25 April 1996

University Acts

Contents of this section:

[ Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • CONGREGATION 22 April
    • Degree by Special Resolution
  • HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL 22 April
    • 1 Decrees
    • 2 Status of Master of Arts
    • 3 Register of Congregation
  • CONGREGATION 23 April: Promulgation of Statutes
  • BOARDS OF FACULTIES

CONGREGATION 22 April

Degree by Special Resolution

No notice to the contrary having been received under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1995, p. 13), the following resolution is deemed to have been approved at noon on 22 April.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

MARGARET ROSALIND LINTERN-BALL, St Hilda's College

HELEN JAYNE MARDON, D.PHIL., St Catherine's College

PADDY ANDREW PHILLIPS, D.PHIL., New College


HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL 22 April

1 Decrees

Council has made the following decrees, to come into effect on 10 May.

List of the decrees:

  • (1) Late admission to a degree, increasing fee for
  • (2) Readership in French Literature, abolishing
  • (3) Pitt Rivers Museum, changing electoral board for Directorship of
  • (4) Environmental Change Unit, changing electoral board etc. for Directorship of
  • (5) Professorship of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, changing electoral board for
  • (6) Readership in Transport Studies, changing electoral board for
  • (7) Economics and Management, concerning Honour School of
  • (8) Jurisprudence, concerning Honour School of
  • (9) Oriental Studies, concerning Honour School of
  • (10) Archaeology, concerning postgraduate courses in
  • (11) B.Phil., Degree of, increasing examiners for
  • (12) Engineering Science, increasing examiners for Honour School of
  • (13) Fees, certain, increasing
  • (14) Dispensation from duties (Morris)
  • (15) Extension of retirement age (Stepan)
  • (16) Permitting over-age appointment (Lands)
  • (17) Fee remission (Gruber)
  • (18) Fee remission (Chobotova)

Explanatory note to Decree (1)

Council has reviewed the level of the fee payable for late entry for admission to a degree, and to maintain it at its real value, in the same way as the majority of other fees of this kind (see Decree (13) below), has made the following decree increasing the fee to £15.00 with effect from 1 September 1996; this represents the same increase (in round terms) as that in examination costs, as recorded in the Universities Pay and Prices Indices, over the previous year.

Decree (1)

1 In Ch. I, Sect. I, § 1, cl. 2 (b) (Statutes, 1995, p. 175, delete `£14.50' and substitute `£15.00'.

2 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 1048, l. 14, delete `14.50' and substitute `15.00'.

3 This decree shall be effective from 1 September 1996.

Explanatory note to Decree (2)

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the General Board and the Modern Languages Board after consultation with the Joint Committee for University/College Appointments, abolishes the Readership in French Literature on the retirement of the present holder, on 30 September 1997. The post is one of those identified by the faculty board for abolition under the retrenchment programme agreed by the General Board in response to the 1986 funding cuts.

Decree (2)

1 In Ch. II, Sect. VI, § 1, SCHEDULE, concerning official members of faculty boards (Statutes, 1995, p. 231), under Medieval and Modern Languages, delete `French Literature, Reader in.'

2 In Ch. VII, Sect. III, delete § 84, concerning the Reader in French Literature (p. 409), and renumber existing § 85 (p. 410) as § 84.

3 This decree shall be effective from 1 October 1997.


Explanatory note to Decree (3)

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the General Board after consultation with the Anthropology and Geography Board and the Committee for Archaeology and with the concurrence of Linacre College, reconstitutes the electoral board for the Directorship of the Pitt Rivers Museum so as to include two appointees of the college and two of the General Board, which is in line with the recommendations of the Working Party on Statutory Posts.

Decree (3)

1 In Ch. III, Sect. III, § 5, cl. 4 (Statutes, 1995, p. 250), delete items (2)–(6) and substitute:

`(2) the head of the college with which Council shall for the time being have associated the directorship, or, if the head is unable or unwilling to act, a person appointed by the governing body of the college;

(3) a person appointed by the governing body of the college specified in (2) of this clause;

(4) a person appointed by Council;

(5), (6) two persons appointed by the General Board;

(7), (8) two persons appointed by the Board of the Faculty of Anthropology and Geography;'.

2 Ibid., renumber existing item (7) as item (9).


Explanatory note to Decree (4)

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the General Board after consultation with the Anthropology and Geography Board, the Biological Sciences Board, and the Bioscience Research Board and with the concurrence of Linacre College, provides for the IBM Directorship of the Environmental Change Unit to be held for such periods as Council may from time to time determine. The decree also reconstitutes the electoral board for the directorship so as to include a second college appointee, a second General Board appointee who replaces the Professor of Geography ex officio, and a second Anthropology and Geography appointee who replaces one of the two persons formerly appointed by the Biological Sciences Board. The balance will reflect the changed provisions pertaining to the Environmental Change Unit, which has become part of the expanded structure of the School of Geography, within the Faculty of Anthropology and Geography, and is in line with the recommendations of the Working Party on Statutory Posts. Finally, the decree provides for the directorship to be held as a professorship.

Decree (4)

1 In Ch. III, Sect. XXXV, cl. 4 (Statutes, 1995, p. 289), delete `There shall be ... Environmental Change Unit. The director' and substitute `There shall be a director of the unit who shall hold the title of IBM Director of the Environmental Change Unit and who shall also be Professor of Environmental Studies. The director and professor shall be appointed for such period or periods as Council may from time to time determine. The director and professor'.

2 Ibid., delete item (3) (p. 290) and substitute: `(3) a person appointed by the governing body of the college specified in (2) of this clause;'.

3 Ibid., delete item (4) and substitute: `(4), (5) two persons appointed by the Board of the Faculty of Anthropology and Geography, one of whom shall be appointed in consultation with the Board of the Faculty of Biological Sciences;'.

4 Ibid., renumber existing item (5) as item (6).

5 Ibid., delete existing items (6) and (7) and substitute: `(7), (8) two persons appointed by the General Board;

(9) a person appointed by the Board of the Faculty of Biological Sciences.'

6 Ibid., cll. 5–9, in each case after `director' insert `and professor'.

7 Ibid., cl. 7, after `professors' insert `and shall reside within the University during six months at least in each academical year, between the first day of October and the ensuing first day of August'.


Explanatory note to Decree (5)

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the General Board after consultation with the Physical Sciences Board, amends the composition of the electoral board for the Professorship of Electrical and Electronic Engineering so as to provide for two electors to be appointed by the General Board and three by the Physical Sciences Board, which is in line with the recommendations of the Working Party on Statutory Posts.

Decree (5)

In Ch. VII, Sect. III, § 67, cl. 2 (Statutes, 1995, p. 403), delete items (5)–(9) and substitute: `(5), (6) two persons appointed by the General Board;

(7)–(9) three persons appointed by the Board of the Faculty of Physical Sciences.'


Explanatory note to Decree (6)

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the General Board after consultation with the Anthropology and Geography and the Social Studies Boards, reconstitutes the electoral board for the Readership in Transport Studies so as to include two college appointees and to replace two of the three persons appointed by the Social Studies Board with a second person appointed by the Anthropology and Geography Board, and a second person appointed by the General Board, which is in line with the recommendations of the Working Party on Statutory Posts.

The decree also places the Transport Studies Fund at the disposal of the Anthropology and Geography Board rather than at that of the Social Studies Board, in recognition of the fact that the Transport Studies Unit has become integrated into the faculty structure of Anthropology and Geography. These changes are acceptable to the Social Studies Board.

Decree (6)

1 In Ch. VII, Sect. III, § 314, cl. 2 (Statutes, 1995, p. 483), insert new items (2) and (3):

`(2) the head of the college with which Council shall for the time being have associated the readership, or, if the head is unable or unwilling to act, a person appointed by the governing body of the college;

(3) a person appointed by the governing body of the college specified in (2) of this clause;'.

2 Ibid., renumber existing item (2) as item (4).

3 Ibid., delete existing items (3)–(7) and substitute: `(5), (6) two persons appointed by the General Board;

(7), (8) two persons appointed by the Board of the Faculty of Anthropology and Geography;

(9) a person appointed by the Board of the Faculty of Social Studies.'

4 In Ch. IX, Sect. I, § 345, cll. 2–7 (Statutes, 1995, pp. 661–2), in each case delete `Social Studies' and substitute `Anthropology and Geography'.

5 Ibid., cl. 2, after `Reader in Transport Studies' insert `jointly with the Head of the School of Geography'.

6 Ibid., cl. 5, after `Reader in Transport Studies,' insert `advised by the Head of the School of Geography,'.


Explanatory note to Decree (7)

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Standing Committee for Economics and Management and with the concurrence of the General Board, changes the title of the compulsory paper, Accounting and Control, for the Honour School of Economics and Management, to Accounting and Finance. This change is made in order to indicate the introduction of a Finance component to the course and a reduction in the Accounting component.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in `Examinations and Boards' below.

