25 March 1999 - No 4507



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 129, No. 4507: 25 March 1999<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

25 March 1999


The following supplement was published with this
Gazette:



Second Report of the
Joint Working Party on Governance
.

Gazette publication arrangements

This the final Gazette of Hilary Term. Publication for
Trinity Term will begin on 22
April. The usual deadlines will apply.

The next Appointments Supplement will appear with the
Gazette of
29 April.


University Health and
Safety
information


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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 25 March 1999: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

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HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL


1 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts
under
the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. v, cl. 1 (Statutes,
1997, p. 367) has been accorded to the following persons who are
qualified for membership of Congregation:

KERSTI GALLIE BERGE, St Hilda's College

MARTIN ROLF CASTELL, Wolfson College

TIMOTHY IAN MILNES, University College

BANDAR SALMAN, St Antony's College

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2 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been
added
to the Register of Congregation:

Asquith, I.S., MA, Christ Church

Berge, K.G., MA status, St Hilda's

Castell, M.R., MA status, Wolfson

Dovey, M.J., MA, M.Sc., Corpus Christi

Hughes, G.J., MA, Campion Hall

Milnes, T.I., MA status, University

Salman, B., MA status, St Antony's

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CONGREGATION 23 March


Declaration of approval of unopposed
Statute promulgated on 9 March

No notice of opposition having been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor
declared the Statute establishing a Professorship of Molecular
Medicine approved.

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BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect
on
9 April, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 25 March 1999: University<br /> Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 29 March


Degree by Special Resolution

The following special resolution will be deemed to be
approved at noon on 29 March, unless by that time the
Registrar has received notice in writing from two or more
members of Congregation under the provisions of Tit. II,
Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1997, p. 15) that
they wish the resolution to be put to a meeting of
Congregation.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the
following:

BJARKE MAX FRELLESVIG, Hertford College

TABITTA VAN NOUHUYS, Magdalen College

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CONGREGATION 27 April 2 p.m.


Voting on General Resolution
depriving a member of the University of the Degree of
Master of Philosophy

Explanatory note

The Proctors, after conducting a full investigation, have
found that a member of the University, on whom the Degree
of Master of Philosophy has been conferred, used unfair
means in an examination for that degree and have
concluded that the appropriate penalty would be
deprivation of the degree. The member concerned pleaded
guilty to that charge and has decided not to exercise the
right of appeal to the Disciplinary Court, under the
provisions of Title XIII, against the Proctors'
decision.

Council, having considered a confidential report from
the Proctors on the circumstances of the case,
accordingly submits the following general resolution to
Congregation under the provisions of Ch. I, Sect. I,
§ 4 (Statutes, 1997, p. 186), which
empowers Congregation `to deprive any graduate of the
University of his or her degree or degrees for any reason
it thinks fit'. The same legislation goes on to
prescribe: `The procedure for
de-gradation shall be laid down by decree on each
occasion.' If the general resolution is approved,
therefore, Council will make a decree depriving the
member concerned of the degree (that decree, together
with the posting of a notice in the Examination Schools,
constituting the procedure).

In the special circumstances of this case, Council has
adopted the recommendation of the Proctors that the
member should not be named publicly at any stage
throughout the procedure. Any member of Congregation
wishing to read a report by the Proctors on the case may
do so, on personal application to the Proctors' Office,
Wellington Square, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. from now
until Wednesday, 31 March, and from Monday, 12 April,
until Monday, 26 April (all dates inclusive), and between
9 a.m. and 1 p.m. on Tuesday, 27 April, provided that he
or she shall first have:

(a) identified himself or herself as a member
of Congregation; and

(b) undertaken in writing not to divulge any
information to any other person (whether a member of
Congregation or not) which would enable the member of the
University concerned, or any other person referred to in
the Proctors' report (whether by name or not), to be
identified.

Text of General Resolution

That this House:

1 (a) take note of the
Proctors' finding that a member of the University used
unfair means in an examination for the Degree of Master
of Philosophy; and

(b) accept the Proctors' conclusion that the
appropriate penalty in this case would be deprivation of
the degree;

2 therefore agree to deprive the
member concerned of the Degree of Master of Philosophy,
and instruct Council to determine by decree the procedure
for de-gradation to be followed in this case.

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CONGREGATION 11 May 2 p.m.


Voting on General Resolutions
approving the proposals of the Joint Working Party on
Governance

Explanatory note to General Resolutions (1)–(13)

The second report of the Joint Working Party of Council
and the General Board on Governance was published as
Supplement (1) to Gazette No. 4506, 24 March
1999, p. 959. This builds on the principles set out in
the working party's first report (Supplement (1) to
Gazette No. 4487, 21 October 1998, p. 177),
refining the approach in the light of responses to that
document. Council and the General Board have agreed that,
as proposed in para. 71 of the second report, resolutions
should now be put to Congregation seeking its approval
for the key points of principle of the proposed new
governance structure for the University. Council submits
the following general resolutions accordingly.

Members of Congregation are asked to note that the first
meeting to debate these resolutions will be held on the
Tuesday of Third Week of Trinity Full
Term, 11 May. If necessary, the debate
will be continued at the stated meeting on the Tuesday of
Fourth Week, 18 May.

Each resolution, and any amendments proposed by members
of Congregation under the statutory procedures, will be
put separately to the vote at the meeting of
Congregation, and will subsequently be put to a postal
vote in order to give members of Congregation who are
unable to attend on 11 May the opportunity to indicate
their views on each point.

General Resolutions (7) and (8) are alternatives,
General Resolution (7) (the two-division option for the
arts) being the alternative preferred by Council and the
General Board: if only one is approved by a majority in
the postal vote, Council and the Board will pursue the
relevant option; if both are approved by a majority,
Council and the Board will pursue the option which
receives the greater number of votes in its favour.

Council attaches great importance to introducing the new
governance structure of the University, as approved by
Congregation, with effect from the beginning of
Michaelmas Term 2000. Because extensive preparations will
therefore need to be made during the academic year
1999–2000, and some of the necessary new legislation
will be subject to the approval of Her Majesty in Council
(a process which takes many months), once the voting on
the general resolutions is complete, and Congregation's
will is known, Council will place before Congregation as
soon as possible the proposed statutes and decrees
setting up the main bodies of the new governance
structure. In particular, Council hopes that it will be
possible to complete by the end of Trinity Term (i.e. not
later than the meeting of Congregation on 29 June) the
University's proceedings on the `Queen-in-Council'
statute replacing the Hebdomadal Council and the General
Board with the new Council, which is the subject of
General Resolution (1), so that this statute can be
submitted to Her Majesty in Council before the Long
Vacation.

Text of General Resolution (1)

That this House approve the proposal that there should be
a single body (`the Council') to replace the Hebdomadal
Council and the General Board, with the role set out in
section 2.2 of the annexe to the second report of the
Joint Working Party on Governance (`the annexe' and `the
report' respectively).

Text of General Resolution (2)

That this House approve the proposal that the Council
should be composed as set out in section 3.2 of the
annexe.

Text of General Resolution (3)

That this House approve the proposal that the Council
should have four main committees with the roles set out
in sections 2.3–2.6 of the annexe.

Text of General Resolution (4)

That this House approve the proposal that the four main
committees should be composed as set out in sections
3.3–3.6 of the annexe.

Text of General Resolution (5)

That this House approve the proposals for the appointment
of
Pro-Vice-Chancellors with defined special
responsibilities broadly as set out in para. 28 of the
report.

Text of General Resolution (6)

That this House approve the proposal that there should be
three science divisions as set out in sections
5.4–5.6 of the annexe, with delegated powers and
ex officio representation as set out in paras.
38–54 of the report.

Text of General Resolution (7)

That this House approve the proposal that there should be
two arts divisions as set out in sections 5.1 and 5.2 of
the annexe, with delegated powers and ex officio
representation as proposed in paras. 38–54 of the
report.

Text of General Resolution (8)

That this House approve the proposal that there should be
a single arts division as set out in section 5.3 of the
annexe, with delegated powers and ex officio
representation as proposed in paras. 38–54 of the
report.

Text of General Resolution (9)

That this House approve the proposal that the divisions
should operate broadly as set out in sections 7 and 8 of
the annexe.

Text of General Resolution (10)

That this House approve the proposals for the academic
services set out in paras. 59–66 of the report.

Text of General Resolution (11)

That this House approve the proposals for the office of
Vice-Chancellor set out in para. 71 (k) of the
report.

Text of General Resolution (12)

That this House approve the proposals for the composition
and role of Congregation set out in para. 71 (l)
of the report.

Text of General Resolution (13)

That this House approve the proposal that there should be
a review of the operation of the new governance structure
after five years, with the remit and composition set out
in para. 71 (m) of the report.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 25 March 1999: Notices<br />

Notices


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

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BAMPTON LECTURERSHIP 2001

DAVID A.S. FERGUSSON, Professor of Systematic Theology,
University of Aberdeen, has been elected to the Bampton
Lecturership for 2001.

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LABORATORY OF PHYSIOLOGY

On the recommendation of the Physiological Sciences
Board, the
General Board has assigned the Laboratory of Physiology
to PROFESSOR J.C. ELLORY, MA, D.SC., Fellow of Corpus
Christi College and Reader in Human
Physiology, for a period of five years from 1 October
1999.

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CHARLES OLDHAM SHAKESPEARE PRIZE
1999

The Prize has been awarded to WILLIAM E. POOLE, New
College.

Additional prizes have been awarded to VICTORIA MCLEOD-
MOORE, Lady Margaret Hall, AMY NORTON, St Hilda's
College, and ALEXANDRA DAVISON, Christ Church.

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THE YEAR 2000 ISSUE

None of us can have avoided all the warnings being given
about problems that may occur when the year changes from
1999 to 2000. Such warnings should not just have been
received through the media but also from one's head of
department or house, and also from the team your unit has
working on this issue.

The University has been assisting unit Year 2000
co-ordinators in a formal way for more than a year
through mailing-lists and periodic meetings where the
various issues and concerns have been aired. Information
about the issue is available on the Web at
http://www.ox.ac.uk/year2000/.

The aim of the compliance project is that heads of
department should be able to sign a certificate of
compliance at the end of March 1999. Details of this will
be sent to heads of department very shortly. To assist in
the preparation of this, a questionnaire was sent to all
departments—not colleges—at the beginning of
this year asking them to say in detail how they were
achieving compliance and to advise the central
administration of any difficulties they were having.

Recently, a Statement of Readiness was published
(http://www.ox.ac.uk/year2000/readiness.html) giving
general information to those outside the University; this
says:
The University of Oxford has established a Working Group
which is charged with co-ordinating Year 2000 readiness.
The University is a signatory of the government-endorsed
Pledge 2000
(http://business.bug2000.co.uk/problem/pledge_index.shtml), and
is committed to identifying and dealing
effectively with Year 2000 issues in the University. The
University is actively pursuing a programme which aims to
achieve Year 2000 compliance throughout the University.
However the potential impact of the Year 2000 issue
differs between individual departments of the University,
and completion of the University's compliance programme
will be achieved at varying rates by individual
departments. Oxford University Press has issued its own
statement of readiness (http://www.oup.co.uk/E-P/y2k/).
Colleges of the University are corporate bodies in their
own right, and as such they are responsible for achieving
their own compliance. The University uses the definition
of Year 2000 compliance which is described in BSI DISC PD
2000--1:1998 (http://www.bsi.org.uk/disc/2000.html).

Any member of the University who has any queries
about the University's work on the Year 2000 issue should
contact Charles Curran (e-mail: y2k@ox.ac.uk, telephone:
(2)70063).

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EASTER VACATION ARRANGEMENTS


University Offices

The University Offices will be closed for normal business
from 1 April to 11 April inclusive.

The offices will also be closed on 3 May and 31 May.



Sheldonian Theatre

The Sheldonian Theatre will be closed for normal business
from 1 April to 11 April inclusive.



University Counselling Service

The hours of the Counselling Service will be as follows
during the Easter Vacation:

Monday, 29 March–Wednesday, 31 March
inclusive
: open 9.30 a.m.–1.30 p.m.

Thursday, 1 April–Friday, 9 April
inclusive
: closed.

Monday, 12 April–Friday, 16 April
inclusive
: open 9.30 a.m.–1.30 p.m.

From Monday, 18 April, usual hours: open
9.15 a.m.–5.15 p.m.



Gazette publication
arrangements

This is the final Gazette of the present
term. Publication for Trinity Term will begin on 22
April.

The next Appointments Supplement will appear with the
Gazette of 29 April.

The usual deadlines will apply.

