25 February 1999 - No 4503



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 128, No. 4503: 25 February 1999<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

25 February 1999



University Health and
Safety
information


Return to Gazette
Home Page






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 25 February 1999: University<br /> Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this
issue



HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL


Code of Practice relating to
Harassment

In Michaelmas Term 1991 the Rules Committee introduced a
new regulation under which harassment by a Junior Member
of any member of the University, or any member of the
staff of the University, or any other person for whom the
University has a special responsibility, constitutes a
university offence (Gazette, No. 4230, 31
October 1991, p. 265; see now Statutes,
1997, p. 787). Council accordingly issued a Code of
Practice relating to Harassment which replaced the
earlier Code of Practice relating to Sexual Harassment
(Gazette No. 4236, 12 December 1991, p. 463;
see now Statutes, 1997, p. 794). The code
also covers harassment by Senior Members and other staff
of the University (see paras. 7 and 8).

As agreed by Council when these new arrangements were
instituted, Council subsequently set up a committee,
under the chairmanship of Ms J.M. Innes, Fellow of
Somerville, to review the working of the new code. On
that committee's recommendation, Council has now agreed,
inter alia, to reconstitute the
Advisory Panel on Harassment, which was previously a
committee of the Proctors, as a standing committee of
Council comprising the Assessor ex officio, five
members appointed by the Proctors and Assessor, and two
members appointed by each of Council, the General Board,
the Libraries Committee, the Staff Committee, the
Conference of Colleges, and the Oxford University Student
Union. The appointed Senior Members will serve for five
years and will be re-eligible, with one-fifth of them
being elected each year. The panel will have the
following revised terms of reference:

(a) to co-ordinate and monitor steps taken by
the University to prevent and deal with harassment as
defined and explained in the Code of Practice relating to
Harassment;

(b) to advise on general issues relating to
harassment to which the panel wishes to draw the
attention of the appropriate university bodies, or which
are referred to the panel by the appropriate university
bodies;

(c) to offer support to advisers appointed by
departments of the University and, on request, those
appointed by colleges;

(d) to act as confidential advisers to
members or employees of the University and to others for
whom the University has a duty of care, in connection
with complaints of harassment.

Meanwhile, the existing panel has reviewed the present
code of practice in the light of the outcome of the
review and has proposed a number of changes, which
Council has now approved. Council has accordingly agreed
to issue the new code of practice which is set out below.
The changes to the 1991 code may be summarised as
follows.

Cl. 1: the addition of a final sentence setting out the
personal responsibility of all staff (`All members and
staff ..').

Cl 2: the inclusion of harassment relating to disability.

Cl 4: an amended description of the panel, redefining it
as a standing committee of Council and referring to
`members and employees of the University' rather than
`Senior Members' to take into account the appointment of
non-academic staff and representatives of OUSU.

Cl. 5: redrafted to include reference to promptness of
response and to remove the procedure under which advisers
could act on behalf of complainants. This is now thought
to be inappropriate because the role of the adviser is to
empower complainants to deal with a situation themselves,
and advisers are not meant to be advocates.

Cl. 7: amended references to statutes. References to
involvement of an adviser in disciplinary matters
removed. This is now thought to be inappropriate, it
being the complainants' responsibility to refer the
matter to a relevant authority and the adviser's role to
support them.

Cl. 8: redrafted for greater clarity.

Cl. 9: amended to ensure the anonymity of annual
returns.

Revised Code of Practice relating to Harassment

PRINCIPLES AND DEFINITION

1. Harassment is an unacceptable form of behaviour.
The University is committed to protecting members, staff,
and any other person for whom the University has a
special responsibility from any form of harassment which
might inhibit them from pursuing their work or studies,
or from making proper use of university facilities.
Complaints of harassment will be taken seriously and may
lead to disciplinary proceedings. All members and staff
have a personal responsibility to ensure that their
behaviour is not contrary to this code and are encouraged
to ensure the maintenance of a working environment in the
University which is free from harassment.

2. For the purposes of this code, harassment may be
broadly understood to consist of unwarranted behaviour
towards another person, so as to disrupt the work or
reduce the quality of life of that person, by such means
as single or successive acts of bullying, verbally or
physically abusing, or ill-treating him or her, or
otherwise creating or maintaining a hostile or offensive
studying, working, or social environment for him or her.
Forms of harassment covered by this code include
harassment relating to another's sex, sexual orientation,
religion, race, or disability.

Unacceptable forms of behaviour may include unwelcome
sexual advances, unwelcome requests for sexual favours,
offensive physical contact or verbal behaviour, or other
hostile or offensive acts or expressions relating to
people's sex, sexual orientation, religion, race, or
disability. The abuse of a position of authority, as for
example that of a tutor or supervisor, is an aggravating
feature of harassment.

3. Being under the influence of alcohol or otherwise
intoxicated will not be admitted as an excuse for
harassment, and may be regarded as an aggravating
feature.

Note on confidentiality

It is essential that all those involved in a complaints
procedure (including complainants) observe the strictest
confidentiality consistent with operating that procedure;
an accusation of harassment is potentially defamatory.

ADVICE

4. Advice may be sought or complaints pursued
through any appropriate channel. In
addition to other officers, the following people have
been specially appointed to give advice in this
connection and to answer questions (whether or not
amounting to a complaint):

(a) departmental or faculty `Confidential
Advisers', appointed by heads of department or the
equivalent. Their names will be publicised within the
institution;

(b) members of the `Advisory Panel', serving
the whole University. The Advisory Panel is a standing
committee of Council consisting of members and employees
of the University with special expertise or interest in
relevant aspects of staff and student welfare. Members of
the panel may be approached on a number specially
designated for this purpose (telephone: (2)70760);

(c) special college advisers or advisory
panels where colleges have established these.

Those protected by this code may appropriately seek
advice in relation to harassment even if the conduct in
question is not sufficiently serious to warrant the
institution of disciplinary proceedings. Any of the
advisers listed above may be approached in the first
instance; those approached will direct enquirers
elsewhere, if that seems most likely to meet the
enquirer's needs.

5. Enquiries about harassment will be responded to
promptly. University advisers (whether Confidential
Advisers or members of the Advisory Panel) will discuss
the range of options available to enquirers on an
entirely confidential basis and whenever possible assist
them in resolving the problem informally in the first
instance. College advisers will be guided by college
rules.

6. It is emphasised that the role of advisers is
advisory and not disciplinary. All disciplinary matters
lie in the hands of the relevant disciplinary bodies.

DISCIPLINE

7. If a complaint is not resolved on an informal
basis the complainant may refer the matter to the
relevant authority, which will determine whether there is
a prima facie case under the relevant disciplinary
provision and, if appropriate, set in motion disciplinary
procedures. In respect of members of the University
subject to the jurisdiction of the Visitatorial Board,
the relevant procedures are those described under Title
XVI of the University's Statutes. The disciplinary
procedures which apply to non-academic staff are set out
in the Handbook for Non-Academic Staff.
Complaints against Junior Members shall be dealt with in
accordance with the procedures contained in Title XIII of
the University's Statutes (also set out in the
Proctors' Memorandum)
[1].
Colleges may have their own forms of disciplinary
provision.

8. It may be that a complaint either against a member
of staff or against a Junior Member could potentially be
heard by more than one disciplinary body. When the person
complained against is a Junior Member, the complainant
will be expected to choose whether to pursue disciplinary
procedures through his or her college or through the
Proctors. If a complainant has previously brought or is
in the process of bringing a complaint against the same
person, founded wholly or in part upon the same matter,
before any other disciplinary body, he or she is
responsible for revealing that fact when seeking to
institute disciplinary proceedings. It is also incumbent
upon a disciplinary body to attempt to ascertain, for
example by direct enquiry of the complainant, or by
consulting other relevant authorities, whether any such
other complaint has been instituted; if so, that body
must consider whether it is appropriate for the same
matter to provide a basis for two separate disciplinary
hearings.

INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS

9. The appointment of Confidential Advisers within
each department or faculty is the responsibility of the
head of department, or equivalent, who must designate two
such advisers, one of each sex, return the names of those
appointed to the Equal Opportunities Officer (or such
other officer as may be designated by the Registrar from
time to time), and ensure that the Code of Practice and
the names of the Confidential Advisers are adequately
publicised within the department or faculty. The Advisory
Panel on Harassment will provide Confidential Advisers
with information, advice, and training opportunities.
Confidential Advisers will be expected to make anonymised
annual returns to the panel as to the number and general
character of complaints they have dealt with. They may
refer enquirers to members of the panel, or themselves
seek advice either about university provisions on
harassment in general or about possible ways of handling
individual cases.

10. Members of the Advisory Panel on Harassment will
give advice on request to those troubled by harassment
and to other advisers. The panel is responsible for
supporting, co-ordinating, and monitoring the
effectiveness of the University's arrangements for
dealing with harassment. Members of the panel may be
contacted on a number specially designated for this
purpose (telephone: (2)70760).

11. The provisions of this code supplement and do not
supersede or override college arrangements.

12. Nothing in this code shall detract from the position
and jurisdiction of the Proctors or the right of free
access to them by all Junior and Senior Members of the
University.

Footnote

[1] The Title XIII procedures will be
reproduced as an appendix to copies of the code which are
printed in leaflet form, for ease of reference.


Return to text

Return to List of Contents of this
section



CONGREGATION 18 February


Election

On Thursday, 18 February, the following was duly elected
to hold office for four years from the first day of
Trinity Term 1999:

As a member of the Buildings Committee

W.S. JAMES, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Magdalen

[The votes recorded were: for Mr Barratt, 78; for Dr
Brown, 123; for Dr James, 124]

Return to List of Contents of this
section



CONGREGATION 23 February


1 Declaration of approval of
unopposed Statute promulgated on 9 February

No notice of opposition having been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor
declared the Statute extending the remit of
the Committee for the History of Science and Technology
to include the History of Medicine approved.


2 Promulgation of Statute

A form of Statute was promulgated. No notice of
opposition having been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor declared
the preamble carried of the proposed Statute establishing
a Donald Pollock Professorship of Chemical Engineering.


3 Presentation of the Annual
Review

The Annual Review of the University for 1997–8
(Supplement* No. 1 to Gazette Vol. 129,
January 1999) was presented.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into
effect on
12 March, see `Examinations and Boards' below.





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 25 February 1999: University<br /> Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

CONGREGATION 9 March 2 p.m.

Members of Congregation are reminded that
written notice of any intention to vote against, or any
proposed amendment to, the enacting part of the statute
at item 1 below, or of any intention to vote against the
preamble of the statute at item 2 below, signed in either
case by at least two members of Congregation, must be
given to the Registrar by noon on Monday, 1 March (see
the Guide to Procedures in Congregation cited in the note
at the end of `University Agenda').

Return to Contents Page of this
issue






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 25 February 1999: Notices<br />

Notices


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



PROFESSORSHIP OF THE PHYSICAL
EXAMINATION
OF MATERIALS

DAVID JOHN HUGH COCKAYNE, D.PHIL. (B.SC., M.SC. Melbourne),
Professor in Physics (Electron Microscopy and Microanalysis),
University of Sydney, has been appointed to the professorship
with
effect from a date to be arranged.