Decree (7)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 173, l. 11, delete `Accounting and Control' and substitute `Accounting and Finance'.

2 This decree shall be effective from 1 October 1997.


Explanatory note to Decree (8)

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Law Board and with the concurrence of the General Board, provides for the number of papers taken by candidates in the Honour School of Jurisprudence to be increased from eight to eight and a half. This will apply to candidates on Course 1 (three-year course) for first examination in 1999, and those on Course 2 (four-year course) for first examination in 2000. Provision is made for special subjects, each to count as half a standard subject. The intention is to meet professional requirements and at the same time increase the number of options in the syllabus.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in `Examinations and Boards' below.

Decree (8)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 259, l. 5, delete `eight'.

2 Ibid., l. 17, after `Course 1.' insert `[Until October 1998: Candidates shall be examined in eight standard subjects.] [From October 1998: Candidates shall be examined in eight standard subjects and one special subject, or in seven standard subjects and three special subjects.]'

3 Ibid., l. 19, after `Course 2.' insert `[Until October 1999: Candidates shall be examined in eight standard subjects.] [From October 1999: Candidates shall be examined in eight standard subjects and one special subject, or in seven standard subjects and three special subjects.]'


Explanatory note to Decree (9)

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Oriental Studies and Literae Humaniores Boards and with the concurrence of the General Board, effects the introduction of Classics into the Honour School of Oriental Studies both as a main subject and as an additional language. This will make it possible for a candidate to offer five papers in Classics as a main subject in combination with three papers in any one of the following additional subjects: Akkadian, Arabic, Aramaic and Syriac, Armenian, Coptic, Egyptology, Hebrew, Old Iranian, Pali, Persian, or Sanskrit. It would also make it possible to offer three papers in Classics with the following main subjects: Arabic, Egyptology, Hebrew, Persian, or Sanskrit.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in `Examinations and Boards' below.

Decree (9)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 457, l. 5, after `Chinese,' insert `Classics,'.

2 Ibid., l. 35, after `sub-section' insert `and subject also to the agreement of the Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores to any regulations concerning Classics'.

3 Ibid., p. 973, l. 35, after `English' insert `, and Oriental Studies'.


Explanatory note to Decree (10)

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Committee for Archaeology and with the concurrence of the General Board, establishes a common structure for the Master of Studies and Master of Philosophy courses under the aegis of the committee. It establishes a one-year course leading to the Degree of Master of Studies, and a two-year course leading to the Degree of Master of Philosophy, in Classical Archaeology, in European Archaeology, and in World Archaeology. In each case the Master of Studies course is identical to the first year of the Master of Philosophy course. The examination in the Trinity Term of the first year counts either for the award of the Degree of Master of Studies or as a qualifying examination within the Master of Philosophy course.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in `Examination and Boards' below.


Decree (10)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 556, l. 3, after `Ethnology and Museum Ethnography,' insert `European Archaeology,'.

2 Ibid., ll. 9–10, delete `Prehistoric and European Archaeology,'.

3 Ibid., ll. 11–12, after `Theology,' insert `World Archaeology,'.

4 Ibid., p. 557, after l. 6 (i.e. the sixth line on that page, on which the line numbers printed in the 1995 edition are incorrect) insert in the left-hand column: `European Archaeology'.

5 Ibid., ll. 7–8, delete: `Prehistoric and European Archaeology'.

6 Ibid., after l. 8 (i.e. the eighth line on that page) insert in the left-hand column within the brace: `World Archaeology'.

7 Ibid., p. 560, l. 9 (i.e. the ninth line on that page, on which the line numbers printed in the 1995 edition are incorrect), before `in Prehistoric' insert `in European Archaeology and'.

8 Ibid., ll. 9–10 (i.e. the ninth and tenth lines on that page), delete `and in Prehistoric and European Archaeology'.

9 Ibid., after l. 10 (i.e. the tenth line on that page) insert `and in World Archaeology'.

10 Ibid., p. 659, delete l. 21.

11 Ibid., p. 660, after l. 2 (i.e. the second line on that page, on which the line numbers printed in the 1995 edition are incorrect) insert:

`European Archaeology      Committee for Archaeology'.

12 Ibid., delete ll. 22–3 (i.e. the twenty-second and twenty-third lines on that page).

13 Ibid., after l. 30 (i.e. the thirtieth line on that page, and following the insertion made by Decree (12) of 27 July 1995, Gazette, Vol. 125, p. 1424), insert:

`World Archaeology        Committee for Archaeology'.

14 Ibid., p. 966, delete ll. 13–21.

15 Ibid., ll. 23 and 26, in each case after `Classical Archaeology' insert `, European Archaeology, and World Archaeology'.

16 Ibid., p. 968, l. 18, delete `Archaeology, in'.

17 Ibid., p. 969, delete ll. 11–18.

18 Ibid., p. 972, ll. 38–9 and p. 973, ll. 1–2, in each case delete `and Prehistoric Archaeology' and substitute `Prehistoric and European Archaeology, and World Archaeology'.

19 Ibid., as amended by cl. 15 above, in each case delete `Prehistoric and European Archaeology,'.

20 Ibid., p. 980, l. 2, after `Archaeology,' insert `for the Degree of Master of Studies in Classical Archaeology, for the Degree of Master of Studies in European Archaeology,'.

21 Ibid., l. 3, after `Prehistoric and European Archaeology,' insert `for the Degree of Master of Studies in World Archaeology,'.

22 Ibid., ll. 1–3, delete `for the Degree of Master of Studies in Archaeology, for the Degree of Master of Studies in Prehistoric and European Archaeology,'.

23 Ibid., l. 4, after `Classical Archaeology,' insert `for the Degree of Master of Philosophy in European Archaeology,'.

24 Ibid., l. 6, after `Archaeology,' insert ` and for the Degree of Master of Philosophy in World Archaeology,'.

25 Ibid., ll. 4–6, delete `and for the Degree of Master of Philosophy in Prehistoric and European Archaeology,'.

26 Ibid., p. 985, ll. 9–10, delete `Prehistoric and European Archaeology,'.

27 Ibid., l. 15, after `Anthropology,' delete `and'.

28 Ibid., l. 16, after `Economics' insert `, Classical Archaeology, European Archaeology, and World Archaeology'.

29 Ibid., p. 990, l. 1, delete `Prehistoric and European Archaeology,'.

30 Ibid., ll. 1–2, after `Classical Archaeology,' insert `European Archaeology, World Archaeology,'.

31 Ibid., p. 999, l. 12 after `European Archaeology,' insert `Prehistoric and European Archaeology, World Archaeology,'.

32 Ibid., as amended by cl. 31 above, delete `Prehistoric and European Archaeology,'.

33 Ibid., after l. 22 insert new item (d) as follows and reletter existing item (d) (l. 23) as item (e):

`(d) Master of Philosophy and Master of Studies in European Archaeology.'

34 Ibid., delete l. 20 and reletter existing items (c), (d), and (e), as amended by cl. 33 above, as items (b), (c), and (d).

35 Ibid., after l. 24 insert:

`(f) Master of Philosophy and Master of Studies in World Archaeology.'

36 Ibid., reletter item (f), as inserted by cl. 35 above, as item (e).

37 Ibid., l. 23, delete `and Master of Studies'.

38 Ibid., delete ll. 23–4 and reletter existing item (e), as amended by cl. 36 above, as item (d).

39 Ibid., p. 1020, l. 25, after `Archaeology' insert `, Classical Archaeology, European Archaeology, and World Archaeology'.

40 Ibid., delete `Prehistoric and European Archaeology,'.

41 Ibid., l. 29, after `Archaeology' insert `, Classical Archaeology, European Archaeology, and World Archaeology'.

42 Ibid., ll. 28–9, delete `Prehistoric and European Archaeology,'.

43 Cll. 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 18, 20, 21, 23, 24, 27, 28, 30, 31, 33, 35, 39, and 41 of this decree shall be effective from 1 October 1996; cll. 10, 12, 16, 17, 22, 34, 36, 37, 40, and 42 shall be effective from 1 October 1997; and cll. 2, 5, 8, 14, 19, 25, 26, 29, 32, and 38 shall be effective from 1 October 1998.

Key to Decree (10)

Cll. 1, 3, 4, and 6 insert European Archaeology and World Archaeology into the list of examinations for the Degree of Master of Philosophy.

Cll. 2 and 5 delete, from the list of examinations for the Degree of Master of Philosophy, Prehistoric and European Archaeology, which will cease to exist after 1997–8.

 

Cll. 7 and 9 insert European Archaeology and World Archaeology into the provisions governing the notice of options for the Degree of Master of Philosophy.

Cl. 8 deletes Prehistoric and European Archaeology from the provisions governing the notice of options for the Degree of Master of Philosophy.

