25 January 2001 - No 4573



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 131, No. 4573: 25 January 2001<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

25 January 2001



University Health and
Safety
information


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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 25 January 2001: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent
entry.]

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CONGREGATION 22 January


Degree by Resolution

No notice to the contrary having been received, the following resolution is deemed to have
been approved at noon on 22 January.

Text of Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

MARCEL FAFCHAMPS, Mansfield College

ALEXANDRA JANE GILLESPIE, Balliol College

JACOB KLEIN, Exeter College

CHRISTOPHER DAVIS MCKENNA, Brasenose College

CHRISTOPHER MICHAEL MARTIN, D.Phil., Mansfield College

DAVID EDWARD PERROW, Templeton College

KEITH RUDDLE, D.PHIL., Templeton College

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COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

Decree

Council has made the following decree, to come into effect on 9 February.


Decree (1): Consultative Committee for
Health and Safety

Explanatory note The following decree, made by Council on the
recommendation of the Health and Safety Management Committee, changes
the constitution of the Consultative Committee for Health and Safety,
following a new recognition agreement between the University and one of
its trade unions, so as to substitute references to the relevant staff groups
for references to specified grades.

Text of Decree (1)

In Ch. III, Sect. XLII, cl. 1 (Statutes, 2000, p. 299), delete items
(2)–(7) and substitute:

`(2), (3) two persons, who shall be appointed by the university branch
of the Manufacturing, Science and Finance Union (MSF), employed in staff
groups for which the MSF has been granted recognition by the
University;

(4), (5) two persons, who shall be appointed by the university branch
of UNISON, employed in staff groups for which UNISON has been
granted recognition by the University;

(6), (7) two persons, who shall be appointed by the university branch
of the Association of University Teachers (AUT), employed in staff groups
for which the AUT has been granted recognition by the University;'.

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SOCIAL SCIENCES BOARD

Decree

The Social Sciences Board, with the approval of the Educational Policy and
Standards Committee of Council, has made the following decree, to come
into effect on 9 February.


Decree (2): Establishment of M.Sc. in
Criminology and Criminal Justice

Explanatory note

The following decree, made by the Social Sciences Board with the
approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council,
establishes a new one-year Master's course in Criminology and Criminal
Justice for the degree of M.Sc. It is intended that the first intake of
students should be from 1 October 2001.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in `Examinations and
Boards' below.

Text of Decree (2)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 753, after l. 12 insert:

`Criminology and Criminal Justice                          Law'.

2 Ibid., l. 41, p. 1052, delete `.' and substitute `;'.

3 Ibid., after l. 41 insert:

`in Criminology and Criminal Justice for two examinations.'

4 This decree shall be effective from 1 October
2001.

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COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY


Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to
the Register of Congregation:

Baker, P.R.S., Modern History Faculty

Cecil, J.B., University Offices

Clarke, S.J., MA, Exeter

Fafchamps, M., MA, Mansfield

Gillespie, A.J., MA, Balliol

Klein, J., MA, Exeter

Lankester, Sir T.P., MA, Corpus Christi

Lawlor, N.T., University Offices

McKenna, C.D., MA, Brasenose

Martin, C.M., MA, D.Phil., Mansfield

Morrison, A.D., MA, Merton

Nash, E.M., Oriel

Payne, J.S., MA, Merton

Perrow, D.E., MA, Templeton

Ruddle, K., MA, D.Phil., Templeton

Stargardt, E.N.R., MA, D.Phil., Magdalen

Willman, P., MA, D.Phil., Balliol

Wood, M.J.A., MA, D.Phil., Somerville

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SOCIAL SCIENCES BOARD

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 9
February, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 25 January 2001: University Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent
entry.]

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CONGREGATION 20 February 2 p.m.

¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that written notice of
any intention to vote against the preamble of the statute below, signed by
at least two members of Congregation, must be given to the Registrar by
noon on Monday, 12 February (see the Guide to Procedures in
Congregation cited in the note at the end of `University Agenda').


Promulgation of Statute

Statute: Salaries of academic staff

Explanatory note

Introduction Since its establishment in October 2000 as one of the major
policy-making committees of the new Council, the Personnel Committee
has been working to draw together a number of key long-running staffing
issues, and to make concrete progress on them in a co-ordinated way. In
general the committee is seeking to use the new central and divisional
structures to pursue policy and practice on personnel matters in a way
which is responsive to the concerns of university staff and their employing
departments, while taking full account of the importance of the college
dimension (where academic staff are concerned). The committee is acutely
conscious of the difficulties of doing this against the background of the
University's current financial constraints and, in many areas, a developing
but still uncertain national picture. However, it is determined to do what
it can to raise morale among staff, and believes that it is important as part
of that process to pursue swiftly, equitably, and coherently the development
of policies and practices which are based on local responsibility for change
within broad central frameworks.

BURDENS ON ACADEMIC STAFF

In respect of academic staff, the Personnel Committee is clear that the level
of burdens is in the eyes of many by far the most important issue. The
committee has reviewed the progress made under the previous governance
structures by the Joint Working Party on Joint Appointments and its
predecessors over the last several years. The joint working party made
some very valuable progress on recruitment and selection procedures for
joint appointments, and on new formulations for future university academic
contracts. New arrangements have also been agreed for buy-outs.

In terms of considering the actual academic workload of academic
staff, the joint working party undertook extensive preparatory work with
individual subject areas and colleges on optimal teaching arrangements.
That has enabled the Personnel Committee to set out a broad framework
for joint appointments: this involves retaining the key role of tutorials;
where appropriate reducing levels of college teaching to a core and
expanding faculty-organised small-group teaching to cover the margin
hitherto arranged by colleges; refining quality assurance mechanisms in
respect of centrally organised teaching; and providing that in most areas no
appointee should be required to teach more than 360 units (as defined) in
each year, the 360-unit maximum to be lower where subject areas and
colleges can achieve this.

The Personnel Committee is clear that the way forward now is to
encourage the new divisions and/or individual subject areas to engage in
intensive discussions with the colleges, with the full involvement of subject
tutors, with a view to streamlining teaching arrangements and reducing
burdens within that broad framework. Any necessary changes to the
detailed arrangements for academic duties in particular subject areas cannot
and should not be imposed centrally. Full local involvement is required,
with subject tutors determining, within the decision-making structures of
the University and the colleges, how best to design the syllabus, to
co-ordinate teaching, and to balance the academic duties of individual
members of the academic staff.

The Personnel Committee has therefore now urged the divisional
boards and through them the individual subject areas to pursue, as tutors
see fit, detailed developments to streamline academic work and to reduce
burdens at the individual level. The committee will retain broad oversight
of the development of the joint appointments scheme through its Joint
Appointments Panel, which has balanced university and college
representation.

ACADEMIC SALARIES (INCLUDING ULNTFS)

Various different and difficult issues have also been discussed recently in
the general field of academic salaries. All academic staff have an acute
personal interest in policy development in this area, and their views and
those of departments, faculties, divisions, and colleges tend to be strongly
held and often divergent—for example on the desirability on the one
hand of greater differentiation to enable the University to recruit, retain,
and reward key staff, and on the other hand the danger this might present
to collegiality and collaboration.

In this context the members of the Personnel Committee believe that
it is important to bear in mind that concerns about general (and particular)
salary levels are of course not confined to academic staff: they are as
important and as complex to address in respect of non-teaching staff
(although most non-academic and academic-related staff groups already
have provisions for additional payments, in appropriate cases, beyond the
top of the substantive scale on which the initial appointment is made). In
developing policy on academic salaries the Personnel Committee must,
because of its remit in respect of all university staff, have regard to current
and developing approaches in other parts of the salary structure.

One particular issue on the academic side is the long-running
question of the salaries of university lecturers holding non-tutorial
fellowships (ULNTFs): here the members of the Personnel Committee are
extremely heartened by the progress made by an ad hoc
working group of college and university representatives convened to
consider proposals made by the General Board. These proposals noted that
a careful role analysis exercise had indicated broadly that those ULNTFs
who took on a full teaching and administrative load equivalent to that of
tutorial fellows merited, in terms of the skills required, an overall salary at
the joint maximum (but not the additional payment in respect of full
tutorial responsibility which the housing allowance represents). The
problem has been to find a mechanism to reflect the different ways in
which the work of such ULNTFs for the collegiate University is
constituted, recognising that although the work of some ULNTFs is entirely
for the University, others undertake regular work for undergraduate
colleges (and virtually all devote a proportion of their time to their colleges
of association). The problem has of course been exacerbated by the
difficult financial position in which the colleges and the University find
themselves. The solution seems likely to involve inviting all ULNTFs (as
defined) to apply to join a new scheme permitting payment at the joint
maximum at age 45; an assessment by the Joint Appointments Panel of the
Personnel Committee as to whether the applicant will indeed have an
overall teaching and administrative load equivalent to that of a tutorial
fellow in the subject; if so, an assessment of the proportion of that load
which can be ascribed to university purposes; direct payment by the
University to successful applicants of a sum equivalent to that proportion
of the joint maximum; and direct payments by the colleges at an agreed
rate to successful applicants in respect of tutorial and equivalent work
actually done for them, so that if the equivalent load is actually delivered,
the ULNTF will overall receive the joint maximum.

The Personnel Committee has carefully considered whether it is
desirable to make any consequential general changes to the salary structure
for university readers, given that their maximum university salary is
£39,718 and under the proposals set out above some ULNTFs will
receive a university salary of £39,564. Noting that many readers in
fact receive additional college emoluments, that not all ULNTFs will apply
successfully to join the new scheme, and that traditionally the joint maxima
for lecturers and readers have been very close in monetary terms, the
committee has concluded that there is no case for a general increase in the
stipends of all readers. As set out below, however, the committee does
propose that readers should, like professors, be eligible to apply for
distinction awards.

This point leads on to the most difficult area which the Personnel
Committee has had to address, namely the central issue raised last Easter
by the Committee on Academic Salaries through the General Board and the
old Council: whether the maximum salaries of all lecturers should remain
fixed in every case at the top of the current salary scales, or whether
lecturers should in principle be able to be considered for additional
payments in appropriate cases.

There was a diverse response from faculty boards, colleges, and
individuals to the previous consultative paper on this (Supplement (2) to
Gazette No. 4544, 26 April 2000, p. 1015). A large majority
of faculty boards supported the principle of extending the availability of
merit awards to lecturers, as did a smaller majority of those colleges which
expressed a view. (Individual respondents were equally divided on the
principle.) Overall, there was a very widespread acceptance that it was not
appropriate for the University to be unable in any case, however
exceptional the circumstances, to offer individual lecturers a salary beyond
the top point of the current scales.

However, even those responses which were supportive of the general
principle tended to be critical of the details of the model put forward by
the General Board and the old Council. In part this criticism was directed
at the detailed criteria proposed, at the extensive and time-consuming
procedures suggested, and to a lesser extent at the range of staff groups it
was thought should be eligible to apply under an extended scheme.
Concerns were also raised about the interaction with other issues such as
burdens and the ULNTF problem (on which see above); but by far the
most consistent and telling criticism was directed at the proposed financial
provision for the new scheme.

The General Board and the old Council, while expressing the hope
that regular, well-funded exercises could be held under the suggested new
provisions, had been able to guarantee only one such exercise, with a
budget of £750K recurrent of new money. This was widely perceived
as inadequate to reward all deserving cases properly. While the
conservative approach of the General Board and the old Council was in
part due to their inability to mandate their successors, it also reflected the
University's difficult financial position. In the meantime these resource
problems have unfortunately become worse (one result being that the
£750K became one of the first casualties of the cuts necessary to
balance the budget for 2000--1). Although some modest additional
resources have now been promised by the DfEE to the higher education
sector as a whole, these are guaranteed for the period 2001--4 only; and
while some of the additional funds relate to salaries, it is unclear how
much of this will be available for Oxford, and on what terms, and what
proportion of it will be for differential payments as opposed to general
salary increases.

