26 April 2001 - No 4583



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 131, No. 4583: 26 April 2001<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

26 April 2001



The following supplement was published with this Gazette:

Code of Practice on Governance and
related Procedural Matters


(available shortly).


University Health and
Safety
information


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Home Page






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 26 April 2001: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent
entry.]

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PLANNING AND RESOURCE ALLOCATION
COMMITTEE OF COUNCIL

Decree

The Planning and Resource Allocation Committee of Council has made the following decree,
to come into effect on 11 May.


Decree (1): Establishment of Professorship of the
Study of
Contemporary China

Explanatory note

The following decree, made by the Planning and Resource Allocation Committee of Council
on the recommendation of the Social Sciences Board, establishes a Professorship of the Study
of Contemporary China and makes provision for an electoral board. The professorship will
be funded for the first ten years by the Leverhulme Trust as part of an initiative to promote
Modern Chinese Studies with special reference to the social sciences. Thereafter the
professorship will be funded by the Social Sciences Board.

Text of Decree (1)

1 In Ch. II, Sect. VI, § 1, SCHEDULE (Statutes, 2000, p. 242), under
Oriental Studies,
after `Armenian Studies, Calouste Gulbenkian' insert:

`China, Contemporary, Study of'.

2 In Ch. VII, Sect. I, § 5. B, SCHEDULE A (p. 379),
after
`Coulson Professor of Theoretical Chemistry' insert:

`Professor of the Study of Contemporary China'.

3 Ibid., Sect. III (p. 408), insert new § 41 as follows and
renumber existing §§ 41–6 (pp. 408–11) as §§
42–7:

`§ 41. Professor of the Study of Contemporary China

1. The Professor of the Study of Contemporary China shall lecture and give instruction
in the Study of Contemporary China.

2. The professor shall be elected by an electoral board consisting of:

(1) the Vice-Chancellor, or, if the Warden of St Antony's College is Vice-Chancellor,
a
person appointed by Council;

(2) the Warden of St Antony's College, or, if the Warden is unable or unwilling to act,
a person appointed by the Governing Body of St Antony's College;

(3) a person appointed by the Governing Body of St Antony's College;

(4), (5) two persons appointed by Council, one of whom shall be appointed after
consultation with the Leverhulme Trust;

(6) a person appointed by the Social Sciences Board;

(7) a person appointed by the Humanities Board;

(8), (9) two persons appointed by the Area and Development Studies Committee.

3. The professor shall be subject to the General Provisions of the decree concerning
the
duties of professors and to those Particular Provisions of the same decree which are
applicable
to this chair.'

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EDUCATIONAL POLICY AND STANDARDS
COMMITTEE OF COUNCIL

Decree

The Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council has made the following decree,
to come into effect on 11 May.


Decree (2): Admission to the status of Senior Student

Explanatory note

The following decree, made by the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council,
amends the present mechanism for approving the status of Senior Student in the light of the
recent changes in governance. Opportunity is taken also to simplify the conditions of
eligibility for the status of Senior Student.

Text of Decree (2)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, delete from p. 18, l. 3 to p. 19, l. 5 (and the
related
footnotes) and substitute:

`1. Subject to the decision of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council in
any cases of doubt or difficulty, the following may be admitted to the status and privileges
of a Senior Student:

(1) Any person who has obtained a degree at another university, provided that he or
she
shall have pursued a course of study extending over three years of full-time study or its
equivalent on a part-time basis.

(2) Any person who, having been a student at a university in a European country, has
successfully completed a course of study on a full-time or equivalent part-time basis deemed
to be equivalent to that of an undergraduate degree qualification.

(3) Any person who has obtained a degree at another university and has also been
selected
to come to Oxford by some body, recognised for the purposes of this section by the
University.*

(4) Any person who, though not eligible under the previous sub-clauses, has satisfied
the
Educational Policy and Standards Committee that he or she is particularly well-qualified to
be admitted as a Senior Student.'

2 Ibid., insert footnote:

`*The Committee for the Selection of Rhodes Scholars has been approved for this purpose.'

3 Ibid., p. 19, ll. 6 and 39, renumber existing cll. 3 and 4 as
cll. 2 and
3.

4 Ibid., pp. 19–20, wherever the word `he' or `his'
occurs, insert
after it the words `or she' or `or her' respectively.

5 Ibid., p. 20, delete ll. 1–6.

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LIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES BOARD

Decree

The Life and Environmental Sciences Board, with the approval of the Educational Policy and
Standards Committee of Council, has made the following decree, to come into effect on 11
May.


Decree (3): Supplementary Subjects in the Honour
School of
Natural Science

Explanatory note

The following decree, made by the Life and Environmental Sciences Board, with the support
of the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board and the Medical Sciences Board, and with
the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, removes
ambiguities in current legislation in order to make clear that candidates may offer themselves
for Supplementary Subjects in the year in which they take the Honour School of Natural
Science as well as in the preceding year (rather than in one or the other), and that only
successful performance in Supplementary Subject examinations is taken into account by the
examiners in the General Subjects in determining candidates' places in the class list.

Text of Decree (3)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 418, ll. 5–6, delete `either `
preceding academic
year' and substitute `in the academic year preceding that in which they take the Final Honour
School; they may also offer themselves for examination in the year in which they take the
Final Honour School.'

2 Ibid., l. 28, delete `performance' and substitute `success'.

3 This decree shall be effective from 1 October 2001.

Key to Decree (3)

Cl. 1 provides that students may take Supplementary Subject examinations in both the year
preceding, and the year of, the Final Honour School.

Cl. 2 provides that only successful performance in Supplementary Subjects is taken into
account by the examiners in General Subjects when drawing up the class list.

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SOCIAL SCIENCES BOARD

Decrees

The Social Sciences Board, with the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards
Committee of Council, has made the following decrees, to come into effect on 11 May.


Decree (4): Conversion of the M.St. in Forced
Migration into
an M.Sc. in Forced Migration and changes in the arrangements for the examination for the
degree

Explanatory note

The following decree, made by the Social Sciences Board, with the approval of the
Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, amends the course regulations for
the M.St. in Forced Migration to allow the research methods element of the course to be
formally examined, and converts the M.St. into an M.Sc. with effect from first entry in
2002.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in `Examinations and Boards' below.

Text of Decree (4)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 682, delete ll. 3–4 and substitute:
`Forced
Migration Area and Development Studies Committee'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 3–4.

3 Ibid., p. 753, after l. 27 insert:

`in Forced Migration Area and Development Studies Committee'.

4 Ibid., p. 1052, l. 41, delete `.' and substitute `;'.

5 Ibid., after l. 41 insert:

`Forced Migration for three examinations.'

6 Clause l of this decree shall have immediate effect; clauses
2–5
shall be effective from 1 October 2002.

Key to Decree (4)

Cl. 1 provides that the admitting body for the M.St. in Forced Migration shall be the Area
and
Development Studies Committee.

Cl. 2 deletes Forced Migration from the list of examinations for the degree of M.St. with
effect from 1 October 2002.

Cl. 3 adds Forced Migration into the list of examinations for the degree of M.Sc. with effect
from the same date.

Cll. 4 and 5 provide for the appointment of examiners for the M.Sc.

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Decree (5): Examination arrangements for the Degree
of
Master of Business Administration

Explanatory note

The following decree, made by the Social Sciences Board, with the approval of the
Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, amends the examination
arrangements for the Degree of Master of Business Administration and makes changes to the
committee structure within which the course for that degree is organised.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in `Examinations and Boards' below.

Text of Decree (5)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 823, l. 13, delete `Committee for Graduate
Studies of
the General Board' and substitute `Social Sciences Board'.

2 Ibid., ll. 22–3, delete `Graduate Applications
Subcommittee'
and substitute `MBA Committee'.

3 Ibid., ll. 32–3, delete `Graduate Studies Subcommittee'
and
substitute `MBA Committee'.

4 Ibid., ll. 37–8, delete `Committee for Graduate Studies
of the
General Board' and substitute `Social Sciences Board'.

5 Ibid., p. 824, ll. 27–8, delete `committee for the
school' and
substitute `MBA Committee'.

6 Ibid., l. 37, delete `General Board's' and substitute
`Divisional
Board's'.

7 Ibid., p. 825, l. 8, delete `General Board' and substitute
`Divisional
Board'.

8 Ibid., l. 16, delete `sixty-four weeks' and substitute `six
terms'.

9 Ibid., l. 22, delete `Graduate Applications Subcommittee' and
substitute `MBA Committee'.

10 Ibid., l. 23, delete `General Board' and substitute `Divisional
Board'.

11 Ibid., l. 32–3, delete `Graduate Applications
Subcommittee'
and substitute `MBA Committee'.

12 Ibid., l. 38, delete `a written examination' and substitute
`written
examinations'.

13 Ibid., l. 39, delete `a written report' and substitute `written
reports'.

14 This decree shall be effective from 1 October 2001.

Key to Decree (5)

Cll. 1–7 and 9–11 modify the committee structure within which the MBA is
organised.

Cl. 8 seeks to clarify the maximum period for which a candidate may retain the status of
MBA student.

Cll. 12 and 13 bring the decree on examination of students into line with the regulations.

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CONGREGATION 23 April


Degree by Resolution

No notice to the contrary having been received, the following resolution is deemed to have
been approved at noon on 23 April.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

SAMSON ABRAMSKY, Wolfson College

SIMON HENRY LAMB, St Anne's College

SUJOY MUKERJI, University College

ALAN LESLIE STEIN, Linacre College

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CONGREGATION 24 April


Declaration of approval of Resolution approving the
conferment of Honorary Degrees

That the conferment of the Degree of Master of Arts, honoris causa, upon
KIM
SCOTT WALWYN, MA (MA Cambridge), Lady Margaret Hall, be approved.

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COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of
Congregation:

Gardner, C.M.K., Jesus

Hughson, L., Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine

Seres, S., Magdalen

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DIVISIONAL BOARDS AND BOARDS OF
FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 11 May, see
`Examinations and Boards' below.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 26 April 2001: University Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent
entry.]

  • CONGREGATION 15 May 2 p.m.

  • CONGREGATION 24 May

    • Elections

  • *
    Note on procedures in Congregation
  • *
    List of forthcoming Degree Days
  • *
    List of forthcoming Matriculation Ceremonies

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    CONGREGATION 30 April


    Degree by Resolution

    The following resolution will be deemed to be approved at noon on 30 April, unless by that
    time the Registrar has received notice in writing from two or more members of Congregation
    that they wish the resolution to be put to a meeting of Congregation.

    Text of Resolution

    That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

    ROBERT CARSON ALLEN, Nuffield College

    SILVIJA SERES, Magdalen College

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    CONGREGATION 1 May

    Notice

    The meeting of Congregation is cancelled. The sole business comprises a question to which
    no opposition has been notified and in respect of which no request for an adjournment has
    been received, and Mr Vice-Chancellor will accordingly declare the resolution carried
    without
    a meeting under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. iii, cl. 11 (Statutes, 2000, p. 7).

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    CONGREGATION 15 May 2 p.m.


    Promulgation of Statute

    Statute: Abolition of the Curators of the Examination Schools

    Explanatory note

    The following statute, and the decree to be made by Council if the Statute is approved, which
    are promoted on the recommendation of the Curators of the Examination Schools and the
    Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council (EPSC), abolish the curators,
    following the transfer of responsibility for organising examinations to the EPSC, and
    administrative responsibility for the Schools to the Registrar. A committee of users, including
    both Senior and Junior Members, is to be set up by the EPSC to advise the Clerk of the
    Schools on the use of the facilities provided.

    WHEREAS it is expedient to abolish the Curators of the Examination Schools
    following the transfer of their previous responsibilities, the university enacts as follows.

    1 In Tit. VIII, Sect. v, cl. 1 (Statutes, 2000, p. 60), delete `Curators
    of the
    Examination Schools'.

    2 This statute shall be effective from 1 May 2001.

    Decree to be made if the Statute is approved

    Text of Decree

    1 In Ch. II (Statutes, 2000, p. 297), delete Sect. xxxvii.

    2 This decree shall be effective from 1 May 2001.

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    CONGREGATION 24 May 2001


    Elections

    | Nomination procedures |
    Notes on the bodies concerned
    | Nominations received
    | Notes on candidates
    | Gazette Home Page
    |

    Vacancies Retiring members Period from MT 2001
    Botanic Gardens, Curators of One (member of Convocation) Dr O.R. Impey 6 years


    Council One (from members of the faculties in the Divisions of Life and
    Environmental Sciences, Mathematical and Physical Sciences, and Medical Sciences)
    Dr N.M.J. Woodhouse 4 years
    One (from members of the faculties in the Divisions of
    Humanities
    and Social Sciences)
    Professor D.F. Hendry 4 years
    One (from members of Congregation, not necessarily being
    members of any division and not in any case being nominated in a divisional capacity)
    Professor D. Noble 4 years


    Libraries, University, Curators of One (member of Congregation) Professor K.J. Wood 4 years


    Visitatorial Board Panel Three (members of Congregation, or other members of the
    University being at least MAs, of at least ten years' standing)
    Dr T.T. Liu
    Professor F.M.B. Reynolds
    Dr G.A.
    Stoy
    4 years


    In the event of a contested election, a brief biographical note on each candidate will be
    published in the Gazette dated 17 May (including the version of the
    Gazette available on the University Web site), and voters may wish to wait
    until they have read these notes before returning their ballot papers (which will be sent
    out to members of Congregation as soon as possible after the closing date for nominations,
    and which, after completion, must be received by the Head Clerk not later than 4 p.m. on
    24 May).


    Notes on the bodies concerned

    The Curators of the Botanic Garden are responsible, under Council,
    for
    the direction and control of the Garden and of the Arboretum at Nuneham Courtenay,
    including the appointment of the Superintendent of the Garden, and for their finances.
    Council is the University's chief executive body, with statutory responsibility for the
    administration of the University (both academic and other) and for the management of its
    finances and property, as well as dealing with the relationship between the University and
    all external bodies.

    Council submits resolutions and statutes to Congregation for approval,
    and has the power to make decrees (which may be opposed in Congregation). Council
    meets three times a term, and twice in the Long Vacation. It has a number of committees
    (including Educational Policy and Standards, General Purposes, Personnel, and Planning
    and Resource Allocation), on which its members are expected to serve if invited to do so.

    The Curators of the University Libraries are responsible to Council
    for
    ensuring that provision is made for the University's library and information requirements
    for teaching and research, and that the University's major research libraries are maintained
    as a national and international scholarly resource. The curators have control of a
    substantial budget.

    The Visitatorial Board is responsible for making recommendations to
    the Vice-Chancellor (or other appropriate officer) on serious disciplinary cases involving
    members of the academic or academic-related staff. (It does not have responsibility for
    dealing with incapacity on medical grounds, or complaints against the Vice-Chancellor
    himself or herself.) Four members of the board, as from time to time constituted to
    consider an individual case, are selected by lot from a panel of twelve persons elected by
    Congregation. The board is chaired by a person with professional legal experience who
    is appointed by the High Steward of the University.


    Nominations received: Visitatorial Board Panel

    Under the provisions of Ch. XI, Sect. II, sub-section 1, cl. 1 (Statutes, 2000, p.
    769), candidates for election to the Visitatorial Board Panel may be nominated by Council,
    as well as by members of Congregation under the normal procedure for elections in
    Congregation. Council has nominated the following three persons on this occasion:

    1. PROFESSOR A.S. BURROWS, BCL, MA, Fellow of St Hugh's

    2. T.T. LIU, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Wadham

    3. G.A. STOY, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall


    Other nominations

    As members of the Council of the University

    (from members of the faculties in the Divisions of Life and Environmental Sciences,
    Mathematical and Physical Sciences, and Medical Sciences)

    1. J.I. BELL, MA, DM, Fellow of Magdalen

    Nominated by:

    D.H. Barlow, Oriel

    Dame Fiona Caldicott, Somerville

    J.C. Ellory, Corpus Christi

    K.A. Fleming, Green College

    J.N.P. Rawlins, University

    A.D. Smith, Magdalen

    2. K.BURNETT, BA, D.PHIL, Fellow of St John's

    Nominated by:

    W.W.M. Allison, Keble

    J.J. Binney, Merton

    R.A. Cowley, Wadham

    R.C.E. Devenish, Hertford

    W. Hayes, St John's

    C.D. Rodgers, Jesus

    C.E. Webb, Jesus

    (from members of the faculties in the Divisions of Humanities and Social Sciences)

    M.D.E. SLATER, MA, M.PHIL, St Edmund Hall

    Nominated by:

    D.A. Hay, Jesus

    A.G. Hopwood, Christ Church

    A.J. Hurrell, Nuffield

    M.F.E. Philp, Oriel

    T. Smith, St Hilda's

    F.J. Stewart, Somerville

    K.D. Sylva, Jesus

    R.C.S. Walker, Magdalen

    (from members of Congregation, not necessarily being members of any division and
    not
    in any case being nominated in a divisional capacity)

    D. NOBLE, MA, Fellow of Balliol

    Nominated by:

    A.W.M. Graham, Balliol

    L.G. Black, Oriel

    Sir John Hanson, Green College

    A.B. Hawkins, Kellogg

    P.K. Maini, Brasenose

    R.G. Smethurst, Worcester


    As a Curator of the University Libraries

    M.E. CEADEL, MA, D.PHIL, Fellow of New College

    Nominated by:

    M.S. Freeden, Mansfield

    D.J. Hine, Christ Church

    C.H.M. Kelly, New College

    R.I. McKibbin, St John's

    M.F.E. Philp, Oriel

    R. Whittington, New College


    Note: no nomination has been received to fill the vacancy for a Curator of the
    Botanic Garden. The nomination therefore lapses to the Vice-Chancellor and Proctors jointly:
    see Tit. II, Sect. IX, cl. d (d) (Statutes, 2000, p. 16).


    Notes on the candidates for election to Council from members of the faculties in the
    Divisions of Life and Environmental Sciences, Mathematical and Physical Sciences, and
    Medical Sciences

    Bell, John Irving (b. 1 July 1952). Nuffield Professor of Clinical Medicine
    (1992-); University Lecturer in Clinical Medicine and Immunology (1989-92). Fellow,
    Magdalen College (1989-). Member, Medical Sciences Board (2000-); Clinical Medicine
    Board (1994- 2000). Member, Singapore Government's Advisory Committee on Medical
    Education (2001); Canadian MRC Director's Scientific Advisory Board (2000-) and
    International Review Board (1997-); MRC Council and its Strategy Development Group
    (1998-).

    Burnett, Keith (b. 30 September 1953). University Lecturer in Physics (1987-);
    titular Professor (1996-). Tutorial Fellow, St John's College (1987-); Establishment Bursar
    (2000-1); Estates Bursar (1994-5); Domestic Bursar (1990-3). Lecturer, Imperial College
    London (1984- 7). Council member, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council
    (1999-); Institute of Physics. Thomas Young Medallist, Institute of Physics.




    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 26 April 2001: Notices<br />

    Notices


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent
    entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    HERTFORD PRIZE 2001

    The Prize has been awarded to CLAIRE HURCOMBE, Brasenose College.

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    DE PARAVICINI PRIZES 2001

    First Prize: DAVID PAYNE, Magdalen College.

    Second Prize: CHRISTOPHER WALTON, St John's College.

    Proxime accessit: YASHOVARDHAN SHAH, Brasenose College.

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    HAROLD LISTER SUNDERLAND PRIZE 2001

    The Prize has been awarded jointly to OLIVIA BUDDS, Queen's College, and
    FERDINAND
    LOVETT, Somerville College.

    Proxime accessit: THOMAS WOOD, Magdalen College.

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    COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY PRIZE 2001

    The Prize has been awarded jointly to WILLIAM DRAPER, Oriel College, and THOMAS
    MUNBY, Balliol College.

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    ELDON LAW SCHOLARSHIP 2002

    The Board of the Faculty of Law announces that the Eldon Law Scholarship, value not less
    than £5,000 per annum, is awarded annually to be held for up to two years.

    Candidates must be members of the University of Oxford who:

    (a) have passed the examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts or
    for the
    Degree of Bachelor of Civil Law or for the Degree of Magister Juris; and

    (b) have either been placed in the First Class or been awarded a
    distinction
    in one or other of these examinations or in Honour Moderations or have gained one of the
    Chancellor's Prizes; and

    (c) intend to follow the profession of the Law; and

    (d) have applied for one of the scholarships either before, or within
    two years
    next following, the date of their call to the Bar.

    Candidates will be required to sign a declaration that they intend to practise at the Bar in the
    United Kingdom.

    Until they have been called to the Bar, scholars must produce proof that they have regularly
    kept their terms, unless prevented by illness, at one of the Inns of Court.

    In general the policy of the awarding committee is to give preference to a candidate who has
    completed his or her Oxford education and is completing the vocational stage of training
    prior
    to entry into pupillage.

    Applications, accompanied by a curriculum vitae, must be sent to the Head
    Clerk
    (on a form obtainable from him), University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD,
    not later than Friday, 26 October 2001, in a sealed envelope marked `Eldon Law Scholarship
    Application'. The Eldon Law Scholarship Committee will summon those candidates they wish
    to interview in Oxford on Saturday, 9 February 2002.

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    CIRCULATION OF THE
    GAZETTE TO RETIRED
    SENIOR MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY

    It has been decided that any former member of Congregation over the age of seventy-five
    who
    is resident in Oxford may continue to receive the Gazette, if he or she so
    wishes,
    on application in writing to the Information Office, University Offices, Wellington Square,
    Oxford OX1 2JD. Such applications must be renewed at the beginning of each academic
    year.

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    OXFORD CENTRE FOR COGNITIVE
    NEUROSCIENCE


    McDonnell Visiting Fellowships

    The McDonnell Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience is closely integrated with
    the Medical Research Council Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience at Oxford and supports
    work
    on many aspects of brain research relevant to human cognition in several departments at
    Oxford University as well as at other institutions.

    The McDonnell Centre encourages work in all areas of cognitive neuroscience across
    all relevant disciplines and embraces research on experimental, theoretical, and clinical
    studies
    of perceptual analysis, memory, language, and motor control, including philosophical
    approaches to cognition. Current and fuller information on the Centre is available on the Web
    at http://www.cogneuro.ox.ac.uk.

    The Centre offers several forms of support including Visiting Fellowships for
    distinguished researchers from overseas or elsewhere in Britain who wish to work within the
    Oxford Centre for periods between a week and several months. A Visiting Fellowship can
    include a modest grant to help with costs of travel and accommodation (but not a stipend),
    and to pay a bench fee to the host department.

    Applications for Visiting Fellowships may be submitted either by a member of the
    Oxford Centre, or by the intended visitor. There is no special form for applications but they
    should include the following information:
    name, address, and status of applicant (in the form of a very brief curriculum
    vitae
    ); names and addresses of collaborators in Oxford; a brief description (a page
    or
    two) of the proposed research; a list of any publications that have already resulted from the
    area of research; an outline plan of visit/s and expenditure, with total estimated budget, other
    sources of funding and the amount requested

    Applications can be submitted at any time (e-mail is acceptable) to
    Sally Harte (Administrative Secretary), McDonnell Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience,
    University Laboratory of Physiology, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT (telephone: Oxford
    (2)72497, fax: (2)72488, e-mail: admin@cogneuro.ox.ac.uk).

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    BOARD OF MANAGEMENT FOR THE GIBBS
    PRIZES

    Gibbs Prizes 2001

    Prizes, on the foundation of Mr Charles D.D. Gibbs, will be offered in 2001. Details of all
    Gibbs Prizes are set out in full below in alphabetical order.

    Candidates are not required to make special application for Gibbs Prizes awarded on the
    results of coursework and public examinations unless instructed to do so in the individual
    subject notice below. Candidates for prizes other than that in Law must be members of the
    University who, at the time of taking the examination or submitting the coursework on which
    the prizes are awarded, have not exceeded the twelfth term from matriculation. Candidates
    for
    the prize in Law must be members of the University who, at the beginning of the
    examination, have not exceeded their twelfth term from matriculation, and are reading for
    a
    final Honour School. The University has, however, now approved legislation to enable
    Council to grant dispensation, on grounds of protracted illness or other good reason, to a
    candidate who has exceeded the twelfth term from his or her matriculation. Examiners may
    agree not to award a particular prize in any year if it is deemed that no candidate is of
    sufficient merit.

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    I. Biochemistry

    The prize in Biochemistry will be awarded on the combined results of the examinations for
    Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry Parts I and II in the Honour School of Natural Science
    in Trinity Term 2001. The value of the prize is £450 and the examiners have the
    power
    to make one proxime accessit award of £250 for meritorious work and up to three
    additional book prizes of £100.