Cll. 10 and 12 delete Archaeology and Prehistoric and European Archaeology from the list of examinations for the Degree of Master of Studies.

Cll. 11 and 13 insert European Archaeology and World Archaeology into the list of examinations for the Degree of Master of Studies.

Cll. 14, 19, 25, 26, 29, 32, and 38 delete Prehistoric and European Archaeology from the provisions governing the appointment of examiners for the Degree of Master of Philosophy.

Cll. 15, 18, 20, 21, 23, 24, 27, 28, 30, 31, 33, and 35 provide for the appointment of examiners for the Master of Studies and Master of Philosophy courses in Classical Archaeology, European Archaeology, and World Archaeology.

Cll. 16, 17, 22, 34, and 37 delete Archaeology and Prehistoric and European Archaeology from the provisions governing the appointment of examiners for the Degree of Master of Studies.

Cl. 36 reletters the list of examinations to take into account the deletion of the M.St. in Archaeology.

Cll. 39 and 41 insert Qualifying Examinations in Classical Archaeology, European Archaeology, and World Archaeology into the schedule of pass lists.

Cll. 40 and 42 delete the Qualifying Examination in Prehistoric and European Archaeology from the schedule of pass lists.


Explanatory note to Decree (11)

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Literae Humaniores Board and with the concurrence of the General Board, provides for an increase of one in the number of examiners for the B.Phil. in order to allow for the appointment of an external examiner in future.

Decree (11)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 965, l. 17, delete `Three' and substitute `Up to four'.


Explanatory note to Decree (12)

In response to a recommendation made by the external examiner in his 1995 report, the Sub-faculty of Engineering Science agreed that an increase in the number of external examiners appointed for the Honour School of Engineering Science would be appropriate, given the broad range of subjects examined. Two external examiners have been appointed for the 1996 examinations, increasing the maximum number of examiners to fourteen, and the sub-faculty wishes to make this increase permanent. The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Physical Sciences Board and with the concurrence of the General Board, provides accordingly.

Decree (12)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 998, l. 16, delete `thirteen' and substitute `fourteen'.


Explanatory note to Decree (13)

Council and the General Board have reviewed the level of various fees payable by candidates for examinations and have agreed that they should in general be increased by 4.9 per cent (the increase in examination costs recorded in the Universities Pay and Prices Indices), normally rounded to the nearest pound, with effect from 1 September 1996 in order to take account of increases in examining and related costs. Resubmission fees for the M.Litt., M.Th., M.Sc., D.Phil., and Diploma in Law, which have not been increased in any respect for seven years, will rise to £100; they will, however, then be held at this new level for the foreseeable future. The following decree provides accordingly.

Decree (13)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 1047, l. 6, concerning the matriculation fee, delete `£137' and substitute `£144'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 15–40 and substitute:

   
(a) On entering or replacing the name of a non-member of the University on the Register of Diploma and Certificate Students under the provisions of Ch. X, Sect. VIII 71.00
(b) On entering for certain examinations: Foundation Certificates in English Language and Literature, and in Social and Political Science 36.00
  Special Diplomas in Social Studies, and in Social Administration* 71.00
  Certificates in Theology 41.00
  Certificate in Management Studies 71.00
  Qualifying Examination for the degree of BD 53.00
  Degree of B.Mus. 150.00
  Degrees of B.Phil., M.Phil., M.Th., M.Sc. (by Coursework), and M.St. on re-entering the examination [dagger sign] 248.00
  Diplomas in Applied Statistics, History of Art, and Human Biology on re-entering the examination [dagger sign] 132.00
  Degree of M.Ch., Part I 79.00
(c) On applying for leave to supplicate for the degree of BD 136.00
  for the degree of M.Ch., Part II 299.00
  for the degree of DM 299.00
  for the degrees of DD, DCL, D.Litt., D.Sc., and D.Mus. 480.00
(d) On resubmission of a thesis for the degree of M.Litt., M.Th., M.Sc., or D.Phil. or before a revised or new dissertation is examined for the degree of M.Sc. in Educational Studies or Educational Research Methodology 100.00
(e) On resubmission of a thesis for the Diploma in Law 100.00'.

3 Ibid., p. 1048, delete ll. 24-8 and substitute:

`(b) for each of the second and subsequent certificates attesting admission to any degree 4.50
(c) for each certificate attesting matriculation or the passing of any examination 4.50
(d) for each complete record of a graduate of the University 15.00'.

4 This decree shall be effective from 1 September 1996.


Decree (14)

Dispensation from prescribed duties is granted to D.J. Morris, MA, D.Phil., Fellow of Oriel College and University Lecturer (CUF) in Economics, for the academic years 1996–7 and 1997–8 to enable him to continue to hold the post of Deputy Chairman of the Monopolies and Mergers Commission.


Decree (15)

Notwithstanding the provisions of Tit. X, Sect. I, proviso (h) (Statutes, 1995, p. 74), Alfred Stepan, MA (BA Notre Dame, Ph.D. Columbia), Fellow-elect of All Souls College and Gladstone Professor-elect of Government, shall not be required to retire until the 30 September immediately preceding his 68th birthday.


Decree (16)

Notwithstanding the provisions of Tit. X, Sect. i, proviso ( h) (Statutes, 1995, p. 74), Professor O. Lando may be appointed as Heather Grierson Visiting Professor in European and Comparative Law for 1996–7.


Decree (17)

Notwithstanding the provisions of Ch. VIII, Sect. I, § 6, cl. 3 (a) (Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 1049), Ms J. Gruber, Wolfson College, shall not be required to pay three terms' composition fees otherwise payable by her in respect of her study for the degree of D.Phil.

Decree (18)

Notwithstanding the provisions of Ch. VIII, Sect. I, § 6, cl. 3 (a) (Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 1049), Ms K. Chobotova, Wolfson College, shall not be required to pay one-half of the fees otherwise payable by her in respect of Hilary and Trinity Terms 1996.


2 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts under the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. vi, cl. 1 (Statutes, 1995, p. 345) has been accorded to the following persons who are qualified for membership of Congregation:

 

EUGENE GERARD MCNALLY, Department of Radiology

ASLÖG KRISTINA MALMBERG, Department of Psychiatry

MARTIN FRANCIS PRICE, Environmental Change Unit

HANIA MOHAMED SHOLKAMY, St Anne's College

DENIS CHARLES TALBOT, Department of Clinical Oncology

ROBERT THOMPSON WALTON, Faculty of Clinical Medicine


3 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of Congregation:

Lintern-Ball, M.R., MA, St Hilda's
McNally, E.G., MA status, Department of Radiology
Malmberg, A.K., MA status, Department of Psychiatry
Mardon, H.J., MA, D.Phil., St Catherine's
Martinson, J.J., MA, D.Phil., Lady Margaret Hall
Phillips, P.A., MA, D.Phil., New College
Price, M.F., MA status, Environmental Change Unit
Sholkamy, H.M., MA status, St Anne's
Talbot, D.C., MA status, Department of Clinical Oncology
Walton, R.T., MA status, Faculty of Clinical Medicine


CONGREGATION 23 April

Promulgation of Statutes

Forms of Statute were promulgated. No notice of opposition having been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor declared the preambles carried of the proposed Statutes concerning the Lyell Bequest, concerning the Bodleian readers' declaration, and concerning the Gibbs Prizes.


BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 10 May, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

University Agenda

Contents of this section:

[ Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • CONGREGATION 29 April
    • Degree by Special Resolution
  • CONGREGATION 14 May 2 p.m.
    • *1 Voting on Statutes promulgated on 23 April
    • 2 Promulgation of Statutes
  • CONGREGATION 23 May
    • Elections
  • * Note on procedures in Congregation
  • * List of forthcoming Degree Days
  • * List of forthcoming Matriculation Ceremonies

CONGREGATION 29 April

Degree by Special Resolution

The following special resolution will be deemed to be approved at noon on 29 April, unless by that time the Registrar has received notice in writing from two or more members of Congregation under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1995, p. 13) that they wish the resolution to be put to a meeting of Congregation.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

WILLIAM OSMOND CHARLES MICHAEL COOKSON, D.PHIL., Green College

PETER ROBERT FRANKLIN, St Catherine's College

DIRK OBBINK, Christ Church

DOMINIC CHRISTOPHER O'BRIEN, Balliol College


CONGREGATION 14 May 2 p.m.

2 Promulgation of Statutes

Explanatory note to Statute (1)

The following statute, and the decree to be made by Council if the statute is approved, which are promoted on the recommendation of the Committee for the School of Management Studies and with the concurrence of the General Board, establish the Degree of Master of Business Administration which it is proposed be introduced in 1996. The introduction of the new degree represents a further stage in the development of Management Studies within the University as outlined to Congregation in November 1990 (see Gazette, vol. cxxi, p. 384).