Against this background, the Personnel Committee has given very
careful consideration to how to proceed, noting that in the responses to the
earlier consultation there were very few suggestions as to alternative ways
forward, beyond much more generous funding of a revised version of the
scheme proposed; and also that in a number of subject areas the firm view
is that urgent action needs to be taken to provide more flexibility on salary
to safeguard the University's academic position. While there is considerable
support for some change in the current arrangements, it is less clear that
there is a consensus on what exactly that change might be. One major and
obvious problem is the current lack of sufficient resources to underpin
desirable reforms in the general area of salaries, whether this be
across-the-board pay increases, the introduction of regular, adequately
funded, gathered-field exercises to reward academic staff on a discretionary
basis, or a combination of both. The committee's first conclusion, then, in
response to a consistent theme in the replies to the earlier consultative
document, is that salary issues must be given a higher profile in the new
budgeting process. Historically the scope for change in this area has been
limited by the precommitment of resources for other purposes, with little
if any room for manoeuvre left to deal with salary issues beyond the
funding of general national pay awards. The view of the Personnel
Committee is that the need to reward the University's staff adequately must
instead become a primary and fundamental item in resource allocation
procedures, with other costs being cut if necessary to fund desirable
developments on pay.

The implications of this will take some time to work through, but the
new governance structures will encourage the development of medium- and
long-term policy in this area. In the interim, the Personnel Committee
believes that some decisions to ease pressures over the recruitment,
retention, and recognition and reward of staff can be taken within existing
resources.

The earlier consultation revealed serious concern among faculty
boards and colleges over the effect in certain cases of the level of payments
at the lower end of the lecturer scales, in view of some particular
difficulties in recruiting new lecturers, the general high costs of living in
Oxford, and the varying availability of help from colleges in this
connection. It is already possible for the salaries of lecturers to be paid
within the normal scale up to five points above the relevant age-wage
point, in pressing cases, and the committee believes that complete
flexibility within the scale should in principle be available to divisions in
future (but that the use of this flexibility must be funded within existing
resources, and that the current robust criteria and procedures governing the
award of extra increments should be maintained).

Because of the wide-ranging nature of the previous consultation, two
familiar procedures which have previously received the clear approval of
Congregation have been suspended, and the Personnel Committee believes,
in the light of the responses it received, that they should now be reinstated.
The first is the periodic gathered-field exercise to consider making new or
enhanced distinction awards to statutory and ad hominem
professors: the committee considers it vital to retain, within the current
financial constraints, a process to enable the professoriate to be considered
for additional remuneration above the Oxford professorial minimum in
order to help the University to retain its attraction to the most senior staff
in an increasingly competitive national and international context, and
believes that the existing arrangements should now be extended to cover
those holding the substantive post of reader. In line with previous
decisions, a separate funding stream should also be maintained for
distinction awards to incoming professors (and readers). The second
procedure is the availability of the conferment of the title of professor or
reader (without changes in duties or stipend) to recognise distinction. The
consultation revealed virtually unanimous support for the retention of
recognition of distinction, and the committee believes that there should be
biennial exercises in this connection over the next few years (with
provision for ad hoc decisions outside the normal gathered
fields in pressing cases, and for monitoring any salary anomalies that may
result).

Finally, in the current absence of sufficient funds to finance this
adequately and in the light of the views expressed in the consultative
exercise, the committee believes that there should at present be no general
scheme as previously proposed under which all academic staff could be
considered in a gathered field for merit awards. However, the committee
notes the clear majority opinion in the responses in favour of the principle
of extending merit awards to lecturers, and the almost unanimous opinion
that it is wrong that in no case should additional payments ever be
available above the top of the lecturer scales however strong the academic
imperative. The committee therefore believes that the potential for
flexibility should be introduced into the salary arrangements for lecturers
to permit additional payments in exceptional cases. This would be part of
the co-ordinated series of measures summarised below.

SUMMARY OF CONCLUSIONS ON ACADEMIC SALARIES

(a) Consideration of the scope for and desirability of
general salary increases, and/or the expansion of funds for targeted salary
increases, should become a principal feature of the annual budgeting
process, with both elements to be considered by the Planning and Resource
Allocation Committee on the advice of the Personnel Committee and in the
light of national funding developments.

(b) The current potential five-point flexibility within the
university age-wage scale for lecturers should be extended to provide
complete flexibility within that scale.

(c) Periodic exercises for professorial distinction awards
should be reinstated, the next round to involve new or enhanced awards
with effect from 1 October 2001, with statutory, `General Board', and
ad hominem readers to be eligible to apply alongside statutory
and ad hominem professors.

(d) A separate, adequately funded allocation to the
Vice-Chancellor should be maintained for awards to incoming professors.

(e) Periodic exercises for the recognition of distinction
should be reinstated, such exercises to be held biennially over the next few
years, and the next exercise to occur in 2001--2.

(f) There should be provision for ad hoc
recognition-of-distinction decisions to confer the title of reader or professor
in the interim, and between future exercises, in pressing cases.

(g) A mechanism should be available to enable the making
of additional payments to lecturers in exceptional cases relating to the
overwhelming academic importance of recruiting, retaining, and rewarding
key and distinguished staff.

The mechanism under (g) above would run on the following
lines:

(1) it would be limited to exceptional cases relating to the
overwhelming academic importance of retaining, rewarding, and (perhaps
to a lesser extent) recruiting key distinguished academic staff;

(2) those eligible would be those holding the university post of
university lecturer, CUF lecturer, faculty lecturer, special (non-CUF)
lecturer, assistant keeper, or keeper, and those holding the university title
of CUF lecturer or university lecturer, i.e. broadly those senior staff who
do not currently have access to discretionary salary arrangements (noting
that these are already in place, for example, for academic-related research
staff), with the Vice-Chancellor having discretion, on the advice of the
Personnel Committee, to rule on eligibility in other cases;

(3) when considering making extra payments to lecturers, regard would
be had to the framework for, and the distribution of, awards to professors
under the existing professorial distinction awards scheme (bearing in mind
the different demands of non-professorial posts);

(4) by definition there would be no gathered field, and no concomitant
time-consuming procedures;

(5) payments would be funded by divisions, from within existing
resources;

(6) it would be for heads of divisions to make the case for such
payments in individual cases, in terms of the academic importance of so
doing, and to provide firm evidence that the award would not lead to
unacceptable salary anomalies within the division (in all cases), and that the
normal stipend, plus all college income, would be significantly below the
individual's prospective salary (in retention cases) or current salary (in
recruitment cases). The Vice-Chancellor would consider the case, acquiring
whatever evidence and taking such advice (e.g. from members of the
Committee for Distinction Awards for Non-Clinical Professors) as seemed
to him or her to be appropriate. An annual report on his or her decisions
would be made in confidence to the Personnel Committee, decisions would
be available for reference to the Committee for Distinction Awards for
Non-Clinical Professors when that committee conducts its periodic
exercises to consider new or enhanced awards to professors and readers,
and a summary of all decisions on merit awards would be published in the
Gazette following each such periodic exercise.

Council has approved all of the above principles, noting that the
Personnel Committee will continue to discuss the detailed arrangements. In
the light of those principles, Council has resolved to promote the following
statute, which extends the availability of merit awards to lecturers and the
equivalent of professorial distinction awards to readers.

WHEREAS it is expedient to provide for the payment of
additional emoluments to the holders of academic posts, THE
UNIVERSITY ENACTS AS FOLLOWS.

1 In Tit. X, Sect. I (Statutes, 2000, p. 71), delete existing provisos
(b) and (c) and substitute:

`(b) the holders of all academic posts shall be paid under standard
arrangements to be determined from time to time by Council, provided that
this shall not prevent the payment of additional emoluments, which may be
pensionable, (i) in the form of such allowances in respect of administrative
responsibilities as may be prescribed by decree, or (ii) in the form of
awards in recognition of academic distinction or contribution to academic
work of the University in accordance with arrangements to be determined
from time to time by Council;'.

2 Reletter existing provisos (d)--(i) (ibid., pp. 71--3)
as
provisos (c)--( h).

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 25 January 2001: Notices<br />

Notices


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published
or recurrent entry.]

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REINTRODUCTION OF THE OXFORD
MOBILITY INCENTIVE SCHEME (OMIS)


Corrigendum

In the notice concerning the reintroduction of the Oxford Mobility Incentive
Scheme, printed in the Gazette of 11 January, p. 475, left-hand
column, the heading printed as `If aged 60 or over' should read
`If aged 60 or under'.

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WINTER WILLIAMS RESTITUTION PRIZE

A prize will be awarded to the candidate who, in the opinion of the examiners,
writes the best paper on Restitution in the examination for the Degree of
Bachelor of Civil Law or Magister Juris. The value of the prize is £300.
No special application is required.

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WINTER WILLIAMS EUROPEAN
BUSINESS REGULATION PRIZE

A prize will be awarded to the candidate who, in the opinion of the examiners,
writes the best paper on European Business Regulation in the examination for
the Degree of Bachelor of Civil Law or Magister Juris. The value of the prize
is £300. No special application is required.

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OXFORD CENTRE FOR FAMILY LAW
AND POLICY

This new research group has been established in the Department of Social
Policy by Ms Mavis Maclean, Mr John Eekelaar, and Professor Jane Lewis.
The address of the group is 32 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2ER
(telephone: Oxford (2)70325).

Until Ms Maclean's direct line and e-mail address are rearranged, those
wishing to contact her at present are asked to use her mobile telephone
number, 0777 1600 392, or 0207 435 4584. Her e-mail address remains, for
the time being, mavis.maclean@wolfson.ox.ac.uk.

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INSTITUTE OF ARCHAEOLOGY


German classes for archaeologists

A week of intensive German classes for archaeologists, for beginners and
intermediate learners, will be offered in the Institute of Archaeology in ninth
week of Hilary Term (12–16 March). Enquiries and registration requests
should be directed to the Receptionist, Institute of Archaeology, 36 Beaumont
Street, Oxford OX1 2PG (telephone: (2)78240, e-mail:
liz.strange@arch.ox.ac.uk). The course tutor will be Gertrud Seidmann,
Research Associate, the Institute of Archaeology.

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SPEAKING BY JUNIOR MEMBERS IN
CONGREGATION

Mr Vice-Chancellor has, with the agreement of Council, approved the
following arrangements for junior members to speak in Congregation under the
terms of Ch. I, Sect. x (Statutes, 2000, p. 213), which reads as follows:

`Any junior member as defined in Tit. XV, Sect. iv, § 1, cl. 2, may
speak at a meeting of Congregation, if called upon to do so by the Chairman
at the Chairman's discretion, provided that the Chairman may at any time
terminate a debate on the floor of the House and proceed to the final speeches
and the taking of a vote.'

The Chairman of Congregation will normally expect to call upon nominated
representatives of the Oxford University Student Union if they wish to speak
in debate, and will normally expect to call upon junior members to speak only
from among those who have given advance notice of their wish to be called.
Should the Chairman consider that the number of junior members who have
given such notice is excessive, he or she will have to be selective in calling
upon them. The Chairman will try to ensure a balanced debate in relation to
the apparent spread and strength of views held by junior members. If informed
selection is to be possible it is desirable that when giving notice of the wish
to be called a junior member should indicate (a) whether he or she
intends to support or oppose the motion before the House, (b)
whether he or she would speak on behalf of any club, committee, group, or
association, (c) whether he or she is supported by other junior
members (up to twelve of whom might sign the notice).

If the number giving notice is small they will all be admitted to the floor
of the House although this does not ensure their being called. In other cases
some selection may be necessary at the stages of both admission and calling
of speakers. If there is to be time to tell applicants whether they will be
admitted notice will have to be received in good time. Junior members should
therefore send in such notice, in writing, to the Registrar to be received at the
University Offices not later than 10 a.m. on the Monday preceding the debate
in question. The name of any representative nominated by OUSU should also
be communicated to the Registrar, in writing, through the President by that
time. A notice will then be posted in the University Offices and on the gate of
the Clarendon Building not later than 10 a.m. on the morning of the debate,
indicating whether all applicants will be admitted to the floor of the House or,
if selection has had to take place, the names of those selected for admission to
the floor.

Junior members not admitted to the floor of the House will normally be
permitted to listen to the debate from the gallery. Junior members on the floor
of the House will be asked to remain in their places while a vote is being
taken.