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    II. Chemistry

    The prize in Chemistry will be awarded on the results of the examination for Chemistry Part
    I in the Honour School of Natural Science in Trinity Term 2001. The value of the prize is
    £450, and the examiners have the power to make one proxime accessit award of
    £250 for meritorious work and up to three additional book prizes of £100.

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    III. Classics

    Candidates achieving a first-class result in Honour Moderations in Classics, Classics and
    English, and Ancient and Modern History who wish to undertake travel or research may
    apply
    for Gibbs Prizes. Eligible candidates should apply to the Committee for the Oldham
    Scholarships, the C.E. Stevens Studentships, and the Sunderland Fund. Enquiries should be
    addressed to Ms Judith Brown, (telephone (2)82464). [Those candidates who achieved a
    distinction in Latin and/or Ancient Greek in the Preliminary Examination for Modern
    Languages in 2000 (which would qualify them to apply for a Gibbs Prize for travel and
    research) may apply for consideration in 2001.]

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    IV. Earth Sciences

    A prize of £180 will be awarded on the basis of the quality and distinction of the field
    mapping report submitted in 2001 in the Final Honour School of Natural Science (Geology).

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    V. Engineering Science

    A prize of £530 will be divided equally between each of the members of the team
    submitting the best Design Project in 2001 for Part I of the Final Honour School of
    Engineering Science.

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    VI. English Language and Literature

    The prizes in English Language and Literature will be as follows. Ten prizes, of £70
    each, will be awarded on the results of Moderations in English Language and Literature in
    Trinity Term 2001. (The same candidate may be awarded the Mrs Claude Beddington
    Literature Prize and a Gibbs Prize.) Prizes of £100 each will be awarded for the
    following papers in the examination for the Honour School of English Language and
    Literature: (a) the best optional thesis; (b) the best extended
    essay in
    Course I, Paper 7; (c) the best extended essay in Course I, Paper 8;
    (d) the best extended essay or optional thesis in Course II;
    (e) the best
    overall performance in Course I of the Honour School; and (f) the best
    overall
    performance in Course II of the Honour School. Candidates in the Joint Schools with English
    are eligible for prizes. Examiners will be asked to specify the top performances in each of
    the
    three Joint Schools for which prizes should be awarded.

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    VII. Geography

    The prize in Geography will be awarded on the results of the examination for the Honour
    School of Geography in Trinity Term 2001. The value of the prize is £450 and the
    examiners have the power to make one proxime accessit award of £250 for meritorious
    work and up to three additional book prizes of £100.

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    VIII. Law

    The prize in Law will be awarded by Special Examination, to be held in the Examination
    Schools, on Monday, 1 October 2001. The value of the prize is £500 and the
    examiners
    have the power to make one proxime accessit award of £300 for meritorious work, and
    up to three additional book prizes of £150 each. The examination will consist of a
    paper
    on Land Law, and a paper on Common Law (Contract and Tort). Candidates for the special
    examination must send in their names on an entry form, which may be obtained at the
    University Offices, to the Head Clerk, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1
    2JD, not later than Friday, 29 June 2001.

    Timetable of papers for the prize in Law:

    Candidates must present themselves for examination in full academic dress, i.e. `subfusc'
    clothing, cap, and gown.

    Monday 1 October; 9.30 a.m. to 12.30 p.m., Common Law (Contract and Tort); 2.30 p.m.
    to
    5.30 p.m., Land Law.

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    IX. Materials

    A prize of £190 will be awarded for the best overall performance in Materials in Parts
    I and II of any of the Materials honour schools in Trinity Term 2001.

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    X. Mathematics

    A prize of £400 will be awarded on the results of the examination in the Honour
    School
    of Mathematical Sciences in Trinity Term 2001 and another prize of £400 on the
    results
    of the examination in the Honour School of Mathematics in Trinity Term 2001. The
    examiners in the Honour School of Mathematics shall have the power to make one proxime
    accessit award of £200. A prize of £200 will be available for the best
    performance in the Mathematics papers in the Honour School of Mathematics and Philosophy
    in Trinity Term 2001.

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    XI. Medieval and Modern Languages

    A prize of £500 will be awarded on the results of the examination for the Honour
    School of Modern Languages in Trinity Term 2001. A prize of £500 will be awarded
    for the best overall performance in the Modern Language in one of the joint Honour Schools
    involving Modern Languages with another subject (i.e. Classics and Modern Languages,
    English and Modern Languages, Modern History and Modern Languages, Philosophy and
    Modern Languages, European and Middle Eastern Languages) in Trinity Term 2001. In
    addition, two prizes, of £100 each, will be available for the two best performances in
    the Preliminary Examination in Modern Languages in Trinity Term 2001 in any of Czech
    (with Slovak), German, Italian, Modern Greek, Portuguese, Linguistics.

    (Note:
    a Gibbs Prize is not available in the language in which the Beddington Prize is being offered;
    in 2001 this is French.).

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    XII. Modern History

    The prize in Modern History will be awarded on the results of the examination for the
    Honour
    School of Modern History and associated joint Honour Schools in Trinity Term 2001. The
    Gibbs Prize is £450. The examiners have the power to make one proxime accessit
    award of £250 for meritorious work, and up to seven additional book prizes of
    £100.

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    XIII. Music

    Prizes will be awarded, provided that there be candidates of sufficient merit, on the results
    of the examination for the Honour School of Music in Trinity Term 2001.

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    XIV. Oriental Studies

    Three prizes, each of £230, will be awarded on the results of Moderations either in
    Oriental Studies (Chinese), Oriental Studies (Japanese) or Oriental Studies (Egyptology and
    Ancient Near Eastern Studies) in Trinity Term 2001.

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    XV. Philosophy

    Gibbs Prizes in Philosophy, of up to £100 each, will be awarded for outstanding
    performance in the Philosophy papers in each of the seven joint Honour Schools involving
    Philosophy (Literae Humaniores; Philosophy, Politics, and Economics; Psychology,
    Philosophy, and Physiology; Mathematics and Philosophy; Physics and Philosophy;
    Philosophy and Modern Languages; and Philosophy and Theology). The examiners shall have
    the power to make proxime accesserunt awards for meritorious work. No candidate shall be
    awarded both a Henry Wilde Prize and a Gibbs Prize in the same examination.

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    XVI. Physics

    The following prizes may be awarded: (i) The Gibbs Prize for Performance in the Physics
    Final M. Phys. Examination (£250). (ii) The Gibbs Prize for the best use of
    experimental apparatus in an M.Phys. project (£100). (iii) Gibbs Prizes for Practical
    Work in Part A of the Physics Final Examination (up to three of £50). A Gibbs Prize
    of up to £100 in value will be offered, provided there are candidates of sufficient
    merit,
    for the best performance in the Physics Department's speaking competition in 2001. Details
    of the competition will be announced in due course. For further information please contact
    the Physics Academic Administrator, NAPL Laboratory. No candidate shall be awarded both
    the Scott Prize and the main Gibbs Prize for performance in the Physics Final M.Phys. in
    the
    same examination.

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    XVII. Physiological Sciences

    A prize of £200 will be awarded on the results of each of the following examinations:
    Parts I and II of the First Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Medicine in Hilary and
    Trinity Terms 2001. The examiners shall, in each case, have the power to make one proxime
    accessit award of £100 for meritorious work. A prize of £100 will be awarded
    on the results of the Preliminary Examination in Physiological Sciences in Trinity Term
    2001.
    Two prizes, of £200 each, will be awarded on the results of the examination in the
    Honour School of Physiological Sciences in Trinity Term 2001. Providing there are
    candidates
    of sufficient merit, one will be awarded to a candidate intending to proceed to the clinical
    course in medicine at Oxford; the other will be awarded to a Physiological Sciences student
    not on the Medical Register. No candidate shall receive both the main Martin Wronker Prize
    in Medicine and the Gibbs Prize.

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    XVIII. Politics

    The prize in Politics will be awarded on the basis of Politics written papers only in the
    examination for the Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics in Trinity Term
    2001. The Gibbs Thesis Prize in Politics will be awarded for the best Politics thesis
    submitted
    in the examination for the Honour School of Philosophy, Politics and Economic in Trinity
    Term 2001, if such a thesis be deemed worthy of a prize. The value of each of these prizes
    is £300 and the examiners have the power in each category to make one proxime
    accessit award of £150 for meritorious work. There will also be a prize available for
    the Politics written paper only in the Preliminary Examination in Philosophy, Politics, and
    Economics in Trinity Term 2001. The value of the prize is £200 and the examiners
    have the power to make one proxime accessit award of £100 for meritorious work.
    Candidates for the Joint Honour School of Modern History and Politics are eligible for the
    three Gibbs Prizes in Politics.

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    XIX. Psychological Studies

    A prize of £175 will be awarded on the results of the examination in Trinity Term
    2001
    in the Honour School of Experimental Psychology and another prize of £175 will be
    awarded on the results of the examination in Trinity Term 2001 for the Honour School of
    Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology. The examiners shall have the power to make up
    to
    two proxime accessit awards of £75 each. A prize of £75 each will be awarded
    for the best Research Project and the best Library Dissertation submitted in Hilary Term
    2001
    in the examination for the Honour School of Experimental Psychology or the Honour School
    of Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology. A prize of £50 will be awarded for the
    best
    practical portfolio in Psychology submitted in Hilary Term 2001 in the examination for the
    Honour School of Experimental Psychology or for the Honour School of Psychology,
    Philosophy, and Physiology. No candidate shall receive more than one Gibbs Prize in the
    same examination. No candidate shall receive both the main Martin Wronker Prize in
    Medicine and a Gibbs Prize in the same examination. It shall be open to the examiners to
    award to the same candidate both a Gibbs Prize and the George Humphrey Prize.

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    XX. Theology

    A prize of £275 will be awarded on the results of the examination for the Final Honour
    School of Theology in Trinity Term 2001. No candidate may be awarded both the Denyer
    and
    Johnson Prize and a Gibbs Prize in the same examination. A prize of £275 will be
    awarded for the best performance in Theology in the Honour School of Philosophy and
    Theology in Trinity Term 2001. A book prize of £200 will be awarded on the results
    of the Preliminary Examination in Theology in Hilary Term 2001.

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    XXI. Zoology

    The prize in Zoology will be awarded on the results of the examination in Biological
    Sciences
    in the Honour School of Natural Science in Trinity Term 2001 at the discretion of the
    examiners to the value of £1,000.

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    LANGUAGE CENTRE

    Intensive weekend courses in foreign languages

    The Language Centre will be running four weekend language courses in Trinity Term 2001.
    Each course will consist of eight hours' tuition and last from 9 a.m. to 1.30 p.m. on both
    Saturday and Sunday. The emphasis will be on speaking and listening. The courses are as
    follows:

    19--20 May: German (Absolute Beginners and Intermediate)

    19--20 May: Italian (Absolute Beginners and Lower Intermediate)

    2--3 June: French (Near/False Beginners, Lower Intermediate, and
    Upper
    Intermediate)

    2--3 June: Spanish (Absolute Beginners and Lower
    Intermediate)

    The fee will be £28 for junior members of the University and other full- time students,
    £36 for members of Congregation and £48 to non-members.

    The Oxford Language Race

    Colleges are currently selecting their participants ready for the launch of the Language Race
    at the Taylorian Lecture Theatre at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 9 May. Further details can be
    obtained from the centre's Web site, http://www.lang.ox.ac.uk/latest.html, or from Aliki
    Pantos (e-mail: lambda@lang.ox.ac.uk). The centre is looking for volunteer native speakers
    in the less commonly taught European languages to act as coaches and testers. Anyone who
    is interested in helping should contact the Language Centre Director, Dr Robert Vanderplank
    (telephone: (2)83360, e-mail: robert.vanderplank@lang.ox.ac.uk).

    Library and self-study area

    The Language Centre library and self-study area will be open during full term from 9.30
    a.m.
    to 6.30 p.m. Monday--Friday, and 10 a.m.--1 p.m. on Saturdays.

    Further information about all courses and facilities at the Language Centre may be obtained
    from the Language Centre's Information Officer, Angela Pinkney, by telephoning (2)83360,
    by e-mailing to admin@lang.ox.ac.uk, or calling at the Centre at 12 Woodstock Road. The
    centre's Web site is at http://www.lang.ox.ac.uk.

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    PITT RIVERS MUSEUM

    Forthcoming exhibitions

    Quilt display: the Millennium Quilt will be hung from the galleries to celebrate the work of
    volunteers in supporting heritage institutions (30 April–21 May)

    `Voices': an exhibition of work by the internationally acclaimed Japanese sculptor Mamoru
    Abe (5 May–7 June)

    Weekend gallery talks and activities

    The following talks and activities, on the theme of `The Museum as Meeting Place', will take
    place at 2.30 p.m. on the days shown during May, which is Museums and Galleries Month.
    The events will take place in the main museum unless indicated otherwise.

    5 May: `Muddle or method' (Pitt Stops family activity).

    6 May: `Reading historical photographs.'

    12 May: `Meeting the past.'

    13 May: `Transformations'—a gallery tour of the special exhibition.

    19 May, Balfour Galleries: `Meet the musical curator.'

    19/20 May: `The museum perceived through the feet'—trails (a One-to-One event
    organised by the Friends of the Pitt Rivers Museum).

    26 May: `Meetings in the Himalayas and Tibet.'

    27 May: `Body adornment: new displays in progress.'

    Other events

    12–19 May: `Culture on the ground: the museum perceived through the feet.' A
    trail on a foot-related theme, organised by the Friends of the Pitt Rivers for One-to-One
    week.

    16 May: Professor Tim Ingold, University of Aberdeen, lectures on `Culture on the
    ground: the world perceived through the feet', 7 p.m., in the Inorganic Chemistry
    Lecture Theatre (Beatrice Blackwood Annual Public Lecture).

    18 May: late night opening with a Japanese theme. The museum will stay open until 9
    p.m. with opportunities to find out about the Japanese collections. The Japanese artis
    Mamoru Abe will be present to discuss his work.

    30 May–1 June: school half-term activities.

    2 June: `Pitt Stops' family activity. The events over these three days will focus on `The
    quest for the Pitt Rivers' dragons'.

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    BATE COLLECTION OF MUSICAL
    INSTRUMENTS

    Exhibition now open

    The French Collection: a selection of items from Jean Henry's gift

    Weekend course/workshop

    Further details of the following events may be obtained from Victoria Beaumont at the Bate
    Collection (telephone: Oxford (2)76139).

    Sat. 19 May: Introduction to the viol. A one-day course for beginners led by Catherine
    Miserandino-Gaherty.

    Sat. 26 May: Introduction to the viol: the next step. A one-day workshop designed for
    those who have already completed the first course and who wish to take their learning
    a step further. Led by Catherine Miserandino-Gaherty.

    Half-Term family activities

    Tue. 22 May and Thur. 24 May, 2–5 p.m. (admission free): a discovery trail, drawing
    activities, and workshops exploring the theme of early music-making, including the chance
    to play copies of early musical instruments.

    Lunchtime Musical Talks

    The following talks will be given at the Bate Collection, 1.15–2 p.m. on the days
    shown.

    1 May: `Viol facts—the basics': a musical talk about the Viola da Gamba led by
    Cathie Miserandino-Gaherty, assisted by Patricia Baines.

    5 June: `Music for baroque cello'—an informal recital including extracts from
    Bach's Cello Suites performed on the Bate Collection's early cello by
    Henry Jay, with Caroline Ritchie of New College.

    Summer Music Week

    Sunday, 16 July–Friday, 20 July: Bow-Making with Andrew Bellis. Learn to make a
    violin, viola, cello or bass bow suitable for modern playing requirements, inspired by the
    William C. Retford Memorial Collection.

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    MUSICAL EVENTS


    Music Faculty

    Events

    Betts Organ Masterclass. DAME GILLIAN WEIR will give a
    masterclass on the organ music of César Franck on Friday, 11 May, in
    Exeter College Chapel. This event, free of charge and open to the public, will
    take place between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday, 11
    May.

    THE CHOIR OF NEW COLLEGE and THE BAND OF INSTRUMENTS,
    conducted by Edward Higginbottom, will perform music by Dumont and
    Purcell in New College Chapel at 4 pm. on Wednesday, 16 May. The event,
    to be broadcast live, is offered as part of Evensong and as such is free of
    charge and open to the public.

    THE BBC SINGERS, conducted by Stephen Cleobury, will perform in a
    workshop for student composers from the Faculty of Music. This will take
    place from 10.30 a.m. on Thursday, 17 May, in the Holywell Music Room.
    The event is open to the general public free of charge.

    Masterclass. ANN LIEBECK, Soprano, will offer the masterclass,
    `Opera Arias from the Baroque to the Twentieth Century: Technique and
    Interpretation'. This will take place on Thursday, 17 May, in the Denis Arnold
    Hall, Faculty of Music, at 3 p.m. The event is open to the general public free
    of charge.

    THE ALLEGRI STRING QUARTET will perform Haydn's Quartet in D
    minor, Op. 42, Elgar's Quartet, Op. 83, and Beethoven's Quartet in C sharp
    minor, Op. 131, in the Holywell Music Room, at 8 p.m. on Friday, 18 May.
    Tickets £10 (£5 concessions) from the Playhouse Box Office,
    Beaumont Street, or on the door.

    THE JOAN CONWAY SCHOLARS 2000–1. Andrew Skidmore, cello,
    and Anna Wilby, percussion, will give a recital on Saturday, 19 May, at 11.30
    a.m. in the Holywell Music Room. The event is open to the general public free
    of charge.

    THE ALLEGRI STRING QUARTET will perform Puccini's Chrysanthemums,
    Verdi's Quartet in E minor, and, with Kate Watt, harp, Catherine Sansom,
    clarinet, and Ellen Wiles, flute, Ravel's Introduction et Allegro. The recital
    will take place at in the Holywell Music Room at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, 30
    May. Tickets £5 (£2.50 concessions) from the Playhouse Box
    Office, Beaumont Street, or on the door.



    Wolfson College Music Society

    VERA VAIDMAN will play the complete works for solo violin by J.S. Bach
    at 8 p.m. on the following days. Tickets, costing £7 (concessions
    £5), for each recital, or £10 for both, are obtainable from the
    Oxford Playhouse (telephone: Oxford 798600).

    Fri. 11 May, Holywell Music Room: Partitas nos. 1 and 2; Sonata
    no. 1.

    Sat. 12 May, the Hall, Wolfson College: Sonatas nos. 2 and 3;
    Partita no. 3.

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    UNIVERSITY CLUB


    Wine-tastings

    Wine-tastings will be held at 5.45 p.m. on the following Wednesdays in the
    University Club.

    Members and their guests are welcome, the cost being £2 per person.

    Wed. 2 May: inexpensive red wines.

    Wed. 13 June: wines for summer drinking.

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    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 26 April 2001: Lectures<br />

    Lectures


    Contents of this section:

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    INAUGURAL LECTURES


    Dr Lee's Professor of Chemistry

    PROFESSOR J. KLEIN will deliver his inaugural lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Monday, 30 April,
    in the Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory.

    Subject: `Soft matter: from hieroglyphics to biolubrication.'

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    Professor of the Physical Examination of Materials

    PROFESSOR D.J.H. COCKAYNE will deliver his inaugural lecture at 2.15 p.m. on
    Thursday, 3 May, in the Sir Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon Laboratory.

    Subject: `Exploring the nano-world of materials and biology with
    modern electron microscopy.'

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    Chichele Professor of Public International Law

    PROFESSOR A.V. LOWE will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Monday, 14
    May, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building.

    Subject: `International law: the common pursuit.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Harold Vyvyan Harmsworth Professor of American
    History

    PROFESSOR T.H. BREEN will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 15 May,
    in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `The Lockean Moment: the languages of rights on the eve of
    the American Revolution.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Barnett Professor of Social Policy

    PROFESSOR J.E. LEWIS will deliver her inaugural lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Thursday, 7
    June, in the Lecture Theatre, Rewley House.

    Subject: `Pictures of welfare.'

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    CYRIL FOSTER LECTURE

    MR KOFI ANNAN, Secretary-General of the United Nations, will deliver the Cyril Foster
    Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 19 June, in the Sheldonian Theatre. The subject of the lecture
    will be announced later.

    Admission will be by ticket only. Tickets will be available from the Sheldonian Theatre from
    21 May (open Monday–Friday, 10 a.m.–12 noon).

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    WILDE LECTURES ON NATURAL AND
    COMPARATIVE RELIGION 2000–1

    Rationality and religious commitment

    PROFESSOR ROBERT AUDI, Charles J. Mach Distinguished Professor of Philosophy,
    University of Nebraska, will deliver the Wilde Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following days in
    the Examination Schools.

    Part I. Epistemological foundations: rationality, justification, and
    knowledge


    Wed. 2 May: `Rationality in thought and action.'

    Thur. 3 May: `Rationality, justification, and reasonableness.'


    Part II. The dimensions of religious commitment


    Wed. 9 May: `Belief, faith, and acceptance.'

    Thur. 10 May: `Religious conduct.'

    Wed. 16 May: `Religious commitment and moral obligation.'


    Part III. The rationality of religious commitment in the postmodern world


    Thur. 17 May: `Religious integration and human
    flourishing.'

    Wed. 23 May: `Internal challenges to the rationality of religious
    commitment.'

    Thur. 24 May: `The challenge of naturalism.'

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    HUSSEY LECTURES ON THE CHURCH AND
    THE ARTS

    PROFESSOR JONATHAN J.G. ALEXANDER, Professor of Fine Arts, New York
    University, will deliver the Hussey annual lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 17 May, in the
    Lecture Hall, the Taylor Institution.

    Subject: `Christianity and the art of the illuminated manuscript in
    Europe in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.'

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    MYRES MEMORIAL LECTURE

    PROFESSOR AMÉLIE KUHRT, University College, London, will deliver the Myres
    Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 7 May, in the McGregor-Matthews Room, New
    College.

    Subject: `Greeks in Persian and Babylonian perspective.'

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    EMDEN LECTURE

    PROFESSOR R.J. EVANS will deliver the Emden Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 9 May,
    in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `The Germans in British public memory since 1945.'

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    AUNG SAN SUU KYI LECTURE

    SIR MARRACK GOULDING will deliver the inaugural Aung San Suu Kyi Lecture at 5 p.m.
    on Tuesday, 8 May, in the Maplethorpe Building, St Hugh's College.

    Subject: `Deliverance from evil.'

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    GEDDES LECTURE

    DOMINIC LAWSON will deliver the Geddes Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 17 May, in
    the Lecture Room, the School of Geography and the Environment.

    Subject: `Language, truth, and journalism.'

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    LEVERHULME LECTURES

    Mathematics, dynamics, and medicine—the role of mathematics and physics in
    biological and clinical research for the new millennium

    PROFESSOR MICHAEL C. MACKEY, Leverhulme Visiting Professor, will deliver the
    Leverhulme Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following Fridays in the Lecture Theatre, the
    Computing Laboratory.

    4 May: `Mathematics, biology, and physics: interactions and
    interdependence—history tells us where the action will be in the twenty-first
    century.'

    11 May: `Biological rhythms: from clocks to chaos—chaos theory
    illuminates the nature of biological processes.'

    18 May: `Periodic and dynamical diseases: bifurcations at the
    bedside—better health through mathematics.'

    25 May: `How the nervous system remembers? Information coding in
    the brain: old and new ideas.'

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    CHARLES SIMONYI LECTURE

    PROFESSOR JARED DIAMOND, University of California, Los Angeles, will deliver the
    third annual Charles Simonyi Lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Wednesday, 9 May, in the Oxford
    Playhouse. Admission is by free ticket, obtainable from the Oxford Playhouse (telephone:
    Oxford 798600). Tickets will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.

    The Simonyi Lecture is presented by the Oxford Playhouse and New College in association
    with the Department for Continuing Education. It will be introduced by Professor Richard
    Dawkins.

    Subject: `Why did human history unfold differently on different
    continents for the last 13,000 years?'

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    SIR JOHN HICKS LECTURE ON ECONOMIC
    HISTORY

    PROFESSOR LARRY NEAL, University of Illinois, will deliver the Sir John Hicks Lecture
    at 5 p.m. on Friday, 11 May, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `Shocking developments in a theory of economic history.'

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    GAISFORD LECTURE

    DR R.L. HUNTER will deliver the Gaisford Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 17 May, in St
    John's College.

    Subject: `Hesiod and Hellenistic poetry.'

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    CLARENDON LECTURES IN MANAGEMENT
    STUDIES

    RONALD BURT, Professor of Sociology and Strategy, Graduate School of Business,
    Chicago, and Professor of Human Resources and Organisational Development, INSEAD, will
    deliver the Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies at 5 p.m. on the following days in
    the Examination Schools.

    The lectures are free and open to the public. Further information may be obtained from
    Martha Michael (telephone: Oxford 267859, fax: 267741, e-mail: michaelm@oup.co.uk).