Professor Cockayne will be a fellow of Linacre College.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



REVIEW OF THE OXFORD FORESTRY INSTITUTE

Under the University's procedures for the regular review of
faculties and departments, the General Board has set up a
committee
under the chairmanship of Professor J.C. Ellory to review the
Oxford Forestry Institute. The terms of reference are as follows:

To review the organisational arrangements and activities of the
Oxford Forestry Institute, taking into account in particular

(a) the retirement of the director not later than 30
September 2004;

(b) the emphasis on future research;

(c) what courses should be taught;

(d) the role of the library and the resources
required
to maintain it;

(e) the relationship with the Department of Plant
Sciences, and with departments and units in other cognate subject
areas, including those concerned with environmental studies, and
the opportunities for co-operation with them;

and to make recommendations.

Members of the University who wish to contribute to the review
are
asked to forward their submission by Wednesday, 31 March, in
writing or by e-mail, to the secretary of the review committee,
Dr
C.R. Repp, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD
(e-mail: Cathy.Repp@admin.ox.ac.uk).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



LANGUAGE CENTRE


Intensive weekend language courses
(Trinity Term)

The Language Centre will be running weekend language courses in
Trinity Term 1999. Each course will consist of eight hours of
tuition with an emphasis on speaking and listening to the
language,
running from 9 a.m. to 1.30 p.m., with a half-hour break, on both
Saturday and Sunday. Some of the material to be studied will be
taken from Satellite TV, radio broadcasts, and newspaper
articles.
The maximum number of participants per group will be fifteen. A
fee
of £26 will be charged to junior members of the University
and
other full-time students, £34 to members of Congregation and
members of staff, and £45 to non-members.

German

Teaching hours: Saturday, 22 May, 9 a.m.–1.30 p.m. (end of
week four), and Sunday, 23 May, 9 a.m.–1.30 p.m. Classes at
the following levels: absolute beginners, intermediate.

Italian

Teaching hours: Saturday, 22 May, 9 a.m.–1.30 p.m. (end of
week four), and Sunday, 23 May, 9 a.m.–1.30 p.m. Classes at
the following levels: absolute beginners, lower intermediate.

French

Teaching hours: Saturday, 5 June, 9 a.m.–1.30 p.m. (end of
week six), and Sunday, 6 June, 9 a.m.–1.30 p.m. Classes at
the
following levels: near/false beginners, lower intermediate, upper
intermediate.

Spanish

Teaching hours: Saturday, 5 June, 9 a.m.–1.30 p.m. (end of
week six), and Sunday, 6 June, 9 a.m.–1.30 p.m. Classes at
the
following levels: absolute beginners, lower intermediate.

Any member of the University who wishes to receive further
details
and a booking form for these courses should contact Angela
Pinkney,
Language Centre, 12 Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6HT (telephone:
(2)83360, e-mail: admin@lang.ox.ac.uk).

An application form is also downloadable from the Language
Centre's World Wide Web pages:
http://info.ox.ac.uk/departments/langcentre/courses/weekend_co
urses
/.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Other courses (Hilary Term)

Intensive academic writing course: course 2—writing a
thesis or dissertation

These one-week/fifteen-hour intensive courses cover the same
material as the term-time Academic Writing Course. The intensive
mode of study enables those with heavy schedules to take the
Academic Writing Course in a more convenient format.

The course will take place between Monday, 15 March, and
Friday, 19 March (ninth week), 9.30 a.m.–12.45 p.m. (three
hours of teaching each day, with a fifteen-minute break).

The fee for the course will be £95 and this will include
all materials.

If you wish to register, please see Angela Pinkney at the
reception
desk for further details.


Writing a research article in English

This ten-hour intensive course offers participants the
opportunity
to improve their skills in writing a research article for
publication in an academic journal. The content of the course is
based on recent research into the features of English in academic
settings. Participants will develop their knowledge through
detailed analysis and discussion of appropriate research
articles.

The course will take place between Monday, 15 March, and
Friday, 19 March (ninth week), 1.45–4 p.m. (two hours of
teaching each day, with a fifteen-minute break).

The fee for the course will be £65 and this will include
all materials.

If you wish to register, please see Angela Pinkney at the
reception
desk for further details.

The Language Centre, 12 Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6HT
(telephone: Oxford (2)83360, fax: (2)83366, e-mail:
admin@lang.ox.ac.uk, Internet:
http://units.ox.ac.uk/departments/langcentre).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES
CENTRE


BUFVC Viewfinder magazine

The British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC)
produces a magazine, Viewfinder, three times each
year which contains a breadth of information about the use of
various forms of media in higher education. In particular,
every issue contains several pages of news, a substantial
listing of video, and other, educational material, and a number
of articles of general interest. As members of the BUFVC, the
University is sent a number of copies of each issue of this
magazine for distribution to interested parties around the
University.

In recent years not all of these copies have, in fact, been
distributed, and the Director of the ETRC, who represents the
University on the BUFVC, would be grateful if anyone who would
like to see a copy, with a view to possibly receiving regular
copies, would contact his Personal Assistant, Mrs Rebecca
Norton, who will arrange for them to be sent a sample copy. She
can be contacted by e-mail at Rebecca.Norton@etrc.ox.ac.uk, or
by telephone on (2)70536.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



DEPARTMENT FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

The Department for Continuing Education exists to make the
University accessible to men and women in ways which complement
the University's provision for its resident members. Each year
the department mounts several hundred courses, either part-time
or short full-time, covering most subjects taught within the
University (except management and clinical medicine). Courses
last anything from one day to ten weeks (full time), and
between ten weeks and two years on a part-time basis. Currently
about 15,900 students enrol annually for the department's
courses, the average length of study being twenty hours. A
recent development has been the introduction of technology-
assisted courses, using the Internet to supplement classroom
teaching. Apart from a large number of individual members of
the University who offer courses or give lectures, the
Department for Continuing Education works in co-operation with
an increasing number of other departments and faculties
throughout the University. It welcomes expressions of interest
from individuals and departments who wish to become involved in
or to explore continuing education activities. The department's
main provision is organised through three programme offices
(see below), each of which is able to provide more detailed
information on current and forthcoming activities. In addition,
the Kellogg Residential Centre, when not being used for
courses, can occasionally be made available for conferences and
other residential meetings.

Return to List of Contents of this
section


The Public Programme Office

This Office (Director: Mr R.T. Rowley) offers to the public a
wide range of study opportunities in most academic disciplines
through part-time day, evening and short residential courses.
Many programmes have open entry and require no formal entry
qualifications. However, the majority of courses are now either
award-bearing or carry higher education credit. The award-
bearing courses are offered at access undergraduate and post
graduate level, and do call for evidence of ability to complete
the programme satisfactorily. During the summer the Public
Programme Division offers a series of study opportunities for
domestic and European students through the Oxford University
Summer School for Adults, a Local History Summer School and the
Summer Academy based at Keble College. The Division engages a
large number of part-time tutors, both from within the
University and outside, and individuals interested in offering
specific courses or contribution to other programmes are
invited to contact the office. Details of all courses are
publicised in the Annual Prospectus or are available at any
time from the Manager of Public Programmes (telephone: Oxford
(2)70360).

Return to List of Contents of this
section


The Continuing Professional Development Centre

Short and extended courses

This Centre (Director: Dr M.A. Gray) works with departments and
faculties throughout the University to offer courses designed
to meet the needs of individuals and organisations drawn from
industry, the professions, commerce, and academia. Courses vary
from one- or two-day intensive updating courses based on the
latest academic research to longer courses enabling
professionals to review advances in specialised fields, and
acquire new areas of expertise and qualifications. Areas
covered include engineering, law, information technology and
computing, mathematics, biomedical science, and personal skills
development. Contributors to courses include Oxford academics
and research staff and experts from other universities and
organisations in the UK and abroad.

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Conferences/Seminars/Workshops

The CPD Centre is also able to offer a conference organisation
and management service to colleagues within the University and
other organisations. The CPD Centre has specialist skills and
more than fifteen years' collective experience or organising
and managing conferences, seminars, and training courses for up
to 500 delegates. The Centre provides a `total conference
package' which combines the best of personal service with the
highest professional standards. Services offered include the
following:

—Conference planning and academic support

—Budget preparation and account management

—Venue sourcing, including residential accommodation,
lecture theatres, hotels, and catering support

—Organisation of exhibitions and displays, design and
provision of publicity

—Promotion/advertising/marketing support

—Mailing; compilation of databases

—Organisation of social programmes, excursions, and tours

—Translation and interpretation services, technical and
audio- visual support

—Pre-registration management and on-site registration
services, preparation of pre-prints, binders, badges

—Post-conference reports and proceedings.

Further details are available from Oxford (2)88169.

Return to List of Contents of this
section


The International Programmes Office

This office (Director: Dr A. Hawkins) offers a wide range of
courses to undergraduates, graduates and continuing education
students from around the world. These courses include year-long
full-time programmes for Japanese graduates and diplomats from
the Republic of China, Taiwan, as well as a large number of
three- or four-week courses held during the summer for students
from Europe and North America. Programmes are held in
partnership with institutions such as the Smithsonian
Institution, the University of California at Berkeley, Duke
University, the University of Virginia and Northwestern
University in America. International Programmes also works with
the British Council, the European Commission, and the FCO, as
well as offering courses in partnership with the Bodleian
Library and many other departments and colleges within the
University. Subjects covered in these courses include topics
from law and industrial relations through to archaeology, art
history, and the physical and biological sciences. Tutors are
drawn from Oxford academic and research staff, and expertise is
also recruited from outside the University. Programmes vary in
size from small groups of twenty students to larger programmes
of over 200 participants. During the summer many residential
International Programmes, including the Oxford University
Summer Programmes in English Literature and in History,
Politics and Society, are held in colleges throughout Oxford,
in addition to those held at the Rewley House Residential
Centre. Over the next few years the range of courses offered by
the International Programmes Office will be expanded, drawing
in more students from Europe, from countries formerly part of
the Soviet Union, and from elsewhere around the world. As the
work of the International Programmes Office expands, approaches
would be welcomed from those colleges, departments and other
institutions who have accommodation from which they would like
to generate further income or from individuals with suitable
qualifications interested in teaching on international
programmes. Telephone: Oxford (2)70456.

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Technology-Assisted Lifelong Learning (TALL)

TALL (Director: Jonathan Darby) was established in 1996 with
support from the Esmée Fairbairn Charitable Trust and
the W.K. Kellogg Foundation to investigate and develop new ways
of using technology to support lifelong learning. It is
directed by Jonathan Darby who previously directed the HE
Funding Councils' and DENI's Computers in Teaching Initiative.
Many aspects of on- line education remain poorly understood.
TALL is conducting research into:

Models of delivery—identifying optimal
ways of using technology to deliver courses and educational
services;

international transferability—addressing
issues such as use of language, culture, educational systems
and differing educational needs with the aim of ensuring that
Oxford-produced on-line courses are designed in such a way that
they will be attractive to students outside the UK;

markets for on-line courses—using surveys
to develop an understanding of the nature of the market for on-
line courses.