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LANGUAGE CENTRE


Intensive weekend language
courses, Trinity Term

The Language Centre will be running weekend language
courses in Trinity Term 1999. Each course will consist of
eight hours of tuition with an emphasis on speaking and
listening to the language, running from 9 a.m. to 1.30
p.m., with a half-hour break, on both Saturday and
Sunday. Some of the material to be studied will be taken
from Satellite TV, radio broadcasts, and newspaper
articles. The maximum number of participants per group
will be fifteen. A fee of £26 will be charged to
junior members of the University and other full-time
students, £34 to members of Congregation and members
of staff, and £45 to non-members.

German

Teaching hours: Saturday, 22 May, 9 a.m.–1.30 p.m.
(end of week four), and Sunday, 23 May, 9 a.m.–1.30
p.m. Classes at the following levels: absolute beginners,
intermediate.

Italian

Teaching hours: Saturday, 22 May, 9 a.m.–1.30 p.m.
(end of week four), and Sunday, 23 May, 9 a.m.–1.30
p.m. Classes at the following levels: absolute beginners,
lower intermediate.

French

Teaching hours: Saturday, 5 June, 9 a.m.–1.30 p.m.
(end of week six), and Sunday, 6 June, 9 a.m.–1.30
p.m. Classes at the following levels: near/false
beginners, lower intermediate, upper intermediate.

Spanish

Teaching hours: Saturday, 5 June, 9 a.m.–1.30 p.m.
(end of week six), and Sunday, 6 June, 9 a.m.–1.30
p.m. Classes at the following levels: absolute beginners,
lower intermediate.

Any member of the University who wishes to receive
further details and a booking form for these courses
should contact Angela Pinkney, Language Centre, 12
Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6HT (telephone: (2)83360,
e-mail: admin@lang.ox.ac.uk).

An application form is also downloadable from the
Language Centre's World Wide Web pages:
http://info.ox.ac.uk/departments/langcentre/courses/weeke
nd_courses/.

The Language Centre, 12 Woodstock Road, Oxford
OX2 6HT (telephone: Oxford (2)83360, fax: (2)83366, e-
mail: admin@lang.ox.ac.uk, Internet:
http://units.ox.ac.uk/departments/langcentre).

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FACULTY OF MUSIC


Concerts

New Music Weekend, 23–4 April

OXFORD PHILOMUSICA WINDS, with Olga Balakleets, piano, will
perform works by Schumann, Harvey, Crosse, and Mozart (K.452),
at 8 p.m. on Friday, 23 April, in the Holywell Music Room.
Tickets are available from the Oxford Playhouse (telephone:
Oxford 798600) or at the door. Full-price tickets cost
£10; details of available concessions may be obtained from
the Oxford Playhouse.

TRIO FIBONACCI (Quebec) will perform new music by the following
British and Canadian composers at 8 p.m. on Saturday, 24 April,
in the Holywell Music Room: Harvey, Lesage, Sokolovic, Barrett,
Oesterle, and Finnissy. Tickets, costing £8 (concessions
£6/£4) are available from the Oxford Playhouse
(telephone: Oxford 798600) or at the door.


Spring Music Weekend, 14–15 May

OXFORD PHILOMUSICA STRINGS, with Marios Papadopoulos, piano,
will perform works by Vaughan Williams, Benjamin, Sakalis, and
Dvorák (`Dumky Trio') at 8 p.m. on Friday, 14 May, in
the Holywell Music Room. Tickets are available from the Oxford
Playhouse (telephone: Oxford 798600) or at the door. Full-price
tickets cost £10; details of available concessions may be
obtained from the Oxford Playhouse.

A Music Faculty Alumni Club reception will be held at 11 a.m.
on Saturday, 15 May, in Wadham College.

The Joan Conway Scholarship winners, 1998–9, will perform
works by Schubert, Liszt, Finzi, Messiaen, and Takemitsu, at 12
noon on Saturday, 15 May, in the Holywell Music Room. This
concert is free and open to the public.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 25 March 1999: Lectures<br />

Lectures


Contents of this section:

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INAUGURAL LECTURES


Professor of Numerical Analysis

PROFESSOR L.N. TREFETHEN will deliver his inaugural
lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 26 April, in the Examination
Schools. The Vice-Chancellor will be present.

Subject: `Scientific computing: the finite,
the infinite, and the future.'

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Harold Vyvyan Harmsworth
Professor of American History

PROFESSOR A. BRINKLEY will deliver his inaugural lecture
at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 18 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Imagining the twentieth century:
perspectives from two fins-de-siècle.'

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J.R.R. Tolkien Professor of
English Literature and Language

PROFESSOR P. STROHM will deliver his inaugural lecture at
5 p.m. on Thursday, 13 May, in Lecture Theatre 2, the St
Cross Building.

Subject: `Chaucer's Troilus
as temporal archive.'

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Drue Heinz Professor of American
Literature

PROFESSOR R. BUSH will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5
p.m. on Thursday, 27 May, in Lecture Theatre 2, the St
Cross Building.

Subject: `American voice/American
voices.'

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CHERWELL-SIMON MEMORIAL LECTURE
1999

PROFESSOR CARL E. WIEMAN, University of Colorado, will
deliver the Cherwell-Simon Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on
Friday, 11 June, in Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology
Building, South Parks Road.

Subject: `Bose–Einstein
condensation: revealing the quantum world using ultra-low
temperatures.'

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HALLEY LECTURE 1999

PROFESSOR ROBERT E. WILLIAMS, Distinguished Research
Scholar, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore,
Maryland, will deliver the Halley Lecture at 5 p.m. on
Tuesday, 18 May, in Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology
Building, South Parks Road.

Subject: `Probing the universe with the
Hubble Space Telescope.'

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CYRIL FOSTER LECTURE 1999

PROFESSOR G. BEST will deliver the Cyril Foster Lecture
at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 29 April, in the Examination
Schools.

Subject: `Peace conferences and the century
of total war: the 1899 Hague Conference and what came
after.'

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O'DONNELL LECTURE 1999

DR PRYS MORGAN, Reader in History, University of Wales,
Swansea, will deliver the O'Donnell Lecture at 5 p.m. on
Thursday, 6 May, in the Hall, the Taylor Institution.

Subject: ` "Among our Ancient Mountains
..." (the appreciation of Welsh mountainscape in the
eighteenth and nineteenth centuries).'

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JAMES P.R. LYELL LECTURES IN
BIBLIOGRAPHY

PROFESSOR M.B. PARKES, James P.R. Lyell Reader in
Bibliography 1998--9, will deliver the Lyell Lectures at
5 p.m. on Tuesdays in Trinity Term in Lecture Theatre 2,
the St Cross Building.

4 May: `Which came first, the reader or the
scribe? (The function and the processes of
handwriting).'

11 May: `The hasty scribe (cursive
handwriting in antiquity and the Middle Ages).'

18 May: `Set in their own ways (scribes and
bookhands c.800--1200).'

25 May: `Features of fashion (scribes and
style c. 1200--1500).'

1 June: `In the eyes of scribes and readers
(handwriting as image).'

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RICHARD HILLARY MEMORIAL
LECTURE 1999

SEBASTIAN FAULKS will deliver the Richard Hillary
Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 12 May, in the
Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `Something happened: how
narrative helps tell the time.'

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D.M. MCKENZIE LECTURE

PROFESSOR L. RAINEY will deliver the fourth annual D.M.
McKenzie Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 26 May, in
Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `The cultural economy of
modernism.'

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MYRES MEMORIAL LECTURE

DR O. RACKHAM, Cambridge, will deliver the Myres Memorial
Lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 10 May, in the McGregor-
Matthews Room, New College.

Subject: `Trees and timber in Greek
history.'

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TIMES LECTURE

PHILIP HOWARD will deliver the Times Lecture
at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 28 April, in Lecture Theatre 2,
the St Cross Building.

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CLARENDON LECTURES IN ECONOMICS
1999

Strategic asset allocation: portfolio choice for
long-term investors

PROFESSOR J.Y. CAMPBELL, Harvard University, will deliver
the Clarendon Lectures in Economics at 5 p.m. on the
following days in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the
Institute of Economics and Statistics, the St Cross
Building.

Tue. 4 May: `Who should buy long-term
bonds?'

Wed. 5 May: `Is the stock market safer for
long-term investors?'

Thur. 6 May: `Investing for retirement.'

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CLARENDON LECTURES IN
MANAGEMENT STUDIES 1999

The determinants of corporate governance

PROFESSOR M. ROE, Milton Hawler Professor of Business
Regulation, University of Columbia School of Law, will
deliver the Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies at 5
p.m. on Monday, 10 May, Tuesday, 11 May, and Wednesday,
12 May, in the Examination Schools. The lectures will be
open to the public, and admission is free.

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SIR ISAIAH BERLIN LECTURES IN
THE HISTORY OF IDEAS

The ideals and practice of scientific objectivity

PROFESSOR L. DASTON, Max Planck Institute for the History
of Science, Berlin, Sir Isaiah Berlin Visiting Professor
in the History of Ideas 1998–9, will lecture at 5
p.m. on the days shown in the St Cross Building.

Tue. 27 Apr.: `Can objectivity have a history?'

Thur. 29 Apr.: `Objectivity versus
truth.'

Thur. 20 May: `A short history of the
fact.'

Tue. 25 May: `Art and science opposed.'

Thur. 27 May: `Objectivity among the
historians.'

Tue. 15 June: `Objectivity and the cosmic
community.'

Professor Daston will be available to meet students at
the following times, in Corpus Christi College:
Wednesday, 28 April, 9–11 a.m.; Friday, 21 May, 11
a.m.–1 p.m.; Wednesday, 26 May, 11 a.m.–1 p.m.;
Wednesday, 16 June, 9–11 a.m.

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SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES ANNUAL
LECTURE

PROFESSOR L. ROSEN, Professor of Anthropology, Princeton
University, will deliver the fifth Annual Lecture in
Socio-Legal Studies at 5.30 p.m. on Friday, 14 May, in
the Examination Schools. The lecture will be followed by
a reception at 6.30 p.m.

Subject: `Defending culture: the cultural
defence plea and judicial uses of the concept of
culture.'

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HUSSEY LECTURES ON THE CHURCH
AND THE ARTS 1999

JOHN TAVENER, composer, will deliver the Hussey annual
lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 11 May, in the Examination
Schools.

Subject: `Hymn of entry.'

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ANTHROPOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY

School of Geography: centenary lectures

The following lectures will be given on Fridays in the
School of Geography, as part of the celebration of the
School's centenary in 1999. With the exception of the
lectures on 7 May, all will begin at 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR A. GOUDIE

30 Apr.: `The geomorphology of the
Oxford region.'

SIR JOHN HOUGHTON

7 May, 2.15 p.m.: `Global climatic
change' (Discussant: Dr R.
Washington).

PROFESSOR A. SCOTT

7 May, 3.45 p.m.: `Global economic
change' (Discussant: Dr E.
Swyngedouw).

DR J. LANGTON

14 May: `The changing geography of poor
relief in rural Oxfordshire: 1772–1834.'

DR H. VILES

21 May: `Traffic, air pollution, and
Oxford's cultural heritage.'

DR M. MORECROFT

28 May: `Wytham Woods: the world's most
studied woods in a century of global change.'

J. ASHDOWN, Oxford City Conservation Officer

4 June: `A celebration of change in the
historic city of Oxford.'

DR J. RYAN and DR D. RYAN

11 June: `Performing place: the Oxford
Pageant of 1907.'

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CLINICAL MEDICINE

Oxford Clinical Neurosciences Lectures

The following lectures will be given at 11.30 a.m. on
Fridays in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe
Infirmary.

DR A. BRONSTEIN, Institute of Neurology

23 Apr.: `The assessment of nystagmus
oscillopsia.'

DR M. BRADA, Royal Marsden Hospital

11 June: `What's new in the treatment of malignant
brain tumours.'

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section



MODERN HISTORY

New approaches to the history of the Second World War

The following seminars, which are open to all, will be
held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the Council Room,
Mansfield College.

Conveners: Dr Ashley Jackson, Mansfield
College, and Mr Paul Collier, Wadham College, in
co-operation with Professor R.J. O'Neill.

DR JACKSON

29 Apr.: `Pioneers, mutineers, and
bombardiers: the colonial empire at war.'

PROFESSOR A. CAPET, Rouen

6 May: `Writing a comprehensive
bibliography of Britain and the Second World War: an
impossible task?'

A. KRYLOVA, Johns Hopkins

13 May: ` "Healing wounded
souls": Soviety identity, gender, and the trauma
of the Great Patriotic War.'

A. HILL, Cambridge

20 May: `German rule and Russian
resistance on the German occupied territories of
Russia in Western, Soviet, and post-Soviet historical
writing.'