    Tue. 15 May: `Social capital and structural holes: creating and
    delivering value.'

    Wed. 16 May: `Trust: gossip, bandwidth, and echo.'

    Thur. 17 May: `Reputation: etiology and consequences.'

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    DOROTHY ROWE MEMORIAL LECTURE

    PROFESSOR THOMAS SCHUMACHER, Dean of the School of Architecture, University
    of Maryland, will deliver the Dorothy Rowe Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 18 May,
    in the Auditorium, Magdalen College (Longwall entrance).

    Subject: `When Terragni spoke to Dante: the
    Danteum of Terragni and Fascist architecture as propaganda.'

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    CAMERON MACKINTOSH LECTURES

    PROFESSOR JOHN NAPIER will deliver the first lecture in the 2001 series at 5 p.m. on
    Wednesday, 2 May, in the Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre.

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    HAMBRO VISITING PROFESSOR OF OPERA

    Divas and scholars: performing Italian opera

    PROFESSOR PHILIP GOSSETT will lecture at 5.30 p.m. on the following days in the
    Auditorium, Magdalen College.

    3 May: ` "Mare e monti": two summer
    festivals.'

    10 May: `Scandal and scholarship: 27,000 errors in Verdi's
    Falstaff.'

    17 May: `Making cuts: Serafin's scissors.'

    24 May: `Ornamenting Rossini and transposing Bellini.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    LIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

    Department of Plant Sciences

    Unless otherwise indicated, the following lectures will be given at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in
    the Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Plant Sciences.

    PROFESSOR J. PICKETT, IACR, Rothamsted

    3 May: `Induction of plant-derived signals imitating or elicited
    by insect feeding.'

    PROFESSOR G. JENKINS, Glasgow

    10 May: `UV/blue light signalling in the regulation of flavonoid
    biosynthesis genes.'

    DR A. SMITH, John Innes Centre

    17 May: `Constructing a starch granule.'

    PROFESSOR D. GODBOLD, Bangor

    24 May: `Mycorrhizal biodiversity and global climate
    change.'

    PROFESSOR J. DANGL, North Carolina

    Tue. 29 May: `Knowing the dancer from the dance: molecular
    intimacy between plants and pathogens.'

    PROFESSOR D. SOLTIS, Florida

    7 June: `Green.'

    DR R. SCOTLAND

    14 June: `The role of morphology in phylogeny reconstruction.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology

    Fertility and Reproduction Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 11 a.m. on Mondays in the basement Seminar Room,
    the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology.

    DR J. CARSEN, Edinburgh

    30 Apr.: `Growing old in Langkawi, Malaysia.'

    DR P. DOVER, Uppsala

    14 May: `Respect or being movious; gender
    and embodiment, or morality and HIV/AIDS in Zambia.'

    DR S. KITZINGER

    21 May: `Touch in childbirth: an analysis of its function and
    meanings.'

    DR D. MARTIN

    4 June: ` "The sitting months": post-partum taboos
    and restrictions among the Chinese of Hong Kong.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    LITERAE HUMANIORES, ORIENTAL STUDIES,
    THEOLOGY

    Religions of the ancient Mediterranean world

    PROFESSOR J. SCHEID, Paris, will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 1 May, in the
    Platnauer Room, Brasenose College.

    Conveners: S.R.F. Price, MA, D.Phil., Lecturer in Ancient History,
    M. Goodman, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Jewish Studies, and M. Edwards, MA, D.Phil.,
    Lecturer in Patristics.

    Subject: `The vow in ancient religions: a comparative approach.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES

    Oxford Physics Colloquia

    Unless otherwise indicated, the following colloquia will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Fridays in
    the Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon Laboratory.

    Conveners: D. Sherrington, MA, D.Phil., Wykeham Professor of
    Physics, and J.I. Silk, MA, D.Phil., Savilian Professor of Astronomy.

    PROFESSOR K. OLIVE, Minnesota and CERN

    4 May: `Supersymmetry and dark matter.'

    PROFESSOR C. ISHAM, Imperial College, London

    11 May: `Topoi in quantum theory and quantum gravity.'

    DR R. GILMOZZI, European Southern Observatory, Garching, Germany

    25 May: `The science and technology of a 100m telescope:
    ESO's OWL concept.'

    PROFESSOR G. WEST, Los Alamos National Laboratory and Imperial College

    1 June: `Universal scaling laws in biology from cells and
    molecules to whales and ecosystems.'

    PROFESSOR T. MAURICE RICE, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Swiss Federal Institute
    of Technology (ETH), Zurich, Switzerland

    8 June, 4.30 p.m.: `Strongly correlated electrons: high
    temperature superconductivity and other surprises.' (Cherwell–Simon
    Lecture
    )

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

    Unless otherwise indicated, the following colloquia will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the
    Main Lecture Theatre, the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory.

    For details of Professor Jacob Klein's inaugural lecture (30 April), see above.

    Convener: M.L.H. Green, MA, Professor of Inorganic
    Chemistry.

    PROFESSOR M. BROOKHART, North Carolina

    Thur. 10 May: `Catalysis using late transition metal complexes.'
    (Centenary Lecture)

    PROFESSOR SIR TOM BLUNDELL, Cambridge

    14 May, Lecture Theatre, University Museum of Natural
    History
    : `Structural biology and crystallography today: the influence of
    Dorothy Hodgkin on current developments.' (Followed by the unveiling of the
    Dorothy Hodgkin Plaque
    )

    PROFESSOR J.P. GLUSKER, Fox Chase Cancer Centre, Philadelphia

    Tue. 15 May: to be announced. (D.H. Memorial
    Lecture, sponsored by Somerville College; to be followed by a wine reception in the
    Abbot's Kitchen, courtesy of Somerville College
    )

    PROFESSOR D. CARDIN, Reading

    21 May: `Threading the zeolite needle—generation of
    conducting polymers inside the pores of micro- and meso-porous solids.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Theoretical Particle Physics Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in the Nuclear and Astrophysics
    Lecture Theatre.

    Conveners: I.I. Kogan, MA, and S. Sarkar, MA, Readers in
    Physics.

    DR A. SAGNOTTI, Rome

    4 May: `Supersymmetry breaking on the brane.'

    PROFESSOR V. ZAKHAROV, Munich

    18 May: `Monopoles in QCD.'

    PROFESSOR F. CLOSE

    1 June: `Glueballs—a central mystery.'

    PROFESSOR R. MAARTENS, Portsmouth

    15 June: `Cosmology of brane-world.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Theoretical Physics Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in the Nuclear Physics Lecture
    Theatre. Details of the final seminar (8 June) will be announced later.

    Conveners: G.G. Ross, MA, Professor of Theoretical Physics, and
    R.B. Stinchcombe, MA, Reader in Physics.

    DR T. MORRIS, Southampton

    27 Apr.: `Non-perturbative computations through the exact
    renormalisation group.'

    PROFESSOR A. BRAY, Manchester

    11 May: `Phase separation dynamics of driven systems.'

    PROFESSOR F. CLOSE

    25 May
    : `Inclusive–exclusive duality: how does the square of the sum
    become the sum of the squares?'

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    MEDICAL SCIENCES

    Oxford Clinical Neurosciences Lectures

    The following lectures will be given at 11.30 a.m. on Fridays in the Witts Lecture Theatre,
    the Radcliffe Infirmary.

    DR R. LANE, West London Neurosciences Centre, Charing Cross Hospital

    11 May: `Heterogeneity in chronic fatigue syndrome.'

    DR C. CLARKE, Division of Neuroscience, City Hospital, Birmingham

    15 June: `The future of dopamine agonists in Parkinson's
    disease.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Laboratory of Physiology

    The following seminars will be held at 12 noon on Wednesdays in the Sherrington Room,
    the University Laboratory of Physiology.

    Conveners: Dr A.J. Hannan and Dr S. Trapp.

    PROFESSOR P. HOFFMANN, Bochum, Germany

    2 May: `Population responses to visual motion stimuli in
    cortical areas MT and MST of the monkey brain.' (Sponsored by the
    Physiological Society
    )

    DR J. ROEPER

    9 May: `Tuning the neuronal pacemaker: the molecular
    physiology of frequency control in dopaminergic midbrain neurons.'
    (Sponsored by the Physiological Society)

    DR P. PEDARZANI, University College, London

    16 May: `Molecular basis of calcium-activated potassium
    channel function in central neurones.' (Jenkinson Seminar)

    PROFESSOR E. BUHL, Leeds

    23 May: `Towards an understanding of hippocampal
    rhythmogenesis.' (Sponsored by the Physiological Society)

    DR T. GRIFFITHS, Newcastle

    30 May: `Normal and abnormal temporal sound processing by
    the human brainstem and cortex.' (McDonnell–Pew
    Seminar
    )

    DR M. VIVAUDOU, Laboratoire de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, Grenoble,
    France

    6 June: `Pharmacological activation of K-ATP channels:
    searching for the molecular mechanisms of action of K channel openers.'
    (Sponsored by the Physiological Society)

    DR K.M. CHANNON

    13 June: `Nitric oxide–superoxide interactions and
    vascular function.' (Jenkinson Seminar)

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology

    Unless indicated otherwise, the following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Mondays in the
    library, the Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology.

    Convener: J. Harding, MA status, Professor of Ocular
    Biochemistry.

    DR G. LAURIE, Virginia

    14 May: `Gene discovery in the human lacrimal gland.'

    PROFESSOR A. WATTS

    21 May, Eye Hospital Lecture Theatre, first floor, Oxford Eye
    Hospital
    : `Rhodopsin: structure and function.'

    PROFESSOR J.R. THOMPSON, Leicester

    4 June, Eye Hospital Lecture Theatre, first floor, Oxford Eye
    Hospital
    : `Is the apparent association between sunlight and cataract due to
    confounding by other life-style factors?'

    DR R. VAN MONTFORT, Birkbeck College, London

    11 June: `The X-ray structure of the oligomeric assembly of a
    wheat small heat shock protein: implications of eye lens [alpha]-crystallin.'

    DR A. SHYADEHI

    18 June: `Protection of lens and enzymes by ibuprofen and its
    metabolites.'

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    MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

    PROFESSOR EMILIO PASQUINI, University of Bologna, Isaiah Berlin Fellow and Visiting
    Fellow, Magdalen College, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in Room 2, the Taylor
    Institution.

    2 May: `Dante e il dominio della metafora.' (\Hosted by the Italian
    Graduate Seminar; in Italian\)

    16 May: `Il primo cant di Stazio.' (Paget Toynbee Lecture on
    Dante; in Italian
    )

    23 May: `Medieval polarities: Dantism and Petrarchism.'
    (Isaiah Berlin Lectures; in English)

    30 May: `The permanence of form: Petrarchism.' (Isaiah
    Berlin Lectures; in English
    )

    6 June: `Work in progress on Dante: the new initiatives.'
    (Isaiah Berlin Lectures; in English)

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Italian Graduate Seminar

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in Room 2, the Taylor
    Institution.

    PROFESSOR K. BROWNLEE, Pennsylvania

    8 May: `Rewriting transcendence: Boccaccio's Dantean
    "miracle" in Decameron 2.1.'

    PROFESSOR G. OLIVA, `G. D'Annunzio' University, Chieti

    15 May: to be announced (on D'Annunzio).

    PROFESSOR J. MEDDEMEN, Pavia

    22 May: `Fenoglio and Kenneth Grahame.'

    PROFESSOR N. SAXBY, Cape Town

    29 May: to be announced (on court literature of the
    Quattrocento) (Supported by the Oppenheimer Fund)

    DR S. VANNINI, University College, Dublin

    5 June: `Calvino's Se una notte d'inverno un
    viaggiatore
    : writing the act of reading, reading the act of writing.'

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    MODERN HISTORY

    Special Faculty Lecture

    PROFESSOR W.R. LOUIS, University of Texas, will deliver the annual Special Faculty
    Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 11 May, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `Oxford's empire: imperial history at Oxford.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Seminar in Medieval History

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Wharton Room, All Souls
    College.

    Conveners: R.R. Davies, MA, D.Phil., Chichele Professor of
    Medieval History, and C.P. Wormald, MA, University Lecturer (CUF) in Modern
    History.

    A. HODGE

    30 Apr.: `Pictish and Scottish kingship: ideas and
    ideologies.'

    J. BARROW, Birmingham

    7 May: `Clergy as family men 1000–1215.'

    A. BELL

    14 May: `Oriental despotism in Anglo-Saxon England.'

    M. BRETT, Cambridge

    21 May: ` The silence of the charters.'

    J. WILLOUGHBY

    28 May: `Libraries and their readers in medieval
    England.'

    A. GRANT, Lancaster

    4 June: `The kingship of Robert I of Scots.'

    J. PELTZER

    11 June: `Archiepiscopal elections at Rouen 1164–1235.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Commonwealth History Seminar: Childhood and empire

    This workshop will be held on Friday, 11 May, in the Modern History Faculty Building. The
    presentations will be followed by a period of discussion at 3.30 p.m.

    PROFESSOR T. RAYCHAUDHURI

    9.30 a.m.: `A politicised childhood in a place without
    trains.'

    DR E. BUETTNER, York

    10.15 a.m.: `Moving beyond stereotypes: British children in late
    imperial India in wider historical contexts.'

    PROFESSOR M. CHAMBERLAIN, Oxford Brookes

    11.30 a.m.: `Growing up in the British West Indies.'

    DR A. DAVIN, Middlesex

    2 p.m.: `Two early twentieth-century childhoods "half the
    world away".'

    DR K. CASTLE, North London

    2.45 p.m.: `Children's magazines and the end of empire.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Modern History Research Centre

    Europaeum Lecture

    PROFESSOR P. BURRIN, Graduate Institute of International Studies, Geneva, will deliver
    the Europaeum Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 16 May, in the Taylor Institution.

    Subject: `Strands of Nazi antisemitism.'

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    MODERN HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCES

    Social and Economic History of the British Isles 1000–1600

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Hovenden Room, All
    Souls College.

    Conveners: R.R. Davies, MA, D.Phil., MA, D.Phil., Chichele
    Professor of Medieval History, R.J.W. Evans, MA, D.Phil., Regius Professor of Modern
    History, and others.

    J. BLAIR

    2 May
    : `The "feudal revolution" and ritual space in late Anglo-
    Saxon England.'

    K. PARKIN, Cambridge

    9 May: `To reconstruct a peasant society from manor court
    rolls: an attempt and its implications for methodology.'

    J. HATCHER, Cambridge

    16 May: `The demographic system of later medieval and early
    modern England.'

    J. DAVIS, Cambridge

    23 May: `Literary and clerical reconstructions of petty traders
    in late medieval England.'

    C. BRIGGS, Cambridge

    30 May: `The functions of credit and the nature of creditors and
    debtors in some fourteenth-century English villages.'

    E. GEMMELL

    6 June: `Durham cathedral priory obedientiary accounts: a
    source of price data for the early fourteenth century.'

    S. RIGBY, Manchester

    13 June: `Literature and society in late medieval England.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    MUSIC

    The Composer Speaks

    The following public lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Holywell Music
    Room.

    9 May: COLIN MATTHEW.

    30 May: NICOLA LEFANU.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Other public lectures

    The following lectures will be given as shown in the Denis Arnold Hall, the Faculty of
    Music.

    DR KENNETH HAMILTON, Birmingham

    Wed. 2 May, 2 p.m.: `The Liszt Sonata in B minor: before and
    after.' (Followed by a performance by Dr Hamilton of the Liszt
    Sonata
    )

    DR ANTHONY NOBLE, Salesian College, Farnborough

    Fri. 4 May, 12 noon: ` "Of her there is scarce a mezzo
    print": Elizabeth Gambarini and her music recontextualised.'

    SUPARMI ARCHER

    Thur. 31 May, 5 p.m.: `Gospel and the roots of Soul.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ORIENTAL STUDIES

    Lectures in the anthropology of Korea

    DR L. KENDALL, Curator, the New York Metropolitan Museum, will lecture at 5.30 p.m.
    on Thursday, 26 April, in the Insitute of Social and Cultural Anthropology.

    Conveners: M.J. Banks, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Social and Cultural
    Anthropology, and J.B. Lewis, MA, University Lecturer in Korean.

    Subject: `Spiritual consumption: gods and goods in the Korean shaman
    world.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    THEOLOGY

    Interdisciplinary seminars in the study of religions

    The following interdisciplinary seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in Lecture Room
    2, Christ Church.

    Conveners: J.S.K. Ward, DD, Regius Professor of Divinity, and
    W.M. Morgan, MA, Lecturer in World Religions, Mansfield and Westminster
    Colleges.

    PROFESSOR R. GOMBRICH

    1 May: `Is there progress in Buddhist studies?'

    DR A. SHAW, Brunel

    8 May: `Cultural issues in religious communities: an analysis
    of Pakistani marriage trends.'

    DR E. ARWECK, King's College, London

    15 May: `Religionwissenschaft and the
    sociology of religion: how do they fit together?'

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    ROTHERMERE AMERICAN INSTITUTE

    CAROLE STONE, Professor of English and Creative Writing, Montclair State University,
    is currently visiting the Rothermere American Institute. She will give a poetry-reading at a
    meeting of the Oxford University Poetry Society at 8 p.m. on Thursday, 3 May, in the
    Oakeshott Room, Lincoln College. The subject of her reading is to be confirmed.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    SAÏD BUSINESS SCHOOL

    P.D. Leake Lectures in Accounting 2001

    The following lectures will be given as shown in the Mary Sunley Conference Centre, St
    Catherine's College. Each lecture will be followed by a discussion.

    Further details may be obtained from Deborah Lisburne, Saïd Business School
    (telephone: 228521, e-mail: deborah.lisburne@sbs.ox.ac.uk).

    PROFESSOR M.W. NELSON, Cornell

    Tue. 15 May, 9.30 a.m.: `Managers' and auditors' decisions
    concerning earnings management.'

    PROFESSOR R. LIBBY, Cornell

    Tue. 15 May, 2.30 p.m.: `Investors' and analyts' interpretations
    of accounting disclosures.'

    PROFESSOR R. BLOOMFIELD, Cornell

    Wed. 16 May, 9 a.m.: `Individual decisions and market
    inefficiency: causes and effects.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    BYZANTINE STUDIES

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the New Seminar Room, St
    John's College.

    Conveners: E.M. Jeffreys, B.Litt., MA, Bywater and Sotheby
    Professor of Byzantine and Modern Greek Language and Literature, J.D. Howard-Johnston,
    MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in Byzantine Studies, and M.C.M. Mango, MA, D.Phil.,
    Fellow in Byzantine Archaeology and Art, St John's College.

    DR L. JAMES, Sussex

    1 May: `For God and Empire: cultural patronage and the
    Byzantine empress.'

    DR K. IERODIAKONOU

    8 May: `The anti-logical movement in Byzantium: the fourteenth
    century.'

    PROFESSOR W. TREADGOLD, St Louis

    15 May: `The Patriarch Photius.'

    PROFESSOR JEFFREYS

    22 May: `Byzantium, Orthodoxy, and early printed Greek books
    in Oxford: an interim report.'

    PROFESSOR I. SHAHID, Georgetown University

    29 May: `Justinian, the emperor who surpassed Solomon:
    antisemitism reflected in architecture.'

    DR A. WILSON

    5 June: `Mills, aqueducts, and the Gothic Wars: excavations on
    the Janiculum Hill in Rome.'

    DR MANGO

    12 June: `The Tchalenko Archive Project.' (Including
    computer demonstration
    )

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    COMPUTING LABORATORY

    Numerical Analysis Group

    Computational mathematics and applications seminars

    Except where otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be given at 2 p.m. on
    Tuesdays in the Lecture Theatre, the Computing Laboratory.

    The co-ordinators are L.N. Trefethen and J. Scott (RAL). Further information may be
    obtained from Shirley Day (telephone: Oxford (2)73885).

    DR R. ABGRALL, Bordeaux

    3 May: `Upwind residual distributive schemes for compressible
    flows.'

    PROFESSOR M. ZWORSKI, Berkeley

    10 May: `Pseudospectra and solvability of PDEs.'

    DR L. DANIELS and DR I. STRACHAN, Hyprotech

    17 May, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory: `On the robust
    solution of process simulation problems.'

    DR H. BYRNE, Nottingham

    24 May: to be announced.

    DR M. HEIL, Manchester

    31 May: to be announced.

    PROFESSOR M. POWELL, Cambridge

    7 June, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory: `Some properties of
    thin plate spline interpolation.'

    PROFESSOR G. STRANG, MIT

    21 June: `Rank-one updates in applied mathematics.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    CENTRE FOR CRIMINOLOGICAL RESEARCH

    Aspects of criminal and penal policy

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Wharton Room, All
    Souls College.

    Conveners: R.G. Hood, MA, D.Phil., DCL, Professor of
    Criminology, and C. Hoyle, M.Sc., D.Phil., Lecturer in Criminology.

    DR A. BARKER, Parole Board for England and Wales

    2 May: `The challenge of assessing mentally disordered
    discretionary lifers: emerging findings from a Parole Board study.'

    D. FAULKNER

    9 May: `Crime, citizenship, and penal policy.'

    PROFESSOR M. WASIK, Manchester; Chairman, Sentencing Advisory Panel

    16 May: `Sentencing: the role of the Advisory Panel.'

    DR A. LIEBLING, Cambridge

    23 May: `The prison officer and the quality of prison life.'

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    DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL STUDIES

    The following research seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in Lecture Room 1, the
    Department of Educational Studies.

    DR G. CORNEY

    30 Apr.: `Teacher education for sustainable development:
    research with primary school teachers.'

    PROFESSOR K. SYLVA

    21 May: `Longitudinal research on the effects of early childhood
    education on children's intellectual and social development: some alternatives to
    randomised control trials.'

    DR R. COE, Durham

    4 June: `Unpalatable medicine or all things to all people? What
    (if anything) is evidence-based education?'

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    OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC STUDIES

    Islam and urban culture in Egypt

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Oxford Centre for
    Islamic Studies.

    Conveners: F.A. Nizami, MA, D.Phil., Director of the Centre, and
    J. Piscatori (Ph.D.), Fellow of the Centre.

    R. BADRAN, Amman, Jordan

    2 May: `Learning from Cairo: reinterpreting Islamic
    architecture.'

    DR J. CHALCRAFT, Edinburgh

    9 May: `The end of the guilds in Egypt,
    1863–1914.'

    PROFESSOR T.P. MITCHELL, New York

    16 May: `The character of calculability: making the economy
    in turn-of-the-century Cairo.'

    D. RICHARDS

    23 May: `The administration of Cairo in the Mamluk
    period.'

    PROFESSOR N. RABAT, MIT

    30 May: `History, the city, and criticism: Maqrizi and his Book
    on the Khitat.'

    PROFESSOR Y. MICHOT

    6 June: `Mamluk popular culture in the Fatwas
    of Ibn Taymiyya.'

    DR L. HERRERA

    13 June: `Downveiling: the contest over culture in contemporary
    Egypt.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    NISSAN INSTITUTE OF JAPANESE STUDIES

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Nissan Institute of Japanese
    Studies, 27 Winchester Road.

    DR T. NELSON

    27 Apr.: `Japanese merchants and mercenaries in the Philippines
    in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries.'

    DR N. EVANS, Sheffield

    4 May: `Mano Machi-zukuri: community
    planning in a Japanese inner city.'

    PROFESSOR NORIYOSHI OGUCHI, Senshû University, Tokyo

    11 May: `The effects of recent reform of the Japanese public
    pensions system.'

    PROFESSOR MAKIKO HIRAKAWA, Tokyo International University

    18 May: `Second language acquisition between Japanese and
    English: are verbs a problem?'

    MS R. PAYNE

    25 May: `Meiji theatre design: from communal participation to
    refined appreciation.'

    DR M. TREVOR, formerly of the EU–Japan Centre for Industrial Co-operation

    1 June: `How the European Union approaches Japan.'

    DR AYUMI TAKENAKA

    8 June: `Ethnicity across the Pacific: Japanese-Peruvians in
    Peru, Japan, and the US.'

    PROFESSOR NAOTO NONAKA, Gakushûin University, Tokyo

    15 June: `Japan's semi-sovereign parliament in comparative
    perspective.'

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    QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE


    Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women

    Women changing their worlds

    The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the Library Wing Seminar
    Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

    Conveners: Dr Lidia Sciama, Dr Maria Jaschok, and Dr Helen
    Callaway.