TALL is seeking to use technology to design courses of three
types:

Hybrid: short intensive periods in Oxford
punctuate Internet- supported study to create a course which
uses each form of teaching for the purposes to which it is best
suited.

Fully remote: a course in Italian for
Intermediate and Advanced Learners has been completed with EU
support which can be wholly completed at a distance. A second
course, `Databases for Historians', is about to be piloted.

Curriculum on demand: an innovative teaching
system based on the finding that many students on continuing
professional development courses have highly specific needs
that are only partially met by a group-based course. Each
student takes a course that is tailored to their specific
needs.

The TALL programme would welcome ideas for on-line courses from
university colleagues.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



MUSICAL EVENTS


St John's College and Colin Carr

IMOGEN COOPER, RAPHAEL OLEG, and SONIA WIEDER-ATHERTON will
perform the following piano trios at 8.30 p.m. on Monday, 1
March: Haydn, E flat major; Schubert, B flat major; Brahms, B
major.

COLIN CARR will give a master-class at 4 p.m. on Sunday, 7
March. Chamber groups or performing soloists wishing to receive
public tuition at this master-class should apply as soon as
possible to the College Secretary.

THE BRENTANO STRING QUARTET will perform the following at 8.30
p.m. on Monday, 26 April: Purcell, four-part
Fantasias 1, 2, 4, and 6; Nicholas Maw, Quartet
no. 3; Beethoven, opus 59, no. 2.

All events are held in the Garden Quadrangle Auditorium.
Admission is free. Admission to concerts can be reserved by
obtaining a programme from the porter's lodge, St John's
College. Programmes are reserved for college members until
about ten days before each performance.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



University Catholic Chaplaincy

John Caldwell's opera-oratorio Good Friday will be
performed at 8 p.m. on Thursday, 4 March, and Friday, 5 March,
in the Newman Rooms, Rose Place. Tickets, costing £7.50
(concessions £4.50), are available from the Old Fire
Station, Gloucester Green, or at the door.

Return to List of Contents of this
section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 25 February 1999: Lectures<br />

Lectures


Contents of this section:

Return to Contents Page of this
issue



INAUGURAL LECTURE


Royal Academy of Engineering/AEA
Technology/INSS Research Professor in Microanalytical
Techniques for Structural Integrity Problems

PROFESSOR J. TITCHMARSH will deliver his inaugural
lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 4 March, in the Mary
Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, St Anne's College. Further
information may be obtained from Diane Taylor, Department
of Materials (telephone: (2)73651, fax: (2)73783).

Subject: `Electrons: from power lines to
white lines.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



GRINFIELD LECTURES ON THE
SEPTUAGINT

The Septuagint at the dawn of the third millennium

PROFESSOR EUGENE ULRICH, John A. O'Brien Professor of
Hebrew Scriptures, University of Notre Dame, will deliver
the first series of his Grinfield Lectures at 5 p.m. on
the following days in the Examination Schools. Each
lecture will be followed by discussion.

Wed. 3 Mar.: `The origins and nature of the
Septuagint.'

Thur. 4 Mar.: `The Septuagint in the Dead
Sea Scrolls.'

Fri. 5 Mar.: `The Septuagint translation of
Isaiah.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



HENSLEY HENSON LECTURES 1998--9

The unorthodox Karl Barth

PROFESSOR DR A.I.C. HERON, Professor of Reformed
Theology, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, will
deliver the Hensley Henson Lectures at 5 p.m. on the
following days in the Examination Schools.

Mon. 1 Mar.: `Alarms, negations, and
surprises.'

Thur. 4 Mar.: `To talk to God ...'

Mon. 8 Mar.: `Creation, preservation and all
the blessings ...'

Thur. 11 Mar.: `The grammar of
reconciliation.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



SIR JOHN HICKS LECTURE ON
ECONOMIC HISTORY

PROFESSOR P. TEMIN, Professor of Economics, Massachusetts
Institute of Technology, will deliver the Sir John Hicks
Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 12 March, in the Examination
Schools.

Subject: `A new view of the golden age of
economic growth.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



LITERAE HUMANIORES

The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on the
days shown in the Old Library, All Souls College.

Convener: M.L. West, MA, D.Litt., Senior
Research Fellow, All Souls College.

DR P. KINGSLEY, Vancouver

Tue. 9 Mar.: `Parmenides, magic, and the
origins of Greek philosophy.'

PROFESSOR D. KOVACS, Virginia

Thur. 18 Mar.: `Euripides'
Ion: doubts and suggestions.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



LITERAE HUMANIORES AND CORPUS
CHRISTI CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF GREEK AND ROMAN ANTIQUITY

PROFESSOR BARRY POWELL, University of Wisconsin-Madison,
will give the following seminar at 5 p.m. on Friday, 12
March, in the Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College.

Conveners: J. Bennet, Sinclair and Rachel
Hood Lecturer in Aegean Prehistory, and R. Osborne,
Professor of Ancient History.

Subject: `Text, orality, literacy, tradition,
dictation education and other paradigms of explication in
Greek literary studies.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

PROFESSOR ANNA LISE CRONE, University of Chicago, will
lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 9 March, in the Taylorian
Annexe, 47 Wellington Square.

Convener: A.S. Kahn, MA, D.Phil, University
Lecturer in Russian pre-1800.

Subject: `Derzhavin in the poetry of
Tsvetaeva and Mayakovsky.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



MUSIC

PROFESSOR A.M.B. BERGER, Astor Visiting Lecturer,
University of California (Davis), will present a public
colloquium at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 17 March, in the Denis
Arnold Hall, the Music Faculty.

Subject: `Friedrich Ludwig and the invention
of the Middle Ages.'


PROFESSOR K. BERGER, Astor Visiting Lecturer, Stanford
University, will deliver a public lecture at 5 p.m. on
Tuesday, 18 March, in the Holywell Music Room.

Subject: `The genealogy of modern music.'


The composer speaks

MIKE ROBERTS will give a public lecture in this series at
5 p.m. on Wednesday, 10 March, in the Holywell Music
Room.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



SOCIAL STUDIES

Foreign policy dilemmas: Britain and the world

The following meetings will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays
in the Lecture Theatre, the New Building, St Antony's
College.

Conveners: A.H. Brown, MA, Professor of
Politics, Mr Tony Baldry, MP, and Dr Denis MacShane,
MP.

THE RT. HON. GERALD KAUFMAN, MP, Chair, Culture and
Heritage Committee, SIR PATRICK CORMACK, MP, and JOHN
LLOYD, Financial Times and New
Statesman


2 Mar.: `Imaging Britain: media,
culture, and foreign policy.'

ROGER LIDDLE, European and Defence Policy Adviser, 10
Downing Street, SIR RODRIC BRAITHWAITE, formerly Foreign
Policy Adviser to the Prime Minister and Chairman, Joint
Intelligence Committee, and LORD WALLACE, LSE

9 Mar.: `Producing foreign policy: how
good is the machinery?'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



HEALTH ECONOMICS RESEARCH
CENTRE

The following seminars will be given at 4.30 p.m. on the
days shown in the Institute of Health Sciences, Old Road,
Headington.

PROFESSOR D. SACKETT

Tue. 2 Mar.: `The doctor's ethical and
economic dilemma.'

PROFESSOR R. SCHEFFLER, Berkeley

Mon. 22 Mar.: `The impact of managed
care on the US health-care system.'

PROFESSOR D. FRYBACK, Wisconsin-Madison

Mon. 26 Apr.: `Bayesian cost
effectiveness analysis: an advance in CEA or are we
just making posteriors of ourselves?'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



OXFORD INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY
RESEARCH CENTRE

Intellectual property in the new millennium (amended
notice)

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays
in the Latner Room, St Peter's College.

This notice replaces that published in the
Gazette of 14 January. Professor Bronwyn
Hall will now speak in place of Dr Christine Greenhalgh
and Mark Longland on 9 March (the seminar by Dr
Greenhalgh and Mr Longland will be held at a later date).

Conveners: D. Vaver, MA, Reuters Professor of
Intellectual Property and Information Technology Law and
Director of the Centre, and C.A. Greenhalgh, MA, Reader
in Economics and Research Director of the Centre.

G. DUTFIELD

2 Mar.: `The public and private domains:
intellectual property rights in traditional
ecological knowledge.'

PROFESSOR B. HALL

9 Mar.: `The patent paradox revisited:
the determinants of patenting in the US semiconductor
industry, 1980–94.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY
OF MEDICINE

History of tropical medicine and infectious diseases

The following workshop will be held at 1 p.m. on Tuesday,
2 March, in the Wellcome Unit, 47 Banbury Road.

Conveners: Dr Maureen Malowany, Dr Michael
Jennings, and Dr Mary Dobson. Further details may be
obtained from Dr Malowany (telephone: Oxford (2)74615, e-
mail: maureen.malowany@wuhmo.ox.ac.uk).

Scientists in tropical laboratories

Chair: PROFESSOR NANCY LEYS STEPAN,
Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN ANATOMY AND
GENETICS

Jenkinson Seminar

DR MARTY COHN, Reading, will give a Jenkinson Seminar at
2 p.m. on Tuesday, 9 March, in the Department of Human
Anatomy and Genetics.

Subject: `Evolution and development of
vertebrate limbs.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS


Corcoran Memorial Lectures

PROFESSOR PETER MCCULLAGH, Chicago, will deliver the
Corcoran Memorial Lectures as follows on Thursday, 11
March, in the Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, St Anne's
College.


3.30 p.m.: `Resampling and exchangeable
arrays.'

5 p.m.: `Linear models and representation
theory.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



BRASENOSE COLLEGE


Tanner Lectures on Human Values
1999

Representation: democratic theory and social surveys

PROFESSOR S. VERBA, Department of Government, Harvard
University, will deliver the Tanner Lectures at 5 p.m. on
the following days in the Examination Schools.

Mon. 10 May: : `Social theory and social
science: two cultures?'

Tue. 11 May: `Citizens in democracies
and democratic citizens.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



LADY MARGARET HALL


Canada Seminars

PROFESSOR M. DOODY, Director of Comparative Literature,
Vanderbilt University, will lecture at 5.15 p.m. on
Wednesday, 3 March, in Lady Margaret Hall. Further
information may be obtained from Elizabeth Jubb
(telephone: (2)74302, e-mail: liz.jubb@lmh.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `The Maritime Provinces—do they
have a future?'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

Special lecture

DR J. HAMILTON, Alistair Horne Visiting Fellow, will
lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 11 March, in the New
Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

Subject: `Art, science, and
song—researching across boundaries in mid-nineteenth-century
British culture.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



RHODES SCHOLARS SOUTHERN AFRICA
FORUM

SIR ANTHONY KENNY, Warden, Rhodes House, will give a
public lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Monday, 1 March, in the
Beit Room, Rhodes House. Further information can be
obtained from Mauro Delorenzo (e-mail:
mauro.delorenzo.@ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `The Rhodes Trust and South Africa:
past and present.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



OXFORD MEDIEVAL SOCIETY

DR P. CROSSLEY, Courtauld Institute of Art, will lecture
at 8.30 p.m. on Thursday, 4 March, in the Kidd Room,
Christ Church. Wine will be served from 8.15 p.m. New
members are welcome.