(1) WHEREAS it is expedient to establish the Degree of Master of Business Administration, NOW THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD, in exercise of the powers in that behalf conferred upon it by the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923, and of all other powers enabling it, ENACTS, clause 1 being subject to the approval of Her Majesty in Council, AS FOLLOWS.

1 In Tit. III, cl. 3, concerning Convocation (Statutes, 1995, p. 29), after `Magister Juris' insert: `Master of Business Administration'.

2 In Tit. XI, cl. 4, concerning degrees of the University (p. 77), after `Master of Education' insert: `Master of Business Administration'.

3 Clause 1 of this statute shall be effective from the date on which it is approved by Her Majesty in Council or from 1 October 1996, whichever is the later; clause 2 shall be effective from 1 October 1996.

Decree to be made by Council if the Statute is approved

1 In Ch. I, Sect. I, FIRST SCHEDULE (Statutes, 1995, p. 184, as renumbered by Decree (1) of 29 February 1996, Gazette, p. 816), insert new item 29:

`29. Master of Business Administration

Ego A. B. etc. testor E. F. (or, if more than one, X, Y, etc.), e collegio (or aula or societate) C. D., quem (or quos) per tres terminos intra academiam prout statuta requirunt cubile et victum sumpsisse scio quatenus studio speciali sive investigationi incubuerit et reliqua omnia praestiterit quae per statuta Universitatis requiruntur (nisi quatenus, etc.), gratiam a collegio suo (or aula sua or societate sua) pro gradu Magistri in Negotiis Administrandis concessam fuisse; fide mea data huic Universitati.

                                         A. B. dec. Coll. C.'

2 Ibid., SECOND SCHEDULE (p. 186), insert new item 24 as follows and renumber existing item 24 as item 25:

`24. Master of Business Administration

Supplicat etc. A. B. scholaris (or Baccalaureus or Magister) facultatis Artium e collegio C., qui omnia praestitit quae per statuta requiruntur (nisi quatenus, etc.); ut haec sufficiant quo admittatur ad gradum Magistri in Negotiis Administrandis.'

3 Ibid., THIRD SCHEDULE (p. 188), insert item 22:

`22. Master of Business Administration

Insignissime, etc., praesento vobis hunc meum scholarem (or hunc Baccalaureum or Magistrum) in facultate Artium ut admittatur ad gradum Magistri in Negotiis Administrandis.'

4 Ibid., FOURTH SCHEDULE (p. 190), insert new item 17 as follows and renumber existing item 17 as item 18:

`17. Master of Business Administration

Domine or Magister (or Domini or Magistri), ego admitto te (or vos) ad gradum Magistri in Negotiis Administrandis.'

5 Ibid., Sect. IV, cl. 1 (p. 194), after `Master of Physics' insert: `Master of Business Administration'.

6 Ibid., Sect. VIII, cl. 1 (p. 197), after `Master of Education if also a Master of Arts' insert: `Master of Business Administration if also a Master of Arts'.

7 Ibid. (p. 198), after `Master of Education if not also a Master of Arts' insert: `Master of Business Administration if not also a Master of Arts'.

8 In Examination Decrees, 1995, after p. 756 insert:

`TIMES AND EXERCISES
REQUIRED FOR THE DEGREE OF
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION*


Ch. VI, Sect. XXXIII]
(i) DECREE
§ 1. Degree of Master of Business Administration

1. Any person who has been admitted to the status of student for the Degree of Master of Business Administration, who has satisfied the conditions prescribed by this section, and who has satisfied the examiners as required, may supplicate for the Degree of Master of Business Administration.

2. The Committee for Graduate Studies of the General Board shall have power to make and vary such regulations as may be necessary for carrying out the duties laid upon it and upon the Secretary of Faculties by this section.

3. A Student for the Degree of Master of Business Administration who is not a graduate of the University may wear the same gown as that worn by Students for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy.

§ 2. Status of Student for the Degree of Master of Business Administration

1. Any person who, in the opinion of the Committee for the School of Management Studies, is well qualified and well fitted to undertake the course of study for which application is made, may be admitted to the status of Student for the Degree of Master of Business Administration.

2. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of Faculties to keep a Register of those admitted to the status of Student for the Degree of Master of Business Administration.

§ 3. Admission of Candidates

1. A candidate seeking admission as a Student for the Degree of Master of Business Administration shall apply to the Committee for the School of Management Studies. Candidates for admission and shall be required to provide such information as the committee may determine from time to time by regulation. Applicants shall in addition be required to undertake such other tests and meet such conditions as, subject to the approval of the Committee for Graduate Studies of the General Board, the committee may determine by regulation.

2. Applications shall be made through the Secretary of Faculties, and it shall be the duty of the Secretary of Faculties to submit each application to the committee and to inform the candidate of the outcome, as soon as may be.

3. No person shall be admitted as a Student for the Degree of Master of Business Administration under these provisions unless he or she is also a member of some college, hall, or other approved society, and unless the application for admission as a Student for the Degree of Master of Business Administration has the approval of that society. The Secretary of Faculties shall forward the application to the candidate's society or to the society to which the candidate wishes to apply for membership, as appropriate; and admission by the committee shall be conditional upon admission by an approved society.

4. A student registered for any other higher degree or diploma in the University may apply for transfer to the status of Student for the Degree of Master of Business Administration. The committee shall have power to make such transfer, provided that it is satisfied that the student is well qualified and well fitted to undertake the course of study for which application is made, and that the application has the support of the candidate's society. A candidate who transfers status in this way shall be reckoned as having held the status of Student for the Degree of Master of Business Administration from the time of admission to his or her previous status, unless the committee shall determine otherwise.

§ 4. Supervision of Students

1. Every candidate on admission as a Student for the Degree of Master of Business Administration shall be placed by the committee for the school under the supervision of a member of the University or other competent person selected by the committee, and the committee shall have power for sufficient reason to change the supervisor of any student or to arrange for joint supervision by more than one supervisor, if it deems necessary.

2. It shall be the duty of the supervisor of a student entered upon a course of study to direct and superintend the work of the student, to meet the student regularly, and to undertake such duties as shall be from time to time set out in the General Board's memorandum of guidance for students and supervisors.

3. The supervisor shall submit a report on the progress of a student to the committee three times a year, and at any other time when the committee so requests or the supervisor deems expedient. In particular, the supervisor shall inform the board at once if he or she is of the opinion that the student is unlikely to reach the standard required for the Degree of Master of Business Administration.

4. It shall be the duty of every Student for the Degree of Master of Business Administration to undertake such guided work and to attend such seminars and lectures as his or her supervisor requests; to attend such meetings with his or her supervisor as the supervisor reasonably arranges; and to fulfil any other requirements of the General Board as set out in its memorandum of guidance for students and supervisors.

§ 5. Residence and other Requirements

1. No full-time Student for the Degree of Master of Business Administration shall be granted leave to supplicate unless, after admission, he or she has kept statutory residence and pursued his or her course of study at Oxford for at least thirty-two weeks.

2. No full-time Student for the Degree of Master of Business Administration shall retain that status for more than sixty-four weeks in all.

3. A Student for the Degree of Master of Business Administration shall cease to hold that status if:

(a) he or she shall have been refused permission to supplicate for the Degree of Master of Business Administration;

(b) the Committee for the School of Management Studies shall, in accordance with provisions set down by regulation by the General Board, and after consultation with the student's society and supervisor, have deprived the student of such status;

(c) he or she shall have been transferred under the relevant provisions to another status; or

(d) he or she shall not have entered for the relevant examination within the time specified under this sub-section.

§ 6. Examination of Students

1. The examination for the Degree of Master of Business Administration shall be under the supervision of the Committee for the School of Management Studies. The subjects of each examination shall be determined by regulation by the committee, which shall have power to arrange lectures and courses of instruction for the examination. The examination shall consist of:

(a) course assignments;

(b) a written examination;

(c) a written report on a business project approved by the committee; and

(d) an oral examination;

provided that the committee shall have power by regulation to authorise the examiners to dispense individual candidates from the oral examination. This provision notwithstanding, the examiners may, if they deem expedient, set a candidate a further written examination after examining the candidate orally.

2. No candidate shall be permitted to take an examination under the preceding clause unless he or she has been admitted as a candidate for the examination in question by the committee and has satisfied any other conditions prescribed in the regulations for that course.

3. Unless otherwise provided in this sub-section, the number and distribution of examiners shall be as set out in Sect. II. A, § 1, cl. 9 of this chapter.

4. A candidate who has failed to satisfy the examiners in the examination may enter again on one, but not more than one, subsequent occasion for that part of the examination which he or she failed, provided that candidates who fail the course assignments must resit all parts of the examination.'

9 Ibid., p. 970, after l. 8 insert:

`Master of Business Administration:   Three.'