DR D. O'SULLIVAN, Catholic University of Eichstaett

27 May: `Framing the mind: information
and perception during the Second World War.'

DR K. FEDOROWICH, University of the West of England, and
DR R. MOORE, Sheffield

3 June: `New approaches to
prisoner-of-war (POW) history.'

J. KIRAS, Hull

10 June: ` "By all possible
means"? The implications of the creation and use
of Special Operations Forces in the Second World
War.'

MR COLLIER

17 June: ` "Planes, trains, and
automobiles": logistics and the Afrika Korps.'

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section



MUSIC

The Composer Speaks

The following composers will lecture at 5 p.m. on the
days shown in the Holywell Music Room. The lectures are
free and open to the public.

Fri. 23 Apr.: JONATHAN HARVEY.

Fri. 14 May: GEORGE BENJAMIN (with a live
performance of his duo Viola, Viola by
Ralph Ehlers and Catherine Manson).

Wed. 19 May: ROBERT SHERLAW JOHNSON.

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section



SOCIAL STUDIES

Political philosophy

The following seminars will be given on Tuesdays. With
the exception of the 25 May meeting, they will be held at
5 p.m. in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

The 25 May meeting will be held at 8.30 p.m. in Harris
Manchester College. Those wishing to attend are asked to
note that seating will be limited.

Conveners: Professor G.A. Cohen, Dr C. Fabre,
and Mr T. Davidson.

M. OTSUKA, London

27 Apr.: `Political society as a
voluntary association.' (Paper available from
the Social Studies library, and should be read prior
to the seminar
)

D. MILLER

4 May: `National self-determination and
global justice.'

A. KELLY, Cambridge

11 May: `What is history? Herzen
v. Turgenev.'

K. GRAHAM, Bristol

18 May: `Collective identification.'

A. SEN, Cambridge

25 May: `Rights, duties, and
consequences.'

B. WILLIAMS

1 June: to be announced.

A. WILLIAMS, Warwick

8 June: `Egalitarian justice and
personal responsibility.'

PROFESSOR COHEN

15 June: `Against constructivism.'

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section



BODLEIAN LIBRARY


Oxford Seminars in Cartography

ROSE MITCHELL, Public Record Office, will give a seminar
at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 6 May, in the School of
Geography.

Subject: `Contention the mother of invention:
early maps of England in the Public Record Office.'

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section



OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC
STUDIES

History, culture, and politics of the Islamic world;
Islamic art and architecture

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on
Wednesdays in the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies.

Conveners: Dr F.A. Nizami and Dr J.
Piscatori.

DR A. MOUSTAFA

28 Apr.: `The science of Arabic
calligraphy.'

A. DUNCAN, World of Islam Trust

5 May: `The noble sanctuary: a
photographic appreciation of Haram al-Sharif in
Jerusalem.'

PROFESSOR A. SCHIMMEL, Harvard

12 May: `The importance of Arabic
calligraphy for Islamic culture.'

DR R. KANA'AN

19 May: `Carved in stone: Waqf
architecture and the formation of power in Ottoman
Bilad al-Sham.'

DR E. ATIL, Smithsonian Institute, Washington

2 June: `Levhi and the surname: the
story of an eighteenth-century Ottoman festival.'

DR P. DONCEEL-VOÛTE, Louvain

9 June: `The Umayyad Palace of Jericho:
the wealth and arts of Khirbet al-Mafjar.'

DR K. AZZAM, Prince of Wales Institute of Architecture

16 June: `Sacred principles of Islamic
art.'

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section



QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE


Centre for Cross-Cultural
Research on Women

Audrey Richards Commemorative Lecture 1999

DR M. LEACH, Institute of Development Studies, University
of Sussex, will deliver the Audrey Richards Commemorative
Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 28 April, in the Taylor
Institution.

Further details may be obtained from the Centre
(telephone: Oxford (2)73644, fax: (2)73607, e-mail:
ccrw@qeh.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `New shapes to shift: war, parks,
and the hunting persona in modern West Africa.'

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section



BRASENOSE COLLEGE


Tanner Lectures on Human Values
1999

Representation: democratic theory and social surveys

PROFESSOR S. VERBA, Department of Government, Harvard
University, will deliver the Tanner Lectures at 5 p.m. on
the following days in the Examination Schools.

Mon. 10 May: : `Social theory and social
science: two cultures?'

Tue. 11 May: `Citizens in democracies
and democratic citizens.'

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section



CHRIST CHURCH

Prophetic Ruskin

This centenary conference on Ruskin's legacy to the arts,
society, and the environment, sponsored by the Pilkington
Foundation, will be held between 6 April and 9 April 2000
in Christ Church. The programme includes lectures by
distinguished speakers, a Ruskin Gaudy, Matins in Christ
Church Cathedral, and a visit to the exhibition `Ruskin,
Turner, and Pre-Raphaelites' at the Tate Gallery.

The fee, including accommodation in college, is
£295. Enquiries should be addressed to Ms Jane
Martin, Pilkington Foundation, Yelvertoft Manor,
Northampthonshire NN6 6LF.

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section



EXETER COLLEGE


Marett Memorial Lecture 1999

PROFESSOR M. GOODMAN will deliver the Marett Memorial
Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 30 April, in the
Saskatchewan Lecture Room, Exeter College.

Subject: `Explaining religious change.'

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section



MAGDALEN COLLEGE


Waynflete Lectures

Seminal events in the evolutionary history of plants

PROFESSOR N. FRIEDMAN, University of Colorado, Boulder,
Colorado, USA, will deliver the Waynflete Lectures at 5
p.m. on Wednesdays in the Grove Auditorium, Magdalen
College.

28 Apr.: `The study of evolutionary
history: insights from Queen Victoria.'

5 May: `The origin of photosynthesis and how
Earth turned green.'

12 May: `The colonisation of land and the
origin of organismic complexity.'

19 May: `The origin of flowering plants: an
examination of Darwin's "abominable
mystery".'

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section



ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

Empire, race, and culture

The following seminars, sponsored by the African Studies
Seminar of St Antony's College, and the Humanities
Research Centre, Oxford Brookes University, will be held
at 5 p.m. (unless indicated otherwise) on Wednesdays. The
first two meetings will be held in the Humanities
Research Centre, Oxford Brookes University; the remaining
meetings will be held in the Nissan Lecture Theatre, St
Antony's College.

Conveners: W. Beinart, A. Jackson, D. Lowry,
and J. Ryan.

A. JACKSON

28 Apr., 8 p.m.: `Race and empire:
colonial troops in an imperial army.'

K. FLINT

5 May: `Images of Native Americans in
British literature.'

E. BOEHMER, Leeds

12 May: `Anthologising colonial
literature.'

N. LEYS STEPAN, Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine

19 May: `Images of disease in early
twentieth-century Brazil.'

M. CHAMBERLAIN, Oxford Brookes

26 May: `Narratives of Caribbean
migration.'

J. RYAN

2 June: `Exposing darkness: photography,
missionary activity, and the Congo Free State.'

E. EDWARDS

9 June: `Professor Huxley and the
Colonial Office: photography and the races of the
empire.'

H. CALLAWAY

16 June: `Institutional racism? Flora
Shaw's journalism promoting the Empire.'

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section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 25 March 1999: Grants and Funding<br />

Grants and Research Funding


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



FISHMONGERS' COMPANY


Mark Quested Exhibition

The Vice-Chancellor has received notice that the Fishmongers'
Company will shortly proceed to the election of a Mark Quested
Exhibitioner.

The value of the exhibition is £1,000 per annum, payable
half-yearly in advance, and is held by a graduate of the
University of Oxford in need and deserving of financial
assistance, who shall on 1 October 1999 be not more than thirty
years of age, and shall during the tenure thereof be bona fide
and diligently engaged either in the University or elsewhere in
a course of study or research approved of in writing by the Vice-
Chancellor.

The exhibition is available from 1 October 1999 and will be
awarded for a period of three years.

The exhibitioner will, on appointment, receive a half-yearly
payment in advance, but in order to be entitled to any subsequent
payment, the Clerk of the Company must receive written
confirmation from the Vice-Chancellor, or from someone nominated
by the Vice-Chancellor, that during the preceding six months the
exhibitioner has been bona fide and diligently engaged in a
course of study or research approved of by the Vice-Chancellor,
and that his/her conduct has been satisfactory.

If no such confirmation is forthcoming, or if the exhibitioner
is, in the judgement of the company, guilty of serious misconduct
or idleness, or wilfully ceases the course of study, the company
may withdraw the exhibition, and for this purpose may act on the
report of the Vice-Chancellor, or on such other evidence as the
company believes sufficient.

All applications must be accompanied by proof of the following
(photocopies only at this stage): that the applicant is a
graduate of the University; that the applicant is in need and
deserving of financial assistance; that the applicant is not over
thirty years of age; plus a testimonial as to good character and
conduct, satisfactory to the Vice-Chancellor.

Each applicant should include a statement about the proposed
course of study or research he/she would undertake if elected to
the exhibition.

Applications and accompanying documents must be received by the
Vice-Chancellor, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford
OX1 2JD, no later than Friday, 30 April.

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section



PETER LIENHARDT MEMORIAL FUND AND PHILIP
BAGBY BEQUEST

The Board of Management for these funds is considering making
small grants to applicants in the following categories: students
registered for degrees at the Institute of Social and Cultural
Anthropology who need funds for research purposes; and, from the
Peter Lienhardt Memorial Fund only, other individuals working in
the field of social anthropology who wish to carry out some
particular project within the University. The terms of reference
of the Philip Bagby Bequest specify that grants from that fund
must encourage the comparative study of the development of urban,
literate cultures in accordance with anthropological principles
and methods. Application forms may be obtained from Mrs Alix
Slater, the Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE, and
completed forms should be returned to her no later than 4 May.

Applicants are advised that the Board of Management is
unlikely to be able to meet commitments requiring expenditure
before August 1999.

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section





<br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 25 March 1999: Examinations and Boards<br />

Examinations and Boards


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



CHAIRMEN OF EXAMINERS

TRINITY TERM 1999

Honour Moderations

Archaeology and Anthropology: PROFESSOR W.R. JAMES,
B.LITT., MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Cross (address: Institute of
Social and Cultural Anthropology)

Honour School

Experimental Psychology: DR R.M.A. MARTIN, MA,
D.PHIL., Fellow of St Edmund Hall

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section


Master of Philosophy

Classical Archaeology: DR D.C. KURTZ, MA, D.PHIL.,
Fellow of Wolfson (address: Ashmolean Museum)

Qualifying Examination in Classical Archaeology: DR
D.C. KURTZ, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Wolfson (address: Ashmolean
Museum)

Qualifying Examination in International Relations:
PROFESSOR S.N. MACFARLANE, MA, M.PHIL., D.PHIL., Fellow of St
Anne's (address: Department of Social Studies)

Qualifying Examination in Islamic Art and
Archaeology
: DR J.A.J. RABY, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St
Hugh's (address: Oriental Institute)

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section


Master of Science

Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management:
DR O.R. DARBISHIRE, MA, Fellow of Pembroke

Public Policy in Latin America: MRS T.R. THORP, MA,
Fellow of St Antony's (address: Latin American Centre)

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section


Master of Studies

Chinese Studies: DR S.J. VAINKER, MA status, St
Hugh's (address: Ashmolean Museum)

Classical Archaeology: DR D.C. KURTZ, MA, D.PHIL.,
Fellow of Wolfson (address: Ashmolean Museum)

Islamic Art and Archaeology: DR J.A.J. RABY, MA,
D.PHIL., Fellow of St Hugh's (address: Oriental Institute)

Islamic Art and Archaeology (Research Methods and
Techniques)
: DR J.A.J. RABY, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St
Hugh's (address: Oriental Institute)

Theology: PROFESSOR J.S.K. WARD, B.LITT., MA, Canon
of Christ Church

Theology (Research): PROFESSOR D.N.J. MACCULLOCH,
MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Cross (address: Theology Faculty)

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section


Qualifying Examination in Medical Sociology for Medical
Students

PROFESSOR R.M. FITZPATRICK, MA, Fellow of Nuffield

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section



BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF BIOLOGICAL
SCIENCES: SUB-FACULTY OF BIOLOGY


Honour School of Natural Science:
Biological Sciences 2000

Under the terms of the regulations for the above examination
(Examination Decrees, 1998, pp. 408–10) the
Sub-faculty of Biology has approved the following topics for
extended essays in Part A of the Honour School examinations for
2000.