Subject: `The politics of presentation: the
architecture of Charles IV of Bohemia.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



OXFORD ENGLISH
DICTIONARY
FORUM

DR C. BREWER will lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 3
March, in Rewley House. All are welcome to attend.

Subject: `Treasure-house of the language: the
OED as a repository of great writers.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



OXFORD BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY

DR A. FRANKLIN will lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Thursday, 4
March, in the Taylor Institution.

Subject: `Broadside ballads, from the street
to the library.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



TRANSLATION RESEARCH IN OXFORD

Don Quijote

This meeting will be held on Saturday, 13 March, in St
Hugh's College. The event is arranged by the British
Centre for Literary Translations (University of East
Anglia), with the support of the Instituto Cervantes, the
Arts Council, and the Maison Française
d'Oxford.

The cost is £15 (students £3), and lunch is an
additional £7. Bookings, by cheque payable to
`TRIO', should be addressed to Edith McMorran, St Hugh's
College, Oxford OX2 6LE (telephone: Oxford (2)74996, e-
mail: maison@sable.ox.ac.uk).

J. RUTHERFORD

10 a.m.: `A new English translation.'

A. SCHULMAN, Paris, Sorbonne

10.45 a.m.: `Don Quichotte de la
Manche
, a new French translation.'

B. VAN DE POL, writer and translator, Amsterdam

12 noon: Ms van de Pol will speak about
her Dutch translation.

D. JOHNSON, Belfast, and T. MOMBLANT, director, Gate
Theatre production

2 p.m.: `Adapting Don
Quijote
for the stage.'

J. RUTHERFORD, A. SCHULMAN and B. VAN DE POL

3.45 p.m.: `Translating the first
paragraph of Don Quijote.'
(Workshop)

L. BURNETT, Essex

5 p.m.: `Quixotic travels through
nineteenth-century Russia.'

R. CHANDLER, translator, London

5.30 p.m.: `Don Quijote
under Russian steppe: Chevengur by
Andrey Platonov.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



ASSOCIATION OF WOMEN IN SCIENCE
AND ENGINEERING

Oxford Science Lecture Series

Dorothy Hodgkin Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR LOUISE JOHNSON, FRS, will deliver the first
Dorothy Hodgkin Memorial Lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 4
March, in the University Museum of Natural History. The
lecture is open to the public.

Subject: `Dorothy Hodgkin and penicillin:
fifty years from structure to present-day understanding
of biosynthesis and bacterial resistance.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 25 February 1999: Grants and Funding<br />

Grants and Research Funding


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



ASSOCIATION OF COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITIES


Development Fellowships 1999–2000

The University has been invited to make two nominations for the
Association of Commonwealth Universities Development Fellowships
1999–2000. One of the fellowships is tenable at the
University of Oxford.

The purpose of these awards is to help ACU member
universities with their staff development needs and to develop
the human resources of their countries.

Nominees should be on the staff of a university in membership
of the ACU, or be working in industry, commerce, or public
service in a Commonwealth country, and should be between twenty-
eight and fifty years of age. Preference will be given to workers
in the following subject areas: agriculture, forestry, food
sciences, biotechnology, development strategies, earth and marine
sciences, engineering, health and related social sciences,
information technology, management for change, professional
education and training, social and cultural development, and
university development and management.

Fellowships will be tenable for up to a maximum of six
months.

Further details and application forms are available from Mrs
K. McGuire, International Office, University Offices, Wellington
Square, Oxford (telephone: (2)70134). Applications must be
returned to the International Office by 10 May.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



OXFORD ITALIAN ASSOCIATION


Grants to promote Italian culture

The Oxford Italian Association is offering modest top-up grants,
not normally of more than £100, to assist graduate students
and others to promote aspects of Italian culture in Oxford. Such
grants may be used, for instance, to help stage an Italian play,
to contribute to research expenses (including travel to Italy),
and other activities which the committee judge to be of value in
this area.

Applications, with a brief account of the project and if possible
a supporting note from a tutor, should be sent by 12 March to
Professor J.R. Woodhouse, 47 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JF.
Applications arriving after that date may be considered for
future grants.

Return to List of Contents of this
section





<br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 25 February 1999: Examinations and Boards<br />

Examinations and Boards


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



GENERAL BOARD OF THE FACULTIES: CHAIRMAN

The General Board of the Faculties gives notice that it has
elected R.C.S. WALKER, B.PHIL., MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Magdalen
College, as its Chairman for the academic year 1999–2000.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



CHAIRMAN OF EXAMINERS

The Vice-Chancellor desires to call the attention of all
examiners to the provisions of Ch. VI, Sect. ii.c, § 1,
clauses 1–3, which require examiners in all university
examinations to appoint one of their number to act as Chairman,
to notify the appointment to the Vice-Chancellor, and to publish
it in the University Gazette.

He desires that these appointments shall be notified to the
Clerk of the Schools who will inform the Vice-Chancellor and see
that notice of them is duly published in the University
Gazette
.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



CHAIRMEN OF EXAMINERS

HILARY TERM 1999

Preliminary Examinations

Classics: PROFESSOR C. COLLARD, Lecturer, St Hilda's
College

Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology: DR P.
GRIFFITHS, MA status (address: Computing Services)

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Moderations

Oriental Studies (Chinese): DR T.T. LIU, MA,
D.PHIL., Fellow of Wadham (address: Institute of Chinese Studies)

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Honour School

Physics and Philosophy: DR W.H. NEWTON-SMITH, MA,
D.PHIL., Fellow of Balliol

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Master of Philosophy

Qualifying Examination in English Studies Courses I and
II
: DR H.L. SPENCER, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Exeter

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Master of Studies

Research Methods in English (Medieval Period):
PROFESSOR R. HANNA, MA, Fellow of Keble

Return to List of Contents of this
section



EXAMINATION SCHOOLS


Accommodation for Lectures

Trinity Term 1999

The Chairman of the Curators of the Schools would be grateful if
Professors, Readers, and University Lecturers who wish to lecture
at the Schools in Trinity Term 1999 could inform the Clerk of the
Schools at the end of the present term. It is necessary to know
whether a room suitable for an audience of more than one hundred
persons is required; only the three large writing©schools will
accommodate more than that number.

Leave for the use of rooms for lectures will expire at the
end
of the fourth week of Trinity Term.

Afternoon lectures should normally finish by 6 p.m.

Attention is drawn to the fact that overhead projection
equipment and 35©mm projectors are available. When these
facilities are required the Clerk of the Schools should be
notified in advance.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in
regulations made by the Committee on Continuing Education will
come into effect on 12 March.


Committee on Continuing Education


Undergraduate Diploma in Local History
(by distance learning)

With effect from 1 April 1999

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p.
981, after l. 24 insert:

`Local History (by distance learning)

1.

Course

The course will comprise two modules:

A. Concepts and Methods for Local History

B. Databases for Historians

The course, which is available on a part-time, distance learning
basis only, will normally be taken over a period of one year, and
may not be taken over a period of more than two years.

2. Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners
in the following:

(a) active participation in all parts of the course
to the satisfaction of the Course Director;

(b) four assignments of 2,500 words, based on the
work covered in the
Concepts and Methods module (A, above);

(c) two assignments of 2,500 words, based on the work
covered in the Databases module (B, above);

(d) a detailed proposal for a database project
equivalent to a conventional assignment of 5,500 words;

(e) active participation in projects specified by the
Course Director and (electronic) group discussions under the
guidance, and to the satisfaction, of the student's academic
tutor.

Assignments under 2 (b)–(d) above shall
be forwarded to the examiners for consideration by such dates as
the examiners shall determine and shall notify candidates.

3. Candidates may be required to attend a viva voce
examination in person at the end of the course of studies.

4. The examiners may award a Distinction to candidates for the
Diploma.

5. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners in the
assignments under 2 (b)–(d) may be
permitted to resubmit work in respect of the part or parts of the
examination which they have failed for examination on not more
than one occasion which shall normally be within one year of the
initial failure.'

Return to List of Contents of this
section



DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF LETTERS

The Board of the Faculty of Modern History has granted leave to
E.M.H. PORT, Hertford, to supplicate for the
Degree of Doctor of Letters.

A list of the evidence submitted by the candidate is available
at
the University Offices.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF SCIENCE

The Board of the Faculty of Physical Sciences has granted leave
to
J.E. BECKMAN, Balliol, to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of
Science.

A list of the evidence submitted by the candidate is available
at
the University Offices.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR
OF
PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give
notice
of oral examination of their candidates as
follows:

Anthropology and Geography

K. BAKKER, St Catherine's: `Privatising the environment: the
political ecology of water in England and Wales'.

School of Geography, Monday, 15 March, 9.30 a.m.


Examiners: J. Emel, G.L. Clark.

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Biological Sciences

N. RAMADEVI, St Hilda's: `Structural and functional analysis of
VP4,
a core protein of bluetongue virus'.

Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, Friday, 12 March, 10 a.m.


Examiners: W. James, T. Barrett.

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Clinical Medicine

S. MONK, Green College: `Positional cloning of the Darier disease
gene'.

Institute of Molecular Medicine, Monday, 22 March, 2 p.m.


Examiners: S.L. Thein, M. Dixon.

Return to List of Contents of this
section


English Language and Literature

S. BROOM, Brasenose: `Inhabitable mythologies: myth in
contemporary
Irish poetry'.

Hertford, Thursday, 25 March, 10.30 a.m.


Examiners: T.N. Paulin, D.G. Williams.

M. DEMATA, St Cross: `Representations of the Ottoman Empire in
travel
literature, the Edinburgh Review, and Byron's early
poetry'.

Hertford, Friday, 16 April, 3 p.m.


Examiners: T.N. Paulin, K. Hanley.

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Management

R. PADULO, Balliol: `Managing corporate transformations: lessons
from
a cross-case analysis of empirical studies'.

Templeton, Monday, 26 April, 3 p.m.


Examiners: R. Galliets, S.E. Doesov.

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Medieval and Modern Languages

E.R.A. PEDERSEN, Wadham: `Henry William Katz: the life and work
of a
German–Jewish writer and journalist in exile
1933–45'.

St Hugh's, Tuesday, 9 March, 11 a.m.


Examiners: T.M. Kuhn, J.M. Ritchie.

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Physical Sciences

P. BAKULE, Merton: `A solid state laser system for doppler-free
spectroscopy of muonium'.

Clarendon Laboratory, Thursday, 18 March, 2.15 p.m.


Examiners: S.M. Hooker, A.I. Ferguson.

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Physiological Sciences

E. JONES, Brasenose: `Localising RNA polymerase sub-units in
human
cells'.

Sir William Dunn School of Geography, Monday, 1 March, 2 p.m.


Examiners: S. Murphy, W. Bickmore.

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Theology

J. DUFF, St Cross: `A reconsideration of pseudepigraphy in early
Christianity'.

Examination Schools, Friday, 19 March, 2 p.m.