10 Ibid., p. 983, l. 14, after `Philosophy,' insert `Master of Business Administration,'.

11 Ibid., p. 989, after l. 33 insert new clause 13 as follows and renumber existing cll. 13–16 (pp. 989–91) as cll. 14–17: `13. Examiners for the Degree of Master of Business Administration shall hold office for two years.'

12 Ibid., p. 1023, after l. 22 insert:

`(k) Examinations for the Degree of Master of Business Administration

Names of candidates who in [here insert term and year] have satisfied the examiners in the examinations for the Degree of Master of Business Administrati on.

A. B.  
C. D.  
E. F.                                              G. H.    
                                                   I. J. Examiners.' 

                                                   K. L.

13 Ibid., p. 1042, after l. 3 insert: `Examinations for the Degree of Master of Business Administration.'

14 Ibid., p. 1050, after l. 1 insert new item (iv) as follows and renumber existing items (iv)–(viii) (ll. 2–6) as items (v)–(ix): `(iv) the Degree of MBA;'.

15 Ibid., p. 1054, after l. 15 insert new item (b) as follows and reletter existing items (b)–(c) (l. 16, as amended by Decree (4) of 14 March 1996, Gazette, p. 866) as items (c)–(d): `(b) for members of the University working for the Degree of Master of Business Administration, £12,000; notwithstanding any general provisions to the contrary, £1,000 of this fee shall be payable by the student as a non-refundable deposit at the time of his or her acceptance of the offer by the University of admission to the course, and the balance shall be payable by the student in advance of the start of the course.'

16 Clause 5 of this decree shall be effective from the date on which clause 1 of Statute (...) approved by Congregation on ... is approved by Her Majesty in Council; the remaining changes shall be effective from 1 October 1996.

Key to Decree

Cll. 1–4 provide for admission to the degree of MBA.

Cl. 5 provides for holders of the new degree to be admitted to membership of Convocation.

Cll. 6 and 7 determine the academic precedence and standing of holders of the new degree.

Cl. 8 makes detailed provision for the new degree.

Cll. 9–13 prescribe the examination arrangements for the new degree.

Cll. 14 and 15 make provision for the payment of composition fees.


Footnote: *This decree should be read in conjunction with the associated regulations made by the General Board and individual faculty boards, to be found on pp. 795-839.
Return to text
Explanatory note to Statute (2)

When promoting the legislation establishing Kellogg College as a society of the University, Council stated that it had agreed that the society should be added to the cycle for the election of the Proctors and the Assessor in a position such that Kellogg would first elect the Assessor to be admitted to office in 2003. Since then Mansfield, Templeton, and Harris Manchester College have received their Royal Charters of Incorporation and have been added to the statutory list of colleges of the University, so that, as previously agreed by Council, they too need to be added to the Proctorial Cycle. The following statute adds all four newly created societies to the cycle and provides for Mansfield, Templeton, and Harris Manchester to elect the Assessors to be admitted to office in 2009, 2010, and 2011 respectively. In order to complete the current cycle, the statute also provides for the societies still due to elect an Assessor under that cycle to do so up to and including the election by Somerville of the Assessor to be admitted in 2017, with the Proctors for the additional years being elected by the societies which were due to elect the Proctors in the first four years of the second rotation of the current cycle (which was instituted with effect from the Proctorial year 1979-80). It will in due course be necessary for Council to review the future arrangements, in the light of the number of societies than in existence, in order to ensure an equitable rotation of these elections thereafter.

(2) WHEREAS it is expedient to add the four newly created societies to the cycle for the election of the Proctors and the Assessor, THE UNIVERSITY ENACTS AS FOLLOWS.

In Tit. IX, Sect. VI (Statutes, 1995, p. 66), delete cl. 3 and substitute:

`3. The Proctors and Assessor to be admitted to office in the years from 1998 to 2017 inclusive shall be elected by the colleges and other societies as shown in the following Schedule.

SCHEDULE
Year of
admission
to office
Societies electing
Proctors
Societies electing
Assessor
1998 Exeter, St Catherine's Queen's
 
1999 Lady Margaret Hall, Nuffield
  Pembroke
 
2000 Wadham, St Edmund Hall St Peter's
 
2001 Green, Jesus Trinity
 
2002 Merton, Somerville Linacre
 
2003 Keble, Lincoln Kellogg
 
2004 Corpus Christi, St Hugh's
  University
 
2005 Brasenose, St John's St Cross
 
2006 All Souls, St Hilda's Christ Church
 
2007 Balliol, Wolfson Hertford
 
2008 St Anne's, Worcester Magdalen
 
2009 New College, St Antony's Mansfield
 
2010 Queen's, St Catherine's Templeton
 
2011 Nuffield, Pembroke Harris Manchester
 
2012 St Edmund Hall, Oriel
  St Peter's
 
2013 Green, Trinity Exeter
 
2014 Linacre, Merton Lady Margaret Hall
 
2015 Keble, St Hugh's Wadham
 
2016 Corpus Christi, Jesus
  St Cross
 
2017 Brasenose, Somerville'
  Christ Church
 


Return to List of Contents of this section

CONGREGATION 23 May

Elections

  Vacancies Retiring members Period from MT 1996
Examination Schools, Curators of the One (member of Convocation) Dr R.C.S. Walker 6 years
General Board of the Faculties Two (from members of the Faculties of English, Law, Literae Humaniores, Modern Languages, Modern History, Music, Oriental Studies, Social Studies, and Theology) Professor R.M. Goode
Ms J.M. Innes
4 years
  Three (from members of the Faculties of Anthropology and Geography, Biological Sciences, Clinical Medicine, Mathematical Sciences, Physical Sciences, Physiological Sciences, and Psychological Studies) Professor R.A. Cowley
(resigned)
Dr R.A. Mayou
Dr N.M.J. Woodhouse
1 year

4 years

Hebdomadal Council Four President of Templeton (retiring)
Dr L.G. Black (becomes an ex officio member as Chairman of the General Board)
Dr W.H. Newton-Smith
Dr G.A. Stoy
3 years

6 years

Parks, University, Curators of the One (member of Convocation) Principal of Linacre (retiring) 6 years
Select Preachers, Committee for the Nomination of Two The Revd P.J.M. Southwell
The Revd H.Wansbrough
4 years

Nominations in writing by two members of Congregation will be received by the Head Clerk at the University Offices, Wellington Square, up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 6 May, and similar nominations by six members of Congregation up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 13 May.

Council has decided that nominations should show for each signatory the name and college or department in block capitals. Any names which are not so shown may not be published.

The following nominations have been duly received (6 May):

As a Curator of the Examination Schools

R.C.S. WALKER, B.PHIL., MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Magdalen


As members of the General Board (humanities side)

1. J.S. ROWETT, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Brasenose
2. D.G. PATTISON, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Magdalen
3. J. STEVENSON, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Worcester
4. A. S. KENNEDY, MA, Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall


As members of the General Board (science side)

1. R.A. MAYOU, BM, MA, M.SC., Fellow of Nuffield
2. N.M.J. WOODHOUSE, MA, Fellow of Wadham
3. R.J. CASHMORE, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Balliol
4. J.C. ELLORY, MA, D.SC., Fellow of Corpus Christi


As members of Council

1. F.G.B. MILLAR, MA, D.PHIL., D.LITT., Fellow of Brasenose
2. D. PALFREYMAN, MA, Fellow of New College
3. P.A. SLACK, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Exeter, Principal-elect of Linacre
4. G.A. STOY, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall
5. J.P. BARRON, MA, D.PHIL., Master of St Peter's
6. G.C.K. PEACH, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Catherine's


As a Curator of the University Parks

1. D.S. COLEMAN, MA, Queen's
2. P.S. SAVILL, MA, Fellow of Linacre


As a member of the Committee for the Nomination of Select Preachers

E.W. NICHOLSON, DD, Provost of Oriel

No nomination has been received to fill the vacancy for a second member of the Committee for the Nomination of Select Preachers. The nomination therefore lapses to the Vice-Chancellor and Proctors jointly: see Tit. II, Sect. IX, cl. 4 (d) (Statutes, 1995, p. 15).


Notices

Contents of this section:

[ Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • *UNIVERSITY PREACHERS
    • *Trinity Term 1996
  • ANDREW COLIN PRIZE 1996
  • CYRIL JONES MEMORIAL PRIZE IN SPANISH 1996
  • CLAUDE MASSART PRIZE IN FRENCH LITERATURE 1996
  • MRS CLAUDE BEDDINGTON MODERN LANGUAGES PRIZE (GERMAN) 1996
  • APPOINTMENT OF CLERK TO THE PROCTORS
  • *PROPOSALS FOR HONORARY DEGREES TO BE CONFERRED AT THE ENCAENIA IN 1997, AND FOR DEGREES BY DIPLOMA
  • CIRCULATION OF FLYSHEETS
  • WIDOWS OF FORMER MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY'S PENSION SCHEMES
  • DISCOUNT ON PERSONAL INSURANCE POLICIES AVAILABLE TO STAFF AND MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY
  • WOMEN'S STUDIES COMMITTEE
  • OLIS, THE UNIVERSITY'S LIBRARY SYSTEM
  • CONCERTS
    • Balliol College
    • *Wolfson College
  • *BODLEIAN LIBRARY
  • *Closure of Duke Humfrey's Library 1997–8
  • *Exhibition now open
  • *Notices of exhibitions, guided tours, etc.:
    • Ashmolean Museum
    • Christ Church Picture Gallery
    • University Museum
    • Pitt Rivers Museum
    • Bate Collection of Musical Instruments

    ANDREW COLIN PRIZE 1996

    The Prize has been awarded to SARAH L. TURNER, University College.