Under Tit. XV, Sect. iv, § 1, cl. 2, junior members are defined as
`those persons who, having been admitted to matriculation, are residing to
fulfil the requirements of any statute, decree, or regulation of the University
or reading for any degree, diploma, or certificate of the University and who
have not proceeded to membership of Convocation'. (Membership of
Convocation is obtained by taking a degree of the University.)

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 25 January 2001: Lectures<br />

Lectures


Contents of this section:

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INAUGURAL LECTURES


Norton Rose Professor of Commercial and Financial
Law

PROFESSOR A.S. BURROWS will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5.45 p.m. on Thursday,
1 March, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `We do this at Common Law but that in Equity.'



May Professor of Medicine

PROFESSOR R.V. THAKKER will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 8
February, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Stone deposition—from pyramids to pelvises.'

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SPEAKER'S LECTURES IN BIBLICAL STUDIES
(SECOND SERIES)

Future Hope and Present Reality

DR ANDREW CHESTER, University Lecturer in Divinity, University of Cambridge, will
deliver the second series of his Speaker's Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following Tuesdays in
the Examination Schools.

30 Jan.`Jesus: a failed prophet?'

6 Feb.: `Jesus: a failed Messiah?'

13 Feb.: `Living between the times.'

20 Feb.: `Time transformed: Johannine eschatology.'

27 Feb.: `Jesus transformed.'

6 Mar.: `Present and future transformed.'

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FORD'S LECTURES IN BRITISH HISTORY

An age of transition? Economy and society in the later Middle Ages

PROFESSOR C. DYER, Birmingham, will deliver the Ford's Lectures in British History at
5 p.m. on Fridays in the Examination Schools.

26 Jan.: `Community and privacy.'

2 Feb.: `Authority and freedom.'

9 Feb.: `Consumption and investment.'

16 Feb.: `Subsistence and markets.'


23 Feb.
: `Leisure and work.'

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SLADE LECTURES

Seeing through art history

PROFESSOR D. PREZIOSI, Professor of Art History, University of California, Los
Angeles, Slade Professor of Fine Art 2000–1, will deliver the Slade Lectures at 5 p.m.
on the following days in the Lecture Theatre, the University Museum of Natural History.
The lectures are open to the public.

Tue. 30 Jan.: `Holy terrors and teleologies.'

Thur. 1 Feb.: `Romulus, Rebus, and the Gaze of Victoria.'

Wed. 14 Feb.: `The astrolabe of the Enlightenment.'

Wed. 21 Feb.: `The crystalline veil and the phallomorphic
imaginary.'

Wed. 28 Feb.: `The museum of what you shall have been.'

Wed. 7 Mar.: `The limit(s) of representation.'

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CLARENDON LECTURES IN ECONOMICS

Volatility and growth

PROFESSOR P. AGHION, Harvard University, will deliver the Clarendon Lectures in
Economics at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination Schools.

Mon. 26 Feb.: `Volatility in emerging market economies.'

Tue. 27 Feb.: `Currency crises and monetary policy.'

Thur. 1 Mar.: `Technology and volatility in 2001.'

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RADHAKRISHNAN MEMORIAL LECTURES

Translating across boundaries: the experience of comparison with reference to Indian
studies, anthropology, and philosophy

DR J.-C. GALEY will deliver the Radhakrishnan Memorial Lectures at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays
in the Examination Schools.

6 Feb.: `Barren encounters, fertile misunderstandings:
Radhakrishnan in the legacy of his critics.'

13 Feb.: `Contextualising universals: Indian values, values and the
tradition of the present.'

20 Feb.: `Knowledge as dwelling: the ethnologist and
phenomenonology.'

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EVANS-PRITCHARD LECTURES 2000–1

Home, family, and property in Béarn, south-west France

THE REVD DR TIMOTHY JENKINS, Dean of Jesus College, Cambridge, will deliver the
Evans-Pritchard Lectures at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Old Library, All Souls
College.

7 Feb.: `The discovery of the Pyrenean family.'

14 Feb.: `Continuity over time: patterns of land inheritance.'

21 Feb.: `The contemporary Béarnais farming family.'

28 Feb.: `Local politics and land use.'

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LIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Palaeobiology Seminar Series

The University Museum of Natural History and the Department of Zoology are pleased to
announce a new series of seminars in the general area of palaeobiology. The seminars will
be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Lecture Theatre, the University Museum of Natural
History.

Conveners: Dr M. Sutton and Dr P.M. Barrett.

PROFESSOR R. FORTEY, Natural History Museum, London

25 Jan.: `Deducing life habits of long extinct animals: is it
science?'

DR P. SELDEN, Manchester

8 Feb.: `Fossils and phylogeny of arachnids: unravelling the
silken web.'

DR A. SMITH, Natural History Museum, London

15 Feb.: `The geological history of diversity: why the fossil
record is not all it seems to be.'

DR E. WESTON, Cambridge

1 Mar.: `Scaling in hippos: evolutionary implications of
allometric variation.'

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LITERAE HUMANIORES

Philosophy of Physics Seminars

With the exception of the ninth-week seminar, the following seminars will take place at 4
p.m. on Thursdays. The ninth-week seminar will take place on Tuesday, 13 March. The
seminars will be given in the Old Library, All Souls College, in weeks 1, 3, 5, and 7, and
in the Wharton Room, All Souls College, in weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, and 9.

Conveners: H.R. Brown, MA, Reader in Philosophy, J.N. Butterfield,
MA, Senior Research Fellow, All Souls College, and S.W. Saunders, MA, University
Lecturer in the Philosophy of Science.

D. WALLACE

25 Jan.
: `Everett and structure.'

PROFESSOR SIR MICHAEL BERRY, Bristol

1 Feb.: `Phase and polarisation singularities: edges, tides,
knots...'

DR HASOK CHONG, University College, London

8 Feb.: `Rumford on the reflection of radiant cold: historical
reflections and metaphysical reflexes.'

PROFESSOR SIR ROGER PENROSE

15 Feb.: To be announced.

P. MORGAN

22 Feb.: `Violations of Bell inequalities in classical continuum
models: arguments for the naturalness of the conspiracy loophole.'

PROFESSOR G. SEGAL

1 Mar.: `Some ways of understanding quantum field
theory.'

PROFESSOR J. EARMAN

8 Mar.: `Lambda: the constant that refused to die.'

DR P. BUSCH, Hull

Tue. 13 Mar.: `Axiomatics of Galilei-invariant particle
interactions.'

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MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Geophysical and Nonlinear Fluid Condensed Matter Seminars

The following seminars will be held on Tuesdays. The seminars on 6 February, 20 February,
and 6 March are joint seminars with the Mathematical Institute, in association with the
Applied Dynamical Systems seminar series.

Organiser: Dr Martin Juckes (telephone: (2)72894, e-mail:
juckes@atm.ox.ac.uk).

Conveners: P.L. Read, MA, Reader in Physics, and I.M. Moroz
(Ph.D. Leeds), University Lecturer (CUF) in Mathematics.

DR HIRO YAMAZAKI

30 Jan., 4.30 p.m., Dobson Room, AOPP: `Subsynoptic-scale
instability along the jet stream and nonlinear development of the shallow
disturbances.'

DR M. ROULSTON

6 Feb., 5 p.m., Mathematical Institute: `Can stochastic
parametrisations in the atmosphere improve ENSO in GCMs?'

DR J. VON HARDENBERG

20 Feb., 5 p.m., Mathematical Institute: `Eulerian and
Lagrangian properties of quasi-geostrophic turbulence at high Reynolds number.'

DR C. LONG, Sussex

27 Feb., 4.30 p.m., Dobson Room, AOPP: `Rotating flows in
gas turbines.'

DR M. PROCTOR, Cambridge

6 Mar., 5 p.m., Mathematical Institute: `Flux separation in
compressible magnetoconvection.'

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Condensed matter seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Thursdays in the Simon Room, the
Clarendon Laboratory.

Conveners: J.F. Ryan, MA, Professor of Physics, and J.T. Chalker,
MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in Physics.

DR R.M. BERRY

1 Feb.: `Rotary molecular motors.'

PROFESSOR R.A. STRADLING, Imperial College, London

8 Feb.: `Geometric magnetoresistance overpowers the giants and
colossi: new magnetoresistance effects in semiconductors.'

DR R.T. PHILLIPS, Cambridge

15 Feb.: `Excitonic coherence in inorganic and organic
semiconductors.'

DR D. MOWBRAY, Sheffield

22 Feb.: `Optical spectroscopy of self-assembled InGaAs
quantum dots.'

PROFESSOR S. BENDING, Bath

1 Mar.: `Recent progress in scanning hall probe
microscopy.'

DR G. ZACCAI, Institut de Biologie Structurale CEA-CNRS and ILL, Grenoble

8 Mar.: `X-ray and neutron scattering studies of structure-
function-dynamics relationships in proteins.'

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Hinshelwood Lectures: Novel spectroscopies using helium atoms, clusters, and
droplets

PROFESSOR J.P. TOENNIES, Max Planck Institut für Strömungsforschung,
Göttingen, will deliver the Hinshelwood Lectures at 11.15 a.m. on the following
Tuesdays and Thursdays in the Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory.

Convener: J. Klein, MA, D.Phil., Dr Lee's Professor of
Chemistry.

20 Feb. and 22 Feb.: `Helium atom time-of-flight spectra of molecules
dancing on surfaces.'

27 Feb. and 1 Mar.: `Diffracting frail, giant helium molecules from
nanostructured gratings.'

6 Mar. and 8 Mar.: `Ultra cold helium droplets as gentle corrals for
molecules and clusters.'

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Oxford Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics

Differential Equations and Applications Seminars

The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the common room,
Dartington House. The co-ordinators are S.D Howison and J.R. Ockendon (telephone:
(2)70501).

Details of the 15 February seminar will be announced later.

PROFESSOR A. BRIGGS

25 Jan.: `Mathematical problems in materials science.'

DR B. HAMBLY

1 Feb.: `The diffusion equation on fractal domains.'

PROFESSOR M. MACKEY, McGill

8 Feb.: `Periodic haematological diseases.'

DR E. WILSON, Bristol

22 Feb.: `Nonlinear dynamics of highway traffic models.'

DR A. JONES, Manchester

1 Mar.: `The calculation of vehicle speed from skid marks on
a curved surface.'

DR S. RIENSTRA, Eindhoven

8 Mar.: `Asymptotic solutions of sound propagation in a slowly
varying lined turbofan engine duct.'

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MEDICAL SCIENCES

Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Mondays in the Library, the Nuffield
Laboratory of Ophthalmology.

Convener: N.N. Osborne, MA, D.Sc., Professor of Ocular
Neurobiology.

DR S. GOUVEIA

29 Jan.: `A new meniscometry methodology for the slit
lamp.'

DR I. THOMPSON

5 Feb.: `Does cell death play a role in shaping topography in
developing retinal projections?'

DR M. NASH, Leicester

12 Feb.: `Imaging GPCR-mediated inositol phosphate
production in a single cell.'

DR A. WHITMORE, University College, London

19 Feb.: `How do retinal precursor cells decide what to
become?'

DR J. WOOD

26 Feb.: `GABA receptor agonists counteract depolarisation-
induced death to retinal neurones.'

N. BULL, Brisbane

5 Mar.: `Modulation of glutamate transporters by protein kinase
C within the rat retina.'

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Department of Radiology: visiting lectures, Hilary Term and Trinity Term

The following lectures will be given at 5.15 p.m. on Mondays in the Lecture Room, the
Oxford MRI Centre, the John Radcliffe Hospital.

DR S. MORCOS, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield

19 Feb.: `Urography with MRI and CT.'

DR J. WEBB, St Bartholomew's Hospital, London

19 Mar.: `Imaging in haematuria.'

DR H. IRVING, St James's Hospital, Leeds

14 May: `Is Doppler any use for the kidney?'

Speaker to be announced

18 June: `Investigation of renal masses' (title to be
confirmed
).

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G.L. Brown Lecture

PROFESSOR STEPHEN B. MCMAHON, Sherrington Professor of Physiology, Centre for
Neuroscience Research, King's College, London, will deliver the G.L. Brown Lecture at
4.30 p.m. on Wednesday, 31 January, in the Large Lecture Theatre, the University
Laboratory of Physiology. The lecture is sponsored by the Physiological Society.

