Literature): `Literature and the gods' (second of eight lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

N. CRONK: `Reading La Fontaine in the eighteenth century: the problem of Voltaire' (Seminar in Early Modern French Literature and Culture), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.


Friday 5 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Crete, Cyprus, and the Levant', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

PROFESSOR P. VAN INWAGEN: `God and science' (Wilde Lectures in Natural and Comparative Religion: `Evil and superfluity: two arguments against the existence of God'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR I. KERSHAW: `Why did Nazi radicalism not subside?' (Faculty of Modern History: Special Faculty Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m. DR P. VITEBSKY delivers the Marett Memorial Lecture, Saskatchewan Lecture Room, Exeter, 5 p.m.

JEREMY PAXMAN: `Surviving spin' (Philip Geddes Memorial Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

G. DUMENIL: `The costs and benefits of neo-liberalism: a class analysis' (lecture), Maison Française, 5 p.m.

DR M. PERCY: `Knowledge of Angles: how spiritual are the English?' (Eric Symes Abbott Memorial Lecture), the chapel, Keble, 5.30 p.m.


Saturday 6 May

STUDY-DAY (Association for the Study of Modern and Contemporary France): `Le Royaume-Uni et l'euro: quelle cohabitation entre esprit anglo-saxon et modèle franco-allemand?', and `Euro-vaches, Euro-corps et Euro-monnaie: l'Europe appelle-t-elle à un axe anglo-française?', Maison Française, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. (advance registration required: (2)74220).

PATRICIA ROZARIO (soprano), Francis Grier (piano), and Colin Carr (cello): programme of works by Beethoven, Tavener, and Britten, with world première of song-cycle Love without Hope by Francis Grier (words by Robert Graves), Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's, 8 p.m. (admission by free programme, available from the college lodge).


Monday 8 May

DR M. SCHOFIELD: `Rule by philosophers: knowledge, virtue, and power' (Carlyle Classes in Classical Political Thought: `The politics of Plato's Republic'), All Souls, 2 p.m.

DR H. KING: `Did Roman medicine exist? Nineteenth-century reconstructions of the Roman past' (Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine seminar series: `Historical perspectives on medicine and culture'), Wellcome Unit, 2 p.m.

THE REVD DR BRYAN SPINKS: `Calvinist consensus and Patristic Reformed Sacramentalism, and the débâcle of the 1637 Book of Common Prayer' (Hensley Henson Lectures in Theology: `Sacraments, Ceremonies, and Stuart Divines: sacramental theology and liturgy in England and Scotland, 1603–62'), Schools, 5 p.m.

J.-P. GENET: `Political society and the public space in later medieval France and England' (Seminar series: `Political societies and culture in late medieval France, the British Isles, and the Netherlands'), Maison Française, 5 p.m.


Tuesday 9 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Coffee and chocolate pots', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

DR M. SCHOFIELD: `Economic man: property and human nature' (Carlyle Classes in Classical Political Thought: `The politics of Plato's Republic'), All Souls, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR G.C. EBERS (Action Research Professor of Clinical Neurology): `Multiple sclerosis—a complex trait paradigm' (inaugural lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. VAN INWAGEN: `God and evil' (Wilde Lectures in Natural and Comparative Religion: `Evil and superfluity: two arguments against the existence of God'), Schools, 5 p.m. E. SENICI: `Verdi's Falstaff and the Italian fin-de- siècle' (Faculty of Music: Graduate Students' Colloquia), Denis Arnold Hall, Music Faculty, 5.15 p.m.


Wednesday 10 May

RUPERT GOUGH: organ recital, in series `Bach at Queen's 2000', the chapel, Queen's, 1.10 p.m. (admission free; retiring collection).

PROFESSOR ROY FOSTER: `Remembering to forget: history and commemoration in Ireland' (A.B. Emden Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR D. MCKITTERICK: `Dependent skills' (Lyell Lectures in Bibliography: `Set in print: the fortunes of an idea, .1450–1800'), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

DR A. O'MAHONEY: `The Copts, politics, and Muslim–Christian relations in modern Egypt' (Becket Institute Lectures), Becket Institute, St Hugh's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. CALASSO (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor of European Comparative Literature): `Literature and the gods' (third of eight lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

S. TOUSSAINT: `Interpreting cultural narratives: ethnography, biography, and the paradox of memory' (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women Commemorative Lecture), Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

J. HART: `Refugees or citizens? Children in a Palestinian camp in Jordan' (Refugee Studies Centre: Seminars on Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth house, 5 p.m.


Thursday 11 May

PROFESSOR P. VAN INWAGEN: `The vast amount of evil' (Wilde Lectures in Natural and Comparative Religion: `Evil and superfluity: two arguments against the existence of God'), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR N. EDWARDS: `Early medieval stones and stone sculpture in Wales: context and connections' (O'Donnell Lectures in Celtic Studies: first of two lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR D. MCKITTERICK: `A house of errors' (Lyell Lectures in Bibliography: `Set in print: the fortunes of an idea, .1450–1800'), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. CALASSO (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor of European Comparative Literature): `Literature and the gods' (fourth of eight lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR H. KATOUZIAN: `European liberalisms and modern conceptions of liberty in Iran' (Hamid Enayat Lecture), New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

JAMES O'DONNELL: organ recital, in series `Bach at Queen's 2000', the chapel, Queen's, 8 p.m. (admission £5/£3).