    CYRIL JONES MEMORIAL PRIZE IN SPANISH 1996

    The Prize has been awarded to KERSTY A. RODEN, St Catherine's College.


    CLAUDE MASSART PRIZE IN FRENCH LITERATURE 1996

    The Prize has been awarded to EVELYN M. WENHAM, St John's College.


    MRS CLAUDE BEDDINGTON MODERN LANGUAGES PRIZE (GERMAN) 1996

    The Prize has been awarded jointly to KATIE E. OGSTON, Magdalen College, and EVELYN M. WENHAM, St John's College.


    APPOINTMENT OF CLERK TO THE PROCTORS

    The Committee for the Proctors' Office is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr Brian Gasser as Clerk to the Proctors, with effect from 1 April 1996.

    This post was established on the recommendation last year of the Committee for the Review of the Proctors' Office. The Clerk will work alongside the University Marshal and increase the senior administrative support for successive Proctors and Assessors.

    Dr Gasser is currently an Assistant Registrar at the University of Leeds specialising in externally-funded research contracts and the management of intellectual property. He also has extensive experience in committee secretarial work, internal resource allocation, and the organisation of central academic services.

    After taking his BA in English Literature at the University of Sheffield, Brian Gasser first came to Oxford in 1975 (St Edmund Hall) to carry out research on English poetry of the South African War. He was awarded a D.Phil. in 1979, prior to moving to Leeds.

    The Clerk to the Proctors will be the first point of contact in the Proctors' Office for matters relating to examinations, academic complaints or queries, clubs committee, or any other matters under the jurisdiction of the Proctors or the Assessor. The University Marshal will continue to act as first point of contact on security matters, student discipline, ceremonial events, and the University Police.

    Dr Gasser can be contacted in the Proctors' Office (telephone: (2)80190).


    CIRCULATION OF FLYSHEETS

    Ten or more members of Congregation may arrange to have a flysheet circulated with the Gazette (a) on matters before Congregation, or Convocation in regard to the election of the Professor of Poetry, or (b) relating to matters of general interest to the University, subject to the following general conditions:

     

    (i) no flysheet will be circulated which in the opinion of the Vice-Chancellor and Proctors might be defamatory or otherwise illegal;

     

    (ii) the right is reserved on behalf of the University and its employees, without prior consultation with the signatories, to publish an apology in respect of any statement in a flysheet which is complained of as defamatory or otherwise illegal (whether or not the statement can be shown to be true);

    (iii) the signatories shall jointly and severally indemnify the University and its employees against any costs or damages payable in respect of their flysheet and, unless a Queen's Counsel (to be mutually agreed on by the signatories and the University) shall advise within four months of the making of any claim in respect of a flysheet that any proceedings could be contested with the probability of success, such damages shall include any sum paid by the University in settlement of any claim arising out of the flysheet;

     

    (iv) the flysheet shall consist of one leaf only (though text may appear on both sides of the leaf); the text shall include the name and college or department of each of the signatories;

     

    (v) a copy of the text of the flysheet shall be delivered to the Registrar before 10 a.m. on the Monday of the week in which circulation is desired; it shall be accompanied by an indemnity in accordance with condition (iii) above drawn up on a form obtainable from the Registrar and signed by each of the signatories of the flysheet; the Registrar shall be informed at the same time which of the signatories is to be notified whether the Vice-Chancellor and Proctors have authorised circulation;

     

    (vi) the Registrar shall arrange for the production by the University Press of copies of a flysheet the circulation of which has been duly authorised.

    Though every effort will be made to circulate on the day desired flysheets so received, it must be understood that this cannot be guaranteed.

    (a) Matters before Congregation or Convocation

    If the flysheet deals with a matter that is a formal agendum for Congregation, or for Convocation in regard to the election of the Professor of Poetry, or the subject of a report published in the Gazette, the production costs will be met from university funds.

    (b) Matters of general interest to the University

    If the flysheet deals with a matter that is not a formal agendum for Congregation or the subject of a report published in the Gazette, the Vice-Chancellor will decide whether it is of sufficient general interest to warrant circulation with the Gazette; the production costs for such a flysheet will be the responsibility of the signatories.

    Oxford University Student Union

    The Executive and the Graduate Committee of the Oxford University Student Union may have flysheets circulated with the Gazette under the arrangements and subject to the conditions set out above, provided that:

     

    (1) the number of names to be included on the flysheet under condition (iv) shall be not less than a majority of the total number of members of the Executive or the Graduate Committee of OUSU, as the case may be, and each of the persons named shall sign the indemnity required under condition (v);

     

    (2) the maximum number of flysheets to be circulated as of right, whether on matters before Congregation (to be paid for by the University) or on matters of general interest to the University (to be paid for by OUSU and to be subject to the Vice-Chancellor's decision as prescribed under (b) above) shall be three per term for each of these bodies, save that the Vice-Chancellor shall have discretion to permit further flysheets.

    Subject to proviso (1) above, the Executive and the Graduate Committee of OUSU may also support flysheets signed by not less than ten members of Congregation.


    WIDOWS OF FORMER MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY'S PENSION SCHEMES

    From time to time the attention of the University is drawn to individual cases of financial hardship among widows of former members of the Federated Superannuation System for Universities (FSSU) and the University of Oxford Employees Pension Scheme (EPS). Limited resources are available to alleviate proven cases of hardship and any enquiry should be addressed to the Superannuation Officer, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD. All cases are dealt with in the strictest confidence.


    DISCOUNT ON PERSONAL INSURANCE POLICIES AVAILABLE TO STAFF AND MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY

    Sun Alliance Connections, the personal insurances division of the main insurer of the University, provides discounts for members, staff, their families, and pensioners of the University of Oxford. The following savings can be achieved:

    Household (buildings and/or contents: 20 per cent;
    Travel (including winter sports): 12.5 per cent;
    Private medical expenses: 10 per cent;
    Private car: 5 per cent.

    The University acts solely as an introducer of business to Sun Alliance Connections, receiving no commission or other remuneration, with all savings passed on to the subscribing member. For further information, a brochure may be obtained from Graham Waite (telephone: (2)80307), or Gill Tombs (telephone: (2)70110) at the University Offices. To obtain a quotation or receive specific information on the covers available, telephone Sun Alliance Connections' Oxford branch on Oxford 244501 and ask for either Louise Cox or Delia Cannon.


    WOMEN'S STUDIES COMMITTEE

    The next meeting of the Women's Studies Committee will be at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, 30 April, in the Old Bar, Mansfield College.


    OLIS, THE UNIVERSITY'S LIBRARY SYSTEM

    OLIS, the University's Library system, is an integrated library system which offers online cataloguing, circulation, acquisitions, and periodicals registration. Sixty-seven Oxford libraries now catalogue onto OLIS. Please see below for a complete list of member libraries with information about when they began cataloguing and if they also use the Acquisitions Circulation or Periodical registration modules.

    In November 1995 the University signed a contract with Geac Computers Ltd. to supply a new system to support OLIS. The new software will combine features of Geac's ADVANCE system with their GeoS2 client server software. It will facilitate the continued growth of OLIS within Oxford while providing additional functionality to readers with links to multimedia, facilities to save searches, to perform parallel searches across several catalogues and to capture records for the creation of bibliographies. The new system will run on a SUN SPARCCentre 2000E with six processors and two Gb of RAM; greater resilience will be offered through the use of nineteen Gb of mirrored disk storage. Implementation is scheduled for the summer of 1996.

    OLIS is a union catalogue which contains cataloguing information (i.e. bibliographic records) from all of the member libraries. This enables a reader to search for any book held in any OLIS member library from any terminal or microcomputer connected to OLIS. Copy information (i.e. shelfmark) which is specific to a particular library has been separated so that when searching for a book, you will first be shown the copy information for the items held in the library where you are conducting your search. If there are copies in other libraries, for which there is information in the OLIS catalogue, you will be given the chance to see the information about them. It will still be necessary to check other catalogues in the libraries concerned to find information about holdings not yet catalogued on OLIS. In common with most other academic libraries in the UK, the catalogue can be searched from any terminal capable of connection to the JANET network.