Examiners: J.B. Muddiman, M.N. Bockmuehl.

Return to List of Contents of this
section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 25 February 1999: Colleges<br />

Colleges, Halls, and Societies


Contents of this section:

Return to Contents Page of this
issue



OBITUARIES


St Anne's College

ANTON TCHETVERTAKOV, 12 February 1999; commoner 1995--8,
scholar 1998--9. Aged 22.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Somerville College, St Anne's
College, and St Catherine's College

DAME IRIS (JEAN) BAYLEY (née Murdoch), 8
February 1999; exhibitioner, Somerville College, 1938--
42, Honorary Fellow; Fellow, St Anne's College, 1952--63,
Honorary Fellow 1963--99; Honorary Fellow, Catherine's
College, 1987--99. Aged 79.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



ELECTIONS


Jesus College

To a Senior Research Fellowship (from 1 January
1999):

JOHN ANTHONY CALDWELL, MA, D.PHIL., FRCO

Return to List of Contents of this
section


To Junior Research Fellowships (from 1 October
1999):

KAREN JESSICA BAKKER (BA, B.SC. McMaster)
(Environmental Change)

DR JULIA TAMSIN PREST (BA Birmingham, PH.D. Cambridge)
(Modern Languages)

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Queen's College

To Honorary Fellowships:

PROFESSOR FERGUS G.B. MILLAR, MA, D.PHIL., D.LITT.,
FBA

PROFESSOR OLIVER W. SACKS, BM, B.CH., MA

TIMOTHY J. BERNERS-LEE, MA

To an Official Fellowship and Praelectorship in Law
(with effect from 1 October 1999):

NICHOLAS C.
BAMFORTH, BCL, MA, Worcester College,
and Robinson College, Cambridge

Return to List of Contents of this
section



St Hilda's College

To a FitzGibbon Scholarship:

EMMA WILKINSON,
formerly of Walthamstow Hall, Sevenoaks

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Somerville College

To a Coombs Scholarship in Modern History:

EMMA
LOUISE FURNISS, formerly of Tertiary College,
Northamptonshire

Return to List of Contents of this
section


To Pope Exhibitions in Modern Languages:

ELIZABETH MARY DYE, formerly of Colchester County High
School

CATHERINE ELIZABETH HUNTER, formerly of Garseinon
College, Swansea

FRANCESCA EMILY SOUTHERDEN, formerly of the Queen's
School, Chester

Return to List of Contents of this
section



PRIZE


Magdalen College

Matthew Taylor Prize 1999 (for excellent academic
performance in a science subject):

PAUL M. TEALE

Proxime accesserunt: JAMES WARBRICK-SMITH and
ROSANNA M.G. WELLESLEY

Return to List of Contents of this
section



NOTICES


Christ Church


Christopher Tower Junior Research
Fellowship in Greek Mythology

Christ Church proposes, provided that a suitable candidate
presents himself/herself, to elect a Christopher Tower Junior
Research Fellow. The fellow's proposed research may be into any
aspect of the ancient world (e.g. Classical Literature, Ancient
History, Archaeology/History of Art, Ancient Philosophy), but
must be concerned in some way with Greek Mythology. The
fellowship is open to men and women, and is tenable from 1
October 1999.

The fellowship will normally be awarded to someone who is
approaching the end of his/her doctoral research or who has begun
postdoctoral study. The fellow must engage in original research
and may be asked to undertake a cetain amount of teaching for the
college. Current annual salary is £13,930 (under review).

Application forms and further particulars may be
obtained from the Censors' Administrator, Christ Church, Oxford
OX1 1DP (telephone: Oxford (2)76158, fax: (2)76488). The further
particulars can also be seen on the college Web site,
http://www.chch.ox.ac.uk/jobs/greekjrf. html. The closing date
for applications is 29 March.

Christ Church is an equal opportunities employer.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Jesus College


Temporary Lecturership in Law

Jesus College seeks to appoint a twelve-hour Stipendiary Lecturer
in Law for a period of at least one year, but not more than two
years, from 1 October 1999. The stipend is £14,814 per annum
(under review). Further particulars, including particulars of
other benefits attached to the post, may be obtained from the
Senior Tutor (telephone: Oxford (2)79720, e-mail:
senior.tutor@jesus.ox.ac.uk). Applications should include a
curriculum vitae and the names of two referees and
should be sent to the Senior Tutor, Jesus College, Oxford OX1
3DW. The closing date for applications is Friday, 26 March.
Applicants should ask their referees to send references direct
to the Senior Tutor by that date.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Magdalen College


Tutorial Fellowship in Modern History

Magdalen College proposes to elect, with effect from 1 October
1999, a Fellow and Tutor (male or female) in later modern
European History. The fellowship is tenable with a stipendiary
University Lecturership (CUF). The combined college and
university salary will be according
to age, on a scale up to £37,113 per annum. Additional
college allowances are available.

Application forms and further information can be
obtained from the College Secretary, Magdalen College, Oxford OX1
4AU (telephone: Oxford (2)76113, fax: (2)76094, e-mail:
college.secretary@magd.ox.ac.uk).

The closing date by which completed applications, including
a full curriculum vitae, and three references, are
to be received by the President is 11 March.

Magdalen College is an equal opportunities employer.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Oriel College


Appointment of Personal Assistant to
the Provost

Applications are invited for the post of Provost's Secretary/
Personal Assistant. The work requires good communication skills,
a high degree of confidentiality and initiative coupled with
discretion, experience of organising social events, and a
sympathetic approach to students. Speedy and accurate
audio-typing and word-processing skills are essential.

The appointment is for a twenty-five-hour week, normal hours
being from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. with an hour, unpaid, for lunch.
Salary will be negotiable according to age and experience. There
is a generous holiday entitlement and free lunches when on duty.

Further particulars may be obtained from the Domestic Bursar,
Oriel College, Oxford OX1 4EW (telephone: Oxford (2)76565), to
whom applications should be sent, together with the names and
addresses of two referees, to arrive not later than 8 March.

Oriel College is an equal opportunities employer.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



St Catherine's College


Stipendiary Lecturership in Biological
Sciences

St Catherine's College proposes to appoint a six-hour Stipendiary
Lecturer in Biological Sciences from October 1999, for two years.
The lecturer will be required to teach (in tutorials and classes)
six hours per week on average in the eight weeks of each full
term. In addition, he or she will be expected to play a full role
in the running of Honour Schools involving Biological Sciences,
including participating in the admissions process, setting and
marking college examinations, and the pastoral care of
undergraduates.

The lecturer will be expected to teach across a range of
topics for the First and Second Public Examinations in the degree
courses at Oxford involving Biological Sciences. He/she will also
be expected to run revision classes in the core subjects, and to
do such special paper teaching as falls within his/her research
areas.

A teaching room is usually available. The lecturer will be a
member of the senior common room and will receive five meals per
week in term time. The stipend for 1999– 2000 will be
£7,884, and will be pensionable.

Applications should be addressed to the Senior Tutor, St
Catherine's College, Oxford OX1 3UJ, and should include a
curriculum vitae, an indication of areas of teaching
expertise, and the names of two referees. Applicants should ask
their referees to write directly to the Senior Tutor.
Applications and references must arrive by Thursday, 25 March.
Short-listed candidates are likely to be interviewed during the
week beginning 19 April.

St Catherine's College is an equal opportunities
employer.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



St Hugh's College


Fixed-term Stipendiary Lecturership
in Greek and Latin Languages and Literature

St Hugh's College proposes to elect a fixed-term Stipendiary
Lecturer in Greek and Latin Languages and Literature with effect
from 1 October 1999. The holder of the post will replace Dr
Laetitia Edwards, who is retiring. The person appointed will be
required to teach not less than ten hours per week (see the
further particulars) and share responsibility for the teaching
of Literae Humaniores and joint schools in the college. The
lecturer will be paid on the stipendiary lecturers' scale (at
present from £12,211 per annum).

Further particulars and application forms may be
obtained from the Senior Tutor, St Hugh's College, Oxford OX2 6LE
(fax: Oxford (2)74918), to whom applications should be sent to
arrive by 8 April. Candidates should ask referees to write direct
to the Senior Tutor by the same date.

St Hugh's College is an equal opportunities employer.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



St John's College


Opening of collection of medieval
vestments

St John's College intends to open to the public its collection
of medieval vestments on Saturday, 6 March, from
2 p.m. to 5 p.m. The collection is displayed
in the Garden Quadrangle and entrance, free of charge, will be
via the Parks Road Lodge or the Main Lodge.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Wolfson College


Godfrey Lienhardt Memorial Fund

Applications are invited for grants from the Fund, which has been
established by Wolfson College out of a bequest from the late Dr
R.G. Lienhardt `for the promotion of the Social and Cultural
Anthropology of Africa south of the Sahara desert but excluding
the Republic of South Africa'. Those eligible to apply are
graduate students of the University, and those admitted as
graduate students for the coming academic year, whose research
falls within the specified terms of the fund. It is proposed to
make one major award of up to £1,500, priority for which
will be given to those engaged in field research, and a few
smaller grants of up to £250.

Application forms and further information may be
obtained from the President's Secretary, Wolfson College, Oxford
OX2 6UD. Applications must be submitted by
Friday, 23 April.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Worcester College


Junior Research Fellowships

Worcester College proposes to elect two non-stipendiary Junior
Research Fellows in the Humanities or Social
Studies to hold office for two years from 1 October 1999. The
fellowships carry senior common room membership with free lunches
and dinners and are open to men and women who have had not more
than seven continuous years in academic work after completing
their first
degree, although consideration will be given to applicants who
have had interrupted academic careers. Application forms and
further particulars are obtainable from the Provost's Secretary,
Worcester College, Oxford OX1 2HB (fax: Oxford 793106). The
closing date for completed
applications, including references, is 14 April.

Worcester College exists to promote excellence in education
and research.

Return to List of Contents of this
section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 25 February 1999: Advertisements<br />

Advertisements


Contents of this section:



How to advertise in the
Gazette

"../../../stdg/conds.htm">

Terms and conditions of acceptance
of advertisements

Return to Contents Page of this issue



Oxford Chamber Music Society

Hilary Term Concerts: 7 Mar., 2.45 p.m.,
Schubert Ensemble of London (works by
Fauré, Martin Butler, and Schubert). Holywell Music Room.
Tickets £10 (concessions
£4.50).

Return to List of Contents of this section



T.E. Utley Memorial Fund

The T.E. Utley Memorial Award was set up 11
years ago in honour of the
political journalist, who had devoted great effort to encouraging
young prospective journalists.
The trustees of the fund continue this enterprise by awarding
annual prizes to school and
University students for a brief (1,200 words maximum),
unpublished, article. Contestants should
address the folowing theme: Leaving economic questions
aside, what political or cultural
arguments do you find most telling against our joining the
Euro?
For further details,
contact the Secretary of the fund, at 111 Sugden Road, London
SW11 5ED, tel.: 0171 228 3900.
Closing date for competition entries: 6 Apr. 1999.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Tuition Offered

Dame Diana Rigg, Cameron Mackintosh Visiting
Professor of Contemporary Theatre
1999, will be giving a masterclass for 15 University students on
Thurs., 11 Mar. (8th week).
This class will be open to students from all colleges and
disciplines and will be repeated for a
different set of students each term for the rest of the year. For
details, please contact the
University Drama Officer at the Burton Taylor Theatre, tel.:
Oxford 791577.