    DR F. MACAULAY

    3 May: `Taking the law into their own hands: women, legal
    change, and legal literacy in Latin America.'

    DR F. WOOD, British Library

    10 May: `Chinese room-mates: from the prudery of the Cultural
    Revolution to Shanghai Babe.'

    NORIKO KAWANAKA, Kobe Shoin Women's University

    17 May: `Landscape for a mythical traveller, or a place called
    home.'

    DR S. TOUSSAINT, Western Australia

    24 May: ` "Sister, I need to talk with you":
    negotiating cultural landscapes in northern Aboriginal Australia.'

    PROFESSOR P. BHACHU, Clark University

    30 May: `Dangerous designs: diaspora Asian women creating
    new cultural and commercial economies.' (Barbara E. Ward Commemorative
    Lecture
    )

    DR A. ABU-HASABO, UN Development Programme

    7 June: `Women entreprneurs in the Arab Gulf region:
    strategies in a climate of constraint.'

    XIU FU

    14 June: `Becoming modern: the images of Chinese women in
    Republican Shanghai, 1927–37.'

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    DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS


    Corcoran Memorial Lectures

    PROFESSOR PETER HALL, FRS, Australian National University, will lecture at 3.30 p.m.
    and 5 p.m. on Thursday, 3 May, in the Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, St Anne's
    College.

    Tea will be served at 4.30 p.m. The lectures will be followed by a reception at 6 p.m.

    Subject: `Nonparametric inference under constraints.'

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    ALL SOULS COLLEGE


    Foreign Policy Studies Programme

    The United States and East Asian security

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Old Library, All Souls
    College.

    Conveners: Professor Joseph Nye and Professor Robert O.'Neill.

    PROFESSOR NYE

    26 Apr.: `The US, East Asia, and the Pacific: challenges and
    prospects.'

    DR YUEN FOONG KHONG

    3 May: `Will the US fight over Taiwan?'

    PROFESSOR O.'NEILL

    10 May: `Working with the United States: an allied
    perspective.'

    PROFESSOR M. YAHUDA, LSE

    17 May: `China's security perspectives on Asia and the Pacific.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE


    Asian Studies Centre

    South Asian History Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Deakin Room,
    Founder's Building, St Antony's College. With the exception of the final meeting, two
    presentations will be made at each seminar.

    Convener: D.A. Washbrook, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Modern South
    Asian History.

    D. PRICE

    1 May: `Ritual and authority in colonial North India.'
    (PRS presentation)

    B. MAZUMDAR

    1 May: `The social history of cricket.' (PRS
    presentation
    )

    Y. KHAN

    8 May: `Muslims in North India after independence.'
    (PRS presentation)

    A. MORRISON

    8 May: `Comparing the Tsarist and the British Empires in
    Central and South Asia.' (PRS presentation)

    DR Z. CHEEMA

    15 May: `The evolution and development of India's nuclear
    weapons policy.'


    Textures of time: language, culture, and history in pre-modern India

    This workshop will be held on Monday, 21 May, 11 a.m.–5.30 p.m., in the
    Dahrendorf Room, Founder's Building, St Antony's College.

    Convener: D.A. Washbrook, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Modern South
    Asian History.

    The speakers will be Professor S. Subrahmanyam, EHESS, Paris; Professor V.N. Rao,
    Wisconsin; Professor M. Alam, JNU, Delhi, and Chicago; and Professor D. Shulman,
    Hebrew University, Jerusalem.

    Enquiries should be directed to the Asian Studies Centre (telephone: Oxford (2)74559, e-
    mail: asian@sant.ox.ac.uk).


    Special seminar organised in association with the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studie

    MR SALMAN KHURSHID, former Foreign Minister, the Republic of India, will speak at
    this seminar, to be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 22 May, in the Oxford Centre for Islamic
    Studies, George Street. Enquiries should be directed to the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies
    (telephone: Oxford (2)78730, fax: 248942).

    Subject: `Muslims and Indian democracy.'


    Seminar series

    Except where otherwise stated, the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays
    in the Dahrendorf Room, the Founder's Building, St Antony's College. Enquiries should be
    directed to the Asian Studies Centre (telephone: Oxford (2)74559, e-mail:
    asian@sant.ox.ac.uk).

    Convener: S.Y. Tsang, MA, D.Phil., Louis Cha Fellow, St Antony's
    College.

    CHI-KWAN MARK

    1 May: `Defending the indefensible colony: Hong Kong, Anglo-
    American relations, and the Cold War in Asia, 1949–57.'

    DR M. GAINSBOROUGH, SOAS

    8 May: `Political change in Vietnam: in search of the middle
    class challenge to the state.'

    DR LIEN CHAN, Chairman, the Kuomintang; until 2000 Vice-President, the Republic of
    China (date to be confirmed)

    15 May: to be announced.

    DR NAOKO SHIMAZU, Birkbeck College, University of London

    22 May: ` "Meiyo no senshi": Japanese attitudes
    towards death in the Russo-Japanese War.'

    DR KING-KUAN TSAO, Chinese University of Hong Kong

    29 May, New Room, Hilda Besse Building: `Local élite
    politics in China.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    TRINITY COLLEGE


    Richard Hillary Lecture

    IAN McEWAN will deliver the Richard Hillary Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 2 May,
    in the St Cross Building.

    Subject: `Literature and human nature.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Margaret Howard Lecture

    SIR LOUIS BLOM-COOPER, QC, will deliver the Margaret Howard Lecture at 5.45 p.m.
    on Thursday, 31 May, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building. Admission
    is free. A reception will be held after the lecture.

    Subject: `Judges among the literati.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    WOLFSON COLLEGE


    Annual Isaiah Berlin Lecture

    PROFESSOR JARED DIAMOND, Professor of Physiology, UCLA School of Medicine, will
    deliver the annual Isaiah Berlin Lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 10 May, in Wolfson College.

    Subject: `Ecological collapses of pre-industrial societies.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 26 April 2001: Grants and Funding<br />

    Grants and Research Funding


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    RESEARCH SERVICES OFFICE


    Electronic submission of research grant
    applications


    Introduction

    Some of the University's largest external funders of research are
    introducing electronic systems for the submission of research
    grant applications. Many have developed their own systems
    (although it has now been recognised by both the sponsors of
    research and the UK academic community that some form of
    rationalisation is required to make the process more `user-
    friendly'), and these are at different stages of development.
    This summary document provides general information on electronic
    grant submission by highlighting the key issues as well as
    explaining the University's response to the changes.



    What is electronic grant submission?

    Electronic grant submission (sometimes referred to as EDS, or
    Electronic Document Submission) is the process of submitting
    grant applications to a sponsor via the internet or e-mail. Two
    types of systems are being developed to facilitate this process.

    (a) Off-line systems allow the applicant
    to download the form filler software from the sponsor's Web site.
    The completed form is then submitted via the host institution's
    administrative authorities to the sponsor. The case for support
    is completed on local word-processing software and is then
    converted to the appropriate format either portable document
    format (pdf) or postscript (ps) files.

    (b) On-line systems involve the
    applicant registering and logging on to the relevant Web site and
    completing the application form on-line. The sponsor notifies the
    University's administrative authorities that the application
    requires formal authorisation. The case for support is prepared
    off-line and converted to the appropriate format (e.g. pdf).



    Why is electronic grant submission being
    introduced?

    Various factors are driving the implementation of electronic
    grant submission. Public sector sponsors of research, such as the
    research councils, Government departments and agencies, are
    required as part of the current Government's Modernising
    Government White Paper to conduct the majority of their business
    electronically by 2005. In this respect electronic grant
    submission can be viewed as the first step towards a more fully
    integrated `e-business' relationship between the sponsors of
    research and the UK science base. Future electronic interactions
    are likely to include other stages in the research grant cycle,
    such as the proposal review process, the issuing of award
    letters, and post-award administration, as well as the reporting
    of both the scientific and financial aspects of the project.

    Although other external funders of research such as UK charities
    and overseas foundations fall outside the scope of the White
    Paper, there are considerable benefits to be realised from the
    introduction of e-business, particularly at the application
    stage. These include the removal of unnecessary duplication of
    effort at the proposal preparation stage and the reduction of
    timescales in the grant assessment process. The new systems also
    encourage all organisations to improve their data capture and
    storage methods. It is possible that in the future some of the
    larger commercial sponsors of research may also consider
    introducing electronic grant submission mechanisms.



    Which grantors are involved?

    Several of the University's largest external funders of research,
    including the research councils, the Wellcome Trust, and the
    European Commission, have either developed (or are in the process
    of developing) systems to enable researchers to submit research
    proposals electronically. The impact of the changes being
    introduced by these sponsors alone will be substantial, since
    they account for over 60 per cent of the 2,500 research grant
    applications submitted by University researchers each year. Just
    over 60 per cent of the University's annual research income (in
    1999/00 this represented £76.7M out of a total of
    £129.5M) derives from this group of sponsors.

    It is anticipated that, in the medium term, other funders, such
    as UK and overseas government departments, large non-government
    organisations (NGOs), and charitable foundations will also
    implement electronic grant submission processes. This will then
    account for almost 90 per cent of the University's research
    activity both in terms of value and volume.



    When can I submit my grant
    electronically?

    Off-line systems

    The ESRC now accepts applications in electronic format.
    Researchers applying to the ESRC should contact Pierre Espinasse
    (e-mail: pierre.espinasse@admin.ox.ac.uk) or Patrick Davis (e-
    mail:

    (patrick.davis@admin.ox.ac.uk) of the Research Services
    Office before completing the electronic forms.

    The EPSRC, PPARC, BBSRC, and NERC had initially collaborated to
    provide a research council group solution called Electronic
    Document Submission (EDS). At the present time, it appears that
    only the EPSRC will go live with the software in the near future,
    although it remains unclear whether EDS is seen as a long-term
    solution. The University is currently pilot-testing the EPSRC's
    system.

    The European Commission's version of Electronic Grant Submission
    (Protool) is, in theory, live, but initial problems have had an
    impact on the level of usage of the system. The EC is attempting
    to resolve these problems. At present the University does
    not submit electronic proposals to the European
    Commission
    . It is unlikely that Protool will be used
    widely under the current Framework Programme V. However, it is
    anticipated that a more robust electronic submission system will
    be in place by the time Framework Programme VI commences in 2003.

    On-line systems

    The MRC has introduced a beta version of its Electronic
    Application and Assessment (EAA) system. The Research Services
    Office recently held seminars for departmental administrators to
    demonstrate the EAA and to explain the revised university
    business processes relating to electronic grant submission in
    general. Documentation from the presentation, including slides,
    draft business processes, and a detailed flowchart are available
    on-line at http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/oxonly/rgo/eds.htm.
    Although the MRC's system is still in its pilot phase and
    enhancements are constantly being added, the system is proving
    popular with applicants and administrators.

    The Wellcome Trust's electronic grant submission system is still
    under development but testing is expected to commence shortly.



    Why are so many systems being developed?

    The development of a single submission system to suit each
    grantor's individual business requirements has not to date proved
    possible as every sponsor seeks to design processes to complement
    its own business requirements. However as a result of lobbying
    from university administrators, the Research Councils instigated
    a review of their current submission systems in February 2001 and
    launched the Joint e-submission Project (Je-S) to examine the
    possibility of combining research council processes. This
    feasibility study invites all potential users of electronic grant
    submission systems to register and then contribute to the project
    via the Je-S Web site in response to issues relating to
    electronic grant submission. The Research Services Office
    co-ordinates the University's official response to the various
    topics.

    It is hoped that Je-S will enable a common research council
    framework to be developed to provide sufficient flexibility to
    meet the diverse requirements of each grantor and Higher
    Education Institute (HEI) while also ensuring that a standard
    interface is made available for all users.



    What are the security issues?

    The MRC's system uses industry-standard Level 2 Secure Sockets
    Layer (SSL) protocols which apply to all users of the EAA at all
    stages and is one of the most secure forms of encryption
    technology currently available. The MRC system will allow lead
    applicants to provide passwords for read-write and read-only
    access to other people such as co-applicants, head of department,
    and departmental administrator. However, once access has been
    provided the whole application can be viewed by the password
    holder. Anyone with read-write access will also be able to edit
    and submit the proposal to the RSO.

    The ESRC's submission system uses industry-standard security
    measures at the transmission stage. However, as the forms under
    the ESRC's processes have to be downloaded to the applicant's
    local computer for completion, the security is only as rigorous
    as that used by the Principal Investigator and co-applicants. The
    application is submitted by the Principal Investigator to the
    Research Services Office via e-mail over an unsecured link. The
    Research Services Office is exploring the use of encryption
    technology to add a greater level of security to the process.

    The EPSRC software, EDS, is similar to the ESRC's software in
    that security protocols are invoked at the transmission stage
    only (Secure Sockets Layer 3). As with the ESRC system, there are
    potential security issues involved with e-mailing applications
    forms and other documents between staff on different servers.



    What changes can I expect to the
    University's current grant submission process?

    The University's new business processes
    (www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/oxonly/rgo/webbusin.pdf) attempt to
    provide a single mechanism for all the various electronic
    submission systems. It is recognised that the University's
    internal procedures, such as the completion of the OG form, will
    need to move to electronic format. Therefore, it is proposed that
    the Resolve OG form will be e-mailed by the appropriate
    departmental authority to the Research Services Office along with
    the application form (for off-line systems) and case for support
    in pdf/postscript format. The University is seeking advice to
    ensure that the proposed changes in processes incorporate the
    requirements of the Data Protection Act 1998. In particular,
    methods of e-mail encryption are being explored.



    Where can I find additional
    information?

    (a) The RSO's Web site at www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/ has
    links to most of the major sponsors' Web sites. The business
    processes can be also be viewed at
    http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/oxonly/rgo/webbusin.pdf

    (b) Direct links to each of the main sponsor's
    submission software are as follows:

    ESRC: http://eforms.esrc.ac.uk/

    EPSRC: http://eds.epsrc.ac.uk/

    MRC: http://www.mrc.ac.uk/fund_sch/EAA/eaa1.html

    European Commission:
    http://www.ukro.ac.uk/public/protool/protool.htm

    (c) Information on the Joint electronic Submission
    project can be viewed at http://www.research-councils.ac.uk/je-s/

    (d) Applicants and administrators wishing to find out
    more information relating to electronic grant submission should
    contact one of the following at the Research Services Office:
    Pierre Espinasse (e-mail: pierre.espinasse@admin.ox.ac.uk,
    telephone: (2)70043); or Patrick Davis (e-mail:
    patrick.davis@admin.ox.ac.uk, telephone: (2)70130).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    OPPENHEIMER FUND

    The Oppenheimer Fund provides grants to assist the academic
    exchange of senior members between the University of Oxford on
    the one hand and universities and similar institutions of higher
    education in the Republic of South Africa on the other.
    Applications are invited from senior members of the University
    who wish either to visit one or more universities in South Africa
    or to invite a staff member from a South African university to
    Oxford. Grants may be awarded to assist with living expenses for
    a maximum of six months, and travel costs. Visits for the sole
    purpose of attending a conference will not normally be eligible
    for support from the fund.

    The maximum level of grants is likely to be up to £1,000
    per month for subsistence and up to £700 for the cost of
    travel between Oxford and South Africa. Applications for grants
    from the fund should include a statement of the purpose of the
    proposed visit (including an outline of any research to be
    carried out during the visit), duration and estimated costs,
    details of any other available sources of funding, and, in the
    case of visits to Oxford, a curriculum vitae of the
    staff member it is proposed to invite and a letter of support
    from a senior member at Oxford. Applications should be sent to
    Mrs Katherine McGuire, International Office, University Offices,
    Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section





    <br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 26 April 2001: Examinations and Boards<br />

    Examinations and Boards


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent
    entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    ELECTIONS TO DIVISIONAL BOARDS 31 May

    | Nomination
    procedures

    |
    Nominations received |
    Gazette Home
    Page

    |

    Vacancies Retiring members Period from MT 2001
    Humanities Board One from among the members of the Faculty of English Dr Flint 4 years
    One from among the members of the Faculty of Literae
    Humaniores
    Dr Bowman 4 years
    One from among the members of the Faculty of Medieval
    and Modern
    Languages
    Professor Maiden 4 years
    One from among the members of the Faculty of Modern
    History
    Mr Briggs 4 years
    Life and Environmental Sciences Board One from among the members of a faculty or sub-faculty
    working in the
    Department of Biochemistry
    Professor Sherratt 4 years
    One from among the members of the Sub-faculty of
    Geography
    Dr Pallot 4 years
    One from among the members of a faculty or sub-faculty
    working in the
    Department of Zoology
    Dr Iles 4 years
    Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board One from among the members of the Sub-faculty of
    Chemistry
    Professor Hancock 4 years
    One from among the members of the Sub-faculty of Earth
    Sciences
    Professor Woodhouse 4 years
    One from among the members of the Sub-faculty of
    Engineering
    Professor Eatock Taylor 4 years
    One from among the members of the Sub-faculty of
    Physics
    Professor Devenish 4 years
    Medical Sciences Board One from among the members of the Faculty of Clinical
    Medicine
    Professor Wilkinson 4 years
    One from among the members of the Faculty of
    Physiological Sciences
    and Sub-faculty of Psychology, who must in this instance be working in the
    Sir William
    Dunn School of Pathology
    Professor Gordon 4 years
    Social Sciences Board One from among the members of the Faculty of
    Law
    Mr Gardner 4 years
    One from among the members of the Faculty of
    Management
    Professor Hopwood 4 years
    One from among the members of the Faculty of Social
    Studies
    Professor Heath 4 years

    Where it is specified in the above list that the candidates must be from among
    certain persons
    `working in' a department or other institution, both the candidates and the
    electors must be
    persons so working at the time of the election.

    Nominations in writing for the elections on 31 May, by two members
    (other than the
    candidate) of the electorate for each vacancy, which is the same as the persons
    from among
    whom t he vacancy will be filled (as specified above), will be received by the
    Head Clerk
    at the University Offices, Wellington Square, up to 4 p.m. on Monday,
    7 May
    ,
    and similar
    nominations by six members of the electorate other than the candidate,
    up to 4 p.m.
    on
    Monday, 14 May
    .

    Council has decided that nominations should show for each signatory the
    name and
    faculty, sub-faculty, or department (indicative of the relevant electorate) in
    block capitals.
    Any names which are not so shown may not be published. At least one
    nomination in respect
    of each candidate must be made on an official nomination form. Copes of the
    form are
    obtainable from the Head Clerk (telephone (2)70190; e-mail:

    richard.brooke@admin.ox.ac.uk
    ).

    In the event of a contested election, a brief biographical notice of each
    candidate will
    be published in the Gazette dated 24 May, and voters may
    wish to wait until
    they have read these notes before returning their ballot papers (which will be
    sent out to
    members of the electorate as soon as possible after the closing date for
    nominations, and
    which, after completion, must be received by the Head Clerk not later than
    4 p.m. on 31
    May).



    Nominations

    The following nominations have been duly received:

    Humanities Board

    (from among the members of the Faculty of English)

    D.L. BIRCH, MA, D.PHIL, Fellow of Trinity

    Nominated by:

    M.R. Godden, Pembroke

    S.L. Mapstone, St Hilda's

    (from among the members of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores)

    A.K. BOWMAN, MA, Student of Christ Church

    Nominated by:

    P.S. Derow, Wadham

    A. Kerkhecker, Worcester

    C.B.R. Pelling, University

    S.R.F. Price, Lady Margaret Hall

    R.B. Rutherford, Christ Church

    O.P. Taplin, Magdalen

    (from among the members of the Faculty of Modern History)

    R. BRIGGS, MA, Fellow of All Souls

    Nominated by:

    R.J.W. Evans, Oriel

    F.M. Heal, Jesus

    Return to top of page


    Life and Environmental Sciences Board

    (from among the members of a faculty or sub-faculty working in the Department of
    Biochemistry)

    I.D. CAMPBELL, MA, Fellow of St John's

    Nominated by:

    R.A. Dwek, Exeter

    D.A. Harris, St Anne's

    J.A. Hodgkin, Keble

    K.B.M. Reid, Green College

    M.S.P. Sansom, Christ Church

    E.M. Southern, Trinity

    (from among the members of the Sub-faculty of Geography)

    J. PALLOT, MA, Student of Christ Church

    Nominated by:

    G.L. Clark, St Peter's

    C.G. Clarke, Jesus

    P.O. Daley, Jesus

    A.S. Goudie, Hertford

    A. Lemon, Mansfield

    E.A.M. Swyngedouw, St Peter's

    (from among the members of a faculty or sub-faculty working in the Department of
    Zoology)

    S.J. SIMPSON, MA, Fellow of Jesus

    Nominated by:

    M.E.S. Dawkins, Somerville

    P. Harvey, Jesus

    Return to top of page


    Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board

    (from among the members of the Sub-faculty of Chemistry)

    J.C.GREEN, MA, D.PHIL, Fellow of St Hugh's

    Nominated by:

    K.A. McLauchlan, Hertford

    W.G. Richards, Brasenose

    (from among the members of the Sub-faculty of Earth Sciences)

    J.H. WOODHOUSE, MA, D.PHIL, Fellow of Worcester

    Nominated by:

    B.E. Parsons, St Cross

    P.C. England, Exeter

    (from among the members of the Sub-faculty of Physics)

    R.C.E. DEVENISH, MA, Fellow of Hertford

    Nominated by:

    W.W.M. Allison, Keble

    D.G. Andrews, Lady Margaret Hall

    S. Cooper, St Catherine's

    J.V. Peach, Brasenose

    J.F. Ryan, Christ Church

    D. Sherrington, New College

    J.I. Silk, New College

    Return to top of page


    Medical Sciences Board

    (from among the members of the Faculty of Physiological Sciences and Sub-faculty of
    Psychology who are working in the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology)

    S. GORDON, MA, Fellow of Exeter

    Nominated by:

    G.G. MacPherson, Oriel

    H. Waldmann, Lincoln

    Return to top of page


    Social Sciences Board

    (from among the members of the Faculty of Law)

    M.J. SPENCE, MA, Fellow of St Catherine's

    Nominated by:

    W.E. Peel, Keble

    S.J. Whittaker, St John's

    (from among the members of the Faculty of Management)

    A.G.HOPWOOD, MA, Student of Christ Church

    Nominated by:

    C.P. Mayer, Wadham

    R.K. Westbrook, St Hugh's

    (from among the members of the Faculty of Social Studies)

    A.F. HEATH, MA, Fellow of Nuffield

    Nominated by:

    R.C. A. Andersen, Nuffield

    T.W. Chan, New College


    No nominations have been received to fill the following vacancies, which therefore lapse to
    the Vice-Chancellor and Proctors jointly (Decrees and Regulations, Ch. II, sect. iv,2, 6,
    Statutes, 2000, p. 239):

    Humanities: one vacancy from among the members of the Faculty of
    Medieval and
    Modern Languages

    Mathematical and Physical Sciences: one vacancy from among the members
    of the Sub-faculty of Engineering

    Medical Sciences: one vacancy from among the members of the Faculty of
    Clinical
    Medicine



    ANNUAL ELECTIONS TO FACULTY BOARDS (31 May 2001)

    | Nomination
    procedures
    |
    Nominations received |
    Gazette Home
    Page

    |

    Board of the Faculty Vacancies Retiring members Period from MT 2001
    English Language and Literature
    (a) Official members Five Professor Bush, Professor Gill, Professor Hudson,
    Professor Lee
    2 years
    Professor Carey 1 year
    (b) Ordinary members Six Dr Brewer, Dr Keymer, Dr Birch, Dr Mee, Dr Small,
    vacancy
    2 years


    Law
    (a) Official members Five Professor Galligan, Professor Lowe, Professor Vaver,
    Professor Weatherill, Professor Ashworth
    Four for 2 years; one for 1 year
    (b) Ordinary members Seven Dr Grevling, Mr Chen-Wishart, Mr Simpson, Mr Smith,
    Mr Swadling, Mr Briggs, Dr Getzler
    2 years


    Literae Humaniores
    (a) Official members Four Professor Smith, Professor Steinby, Professor Broome,
    Professor Davies
    2 years
    (b) Ordinary members Six Dr Wilkes, Dr Kerkhecker, Dr Kenyon, Dr Logue, Mr
    Rice, Mr Taylor
    2 years


    Management
    Members Two Professor Sako, Mr Undy 2 years


    Modern History
    (a) Official Members Four Professor Rhodes, Professor Davies, Professor Foster, Dr
    Humphries
    2 years
    (b) Ordinary members Six Dr Rosser, Mr Blair, Dr Catto, Dr Heal, Mrs Howarth,
    Dr Robertson
    2 years


    Music
    Ordinary members Three Dr Wollenberg, Dr Bujic, Dr Rees 2 years


    Oriental Studies
    (a) Official members Five Professor Baines, Professor Goodman, Professor Holes,
    Professor van Gelder
    2 years
    Professor Thomson 1 year
    (b) Ordinary members Six Professor Allan, Dr Black, Dr Benson, Dr Goodman, Dr
    Liu, Miss Forbes
    2 years


    Theology
    (a) Official members Three Professor Barton, Professor Webster, vacancy 2 years
    (b) Ordinary members Five Dr Fiddes, Canon Williams, Dr Muddiman, Dr
    Weinandy, Dr Day
    2 years


    Notice is hereby given under Ch. II, Sect. vi, 5 (Statutes, 2000,
    p. 244), of impending
    vacancies for official and ordinary members of boards of faculties, as set out
    above.