Subject: `Pain, injury, and repair in the somatosensory system.'

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Pharmacology and Anatomical Neuropharmacology seminars

The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Lecture Theatre, the
Department of Pharmacology.

PROFESSOR N. OSBORNE

30 Jan.: `Ganglion cell death in glaucoma: how does it occur
and how can it be counteracted?'

PROFESSOR A.H. DICKENSON, University College, London

6 Feb.: `Plasticity in sensory processing in the spinal cord in
different pain states.'

PROFESSOR P. O'SHEA, Nottingham

13 Feb.: `Peptide–membrane and ligand–receptor
interactions: spatial imaging and kinetics.'

DR R. PERRINS, Bristol

20 Feb.: `The neuronal pathway that terminates activity in a
simple vertebrate locomotor central pattern generator.'

PROFESSOR W. WRAY, Liverpool

27 Feb.: `Uterine contractility—insights into the
mechanisms and their control.'

DR C. TAYLOR, Cambridge

6 Mar.: `Ca and IP3 receptors: a complex relationship.'

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MODERN HISTORY

PROFESSOR ALAN SHARP, University of Ulster, will give a talk at 5 p.m. on Monday,
29 January, in the European Studies Centre, St Antony's College, 70 Woodstock Road.

Subject: `James Headlam-Morley and Anglo-German relations,
1918–25.'

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Seminar in Medieval History

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on
Mondays in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: R.R. Davies, MA, D.Phil., Chichele Professor of
Medieval History, and C.P. Wormald, MA, University Lecturer (CUF) in Modern
History.

S. FOOT, Sheffield

29 Jan.: `Apocalypse tomorrow: perceptions of time in the
Alfredian Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.'

DR M. ATHERTON

5 Feb.: `A late Saxon homily collection: content and
context.'

R. FRAME, Durham

12 Feb.: `English political culture in late medieval
Ireland.'

E. HORNBY

19 Feb.: `Music and memory: Carolingian chant and its Roman
sources.'

D. BULLOUGH, St Andrews

26 Feb.: `Charlemagne's court library revisited.'

E. LAGADEC

5 Mar.: `The emancipation of Oxford.'

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MODERN HISTORY, SOCIAL SCIENCES

Seminar in Economic and Social History

The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Wharton Room, All Souls
College.

Conveners: P.A. David, MA, Professor of Economics and Economic
History, J. Humphries, MA (Ph.D. Cornell), Reader in Economic History, and A. Offer,
MA, D.Phil., Chichele Professor of Economic History.

D. STEAD

30 Jan.: `Missed opportunism: investment security in British
agriculture, c.1750–1850.'

DR HUMPHRIES

6 Feb.: `Child labour in the Industrial Revolution.'

DR A. GODLEY, Reading

13 Feb.: `Globalisation, convergence, and inequality,
1870–1914.'

DR A. GREEN

20 Feb.: `Reinforcing difference and fostering community:
railway construction and territorial fragmentation in Germany 1850–66.'

PROFESSOR M. DAUNTON, Cambridge

27 Feb.: `Monopolies and nuisances in Victorian cities.'

DR C. MCKENNA

6 Mar.: `The good, the bad, and the ugly: three case studies of
American management consultants at work, 1910–70.'

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ORIENTAL STUDIES

DR J.B. WHITMAN, Cornell University, will lecture at 5 p.m. on the following days.

Mon. 29 Jan., Oriental Institute: `Internal reconstruction of pre-Old
Japanese.'

Tue. 30 Jan., Oriental Institute: `Diachronic reanalysis from the
standpoint of current syntactic theory.'

Wed. 31 Jan., Examination Schools: `The Japanese–Korean
genetic relationship.'

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SOCIAL SCIENCES

PROFESSOR C.O. JONES, Wisconsin, will lecture on the state of American politics at 5
p.m. on Tuesday, 30 January, in the Clay Room, Nuffield College.

Convener: B.E. Shafer, MA, Andrew W. Mellon Professor of
American Government.

Subject: `The presidential transition into a fifty/fifty government:
presidential politics, 2001.'

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Politics and constitutional change under Labour

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the
Summer Common Room, Magdalen College.

Conveners: Sir Michael Wheeler-Booth, Dr Stewart Wood, and Dr
Christopher Brooke.

E. MILIBAND, Special Adviser to the Chancellor of the Exchequer

29 Jan.: `The case for Special Advisers to assist Ministers.'

THE RT. HON. MRS MARGARET BECKETT, MP, Leader of the Commons

5 Feb., 5.30 p.m.: `Modernising the Commons.'

BILL MORRIS, President, TUC, and General Secretary, Transport and General Workers'
Union

12 Feb.: `Trade unions and New Labour.'

LORD PAREKH, Chair, Commission on Multi-Ethnic Britain

19 Feb., 5.30 p.m.: `Rethinking race relations in Britain.'

SIR MURDO MACLEAN, ex-Private Secretary, Government Chief Whip Commons, and
MRS MARY ROBERTSON, Private Secretary to the Leader and Chief Whip, Lords

26 Feb.: `Organising the Government's business in
Parliament.'

THE RT. HON. BARONESS DEAN, formerly General Secretary, SOGAT, member PHSC

5 Mar.: `The House of Lord appointments system and the
Political Honours Scrutiny Committee: how they work.'

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Sociology Lunchtime Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 12.45 p.m. on Mondays in the Seminar Room,
Department of Sociology (3 George Street Mews).

A. ABBOTT, Chicago

20 Jan.: `Linked ecologies.'

PROFESSOR A. OFFER

5 Feb.: `Body weight and self-control in the United States and
Britain since c.1950s.'

B. MARSH

12 Feb.: `The evolution of irrationality: violations of normative
rationality in human and non-human contexts.'

H. VAN DE WERFHORST

19 Feb.: `A detailed examination of the role of education in
social class mobility in the Netherlands.'

K.-D. OPP, Leipzig

26 Feb.: `When do norms emerge by human design and by the
unintended consequences of human action? The example of the no-smoking
norm.'

S. HARPER and H. ZEILIG

5 Mar.: To be announced.

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THEOLOGY

Old Testament Seminars: amended notice

The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Mondays in the Large Seminar Room,
the Theology Faculty Centre.

This notice replaces that published in the Gazette of 18 January (p. 532).

Convener: J. Barton, MA, D.Phil., D.Litt., Oriel and Laing Professor
of the Interpretation of Holy Scripture.

DR L. KREITZER

5 Feb.: `The Messianic Man of Peace as temple builder:
Solomonic imagery as a background to Ephesians 1–2.' (Temple and
Worship series
)

A. HAGEDORN

19 Feb.: `The temple as a centre in Greece and Israel.'
(Temple and Worship series)

PROFESSOR BARTON

26 Feb.: `Dating the "Succession
Narrative".' (In search of Pre-Exilic Israel series)

MS C. SMITH

5 Mar.: `Women and the cult.' (Temple and Worship
series
)

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OXFORD COLLEGES ADMISSIONS OFFICE

Admissions Seminars 2001

DR KEITH TRIGWELL, Principal Research Fellow, Institute for the Advancement of
University Learning, will give a seminar at 12.30 p.m. on Friday, 2 February, in the Danson
Room, Trinity College.

Subject: `An investigation into the learning process at Oxford:
implications for admissions.'

This is one of a series of occasional seminars to be organised by the Admissions Office
throughout the academic year on topics related to undergraduate admissions and selection.
All Tutors for Admissions are invited. It is expected that the seminar will end around 1.30
p.m. Light refreshments will be available.

Anyone wishing to attend is asked to contact Louise Horsfall, Project Officer, Oxford
Colleges Admissions Office (telephone: (2)70571, e-mail: louise.horsfall@admin.ox.ac.uk).

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INSTITUTE OF BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the Pauling Human
Sciences Centre.

Details of the 1 March seminar will be announced later.

PROFESSOR C. STRINGER

25 Jan.: `Origins of modern humans.'

DR S. ELTON, Kent

1 Feb.: `OW monkey palaeobiology: a model for hominin
evolution.'

P. RAMALEY, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics

8 Feb.: `Host genetics of HIV infection and progression in
Uganda.'

DR C. TYLER-SMITH

15 Feb.: `Y chromosomal DNA polymorphism and human
population history.'

DR M. HERMANUSSEN, Kiel

22 Feb.: `Cyclical growth dynamics in children.'

DR R. MACE, University College, London

8 Mar.: `Evolutionary ecology of reproduction in the Gambia.'

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SAÏD BUSINESS SCHOOL

Interdepartmental finance seminars

The following seminars will be held at 12.30 p.m. on Fridays in the Lecture Room (Staircase
L), Nuffield College.

Conveners: Alexander Gümbel (Saïd Business School),
Neil Shephard (Economics), and Sam Howision (Mathematics).

Administration: Elaine Durham, Saïd Business School, 59 George
Street, Oxford OX1 2BE (telephone: Oxford (2)88683, e-mail:
elaine.durham@sbs.ox.ac.uk).

R. BACHMANN, Amsterdam

26 Jan.: `Payout policy design.'

N. SHEPHARD

2 Feb.: `Stochastic volatility models of OU type: levy
processes, data analysis, and option pricing.'

Z. FLUCK, Stern School of Business

9 Feb.: to be announced.

M. DAVIS, Imperial College

16 Feb.: `Stochastic volatility: the hedger's perspective.'

H. WEEDS, Warwick

23 Feb.: `Real options and competition.'

R. PAYNE, LSE

2 Mar.: `Order flow interactions in a hybrid market: evidence
from the London Stock Exchange.'

S. BOND

9 Mar.: `Noisy share prices and the Q model of investment.'

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COMPUTING LABORATORY

Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminars

Unless indicated otherwise, the following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in
the Lecture Theatre, the Computing Laboratory.

The co-ordinators are L.N. Trefethen and J. Scott (RAL). Further information may be
obtained from Shirley Day (telephone: Oxford (2)73885).

PROFESSOR K.W. MORTON, Bath

25 Jan.: `The system wave equation—a generic hyperbolic
problem?'

PROFESSOR J. BINNEY

1 Feb.: `Simulating galaxy formation.'

DR C. CAMPBELL, Bristol

8 Feb., RAL: `Support vector machines and related kernel
methods.'

DR D. GRIFFITHS, Dundee

15 Feb.: `Mixed finite element methods, stability, and related
issues.'

DR O. ERNST, Bergakademie Freiberg

22 Feb.: `Acceleration strategies for restarted minimum residual
methods.'

PROFESSOR M. STADTHERR, Notre Dame

1 Mar., RAL: `Reliable process modelling and optimisation
using interval analysis.'

PROFESSOR W. HEINRICHS, Essen

8 Mar.: `Spectral multigrid methods for the
Navier–Stokes equations.'

PROFESSOR I. SLOAN, New South Wales

15 Mar.: `Scientific computing for problems on the
sphere—applying good approximations on the sphere to geodesy and the scattering
of sound.'

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RUSKIN SCHOOL OF DRAWING AND FINE
ART

Ruskin then and now

The following lectures will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Examination Schools.
The series has been organised to coincide with the exhibition `Praeterita:
a series of photographs suggested by the autobiography of John Ruskin', by John Riddy, at
the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art, 19 January–23 February.

ROBERT HEWISON

30 Jan.: ` "The teaching of art is the teaching of all
things": Ruskin, art, and society.'

STEPHEN BURY

6 Feb.: `Ruskin and slavery.'

DINAH BIRCH

13 Feb.: `Ruskin and the education of communities.'

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OXFORD CENTRE FOR HEBREW AND JEWISH
STUDIES

PROFESSOR YOSEF KAPLAN, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, will lecture at 5 p.m. on
Thursday, 15 February, in the Examination Schools.

The lecture is being given to celebrate the inauguration of the new Oxford University
Teaching and Research Unit in Hebrew and Jewish Studies.

Subject: `The civilising process of the Western Sephardim in early
modern Europe.'