Animal Biology

1. Discuss the influence that Niko Tinbergen, Konrad Lorenz,
and Karl von Frisch have had on the study of animal behaviour.

2. How does the reproductive strategy of an animal reflect its
phylogeny and ecology?

3. How do the cellular properties of nerve cells influence the
behaviour of neural circuits?

4. Discuss how the locomotory systems of animals have been
shaped by physical constraints.

5. Many animals are faced with the problem of achieving their
requirements for multiple nutrients in a variable and complex
nutritional environment. How do they do it?

Plant and Microbial Ecology

1. Discuss why flowering plants have such flexible
reproductive strategies.

2. Discuss the potentials and problems of genetically
engineered crops.

3. Interpret the microscopic and molecular structure of the
fungal hypha in relation to nutrient acquisition.

4. Discuss the central role of sucrose in plant metabolism.

5. Why don't plants get cancer?

Environmental Biology

1. Discuss the contention that invasions by exotic plants or
animals present the single greatest threat to biological
diversity.

2. Discuss the theory and practice of marine conservation.

3. Describe the causes of habitat fragmentation, its
consequences both for plant and animal populations and for
ecosystem structure and function.

4. Review the concepts of density dependent, density
vague
, and density independent growth. What
do they imply about the population dynamics one would observe in
the field? Describe the observations or experiments that you
would make in order to determine which type of growth was being
exhibited.

5. To what extent should conservation priorities in the UK be
based on ecological criteria?

Cell and Developmental Biology

1. Discuss the use of drugs in cell biology.

2. What determines cell shape and size?

3. Compare the cellular functions of adenine and guanine
nucleotides.

4. What mechanisms do cells employ to control the accumulation
of proteins in a cell-type and developmentally appropriate
manner?

5. Given that all cells experience a high rate of mutation in
each cell cycle, evaluate the relative importance of the
different mechanisms which reduce the effect of these mutations
on the phenotype of the organism.

Biology of Animal and Plant Disease

1. Explain the features of the vertebrate immune system that
may be exploited for the development of vaccines.

2. How can a knowledge of host and parasite genetics help in
attempts to control disease in plants and animals@

3. What are the problems in applying vector-borne disease
models in field situations?

4. What characteristics of parasites make them an especial
threat to host populations?

5. What is the molecular basis of resistance and immunity to
disease in plants?

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section



CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in
regulations made by boards of faculties will come into effect on
9 April.


1 Board of the Faculty of Biological
Sciences

Honour School of Natural Science (Biological Sciences)

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 409, add after
`envelope.' in l. 43 `Extended essays previously submitted for
the Honour School of Natural Science (Biological Sciences ) may
be resubmitted.'

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section



2 Board of the Faculty of Law

(a) Honour School of Jurisprudence

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in
2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p.
237, ll. 24, 26, 28, 30, and 32 delete `14' and substitute `13'
and delete `22' and substitute `21'.

2 Ibid., p. 238, delete ll. 3–4 and
renumber subsequent
papers 13–22 as 12–21.

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section


(b) Magister Juris

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p.
903, delete ll. 3–4 and renumber subsequent
(c)–(e) as (b)–(d).

2 Ibid., p. 906, delete l. 11.

3 Ibid., p. 911, delete l. 21, and renumber
subsequent cll. 17–21 as 16–20.

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section


(c) Diploma in Legal Studies

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in
2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 949, l. 11, delete
`, and paper 12, Philosophy of Mind'.

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section



3 Board of the Faculty of Literae
Humaniores

(a) Honour Moderations in Classics

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 31, l. 37, delete
`The Elements of Deductive Logic', and substitute `Introduction
to Logic'.

(b) Honour School of Literae
Humaniores

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 265, l. 32, after
`exceeded' insert `, except that, in the case of a commentary on
a text and at the discretion of the chairman of examiners, any
substantial quoting of that text need not be included in the word
limit'.

(c) Regulations for Philosophy in all Honour Schools
involving Philosophy

(i) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first
examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p.
459, l. 26, after `show' insert `adequate'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 28–36 and
substitute:

`102. Knowledge and Reality

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge in some of the
following areas: knowledge and justification; perception; memory;
induction; other minds; a priori know-
ledge; necessity and possibility; reference; truth; facts and
propositions; definition; existence; identity, including personal
identity; substances, change, events; properties; causation;
space; time; essence; natural kinds; realism and idealism;
primary and secondary qualities. There will also be a section on
Philosophy of Science. Candidates' answers must not be confined
to questions from the section on Philosophy of Science.'

3 Ibid., p. 460, delete ll. 10–12 and
substitute:

`Part A: The nature of theories; scientific observation and
method; scientific explanation; the interpretation of laws and
probability; rationality and scientific change; major schools of
philosophy of science.'

4 Ibid., p. 461, l. 16 and l. 27, after
`show' insert `adequate'.

5 Ibid., p. 462, l. 4, after `show' insert
`adequate'.

6 Ibid., p. 463, after l. 28 insert:

`198. Special Subjects

From time to time special subjects may be approved by the
Sub-faculty of Philosophy by regulations published in the
University Gazette and communicated to college
tutors by the end of the fifth week of Trinity Term two years
before examination. Candidates may not be permitted to offer
certain special subjects in combination with certain other
subjects, or may be permitted to do so only on condition that in
the papers on the other subjects they will not be permitted to
answer certain questions. No candidate may offer more than one
special subject. Subject to these qualifications, any candidate
may offer any special subject.'

(ii) With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p.
464, l. 20, after `excess' insert `, except that in Literae
Humaniories, in a thesis consisting in commentary on a text,
quotation from the text will not be counted towards the the word
limit.'

2 Ibid., delete from `Any' in l. 23 to
`label.' in l. 25.

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section



4 Boards of the Faculties of Literae
Humaniores and Mathematical Sciences

Honour Moderations in Mathematics and Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p.
50, delete ll. 32–9 and substitute:

`Subjects to be studied include: propositional and predicate
languages; truth tables; tableaux; relations; the critical
application of formal logic to the analysis of English sentences
and inferences (problems of symbolisation; scope,
truth-functionality, quantification, identity, descriptions);
elementary metatheorems about propositional calculus (including
the following topics; expressive adequacy, duality, substitution,
interpolation, compactness, consistency, soundness and
completeness). Some questions of a mathematical nature will be
set.

The logical symbols and tableaux rules to be used are those
found in Wilfred Hodges, Logic (Penguin Books). Philosophical
questions about logic may be studied by reading Mark Sainsbury,
Logical Forms: an Introduction to Philosophical Logic
(Blackwell), chapters 1, 2, and 4, omitting the starred
sections.'

2 Ibid., ll. 42–3, delete `B. Russell,
Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy, Allen and Unwin, 1919'
and substitute `Frege, Foundations of Arithmetic, trans. J.L.
Austin, Blackwell, 1980'.

3 Ibid., p. 51, l. 4 after `show' insert
`adequate'.

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section



5 Boards of the Faculties of Literae
Humaniores and Medieval and Modern Languages

(a) Preliminary Examination in Philosophy and Modern
Languages

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

As for Preliminary Examination for Philosophy, Politics, and
Economics (see 18 below).

(b) Honour School of Philosophy and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in
2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p.
465, l. 49, delete `subject 101' and substitute `either subject
101 or subject 102'.

2 Ibid., p. 471, l. 15, delete `101' and
substitute `either 101 or 102'.

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section



6 Boards of the Faculties of Literae
Humaniores and Physical Sciences

Moderations in Physics and Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

As for Honour Moderations in Mathematics and Philosophy (see 4
above).

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section



7 Boards of the Faculties of Literae
Humaniores and Social Studies

Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in
2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p.
466, ll. 19–20 delete `subject 103' and substitute
`(i) either subject 101 or subject 102, and (ii) subject
103'.

2 Ibid., ll. 22–3, delete `subject 101
and subject 103' and substitute `(i) either subject 101
or subject 102, and (ii)
subject 103'.

3 Ibid., ll. 25–6, delete `subject 101
and subject 103' and substitute `(i) either subject 101
or subject 102, and (ii) subject 103'.

4 Ibid., p. 473, l. 38, delete `subjects 103'
and substitute `(i) either subject 101 or 102, and (ii)
subjects 103.

5 Ibid., p. 474, l. 1 delete `three' and
substitute `two'.

6 Ibid., p. 474, delete from `(i)'
on l. 2 to `(ii)' on l. 5.

7 Ibid., l. 8, delete `subjects 101 and 103'
and substitute `(i) either subject 101 or subject 102,
and (ii) subject 103'.

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section



8 Boards of the Faculty of Literae
Humaniores and Theology

Honour School of Philosophy and Theology

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p.
466, l. 36 after `107' insert `and either subject 102 or subject
103'.

2 Ibid., l. 37, delete `two' and substitute
`three'.

3 Ibid., delete `must' and substitute `may'.

4 Ibid., delete `or three'.

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section



9 Boards of the Faculties of Literae
Humaniores, Physiological Sciences, and Psychological Studies

Honour School of Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p.
467, after l. 17 insert:

`Candidates who take one or two subjects in Philosophy must
offer either 101, 102, 104, or 105. Those offering three or more
Philosophy subjects must choose at least two from the above
list.'

2 Ibid., delete ll. 16–17.

3 Ibid., ll 22–4 delete `either
(a) take two subjects in
Philosophy or (b)'.

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section



10 Board of the Faculty of Management

Master of Business Administration

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p.
782, l. 22, add `Entries must be made on the appropriate form,
obtainable from the Said Business School, by Friday of the fourth
week of Michaelmas Full Term.'

2 Ibid., delete ll. 23–39.

3 Ibid., delete ll. 40–7 and substitute:

`3. Part I: Written assignments

Candidates must complete ten written assignments each of no more
than 2,000 words, covering required courses
from Michaelmas and Hilary Terms. In addition, there will be one
assignment of 8,000 on the New Business Development project which
candidates are required to undertake during Hilary Term and to
present at the beginning of Trinity Term. These assignments will
normally be undertaken in groups. Students must also complete one
assignment of 4,000 words for each of three Trinity Term advanced
electives and one assignment of 2,000 words for the required
International Business Strategy course, all to be taken either
individually or in groups. Trinity Term advanced electives are
to be chosen from the list of such courses which will be
published annually by the Deputy Director (MBA) before the first
Friday of Hilary Term. Three copies of each assignment must be
submitted to the
Chairman of Examiners for the MBA, c/o the Clerk of the Schools,
Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford: submission dates will
be published before the beginning of each lecture course.'

4 Ibid., p. 783, delete ll. 1–13, and
substitute:

`3. Part II: Written examinations

There shall be seven written papers of three hours each:

(a) Four papers shall be taken in tenth week of
Hilary Term on the required courses of Michaelmas and Hilary
Terms.

(b) Two papers shall be taken in ninth week of
Trinity Term, and shall be on advanced electives and the required
courses, International Business Strategy and Business Law and
Ethics.

(c) One paper shall be taken during the final session
in September. This will be a case study on which questions may
be set relevant to all required courses held throughout the year
(details of which are set out in the Schedule below). The case
study will be made available to candidates four hours before the
start of the examination.

4. Part III: Business project report'.

5 Ibid., l. 25 after `taken' insert `, unless
prior permission has been obtained from the Deputy Director (MBA)
by a date to be specified by the Chairman of Examiners'.

6 Ibid., delete ll. 33–4 and renumber
subsequent paragraphs 7 and 8 as 5 and 6.

7 Ibid., l. 36 delete `final examination' and
substitute `written examinations'.

8 Ibid., l. 37, add `any candidate who fails
a group assignment may be considered for a pass on the basis of
an oral examination'.

9 Ibid., after l. 38 insert:

`8. Any candidate who wishes to take an examination later than
the one to which he or she has been admitted may do so on such
later date as may be specified by the chairman of examiners,
provided that the candidate has obtained the prior consent of the
Deputy Director (MBA), who shall consult the chairman of
examiners.'

10 Ibid., delete from l. 39 on p. 783 to l.
32 on p. 785 and substitute:

`The following courses are required to be taken during
Michaelmas and Hilary Terms:

(a) Financial Accounting

Financial reporting and its regulations; sources of
company information; structure and interpretation of financial
statements; financial analysis and company valuation. Accounting
for management, cost behaviour, and analysis; financial planning
and control systems, including performance measurement .

(b) Corporate Finance

Sources of finance and financial systems; capital structure and
the cost of capital; taxation; dividend policy; investment
appraisal. Portfolio theory and asset pricing models; market
efficiency and anomalies; options and derivatives; mergers and
takeovers.