    Retrospective conversion of card and other catalogues into machine-readable form so that they can be interrogated online has been recognised by the University as a major priority. The OLIS catalogue currently has over 2.25 million copies attached to 1.6 million titles. The Bodleian Library's Pre-1920 catalogue comprising 1.2 million titles has been available on CD-ROM since 1994. This represents the culmination of a project commenced in 1966 by John Jolliffe, Bodley's Librarian from 1982 to 1985.

    The University is funding the conversion of records in the Bodleian Guard Book catalogues, and in the card catalogues of the Bodleian-dependent libraries. This project, using services provided by OCLC, will be completed within the next three years. Over 500,000 records are currently being added to the OLIS database each year.

    Online circulation (issuing, reservations, and fines) has been introduced into seventeen OLIS libraries. This allows readers registered in these libraries to find out what they have on loan and to place reservations from any terminal. Online acquisitions allows a reader to find out when a book has been ordered and received by one of the twenty-nine libraries now using the Acquisitions module. Seven libraries are now using the periodicals registration module. This allows readers to find out when a specific issue of a journal has been received or declared missing.

    Searching the OPAC (Online Public Access Catalogue) allows you to access the items catalogued by any of these sixty-seven libraries. By selecting `Information about OLIS libraries' from the Introductory menu screen on the OPAC it is also possible to find out the address and opening hours of any member library, information about the holdings of that library, its admission procedures, and library news.

    The online catalogue is designed so that it can be used easily, but guidance in how to use it is also provided. Help screens are now available on OLIS by pressing the F2 key, and explanatory leaflets about basic searching procedures and remote connection to OLIS are available in any library or from the Libraries Automation Service ((2)78170). A more complete description of OLIS and the special features available on the online catalogue can be found in a black booklet entitled `Making the most of OLIS' which is located next to every reader terminal. Library staff are able to show readers how to use the online catalogue and give advice on how to search the catalogue. Assistance with problems is also provided by an Online Catalogue Help Desk ((2)77163), staffed by members of the Bodleian Library Cataloguing Division. This is located in the Lower Reading Room of the Bodleian Library.

    OLIS Member Libraries
      (1) (2) (3) (4)
    All Souls College 2/90      
    Ashmolean 6/90   8/91  
    Balfour Library (Pitt Rivers) 11/93   8/95  
    Balliol College 9/89   8/91  
    Biochemistry Department 7/94      
    Bodleian 9/88   8/92  
    Bodleian Japanese Library 1/88 10/94 8/93  
    Bodleian Law Library 9/88   8/92  
    Brasenose College 8/93      
    Clarendon Laboratory 1/93 10/95    
    Classics Lending 10/92 4/94    
    Computing Laboratory 6/90 10/94    
    Corpus Christi College 8/89 10/92 8/90 1/95
    Criminological Research 2/95      
    Earth Sciences 2/92   8/93 1/95
    Educational Studies 3/91 8/95 8/95  
    Engineering Science 2/91      
    English Faculty 1/89 4/90 8/91  
    Experimental Psychology 6/90 10/92    
    Geography 1/90 1/95 8/91  
    History Faculty 5/91      
    History of Art 1/92   8/93  
    History of Science 2/96      
    Hooke 1/89 10/89 10/92  
    Indian Institute 9/88   8/92  
    Institute of Economics and Statistics 1/90      
    Jesus College 8/92      
    Keble College 1/93      
    Kellogg College/
    Continuing Education
    9/92      
    Lady Margaret Hall 7/92   10/93  
    Latin American Centre 1/91   11/91  
    Lincoln College 1/92 10/94    
    Magdalen College 1/93      
    Maison Française 1/91      
    Materials Department 1/93 10/95    
    Mathematical Institute 5/90      
    Middle East Centre 1/91   11/91  
    Modern Languages Faculty 1/89 4/90 9/92  
    Music Faculty 6/90      
    New College 9/89      
    Nuffield College 9/89 10/94 8/90 1/93
    Oriental Institute 1/88   8/92  

    Chinese Studies

    1/88   8/92  

    Eastern Art

    1/88   8/92  
    Philosophy 11/90 4/95 9/92  
    Physics (Astro, Nuclear, Clarendon Lab) 1/93      
    Physiology Departmental 6/90      
    Plant Sciences 1/90 10/93    
    Queen Elizabeth House 1/90 10/92 8/91 1/95
    Queen's College 2/92      
    Radcliffe Science 9/88   1/91 1/93
    Rhodes House Library 9/88   8/92  
    St Anne's College 1/91   9/92  
    St Antony's College 1/91   12/91  
    St Cross College 10/93      
    St Edmund Hall 1/92      
    St Hugh's College 7/95      
    St John's College 1/95      
    St Peter's College 10/93   9/94  
    Social and Cultural Anthropology 1/92      
    Social Studies 1/89 1/90 8/91 1/95
    Socio-Legal Studies 7/94      
    Staff Library 9/89   1/93  
    Taylor Institution 9/88      
    Theology 1/90 10/94    
    Trinity College 4/92      
    University Museum 1/91      
    Wadham College 4/92      
    Wellcome Institute 10/93      
    Wolfson College 7/90   8/92  
    Zoology 1/90      

    Alexander

    1/90      

    Elton

    1/90      

    Key

    (1) Cataloguing
    (2) Circulation
    (3) Acquisitions
    (4) Periodicals registration

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    CONCERTS

    Balliol College

    The Stephen Temple Memorial Concert

    THE LANDOR PIANO TRIO will play the following at 9 p.m. on Sunday, 28 April, in the hall, Balliol College: Beethoven, trio op. 70, no. 1 in D, The Ghost; Frank Bridge, Miniatures; Edouard Lalo, op. 7 in C minor.


Lectures

Contents of this section:

  • INAUGURAL LECTURES
    • Professor of European Thought
    • Harmsworth Professor of American History
  • CLARENDON LECTURES IN ECONOMICS 1996
  • HALLEY LECTURE 1996
  • GAISFORD LECTURE 1996
  • JAMES P.R. LYELL LECTURES IN BIBLIOGRAPHY 1996
  • THOMAS HARRIOT LECTURE 1996
  • ANTHROPOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY
  • CLINICAL MEDICINE
  • LITERAE HUMANIORES
  • MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES
  • ORIENTAL STUDIES
  • PHYSICAL SCIENCES
  • SOCIAL STUDIES
  • RESEARCH LABORATORY FOR ARCHAEOLOGY AND THE HISTORY OF ART
  • BODLEIAN LIBRARY
  • COMPUTING LABORATORY
    • Numerical Analysis Group
    • Programming Research Group
  • OXFORD CENTRE FOR HEBREW AND JEWISH STUDIES
  • OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC STUDIES
  • QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE
    • Refugee Studies Programme
    • Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women
  • INSTITUTE OF VIROLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY
  • HARRIS MANCHESTER COLLEGE
    • Idreos Lectures in Science and Religion 1996
  • LADY MARGARET HALL
    • Philip Maurice Deneke Lecture 1996
  • MAGDALEN COLLEGE
    • Waynflete and related lectures
  • ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE
    • Middle East Centre
  • UNIVERSITY COLLEGE
    • H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture
  • WOLFSON COLLEGE
  • FRIENDS OF THE PITT RIVERS MUSEUM
  • OXFORD MEDIEVAL SOCIETY

INAUGURAL LECTURES

Professor of European Thought

PROFESSOR J. BURROW will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 7 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `A common culture? Nationalist ideas in nineteenth-century European thought.'


Harmsworth Professor of American History

PROFESSOR D.M. KENNEDY will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 7 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Can the United States still afford to be a nation of immigrants?'


CLARENDON LECTURES IN ECONOMICS 1996

Inefficient markets

PROFESSOR ANDREI SHLEIFER, Harvard University, will deliver the Clarendon Lectures in Economics at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination Schools (East School).

Tue. 7 May: `Inefficient financial markets.'

Wed. 8 May: `Origins of investor sentiment.'

Thur. 9 May: `The limits of arbitrage.'


HALLEY LECTURE 1996

PROFESSOR D. GOUGH, Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, will deliver the Halley Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 7 May, in the Lecture Theatre, the University Museum.

Subject: `The seismic structure of the sun.'


GAISFORD LECTURE 1996

PROFESSOR J. GOULD, Bristol, will deliver the Gaisford Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 9 May, in St John's College.

Subject: `Something to do with Dionysos.'


JAMES P.R. LYELL LECTURES IN BIBLIOGRAPHY 1996

In praise of scribes: manuscripts and their makers in seventeenth-century England

DR P. BEAL will deliver the following illustrated lectures at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays in the St Cross Building.
14 May: `In praise of scribes.'