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LANGUAGE CENTRE

Lunctime seminars in applied linguistics

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Thursdays in the Language Centre, 12
Woodstock Road. Refreshments will be available in the Language Centre reception area from
12.30 p.m.

Details of the 22 February seminar will be announced later.

M. CHARLES

8 Feb.: `Exploiting the Oxford Academic Text Corpus: authorial
stance in politics and materials science theses.'

DR C. WALTER, Cambridge

8 Mar.: `Working memory and the LC reading threshold.'

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UNIVERSITY MUSEUM OF NATURAL
HISTORY

MARK WALLINGER, Artist in Residence, will give an illustrated talk and video
presentation, entitled `Credo', at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, 31 January, in the Lecture Theatre,
the University Museum.

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OXFORD CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Centre for Socio-Legal
Studies, Wolfson College.

Convener: D.J. Galligan, MA, DCL, Professor of Socio-Legal Studies
and Director of the Centre.

PROFESSOR M. ADLER, Edinburgh

29 Jan.: `A socio-legal approach to procedural justice.'

DR M. COHN, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

5 Feb.: `Fuzzy legality in regulation: the legislative mandate
reconsidered.'

DR PENG HWA ANG, Nanyane Technological University, Singapore

12 Feb.: `The myths of Internet content non-regulation.'

PROFESSOR G. HAY, Cornell

26 Feb.: `The challenges of competition policy.'

C. STEWART, Macquarie University

5 Mar.: `The tort of wrongful living: a wrong without a
remedy?'

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CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE AND THE
MAISON FRANÇAISE D'OXFORD

Collecting antiquities from Pliny to Soane

This meeting will be held on Saturday, 24 February, in the Maison Française.

Places are limited and booking is essential. To book, contact Robin Osborne, Corpus Christi
College, Oxford OX1 4JF (e-mail: robin.osborne@ccc.ox.ac.uk).

A. ROUVERET, Paris X: `De tabulis omnibus signisque publicandis:
some attitudes toward collecting in Pliny's Naturalis Historia.'

I. AGHION, Paris: `The King's Collection: Louis XV and J.-J.
Barthélemy.'

J. FEJFER, Copenhagen, and R. SCHNEIDER, Cambridge:
`Collecting antiquities in the English countryside.'

D. PREZIOSI, Slade Professor: `The museum of what you shall have
been: John Soane's antiquity.'

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LINACRE COLLEGE


Linacre Lectures

Managing the Earth

The Linacre Lectures will be given at 5.30 p.m. on Thursdays in Hilary Term
in Lecture Theatre A, the Zoology/Psychology Building, South Parks Road.

PROFESSOR P. SANDS, SOAS, London

1 Feb.: `Who governs the sustainable world? The role of
international courts and tribunals.'

DR B. METZ, Netherlands National Institute of Public Health and the Environment,
Bilthoven

8 Feb.: `Will technology save us?'

DR J. GUPTA, Amsterdam

15 Feb.: `Negotiating climate change: can a divided world unite?'

PROFESSOR R. CONSTANZA, Maryland

22 Feb.: `Valuing the Earth.'

SIR JOHN BROWNE, Group Chief Executive, BP Amoco

1 Mar.: `The role of corporate leadership.'

SIR CRISPIN TICKELL

8 Mar.: `Risks of conflict: resource and population pressures.'

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MANSFIELD COLLEGE


Oxford Centre for the Environment, Ethics, and
Society

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the ground-floor Council
Room, Mansfield College. Admission is free and open to the public.

Details of the 20 February seminar will be announced later.

For further information contact Caroline Bastable, OCEES, Mansfield College, Mansfield
Road, Oxford OX1 3TF (telephone and fax: Oxford (2)70886, e-mail:
ocees@mansfield.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR D. GIBBS, Hull

30 Jan.: `Governance, regimes, and local environmental policy-
making.'

A. DIXON, Sheffield Hallam

6 Feb.: `Fictional futures, sustainable stories.'

F. DODDS, Co-Ordinator, UNED-Forum

13 Feb.: `Environmental and social values in the international
community.'

D. BRUCE, Church of Scotland Society, Religion and Technology Project

27 Feb.: `The ethics of GM crops and food.'

A. WILKINSON and F. MONKS, Shell International Petroleum Company

6 Mar.: `Sustainability in 2030.'

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ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

The future of the nation-state: amended notice

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Main Lecture Theatre, St
Antony's College (building of the Nissan Institute).

This notice replaces previous announcements. The arrangements for the speakers at the 6
February meeting are now as given below.

Conveners: Professor Archie Brown, Mr Mark Fisher, MP, and the
Rt. Hon. Gillian Shephard, MP.

LORD DAHRENDORF, MR EDWARD GARNIER, QC, MP, MR GILES RADICE, MP

30 Jan.: `The impact of the European Union.'

SIR PATRICK CORMACK, MP, DR CALUM MACDONALD, MP, and KENNETH
(LORD) MORGAN

6 Feb.: `The cases of Scotland and Wales.'

MR MARK FISHER, MP, PROFESSOR PETER HENNESSY, and THE RT. HON.
GILLIAN SHEPHARD, MP

13 Feb.: `The English Question: an English Parliament or
regional government?'

DR DAVID HINE, SIR MICHAEL JAY, and DR KALYPSO NICOLAÏDIS

20 Feb.: `West European experience in comparative
perspective.'

FORMER SENATOR GARY HART, PROFESSOR DESMOND KING, and MR IAN
SCOTT

27 Feb.: `The United States: nation-building, ethnic diversity,
and multi-culturalism.'

PROFESSOR BROWN, SIR PATRICK CORMACK, MP, MR MARK FISHER, MP, and
THE RT. HON. GILLIAN SHEPHARD, MP

6 Mar.: `Concluding reflections.'

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African Studies Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays, as follows: weeks 1–4,
in the Fellows' Dining Room, St Antony's College; weeks 5–8, in the School of
Geography.

Further details may be obtained from Professor William Beinart (telephone: Oxford (2)84730,
e-mail: william.beinart@sant.ox.ac.uk), or his secretary (telephone: Oxford (2)74477, e-mail:
janet.pearson@sant.ox.ac.uk).

Conveners: W. Beinart, MA, Rhodes Professor of Race Relations,
P.O. Daley, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in Human Geography, and B. Page, MA,
Lecturer in Geography, St Hugh's College.

W. ADAMS, Cambridge

25 Jan.: `Trouble with the neighbours: the costs and benefits
of gorilla conservation in Uganda.'

K. KOSER, University College, London

1 Feb.: `New African diasporas.'

I. PIKIRAYI, Zimbabwe

8 Feb.: `Landscapes of the Zimbabwe culture states,
1100–1900.'

DR DALEY, PROFESSOR A. GOUDIE, DR A. LEMON, and MR PAGE

15 Feb.: `Geographical studies on Africa.'
(Colloquium)

L. STEVENS

22 Feb.: `Legitimacy and leadership: community participation
in housing projects in Africa.'

M. MORTIMER and M. TIFFEN, ODI/ESRC Drylands Research

1 Mar.: `Livelihood transformations in semi-arid Africa
1960–2000.'

P. LE BILLON, ODI

8 Mar.: `A land cursed by wealth? The political economy of
war in Angola.'

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Middle East Centre

Under the auspices of the Turkish Embassy there will be a `live' documentary (with slides)
on `Turkish arts through the ages' presented by PROFESSOR TALAT HALMAN, Bilkent
University, Ankara, and MS YILDIZ KENTER. This will take place at 5.30 p.m. on
Thursday, 1 February, in St Giles' House, 16 St Giles' (by kind permission of St John's
College).

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ST HUGH'S COLLEGE


Middle Common Room

Moving towards a sustainable world

The following lectures will be given at 5.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the Old JCR, St Hugh's
College.

For directions and general information, telephone Oxford (2)74900. Further information may
be obtained from Alison Ussing (e-mail: alison.ussing@st-hughs.ox.ac.uk).

DR G. GOODWIN-GILL

25 Jan.: `Sovereignty, human rights, and migration.'

DR N. SUMEMRTON

1 Feb.: `Sustainability and religious values.'

DR J. WELTON

8 Feb.: `Sustainable development or natural selection—can
we adapt to survive?'

DR M. ESIRI

15 Feb.: `Assisting development—is there a better way?
Musings of a wandering neuropathologist.'

DR S. NEW

22 Feb.: `Industry and sustainability—the prospects for
greening the supply chain.'

DR C. BROCK

1 Mar.: `The role of women in a sustainable world.'

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UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture in Jurisprudence and
Political Philosophy

PROFESSOR R. DWORKIN, FBA, will deliver the Hart Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on
Tuesday, 13 February, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Hart's postscript and the point of political philosophy.'

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WOLFSON COLLEGE


Wolfson College Lectures

China's technology transfer to the world

The Wolfson Lectures will be given at 6 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Hall, Wolfson College.
The lectures are open to the public.

PROFESSOR L. LEDDEROSE, Heidelberg

30 Jan.: `The quest for the perfect copy: bronze casting and the
invention of printing in China.'

N. WOOD

6 Feb.: `Chinese ceramics and their impact on the world.'

PROFESSOR D. KUHN, Würzburg

13 Feb.: `On the origin and transfer of silk technology.'

PROFESSOR T. BARRETT, SOAS, London

20 Feb.: `The rise and spread of printing.'

PROFESSOR HO PENG YOKE, Cambridge

27 Feb.: `The gunpowder epic.'

DR GU SHULIN, Tsinghua University, China

6 Mar.: `Technology and institutions in contemporary China.'

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FRIENDS OF THE PITT RIVERS MUSEUM

The following lectures will be held at 6 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Pitt Rivers Research
Centre, 64 Banbury Road. Visitors are welcome, but are asked to make a contribution of
£2 to the Friends' Purchasing Fund.

DR L. PEERS

8 Feb.: `Of research and relationships: first nation countries,
customs, and collections at the Pitt Rivers.'

J. STARKEY, Durham

14 Mar.: `Sheikhs, swords, and daggers.'

E. KINGDON

11 Apr.: `Jogging memories: characters I met in Northern
Queensland.'

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OXFORD ITALIAN ASSOCIATION

Lectures

The following lectures will be given at 7.45 for 8 p.m. on the days shown. Unless otherwise
indicated, they will be held in the Mary Ogilvie Theatre, St Anne's College. Admission is
£1 for members, £3 for non-members (students free).

Further information on the aims and activities of the association may be obtained from the
Honorary Secretary, Mrs Patricia Milner (telephone: Oxford 377479, e-mail:
pmilner@clara.net).

S. QUILL

Thur. 25 Jan.: `Ruskin's Venice: the stones revisited.'

E. PASSANNANTI

Thur. 8 Feb., No. 48 Common Room, St Anne's College: Ms
Passannanti will read, and recite her poetry (with translations).

DR J. STRUPP, Buckingham

Tue. 13 Feb.: `From holy houses to guest houses: a history of
Venetian tourism.'

PROFESSOR R. COOPER

Tue. 27 Feb.: `Dante on stage' (with informal dramatic
illustrations
).


Other events

Film: Sedotta e abbandonata, with subtitles, 8 p.m. on Monday, 19
February, Rewley House Film Theatre, Wellington Square. Admission free.

Conversazione in italiano: 7.45 for 8 p.m., Monday, 5 March, Pauling Institute
for Human
Sciences, 58 Banbury Road. Admission free.

Day-school, led by Professor J.R. Woodhouse: `The Renaissance in Ferrara
(music, art,
patronage, and literature)', Rewley House, Saturday, 10 March, 9.30 a.m.–5 p.m.
Differential fees, further details, and enrolments available through the OUDCE, Rewley
House (telephone: Oxford (2)70368).

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 25 January 2001: Grants and Funding<br />

Grants and Research Funding


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



OXFORD ITALIAN ASSOCIATION


Grants to promote Italian culture

The Oxford Italian Association offers modest top-up grants, not
normally of more than £100, to assist graduate students and
others to promote aspects of Italian culture in Oxford. Such
grants may be used, for instance, to help stage an Italian play,
to contribute to research expenses (including travel to Italy),
and other activities which the committee judge to be of value in
this area. Applications, with a brief account of the project and
if possible a supporting note from a tutor, should be sent by 12
March to Professor J.R. Woodhouse, Taylorian Annexe, 47
Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JF. Applications arriving after
that date may be considered for future grants.