    Qualification for official and ordinary membership is set out in §§
    1 and 2 of
    that section (Statutes, 2000, pp. 241--3). Those entitled to
    nominate and to vote in these
    elections are:

    (a) for official members, all the members of the faculty
    concerned,
    and

    (b) for ordinary members, the membership of the
    faculty concerned,
    exclusive of those qualified to be official members of the faculty board.

    Nominations in writing by two electors will be received by the Head Clerk,
    University
    Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD up to 4 p.m. on Monday,
    7 May
    , and by six
    electors up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 14 May. There is no special
    form but, in addition to the
    signatures of nominators, nominations must state, in block capitals, the name
    and initials, and
    college (or, if no college, the department) of (1) each person nominated, and
    (2) each
    nominator.

    Note:

    Under the provisions of Ch. II, Sect. VI, § 4, cl. 5, the electors of
    ordinary members
    of the following boards of faculties have directed by by-law that no ordinary
    member shall
    be eligible to serve for more than three successive periods of two years:

    English Language and Literature, Law, Oriental Studies.


    Nominations

    The following nominations have been duly received:

    English Language and Literature

    Official members

    1. R.L. BUSH, MA, Drue Heinz Professor of American Literature

    2. S.C. GILL, B.PHIL, MA, Professor of English Language and Literature

    3. A.M. HUDSON, MA, D.PHIL, Professor of Medieval English

    4. K. SUTHERLAND, MA, D.PHIL, Reader in Bibliography and Textual
    Criticism

    Nominated by:

    M.R. Godden, Pembroke

    S.L. Mapstone, St Hilda's

    Ordinary members

    1. D.L. BIRCH, MA, D.PHIL, Fellow of Trinity

    2. C.D. BREWER, MA, D.PHIL, Fellow of Hertford

    3. T. KEYMER, MA, Fellow of St Anne's

    4. R.A. McCABE, MA, Fellow of Merton

    5. J.B. O'DONOGHUE, MA, Fellow of Wadham

    Nominated by:

    S.L. Mapstone, St Hilda's

    N.G. Shrimpton, Lady Margaret Hall

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    Law

    Official members

    (a) until MT 2003:

    1. A.V. LOWE, MA, Chichele Professor of Public International Law

    2. D. VAVER, MA, Reuters Professor of Intellectual Property and Information
    Technology
    Law

    3. S.R. WEATHERILL, MA, Jacques Delors Professor of European Community
    Law

    Nominated by:

    J.M. Eekelaar, Pembroke

    D.D. Prentice, Pembroke

    4. D.J. GALLIGAN, Director of the Socio-Legal Studies Centre

    (b) until MT 2002:

    5. A.J. ASHWORTH, DCL, Vinerian Professor of English Law

    Nominated by:

    J. Cartwright, Christ Church

    J.M. Eekelaar, Pembroke

    S. Gardner, Lincoln

    P.N. Mirfield, Jesus

    D.D. Prentice, Pembroke

    S.J.Whittaker, St John's

    Ordinary members

    1. A. BRIGGS, BCL, MA, Fellow of St Edmund Hall

    2. J.S. GETZLER, MA, D.PHIL, Fellow of St Hugh's

    3. R.H.STEVENS, BCL, MA, Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall

    4. R.P.YOUNG, MA, Centre for Criminological Research and Probation Studies
    Unit

    Nominated by:

    J.M. Eekelaar, Pembroke

    D.D. Prentice, Pembroke

    5. K.D. GREVLING, BCL, MA, Fellow of Magdalen

    6. W.J. SWADLING, MA, Fellow of Brasenose

    Nominated by:

    J. Cartwright, Christ Church

    J.M. Eekelaar, Pembroke

    S. Gardner, Lincoln

    P.N. Mirfield, Jesus

    D.D. Prentice, Pembroke

    S.J.Whittaker, St John's

    7. A.A.S. ZUCKERMAN, MA, Fellow of University

    Nominated by:

    G.D. Child, Lincoln

    J.M. Eekelaar, Pembroke

    S.D. Fredman, Exeter

    S. Gardner, Lincoln

    J.J.W. Herring, Exeter

    J.C. McCrudden, Lincoln

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    Modern History

    Official members

    1. R.FOX, MA, D.PHIL, Professor of the History of Science

    2. K.J. HUMPHRIES, MA, Reader in Economic History

    3. D.A. WASHBROOK, MA, Reader in Modern South Asian History

    Nominated by:

    F.M.Heal, Jesus

    R.J.W.Evans,Oriel

    Ordinary members

    1. W. J. BLAIR, MA, D.PHIL, Fellow of Queen's

    2. E.J. GARNETT, MA, D.PHIL, Fellow of Wadham

    3. M. WHITTOW, MA, D.PHIL, Fellow of St Peter's

    4. J. M. WORMALD, MA, Fellow of St Hilda's

    Nominated by:

    R.J.A.I. Catto, Oriel

    F.M.Heal, Jesus

    5. R.J.A.I. CATTO, MA, D.PHIL, Fellow of Oriel

    Nominated by:

    F.M. Heal, Jesus

    J.M. Wormald, St Hilda's

    6. F.M. HEAL, MA, D.PHIL, Fellow of Jesus

    Nominated by:

    R.J.A.I. Catto, Oriel

    J.H. Howarth, St Hilda's

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    Music

    Ordinary members

    1. S.L.F. WOLLENBERG, MA, D.PHIL, Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall

    Nominated by:

    J.A. Caldwell, Jesus

    O.L. Rees, Queen's

    2. B. BUJIC, MA, D.PHIL, Fellow of Magdalen

    Nominated by:

    J.A. Caldwell, Jesus

    P.R. Franklin, St Catherine's

    E. Higginbottom, New College

    N.J. Marston, St Peter's

    O.L. Rees, Queen's

    S.L. F. Wollenberg, Lady Margaret Hall

    3. O.L. REES, MA, Fellow of Queen's

    Nominated by:

    B.Bujic, Magdalen

    J.A. Caldwell, Jesus

    P.R. Franklin, St Catherine's

    E. Higginbottom, New College

    N.J. Marston, St Peter's

    S.L.F. Wollenberg, Lady Margaret Hall

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    Oriental Studies

    Official members

    1. J.B. BAINES,MA, D.PHIL, Professor of Egyptology

    2. M.D. GOODMAN, MA, D.PHIL, Professor of Jewish Studies

    3. C.D. HOLES, MA, D.PHIL, Khalid bin Abdullah Al Saud Professor for the Study
    of the
    Contemporary Arab World

    4. G.J.H. VAN GELDER, MA, Laudian Professor of Arabic

    Nominated by:

    J.A. Black, Wolfson

    D.W. Faure, St Antony's

    J.D. Gurney, Wadham

    C. Melchert, Pembroke

    R.L. Nettler, Mansfield

    C.F. Robinson, Wolfson

    Ordinary members

    1. J.W. BENSON, MA, Fellow of Wolfson

    2. L.E. FORBES, MA, Fellow of St Cross

    3. R.J. GOODMAN, MA, D.PHIL, Fellow of St Antony's

    4. P.T. HARRIES, MA, D.PHIL, Fellow of Queen's

    5. J. JOHNS, MA, D.PHIL, Fellow of Wolfson

    6. C.J.KERSLAKE, MA, D.PHIL, Fellow of St Antony's

    Nominated by:

    J.A. Black, Wolfson

    D.W. Faure, St Antony's

    J.D. Gurney, Wadham

    C. Melchert, Pembroke

    R.L. Nettler, Mansfield

    C.F. Robinson, Wolfson

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    Theology

    Official members

    1. O.M.T. O'DONOVAN, Regius Professor of Moral and Pastoral Theology

    2. C.C. ROWLAND, Dean Ireland's Professor of Exegesis of Holy Scripture

    Nominated by:

    J. Day, Lady Margaret Hall

    P.A.M. Kennedy, Mansfield

    J.B. Muddiman, Mansfield

    R.G. Swinburne, Oriel

    J.S.K. Ward, Christ Church

    T.S.M. Williams, Trinity

    3. R.G. SWINBURNE, B.PHIL, MA, Nolloth Professor of the Philosophy of the
    Christian
    Religion

    Nominated by:

    J. Day, Lady Margaret Hall

    P.A.M. Kennedy, Mansfield

    S.D. Lake, Theology Faculty Library

    J.B. Muddiman, Mansfield

    J.S.K. Ward, Christ Church

    T.S.M. Williams, Trinity

    Ordinary members

    1. J. DAY, MA, D.PHIL, Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall

    Nominated by:

    P.S. Fiddes, Regent's Park

    P.A.M. Kennedy, Mansfield

    J.B. Muddiman, Mansfield

    J.A. Shaw, Regent's Park

    C.M. Tuckett, Wolfson

    T.S.M. Williams, Trinity

    2. P.S. FIDDES, MA, D.PHIL, Principal of Regent's Park

    Nominated by:

    J. Day, Lady Margaret Hall

    P.A.M. Kennedy, Mansfield

    J.A. Shaw, Regent's Park

    C.M. Tuckett, Wolfson

    T.S.M. Williams, Trinity

    N.J. Wood, Regent's Park

    3. J.B. MUDDIMAN, MA, D.PHIL, Fellow of Mansfield

    4. T.G. WEINANDY, MA, Warden of Greyfriars

    Nominated by:

    J. Day, Lady Margaret Hall

    P.S. Fiddes, Regent's Park

    P.A.M. Kennedy, Mansfield

    J.A. Shaw, Regent's Park

    C.M. Tuckett, Wolfson

    T.S.M. Williams, Trinity

    5. T.S.M. WILLIAMS, MA, Fellow of Trinity

    Nominated by:

    J. Day, Lady Margaret Hall

    P.S. Fiddes, Regent's Park

    P.A.M. Kennedy, Mansfield

    S.D. Lake, Theology Faculty Library

    J.B. Muddiman, Mansfield

    J.A. Shaw, Regent's Park


    No nominations have been received for the following vacancies, which therefore lapse to the
    Vice-Chancellor and Proctors jointly (Decrees, ch. II, sect.vi, 5,6 Statutes, 2000, pp.245-
    6):

    English Language and Literature: one official member and one ordinary
    member

    Literae Humaniores: four official members and six ordinary members

    Management: two members

    Modern History: one official member

    Oriental Studies: one official member (for one year)



    BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MEDIEVAL AND
    MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES


    Annual elections

    Notice is hereby given of impending vacancies for members of the Modern Languages as set
    out below. Those entitled to nominate and to vote in these elections are the members of the
    relevant sub-faculty holding posts on the establishment or under the aegis of the faculty
    board.

    Nominations in writing by two electors will be received by the Secretary of the Modern
    Languages Board, Modern Languages Administration, 37 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1
    2JF, up to noon on Monday, 28 May. There is no special form.

    Vacancies

    One member will be elected from each of the following sub-faculties:

    French

    German

    Italian

    Russian and other Slavonic Languages

    Those elected will serve for three years from Michaelmas Term 2001.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    APPOINTMENTS, REAPPOINTMENTS, AND
    CONFERMENTS OF TITLE

    With the approval of the relevant divisional board or the appropriate body, the following
    appointments and reappointments have been made and titles conferred for the periods stated.
    Where appropriate the relevant faculty board is given above the name(s) of the person(s)
    concerned.


    HUMANITIES DIVISION

    Reappointments
    
    UNIVERSITY LECTURERS (CUF)
    
    English
    
    PETER D. MCDONALD, MA, D.Phil. (BA, MA Rhodes), Fellow of St
    Hugh's. In English. from 1 October 2001 until the retiring age.
    HELEN D. MOORE, MA, D.Phil., Fellow of Corpus Christi. In English. From
    1 October 2001 until the retiring age. 
    
    
    
    Literae Humaniores
    
    GRAMMATIKOS
    
    ANDREW HOBSON, MA, Fellow of Magdalen.  From 1 October 2001 until
    30 September 2006
    
    GROCYN LECTURER
    
    JAMES H.W. MORWOOD, MA (MA Cambridge), Fellow of Wadham. From
    1 October 2001 until 30 September 2006. 
    
    
    
    TUTOR IN FINE ART
    
    Ruskin School
    
    J. BASEMAN, MA status (BFA Temple, USA, MA London). In Fine Art
    

    (Sculpture). From 1 October 2001 until 30 September 2004.

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    LIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
    DIVISION

    Appointments
    
    UNIVERSITY LECTURER
    
    ELISABETH L. HSU (M.Sc. Zurich, Ph.D. Cambridge), Fellow-elect of Green
    College. In Medical Anthropology. From 19 March 2001 to 18 March 2006.
    
    TEMPORARY UNIVERSITY LECTURERS
    

    (From 1 January 2001 until 30 June 2001) EDWARD C. HOLMES, MA (B.Sc. London, Ph.D. Cambridge), Fellow of New College. In Zoology. ADRIAN L.R. THOMAS, MA (Ph.D. Lund), Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall. In Zoology.

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    MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES
    DIVISION

    Appointments
    
    READER
    
    RICHARD C. DARTON, (B.Sc. Birmingham, Ph.D. Cambridge) FR.Eng.,
    Fellow of Keble. In Chemical Engineering. From 1 January 2001 until the
    retiring age. 
    
    
    
    TEMPORARY UNIVERSITY LECTURERS
    
    STEPHEN R. LEWIS, MA, D.Phil. (MA Cambridge), Fellow-elect of
    Wolfson. In Physics. From 1 October 2001 until 30 September 2004.
    
    SUKYOUNG K. YI (BS, MS, Ph.D. Yale). In Astrophysics. From 1 August
    2001 to 31 July 2006. 
    
    
    
    FACULTY LECTURER
    
    PETER D. HOWELL, BA, Fellow-elect of University College. In
    Mathematics. From 1 October 2001 until 30 September 2006. 
    
    
    
    Reappointments
    
    UNIVERSITY LECTURERS
    
    STEPHEN J. ELSTON, MA status (B.Sc., Ph.D. Exeter), Fellow of St John's.
    In Engineering Science. From 1 October 2001 until the retiring age.
    
    ANTHONY J. FAIRBANKS, MA, D.Phil., Fellow of Jesus College. In
    Organic Chemistry.  From 1 October 2001 until the retiring age.
    
    LANCE MILLER, MA (B.Sc. Leics., Ph.D. Cambridge), Fellow of St
    Catherine's. In Physics (Astrophysics). From 1 March 2001 until the retiring
    age.
    
    AMY B. ZAVATSKY, MA, D.Phil. (B.Sc. Pennsylvania), Fellow of St
    Edmund Hall. In Engineering Science. From 1 September 2001 until the
    retiring age. 
    
    
    
    Conferment of title
    
    JULIA M. YEOMANS, MA, D.Phil., Fellow of St Hilda's as University
    Lecturer in Physics. From 1 October 2000 until the retiring age.
    
    

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    MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES
    DIVISION AND CONTINUING EDUCATION

    
    Appointment
    
    TEMPORARY UNIVERSITY LECTURER
    
    ANDREW P. MARTIN, MA, D.Phil., Fellow of Kellogg. In Software
    Engineering and Continuing Education. From 5 March 2001 to 30 September
    2002. 
    
    
    
    Reappointment
    
    UNIVERSITY LECTURER
    
    JAMES W. DAVIES, MA, , Fellow of Kellogg. In Computer Science and
    Continuing Education. From 1 September 2001 until the retiring age.
    
    

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    MEDICAL SCIENCES DIVISION

    
    Appointments
    
    UNIVERSITY LECTURERS
    
    KEITH J. BUCKLER, MA status (B.Sc. London, Ph.D. Newcastle ), Fellow-
    elect of Trinity. In Physiology. From 1 October 2003 until 30 September 2008.
    
    HELEN C. CHRISTIAN (B.Sc. Edinburgh, Ph.D. London), Fellow of St
    Anne's. In Biomedical Sciences. From 1 December 2000 until 30 November
    2005.
    
    WILLIAM JAMES, MA, D.Phil. (B.Sc. Birmingham), Fellow of Brasenose. In
    Experimental Pathology. From 1 January 2001 until 31 December 2003.
    
    BINA SANTORO (MS, Ph.D. Rome), Fellow-elect of Worcester. In Molecular
    Pharmacology. From 31 March 2001 until 30 March 2006.
    
    CLIVE WILSON (BA Cambridge, Ph.D. Warwick), Fellow-elect of St Hugh's.
    In Biomedical Science. From 1 April 2001 until 31 March 2006. 
    
    
    
    UNIVERSITY LECTURERS (part-time) IN GENERAL PRACTICE
    

    (From 1 April 2001 to 31 March 2006) ANTHONY R. HARNDEN, MA status (MB, Ch.B. Birmingham, M.Sc. London) MRCGP, MRCP, Fellow of Kellogg ANN MCPHERSON, CBE, MA (MB BS London) FRCGP, Fellow of Green College. PETER W. ROSE (MA Cambridge, MB., B.Chir London) FRCGP. CLINICAL TUTORS BRIAN J. ANGUS (B.Sc., MB, Ch.B. Glasgow) MRCP. In Clinical Medicine. From 13 November 2000 until 12 November 2005. JONATHAN R. PRICE, BA, BM,

    (MA Cambridge) MRCPsych. In Psychiatry. From 1 June 2001 to 31 May 2004. CLINICAL LECTURERS ANDREA H. NÉMETH, D.Phil. (B.Sc., MBBS London). In Clinical Laboratory Sciences. From 1 February 2001 until 31 January 2004. GARETH D.H. TURNER, BM, MA, D.Phil. (BA Cambridge). In Clinical Laboratory Science. From 1 January 2001 until 31 December 2003 Reappointments UNIVERSITY LECTURER ANNA C. DE OZ҉O NOBRE, MA, D.Phil. (Ph.D. Yale), Fellow of New College. In Experimental Psychology. From 1 October 2001 until the retiring age. CLINICAL LECTURERS DEBORAH J. PHILLIPS, MA status (BMS, BS Nottingham). In Surgery. From 1 October 2001 until 30 September 2004. PART-TIME TUTORS IN GENERAL PRACTICE RICKMAN J.P. GODLEE, MA status (MB BS London, MA Cambridge). From 1 March 2001 until 28 February 2006. ANTHONY A.S. RANDALL, MA (MB BS London). From 1 July 2001 until 30 June 2006. Conferment of title HONORARY SENIOR CLINICAL LECTURERS

    (From 1 November 2000 until 31 October 2005) MARTIN DAWES (MB BS, MD London) MRCGP. In Evidence Based Medicine. ROBIN GOODMAN (M.Sc. Dundee, MB, B.Chir. Cambridge). In Radiology. PETER HAMBLY (MB, Ch.B. Bristol). In Anaesthetics. KOKI L. LAKHOO (MB, Ch.B. Natal, Ph.D. Wits, South Africa) FRCS. In Paediatric Surgery. MARTIN MCNALLY (BM, Ch.B, Belfast). In Orthopaedic Surgery. SHEILA POWELL (MB BS London) MRCS, LRCP. In Dermatology. IAN S.D. ROBERTS (B.SC., MB, Ch.B. Manchester). In Clinical Laboratory Sciences. PAUL ROSEN (MB, Ch.B., B.Sc. Manchester). In Ophthalmology.

    (From 1 December 2000 to 30 November 2005) ZAFRA COOPER, D.Phil. (BA Cape Town). In Psychiatry. ANDREW J. FARMER, BA, BM. In General Practice. SUSAN HAGUE (BM Southampton) FRCSm FRCOphth. In Ophthalmology. ANTHONY R. HARNDEN (MB, Ch.B. Birmingham, M.Sc. London) MRCP In General Practice. ALISON HILL (B.Sc., MB, Ch.B. Bristol) FRCP. In Public Health. ROSAMUND L. SHAFRAN, BA (Ph.D. London). In Psychiatry.

    (From 1 February 2001 to 31 January 2004) PATRICK P. DAVEY, DM (BA Cambridge) MRCP. In Cardiology.

    (From 1 February 2001 to 31 January 2006) ROGER GUNDLE, BM, MA, D.Phil., FRCS. In Orthopaedic Surgery.

    (From 1 March 2001 until 28 February 2006) DAVID J. ROBERTS, MA status, D.Phil (BA Cambridge, MB, Ch.B. Liverpool), In Haematology. DEREK E. ROSKELL, BM, MA (MA Cambridge) In Pathology. PREMILA N. WEBSTER, MA status (MB BS Vellone, India, M.Sc. London), In Public Health Medicine. Reconferment of title HONORARY SENIOR CLINICAL LECTURERS

    (all to the retiring age or resignation from the substantive post) MARY Y. ANTHONY, MA status (MB BS, D.Ch. London, MD Leeds) MRCP, FRCPCh. In Paediatrics. From 10 November 2001. PAUL L.F. GIANGRANDE, MA status (B.Sc., MD Manchester) FRCP, FRCPath. In Haematology. From 1 July 2001. DAVID M. KEELING, MA status (B.Sc., MD London). In Haematology. From 1 July 2001.

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    SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION

    
    Appointments
    
    UNIVERSITY LECTURER
    
    Management
    
    NIR VULKAN (B.Sc. Tel Aviv, Ph.D. London), Fellow of Worcester. In
    Management Studies (Business Economics), From 1 January 2001 until 31
    December 2005.
    
    JUNIOR LECTURER
    
    MARIA BIRBILI, M.Sc., D.Phil. (BA Greece, MA Boston). In Educational
    Studies (Research Methodology). From 1 January 2001 until 31 March 2002. 
    
    
    
    Reappointments
    
    UNIVERSITY LECTURERS
    
    CHRISTOPHER S. CHAPMAN, MA (B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D. London), Fellow of
    Linacre. In Management Studies. From 1 August 2001 to the retiring age.
    
    OWEN R. DARBISHIRE, MA (MS, Ph.D. Cornell), Fellow of Pembroke. In
    Management Studies. From 1 October 2001 to the retiring age.
    
    STEPHEN J. NEW, MA (B.Sc. Southampton, Ph.D. Manchester) Fellow of
    Hertford. In Management Studies. From 10 June 2001 to the retiring age.
    
    RICHARD C.L. WHITTINGTON, MA (MBA Aston, Ph.D. Manchester),
    Fellow of New College. In Management Studies. From 1 April 2001 to the
    retiring age. 
    
    
    
    Conferment of title
    
    FACULTY LECTURER
    
    MARGARET J. STEVENS, MA, M.Phil., D.Phil., Fellow of Lincoln. In
    Economics. From 1 January 2001 until 31 December 2005.
    
    Reconferment of title
    
    ISLAMIC CENTRE LECTURER
    
    JAMES P. PISCATORI, MA (AB Boston, Ph.D. Virginia), Fellow of
    Wadham. In International Relations. From 1 October 2001 until 30 September
    2006.
    
    

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    CONTINUING EDUCATION

    
    Appointment
    
    STAFF TUTOR (part-time/fixed term)
    
    ALAN HUDSON, BA (M.Sc. London). In Social and Political Science  From
    1 March 2001 until 29 February 2004. 
    
    
    
    Reappointments
    
    DIRECTOR OF HEALTH SERVICES AND HEALTH CARE
    
    JANET L. HARRIS, MA (BA Toronto, MA Boston), Fellow of Kellogg. From
    1 January 2001 until 31 December 2005.
    
    

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    INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF
    UNIVERSITY LEARNING

    M. FIONA SPENSLEY (BA Warwick, Ph.D. Open). In Professional
    Education. From 1 January 2001 to 31 December 2003.
    
    

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    LECTURE LISTS: MICHAELMAS TERM 2001


    Timetabling arrangements

    Faculties and departments are asked to forward their lecture-list files as soon as possible after
    the finalisation of their arrangements. Details of the dates by which the files are expected to
    be supplied will be circulated to faculties and departments.

    The printed lecture lists will be distributed shortly before the start of term.

    Disks, copy, and proofs relating to the Lecture Lists should be forwarded to Val Wood,
    Assistant Editor, University Gazette, Public Relations Office, University
    Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: (2)80548, fax: (2)80522, e-mail:
    lecture.lists@admin.ox.ac.uk).

    For arrangements concerning the Special Lecture List, see below.



    Entries shared between lists

    Any faculty member who wishes to place an entry in the lecture list of another faculty or
    department is asked to forward the information as soon as possible, and directly
    to the other faculty
    .



    Special Lecture List

    Michaelmas Term 2001

    The Special Lecture List for Michaelmas Term 2001 will appear shortly before term, at the
    same time as the other Lecture Lists. It will include all appropriate lectures for Trinity Term
    published in the Gazette during Hilary Term, and also lectures of which
    details are received by Monday, 20 August.