Spanish tutor. Professional Spanish Linguist and
Philologist, all levels, ages,
all purposes. Jaime Veiga Perez, tel.: Oxford 794294.

Oxford Software Training: I can offer training
and help over many Windows
applications (Windows 95, Word, e-mail, etc) for small groups and
1-to-1. If you are struggling
to get started, or trying to get the best possible use use your
PC resources, I can visit to see
where I can help with filling in knowledge gaps, suggesting short
cuts, and generally turning
software use into an enjoyable and meaningful activity. Ask for
further details: Janet Caldwell,
Oxford Software Training, tel.: Oxford 511566, e-mail:
janet.caldwell@virgin.net.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Services Offered

Town and Country Trees: professional tree
surgeons. All aspects of
arboriculture undertaken including orchard and shrub pruning,
planting, hedge trimming, stump
grinding, etc. Quality work at competitive prices. We are fully
insured. For a free quotation,
call Paul Hodkinson. Tel.: 01869 351540.

Personal Computer Consultants: we offer expert
advice and tuition for both
hardware and software. On-site service at home or in the office.
We provide upgrades for most
computers, or alternatively we now supply our range of
personally-built to your own
specifications K Tec computers. We will also supply or source
software to match your
requirements. For a quality service matched with competitive
prices, contact Chris Lewis, tel.:
Oxford 461222, fax: 461333.

Garden Design: Spring will be here soon—let
me help you re-think your
garden. full design or short consultation. Judith Walton, tel.:
Oxford 735179.

Long-established Oxford builder (25 years).
Property maintenance, renovation,
extensions. Every aspect of the building trade covered. Free
estimates. Academic references
available. Richard Edwards. Tel.: Oxford 343562.

Tax advice. Ex-KPMG Chartered Accountant
spacialises in assisting professionals
and small businesses with tax problems including self-assesment.
Convenient North Oxford
premises. To receive further information, please tel.: Oxford
513381, or e-mail:
100430.145@compuserve.com.

Bespoke Garden and Landscape Design. `One-off'
consultancy visits, or sketch
and scaled layouts, planting schemes, construction details and
site supervision, as desired.
Nationwide service from Oxford/Gloucestershire base. Chelsea Gold
Medal 1996 and 1997. contact
Jacquie Gordon, tel./fax: 01531 822743.

Shipping? Abyssinia to Zanzibar, New York to
Newmarket. Today, tomorrow, next
week? All the best options are at Mail Boxes Etc. Will collect
from college, home, factory, or
elsewhere. Also 24-hour photocopying, secure mailboxes, computer
workstation, high-grade colour
photocopying, faxing, laminating, binding, etc. 266 Banbury Road,
Summertown, Oxford OX2 7DL.
Contact Justin Brookes. Tel.: Oxford 514655, fax: 514656, e-mail:
summertown@020.mbe.uk.com.

Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press—the
University Printers: specialising
in booklet and publicity material, typesetting, printing, and
finishing. Output Bureau provides
high-quality output from disc from all major DTP programs onto
paper, bromide, colour-separated
positive or negative film; high-quality specialist colour copier
service. For service, quality,
and competitive prices contact Oxuniprint, Oxford University
Press, Great Clarendon Street,
Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 514691, fax: 514010.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Domestic Services

Beech Tree Nursery School: taking children aged
3–5 years. High
adult–child ratio, and set in idyllic surroundings. Write
or telephone for a prospectus.
Beech Tree Nursey School, Rye St Antony School, Pullen's Lane,
Headington, Oxford OX3 0BY, tel.:
Oxford 229215.

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by
Grimebusters, your local specialists.
Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college.
Also carpet/upholstery stain
protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying,
oriental rug cleaning. For free
estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford
726983 or Abingdon 555533.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Situations Vacant

Readers required for blind examiner in June
1999. Sessions of 4 or 2 hours,
morning or afternoon, at £7 p.h. Tel.: Oxford 552209
(evenings/weekends).

Administrator, Oxfordshire BiotechNet
(office/lab. premises for start-up
bioscience companies). Salary c. £15,000. Exciting
opportunity for efficient and
enthusiastic person. Long term prospects. General admin. and
basic bookkeeping. Computer
skills (MS Word and Excel). Ability to communicate with wide
range of people and problem-
solving attitude. Visit our Web site for info:
http://www.biotechnet.co.uk, or contact Margaret
Henry, The Oxford Trust, Oxford Centre for Innovation, Mill
Street, Oxford OX2 0JX, tel.: Oxford
728953. Apply with c.v. to Dr David Baghurst, address as before,
or by email:
davidb@oxtrust.org.uk. Closing date: Fri. 12 Mar.

Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine: Unit
Secretary. Clerical and Library
Grade 3 (£11,294–£13,074 p.a.). Departmental
Secretary required to provide
support for staff and students in the Wellcome Unit. As well as
acting as secretary to the
Director, duties will include: word-processing, assisting in the
organisation of conferences and
seminars, organising catering, acting as
receptionist/telephonist, and making travel
arrangements. Applicants should have a secretarial qualification,
excellent typing, and
proficiency in Word for Windows. Suit flexible organised
candidate whole enjoys variety and can
work on own initiative. Post is to 30 Sept. 2001 in the first
instance (renewable thereafter).
Further particulars available from the Administrator, tel.:
Oxford (2)74618, e-mail:
wuhmo@wuhmo.ox.ac.uk, and at http://www.wuhmo.ox.ac.uk.
Applications (giving details of previous
employment and names and addresses of 2 referees) should be sent
to the Administrator, WUHMO,
45–47 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE, by Fri. 26 Mar.

St Hugh's College: Head Chef. We require an
experienced, enthusiastic, and
self-motivated professional Chef to manage our Catering Services,
starting 1 Sept. 1999. The
successful candidate will head a kitchen brigade of 4 other
chefs/cooks, and other kitchen
support, Senior Common Room, and Dining Hall Servery staff, to
provide an in-house catering
service to the whole College. Communication and leadership skills
are essential. Applicants
should have a keen desire to provide a high standard of customer
service, together with a full
understanding of catering legislation, including food hygiene and
safety provisions. St Hugh's
is embarking on a period of expansion on the College site with
a new 96 en
suite
bedroom building, which will include a second kitchen
to cater for an increasing
conference trade. The Chef will be responsible for developing
this facility. Candidates should
have at least 5 years' experience of managing a large catering
operation, plus appropriate
qualifications and hands-on experience. Salary negotiable between
£20,000–£25,000
p.a. Applicants should write to the Domestic Administrator, St
Hugh's College, Oxford OX2 6LE
for details and application form. Closing date for completed
applications and c.v. is 15 Mar.
1999; interview like to be held during the week of commencing 19
April.

Research Assistant/Psychology student needed to
organise, manage, and collate
Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for Child and Adolescent
(HoNOSCA) for 1 day p.w.
(preferably Mon.) for at least a year. The post holder will
introduce a routine outcome measure
in the Department of child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and will
organise the collection and
collation of completed forms from several clinics across
Oxfordshire, and develop a computerised
database. Good organisational, IT, and interpersonal skills
required. Post is based in the Park
Hospital for Children, Headington. £8 p.h. Details from
Glynis Phillips, tel.: Oxford
226510; application forms from Jayne Bowles, Personnel
Department, 11 Morrell Crescent, Oxford,
tel.: Oxford 223528. Closing date: 13 Mar.

Experienced part-time telesales person required.
Must be experienced and self-
motivated; have a pleasant telephone manner; be positive,
persistent, and persuasive; and be
able to use a database program. Contact Mike Elsey at Planprints
Ltd, tel.: Oxford 244455.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Houses to Let

East Oxford: furnished 2-bedroom terrace house
with garden, in very quiet
street, convenient for bus routes and walk (20–25 minutes)
to Bodleian and city centre.
Available Sept. 1999–June 2000. £600 p.c.m. Tel.: 001
202 363 3241, e-mail:
dn44@umail.umd.edu.

Kidlington: fully-furnished, 2-bedroom,
semi-detached house. Sitting/dining-
room, kitchen with all domestic appliances, c.h., small gardens,
parking for 2 cars. Close to
shopping and bus stops to Oxford. Non-smokers. Available from 1
Apr. 1999. £500 p.c.m. Ivy
Samuel, tel. (mobile): 07971 436790 (between 1–2 p.m. and
after 9 p.m.), 01895 238102
(after 9 p.m.), 01993 881003 (weekends).

House to rent in Moreton-in-Marsh, a Cotswold
village outside Oxford (own
transport essential). Available for short let from now until end
Apr. Three bedrooms (2 double,
1 single). All mod. cons. £500 p.c.m. Please tel.: 0121 427
2993, or e-mail:
ElizabethGillow@Eversheds.com.

Victorian house in North Oxford, near St
Antony's College, 15 minutes' walk
from centre, available while owners on holiday. One double and
2 single bedrooms, 2 living-
rooms, 2 bathrooms, study with PC and e-mail. Nice garden. Small
friendly cat. Available 13
July–29 Aug. £275 p.w. or £1,500 for whole period.
Tel.: Oxford 515077, e-mail:
mollison@cableinet.co.uk.

Available August: light and spacious
semi-detached house in south Oxford. Close
to city centre (10 minutes by bicycle—2 available). Two
bedrooms, 2 reception,
kitchen/dining-room, bathroom, garden. Fully furnished and
equipped. Overlooks open country from
the back. Frequent bus service. Prefer 1 or 2 persons. Resident
cat to be fed. £450 for 1,
£700 for 2. Tel.: Oxford 728111, e-mail: Majaob@aol.com.

Headington, close to schools and hospitals.
Four-bedroom house; large kitchen,
2 reception, garage, gardens. Available 15 Aug. 1999–31 July
2000. £950 p.c.m. Tel.:
Oxford (2)76202 or 761316, e-mail:
alan.bowman@christ-church.oxford.ac.uk.

College-owned houses available 12 July–10
Sept. only, centrally located
(St Clements), fully equipped, serviced by college scouts. Long
lets preferred. Individual rooms
sharing facilities may also be available. Tel.: Oxford (2)79082,
e-mail:
janet.mead@seh.ox.ac.uk, or write to Ms Janet Mead, St Edmund
Hall, Queen's Lane, Oxford OX1
4AR.

To rent from Apr. 1999: an exceptional 4-bedroom
town house in North Oxford.
Recently furnished with IKEA and redecorated. All modern
appliances. Ground floor: large
study/bedroom, bedroom 3, shower room, separate w.c. First floor:
lounge/dining-room, fully-
fitted kitchen. Second floor: bedrooms 1 and 2, bathroom, w.c.
Off-road parking for 1 car, small
paved garden. Non-smokers only. £950 p.m. Contact Mr or Mrs
Morris, tel.: Oxford 750375.