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section





<br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 25 January 2001: Examinations and Boards<br />

Examinations and Boards


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published
or recurrent entry.]

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of
Council, the following changes in regulations made by the Social Sciences
Board will come into effect on 9 February.


Social Sciences Board

M.Sc. in Criminology and Criminal Justice (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 2000, p.764, after l. 41 insert:

`Criminology and Criminal Justice

1. Every candidate must follow, for at least three terms, a course of
instruction in Criminology and Criminal Justice.

2. There shall be a board of studies for the course, to be chaired by the
Director of the Centre for Criminological Research and comprising the director
of studies and such other members of the Centre for Criminological Research
and of the Faculty of Law as provide teaching for the course, plus one student
representative.

3. The course will consist of three elements: core course, options, and
thesis. The core course will run for two hours a week for the first two terms
(Michaelmas and Hilary) . Options will run for six weeks in each term
(Michaelmas, Hilary and Trinity) . Candidates will be required to choose two
options in each of the first two terms and one for the final term. The
dissertation will be 12,000–15,000 words long on a topic to be agreed
by the board of studies.

4. The syllabus outlines will be as follows:

Core Course: Analytical Criminology and Criminal Justice

(a) constructing knowledge of crime, offenders and victims

(b) justifications and principles of social control

(c) prevention, risk and effectiveness

(d) discretion and accountability

(e) the impacts of race, gender and class

(f) organised and white-collar crime

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Option 1: Policing, Surveillance, and Actuarial Justice

(a) the emergence of professional policing

(b) the development of knowledge about the police

(c) police culture, its consequences and organisational
responses

(d) policing professional and organised crime

(e) police corruption and miscarriages of justice

(f) the politics of the police

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Option 2: Sentencing

(a) the structure of sentencing practice

(b) law and politics in sentencing

(c) sentencing repeat offenders

(d) aggravating and mitigating factors

(e) defendants' rights, victims' rights, and procedural justice

(f) comparative perspectives on sentencing structures

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Option 3: Dilemmas of Custody

(a) a just measure of pain: the historical emergence of the use
of imprisonment

(b) understanding the forces shaping the use of imprisonment

(c) fundamental dilemmas and conflicts in prison organisation
and regimes

(d) serving short time: providing for remand and short-term
prisoners

(e) young offenders behind bars

(f) the problem of security, order and control of long-term
prisoners

(g) releasing long-term prisoners: the mechanics and politics
of parole

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Option 4: The Design and Evaluation of Research

This course will be run as a "research workshop", with students
being expected to play a part at each session in the design of a criminological
project. This method will be used to illustrate the following themes:

(a) understanding the relationship between theory and research
in criminology

(b) the politics of the research enterprise: the relationship
between the researcher, the research subject and the funding body

(c) designing research: balancing ambitions with constraints

(d) different methodological approaches, ranging across
surveys, ethnographical fieldwork, and controlled experiments

(e) spotting the flaws: a critical approach to research findings

(f) vulnerable subjects: ethical issues in criminological research

Option 5: Community Penalties

(a) the history of non-custodial disposals

(b) the expansion of community penalties: is the net of social
control
widening?

(c) the changing rationale of community penalties

(d) the effectiveness of community penalties: "Nothing
Works" versus "What Works"

(e) problems of assessing the effectiveness of community
penalties

(f) the new language of risk, rationality and choice: probation
in the 21st Century

Option 6: Human Rights and Criminal Justice

(a) human rights in theory and practice

(b) the Human Rights Act and the European Convention

(c) human rights and pre-trial procedure

(d) human rights and fair trials

(e) human rights, sentencing, and release

(f) human rights and the administration of sanctions

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Option 7: Restorative Justice in International Perspective

(a) history and definition of restorative justice

(b) models of restorative justice

(c) victims, criminological theory and restorative justice

(d) the community and restorative justice

(e) offenders, offences and forms of restorative justice

(f) sociological critiques

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Option 8: Comparative Criminal Justice

(a) the meanings of crime in different jurisdictions

(b) the politics of criminal justice

(c) differences of institutional structure

(d) comparative sentencing and penal sanctions

(e) the place of the victim in different jurisdictions

(f) the effects of harmonisation and globalisation on criminal
justice policies

5. The course shall be assessed as follows:

(i) Core course: There shall be a three-hour examination for
the core course, to be taken in week one of Trinity Term. Candidates shall be
required to pass at least three of the four assessed essays submitted in
Michaelmas and Hilary Terms as a condition of admission to the core course
examination.

(ii) Options: Options other than "Design and
Evaluation of Research" shall be examined by means of an assessed
essay of 3,500–5,000 words, for which time will be set aside during the
last two weeks of each term. A title, or choice of titles (as determined by the
course leader for the option), shall be posted on the designated noticeboard at
the Centre for Criminological Research by noon on the Friday of week four
of the relevant term. Candidates shall be required to submit the essay to the
Clerk of the Schools, Examinations Schools, High Street, Oxford not later than
five weeks after this date, by noon.
For "Design and Evaluation of Research", there shall be a special
ongoing assessment exercise, the nature of which will be explained to students
at the beginning of the option; precise details of the assessment will be posted
on the designated noticeboard at the Centre for Criminological Research by
noon on the Friday of week four of the relevant term.

(iii) Dissertation: Two typewritten copies of the dissertation
shall be submitted to the Clerk of the Schools by noon on Friday of week nine
of Trinity Term. One bound copy of the dissertation of each candidate who
passes the examination shall be deposited in the library at the Centre for
Criminological Research.

6. The degree of M.Sc. shall be awarded to any candidate who achieves
at least 60 per cent in all papers and the dissertation. The examiners may
award a distinction to any candidate who achieves marks of at least 70 per cent
on at least half of the papers: in this calculation, both the core course and the
dissertation shall count as two papers and each option shall count as one.

7. Arrangements for reassessments shall be as follows:

(i) Core course: Candidates who fail the core-course
examination may resit the examination in the Trinity Term of the following
academic year. Such candidates who have completed successfully either or
both of (a) the options (i.e. all five assessed essays) and
(b) the dissertation may carry forward the marks gained for those
part or parts of the course.

(ii) Options: Candidates who fail up to two of the four
assessed essays submitted in Michaelmas and Hilary Terms shall resubmit that
essay or essays to the Clerk of the Schools by noon on Friday four weeks after
week nine of the term in which the essay or essays were first submitted.
Candidates who fail more than two of the four essays, or one or more
resubmitted essays, or who fail the fifth essay submitted in Trinity Term, may
resubmit all five essays to the Clerk of the Schools according to the standard
timetable for submitting essays in the following academic year. Such
candidates who have completed successfully either or both of (a)
the core course examination and (b) the dissertation may carry
forward the marks gained for those part or parts of the course.

(iii) Dissertation: Candidates who fail the dissertation may
resubmit the dissertation by the required date in the Trinity Term of the
following academic year. Such candidates who have completed successfully
either or both of (a) the core course and (b) the
options may carry forward the marks gained for those part or parts of the
course.'

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following divisional boards, faculty boards, and committee
give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Medical Sciences

C. TUFARELLI, Wolfson: `Activation and silencing of a globin expression'.

Brasenose, Friday, 2 February, 2 p.m.


Examiners: N.J. Proudfoot, N. Brockdorff.

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Social Sciences

S. ALLEN, Nuffield: `Male rape as a threat to masculine identity'.

Centre for Criminological Research, Wednesday, 14 February, 2 p.m.


Examiners: R.P. Young, E.M.W. Maguire.

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Biological Sciences

S.C. HOWARD, New College: `Statistical estimation of epidemiological parameters relating
to infectious disease'.

Department of Zoology, Friday, 2 February, 11 a.m.


Examiners: A.C.H. Ghani, M.E.J. Woolhouse.

CHUNG-SHENG BRIAN LEE, Wolfson: `Studies of SPOIIA, the anti-anti-6F factor of
Bacillus subtilis'.

Department of Biochemistry, Monday, 29 January, 10.30 a.m.


Examiners: K.G.H. Dyke, M.J. Buttner.

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Clinical Medicine

J. JOHN, Balliol: `Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in primary care: a randomised
controlled trial and qualitative study'.

Green College, Wednesday, 21 March, 2 p.m.


Examiners: T.J. Key, R. Pill.

R. WHITE, Jesus: `Developing an infectious Epstein–
Barr virus-based vector for the delivery of genomic transgenes'.

Department of Biochemistry, Monday, 19 February, 2 p.m.


Examiners: C. Tyler-Smith, P. Farrell.

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English Language and Literature

J.E. GRIFFITHS, Magdalen: `"The Liberty to Speak": authority in the poetry
of John Skelton'.

St Anne's, Monday, 29 January, 2 p.m.


Examiners: P. Strohm, C.J. Burrow.

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Law

J. NEWTON, St Edmund Hall: `The uniform interpretation of the Brussels and Lugano
Conventions'.

Keble, Monday, 29 January, 11.30 a.m.


Examiners: W.E. Peel, W.A. Kennett.

M. SU LIN OOI, Merton: `Shares in the conflict of laws'.

Examination Schools, Monday, 26 March, 2 p.m.


Examiners: R.M. Goode, R. Fentiman.

T.R. TOLLEY, St Anne's: `Understanding children's rights'.

All Souls, Wednesday, 31 January, 2.30 p.m.


Examiners: S.M. Cretney, D. Archard.

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Mathematical Sciences

A.F.M. PENAUD, Somerville: `Optimal decisions in finance: passport options and the bonus
problem'.

Dartington House, Friday, 26 January, 10.45 a.m.


Examiners: B.M. Hambly, C. Atkinson.

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Modern History

S. KING, Oriel: `Parties, issues, and personalities: the structural determinants of Irish voting
behaviour from 1885 to 2000'.

Hertford, Thursday, 8 February, 2 p.m.


Examiners: R.F. Foster, R. Sinnott.

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Social Studies

J.A. CUESTA, Hertford: `Social transfers, the household, and the distribution of incomes
in Chile'.

Nuffield, Friday, 9 March, 2 p.m.


Examiners: A. Atkinson, R. Vos.

A. ZASLAVSKY, Nuffield: `The Anglo-Russian Entente: alliance formation and
management, 1907–14'.

Nuffield, Friday, 2 February, 11.30 a.m.


Examiners: K. Nabulsi, P.J.S. Duncan.

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Committee for Archaeology

E. VARDAKI, St Antony's: `Consuming pastoralism. An anthropological insight in the
archaeology of animal husbandry'.

Institute of Archaeology, Tuesday, 20 February, 2 p.m.


Examiners: D.J.L. Bennet, H.A. Forbes.

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EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF
MASTER OF LETTERS

The examiners appointed by the following faculty board give notice of oral examination of
their candidate as
follows:

Anthropology and Geography

K. MARTINDALE, St Catherine's: `To what extent are the modern Olympic Games a
catalyst for urban redevelopment? Case study: the 2000 summer Olympic Games,
Sydney, Australia'.

School of Geography and the Environment, Thursday, 29 March, 2 p.m.


Examiners: G.L. Clark, K. Anderson.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 25 January 2001: Colleges<br />

Colleges, Halls, and Societies


Contents of this section:

Return to Contents Page of this issue



OBITUARIES


Corpus Christi College

HERBERT CAIRNS BOLTON, MA, 11 July 2000; MA status 1968–9. Aged 79.

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Hertford College

FREDERICK NOEL CHARLTON, CB, CBE, November 2000; commoner 1925.

LANCELOT JOHN BUNSTER CORIN, September 2000; commoner 1947.

RALPH HORNER, 21 July 2000; commoner 1946.

MAURICE RAYMOND HUMPHREYS, 13 September 2000; commoner 1937.

THE HON. MARCEL JOSEPH AIMÉ LAMBERT, QC, 24 September 2000; Rhodes
Scholar 1947. Aged 81.