    Those wishing to contribute to the Special Lecture List are asked to note that this is
    a firm deadline, and that items received after it are unlikely to be included.

    Items for the Special Lecture List should be forwarded to Val Wood, Assistant Editor,
    University Gazette, Public Relations Office, University Offices, Wellington
    Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: (2)80548, fax: (2)80522, e-mail:
    lecture.lists@admin.ox.ac.uk).



    Enquiries concerning proposed dates for special
    lectures

    Those responsible for arranging lectures intended to be of interest to a wide university
    audience may wish to consult the Editor or Assistant Editor of the Gazette
    (fax: (2)80522, e-mail: gazette@admin.ox.ac.uk or lecture.lists@admin.ox.ac.uk), for
    information on any other similar lectures, of which details have been received, due to be
    given on the proposed date or dates.



    Distribution: Standing Orders

    Undergraduate colleges will be contacted in due course with regard to the quantities of the
    lecture lists to be supplied to them in the next academic year.

    Any faculty, department, or individual Senior Member wishing to check or amend a standing
    order for the lecture lists should contact the Assistant Editor, Gazette
    (details as above), before the end of the present term.



    Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores

    The Board of the Faculty recommends that lectures should be given at the following hours:

    Monday       9      Greek History/Latin Literature
                10      Philosophy
                11      Roman History/Greek Literature
                12      Archaeology/Philosophy
                5–7    Free
    
    Tuesday      9      Archaeology
                10      Philosophy
                11      Literature
                12      History
                5–7    Free
    
    Wednesday    9      Roman History/Greek Literature
                10      Philosophy
                11      Latin Literature/Greek History
                12      Archaeology/Philosophy
                5–7    Free
    
    Thursday     9      Literature
                10      Philosophy
                11      Greek History/Latin Literature
                12      Archaeology
                5–7    Free
    
    Friday       9      History
                10      Philosophy
                11      Roman History/Greek Literature
                12      Archaeology/Philosophy
                5–7    Free
    

    Sub-faculty of Languages and Literature

    It is recommended that lectures for Honour Moderations should be given at the following
    hours whenever possible:

    Homer               11 (Wednesdays, Fridays)
    Virgil              11 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
    Greek Authors       12 (Mondays, Wednesdays)
    Latin Authors       11 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
    Language Papers     10 (Fridays)
    A                   11 (Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, TT;                                        
        
    Mondays, Wednesdays, MT, HT)
    C                   10 (Mondays, Wednesdays)
    D                   10 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
    E                   12
    F                   12 (Tuesdays, Thursdays, HT, TT);
                        11 and 12 (Tuesdays, Thursdays, MT)
    
    



    Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern
    Languages

    Timetable of introductory or survey lectures

    The Board of the Faculty recommends that lectures should be given at the following hours:

    Monday      10      French
                11      German
                12      German
    Tuesday      9      Italian
                10      Spanish
                11      Italian 
                12      Spanish
    Wednesday    9      Russian
                10      French
                11      Linguistics
                12      Linguistics
    Thursday     9      Spanish
                10      Russian
                11      Russian
                12      Italian
    Friday      10      French
                11      German
                12      Linguistics
    
    



    Board of the Division of Social Sciences

    The Divisional Board recommends that:

    (a) lectures for the Preliminary Examination for Philosophy, Politics,
    and Economics should be given at the following times:

    Politics    10
    Economics   11
    Philosophy  12 noon (or a 10 o'clock period not occupied by                 Politics);

    (b) courses of introductory lectures and lectures on compulsory
    subjects for undergraduates in their first three or four terms of work for the Honour School
    of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics should normally be given at the following times:

    Politics    12 
    Economics   11
    Philosophy  10
    



    Board of the Faculty of Theology

    To avoid clashes with Philosophy lectures members of the faculty are asked not to offer
    Theology lectures of interest to those reading for the Joint Honour School of Philosophy and
    Theology at the following times:

    Preliminary Examination

    Monday–Saturday 12

    Honour School

    Monday 10 and 12

    Tuesday 10

    Wednesday 10 and 12

    Thursday 10

    Friday 10 and 12

    Saturday 10

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    CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

    With the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, and, where
    applicable, of divisional boards, the following changes in regulations made by
    divisional and faculty boards will come into effect on
    11 May.


    1 Life and Environmental Sciences Board

    (a) Preliminary Examination in Molecular Cellular Biochemistry

    With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 92, delete ll. 36–8 and substitute:

    `The Moderators will permit the use of hand-held pocket calculators subject to the
    conditions set out under the heading `Use of Calculators in examinations' in the Special
    regulations concerning Examinations. Candidates are restricted to models of calculators
    included in a list provided by the Chairman of the Moderators not later than the Wednesday
    of the fourth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination. The use of
    calculators may not be permitted in certain papers.'

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    (b) Honour School of Natural Science (Molecular and Cellular
    Biochemistry)

    With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 419, l. 30, after
    `Metallurgy
    and Science of Materials' insert `, Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry'.

    2 Ibid., p. 429, delete from `the examiners', ll. 25–6, to
    `Examinations', l. 28.

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    (c) Honour School of Human Sciences

    With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 235, delete ll.
    19–23
    and substitute:

    `not earlier than the first day and not later than Friday of the seventh week of Trinity
    Full Term of the year before that in which the candidate is to be examined. The Chairman
    of the Teaching Committee, after consultation with course co-ordinators, if necessary, shall
    as soon as possible decide whether or not to approve the title and shall advise the candidate
    through his or her college. No decision shall
    normally be deferred beyond the end of eighth week of Trinity Full Term.'

    2 Ibid., p. 236, delete ll. 37–40 and substitute:

    `The subject examines the relationship between spatial pattern and social process in the
    formation and modification of ethnic and social identity in Britain, Western
    Europe, the USA, Canada, Australia, and South Africa. Candidates will be expected to show
    knowledge of the conceptualisation and measurement of segregation in urban areas. They will
    be expected to show knowledge of the concepts of "ghetto", "ethnic
    enclave", "ethnic village", the "barrio",
    "Chinatowns", and "the gay ghetto". They will be expected to show
    knowledge of the behavioural consequences of social segregation (for example in marriage
    patterns and language modification). Topics
    to be covered will also include models of assimilation,
    plurality, and multiculturalism.'

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    2 Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board

    (a) Honour School of Earth Sciences

    With immediate effect

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 425, l. 40, delete `week 6' and substitute
    `week 4'.

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    (b) Honour School of [Computation] Computer Science

    With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 159, ll. 39–40, delete `Operations of
    matrix algebra.
    Fast Fourier transform.'

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    (c) Honour School of Mathematics and [Computation] Computer
    Science

    With immediate effect

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p.294, l.38, delete `Papers b8 and b9' and
    substitute `Paper
    b8'.

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    (d) Honour School of Mathematics

    With immediate effect

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p.287, l.27, delete
    `, and
    Paper O1'.

    2 Ibid, l.28, delete `and Paper O1'.

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    (e) Honour School of Mathematical Sciences

    With immediate effect

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 277, ll.
    17–18 and
    30, in each case delete `Projects Committee of the Board of the Faculty of Mathematical
    Sciences' and substitute `Projects Committee of the Teaching Committee of the Department
    of Mathematics'.

    2 Ibid., p. 285, l. 7, after `Honour Schools).' insert `No
    candidate will be permitted this option who is not offering paper b1.'

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    (f) Honour School of Mathematics

    (i) With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in Part I in
    2003)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 287, l. 37,
    delete `take
    three' and substitute `take two, three'.

    2 Ibid., p. 288, l. 1, delete `two or three' and substitute `two,
    three, or four'.

    (ii) With immediate effect

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 289, l. 38, and p. 290, ll. 1–2, in each
    case delete
    `Projects Committee of the Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences' and substitute
    `Projects Committee of the Teaching Committee of the Department of Mathematics'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (g) M.Sc. in Computer Science

    With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 762, delete ll.
    45–6
    and substitute:

    `2. Candidates must follow a course of instruction in Computer Science for at least
    three terms and a substantial part of the three subsequent vacations, as determined by the
    course timetable, and will be required to produce a certificate from their supervisors to that
    effect.'

    2 Ibid., p. 763, after l. 47 insert:

    `No candidate shall attend classes or receive any form
    of individual tuition in the subject of an assignment
    between the time when the assignment is made available to the candidates and the time fixed
    for the delivery of
    the assignment to the examiners.'

    3 Ibid., p. 764, delete ll. 1–4 and substitute:

    `To satisfy the examiners a candidate must attain a minimum standard in seven of the
    assignments under clause 3(i) and pass five of them (including at least two
    from Schedule B or assignments on alternative topics approved under clause 8), pursue an
    adequate course of practical work, and attain an adequate level of achievement in all three
    parts of the examination.'

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    3 Mathematical and Physical Sciences and
    Humanities Boards

    (a) Honour School of Mathematics and Philosophy

    (i) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first Part I examination in 2002 and

    first
    Part II examination in 2003)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 474, ll. 9–10, delete `A
    candidate who takes only three subjects in Philosophy in Part I cannot offer Option
    (i) Mathematics in Part II.'

    (ii) With immediate effect

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 299, ll.
    38–9, and
    p. 300, ll. 5–6, delete `Projects Committee of the Board of the Faculty of
    Mathematical Sciences' and substitute `Projects Committee of the Teaching Committee of the
    Department of Mathematics'.

    2 Ibid., p. 300, l. 44, delete `University Offices, Wellington
    Square' and substitute `Mathematical Institute, St Giles''.

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    (b) Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy

    With immediate effect

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 474, ll. 20–1, delete `University Offices,
    Wellington
    Square' and substitute `Mathematical institute, St Giles''.

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    4 Social Sciences Board

    (a) Master of Business Administration

    With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, as amended by the
    changes in
    regulations published on 5 October 2000 (Gazette No. 4560, 5 October
    2000, p. 113), p. 826, delete ll. 19–46.

    2 Ibid., p. 827, delete ll. 1–36 and substitute:

    `1. Candidates must follow for at least three terms a course of instruction in
    Management Studies. Candidates must complete

    (a) all courses from the schedule of required courses, and satisfy the
    examiners in the assignment and/or examination associated with each course;

    (b) four electives, and satisfy the examiners in the assignment and/or
    examination associated with each course, the list of electives to be published annually by the
    MBA Director before the first Monday of Hilary Term;

    (c) a written report on a new business development project of not more
    than 8,000 words. Such projects must be undertaken in groups and approved by the MBA
    Director;

    (d) a written report on a business project of not more than 15,000
    words. Such projects must be undertaken in groups and approved by the MBA Director;

    (e) a case study examination, on which questions may be set relevant
    to all the required courses held throughout the year (details of which are set out in the
    schedule);

    (f) candidates may be required to attend an oral examination on any
    of
    the above.

    2. Assignments and written reports on projects must be
    presented not later than the time and date stipulated for each exercise; these will be published
    before the first
    Monday of each term by the MBA Director in which the
    assignment or project must be undertaken. The required number of copies must be delivered
    to the Examination Schools, and addressed to the Chairman of Examiners for the MBA, c/o
    Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford. In cases where such work contains material of
    a commercially sensitive nature, access to such work may be restricted for a length of time
    to be decided by the Chairman of Examiners.

    3. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the
    whole examination to candidates for the Degree.

    4. In exceptional circumstances, a candidate wishing to take an
    examination later than the one to which he or
    she has been admitted may do so by application to the Chairman of Examiners.'

    3 Ibid., p. 827, delete ll. 40–4 and substitute:

    `(a) Financial Reporting

    Financial reporting and its regulation; sources of company information; structure and
    interpretation of financial statements.'

    4 Ibid., p. 827, delete ll. 45–9 and substitute:

    `(b) Finance 1:

    Sources of finance and financial systems, valuation and risk, portfolio theory, market
    efficiency, investment appraisal, options and derivatives.

    (c) Finance 2:

    Capital structure, dividends, equity and debt finance, risk management, financial
    management, mergers and corporate control.'
    and renumber items (c)–(j) which follow as
    (d)–(k).

    5 Ibid., p. 828, delete ll. 32–4 and substitute:

    `Globalisation and global governance; politics and regulations over international
    investment and trade; strategies and structures of multinational enterprises;
    government– industry relations; diversity of modern capitalism and comparative
    business systems.'

    6 Ibid., p. 829, delete ll. 1–3 (note: (l)
    Industrial Organisation remains as item (l) in the renumbered sequence).

    7 Ibid., p. 829, delete ll. 9-18.

    8 Ibid., p. 829, delete ll. 19–23 (note: (o) Economic
    Environment becomes item (m) in the renumbered sequence).

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    (b) M.St. in Forced Migration

    With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 701, delete ll.
    2–3
    insert:

    `Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in two papers and three
    essays as follows:'.

    2 Ibid, p. 701, delete ll. 23–39 and substitute:

    `Essay I: Regional Essay

    Each student will be required to undertake a course of study and write an essay of not more
    than 5,000 words on forced migration in a particular region. This essay must be submitted
    by week eight of Hilary Full Term.

    Essay II: Extended Essay

    Each student will be required to write an essay of not more than 8,000 words on a topic
    relevant to forced migration. The purpose of this essay is to ensure that the students have
    engaged in a multidisciplinary analysis of a single issue to gain an awareness of the complex
    inter-relations in the field. Students must submit their essays at least fourteen days before the
    first day of the examination in week nine of Trinity Term.

    Essay III: Research Methods Group Essay

    Each student must display an understanding of research methods relevant to forced migration.
    This will be in the form of a group essay based on directed field research conducted during
    a four-week period in Hilary Term. The essay will present findings and engage with topics
    which include: epistemology of social science; social science paradigms; ethics and values;
    quantitative, qualitative, and participatory methods of data collection; the presentation of
    statistical information; research design; sampling theory; hypothesis testing; questionnaire
    design; participant observation; participatory learning and action; and evaluative research.'

    3 Ibid, p. 702, delete ll. 3–9 and substitute:

    `A candidate who fails the examination will be permitted to retake it on one further
    occasion only, not later than one year after the initial attempt. A candidate who has reached
    a satisfactory standard on any of the three components of the examination: (i)
    the thesis; (ii) the two written papers; (iii) the two essays; will not be required to retake that
    part of the examination.
    Candidates may also be required to attend an oral examination, which may be on one or
    more of the candidate's written examinations, thesis, or group essay.

    Any candidate who fails a group assignment may be considered for a pass on the basis
    of an oral examination.'

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    (c) M.Sc. in Forced Migration

    With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2003)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p 790, after l. 32, insert:

    `Forced Migration

    1. Candidates will be expected to attend such lectures and
    seminars as their supervisor/course director shall recommend.

    2. Candidates will, when they enter for their examination, be
    required to produce a certificate from their society that they are following a course of study
    in the field which they have pursued in Oxford for at least three terms.

    3. A multidisciplinary thesis topic to be offered by each
    candidate, duly approved by the candidate's supervisor, must be submitted for approval to
    the chairman of the examiners by the third week of Hilary Term. Students must submit their
    theses in week seven in Trinity Term at least 14 days before the first day of the examinations
    in week nine.

    4. Candidates must present themselves for an oral examination
    unless exempted by the examiners.

    5. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the
    whole examination. Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in two papers
    and two essay
    papers as follows:

    Paper I: International Legal and Normative Framework

    The international legal and normative framework in relation to refugees and displaced
    persons. International and domestic application of individual and group rights to displaced
    persons and refugees. Implications of displaced populations for international order and for
    the security and stability of states. Activities and involvement of
    the relevant international organs, governments, and inter-governmental and non-governmental
    organisations regarding forced migration. The creation and dissolution of states. Concepts
    of intervention and their justifications. The evolution of humanitarian responses to forced
    migration. The organisational culture of assistance.

    Paper II: Causes and consequences of forced migration

    Theories of the causes of forced migration and humanitarian crises. Historical dimensions
    and social dynamics of forced migration. Coercion and conflict. Poverty and vulnerability.
    The impact of forced migrants on host populations and governments. Coping mechanisms,
    survival strategies, and psychological adaptation of affected populations. Nationalism,
    ethnicity, and group identity. Integration in rural and urban settings. The impact of
    resettlement programmes on the livelihood and economic autonomy of affected populations.
    Repatriation and social reconstruction.

    Multidisciplinary Thesis

    Each student will be required to write a thesis of not less than 10,000 and not more than
    15,0000 words on a topic relevant to forced migration. The purpose of this thesis
    is to ensure that the students have engaged in a multi-
    disciplinary analysis of a single issue to gain an awareness of the complex inter-relations in
    the field.

    The topic of the thesis will require approval by the chairman of examiners. This thesis
    must be the work of the candidate alone and aid from others must be limited to prior
    discussion as to the subject and advice on presentation. The thesis must be presented in
    proper scholarly form, in two copies typed, in double-spacing on one side only of quarto or
    A4 paper, each copy bound or held firmly in a stiff cover, and must be delivered to the
    Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, no later than Friday noon
    of ninth week in Trinity Term.

    Research Methods Group Essay

    Each student must display an understanding of research methods relevant to forced migration.
    This will be in the form of a group essay based on directed field research conducted during
    a four-week period in Hilary Term. The essay will present findings and engage with topics
    which include: epistemology of social science; social science paradigms; ethics and values;
    quantitative, qualitative, and participatory methods of data collection; the presentation of
    statistical information; research design; sampling theory; hypothesis testing; questionnaire
    design; participant observation; participatory learning and action; and evaluative research.

    The essay must be presented in a proper scholarly form and delivered to the Clerk of
    Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, no later than Friday noon in third week
    of Trinity Term.

    A candidate who fails the examination will be permitted to retake it on one further
    occasion only, not later than one year after the initial attempt. A candidate who has reached
    a satisfactory standard on any of the three components of the examination: (i)
    the thesis; (ii) the two written papers; (iii) the two essay; will not be required to retake that
    part of the examination. Candidates may also be required to attend an oral examination,
    which may be on one or more of the candidate's written examinations, thesis or group essay.
    Any candidate who fails a group assignment may be considered for a pass on the basis of an
    oral examination.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (d) M.Phil. in Economics

    With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 599, ll. 1 and
    l.7, delete
    `during' and substitute `at the same time as'.

    2 Ibid., p. 599, l. 14, after `examination.' insert `No candidate
    will be permitted to resit any of the compulsory
    papers more than once.'

    3 Ibid., p. 600, delete ll. 40–2 and renumber existing
    paragraphs (j)–(m) as
    (i)–(l) respectively.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    5 Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores

    (a) Honour Moderations in Classics

    (i) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 36, l. 18, delete `24' and
    substitute `34'.

    (ii) With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 37, l. 28; p. 39,
    l. 33 and
    p. 41, l. 12, in each case delete `III' and substitute `IV'.

    2 Ibid., p. 37, delete ll. 30–1 and substitute:

    `There will be a compulsory question containing passages for translation and comment
    from the prescribed book. The paper will also include questions on the philosophical topics
    examined in that book, together with some questions of a more general character on
    Epicurean philosophy as expressed in De Rerum Natura as a whole.'

    3 Ibid., p. 39, l. 21, and p. 40, l. 41, in each case delete

    `Cicero, Pro Murena;' and substitute `Cicero, In Catilinam I, Pro Archia.'

    4 Ibid., p. 41, delete ll. 38–44 and substitute:

    `The prescribed texts, from which compulsory passages for comment will be
    set, are Sallust, Catiline; Cicero, In Catilinam I–IV, Pro Sulla; Asconius, In orationem
    in toga
    candida. Compulsory passages for translation will be set only from Sallust, Catiline and
    Cicero, In Catilinam IV.
    Passages for comment from Cicero, In Catilinam I–III and Pro Sulla will be
    accompanied by the English translation of C. Macdonald (Loeb, 1977) and from Asconius,
    In orationem in toga candida by the English translation of S. Squires

    (Bristol, 1990).'

    5 Ibid., p. 44, l. 26, delete `*Bailey' and substitute
    `Rouse-Smith (Loeb, 1975 edn. or later)'.

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    (b) Honour School of Literae Humaniores

    (i) With immediate effect

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 263, l. 36, delete `Sophocles, Ajax,
    1–1184' and
    substitute `Aristophanes, Peace 1–1126'.

    (ii) With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 248, delete l.
    31.

    2 Ibid., delete from p. 260, l. 49 to p. 261, l. 5.

    3 Ibid., p. 261, delete l. 42.

    4 Ibid., p. 263, l. 36, delete `Aristophanes, Peace 1–1126'
    and substitute `Sophocles, Ajax, 1–1184'.

    5 Ibid., p. 268, l. 4, delete `*Bailey' and substitute
    `Rouse-Smith (Loeb, 1975 edn. or later)'.

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    (c) Pass School of Literae Humaniores

    With immediate effect

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 269, delete `Valerius, Argonautica: Ehlers
    (Teubner).'

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    (d) Honour School of Literae Humaniores

    (i) With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 253, delete ll.
    28–33.

    2 Ibid., p. 253, l. 34, delete `I.9' and substitute `I.8'.

    3 Ibid., p. 254, l. 14, delete `I.10' and substitute `I.9'.

    4 Ibid., p. 254, l. 30, delete `I.11' and substitute `I.10'.

    5 Ibid., p. 255, l. 34, delete `I.12' and substitute `I.11'.

    6 Ibid., p. 255, l. 49, delete `I.13' and substitute `I.12'.

    7 Ibid., p. 256, l. 18, delete `I.14' and substitute `I.13'.

    8 Ibid., p. 256, l. 45, delete `I.15' and substitute `I.14'.

    (ii) With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in Trinity Term
    2004)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 265, delete ll.
    10–15
    and substitute:

    `IV. 3 Art under the Roman Empire, ad 14–337

    The art and visual culture of the Roman empire is studied in its physical, social, and
    historical contexts. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with major monuments in
    Rome and Italy and other leading centres of the empire (such as Aphrodisias, Athens,
    Ephesus, and Lepcis Magna) and with the main strands and contexts of representation in the
    eastern and western provinces. They will be expected to show knowledge of written evidence
    where relevant
    as well as of the main media and categories of surviving images—statues, portrait busts,
    historical reliefs, funerary monuments, cameos, wallpaintings, mosaics, silverware, and
    coins.'

    (iii) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 265, delete ll. 16–21 and substitute:

    `IV.4 Roman Archaeology: Cities and Settlement under the Empire

    The subject comprises the study of the Roman city from Augustus to the Tetrarchy placed
    in the broader context of patterns of rural settlement, agricultural production, transport, and
    trade. Areas of emphasis include selected key sites (Corinth, Caesarea Maritima, Palmyra,
    Lepcis Magna, Verulamium [St Albans], and Silchester) and major landscape studies in Italy,
    Greece, and North Africa. Particular attention is paid to problems and biases in assessing the
    character of the surviving evidence and in testing theoretical models against physical data.
    Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of written evidence where relevant as well
    as of the main categories of surviving
    ancient material evidence. The subject may not be combined with subject I.12, `Civic Life
    of the Roman Empire from the Flavian to the Severan Period'.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (e) M.Phil. in Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature

    With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 621, delete l. 16 and substitute:

    `Term of the second year of the course (except that the
    titles of essays to be examined at the end of the first year of study in accordance with cl. 7
    below should be submitted no later than the Tuesday of first week in the Hilary Full Term
    of the first year of the course)'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (f) M.Phil. in Greek and/or Latin Literature

    With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 621, delete ll.
    17–23
    and substitute:

    `5. Examination. Each option in section A will be examined by (i) a
    written paper (three hours) of passages for translation and comment, in which the passages
    for comment will be set only from the books listed under a in each case, while passages for
    translation will be set from the books listed under both a and b in each case, and (ii) by three

    presubmitted essays (see §6 below) which between them
    display knowledge of more than a narrow range of the topic. For the examinations to be set
    in the options under Section B, see the detailed schedule.'

    2 Ibid., p. 621, ll. 30–1, delete `in the Trinity Full Term
    in which the examination is to be taken' and substitute `in the appropriate Trinity Full Term'.

    3 Ibid., p. 621, after l. 31 insert:

    `7. One of the two options taken from A and B must be completed by the end of the
    first year of study. If it is an option to be examined by presubmitted essays, these must be
    delivered as in §6 above, but to arrive by noon on the Thursday of Sixth Week in the
    Trinity Full Term of the first year of study for the M.Phil.'

    4 Ibid., p. 621, l. 32, delete `7' and substitute `8'; l. 34, delete
    `8' and substitute `9'; l. 36, delete `9' and substitute `10'.

    5 Ibid., p. 623, after l. 30 insert:

    `6. Intermediate Greek. There will be one three-hour paper. Candidates will be
    expected to be familiar with An Anthology of Greek Prose, ed. D.A. Russell (OUP 1991),
    nos. 17, 18, 23, 24, 33, 40, 44, 66, 78, from which a selection of passages will be set for
    translation.