(c) People and Organisations

Theories and concepts of organisation behaviour; industrial
relations and human resource management; leadership; technology;
work design; organisational change; culture; diversity; power;
groups; motivation; employee involvement; collective
representation; the role of trade unions; the management of human
resources and industrial relations; strategies, structures, and
styles; methods of job regulation; pay systems; comparative
approaches to the management of employees; contemporary
developments.

(d) Operations Management

Product management and new product development; distribution and
marketing; vertical integration and capacity investment;
technological innovation; inventory management; planning and
control issues; customer service and the management of product
and service quality.

(e) Marketing Management

Concepts of products and services and the role which marketing
and operations management may play in manufacturing and service
organisations; the product life- cycle, the marketing of
services; markets analysis, marketing research and marketing
information; market segmentation and positioning; the buying
behaviour of individuals and organisations; direct marketing,
promotion and marketing communications, pricing.

(f) Strategic Management

Theoretical foundations of strategic management. Structural
analysis of industrial and industry dynamics. The resource and
capability based view of the firm. Company and competitor
analysis. Strategy and organisation. Mergers, acquisitions, and
alliances. Competitive strategy in different industry
environments. The nature and sources of competitive advantage and
patterns of competition. Strategic change and its implementation.
Strategy evaluation. Competitive and co-operative strategies.
Strategic risk management. Corporate strategy and competitive
advantage. Strategic innovation, R&D, and technology
management. Current issues in strategic management.

(g) Global and Comparative Business

Globalisation and new regionalism; politics and regulations over
international investment and trade; comparative law and
environmental issues; government–industry relations;
diversity of modern capitalism and comparative business systems.

()h) Business Law and Ethics

The nature of corporate and management responsibility in terms
of both legal compliance and wider social and
political issues.

(i) Data Analysis and Computing

Business statistics: Data, measurement, and computing,
descriptive statistics, probability distribution; sampling,
hypothesis testing, interval estimation—problem laboratory,
worked examples in practice; testing differences in mean and
proportions; test of goodness to fit; analysis of variance;
linear regression—problem laboratory; worked examples, in
practice; multiple regression; discriminant and cluster analysis;
non-parametric methods. Modelling: Quantitative models in
business: linear programming, network models; heuristics,
stimulation; decision analysis.

(j) Management Accounting and Information

Analysis of cost behaviour. The use of management accounting
information for planning, control, and per-
formance evaluation. MIS for Business: Introduction
to information systems (soft modelling, decision
modelling); information system applications (MIS, EIS, DSS);
information system technology, development of user applications;
future of MIS; business simulation
(software).

(k) Management Skills

The practice and where appropriate the theories of business
communication and presentations, leadership, and small group
skills and negotiations.

(l) Industrial Organisation

The price mechanism, resource allocation, and their welfare
aspects. Market structures, cost and scale economies, oligopoly,
entry empirical studies of pricing and profit-
ability, advertising, product differentiation, innovation,
theories of the firm, mergers and vertical integration, public
policy towards industry.

(m) Technology, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship

Creating and managing emerging companies with a specific focus
on entrepreneurship, particularly in science and
technology-related areas. Science and technology are sources of
innovation; the role of university commercialisation units and
science parks, regionalism, the importance of networks, the role
of intellectual property rights in entrepreneurship;
identification and evaluation of new business opportunities;
valuation, venture capital, the role of the financial markets;
starting a new business and the role of finance, human resource
management and operations' strategies for the operation of a new
enterprise where the focus is on achieving rapid growth.

(n) International Business Strategy

Global strategies of multinational enterprises; organisational
structures of multinational enterprises; building dynamic
organisational capabilities across borders;
parent-subsidiary relationships; managing joint-
ventures, strategic alliances and networks.

(o) Economic Environment

Economic growth. Macroeconomic demand. Inflation and
unemployment. Monetary policy. Forecasting and policy analysis.
Exchange rate and balance of payments. Inter-
national macroeconomic policy.'

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11 Board of the Faculty of Modern
History

(a) Honour Moderations in Modern History

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p.
51, after l. 29, insert:

`6. Gunpowder, Compass, and Printing Press: Technology and
Society in Renaissance and Early Modern Europe.'

2 Ibid., ll. 30–40, renumber subjects
6 to 15 as 7 to 16
respectively.

3 Ibid., p. 55, after l. 23, insert:

`6. GUNPOWDER, COMPASS, AND PRINTING PRESS: TECHNOLOGY AND
SOCIETY IN RENAISSANCE AND EARLY MODERN EUROPE

1. Francis Bacon, `Mr Bacon in praise of learning', in
Benjamin Farrington, Francis Bacon. Philosopher of Industrial
Science (London, 1951), pp. 34–5, and the extract from New
Atlantis, ibid., pp. 179–91.

2.Vanoccio Biringuccio, Pirotechnia, trans. Cyril Stanley
Smith and Martha Teach Gnudi (1942; New York, 1959), pp.
222–7, 234–43, 409–25.

3. William Bourne, The Arte of Shooting in Great Ordnaunce
(1587; English Experience, 1969), Preface and pp. 21–41.

4. Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg, Civitates orbis terrarum
(1572–1617), town views of Antwerp, Bologna, Hamburg, Padua,
Rome, Vienna, reproduced in John Goss, Braun and Hogenberg's The
City Maps of Europe (London, 1991).

5. Thomas Digges, Stratioticos (1579; English Experience,
1968), preface and pp. 69–70, 181–91.

6. Galileo Galilei, Two New Sciences, translated by Stillman
Drake (Madison, Wisconsin, 1974), pp. 217–29, 245–6,
and 249–56.

7. Francesco Guicciardini, The History of Italy, translated
and edited by Sidney Alexander (Princeton, 1969), pp. 49–52.

8. Paul Ive, The Practice of Fortification (1589; English
Experience, 1968; facsimile with introduction by Martin Biddle,
1972).

9. Niccolò Tartaglia, La nova scientia (1537) and
Quesiti et inventioni diverse (1546), translated passages from
Stillman Drake and I.E. Drabkin, Mechanics in Sixteenth-Century
Italy. Selections from Tartaglia, Benedetti, Guido Ubaldo &
Galileo (Madison, Wisconsin, 1969), pp. 63–9, 81–97,
and 98–104.

10. William Bourne, An Almanacke and Prognostication for Three
Yeares ... Practised at Grausend for the Meridian of London
(1571), in E.G.R. Taylor (ed.), A Regiment for the Sea and
Other Writings on Navigation by William Bourne (Cambridge,
Hakluyt Society, 1963), pp. 56–95.

11. Martin Cortes, The Art of Navigation, trans. by R. Eden
(1561), ff. liii–lxxix.

12. William Gilbert, De Magnete (1600); English
translation by P. Fleury Mottelay in Dover paperback edition
(1958), pp. xxxvii–li, 121–5, 177–83, 229–42,
275–85, 313–35.

13. Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations (1589); Penguin
edition entitled Voyages and Discoveries (1972), pp. 60–6,
71–5, 105–16, 171–88, 197–206, 231–42,
275–97, 298–303, 386–410.

14. Thomas Hood, A Copie
of the Speache. Made by the Mathematicall Lecturer (1588), all
(13 pages).

15. William Johnson (Blaeu,
Willem Janszoon), The Light of Navigation (1612), facsimile, in
R.A. Skelton (ed.), Theatrum orbis terrarum, first series, vol.
6 (Amsterdam, 1964), two frontispieces, dedicatory letter,
`Briefe and shorte Introduction to the Celestiall Sphere', and
figures.

16. Robert Norman, The New Attractive (1581), `The Epistle
Dedicatorie' and `To the Reader', pp. 1–26.

17. Hans Sachs and Jost Amman, A True Description of all
Trades published in Frankfort in the year 1568 (New York, 1930),
pp. 9–19.

18. Thomas Platter, Autobiographie, translated Marie Helmer
(Paris, 1964, pp. 97–101, 116–17, 122–5.

19. Jean-Franìois Gilmont, `Printing by the Rules', The
Library, vi, part 2 (1980), 129–55.

20. Henri Estienne, The Frankfort Book Fair (1574)
(Frankfurt/Main, 1968), pp. 71–104.

21. Léon Voet, The Golden Compasses. A History and
Evaluation of the Printing and Publishing Activities of the
Official Plantiniana at Antwerp (Antwerp, 1969–72), vol II,
Appendices, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, pp. 467–90, 500–25.

22. W.W. Greg, A Companion to Arber, being a Calendar of
Documents in Edward Arber's transcript of the Registers of the
Company of Stationers of London 1554–1640 (Oxford, 1967),
Supplementary Documents 1, 2, 5, 8, 11, 14, 31.

23. Joseph Moxon, Mechanick Exercises on the whole art of
Printing (1683–84), ed. Herbert Davis and Harry Carter
(Oxford, 1962), pp. [3]–[80], [191–322].

24. Rodney W. Shirley, The Mapping of the World. Early Printed
World Maps 1472–1700 (London: New Holland Press, 1993)
Plates 29, 43, 60, 86, 91, 102, 104, 201, 272.

25. Catherine Delano Smith and Elizabeth M. Ingram, Maps in
Bibles 1500–1600) (Geneva: Droz, 1991), Figures 1, 3, 5, 18,
29, 32.

26. Mercator-Hondius-Janssonius, Atlas or Geographick
description of the World (Amsterdam, 1636), in R.A. Skelton,
Theatrum orbis terrarum, fourth series, vol. 2 (Amsterdam, 1968),
title-page and dedication (unnumbered); Preface to the Reader,
Life of Mercator, life of Hondius, sig.**1r–***2r;
world-map, sig. L1v–L2r.

27. Instruments from the Museum of the History of
Science: late-sixteenth-century geometrical quadrant by C.
Schissler; gunner's compendium and military protractor by Erasmus
Habermel; radio latino by Mancinus, c.1600; gunner's rule, 1612;
sixteenth-century Italian compass; Gunter sector; planispheric
astrolabe Arsenius; late sixteenth-century Spanish mariner's
astrolabe; English backstaff by J. Gilbert; portolan charts.

28. `The Measurers', late-sixteenth-century Flemish
painting, Museum of the History of Science.'

4 Ibid., from p. 55, l. 124–p. 59, l.
17, renumber subjects `6' to `15' as `7' to `16' respectively.

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section



12 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
History and Literae Humaniores

Honour Moderations in Ancient and Modern History

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

As for Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 11 above).

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section



13 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
History and English Literature

Honour Moderations in Modern History and English

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

As for Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 11 above).

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section



14 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
History and Medieval and Modern Languages

Preliminary Examination in Modern History and Modern
Languages

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

As for Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 11 above).

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section



15 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
History and Social Studies

Honour Moderations in Modern History and Politics

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

As for Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 11 above).

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section



16 Board of the Faculty of Music

Master of Studies in Music (Musicology)

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p.
691, delete ll. 30–2, and substitute:

`3. Candidates may be summoned for a viva voce examination,
at which any aspect of the candidate's submissions and course
work might be subject to discussion. The list of candidates
required to present themselves for
a viva voce examination will be published at a time to be
announced by the examiners.'

2 Ibid., after l. 34 insert:

`5. A candidate who fails the examination will be permitted
to retake it on one further occasion only, not later than one
year after the initial attempt. Such a candidate whose work has
been of satisfactory standard on the course work related essays
will not be required to resubmit the same pieces of work, while
a candidate who has reached a satisfactory standard on the
written examination paper will not be required to retake that
part of the examination.'

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section



17 Board of the Faculty of
Psychological Studies

(a) Preliminary Examination in Psychology,
Philosophy, and Physiology

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

As for Preliminary Examination in Philosophy, Politics, and
Economics (see 18 below).

(b) Honour School of Experimental Psychology

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in
2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p.
217, delete ll. 30–2 and substitute `D7 Either subjects 101,
102, 104, or 105 as prescribed in the Regulations for Honour
Schools including Philosophy'.

2 Ibid., p. 215, in l. 29, after `Group C.*'
insert: `All candidates shall offer paper D1 (Research Project).'

3 Ibid., p. 216, delete from `Candidates who
do not' in l. 3 to `Experimental Psychology or deputy.' in l. 6
and substitute:

`If an Experimental Project (Mini-Project)) is included in
practical work, the subject of this shall be approved in
advance by the Head of Department of Experimental
Psychology or deputy.'

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section



18 Board of the Faculty of Social
Studies

Preliminary Examination for Philosophy, Politics, and
Economics

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p.
98, l. 41, after `show' insert `knowledge'.