LLEWELYN POWELL LEWIS, 21 April 2000; commoner 1934. Aged 83.

CHARLES CASPAR TREMLETT, September 2000; commoner 1935.

ANTHONY MICHAEL WALTON, QC, 18 November 2000; scholar 1943. Aged 75.

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St Anne's College

MRS MONICA BARNETT (née Gluck); Member of St Anne's
Society
1941–4.

MRS JAN BURT (née Watson); Member of St Anne's Society
1952–5.

MRS HESTER BURTON (née Wood-Hill); Member of the Society
of Oxford
Home-Students 1932–5.

MISS MARIAN GIMBY; Member of the Society of Oxford Home-Students
1928–31.

SISTER SARA GRANT; Member of St Anne's Society 1945–8.

MISS DOREEN HARDY; Member of the Society of Oxford Home-Students
1933–6.

MRS JESSIE HARRISON-HALL (née Brown); Member of St
Anne's Society
1943–6.

MRS ALTHEA HILL (née Gibbins); exhibitioner
1964–7.

MRS ELEANOR HOLMES (née Murphy); Member of St Anne's
Society
1945–8.

MISS VICTORIA KINGSLEY; Member of the Society of Oxford Home-Students
1920–3.

MISS DOROTHY MCEUNE; Member of the Society of Oxford Home-Students
1930–3.

MRS WINIFRED MORLEY (née Taylor); Member of the Society
of Oxford
Home-Students 1936–9.

MISS DOROTHEA PULLAN; Member of the Society of Oxford Home-Students
1925–8.

MRS FLORENCE RILEY (née Evans); Member of the Society of
Oxford
Home-Students 1920–3.

MRS GERALDINE SMITH-PARR (née Banerji); commoner
1960–3.

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St Edmund Hall

WILLIAM HENRY HUNTINGTON, BA, 8 March 2000; exhibitioner 1935–8.

ARTHUR MARTIN REID, BA, 11 September 2000; exhibitioner 1935–8.

HAROLD TAPLIN SHERGOLD, BA, 25 December 2000; commoner 1934–7.

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ELECTIONS


Christ Church

To an Official Studentship in Experimental Psychology (from 1 January
2001):

BRIAN PARKINSON (BA, PH.D. Manchester)

To a Lecturership in Physiological Science (from 1 January 2001):

KRISTINE
KRUG,
BA, D.PHIL.

To a Lecturership in Management Studies (HT and TT 2001):

DUNCAN
ROBERTSON, BA

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University College

To a Senior Research Fellowship:

PROFESSOR J.F. DEWEY, FRS

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NOTICE


Mansfield College

Elfan Rees Scholarship

2001 Award to be made in Theology

Mansfield College awards a scholarship once in every four years, tenable for two years, in
memory of Dr Elfan Rees. Dr Rees was Adviser on Refugee Affairs to the World Council
of
Churches on International Affairs, and was Dale Lecturer at Mansfield College
1974--5.

The scholarship is open to men and women commencing studies towards a higher degree
in the field of Theology. Approved courses include the M.Phil., M.Litt., or D.Phil. in any
branch
of Theology. Applications are conditional upon candidates' acceptance by the Theology
Faculty
Board. Graduates wishing to read for Honour Schools in these subjects may also apply. The
annual value of the scholarship is £2,300.

Application forms are available from the College Secretary at Mansfield College.
Applications in triplicate, including a curriculum vitae and the names of two
referees, should be sent to the College Secretary, Mansfield College, Oxford OX1 3TF, by
1
May. Referees should be asked to send references direct to the College Secretary, to arrive
by
this date.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 25 January 2001: Advertisements<br />

Advertisements


Contents of this section:



How to advertise in the
Gazette


Terms
and conditions of acceptance of advertisements

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Adventurous Doctors and Nurses
Wanted

During May–Sept., 2001 the next Kota Mama
Expedition is to take place in Bolivia and Brazil under the leadership of
Colonel John Blashford-Snell. This will involve archaeological surveys in
dense jungle, community aid projects, and a 4660-kilometre river voyage on
traditional craft from the Andes to the Amazon, and the Atlantic. Volunteers
must be fit, self-reliant, and willing to learn some basic Spanish or
Portuguese. The expedition is phased for those unable to participate for the
whole 4 months. For further details, please contact Melissa Dice at 01747
854898 or e-mail: base@ses-explore.org, or by post at the Scientific
Exploration Society, Expedition Base, Motcombe, Shaftesbury, Dorset SP7
9PB.

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Concerts

A unique performance for New College to celebrate the
Amicabilis Concordia, generously arranged by the Three
Counter-Tenors, James Bowman (New College), Charles Brett (Winchester
and King's, Asst. Master, Eton), Michael Chance (Eton and King's), for the
purpose of raising funds for New College Chapel. Fri., 16 Feb. 2001, New
College Chapel, 8 p.m. The programme will include Blow's Ode on
the Death of Mr Henry Purcell
, and works by Dufay, Schutz,
Purcell, Grandi and J.S. Bach. Concert tickets: £20 (to include drinks
during interval). There will be a 2-course supper served in the Founder's
Library at 10 p.m.: tickets, £25. Further enquiries and booking form:
Susan Ashcroft-Jones, The Development Office, New College, Oxford OX1
3BN. Tel.: 01865 279509, e-mail: develop@new.oxford.ac.uk.

Addaction: helping individuals and communities to manage the effects of drugs
and alcohol misuse (www.addaction.org.uk). St Johns, Smith Square, London
SW1, Thurs. 8 Mar., at 7.30 p.m. Christ Church Festival Orchestra
(Conductor: James Ross). Elgar: Introduction and Allegro;
Poulenc: Organ Concerto(Soloist: Alexander Ffinch);
Telemann: Viola Concerto; Shostakovich: Chamber
Symphony
. Tickets: £17.50, £15, £10, £6
(concessions), from the Box Office, St John's, Smith Square, London SW1P
3HA (please enclose SAE). Tel.: 020 7222 1061. Open Mon.–Fri., 10
a.m.–5 p.m., or until the concert starts. Mastercard, Visa and Switch
accepted. www.sjss.org.uk.

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Restoration and Conservation of
Antique Furniture

John Hulme undertakes all aspects of restoration: 30
years experience; collection and delivery. For free advice, telephone or write
to: The Workshop, 11A High Street, Chipping Norton, Oxon., OX7 5AD.
Tel.: 01608 641692.

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Oxford Amnesty Lectures 2001

Tzvetan Todorov, Thurs. 1 Feb; Michael Ignatieff, Fri.
2 Feb., starts 3 p.m.; Gayatri Spivak, Fri. 2 Feb., starts 5.30 p.m.; Peter
Singer, Fri. 2 Feb.; Gitta Sereny, Thurs. 15 Feb.,; Geoffrey Bindman, Fri.
16 Feb.,; Susan Sontag, Thurs. 22 Feb.; Eva Hoffman, Fri. 23 Feb. All
lectures, with the exception of Fri. 2 Feb., start at 5.30 p.m., Sheldonian
Theatre, Broad St., Oxford. Season tickets: £25 (£16 unwaged),
from Oxford Playhouse, Box Office,tel.: 01865 798600, minicom: 01865
792196; e-mail: boxoff@oxfordplayhouse.com. Single tickets will be sold on
the door for £5 (£3 unwaged) per lecture if seats are available.

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Tuition Offered

The Alliance Française runs classes in French
for Adults and Children, and A, A/S, and GCSE classes. For details on these
and all other courses, please ring 01865 310946.

Piano tuition: experienced teacher. Adults and children.
All grades. Beginners welcome. Miss P. Read, BA (Hons.), LRAM. Jericho.
Tel.: 01865 510904.

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Services Offered

Big or small, we ship it all, plus free pick up anywhere
in Oxford. Also 24-hour photocopying, private mailing addresses (24-hour
access, and mail forwarding world-wide), binding, fax bureau, colour
photocopying, mailing services, and much more. Contact or visit Mail Boxes
Etc., 266 Banbury Rd., Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 514655, fax: 514656, email:
summertown@020.mbe.uk.com.

Glass, glazing, double-glazing, secondary-glazing, sash
windows, conservatories and porches. Oxford Double Glazing Ltd., have 36
years' experience of the supply, installation, and repair of single and double
glazing. Please call us for pressure-free advice, or visit our showroom at 3,
South Parade, Summertown. Tel.: 01865 517200, e-mail:
info@oxforddoubleglazing.com.

Bilingual secretary (English/German) offers
typing/word-processing service. Rates vary according to quantity of work, but
average at about £7.50 p.h. Tel.: 01235 550519, e-mail:
martinaharley@hotmail.com.

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Domestic Services

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters,
your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic,
commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy
cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and
friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford 726983 or Abingdon 555533.

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Situations Vacant

Research Interviewers/Nurses: The Oxford Healthy
Ageing Project is seeking 3 part-time interviewers for a community-based
study of health and wellbeing of older people. Workload will be
approximately 12 hrs p.w. Applicants should have experience in health related
areas and be able to work with a degree of independence. Written applications
with c.v. to Professor Sir John Grimley Evans, Department of Clinical
Geratology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford OX2 6HE. Tel.: 01865 224975, fax:
01865 224815, e-mail: Sarah.Sampler@orh.nhs.uk.

Department of Zoology, Postgraduate Courses
Administrator/PA to two Professors: Clerical and Library Grade C5: Salary
£16,134–£19,227 p.a. pro rata. Applications are invited for
this part-time job share position. The part of the job share available is three
days (21.5 hours), Wednesday to Friday, for up to 1 year to cover maternity
leave. This varied and interesting position requires someone with the ability
to work under pressure and able to prioritise. A good command of English,
self-motivation and discretion are also required. Applications with a covering
letter and full curriculum vitae, with names, addresses and contact numbers
of 2 referees, should be sent to the Administrator (Ref AT01003), Department
of Zoology, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, from whom further details
are available. The closing date for receipt of applications is Friday 9
Feb.

International NGO Training and Research Centre:
Information Officer. Exciting opportunity to manage our Library and
Documentation Centre. Salary: £13,000–£18,000 pro rata
(2–3 days per week). Contact: Carolyn Blaxall, INTRAC, P.O. Box
563, Oxford OX2 6RZ. Fax : 01865 201852, e-mail: c.blaxall@intrac.org.
Closing date 31 Jan.

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Houses to Let

Melbourne, Australia: large, fully-furnished, 4-bedroom
house, with swimming pool, on the edge of the Monash University campus.
Available for 5–6 months from 1 Feb. Rent Aus $ 1,400 p.m. Contact:
Joan Preston 613 9544 9497, e-mail: preston@dezzanet.net.au. Wheatley:
3-bedroom, detached bungalow to let unfurnished for 6 months. C.H.,
telephone, gardens, garage, in quiet road. Modernised April 2000, with
curtains, carpets, painted white. £750 p.c.m. exc. Tel.: 01865
873458.

E. Gordon Hudson & Co., 24 Friars Entry, Oxford
OX1 2DB, tel.: 01865 244089, fax: 01865 728942, e-mail:
egordonhudson@netscapeonline.co.uk: (1) Due to a successful period our
Letting Department is currently seeking more properties to let. We have many
good quality prospective tenants registered with us who are actively seeking
accommodation to rent. Please contact the Lettings Department for further
advice and information; (2) New Instruction - Headington, close to hospitals:
a nicely presented unfurnished 2-bedroom ground-floor flat, entrance porch,
spacious living room, modern kitchen with gas cooker and fridge. Bathroom
with shower. Double bedroom with fitted wardrobes, single bedroom. Gas
c.h. Good sized private rear garden. Allocated parking. Available immediately
for 6 months in the first instance. £750 p.c.m.; (3) Wolvercote -
splendid views overlooking Port Meadow: a light and sunny, 3-bedroom town
house situated in a quiet close. The house is part-furnished and comprises:
hall, cloakroom, kitchen with cooker and fridge, spacious first-floor lounge
with balcony overlooking Port Meadow. Two double bedrooms, 1 single
bedroom/study. Modern bathroom. Gas c.h. Rear patio garden, off-road
parking. Regret no pets. Available immediately. £795 p.c.m..