    Candidates will also be expected to translate from two of the following texts:
    (i) Herodotus I. 1–93 [ed. Hude, OCT]; (ii) Plutarch, Life of Antony
    1–9, 23–36, 71–87 [ed. Pelling, CUP]; (iii) Euripides, Bacchae [ed.
    Diggle, OCT]. Alternative texts for translation under this head may be offered by agreement
    with the Graduate Studies Committee.

    7. Intermediate Latin. There will be one three-hour paper.
    Candidates will be expected to be familiar with An Anthology of Latin Prose, ed. D.A.
    Russell (OUP 1990), nos. 7, 12, 22, 23, 34, 52, 63, from which a selection of passages will
    be set for translation.

    Candidates will also be expected to translate from two of the following texts:
    (i) Cicero, Pro Caelio [ed. OCT]; (ii) Pliny, Letters I.6, 9, 13, 19; VII.21,
    24, 26, 29; VIII.16, 17; IX.6, 12, 15, 27, 33, 39; X.31, 32, 96, 97 [ed. M.B. Fisher and
    M.R. Griffin, CUP 1973]; (iii) Ovid, Metamorphoses 8 [ed. A.S. Hollis, OUP 1970].
    Alternative texts for translation under this head may be offered by agreement with the
    Graduate Studies Committee.'

    7 Ibid., p. 623, l. 31, delete `6' and substitute `8'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (g) M.St. in Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature

    With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 704, ll. 14–15, delete `The title of any
    dissertation,
    if not already approved, should be submitted not later than the Friday of the fifth week of
    Michaelmas Full Term' and substitute `The title of any dissertation, if not already approved,
    should be submitted not later than the Friday of first week of Hilary Full Term. The final
    confirmation of the title of the dissertation should be submitted not later than the Monday of
    the week before the first week of Trinity Full Term'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    6 Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores and
    Life and Environmental Sciences Board

    (a) Honour Moderations in Classical Archaeology and Ancient
    History

    With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 30, l.34, delete
    `the
    countryside, demes, and cemeteries of Attica;'.

    2 Ibid., p. 31, delete ll. 2-20, and substitute:

    `1. Homeric archaeology and early Greece, 1550–700 BC

    Evidence on the composition and history of the poems provided by extant archaeological
    remains, with special emphasis on burial practices, architecture, metals, and the world
    outside the Aegean. An overall knowledge will be
    required of the archaeological evidence for the Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age of the
    Aegean from 1550 bc to 700 BC.

    2. Greek vases

    The study of the general history of Greek decorated pottery from c.800 bc to c.300 bc,
    including study of the Attic black-figure and red-figure styles and of South Italian Greek vase
    painting. Knowledge will be required of the techniques used in making Greek pottery and in
    drawing on vases, also of the ancient names for vases and the shapes to which they refer.
    Candidates should in addition study the subjects of the paintings and their treatment by
    painters as compared with their treatment by writers and should be familiar with actual vases,
    for example those in the Ashmolean Museum.

    3. Greek sculpture, c.600–300 BC

    The major monuments of archaic and classical Greek sculpture—their context and
    purpose as well as their subjects, styles, and techniques. Candidates will be expected to show
    some knowledge of the external documentary evidence, such as literary and epigraphic texts,
    on which the framework of the subject depends, and to be acquainted with the major
    sculptures of the period represented in the Ashmolean Cast Gallery. The examination will
    consist of one picture question and three essay questions.

    4. Roman architecture

    The subject comprises the study of Roman architecture from the Republic to the Tetrarchy
    in Italy and in the provinces, looking at public buildings, private housing, and imperial
    palaces. Particular attention is paid to developments in building materials and techniques, the
    evolution of architectural styles and ideas, and the ways in which different provinces show
    variations on a common theme as Roman influences interacted with local culture.

    B. Special subjects in Ancient History:

    Note: All texts are studied in translation. Except as otherwise indicated,
    passages for comment will be set from the most recent Penguin Classics edition; see Course
    Handbook for details.

    1. Thucydides and the west

    The prescribed text is Thucydides VI. Compulsory passages for comment will be set from
    this book. Candidates will also be expected to be familiar with Thucydides VII and Plutarch,
    Nicias.

    2. Aristophanes' political comedy

    The prescribed plays are Acharnians and Lysistrata. Compulsory passages for comment will
    be set from these. Candidates will also be expected to be familiar with Frogs.

    3. Cicero and Catiline

    The prescribed texts are Sallust, Catiline; Cicero, Against Catiline I–IV; Asconius, In
    orationem in toga candida (in
    Asconius, Commentaries on Five Speeches of Cicero, ed. S. Squires, Bristol Classical Press,
    1990). Compulsory passages for comment will be set from these.

    4. Tacitus and Tiberius

    The prescribed text is Tacitus, Annals I and III. Compul-
    sory passages for comment will be set from these books. Candidates will also be expected
    to be familiar with
    Annals II and IV–VI.

    5. The ancient city

    The prescribed texts are Aristotle, Politics I and III.1-13; Polybius VI. Candidates will be
    expected to show knowledge of ancient and modern views of relevant aspects of both Greek
    and Roman civic life.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (b) Honour School of Classical Archaeology and Ancient
    History

    (i) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 136, delete ll. 12–19 and substitute:

    `F. Roman Archaeology: Cities and Settlement under the Empire

    The subject comprises the study of the Roman city from Augustus to the Tetrarchy placed
    in the broader context of patterns of rural settlement, agricultural production, transport, and
    trade. Areas of emphasis include selected key sites (Corinth, Caesarea Maritima, Palmyra,
    Lepcis Magna, Verulamium [St Albans], and Silchester) and major landscape studies in Italy,
    Greece, and North Africa. Particular attention is paid to problems and biases in assessing the
    character of the surviving evidence and in testing theoretical models against physical data.
    Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of written evidence where relevant as well
    as of the main categories of surviving
    ancient material evidence. The subject may not be combined with subject I.12, `Civic Life
    of the Roman Empire from the Flavian to the Severan Period'.'

    (ii) With effect from 1 October 2003 (for first examination in Trinity Term
    2004)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 136, after l. 37
    insert:

    `4. Art under the Roman Empire, ad 14–337
    The art and visual culture of the Roman empire is studied in its physical, social, and
    historical contexts. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with major monuments in
    Rome and Italy and other leading centres of the empire (such as Aphrodisias, Athens,
    Ephesus, and Lepcis Magna) and with the main strands and contexts of representation in the
    eastern and western provinces. They will be expected to show knowledge of written evidence
    where
    relevant as well as of the main media and categories of surviving images—statues,
    portrait busts, historical reliefs, funerary monuments, cameos, wallpaintings, mosaics,
    silverware, and coins.'

    2 Ibid., p. 136, l. 38, delete `4' and substitute `5'; p. 136,
    l. 45, delete `5' and substitute `6'; p.137, l. 8, delete `6' and substitute `7'.

    3 Ibid., p. 137, delete ll. 13–15.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    7 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores
    and English Language and Literature

    Honour Moderations in Classics and English Paper II

    With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 46, delete ll. 16–19 and substitute:

    `(1) Greek or Latin texts. Candidates must offer either (a) or
    (b):

    (a) Homer, Iliad I. 1–336; Sophocles, Antigone
    1023–1114, 1155–1620; Lysias I

    (b) Virgil, Aeneid I. 1–367; Horace, Odes III.5, 7, 9, 13, 14,
    18, 21, 26, 30; Seneca, Epistles'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    8 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores
    and Medieval and Modern Languages

    (a) Preliminary Examination in Philosophy and Modern
    Languages

    With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 95, delete ll. 7–9 and substitute:

    `Provided that a candidate who fails one only of the papers in 2(l)
    above may offer, in a subsequent examination or subsequent examinations, the paper in
    which he or she has failed.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (b) Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages

    (i) With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 152, delete ll. 36–7.

    (ii) With immediate effect

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 153, l. 25,
    insert `*' before
    `(d)'.

    2 Ibid., p. 153, insert footnote:

    `* Paper (xii) (d) on Procopius may not be offered after October 2003
    by candidates following Course I.'

    (iii) With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 153, delete ll. 25–7.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    9 Board of the Faculty of Modern History

    (a) Honour School of Modern History

    With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 304, ll.
    39–40, delete

    `A thesis may be offered in place of I, a paper in the History of the British Isles, in
    accordance with the detailed regulations stated below under VI. THESES.'

    2 Ibid., p. 305, delete ll. 33–4.

    3 Ibid., p. 307, after l. 6 insert:

    `10. Court Culture and Art in Early Modern Europe' and renumber all subsequent
    numbers from 10 to 23.

    4 Ibid., delete ll. 19–21 and renumber paragraphs
    21–3 as 20–2.

    5 Ibid., after l.24 insert:

    `23. Scholasticism and Humanism.

    24. The Science of Society.

    25. Political Theory and Social Science.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (b) Honour School of Modern History and Politics

    With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 380, ll. 16–21, delete `Candidates who
    `Parts II or
    III).' and substitute:

    `Candidates who choose Politics Further Subject 215 (Classical Political Thought)
    cannot also take Modern History Further Subject 23 and 24 (Scholasticism and Humanism
    and The Science of Society). Candidates who choose Politics Further Subject 216
    (Foundations of Modern Social and Political Thought) cannot also take Modern History
    Further Subject 25 (Political Theory and Social Science).'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (c) M.Phil. in Economic and Social History

    With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 596, l. 6, delete
    `.'.

    2 Ibid., after l. 6 insert:

    `or A paper from another established course within the University where this would
    provide a more appropriate training for the candidate's dissertation focus. Such a choice will
    need formal approval from both the Course
    Director and the Chairman of the Graduate Studies Committee of the Board of the Faculty
    of Modern History.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (d) M.Phil. in Byzantine Studies

    With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 578, l. 10,
    delete `I, IV,
    or V' and substitute `I, III, IV, or V'.

    2 Ibid., delete ll. 11–19.

    3 Ibid., l. 20, delete `II' and substitute `I'.

    4 Ibid., l. 27, delete `III' and substitute `II'.

    5 Ibid., after l. 32 insert:

    `(5) Old Church Slavonic.

    (6) Medieval Latin.'

    6 Ibid., delete ll. 33–5 and substitute:

    `III, IV, and V. Candidates will be required to offer three options which they must take
    from three different sections in the schedule A–G below, except that candidates may
    take two options from either Section D or Section E.

    A. GENERAL BYZANTINE HISTORY

    Candidates will be required to offer a paper which focuses on either early Byzantine history
    (to 717) or later Byzantine history (to 1453). Candidates will be given a wide choice of
    questions on the history of Byzantium and its neighbours. Approximately a quarter of the
    questions will deal with cultural history.'

    7 Ibid., l. 36, delete `A' and substitute `B'.

    8 Ibid., p. 579, l. 39, delete `B' and substitute `C'.

    9 Ibid., p. 580, l. 8, delete `C' and substitute `D'.

    10 Ibid., l. 23, delete `D' and substitute `E'.

    11 Ibid., l. 26, delete `Peter of Atroa' and substitute `Andreas
    Salos'.

    12 Ibid., l. 36, delete `E' and substitute `F'.

    13 Ibid., p. 581, l. 1, delete `F' and substitute `G'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (e) M.Sc. in Economic and Social History

    With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 771, l. 10,
    delete `.'.

    2 Ibid., after l.10 insert:

    `or A paper from another established course within the University where this would
    provide a more appropriate training for the candidate's dissertation focus. Such a choice will
    need formal approval from both the Course
    Director and the Chairman of the Graduate Studies Committee of the Board of the Faculty
    of Modern History.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    10 Board of the Faculty of Theology

    (a) Honour School of Philosophy and Theology

    With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 498, delete ll.
    4–16
    and substitute:

    `All candidates must take papers (i) (unless they intend to offer both
    papers 3 and 7 as prescribed for the Honour School of Theology) and (ii) below. In addition
    they must take either (iii) or (iv) below. Candidates may select their remaining papers from
    the paper not selected from (iii) and (iv), paper (v) below, and any other papers prescribed
    for the Honour School of Theology.'

    2 Ibid., ll. 31–2, delete `(1) Christian Moral Concepts Ɋ(5) Sexual Ethics.' and substitute:

    `(1) Christian Moral Concepts; (2) Government and its tasks; (3) Medical Ethics; (4)
    Sexual Ethics.'

    3 Ibid., p. 499, l. 12, delete `(17)' and substitute `(25)'.

    4 Ibid., l. 13, delete `(20)' and substitute `(29)'.

    5 Ibid., l. 17, delete `(12)' and substitute `(11)'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (b) Honour School of Theology

    (i) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 541, after l. 7
    insert:

    `The provisions of cll. 2–4 and clause 6 of the regulations concerning essays will
    apply to the submission of the short essay, save that in cl. 2, approval must be sought not
    later than Friday in the fourth week of Michaelmas Term in the year of the examination.'

    2 Ibid., p. 533, delete ll. 24–6.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (ii) With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 533, delete ll.
    3–18
    and substitute:

    `(17) Islam I: the Classical Period of Islam

    This paper examines the historical development of theological thought in Islam, from the
    Prophet Muhammad to the end of the classical period (seventh to the fifteenth century CE).
    Particular attention is paid to (i) the interaction between the theology of
    Kalëm and the other major religious disciplines—exegesis (tafsör),
    Tradition (hadöth), Law (fiqh), sects (firaq)-, mysticism (tasawwuf), and philosophy
    (falsafa); (ii) the structuring of the doctrinal debate in respect of theodicy, prophetology, and
    humanism. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of such texts (in English
    translation) as are prescribed by the Board of the Faculty of Theology in the Michaelmas
    Term of the academic year preceding the examination.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (18) Islam II: Islam in the Modern World

    This paper examines the development of Islam as a world religion since 1500, paying special
    attention to Islamic religious thought in the nineteenth and twentieth
    centuries. Topics include: the historical, political, and
    ideological contexts; new interpretations of traditional sources; Islamic movements; Islamic
    modernism. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of such primary texts and
    secondary sources (in English translation) as are prescribed by the Board of the Faculty of
    Theology in the Michaelmas Term of the academic year preceding the
    examination. This paper may only be offered by candidastes also offering paper (17).'

    2 Ibid., p. 533, delete from l. 34 to p. 534, l. 6, and substitute:

    `(21) Hinduism I

    Vedism, monism, traditional (smarta) ritual. This paper will be concerned with the main
    components of brahminical tradition; they are of ancient origin but still relevant today. The
    subject will be mainly studied with reference to the following concepts: brahman, karman,
    moksa, samskara, samnyasa, yajûa, asruti, smrti, dharma, varna, asrama, asauca
    (impurity), dana, tapas (austerity), bhakti, yoga, mantra, adhikara, dksa (initiation).

    (22) Hinduism II

    Hindu theism. The principal sects/denominations. Theistic ritual and theology, including, in
    addition to the concepts mentioned under Hinduism I, the concepts of puja, prapatti, prasada,
    seva, nyasa, sakti. The main teachings of Rammohan Roy and Dayananda Sarasvat.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (c) M.St. in Philosophical Theology

    With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 725, l.44, delete `at least fourteen days before
    the first day
    of the examination' and substitute `EITHER at least fourteen days before the first day of the
    examination, OR at least twenty-eight days
    before the first day of Michaelmas Full Term following the examination. Candidates must
    notify examiners of their intention to submit early or late when seeking approval of their
    essay topic.'

    (d) M.St. in Theology

    With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 734, after l.46 insert:

    `Candidates must notify examiners of their intention to submit early or late when
    seeking approval of their essay topic.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (e) M.St. in Theology (Research)

    With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 741, l. 22,
    delete `at least
    fourteen days before the first day of the examination' and substitute `at least twenty-eight
    days before the first day of Michaelmas Full Term following the examination'.

    2 Ibid., p. 742, after l. 45 insert:

    `(c) A qualifying examination will normally be required in a major
    research language to be proposed by the candidate.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF
    DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

    The examiners appointed by the following divisional board, faculty boards, and committee
    give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

    Medical Sciences

    L. DAVIES, Hertford: `The electrical manipulation of bio-formulations for delivery to the
    lung'.

    Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, Friday, 11 May, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: G. Brownlee, S. Eastman.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Anthropology and Geography

    F. GRAHAM, Oriel: `Ideology and practice: an ethnographic study of a Japanese company
    in the 1990s'.

    Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Tuesday, 8 May, 2.30 p.m.


    Examiners: N.J. Allen, J. Clammer.

    A.C. JIMENEZ, St Antony's: `The becoming of space: a geography of liminal practices of
    the city of Antofagasta, Chile'.

    Institute of Social and Cultural Anthopology, Friday, 4 May, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: M. Banks, E. Hirsch.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Biological Sciences

    SUET MIEN TAN, Trinity: `The domain organisation and function of the integration of the
    integrin b2 subunit (CD18)'.

    Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, Wednesday, 2 May, 2.30 p.m.


    Examiners: N. Barclay, C. Buckley.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    English Language and Literature

    G. PUGIN, Campion Hall: `The Ormulum: the manuscript, its uses, and
    its users'.

    Lady Margaret Hall, Friday, 25 May, 10 a.m.


    Examiners: A.M. Hudson, M. Laing.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Law

    J. EDELMAN, Magdalen: `Gain-based awards for wrongs'.

    St Hugh's, Wednesday, 2 May, 10.45 a.m.


    Examiners: A.S. Burrows, C. Mitchell.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Literae Humaniores

    T. NELSON, Corpus Christi: `Deception in archaic Greek poetry from Homer to
    Pindar'.

    Magdalen, Tuesday, 8 May, 2.15 p.m.


    Examiners: O.P. Taplin, R.G.A. Buxton.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Management

    TOMOHIDE SUZUKI, Balliol: `Accounting and economics: epistemology of economic
    reality from an accounting point of view'.

    Said Business School, Radcliffe Infirmary, Wednesday, 2 May, 10.30 a.m.


    Examiners: G. Jones, I. Lapsley.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Physical Sciences

    S. TAFFLER, Hertford: `The use of the Hilbert spectrum
    in the analysis of electromyographic signals and its application in the development of
    myoelectric prosthesis
    controllers'.

    Department of Engineering Science, Thursday, 3 May, 10 a.m.


    Examiners: I. Reid, B. Hudgins.

    M. YAM, Balliol: `Detection and analysis of microcalcification clusters in X-ray
    mammograms using the hint representation'.

    Department of Engineering Science, Monday, 14 May, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: J.A. Noble, S. Astley.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Theology

    A. ATHERSTONE, Wycliffe Hall: `Charles Golightly (1807– 85), church parties, and
    university politics in Victorian
    Oxford'.

    Wadham, Monday, 30 April, 10 a.m.


    Examiners: E.J. Garnett, P. Nockles.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Committee for Educational Studies

    R. BERKELEY, Corpus Christi: `Exclusions from school: market forces or disciplinary
    structures?'
    Examination Schools, Tuesday, 15 May, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: A. Watson, C. Parsons.

    Return to List of Contents of this section





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 26 April 2001: Colleges<br />

    Colleges, Halls, and Societies


    Contents of this section:

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    OBITUARIES


    Merton College

    PETER LOCKWOOD BOULTON, 4 January 2001; Postmaster 1942–3 and 1946–8.
    Aged 77.

    MICHAEL JOHN DYMOND, 21 February 2001; commoner 1957–60. Aged 64.

    NEIL STUART MALCOLM, March 2001; 1957–61. Aged 64.

    DEREK JOSEPH PAYTON-SMITH, 12 February 2001; Postmaster 1938–40 and
    1946–7. Aged 80.

    LEONARD ROE, 20 December 2000; Commoner's Exhibitioner 1930–3. Aged 88.

    JOSEPH ANTHONY SEMLYEN, 7 March 2001; exhibitioner 1958–63. Aged 64.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    St Hilda's College

    KARIN ELIZABETH DAVIES (née Hodgkiss), MA, 14 April 2001;
    exhibitioner 1960–4. Aged 60.

    DAPHNE ELIZABETH LOGAN SHANKLAND (née Elmslie), OBE, MA,
    10 April 2001; commoner 1939–42. Aged 80.

    JEAN MARGARET LORRAINE TAYLOR, MA, 25 March 2001; commoner 1974–8.
    Aged 44.

    MAVIS YOUNG (née Charles), MA, DIP.ED., 15 February 2001; commoner
    1941–5. Aged 79.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    St Hugh's College

    MRS DIANA BETTY ANDERSON (née Morgans), 22 February 2001;
    Modern History 1931. Aged 88.

    MISS MARGARET MONICA BEALE JONES, 15 February 2001; English 1941. Aged 78.

    MISS JULIA MARY BISKNELL, 11 March 2001; Forest Sciences and Agriculture 1978. Aged
    40.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ELECTIONS


    Brasenose College

    To a Tutorial Fellowship in Law (with effect from 1 October 2001):

    DR ANNE C.L.
    DAVIES, MA, D.PHIL.

    To a Junior Research Fellowship (with effect from 1 October 2001):

    DR SIMON L.
    CORNISH, BA, D.PHIL.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    NOTICE


    Oriel College

    Eugene Lee-Hamilton Prize 2000

    The Provost and Fellows of Oriel College offer a prize of £60 for the best Petrarchan
    Sonnet in English submitted by an undergraduate of Oxford or Cambridge, on a subject to be
    chosen by the candidate.

    Enjambment between the eighth and ninth lines will be permitted.

    No candidate may submit more than one sonnet, nor may the prize be awarded more than
    once to the same person.

    The competing sonnets should be sent to Mrs Yvonne Scott, College Secretary, Oriel
    College, Oxford OX1 4EW, not later than Friday, 1 June. Each sonnet must be accompanied by
    a certificate from the head or a fellow of the candidate's college, stating that the candidate is an
    undergraduate. The winner will have been deemed to have given permission to publish his/her
    sonnet in the Oriel Record.

    Return to List of Contents of this section





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 26 April 2001: Advertisements<br />

    Advertisements


    Contents of this section:



    How to advertise in the
    Gazette


    Terms and conditions
    of acceptance of advertisements

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    Oxford Chamber Music Society

    The Belcea String Quartet in works by Schubert and Janacek, 6 May,
    8 p.m. in the Holywell Music Room. Tickets from the Oxford Playhouse (01865 798600)
    £11 , seniors £9, students £4.50; at the door £11, seniors £9,
    students/juniors £4.50. 8–22 year olds, first 20 free.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Oxford Brookes University

    Centre for Family and Household Research Summer Seminars: 15
    May, Fiona Devine (Manchester University), Transmitting Culture Capital from
    Parents to Children: A UK-US Comparison
    , Research Centre, SG03, 5 p.m.; 6
    June, Mairian Corker (Kings College, London), The Family Lives of Disabled
    Children
    , Lloyds Building, Room 407, 5 p.m. These are open seminars, all
    welcome. For further information contact: Sara Ryan, tel.: 01865 483750, e-mail:
    fam@brookes.ac.uk.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Wanted

    American male age 24, and female age 23, highly responsible
    individuals with University degrees, seek interesting employment in Oxford from mid-May
    to mid-Aug. Have full government permission to work in any capacity, send enquiries or
    information to: dr_mes@yahoo.com.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Volunteers Wanted

    The Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics: we are currently
    investigating a new device to measure the depth of anaesthesia. To test the device we need
    fit, healthy volunteers in the age range 18 or older who would be willing to be anaesthetised
    for 2 hours at the John Radcliffe Hospital. The study would take most of the day, but
    volunteers would be able to go home in the late afternoon. We would pay you a fee and
    would reimburse all your expenses. If you are interested in helping us please contact: Duncan
    Young, Clinical Reader in Anaesthetics, Nuffield Dept., of Anaesthetics, Radcliffe Infirmary,
    Woodstock Road, Oxford. Tel.: 01865 224772 (work), 01865 741166 Bleep 1249 (pager),
    01869 331215 (home). E-mail: duncan.young@nda.ox.ac.uk. Feasibility Study of Patient
    Response Monitor in Normal Volunteers Protocol No: 9500002 COREC No: C00.182.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Restoration and Conservation of Antique Furniture

    John Hulme undertakes all aspects of restoration: 30 years experience;
    collection and delivery. For free advice, telephone or write to: The Workshop, 11A High
    Street, Chipping Norton, Oxon., OX7 5AD. Tel.: 01608 641692.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Services Offered

    Reliable house sitter available from June 2001–May 2002.
    Contact 01202 429586.