2 Ibid., p. 99, delete ll. 6–14 and
substitute:

`Subjects to be studied include: propositional and predicate
languages; truth tables; tableaux; relations; the critical
application of formal logic to the analysis of English sentences
and inferences (problems of symbolisation: scope,
truth-functionality, quantification, identity, descriptions).
The logical symbols and tableaux rules to be used are those
found in Wilfred Hodges, Logic (Penguin Books). Philosophical
questions about logic may be studied by reading Mark Sainsbury,
Logical Forms: an Introduction to Philosophical Logic
(Blackwell), chapters 1, 2, and 4, omitting the starred
sections.'

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section



EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR
OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give
notice of oral examination of their candidates as
follows:

English Language and Literature

C. TAYLOR, Exeter: `Female Cross-Gendered Behaviour in the
Fiction of Radclyffe Hall, Anais Nin, H.D., and Djuna
Barnes'.

Exeter, Tuesday, 30 March, 2 p.m.


Examiners: J.L. Johnson, L. Marcus.

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section


Physical Sciences

T. CORBETT-CLARK, St Edmund Hall: `Explanation from neural
networks'.

Department of Engineering Science, Monday, 29 March, 10 a.m.


Examiners: A.L. Dexter, J. Austin.

SANGHOON KIM, Trinity: `Some effects of alloying elements on
gamma-TiA1 base intermetallics'.

Department of Materials, Monday, 29 March, 10.30 a.m.


Examiners: G. Taylor, I.P. Jones.

T.T. RAUTIAINEN, Linacre: `Modelling microstructural evolution
in binary alloys'.

Department of Materials, Wednesday, 21 April, 2.15 p.m.


Examiners: A. Cerezo, O. Penrose.

M.P.H. STUMPF, Balliol: `Interplay of magnetism and temperature
in the large-dimensional limits of the Hubbard and TJ model'.

Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Saturday, 10
April, 10 a.m.


Examiners: D.E. Manolopoulos, F. Gebhard.

SHINRO TANIGUCHI, St Catherine's: `Measurement of the
through-thickness strength of composites'.

Department of Engineering, Friday, 26 March, 11 a.m.


Examiners: B. Derby, R.E. Lewin.

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section


Theology

S. TAYLOR, Worcester: `Sacrifice, revelation, and salvation in
the thought of René Girard'.

St Peter's, Tuesday, 11 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: C.M. Jones, T.J. Gorringe.

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section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 25 March 1999: Colleges<br />

Colleges, Halls, and Societies


Contents of this section:

Note: college vacancies will also be found in
the
Gazette's
Appointments
Supplement
.

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issue



OBITUARIES


Magdalen College

SIR (ERNEST) ASHLEY BRAMALL, 10 February 1999; commoner
1935–8. Aged 83.

EDGAR JOHN SOUTHWELL CLARKE, TD, 29 January 1999; demy
1931–5. Aged 85.

RICHARD FREDERICK DE GROOT, 22 February 1998; commoner
1959–62. Aged 57.

ALFRED THOMPSON DENNING, OM, PC, KT., Baron of
Whitchurch, 5 March 1999; exhibitioner 1916, demy 1917
and 1919–22, Honorary Fellow 1948. Aged 100.

BARON MAX ROBERT FOULD-SPRINGER, 11 March 1999;
commoner 1924–6. Aged 93.

LT.-COL. RODERICK GORDON DUFF, MBE, 2 March 1999;
commoner 1959–62. Aged 58.

STEPHEN CLEMENT HAIMES, 1998; commoner 1967–70.
Aged 49.

RODNEY JULIAN HIRST, 14 January 1999; demy
1938–40 and 1945–7. Aged 78.

(GEOFFREY) LIONEL BERRY KEMSLEY, DL, Second Viscount
of Dropmore, 28 February 1999; commoner 1928–31.
Aged 89.

THE HON. JAMES LOUIS LINDSAY, 4 January 1999; commoner
1925–8. Aged 90.

FRANCIS HENRY LOW-BEER, 18 January 1999; commoner
1953–6. Aged 67.

DONALD JAMES METHVEN, TD, 4 January 1999; commoner
1933–6. Aged 84.

RUSSELL WAYNE SHEPHERD, March 1999; commoner
1980–3. Aged 37.

FRANK WILLIAM WILLIS, 16 March 1999; Doncaster Scholar
1965–8. Aged 51.

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section


Corrigendum

LT-COL. PHILIP BRAND FIELDEN, MC, 2 December 1998;
commoner 1937–9. Aged 79.

Note: this replaces the obituary notice in
the name `Lt.-Col. Brand Fielden' published in the
Gazette of 28 January, p. 671.

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section



St Edmund Hall

CANON ROGER HARDHAM HOOKER, MA, 4 January 1999; commoner
1955–8. Aged 64.

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section



St Hilda's College

DEBORAH AMY O'NEILL, BA, 1999; commoner 1993–6. Aged
23.

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section



St Hugh's College

JULIETTE AMELITA RODDAM (née Pontremoli),
1 January 1998; commoner 1945–8. Aged 73.

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section



ELECTIONS


Jesus College

To an Official Fellowship and Tutorship in Pure
Mathematics (from 1 October 1999):

ANDREW STUART
DANCER, BA, D.PHIL.

To an Official Fellowship and Tutorship in Politics
(from 1 January 2000):

STUART GORDON WHITE, BA,
M.PHIL. (PH.D. Princeton)

To the College Chaplaincy (for five years from 1
September 1999):

THE REVD ELISABETH GODDARD, BA

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section



St Hugh's College

To a Nuffield Exhibition:

STEVEN PETER MOULD,
formerly of St Thomas More School, Blaydon

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section



Wadham College

To a Tutorial Fellowship in Law (with effect from 1
August 1999):

LAURA CHRISTINE HAMSON HOYANO, BCL
(BA, LL.B., MA Alberta)

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section



NOTICES


MAGDALEN COLLEGE


Appointment of Senior Bursar (Chief
Financial Officer)

Magdalen College is seeking a replacement for the Senior Bursar,
who is retiring towards the end of 1999.

The Senior Bursar is responsible for financial planning,
investment management, property management, property development,
and the maintenance of the fabric of the college, as well as the
accounting, legal, and secretarial services.

The successful applicant will need to demonstrate experience
in the use of broad management skills, plus an ability to fit
into the college community. The post carries with it a fellowship
of the college and is open to men and women.

An application form and further particulars may be
obtained from the President, Magdalen College, Oxford OX1 4AU,
to whom completed aplications should be sent not later than 14
April.

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section



MERTON COLLEGE


Research Fellowship

Merton College proposes to elect one Research Fellow from 1
October 1999. The election will be for a limited term of up to
five years, and is not renewable. No stipend will be attached,
for the college expects to elect someone who is (or will be)
already in Oxford, and who already holds (or will hold) a
research award at a level equivalent to the Royal Society
Research Fellowships or the British Academy Readerships, but who
has no present college
attachement and has held no previous college fellowship at
Oxford.

Further particulars may be obtained from the Warden's Secretary,
Merton College, Oxford OX1 4JD (telephone: Oxford (2)76352, fax:
(2)76282, e-mail: moira.wise@merton.
ox.ac.uk). Applications should be received by 20 April.

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section



PEMBROKE COLLEGE


Appointment of Junior Deans

Pembroke College proposes to appoint two Junior Deans for a
period of one year from 1 October 1999 with the possibility of
renewal for a second year. The Junior Deans will be required to
reside in college, free of charge, and will also receive free
meals at high table and a stipend (under review) of £1,100
per annum, which will be additional
to any other income which the appointees may receive. The Junior
Deans will assist the Dean and other College Officers in the
smooth running of the college. Applicants must be graduates, and
it is expected that they will be
pursuing advanced study or research.

Applications, including a full curriculum vitae and
an outline of the academic work which the applicant proposes to
undertake, should reach the Dean, Pembroke College, Oxford OX1
1DW, from whom further particulars may be obtained, by Monday,
26 April. Applicants should inform the Dean of the names,
addresses, and telephone numbers of three referees and arrange
for their referees
to write directly to the Dean by Monday, 26 April. If the
applicant is a registered graduate student, one of the
referees must be the applicant's university supervisor.

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section



ST ANNE'S COLLEGE


Stipendiary Lecturership in Economics

St Anne's College proposes to elect a twelve-hour Stipendiary
Lecturer in Economics, for one year from October 1999. The
lecturer will teach for twelve hours per week, and act as
Director of Studies for those students studying economics
(organising teaching, monitoring student progress, and
participating in admissions).

Candidates should have tutorial teaching experience in the
compulsory first- and second-year economics papers for PPE and
Economics and Management, and the compulsory third- and
fourth-year economics papers for Engineering, Economics, and
Management. The remuneration will be at the rate of £15,735
or £16,655 according to experience. The stipendiary lecturer
will be a member of the senior common room and will be entitled
to free lunches and dinners at high table. There is an academic
allowance of £524 and free BUPA membership.

Further particulars may be obtained from the Senior Tutor's
Secretary, St Anne's College, Oxford OX2 6HS (telephone: Oxford
(2)74825, e-mail: heather.law@st-annes.
ox.ac.uk). Applications (four copies, typewritten), including a
curriculum vitae and a brief statement of the
applicant's research interests, should be sent to the Senior
Tutor, St Anne's College, by 26 April. Applicants should
include one copy of a recent research paper or thesis
chapter. Applicants should also ask two referees to write
directly to the Senior Tutor, St Anne's College, Oxford OX2 6SH,
by the same date.

St Anne's College is an equal opportunities employer.

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section



ST HILDA'S COLLEGE


E.P. Abraham Junior Research
Fellowship

Applications are invited for an E.P. Abraham Junior Research
Fellowship, for study in biochemistry, chemistry, medicine,
biological sciences, or engineering science with an application
in the aforementioned areas. The appointment would be for two
years from October 1999, with the possibility of renewal for a
further year. The fellowship is open to women graduates of any
country.

Further particulars should be obtained from the Secre-
tarial Assistant, Academic Office, St Hilda's College, Oxford OX4
1DY (telephone: Oxford (2)76815, e-mail: college.
office@st-hildas.ox.ac.uk). The closing date is 30 April.

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ST PETER'S COLLEGE


Appointment of Development Office
Assistant

This post offers an opportunity to work two days a week as part
of a job-share arrangement in an active development office with
responsibility for the Annual Fund's database. The fund raises
about £100,000 each year from alumni. Applicants should have
current computing experience and good written and spoken
communication skills; salary grade 4
(£13,074–£15,134).

Letters of application, including a brief curriculum
vitae
with the names of two referees, should be sent to
Richard Marson, Development Director, St Peter's College, Oxford
OX1 2DL, by Friday, 23 April.

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section



SOMERVILLE COLLEGE


Appointment of Administrator/Executive
Personal Assistant to the Principal

Somerville College invites applications from suitably
experienced and highly able candidates, for this newly
established, stimulating position. The post-holder will provide
professional administrative support for the Principal's varied
college and external commitments. A significant element of the
work will be the co-ordination of the Principal's fund-raising
activities for the college. In
addition the post-holder will be required to develop and maintain
office systems to ensure that both the routine and complex
functions of the Principal's office are dealt with efficiently.

The post would therefore offer an ideal opportunity for someone
interested in pursuing a career in either higher education
administration or fund-raising.

The successful applicant will be educated to degree level, or
equivalent, and will possess excellent administrative/secretarial
skills, including proficiency in IT (preferably in
Windows/Office). Strong communication and organisational skills
will also be essential, together with the determination to
achieve high standards at all times. Salary:
c.£17,000–£19,000.

Further details and application forms are available from Susan
White, Personnel Officer, Somerville College, Oxford OX2 6HD
(telephone: Oxford (2)80620, e-mail:
susan.white@somerville.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for
applications is Tuesday, 6 April.

Somerville College is committed to achieving equal
opportunities.

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section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 25 March 1999: Advertisements<br />

Advertisements


Contents of this section:



How to advertise in the
Gazette

"../../../stdg/conds.htm">

Terms and conditions of acceptance
of advertisements

Return to Contents Page of this issue



Art Exhibition

Mary Oglivie Gallery, St Anne's College,
Woodstock Road: daily 10 a.m.–4
p.m. until 10 Apr., Paintings and Drawings by Susan Garrington.
Visitors are advised to ring the
College Lodge beforehand, tel.: Oxford (2)74800.