An Englishman's home is his castle—so the
saying goes. We cannot pretend
that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking
quality rental accommodation in
Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB
Management is one of Oxford's foremost
letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical
personnel, and other
professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most
helpful service in Oxford. Visit our
Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the
properties that we have
currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or
e-mail us with details of your
requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation.
Tel.: Oxford 764533, fax:
764777, e-mail: info@qbman.co.uk.

Make finding accommodation a pleasure, not a
chore. Finders Keepers is
dedicated to making it easy for visitors to Oxford to find the
right property. Browse through
our Web site for up-to-date detailed information on properties
available and make use of our
interactive database, priority reservation service (credit cards
accepted), welcome food pack,
personal service, and much more. Call us and you will not need
to go elsewhere. For further
information contact Finders Keepers, 226 Banbury Road,
Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: Oxford
311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk; Internet site:
http://www.finders.co.uk.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Flats to Let

Light 2-bedroom flat, first floor. Oxford ring
road above Summertown.
Convenient centre and hospitals; 24-hour bus route. Off-street
parking. Fully furnished. Washing
machine. Gas c.h. Available 1 Apr. £520 p.c.m. plus bills.
Tel./fax: Oxford 554285.

Wytham Abbey, Oxford. Spacious fully-furnished
2-bedroom apartment with private
courtyard and use of walled garden. Part of Grade 1 manor house,
3 miles from city centre, set
in 3,000 acres of park and woodland. Fully equipped, luxuriously
appointed. Available 1 June.
Tel.: Oxford 725015, fax: 724762.

Comfortable warm flat. Recently-refurbished,
tastefully-furnished, 1-bedroom
flat plus basement in central North Oxford. Very near Port
Meadow, convenient for shops,
schools, University. Oak-floored dining-room and sitting-room,
large carpeted bedroom, fully-
fitted kitchen with dishwasher. Washing machine, drier. Bathroom
with separate shower cubicle.
Gas c.h. Two telephones. TV point. Charming secluded paved garden
to rear, small front garden.
£950 p.m. Available now. Tel.: Oxford 559614.

Luxurious, bright, 3-bedroom apartment on 2
floors in central North Oxford.
Near Port Meadow, convenient for University, schools, and shops.
Sitting-room, dining-room,
modern well-equipped kitchen. Two double bedrooms, 1 single; 2
luxury bathrooms (1 has separate
shower). Terrace and paved, well-stocked garden. Beautifully
furnished and carpeted throughout.
Gas c.h., washing machine, drier, dishwasher, 2 telephones, TV
points. Rent £1,450 p.m.
Families only. Available from mid-Apr. Tel.: Oxford 559614.

North and central North Oxford. Two-bedroom
apartments, fully furnished to high
standard, good security, off-street parking. From
£695–£725 p.c.m. Best suit
professionals or visiting academics. Tel.: Oxford 516144.

Newly-converted, self-contained basement studio
flat with private entrance, in
St Clement's area of Oxford; short walk to city centre.
Bed/sitting-room with cooking
facilities, gas coal-effect fire; shower room. Fully furnished.
suit
professional/academic/graduate. £450 p.c.m. including gas,
electricity, and Council Tax.
Tel.: Oxford 436381.

Central North Oxford: 10 minutes' walk from city
centre, all main university
buildings, and parks, and very close to the river. Available for
short/long let. Exceptionally
well-furnished, comfortable flat in extremely quiet, civilised,
large Victorian house in this
exclusive, leafy, residential Victorian suburb, with large,
light, airy rooms. Ground-floor
(available end. Feb./Mar.): 1 double, 1 single bedroom,
drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom. Off-
street parking; large secluded garden. Regret no children or
pets. Tel./fax: Oxford 552400.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Accommodation Offered

Bed-and-breakfast available in the warm
comfortable home of a semi-retired
academic couple in exclusive, leafy, central North Oxford; within
easy walking distance of the
city centre and all main university buildings; a stone's throw
from the river, parks, excellent
pubs and restaurants and a 9–9 corner shop. All rooms have
colour TV, microwave, tea- and
coffee-making facilities, c.h., and independent heating.
Refrigerators available. Very moderate
terms. Tel./fax: Oxford 557879, mobile: 0374 434489.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Accommodation Sought

Visiting Fellow from USA seeks sublet or short
lease of flat/room in North
Oxford/Summertown area for 1 Apr.–30 June. Access to kitchen
preferred. Please contact Dr
Marc W. Steinberg, 203 Wright Hall, Smith College, Northampton,
MA 01063. Fax (USA): 413 585
3389, office: 413 585 3443; e-mail: mwsteinb@sophia.smith.edu.

Wanted: 3/4-bedroom house, in North Oxford or
within 5 miles of Oxford, for 2
weeks at end July/beginning Aug. 1999. Please tel.: Oxford
240053.

Professional couple on a budget, expecting first
child, seeks 2-bedroom house
or ground-floor flat from APr./May. Anything considered within
easy reach of the city centre.
Twelve-month contract preferred. Tel.: Oxford 516490, e-mail:
fameduc@aol.com.

Academic family, 2 children (girls), seeks house
to rent 3–4 weeks during
July. Prefer East Oxford, but will consider elsewhere. Contact:
Elisabeth Reed, 1850 Capistrano
Avenue, Berkeley, tel.: +1 510 527 7686, e-mail:
aereed@ibm.net.

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your
property? QB Management is one
of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We
specialise in lettings to both
academic and professional individuals and their families, and
have a constant flow of enquiries
from good-quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area.
If you would like details of our
services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice
without obligation, telephone us:
Oxford 764533, fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk.
Alternatively, we would invite
you to visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how
we could be marketing your
property.

Mallams Residential Letting is well placed to
help with your letting and
management requirements. Based in Summertown, we offer a
professional service tailored to your
individual requirements. If you are thinking of letting your
property, please call us. Tel.:
Oxford 311006, fax: 311977.

Finders Keepers specialises in managing your
home or investment. We have
celebrated 25 years in Oxford letting and managing
properties—try us first! Many of our
landlords have remained with us since we opened and are delighted
with our service—why not
pop in and read their comments? Contact Finders Keepers, 226
Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford
OX2 7BY. Tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 556993, e-mail:
oxford@finders.co.uk, Internet site:
http://www.finders.co.uk.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Accommodation Sought to Rent or
Exchange

Academic on sabbatical in Oxford requires
accommodation for a couple, 1 Aug.
1999–31 Mar. 2000. Possible swap for country home near
Cornell University, Ithica, New
York. Contact Prof. C.E. Farnum, tel.: 001 (607) 253 3543, fax:
(607) 253 3541, e-mail:
cef2@cornell.edu.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Accommodation Offered to Rent or
Exchange

Summertown, Oxford: lovely, 3-bedroom, Victorian
terrace hosue; fully-
furnished/equipped; available from mid-July 1999. to let or
exchange for 1 year minimum (longer
if required). Three double bedrooms, eat-in kitchen overlooking
pretty garden, 2 reception
rooms, 1.5 bathrooms, gas c.h., hardwood floors, washer/drier.
Near shops, buses, excellent
schools, university, hospitals, etc. Family owners (prof. mother,
2 children) ideally seeking
exchange with New York apartment in Manhattan. Otherwise,
£1,100 or $1,800 p.c.m.
exclusive. New York tel.: 212 663 2664, fax: 212 531 1224; London
tel.: 0181 874 5909; e-mail:
101642.2251@compuserve.com.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Holiday Lets

Bayeux, Normandy: 18th-c. house in rural
position, with large garden.
Comfortably furnished, sleeps 8 + cot. Thirty minutes to
wonderful sandy beaches, close to
shops, ideal for touring Normandy—Mont St Michel, Giverny,
Honfleur, Suisse Normande. Very
pretty countryside. For details and photograph, tel.: 01453
836634.

France, Lot region: 2 houses. First sleeps 6
(all 3 bedrooms en
suite
), £320–£400 p.w. Second sleeps 2,
£140–£180 p.w. Both
detached with garden, and available Apr.–Oct. Situated in
small medieval village 3 miles
from main town. Tel.: 01327 262889.

Mediterranean: attracative studio flatlet, third
floor (lift); large study
table, balcony, sleeps 2. Juan les Pins 5, Antibes 15 minutes'
walk. Bus at door. Out of season:
£75 p.w. (for first week; subsequently less); June:
£120 p.w.; July/Aug.: £200
p.w.; Sept.: £150 p.w. Contact Claude Murray for details and
photograph, tel.: 0181 347
6957.

Skopelos, Skiathos, and Alonissos. Lovely island
houses for rent in town,
country, and seaside locations sleeping 2–8 persons. Prices
from £39 per person p.w.
For brochure, tel.: +30424 22947, fax: +30424 23057, e-mail:
thalpos@otenet.gr.

Traditional Andalusian house in mountain
village. Sleeps 6. Immaculate and
newly furnished, spacious with large roof terrace overlooking
orange groves and hills.
Dishwasher, washing machine. Sea 25 minutes; Granada 20 minutes.
Sierra Nevada peaks 40 minutes.
Summer: £380 p.w., otherwise £250 p.w.—both
inclusive of linen and cleaner. Tel.:
Oxford 515778.

Tuscany, Italy. Charming, seventeenth-century
farmhouse in unspoilt mountain
village with magnificent views. Spacious accommodation, fully
modernised, with lovely garden and
swimming pool. Near Lucca; easy access to Pisa and Florence.
Sleeps 8–10. Not available
Aug. Tel.: 0181 446 4913.

Andalucia, Gaucin. Divided house with pool to
let. Magical Medieval village
with stunning landscape. Our house is at the front of the village
with unobstructed views past
Gibralter and the Med. to the Rif mountains of Morocco. Excellent
walking and bird watching.
Visit Granada, Cordoba, Ronda, Seville, Cadiz, and Morocco.
Reduction long let. Dr Campbell. For
brochure, tel.: Oxford 513935, e-mail:
L.Lustgarten@soton.ac.uk.

Catalonia: well-appointed 3-bedroom house in the
unspoilt village of
Regencós (about 60 miles north east of Barcelona and 4
miles inland) near Palafrugell.
Available 1 Apr.–31 Aug. Superb beaches within 6-mile
radius. House sleeps 6 on 2 floors,
each of which is a self-contained flat with kitchen, bathroom,
lounge/dining area. Ground floor:
large double bedroom; upstairs: large double, 1 twin. Attractive
roof garden with superb views
over surrounding countryside. Spanish maid visits every Sun.,
cooks delicious meals. £1,000
p.c.m., £550 per fortnight, £300 p.w. Dr Charles Mould,
tel.: 01844 208234, fax:
202613, e-mail: charles.mould@stx.ox.ac.uk.

Pembrokeshire National Park: holiday cottage in
idyllic cliff-top situation
overlooking St Bride's Bay. Scenic cliff walks, safe sandy
beaches, wild flowers and
birdwatching. Simply but comfortably furnished; sleeps 8/9 in 4
bedrooms; children and dogs
welcome. Tel.: 01562 777283.

Charming terrace house for short and long lets
in conservation zone of unspoilt
Southwold (Suffolk), seconds from the sea. Sleeps 4+. Marvellous
area for walking, cycling (2
bicycles available), church visiting, bird watching, and pub
hopping. Tel.: Oxford 513464
(evenings).