    Big or small, we ship it all, plus free pick up anywhere in Oxford.
    Also 24-hour photocopying, private mailing addresses (24-hour access, and mail forwarding
    world-wide), binding, fax bureau, colour photocopying, mailing services, and much more.
    Contact or visit Mail Boxes Etc., 266 Banbury Rd., Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 514655, fax:
    514656, email: summertown@020.mbe.uk.com, also at: 94 London Road, Oxford. Tel.:
    01865 741729, fax: 01865 742431, e-mail: staff@mbeheadington.co.uk.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Tuition Offered

    University French tutor offers French courses at all levels to
    individuals or small groups. Tuition designed to suit specific needs (improving speaking,
    reading, writing skills, language for work, university studies or personal interest). Tel.:
    07796 246059, e-mail: LFRTUTOR@netscape.net.

    Piano lessons: Experienced teacher, adults and children, all grades,
    beginners welcome. Contact: Miss P. Read BA (Hons.) LRAM. Tel.: 01865 510904.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Situations Vacant

    Oxford Colleges Admissions Office are looking for undergraduates to
    work as student helpers for the Sutton Trust Summer Schools. The Summer School aims to
    enable Year 12 students from non-privileged backgrounds to experience a `taster' of both the
    academic and social sides of University life. 250 places are available across two one-week
    schools: Week 1: 8 July–14 July; Week 2: 15 July–21 July. An allowance of
    £100 is offered per week along with free accommodation and food. Closing date for
    applications is 4 May 2001. Job descriptions are available from Jane Bass
    (jane.bass@admin.ox.ac.uk or 01865 270215).

    Oxford Colleges Admissions Offcie are looking for undergraduates to
    work as student helpers for the Higher Education Summer School. The Summer School aims
    to encourage Year 11 students from maintained sector schools in inner city areas to aspire
    to Higher Education in general. An extensive academic and social programme is offered to
    128 participants along with a day exploring graduate employment. Dates: Sun., 15
    July–Fri., 20 July. An allowance of £100 is offered per week along with free
    accommodation and food. Closing date for applications is 4 May. Job descriptions are
    available from Jane Bass (jane.bass@admin.ox.ac.uk or 01865 270215.

    The New DNB is currently looking for keyboarders to work in-house
    entering biographical and bibliographical data into the dictionary's database. Academic,
    publishing or bibliographical experience would be an advantage: good typing skills are
    essential. Rates start at £8.60 p.h., with potential for quick increases. Might suit
    graduate students while working on their theses. Please contact John McManus (Production
    Editor) at: jmcmanus@oup.co.uk, tel: 01865 267052 (direct line), or write via: New
    Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Great Clarendon Street, Oxford
    OX2 6DP.

    Required from Sept., 2001: Registrar at Christ Church Cathedral
    School. We seek a well-presented professional person with good organisational and
    communication skills, and a clear market awareness for this important full-time post. Further
    details from: The Headmaster, Christ Church Cathedral School, 3 Brewer Street, Oxford
    OX1 1QW. Tel.: 01865 242561, e-mail: admin@cccs.org.uk. Application deadline: Fri., 11
    May.

    The Examination Schools: Room Assistants. We are looking for a
    team of people to work full time, inc. some Saturdays, for a 6 week period in Trinity term
    to cover the exam season (14 May–22 June 2001), with a possible extension to 13 July.
    The duties inc. setting up examination rooms, tidying up between sessions, laying out script
    booklets and exam materials, and delivering packages in central Oxford. If you would like
    to apply please send a c.v. and covering letter to the Clerk of the Schools Examination
    Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG. For further information phone the Deputy Clerk
    (Building) on 01865 (2) 76905.

    Part-time administration: the Sarah Lawrence Programme seeks a part-
    time administrative assistant to work at the Programme Office in Wadham College. The
    successful candidate will share in the responsibilities for the organisation and management
    of the many aspects of the Visiting Students' Programme. Applicants need to have good
    working knowledge of the University, an enthusiasm for the young, an awareness of cultural
    differences, and a cheerful disposition. A proficiency in Microsoft Word and Office is
    preferred. Terms and conditions negotiable. Post available from Trinity 2001. Applicants
    should send a full c.v. with names and addresses of two referees, with covering letter, to:
    Jane Wylie, Sarah Lawrence Programme, Wadham College, Oxford OX1 3PN.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Houses to Let

    Oxford–a 3/4 bedroom, furnished house, will be available as
    from the end of Sept., for the following academic year. It is centrally located with garden,
    gas c.h., fully equipped with washing machine etc. Rent £850 p.m. Please phone
    01865 554384 or e-mail: hugh.brett@btinternet.com.

    Quiet, modernised terrace house, fully furnished, central north Oxford.
    Central heating, 2 bedrooms, garden. Suitable visiting academics. Available to let to 1 or 2
    persons only for the academic year from mid-Sept.–June 2002. For further details tel.:
    Rosaleen Ockenden on 01865 512747 or e-mail: rosaleen@community.co.uk.

    Moreton-in-Marsh: 3-bedroom house in Cotswolds (1880), sleeps 5,
    sitting-room, kitchen/diner, scullery, storeroom, bathroom, loo, study, garden. Twenty-seven
    miles Oxford, 35 minutes by train. All mod cons. Available 1 June for one year, at least.
    £650 p.c.m. exc. all bills. For further information ring 01608 810549.

    Lifestyle Letting and Management, 1 North Parade Avenue, Oxford:
    Foxglove Cottage, Woodstock–£850 p.c.m. Spacious, modern, 2-bedroom
    cottage with garage, offered unfurnished. Available late April; Hobson Road,
    Summertown–£1,250 p.c.m. New 3-bedroom family house with parking, and
    garden, fully furnished. Available May. Contact us for a full list of property: tel.: 01865
    554577, fax: 01865 554578, e-mail: lifestyle-lettings@dial.pipex.com, Website:
    www.letitbetter.co.uk.

    Close to John Radcliffe hospital, this 3-bedroom semi-detached house
    has just had the kitchen and bathrooms beautifully refurbished in an original manner.
    Spacious sitting-room/dining-room, leading to a conservatory. Three double bedrooms, large
    enclosed garden. Ideal for a visiting medical family. Available 1 May–31 October. For
    more information please call Gay Hawley at Finders Keepers on 01865 200012, or e-mail:
    gayh@finders.co.uk.

    Oxford: 18th-century house, furnished, secluded garden, 3 miles city
    centre, frequent buses. 1 Sept.–20 June 2002. Three bedrooms, gas c.h., fully
    equipped kitchen, locked carport. Rent £750 p.c.m. Rent of car possible
    extra.Tel./Fax: 01865 778768.

    Pretty Edwardian house, newly refurbished to mix classic features with
    modern amenities. Central location in quiet residential area, close to University and riverside
    meadows, 3 bedrooms, large study, lounge, dining room, completely new kitchen, bathroom,
    and garden. Furnished and equipped to high standard; bed linen provided. Rent £1,200
    p.c.m. exc. bills. Available from Aug. Tel.: 00-44-(0)1865-251003, or e-mail:
    mpaehoney@aol.com.

    Stonesfield (delightful village on the edge of the Cotswolds): first
    class, fully furnished, 2-bedroom cottage with conservatory–photographs
    available–for 4 months (June, July, Aug., and Sept.). £1,100 p.c.m. Tel.: 01993
    898490.

    Spacious house, Headington, near John Radcliffe and Nuffield
    Hospitals, 3 miles from city centre, within 5 minutes walk of Headington shopping area and
    buses; easy access to London. Available 15 July–5 Oct. Two double and 1 single
    bedroom, study, very spacious living/dining room and large kitchen. Fully equipped and
    attractively furnished, inc. washing machine/dryer, dishwasher, microwave, TV, video, hi-fi.
    Large garden with mature trees/shrubs. Rent £1,000 p.c.m. exc. charges (negotiable).
    E-mail: chapman@maths.ox.ac.uk or fax (USA) 1-626-449-1407.

    An Englishman's home is his castle---so the saying goes. We cannot
    pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental
    accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB Management
    is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical
    personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful
    service in Oxford. Visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the
    properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or email us
    with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.:
    01865 764533, fax: 764777, email: info@qbman.co.uk.

    Make finding accommodation easy. Finders Keepers have a dedicated
    approach to helping you find the right property. Browse through our website for up-to-date
    detailed information on properties available and make use of our interactive database, priority
    reservation service (credit cards accepted), personal service and professional advice. For
    further information please contact Finders Keepers at 226, Banbury Road, Summertown,
    Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: 01865 311011. Fax: Oxford 556993. Email: oxford@finders.co.uk.
    Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Flats to Let

    Central North Oxford, 10 minutes' walk from city centre, University
    Parks, all main university buildings, and very close to the river. Available for short/long lets.
    Three exceptionally well-furnished, comfortable flats in extremely quiet, civilised, large
    Victorian house in this exclusive, leafy, residential Victorian suburb, with large, light, airy
    rooms: (1) Ground-floor, available Sept., 1 double, 1 single bedroom, large drawing-room,
    kitchen, bathroom. (2) First-floor flat available mid-June, second-floor from 1 Dec. Each
    with large double bedroom, large drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom. Off-street parking, large
    secluded garden. Tel./fax: 01865 552400.

    Cambridge flat in city centre to sublet. Available immediately until
    Sept. Fully-furnished, 2-floor maisonette with private entrance, balcony, all appliances inc.
    washing machine. Rent £650 p.c.m. plus expenses (utilities and council tax). E-mail:
    rs236@cus.cam.ac.uk. Tel.: 01223 322290.

    Lifestyle Letting and Management, 1 North Parade Avenue, Oxford:
    Tennyson Lodge, City centre–£895 p.c.m. Modern 2-bedroom apartment with
    underground parking, fully furnished. Available NOW. Contact us for a full list of property.
    Tel.: 01865 554577, fax: 01865 554578, e-mail: lifestyle-lettings@dial.pipex.com, Web site:
    www.letitbetter.co.uk.

    Central North Oxford, 4 minutes' walk from University Parks, and
    easy walking to University Science Area, libraries and city centre. Charming and spacious
    garden flat in quiet residential street, inc. sitting-room, double bedroom, kitchen with
    washing machine, bathroom with bath and shower, plentiful storage space. Gas c.h. Suit
    single person or couple. No smokers. Available from July. £760 p.c.m. Tel.: 01865
    512138, e-mail: mdy@bioch.ox.ac.uk.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Accommodation Sought

    Visiting American scholar/businessman and family seek comfortable
    (preferably furnished) 3/4 bedroom home in North Oxford/Summertown for Michaelmas
    2001 term (dates flexible). Deposit and excellent references available. Contact:
    deborah.sandler@csls.ox.ac.uk.

    I am looking for a room to rent in north Oxford during the months of
    July–Aug. Please e-mail me at: droryj@mail.biu.ac.il.

    Professional couple (University Professor, Barrister, non-smoking, no
    pets) seek 2-/3-bedroom accommodation in Oxford or environs for Summer 2001. Exchange
    with very large, well-appointed lakeshore apartment in Chicago possible. Calvert-Lee (UK)
    0207 837 3318, (USA) 1-847/475 7410, fax: 1-847/491 7598. Ahuvia Kahane, Department
    of Classics, Northwestern University, 1859 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL. 60209-2200, USA.
    E-mail: aka120@northwestern.edu.

    Two or three-bedroom house wanted to rent starting in
    July–flexible dates (could be Sept.). Wife and daughter of academic are returning from
    extended U.S. sabbatical to start A-level studies for child. Excellent local references. Prefer
    East Oxford/Headington location. E-mail address: aereed1@home.com.

    Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB
    Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise
    in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a
    constant flow of enquiries from good quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If
    you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice
    without obligation, telephone us: 01865 764533, fax us: 764777, or email us:
    info@qbman.co.uk. Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our web site at:
    http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.

    Small family (Scientist at Dunn School of Pathology, wife, General
    Practitioner, and child age 4) seeks 2-3 bedroom house to let in south Oxford or Abingdon,
    for 4-6 months starting 1 June. Contact: e-mail: harder@bii.ch, or Fax: +41 61 605 1364.
    Tel.: (after 23 Apr.) +41 61 605 1323.

    Wanted: the Oxford Chamber Music Festival (Artistic Director Priya
    Mitchell, Administrative Director Dr Duncan Hinnells) needs a large, comfortable house with
    at least 10 bedrooms to accommodate its distinguished international musicians this summer.
    Preferably close to, or in, Oxford. Dates: 27 June–7 July. Please contact Dr Duncan
    Hinnells on 0115 928 4331.

    Non-smoking academic, faculty director for a Study Abroad
    programme at Oxford, seeks to rent a furnished house, near South Oxford, Jericho, or near
    North Oxford (walking distance from the centre), from late Aug., to mid-late Dec. Contact:
    Lirvine@gmu.edu.

    American family coming to Oxford on faculty exchange (2 children,
    ages 7 and 12) would like to sub-let furnished flat in Oxford, preferably North
    Oxford/Summertown or similar, for 4 months, 1 Sept.–31 Dec., 2001. Contact
    Maurice Isserman at: misserma@hamilton.edu, or c/o Dept. of History, Hamilton College,
    Clinton, New York, 13323, USA.

    Mature couple, post-grad., ex-professionals, engaged in D.Phil
    research, require up to 1 year's accommodation in North Oxford, or area, from Aug., when
    college provision ends. No children, non-smoking, 1 elderly car. Willing to house-/pet-
    /garden-sit as part of rent (own property let to pay study-fees!).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Accommodation Offered

    C.S. Lewis' home provides beautiful surroundings: The Kilns in
    Headington features 6 bedrooms furnished with comfortable beds, wardrobes, oriental rugs,
    wing back chairs, and drop-leaf desks. Rates range from £255 to £425 exc. of
    utilities. Available Aug.through June 2002. Contact Gail Ward on 01865 741865 or e-mail:
    GSTANDISHWARD@YAHOO.COM.

    Paying guests, visiting academics, welcomed for short or long stays
    in the warm, comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple in exclusive, quiet, central
    North Oxford, within walking distance of all main university buildings, town centre, parks,
    river, shops and restaurants. All rooms have colour TV, tea-/coffee-making facilities,
    microwave, and refrigerator or refrigerator availability, c.h., and independent heating.
    Breakfast included in the very moderate terms. Tel./Fax: 01865 557879.

    Spacious self-contained loft room in family house, newly converted,
    on Woodstock Road, North Oxford. Central Oxford 1½ miles on frequent bus route.
    Furnished, central heating, own shower, WC, kitchen unit and washing machine. Rent
    £125 p.w. inc. all bills except phone. Suit peaceful, non-smoking woman, animal-
    lover. Available mid-May. Call 01865 511499 eves.

    Finders Keepers specialises in managing your home and investment.
    With our 27 years' experience we assure you of a high level of service from dedicated and
    professional letting and management teams. Many of our landlords have remained with us
    since we opened and are still reaping the benefits of our high standards of property
    management. if you would like details of our services please contact Finders Keepers at 226
    Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: 01865 311011, fax: Oxford 556993,
    email: oxford@finders.co.uk. Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Accommodation Exchange

    Two/three bedroom house on a pond, in Alexandria, Virginia, near
    Washington D.C., available for exchange with a similar residence in North Oxford for the
    academic year commencing with Michaelmas 2001. E-mail: joykundahl@aol.com. Tel.: 001
    703 370 6760.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Summer Lets

    Oxford, Grandpont: 2-bedroom, terrace house, easy walk to centre,
    close to bus stop. Delightful outlook onto park, garden. Bright, well furnished and with all
    appliances, inc. microwave, dishwasher, c.h. Ideal for 1 or 2 visiting academics, non-
    smokers. Available from 12 July–19 Sept. £750 p.m. Tel.: +44 (0) 1865
    721006, e-mail: christopher.haigh@chch.ox.ac.uk.

    To let in August: light and spacious semi-detached house in south
    Oxford. Close to city centre (10 minutes on a bicycle: available). One bedroom, 2 reception
    rooms, kitchen/dining room, bathroom, garden. Fully furnished and equipped. Overlooking
    open country from the back. Frequent bus service. Suitable for 1 or 2 single persons.
    Resident cat to be fed. £120 p.w. for one, £200 p.w. for two. Tel.: 01865
    728111, e-mail: Majaob@aol.com.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Holiday Lets

    France (Tarn et Garonne): renovated farmhouse in over 1 acre with
    pool, surrounded by unspoilt countryside. Sleeps 6 plus 1 bedroom with 5 single beds, 3 km
    from medieval village of Lauzerte, Toulouse airport 1 hour, auto-route from Bordeaux 2
    hours. Available all May and 16–30 June, £500 p.w. Also 14–21 July,
    £750 and 22–29 Sept., £500. Lower rates for long lets over
    autumn/winter. Tel.: 01367 810218 or 01494 864573.

    Holidays in the Baltic States: Individual B & B offered in Vilnius,
    historic capital of Lithuania, and/or country cottage in National Park. Lithuania is still cheap
    ("Vilnius is the new Prague"), and welcoming to visitors. Details on the web:
    www.milda.freeuk.co.uk or e-mail: lumi@lumilinna.co.uk, or phone Gordon on 01865
    246006.

    Aldeburgh, Suffolk: delightful, second-floor apartment with sea-view.
    Close to shops and concerts, self-catering, sleeps 3 (no small children please. Non-smokers).
    Aldeburgh is a quaint seaside town (fresh fish daily!) with strong musical connections and
    International Festivals at nearby Snape Maltings in June and Aug. Pretty, historic villages
    are close by. Day trips to Cambridge, Norfolk, London. Seasonal prices per week: Apr.
    £200; May £250; June £300; July £350; Aug. £350; Sept.
    £350; Oct. £300. All inc. of electricity, gas and taxes. Tel./Fax: 01473 730 737.
    E-mail: yal20@dial.pipex.com. Address: P.O.Box 31, Washbrook, Ipswich, IP8 3HP.

    France: beautiful old farmhouse high above the Sorgues valley in the
    Languedoc/Aveyron hills. Easy drives to the Gorges du Tarn, Millau, Montpellier, Albi.
    Enormous stone-flagged living area with mezzanine. Magnificent kitchen. Huge beams and
    fireplace. Five bedrooms (sleeping up to 11). Utility room. Barn. Roof terrace. Orchard
    garden with hammocks. Stunning views. Glorious walks. River bathing. Riding and tennis.
    Excellent restaurants. Completely unspoilt area. £250–£500 p.w. Tel.:
    01865 244619.

    Vacancies June onwards: why not enjoy marvellous unpolluted air and
    magnificent panoramic views over Assisi in a Casa Colonica; 36 ft lounge, 2-levels with
    archway, large well-equipped kitchen, impressive entrance hall, 2 large double bedrooms,
    spacious bathroom, lots of beams, beautiful garden. Car essential to reach us at 2,000 ft,
    enabling you to visit many other medieval towns, such as Perugia, Gubbio, Spoleto, and
    Lake Trasimeno region. To book tel.: 0039 (0) 75813793, or write, Irving Lamell, `Miracolo
    di S. Franceso', Pieve S. Nicolo 24, Petrata 06081, Assisi P.G., Umbria, Italy. £500
    p.w. (sleeps 4). Deposit £100 (Sat.–Sat.). Our contact no. in England is: 0208
    89911514 or e-mail: ctr@clarezone.co.uk.

    Headington, short bus ride from city centre, comfortable house, to
    sleep 3/4. Low rental on account of lawn to mow and friendly cat to be fed. £750
    p.c.m. Available 1 July–mid-Sept. Tel.: 01865 751295.

    Barga, Tuscany: Garfagnana Valley, close to Carrera mountains and
    easy reach of Lucca, Viareggio, and Florence. Charming 2-bedroom, 2-bath cottage, sleeps
    4. Surrounded by vines and olive trees. Stunning panoramic views. All mod cons in rustic
    traditional setting. No children under 12. For details and photos contact Mrs J. Collett 01672
    516602 (eves), or e-mail: rtc@defconet.demon.co.uk.

    Skopelos, Skiathos and Alonissos. Lovely island house available for
    rent. Town, country and seaside locations, sleeping from 2–8 persons. Prices from
    £50 p.p.p.w. For information see: www.holidayislands.com, e-mail:
    thalpos@otenet.gr, fax: 0030 424 23057.

    SW France: charming, 17th-century farmhouse near Bergerac in quiet
    hamlet, sleeps 6, 2 en suite bathrooms. Well equipped. Huge new non-chlorinated pool, 2
    terraces, bikes, large barn, ping pong, BBQ. Fruit and herbs in garden. Beautiful rolling
    countryside amidst vineyards and woods. Fascinating Bastide towns with weekly markets
    within easy reach. Some weeks available May, June, Sept., Oct. £595 p.w.
    Inexpensive short and long winter lets. Tel.: 01865 553685.

    Northern Portugal: delightful farmhouse with pool set in Port Wine
    vineyards with spectacular views over the River Douro. Sleeps 6–8. Tel.: 01296
    748989, e-mail: paberg@quintadelarosa.com, Website: quintadelarosa.com.

    Cornwall, near Sennen Cove: converted barn, sleeps 4, comfortable,
    with microwave, washing machine, tumble drier, TV, video. Sea view, small garden.
    £150-£300 p.w. Visit www.hayloftcottage.co.uk, or tel.: 01865 557713.

    French Riviera ground-floor, 2-bedroom, end flat, sleeps 4; at Agay
    between St Raphael and Cannes; situated 5 minutes' walk from beach, pool, shops,
    restaurants. South-facing, screened patio, parking alongside, tennis, golf, aquatic sports,
    horse riding nearby. Tel.: 01372 744246.

    Dordogne and Rome holiday rentals: stone house in an acre of garden
    in the Dordogne, France, with a fabulous 270 degree panorama (sleeps 8/10). Also Rome,
    19th-c., country farmhouse with lovely views, 45 minutes' from Rome, and two hours to
    Florence (sleeps 4 with downstairs rooms available to sleep 4 more). Prices vary from
    £250--550 p.w. Private owner. Tel.: 01223 353603 or e-mail: hugobowles@tiscalinet.it
    for details.

    Crete. A traditional Cretan house in old town Rethimno, superbly
    renovated to provide space and comfort in beautifully furnished surroundings. Elevated,
    vine-covered, sitting area with brick barbecue---perfect for alfresco dining. It is in a quiet
    area, and close to long, sandy beach, taverns, shops, and the many interesting sights in and
    around this historic area. Sleeps 4 (1 double, 1 twin). Available all year round. All linen,
    electricity and cleaning inc. 2001 rates on request. Tel./fax: Nikolaos Glinias, 0030 831
    56525, e-mail: nglynias@ret.forthnet.gr.

    Paris studio: charming courtyard studio apartment, period building,
    in the fashionable and very central Marais (Rue St Paul). Quiet, light, well-equipped and
    attractively furnished. £35 per night or £205 per week for members of the
    University. Available from 22 May. throughout the year. Tel.: Oxford 248532.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    House for Sale

    Seventeenth-century thatched cottage in Church Hanborough (6 miles
    from Oxford). Two reception rooms with inglenook fireplaces, 4 bedrooms, kitchen/breakfast
    room, utility room, secluded 30ft garden. Excellent thatch. Village pub with good food.
    Regular bus service. No chain. £220,000. Phone: 020 7970 4522 (daytime), or e-mail:
    howards@centaur.co.uk.
    n

    Return to List of Contents of this section





    Oxford University Gazette: Appointments, 26 April 2001<br />


    Oxford University Gazette: 26 April 2001

    Appointments


    Vacancies within the University of Oxford:

    The University is an equal opportunities employer

    WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY OF
    MEDICINE
    Appointment of Research Assistant

    Note: a complete list of current "http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/ps/gp/">University vacancies is available
    separately.


    Vacancies in Colleges and Halls:

    LINCOLN COLLEGE
    Appointment of Accounts Assistant
    MANSFIELD COLLEGE
    Appointment of Assistant Junior Deans
    NEW COLLEGE
    Harvey McGregor Fellowship and University Lecturership in Law
    ST CROSS COLLEGE
    Hellenic Foundation Visiting Fellowship in Modern Greek Studies
    ST EDMUND HALL
    Official Tutorial Fellowship in English (Medieval and Renaissance Literature)
    ST HILDA'S COLLEGE
    Appointment of Tutorial Secretary
    ST HUGH'S COLLEGE
    Appointment of Assistant Academic Administrator


    Vacancies outside the University of Oxford:

    DEPARTMENT OF APPLIED ECONOMICS
    AND ST
    CATHARINE'S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE
    Appointment of Research Associate and Teaching Fellow in Economics
    CLARE COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE
    Appointment of Bursar
    NEW HALL, CAMBRIDGE
    Appointment of Development Director
    PEMBROKE COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE
    Appointment of Assistant Fund-raiser

    All notices should be sent to the Gazette
    Office, Public Relations Office, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD
    (fax: (2)80522, e-mail: "mailto:gazette@admin.ox.ac.uk">gazette@admin.ox.ac.uk
    ). The deadline is
    5 p.m. on Thursday of the week preceding publication.



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