Moreton-in-Marsh: beautiful Cotswolds house available
mid-Feb. Sleeps 5. All mod cons, with terrace and garden, 40 minutes to
Oxford by train or car. £600 p.c.m. Ring: 01608 810549. Victorian,
3-bedroom house in South Central Oxford, available now until the end of
Aug. Fully furnished and equipped with rear garden and garage. Available at
£1,200 p.c.m., inc. of council tax and utilities. For more information
please contact Julia at Finders Keepers, 226 Banbury Road, Summertown,
Oxford, OX2 7BY. Tel.: 01865 311011, or visit our Website at
www.finders.co.uk.

Traditional country cottage, Bladon: 8 miles Oxford
city centre. Newly appointed, 2 bedrooms, fully furnished, parking. Suit
non-smoking single or couple. £700 p.c.m. exc. bills. Available 1
March for 6 months, renewable. Photos available. E-mail:
leo.cookson@csls.ox.ac.uk.

Renovated 2-bedroom house in Marlborough Road,
south Oxford, overlooking large meadow. Tastefully fitted bathroom and
kitchen. Ten minutes' walk from Oxford centre. Available now. £750
p.c.m. Suit professional couple. Dr P. Collett, tel.: 01865 744073, e-mail:
peter.collett@psy.ox.ac.uk.

An Englishman's home is his castle---so the saying
goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are
seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we
may be able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting
agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other
professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in
Oxford. Visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of
all the properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively,
telephone, fax, or email us with details of your requirements and we will do
whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: 01865 764533, fax: 764777, email:
info@qbman.co.uk.

Make finding accommodation easy. Finders Keepers
have a dedicated approach to helping you find the right property. Browse
through our website for up-to-date detailed information on properties available
and make use of our interactive database, priority reservation service (credit
cards accepted), personal service and professional advice. For further
information please contact Finders Keepers at 226, Banbury Road,
Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: 01865 311011. Fax: Oxford 556993.
Email: oxford@finders.co.uk. Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

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Flats to Let

One-bedroom flat near Summertown, within walking distance from city centre,
colleges, libraries. Modern, charming, convenient, quiet, with balcony and
parking. Ideal for 1 person or a couple. Available from early April--early
mid-July. For details tel.: 01865 512 790.

Camden: self-contained flat a few minutes from Chalk
Farm tube, NW5. Living/bedroom, kitchen/diner, shower room. Fully
furnished, well decorated, c.h. Close to Primrose Hill, Camden Market,
Hampstead. Direct bus route to LSE. Short or long let. £760 p.m. inc.
all bills except phone. Non-smokers only. Contact: 0207 482 0158 or e-mail:
r.fitzgerald@mailbox.ulcc.ac.uk.

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Accommodation Offered

Excellent value rooms currently available, set in
woodland with swimming pool. Ideal for a single academic or professional.
Located 3 miles from Oxford centre with bus and cycle routes nearby.
Available from Feb. at £250 p.c.m. inc. of council tax and utilities. For
more information please contact Julia at Finders Keepers, 226 Banbury Road,
Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: 01865 311011, or visit our Website at
www.finders.co.uk.

Room to let in spacious and beautiful house with
garden, near Ashmolean Museum. Available immediately. £300 p.c.m.
Call 07774 447898 or 07957 631033.

Large size bedroom, with ensuite facilities, £75;
medium size bedroom, £60; small bedroom £50. Ideally suited
for quiet postgraduate students, non-smokers. New house with modern
facilities, inc. large kitchen and sitting room, and close to Headington
hospitals. Please contact Saad Pathan on 0797 7473055 (mobile), or e-mail:
saad@well.ox.ac.uk.

North Oxford : short let or long let. Independent male
graduate wanted to share quiet house. Spacious room, shared facilities. Share
of computer negotiable. Rent £58 p.w. inc. fuel. Please tel.: 01865
515379.

Finders Keepers specialises in managing your home and
investment. With our 27 years' experience we assure you of a high level of
service from dedicated and professional letting and management teams. Many
of our landlords have remained with us since we opened and are still reaping
the benefits of our high standards of property management. if you would like
details of our services please contact Finders Keepers at 226 Banbury Road,
Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: 01865 311011, fax: Oxford 556993,
email: oxford@finders.co.uk. Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

Large bright beautiful basement room for rent in our
home in North Central Oxford; c.h., own access, telephone, bathroom and
basic cooking facilities; ideal as study or artist/writer's studio; applications to
use as living space from single professionals or mature graduate students
considered. £95 max. p.w., inc. bills (except telephone and council tax
increment, if applicable). Tel.: 01865 557932.

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Accommodation Sought

Paying guests, visiting academics, welcomed for short
or long stays in the warm, comfortable home of a semi-retired academic
couple in exclusive, quiet, central North Oxford, within walking distance of
all main university buildings, town centre, parks, river, shops and restaurants.
All rooms have colour TV, tea-/coffee-making facilities, microwave, and
refrigerator or refrigerator availability, c.h., and independent heating.
Breakfast included in the very moderate terms. Tel./Fax: 01865 557879.

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Accommodation Exchange

House Exchange: we are an English family from Perth,
Western Australia, geologist and social worker, with children aged 5 and 3,
who would like to swap houses with a family from Oxford or environs, about
April 2001 for a year. We have 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, and area to park. Ten
minutes from University of Western Australia, and from City centre, 15
minutes to stunning Cottesloe Beach. Ring my parents in Oxford for more
details on 01865 725806, or write, Ed Hooper, 243 Heytesbury Road,
Subiaco, WA 6008. Phone 6189 388 0440, or e-mail:
ed.hooper@aus.apachecorp.com. We're all set to go!

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Holiday Lets

Umbria---near Perugia, easy reach of Assisi, Lake
Trasimene, Orvieto. Flat in restored 17th-c. farmhouse, own private valley,
large swimming pool, sleeps 6 in comfort, divisible into 2 self- contained units
of 2 and 4 beds. £160--£620 p.w. depending on number of beds
and season. Contact phone or fax: 01865 390581.

Crete. A traditional Cretan house in old town
Rethimno, superbly renovated to provide space and comfort in beautifully
furnished surroundings. Elevated, vine-covered, sitting area with brick
barbecue---perfect for alfresco dining. It is in a quiet area, and close to long,
sandy beach, taverns, shops, and the many interesting sights in and around
this historic area. Sleeps 4 (1 double, 1 twin). Available all year round. All
linen, electricity and cleaning inc. 2001 rates on request. Tel./fax: Nikolaos
Glinias, 0030 831 56525, e-mail: nglynias@ret.forthnet.gr.

Tuscan Hills: in superb situation near Siena, we offer
a few summer lets in our private farmhouse, standing amidst its own olives,
and vineyard. Spectacular hill and forest scenery in superb walking and
cycling country. Easy access to Florence and other main art centres. Excellent
local food and wine. Very peaceful with full services (no pool). Sleeps up to
8. Tel./fax: 01252 660899.

Dordogne and Rome holiday rentals: stone house in an
acre of garden in the Dordogne, France, with a fabulous 270 degree panorama
(sleeps 8/10). Also Rome, 19th-c., country farmhouse with lovely views, 45
minutes' from Rome, and two hours to Florence (sleeps 4 with downstairs
rooms available to sleep 4 more). Prices vary from £250--550 p.w.
Private owner. Tel.: 01223 353603 or e-mail: hugobowles@tiscalinet.it for
details.

Tuscany: family-owned wine Estate, producing highly
recognised wines, olive oil and cheese; offers ancient farmhouse and
apartments accommodation 2 up to 12+. Pool, secluded rural setting,
half-hour central Florence. Contact: tel./fax: (0039) 055 824 9120, e-mail:
pgklpoggio@ftbcc.it.

France: beautiful old farmhouse high above the Sorgues
valley in the Languedoc/Aveyron hills. Easy drives to the Gorges du Tarn,
Millau, Montpellier, Albi. Enormous stone-flagged living area with
mezzanine. Magnificent kitchen. Huge beams and fireplace. Five bedrooms
(sleeping up to 11). Utility room. Barn. Roof terrace. Orchard garden with
hammocks. Stunning views. Glorious walks. River bathing. Riding and tennis.
Excellent restaurants. Completely unspoilt area. £250–£550
p.w. Tel.: 01865 244619.

Italy: beautiful and spacious, newly converted typical
old granary. Less than a mile from Montagnana, a medieval town in Veneto.
Half-an-hour to Padua, Mantua; an hour from Verona £ Vicenza, and
Ferrara, 45 minutes to Venice. Sleeps 4/5. Contact (e-mail):
fratucello@aol.com, or tel.: 0208 348 8528.

Skopelos, Skiathos and Alonissos: lovely island houses
available for rent. Town, country and seaside locations, sleeping from
2–8 persons. Prices from £50 p.p.p.w. For information see
www.holidayislands.com; e-mail: thalpos@otenet.gr; fax: 0030 424 23057.

Czech Republic: fairytale woodland cottage only 30
minutes from Prague, available May-- Oct.; sleeps 5 plus; lovely lake for
swimming, boating, surfboarding; views, walks, woodfires, mushrooms,
castles; good food and wine and still a bargain. English-speaking owner. From
£260 p.w. Tel.: 0207-373 0667.

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House Wanted

Two-three bedroom house wanted by first time buyers,
max. around £150,000, as close to the Science Area as price permits
(preferably Marston, Summertown, Headington). Tel.: 01865 272491 (work),
01865 452058 (home), or e-mail: jan.koch@physiol.ox.ac.uk.

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Houses for Sale

Beat the Oxford traffic---walk (or cycle) to work across
the Parks. Well maintained 3-storey, 4 bedroom, 2 bathroom family home
with integral garage, conservatory, and garden. College playing fields, river
and parkland to rear. OIEO £220,000. Please e-mail:
bigj@teaching.physics.ox.ac.uk, or ring 01865 727421 (evenings).

Spacious 2-bedroom house with large L-shaped sitting-
room/dining-room in Witney (12 miles from Oxford); upstairs bathroom and
downstairs w.c. Generous cupboard space. Gas c.h. Secluded, walled garden.
In excellent condition. No chain. Price £103, 950. Tel.: for further
information: 01865 554684.

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Flat for Sale

St Thomas Street, Oxford: a unique opportunity to
acquire a first floor modern flat in a development close to the city centre,
railway station, and Said Business School. Entrance hall leading to sitting
room, exceptionally well equipped kitchen, 2 double bedrooms with built-in
wardrobes, bathroom with overhead shower, double length garage. Entry
phone security system to secure Mews courtyard. £185,000. Contact:
A. N. Lane, 01865 514516 (home), 01865 459204 (work).
n

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Oxford University Gazette: Appointments, 25 January 2001<br />


Oxford University Gazette: 25 January 2001

Appointments


Vacancies within the University of Oxford:

The University is an equal opportunities employer

UNIVERSITY LECTURERSHIP IN FOREST
POLICY

UNIVERSITY LECTURERSHIP IN PLANT
ECOLOGY

CRC CANCER EPIDEMIOLOGY RESEARCH
GROUP
Appointment of Statistician

Note: a complete list of current "http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/ps/gp/">University vacancies is available
separately.


Vacancies in Colleges and Halls:

HERTFORD COLLEGE
Appointment of Old Members' and Development Officer
KEBLE COLLEGE
Research Fellowship and Tutorship in Politics
LADY MARGARET HALL
Appointment of Secretary to the Treasurer and Senior Tutor
LINACRE COLLEGE
Domus Research Studentships
Mary Blaschko Graduate Scholarships
ORIEL COLLEGE
Appointment of Bursar
QUEEN'S COLLEGE
Browne Research Fellowship in Biological Science or Biochemistry
ST HUGH'S COLLEGE
Becket Institute Fellowships
ST PETER'S COLLEGE
Bodossaki Foundation Graduate Scholarship in Science

All notices should be sent to the Gazette
Office, Public Relations Office, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD
(fax: (2)80522, e-mail: "mailto:gazette@admin.ox.ac.uk">gazette@admin.ox.ac.uk
). The deadline is
5 p.m. on Thursday of the week preceding publication.



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