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Oxford Film Footage

Got any film/home videos of Oxford? We are
looking for any old moving images of
the University for a Channel 4 documentary on St Hilda's College.
Special interest: women at
Oxford, college life, balls, exams, etc. Contact Sara, tel.:
Oxford 276871.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Tuition Offered

For English-speaking students studying Russian
at University, Russian
conversation is offered, on political, economic, literary, etc.
themes. An opportunity to learn
about the different `mentalities' of Russia and Britain. £10
per hour. Margaret Coulson, 9
Blandford Avenue. Tel.: Oxford 511657.

For Russian-speaking students of English,
English conversation is offered with
poet Robert Coulson, on political, economic, literary, etc.
themes. An opportunity to learn
about the different `mentalities' of Russia and Britain. £10
per hour. 9 Blandford Avenue.
Tel.: Oxford 511657.

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Services Offered

Efficient medical secretary offering an
efficient, personal, and reliable
secretarial support for professional and medical personnel. With
fully-equipped home office
(computer, printer, e-mail, Internet). Any job undertaken, copy
or audio work. For further
details, please contact Jackie Webster, tel./fax: Oxford
882499.

Annual multi-trip holiday insurance. From as
little as £26 per year, you can
travel as many times as you like. This insurance is arranged by
Affinity Groups Advantage Ltd., an
independent intermediary for selling of general insurance. For
further details, tel.: 0345
660453.

Shipping? Abyssinia to Zanzibar, New York to
Newmarket. Today, tomorrow, next
week? All the best options are at Mail Boxes Etc. Will collect
from college, home, factory, or
elsewhere. Also 24-hour photocopying, secure mailboxes, computer
workstation, high-grade colour
photocopying, faxing, laminating, binding, etc. 266 Banbury Road,
Summertown, Oxford OX2 7DL.
Contact Justin Brookes. Tel.: Oxford 514655, fax: 514656, e-mail:
summertown@020.mbe.uk.com.

West Country artist of national reputation is
available to take commission for
portraits in oil at reasonable prices. For more details, tel.:
Oxford 726124.

Frederick and Sudabeh Hine have top quality rugs
to clear. Example: new Turkey
handknotted rugs from Kars with bold, simple designs in
sun-washed colours. Size 2.02 x 1.26 at
£219, 2.25 x 1.31 at £264, and 2.53 x 1.49 at
£349. Others from Iran and Afghanistan
plus some carpets and runners. Tel.: Oxford 559396 any time
(central North Oxford).

Town and Country Trees: professional tree
surgeons. All aspects of
arboriculture undertaken including orchard and shrub pruning,
planting, hedge trimming, stump
grinding, etc. Quality work at competitive prices. We are fully
insured. For a free quotation,
call Paul Hodkinson. Tel.: 01869 351540.

Personal Computer Consultants: we offer expert
advice and tuition for both
hardware and software. On-site service at home or in the office.
We provide upgrades for most
computers, or alternatively we now supply our range of
personally-built to your own
specifications K Tec computers. We will also supply or source
software to match your
requirements. For a quality service matched with competitive
prices, contact Chris Lewis, tel.:
Oxford 461222, fax: 461333.

Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press—the
University Printers: specialising
in booklet and publicity material, typesetting, printing, and
finishing. Output Bureau provides
high-quality output from disc from all major DTP programs onto
paper, bromide, colour-separated
positive or negative film; high-quality specialist colour copier
service. For service, quality,
and competitive prices contact Oxuniprint, Oxford University
Press, Great Clarendon Street,
Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 514691, fax: 514010.

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Domestic Services

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by
Grimebusters, your local specialists.
Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college.
Also carpet/upholstery stain
protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying,
oriental rug cleaning. For free
estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford
726983 or Abingdon 555533.

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Situations Vacant

Junior Research Fellowship in Israel Studies.
Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish
Studies and St Antony's College invite applications for this
fixed-term 3-year JRF, with effect
from Oct. 1999. The appointment will be in the field of the
modern history or politics of Israel.
Applicants must already hold a doctorate (awarded within the
previous 5 years) or provide clear
evidence that the degree will be awarded before taking up the
appointment. The appointee will be
expected to have a fluent command of modern Hebrew. The duties
of the post include teaching as well
as research on a substantial project which could be completed
within the period of the fellowship.
The appointee would normally be elected to a Junior Research
Fellowship at St Antony's College.
Further particulars may be obtained from the Fellows and Visitors
Co-ordinator, Oxford Centre for
Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor, Yarnton, Oxford OX5
1PY. Applications, to include letter
of application, detailed research proposal, c.v., and publication
list, and 3 letters of
recommendation, sent directly to the Fellows and Visitors
Co-ordinator, must arrive no later than
10 May 1999.

St John's College, Cambridge: Librarian
required. Details of this appointment
may be obtained from the Domestic Bursar's Assistant, St John's
College, Cambridge CB2 1TP.
Tel.: 01223 338687.

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Houses to Let

House in central Oxford close to university
parks, science area, and hospitals.
Two bedrooms, 2 reception rooms, garden backing onto playing
fields. Would suit visiting
academic/medical couple. Available from 1 May–30 Sept.
£750 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 721344.

Walk to colleges: North Oxford house available
from 1 Sept. 1999, for 1 year or
less. Walk to colleges, train/bus stations; near Port Meadow.
C.h., recently redecorated, desks,
filing cabinets, several large closets, secluded garden, 2.5
bathrooms, washing machine, drier,
telephone, linen, dishes, 2 bicycles. Quiet; suit visiting
academics. Two bedrooms: £950 p.m.,
3 bedrooms: £1,250 p.m. (includes bedsit with separate
kitchen and entrance). Contact J.
Mackrell (evenings), tel.: Oxford 775567, or A. Gaston (Canada),
tel.: 613 745 1368, fax: 613 745
0299, e-mail: gaston@cyberus.ca.

Central North Oxford: attractively-furnished
4-storey Victorian house in very
quiet street, 15 minutes' walk from city centre, quarter mile
from river Thames and Port Meadow.
Two double bedrooms and 1 single. Two bathrooms (1 with shower,
1 with bath, both with w.c.).
Double reception room with stripped pine floor, oriental rugs,
and desk. Modern pine kitchen/diner
with large table. Dishwasher, fridge, freezer, gas c.h., washing
machine, drier, TV, bicycles. Free
street parking. £965 p.c.m. including utilities and Council
Tax. Available 24 July–4
Sept. Dr Josephine Reynell, tel.: Oxford 516615, fax: 516616.

North Oxford family house in sought-after
location, close to schools, hospitals,
station, University. Five bedrooms, large kitchen, sitting-room,
lovely long south-facing garden,
car parking for 2 cars. Furnished. Available from 1 July for 1
year or more. Tel.: Oxford
790640.

Family holiday accommodation, central North
Oxford: three-quarters of Victorian
terrace house (self-contained); sleeps 6–7; attractive,
well-equipped rear courtyard; street
parking; 10 minutes from city centre; 3 minutes from water
meadows and scenic canal route.
£400 p.w. inclusive. Tel.: Oxford 559911.

City centre house with views of Thames,
available for 4 months, June–Sept.
Fully equipped, 3 bedrooms (2 double, 1 single), 2 bathrooms, gas
c.h., garden, garage. £1,000
p.c.m. inclusive of charges except telephone calls. Tel.: Oxford
250462.

Two-bedroom, semi-detached house, Harcourt Hill.
Available for short to medium
term let. Fully furnished and equipped following recent
modernisation. Large open-plan
living/dining-room, fitted kitchen, utility room, study, c.h.,
parking. Both bedrooms en
suite
. For details, contact Ann Rowcliffe at Westminster
College Conference Centre. Tel.:
Oxford 253358, e-mail: a.rowcliffe@ox-west.ac.uk.

Summer and/or Easter let in Oxford: live in
comfort near the Thames. Beautiful
Victorian house, architect converted; south-facing garden. Four
bedrooms, large split-level
living-room, pale wood floors, dining room, new fully-equipped
kitchen, bathroom with bidet and
w.c., shower room with w.c.; c.h. Available Easter (27
Mar.–10 Apr.) and Summer (23
July–2 Sept.). Price negotiable. Tel.: Oxford 725193.

Charming house on Osney Island available to
academic family for flexible period
as desired. Two bedrooms. Sleeps 3 people. £875 p.m. Contact
Betsey Newell, tel.: Oxford
721215, e-mail: betsy@tasis.demon.co.uk.

Make finding accommodation a pleasure, not a
chore. Finders Keepers is
dedicated to making it easy for visitors to Oxford to find the
right property. Browse through
our Web site for up-to-date detailed information on properties
available and make use of our
interactive database, priority reservation service (credit cards
accepted), welcome food pack,
personal service, and much more. Call us and you will not need
to go elsewhere. For further
information contact Finders Keepers, 226 Banbury Road,
Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: Oxford
311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk; Internet site:
http://www.finders.co.uk.

An Englishman's home is his castle—so the
saying goes. We cannot pretend
that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking
quality rental accommodation in
Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB
Management is one of Oxford's foremost
letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical
personnel, and other
professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most
helpful service in Oxford. Visit our
Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the
properties that we have
currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or
e-mail us with details of your
requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation.
Tel.: Oxford 764533, fax:
764777, e-mail: info@qbman.co.uk.
n

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Flats to Let

Iffley village: self-contained furnished
1-bedroom flat with c.h. Suit academic
couple. Available 6 Apr. for 6 months; renewable. £530
p.c.m., including Council Tax and
all fuel charges. Tel.: Oxford 778335 (after 26 Mar.).

Self-contained 1-bedroom flat, for couple or
single person. Fully furnished and
equipped, including bed linen. Lovely view. Parking space and
lock-up storage for bicycle. Lower
Wolvercote. Available from 1 Apr. £550 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford
452682.

Central North Oxford, Bardwell Road. Attractive
ground-floor flat in Victorian
conversion. Two bedrooms (1 double, 1 single), living-room with
open plan kitchen, c.h.,
dishwasher, washing machine, etc., parking, maintained gardens.
Short/long let from mid/late-
Mar. Tel.: Oxford 510542.

Delightful, large, loft sitting-room/study. Plus
double bedroom, separate kitchen,
and bathroom. Virtually independent in owner's home.
Approximately 10 minutes' walk from City
Centre. Suit graduate or young working couple. £450 p.c.m.
plus gas and electricity. Tel.:
Oxford 241845.

North Oxford (Upper Wolvercote): delightful,
self-contained, furnished
maisonette overlooking Port Meadow and Oxford canal. Spacious
refurbished accommodation on 2
levels. Gas c.h. Available end Apr. 1999. £650 p.c.m. Tel.:
Oxford 512906.

Self-contained flat in very quiet surroundings.
Newly decorated and furnished.
Lockable garage and off-street parking. Suit mature single person
needing peace and quiet.
Godstow Road (off Woodstock Road). Available 31 Mar. 1999.
£485 p.c.m. Jill Loveday, tel.:
Oxford 558482.

Central North Oxford: 10 minutes' walk from city
centre, all main university
buildings, and parks, and very close to the river. Available for
short/long let. Two
exceptionally well-furnished, comfortable flats in extremely
quiet, civilised, large Victorian
house in this exclusive, leafy, residential Victorian suburb,
with large, light, airy rooms. (1)
First-floor (available now): double bedroom, drawing-room,
kitchen, bathroom. (2) Ground-floor
(available now): 1 double, 1 single bedroom, drawing-room,
kitchen, bathroom. Off-street
parking; large secluded garden. Regret no children or pets.
Tel./fax: Oxford 552400.

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Accommodation Offered

Bed-and-breakfast available in the warm
comfortable home of a semi-retired
academic couple in exclusive, leafy, central North Oxford; within
easy walking distance of the
city centre and all main university buildings; a stone's throw
from the river, parks, excellent
pubs and restaurants and a 9–9 corner shop. All rooms have
colour TV, microwave, tea- and
coffee-making facilities, c.h., and independent heating.
Refrigerators available. Very moderate
terms. Tel./fax: Oxford 557879, mobile: 0374 434489.

Large top floor room on Osney Island with own
bathroom and phone. Sharing house
with single parent and disabled child. Quietish mature person
with references. Rent negotiable in
return for occasional babysitting and/or cleaning. Tel.: Oxford
725974.

Lovely sunny room in comfortable house off the
Abingdon Road. £65 p.w.
including bills but not phone. The house has 2 bathrooms and a
piano. Please contact Alison, tel.:
Oxford 723189 for more details.

Available from June 1999: family accommodation
in central North
Oxford—excellent schools; three-quarters of attractive
Victorian well-equipped house; 28-ft.
sitting-room; 3 double bedrooms, etc; courtyard garden; parking;
10 minutes' walk to city centre;
close to water meadows and scenic canal. £1,100 p.c.m.
(excluding bills). Tel.: Oxford
559911.