Cyprus: very attractive fully-equipped holiday
cottage sleeping 2 people, in a
picturesque village in South Cyprus. Ideally suited for painting,
walking holidays; access to
mountains and sea. £120–£140 p.w. Discount car
hire available. for brochure,
tel./fax: 01624 862697.

You can write—you can paint: join us for
a memorable experience in either
Cyprus or Italy. The programme is fully inclusive of tuition,
excursions, transfers,
accommodations, and cuisine. Writing and Painting holidays: Dial
A Fare Travel, tel./fax: Oxford
847357, e-mail: dialafare@cwcom.net. We can take bookings any
time evenings or weekends.

Return to List of Contents of this section



For Sale

Woodstock Bookshop: 3 Market Place, Woodstock,
Oxon OX20 1SY. Alongside Town
Hall. Second-hand academic books, literature, criticism, review
copies, art. Some philosophy and
theology. Oxford paperbacks. Books bought. Tel.: 01993 811005.

Return to List of Contents of this section






<br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette: Diary, 26 February<br /> - 8 March

Diary


Contents of this section:

Academic Staff
Development Seminars
: places should be booked in advance
through
the Staff Development Office, University Offices,
Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

For the full list of courses, see the HREF="http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/training/">Staff Development
ProgrammeWeb site.

Return to
Contents Page of this issue



Friday 26 February

DR D. MACLEOD: ` "The sea is everything": fishermen of
the Canary Islands in their sociocultural context'
(Ethnicity and Identity Seminar: `Artisans, crafts, and
local identities'), Institute of Social and Cultural
Anthropology, 11 a.m.

THE ALLEGRI STRING QUARTET perform works by Haydn and
Mendelssohn, the chapel, Exeter, 1 p.m. (tickets £5
(£2.50) from the Playhouse Box Office, Beaumont
Street, or at the door).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Chinese tomb figures',
1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015,
9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

P. HARVEY: `Why "smart objects" need narratives: the
transformation of objects in new museum databases'
(Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology seminars),
Lecture Theatre, ISCA, 4.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR T.C. SMOUT: `The quarrel over the
countryside' (Ford's Lectures in British History: `Use
and delight: environmental history in Northern England
since 1600'), Schools, 5 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Sunday 28 February

THE RT. REVD AND RT. HON. LORD HABGOOD preaches, St
Mary's, 10 a.m. (Second Bampton Lecture: `Varieties of
unbelief—a matter of proportion').

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Monday 1 March

BODLEIAN LIBRARY exhibition opens: `University
College—the first 750 years' (until 29 May).

M. UNKOVSKAYA: `Seventeenth-century Russian
élite women and foreign doctors: the myth of the
unseen body' (lecture series: `Medicine and culture
before 1750'), Wellcome Unit, 47 Banbury Road, 2.15 p.m.

LITERAE HUMANIORES Faculty Board election, 25 March
(one ordinary member): nominations by two electors to be
received at the University Offices by 4 p.m.

PROFESSOR DR G. THEISSEN: `The Gospel of John: the
autonomy of the Christian sign world is brought to
consciousness' (Speaker's Lectures: `Theory of Primitive
Christian Religion (II)—the autonomy of primitive
Christian religion'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR DR A.I.C. HERON: `Alarms, negations, and
surprises' (Hensley Henson Lectures: `The unorthodox Karl
Barth'), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR C. MACKENZIE: `Policies and strategies in ethical
investment' (Environmental Change Unit seminar), Main
Lecture Theatre, School of Geography, 5 p.m.

IMOGEN COOPER, RAFAEL OLEG, and SONIA VIDA-ATHERTON
perform piano trios, the Auditorium, St John's, 8.30 p.m.
(admission by programme, from porters' lodge).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Tuesday 2 March

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM exhibition opens: `Recent
acquisitions—British drawings and watercolours of
the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries' (until 30 May).

BRENDA NEECE: `Early eighteenth-century strings: viols
and violoncellos' (lecture-demonstration), Ashmolean,
1.15 p.m. (tickets £1.50 by reservation: tel.
(2)76133).

DR W. SACHS: `The environmental impact of
globalisation' (Wolfson College Lectures: `Globalisation
and insecurity'), the Hall, Wolfson, 5 p.m. (open to the
public).

PROFESSOR DR G. THEISSEN: `Primitive Christianity'
(Speaker's Lectures: `Theory of Primitive Christian
Religion (II)—the autonomy of primitive Christian
religion'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. SCRUTON: `Democratic destruction'
(Herbert Spencer Lectures: `Democracy in practice and in
theory'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. ELSTEIN: `The political structure of
British broadcasting 1949–99: Annan' (lecture
series), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

D. LEWIS: `Setting environmental standards' (Oxford
Centre for the Environment, Ethics, and Society
seminars), Council Room, Main Building, Mansfield, 5 p.m.

DR A. GLEES: `Britain and Germany: the cold war and
beyond' (seminar series: `Bilateral relations in west
Europe'), European Studies Centre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

THE RT. HON. GERALD KAUFMAN, MP,
SIR PATRICK CORMACK, MP, and
JOHN LLOYD: `Imaging Britain: media, culture, and
foreign policy' (seminar series: `Foreign policy
dilemmas: Britain and the world'), Lecture Theatre, New
Building, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Wednesday 3 March

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM exhibition opens: `Buddhist art from
Tibet—the E.M. Scratton collection' (until 2 May).

PROFESSOR DR G. THEISSEN: `The construction and
plausibility of the primitive Christian religion'
(Speaker's Lectures: `Theory of Primitive Christian
Religion (II)—summary and final considerations'),
Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR E. ULRICH: `The origins and nature of the
Septuagint' (Grinfield Lectures: `The Septuagint at the
dawn of the third millennium'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. LITTLEWOOD: `Satan and the computer: the
European revival of spirit possession' (Wilde Lectures in
Natural and Comparative Religion: `Religion, restitution,
and agency: lectures in medicine and religious thought'),
Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. CONNORS: `Piazza Navona and dynastic
urbanism' (Slade Lectures: `Borromini and Baroque Rome'),
Lecture Hall, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

DR D. HADLEY: `Migration and forced migration in early
medieval Europe' (Refugee Studies Programme: Seminars on
Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen
Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

DR C. BREWER: `Treasure-house of the language: the
OED as a repository of great writers'
(OED Forum), Rewley House, 5 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Thursday 4 March

A. FOSTER: `Perceptions of domestic violence in Tunisia:
responses from health service providers, women's
organisations, and students' (Centre for Cross-Cultural
Research on Women seminars: `Researching gender,
conflict, and violence'), Library Wing Seminar Room,
Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

DR A. CAGLAR: `Urban spaces, popular culture, and the
new scripts of "community": German-Turks in Berlin' (ESRC
Research Programme: `Transnational communities'), Senior
Common Room, School of Geography, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. TITCHMARSH (Royal Academy of
Engineering/AEA Technology/INSS Research Professor in
Microanalytical Techniques for Structural Integrity
Problems): `Electrons: from power lines to white lines'
(inaugural lecture), Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, St
Anne's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR E. ULRICH: `The Septuagint in the Dead Sea
Scrolls' (Grinfield Lectures: `The Septuagint at the dawn
of the third millennium'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. ELSTEIN: `The political structure of
British broadcasting 1949–99: Hunt' (lecture
series), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR DR A.I.C. HERON: `To talk to God ...'
(Hensley Henson Lectures: `The unorthodox Karl Barth'),
Schools, 5 p.m.

A. GOSCHA: `Ruptures et continuités
idéologiques in Indochine, 1900–40' (seminar
in modern French history and politics), Maison
Française, 5 p.m.

C. BIET: `Jouer Racine' (Maison Française
seminar: `French literature from the Renaissance to the
Enlightenment'), Okinaga Room, Wadham, 5 p.m.

WALID KHAZENDAR (Arab Poet in Residence): `Poetry and
science' (round-table discussion with Oxford poets), Old
Library, All Souls, 5 p.m.

SIR TONY WRIGLEY: `Country and town: farmers,
labourers, craftsmen, manufacturers, merchants' (Linacre
Lectures: `The peopling of Britain—the shaping of a
human landscape'), Lecture Theatre A, the
Zoology/Psychology Building, 5.15 p.m.

DR A. FRANKLIN: `Broadside ballads, from the street to
the library' (Oxford Bibliographical Society lecture),
Taylor Institution, 5.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR L. JOHNSON: `Dorothy Hodgkin and penicillin:
fifty years from structure to present-day understanding
of biosynthesis and bacterial resistance' (first Dorothy
Hodgkin Memorial Lecture—open to the public),
University Museum of Natural History, 6 p.m.

CATHOLIC CHAPLAINCY: performance of John Caldwell's
Good Friday, Newman Room, Rose Place, 8 p.m.
(tickets £7.50/£4.50 from the Old Fire Station,
Gloucester Green, or at the door).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Friday 5 March

DR I. FOWLER: `Iron-working and identity in the Cameroon
grassfields' (Ethnicity and Identity Seminar: `Artisans,
crafts, and local identities'), Institute of Social and
Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `East meets West: God,
gods, and goddesses', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel.
for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

A. HORNBORG: `Animism, fetishism, and machines'
(Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology seminars),
Lecture Theatre, ISCA, 4.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR E. ULRICH: `The Septuagint translation of
Isaiah' (Grinfield Lectures: `The Septuagint at the dawn
of the third millennium'), Schools, 5 p.m.

BARONESS PARK: `Difficult places' (lecture series:
`Women in Whitehall'), Jacqueline du Pré Music
Building, St Hilda's, 5.30 p.m.

CATHOLIC CHAPLAINCY: performance of John Caldwell's
Good Friday, Newman Room, Rose Place, 8 p.m.
(tickets £7.50/£4.50 from the Old Fire Station,
Gloucester Green, or at the door).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Saturday 6 March

DEGREE CEREMONIES, Sheldonian, 11.30 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Sunday 7 March

THE RT. REVD AND RT. HON. LORD HABGOOD preaches, St
Mary's, 10 a.m. (Third Bampton Lecture: `Varieties of
unbelief—explanation and understanding').

ST ANNE'S COLLEGE exhibition opens: `Pictures of You'
(photographs by Simon Jones, open until 19 March), Mary
Ogilvie Foyer, St Anne's (before visiting telephone
college lodge, (2)74800, to check availability).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



Monday 8 March

J. PHILIPS: `Allegories of the body: Bunyan, disease, and
popular medicine' (lecture series: `Medicine and culture
before 1750'), Wellcome Unit, 47 Banbury Road, 2.15 p.m.

DR H. OLIVER: `Tiger travels—an illustrated
journey through time and space of past, present, and
future climates, climate processes, and climate change
impacts' (Environmental Change Unit seminar), Main
Lecture Theatre, School of Geography, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR DR A.I.C. HERON: `Creation, preservation and
all the blessings ...' (Hensley Henson Lectures: `The
unorthodox Karl Barth'), Schools, 5 p.m.

Return to List of Contents of this
section