Two properties, North Oxford, well within ring
road. Both quiet, with lovely views
to open countryside, near bus route. (1) Self-contained, luxury,
open plan accommodation with
patio. Suit visiting academic, single/couple. Available from end
Apr. £650 p.m. (single),
£700 p.m. (couple), including electricity. (2) Beautiful,
unusual, open-plan, fully-furnished
modern house. Off-street parking and small patio garden. Suit
visiting academic/professional
couple. £895 p.m. including Council Tax and water rates.
Available from July 1999. Regret no
children, pets, or smokers. Tel.: Oxford 515085, e-mail:
trishaboyd@hotmail.com.

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Accommodation Sought

Norwegian academic visitor with small family
seeks (2)/3-bedroom accommodation
within walking/biking distance of city centre, from July/Aug.
1999–July 2000. Will visit
Oxford 26/27 Mar. Please contact Rev./Major Bard Maeland, tel.:
+47 2262 0232, e-mail:
barmaelan@online.no.

Canadian academic couple seeks furnished
1-bedroom Oxford house or flat, within
easy reach of the John Radcliffe hospital, from
Apr.–Sept./Oct. 1999. Non-smokers, no
children, happy to look after after pets or garden. Local
references available. E-mail to Dr Rupert
Kaul c/o sarah.rowland-jones@ndm.ox.ac.uk, or tel.: 222316.

Visiting US academic seeks 1- or 2-bedroom
apartment within the ring road from
mid-May to mid-Aug. Will be accompanied by husband and infant
child. Happy to house sit and/or look
after pets. Contact through Dr G.M. Henderson, tel.: Oxford
282123, e-mail:
gideonh@earth.ox.ac.uk.

American family with 3 well-behaved teenage
children seek to rent house in North
Oxford in July, preferably for the whole month, but shorter
periods will be considered. Former
Oxford residents. Tel.: Oxford 557932 (Anne de Moor).

Female graduate student seeks accommodation
(full board) for period 10 Mayþ10
July 1999, in central Oxford or the Headington area. House-,
dog-, or baby-sitting possible. The
less expensive the better. Reference from Oxford University
professor available. Please contact
Regina, tel. (Hungary): 00 36 30 9105353, e-mail:
Saphier@westel900.net, local contact: tel.:
Oxford 727261.

Visiting professor and wife need 2-bedroom,
fully-furnished apartment/flat, with
c.h., laundry facilities, parking garage; near to Oxford
University; for period 1 July–30 Nov.
1999. Responses to Dr H.T. Debas, 240 St Francis Blvd, San
Fransisco, CA 94127, USA. Fax: (415) 502
0317, e-mail: kdebas@medsch.ucsf.edu.

Visiting Fellow from USA seeks sublet or short
lease of flat/room in North
Oxford/Summertown area for 1 Apr.–30 June. Access to kitchen
preferred. Please contact Dr Marc
W. Steinberg, 203 Wright Hall, Smith College, Northampton, MA
01063. Fax (USA): 413 585 3389,
office: 413 585 3443; e-mail: mwsteinb@sophia.smith.edu.

Doctor and family on sabbatical from Australia
need furnished and equipped home,
3+ bedrooms, commuting distance to John Radcliffe Hospital, from
1 Aug. for approximately 4 months.
Tel.: 61 3 9824 0998, e-mail: greensil@netspace.net.au. Local
contact (Prof. Foex) tel.: Oxford
727342.

Visiting lecturer seeks accommodation for the
Trinity Term. Please contact Dr
Andrew O'Shaughnessy, tel.: 01223 301458 (or 01273 818421 after
1 Apr.).

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your
property? QB Management is one of
Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We
specialise in lettings to both academic
and professional individuals and their families, and have a
constant flow of enquiries from good-
quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would
like details of our services, or
if you simply need some informal help and advice without
obligation, telephone us: Oxford 764533,
fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk. Alternatively,
we would invite you to visit our Web
site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing
your property.

Mallams Residential Letting is well placed to
help with your letting and
management requirements. Based in Summertown, we offer a
professional service tailored to your
individual requirements. If you are thinking of letting your
property, please call us. Tel.: Oxford
311006, fax: 311977.

Finders Keepers specialises in managing your
home or investment. We have
celebrated 25 years in Oxford letting and managing
properties—try us first! Many of our
landlords have remained with us since we opened and are delighted
with our service—why not pop
in and read their comments? Contact Finders Keepers, 226 Banbury
Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY.
Tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk,
Internet site:
http://www.finders.co.uk.

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Accommodation Sought for Rent or
Exchange

Visiting Professor requires accommodation for 2 adults and
2 children for May and June. Strong preference for North Oxford,
but will consider others within walking distance of the city
centre. Will consider house swap. Current residence is a 4-
bedroom house in Concord, Massachusetts (suburban Boston), and
is well suited for small children. Contact Bill Wilhelm. Tel.
(USA): 001 617 552 3990, e-mail: william.wilhelm@bc.edu.

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Accommodation Offered for Rent or
Exchange

To let during sabbatical leave mid-Sept.
1999–early Jan. 2000. Four-bedroom
house just south of Summertown and within walking distance of
university and city centre. Gas c.h.,
washing machine, drier, dishwasher, 2 telephones, garden. Close
to schools. Start date could be
flexible. £1,000 p.c.m., or exchange for 3/4-bedroom house
in Sydney, Australia, within easy
reach of University of Sydney. For more details, please tel.:
Oxford 554556 (p.m.), e-mail:
paul.madden@chem.ox.ac.uk.

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Holiday Lets

Italy, Umbria: Assisi National Park. Two double
bedrooms, kitchen/dining-room,
large bathroom. Own road, superb views, wildlife. Lombardia: Lake
Como. Village house apartment
closely overlooking lake. One double bedroom, bathroom,
kitchenette, dining/sitting-room, terrace;
20 minutes Como city. £900 p.m./£300 p.w./£550 per
fortnight for either let. Tel.:
Oxford 768775.

Crete: a tradiational Cretan house in Rethimno,
superbly renovated to provide
space and comfprt in beautifully-furnished surroundings. Elevated
vine-covered sitting area with
brick barbecue perfect for al fresco dining. Situated in the
quiet area of the Old Town, near long
sandy beaches, tavernas, shops, and the many interesting sights
in and around this historic area.
Sleeps 4 (1 double, 1 twin). Available year round. £250
p.w., £900 p.m. Tel./fax: 0030
831 56525.

Skopelos, Skiathos, and Alonissos. Lovely island
houses available for rent in
town, country, and seaside locations, sleeping 2–8 persons.
Prices from £39 per person
p.w. For brochure, tel.: +30424 22947, fax: +30424 23057, e-mail:
thalpos@otenet.gr.

Charming terrace house for short and long lets
in conservation zone of unspoilt
Southwold (Suffolk), seconds from the sea. Sleeps 4+. Marvellous
area for walking, cycling (2
bicycles available), church visiting, bird watching, and pub
hopping. Tel.: Oxford 513464
(evenings).

Tuscany: farmhouse around beautiful medieval
village of Loro Ciuffenna near
Florence Sienna and Arrezo. Two bedrooms, attic, 2 bathrooms,
terrace. £300 p.w. (July/Aug.
£350 p.w.). Other farmhouses to rent and apartments with
swimming pool. For details, tel.:
0171 3282454, e-mail: kensaat@zoo.co.uk.


House for Sale

North Oxford , within ring road. Lovely
5/6-bedroom Edwardian detached family
home. Good decorative order, large garden, off-road parking for
several cars, bathroom, shower
room, utility room, cloakroom, c.h. Original fireplaces, stripped
pine doors. £348,500.
Tel.: Oxford 554062 anytime.

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<br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette: Diary, 26 March<br /> - 30 April

Diary


Contents of this section:

Academic Staff
Development Seminars
: places should be booked in advance
through
the Staff Development Office, University Offices,
Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

For the full list of courses, see the HREF="http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/training/">Staff Development
ProgrammeWeb site.

Return to
Contents Page of this issue



Friday 26 March

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Jewellery in the ancient
world', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings:
(2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

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section



Saturday 27 March

MAISON FRANÇAISE Study Day: `Virginia Woolf and
the body' (various speakers), Maison Française,
9.30 a.m.–6 p.m.

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section



Tuesday 30 March

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Porcelain: "Figures for
Desart" ', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for
bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

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section



Thursday 1 April

UNIVERSITY COUNSELLING SERVICE closed (reopens 12 April).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Friday 2 April

ASHMOLEAN LIBRARY closed (reopens 6 April).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM closed (reopens 5 April).

BODLEIAN LIBRARY closed (most buildings reopen 6 April).

TAYLOR INSTITUTION library closed (reopens 6 April).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Tuesday 6 April

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Gold boxes', 1.15 p.m.
(Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1
p.m.)

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section



Friday 9 April

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The Etruscans', 1.15 p.m.
(Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1
p.m.)

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section



Tuesday 13 April

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Gods, heroes, and men of
ancient Greece', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for
bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

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section



Friday 16 April

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Buddhist art from Tibet'
(special exhbition), 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel.
for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

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section



Tuesday 20 April

ACADEMIC STAFF Development Seminar: `Gender in teaching',
9.30 a.m. (see information
above
).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Roman home life', 1.15
p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9
a.m.--1 p.m.)

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section



Thursday 22 April

ACADEMIC STAFF Development Seminar: `Pastoral skills for
tutors', 9.15 a.m. (see information
above
).

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section



Friday 23 April

ACADEMIC STAFF Development Seminar: `Memory skills', 1.30
p.m. (see information above).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `An introduction to
Egypt of the Pharaohs', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel.
for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

JONATHAN HARVEY lectures in series `The Composer
Speaks', Holywell Music Room, 5 p.m. (free and open to
the public).

OXFORD PHILOMUSICA WINDS (with Olga Balakleets, piano)
perform works by Schumann, Harvey, Crosse, and Mozart,
Holywell Music Room, 8 p.m. (full-price tickets £10,
from Oxford Playhouse or at the door).

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section



Saturday 24 April

TRIO FIBONACCI perform new music by Canadian and British
composers, Holywell Music Room, 8 p.m. (tickets £8
(£6/£4 concessions) from Oxford Playhouse or at
the door).

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section



Sunday 25 April

TRINITY FULL TERM begins.

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section



Monday 26 April

PROFESSOR L.N. TREFETHEN (Professor of Numerical
Analysis): `Scientific computing: the finite, the
infinite, and the future' (inaugural lecture), Schools, 5
p.m.

THE BRENTANO QUARTET perform works by Purcell,
Nicholas Maw, and Beethoven, the Auditorium, St John's,
8.30 p.m. (admission by programme, from porters' lodge;
reserved for college members until ten days before the
concert).

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Tuesday 27 April

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Watercolours: Cozens to
Palmer' (special exhibition), 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
£1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

CONGREGATION meeting, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR L. DASTON: `Can objectivity have a history?'
(Sir Isaiah Berlin Lectures in the History of Ideas: `The
ideals and practice of scientific objectivity'), St Cross
Building, 5 p.m.

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Wednesday 28 April

PROFESSOR P. LUBECK: `Global Islam' (ESRC Research
Programme on Transnational Communities: `Transnational
religious communities: Muslim and Hindu movements and
networks'), Seminar Room, School of Geography, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR N. FRIEDMAN: `The study of evolutionary
history: insights from Queen Victoria' (Waynflete
Lectures: `Seminal events in the evolutionary history of
plants'), Grove Auditorium, Magdalen, 5 p.m.

PHILIP HOWARD delivers the Times Lecture,
Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

DR M. LEACH: `New shapes to shift: war, parks, and the
hunting persona in modern West Africa' (Centre for Cross-
Cultural Research on Women: Audrey Richards Commemorative
Lecture), Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

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Thursday 29 April

PROFESSOR G. BEST: `Peace conferences and the century of
total war: the 1899 Hague Conference and what came after'
(Cyril Foster Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR L. DASTON: `Objectivity versus
truth' (Sir Isaiah Berlin Lectures in the History of
Ideas: `The ideals and practice of scientific
objectivity'), St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

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Friday 30 April

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Camille Pissarro', 1.15
p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9
a.m.--1 p.m.)

PROFESSOR M. GOODMAN: `Explaining religious change'
(Marett Memorial Lecture), Saskatchewan Lecture Room,
Exeter, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR A. GOUDIE: `The geomorphology of the Oxford
region' (School of Geography Centenary Lectures), School
of Geography, 5 p.m.

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