16 May: ` "It shall not therefore kill itself; that is, not bury itself": Donne's Biathanatos and its text.'

21 May: `The character of a London scrivener: the "feathery scribe" .'

23 May: ` "Hoping they shall only come to your merciful eyes": Sidney's Letter to the Queen and its transmission.'

28 May: ` "The virtuous Mrs Philips" and "that whore Castlemaine": Orinda and her apotheosis, 1664–8.'


THOMAS HARRIOT LECTURE 1996

DR M. SELTMAN, University of Greenwich, will deliver the Thomas Harriot Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 2 May, in the Champneys Room, Oriel College.

Subject: `The algebra of Thomas Harriot: reputation and reality.'


ANTHROPOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY

School of Geography: research seminars

The following seminars will be held 4.45 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Senior Common Room, the School of Geography.

Conveners: G.C.K. Peach, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Social Geography, A.S. Goudie, MA, Professor of Geography, and G.L. Clark, MA, Halford Mackinder Professor of Geography.

 

Tuesday, 30 April

PROFESSOR PEACH: `How to apply for grants.'

Tuesday, 7 May

P. GONCALVES: `Bulldozer and pastiche: the post-Second World War renewal experience of Rfgife, Brazil.'

Tuesday, 14 May

DR M. WILLIAMS: `Getting published.'

Tuesday, 21 May

G. ASSENZA: `The role of the World Bank in facilitating private capital flows: the cases of solar energy investments.'
M. KATAYAMA: to be announced.

Tuesday, 28 May

D. WEST: `Settement of Bangladeshis in Tower Hamlets.'
A. MALLETT: to be announced.

Tuesday, 4 June

HWA-GUANG SHANG: `Applying GIS as the spatial decision support system in analysing land use of development on slope land with soil erosion.'
N. IIDA: `Ethnic minorities in Japan.'

Tuesday, 11 June

P. CORNUT: `The relationship between nature and society in the city of Brussels.'
I. POTTAKI: to be announced.


International environmental public policy

The following lectures will be given at 12 noon on Mondays, and at 9 a.m. on Fridays, in the Senior Common Room, the School of Geography.

Convener: Ms A. Munson, Junior Lecturer, Human Geography.

DR J. LEGGETT, Director of the Solar Initiative, Greenpeace International
Mon. 29 Apr.: `The Framework Climate Convention: continuing negotiations and the future.'

C. HINES, Goldsmith Foundation Scholar
Fri. 3 May: `Trade and the environment: the new protectionism.'

DR J. FARMAN, European Ozone Research Co-ordinating Unit, Cambridge
Fri. 10 May: `Ozone depletion: the future of the Montreal Protocol.'

A. JUNIPER, Friends of the Earth
Mon. 13 May: `The politics of deforestation.'


Geography and gender

The following seminars will be given at 11.30 a.m. on Fridays in the Senior Common Room, the School of Geography.

Convener: Ms H. Crawley-Lyons.

PROFESSOR E. KOFMANN, Nottingham Trent
26 Apr.: `Gender and the politics of international migration in Europe.'

MS T. HAQUE, UCL
3 May: `Transformations of women's lives; a case study from Bangladesh.'

DR J. LITTLE, University of Exeter
10 May: `Women's planning initiatives and local politics in Britain: progress or stagnation in the 1990s?'

C. DWYER, UCL
17 May: `Constructions and contestations of Islam: questions of identity for young British Muslim women.'

M. MARWICK, Roehampton Institute
24 May: to be announced.


Public Arts Lecture

MARLENE CREATES, artist, from St John's, Newfoundland, will lecture at 4.45 p.m. on Monday, 13 May, in the School of Geography.

Convener: J. Ryan (BA Exeter), Departmental Lecturer, the School of Geography.

 

Subject: `Narratives of place and displacement.'


CLINICAL MEDICINE

Epidemiology and Social Medicine Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Abraham Lecture Theatre, Green College.

Further information may be obtained from Sue Ziebland (telephone: Oxford 319126), or Tim Lancaster (telephone: Oxford 319124).

C. HYDE, Birmingham
30 Apr.: `The work of a regional research dissemination unit.'

A. MCMICHAEL, LSHTM
7 May: `Climate change and human health: is it real? Is it science?'

S. DARBY, CEU
14 May: `The effects of HIV and HCV on the UK haemophilia population.'

L. PEDERSEN, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, and J. KOVAL
21 May: `Psycosocial factors in initiation of smoking in adolescents.'

J. LUMLEY, NPEU
28 May: `Does prolonged lactation prevent postmenopausal breast cancer?'

DR V. BERAL, CEU
4 June: `The epidemiology of breast cancer.'


LITERAE HUMANIORES

PROFESSOR J.T. SANDERS, RIT, New York, will lecture at 2.15 p.m. on Tuesday, 30 April, in the Sub-faculty of Philosophy, 10 Merton Street.

Dr David Miller, Nuffield College, will respond.

Subject: `The state of statelessness.'


Corrected notice

PROFESSOR C. LE ROY, University of Paris I (Sorbonne), will lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Wednesday, 15 May, in the Ashmolean Museum.

Note: this replaces the notice published in the Gazette of 18 April, p. 943, which incorrectly stated that Professor Le Roy's lecture would be given in the Institute of Archaeology.

Convener: J.J. Coulton, MA, Reader in Classical Archaeology.

 

Subject: `Tlos and Oinoanda: a tale of two cities in Northern Lycia.'


MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

ULRIKE DRAESNER, writer, will read from and discuss her work at 8.15 p.m. on Monday, 29 April, in Worcester College.

Convener: T.J. Reed, MA, Taylor Professor of the German Language and Literature.


Modern German Studies Seminar

DR G. FISCHER, New South Wales, will lecture at a special meeting to be held at 8 for 8.30 p.m. on Monday, 6 May, in Worcester College.

Conveners: Dr Sarah Colvin, St John's College, and Ms Regina Umbach, Pembroke College.

 

Subject: `Intercultural dramaturgy, or the politics of framing: Heiner Müller's Der Auftrag "aboriginalised".'


Oxford Italian Graduate Seminar and Oxford–Reading Italian Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 3 p.m. on Fridays. The 31 May lecture will take place in the Seminar Room, the Department of Italian Studies, the University of Reading; other seminars will take place in Room S.7, 47 Wellington Square.

Convener: M.L. McLaughlin, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in Italian.

PROFESSOR M.J.B. ALLEN, UCLA
3 May: `Pico, Ficino, and the cultura hominis.'

PROFESSOR T.J. CACHEY, Notre Dame
10 May: `Voyage literature from Petrarch to Tasso.'

DR R. MIDDLETON
17 May: `The absence of che in fifteenth-century Italian.'

DR L. PARISI, Oxford Brookes
31 May: `Borgese e Manzoni.'

MS D. HOLMES
14 June: `The figure of the dictator in Silone's exile writings.'


ORIENTAL STUDIES

The status of medieval Arabic literature

The following seminars will be given at 4 p.m. on Tuesdays in St Giles' House, 16 St Giles'. Those attending are asked to note that all meetings will now begin at 4 p.m.

Conveners: J.M. Ashtiany, MA, D.Phil., James Mew Senior Research Fellow, the Oriental Institute, and P.F. Kennedy, MA, D.Phil., Junior Research Fellow in Oriental Studies, St John's College.

DR KENNEDY
30 Apr.: `The Maqamat: a nexus of interests?'

DR R. HOYLAND
7 May: to be announced.

R. IRWIN, London
14 May: `Ibn Zunbul, an Egyptian historical novelist of the sixteenth century.'

DR J. MONTGOMERY, Leeds
21 May: `J. Stetkevych's The Zephyrs of Najd.'

DR J. MEISAMI
28 May: `The use of texts and attitudes towards women.'

DR H. KILPATRICK, Lausanne
4 June: `Historical and non-historical approaches in Abu 'l-Faraj al-Isfahani, Kitab al-Aghani.'

DR ASHTIANY
11 June: `Segments and floating texts.'


Lectures in Korean Studies

The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in Lecture Room 1, the Oriental Institute.

Convener: J.B. Lewis, MA, Korea Foundation Lecturer in Korean Studies.

DR SONG NAM-SUN, Osaka University of Economics and Law
2 May: `A contrastive linguistic study of Japanese and Korean.'

DR L. KENDALL, Asian Ethnographic Collections, American Museum of Natural History
9 May: Dr Kendall will lecture on her new book, Getting married in Korea: of gender morality and modernity (for publication in April 1996).

MS. YURI NAKAGAWA
6 June: `A study of Chokpo: how Koreans negotiate their written genealogy.'


PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Theoretical Physics Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in the Nuclear Physics Lecture Theatre.

Convener: Sir Roger Elliott, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Theoretical Physics.

PROFESSOR M. NAUENBERG, Santa Cruz and Leiden
26 Apr.: `Newton, Hooke, and the birth of celestial mechanics: solution to a 300-year-old puzzle.'

PROFESSOR N. TUROK, Cambridge
10 May: `Looking for cosmic defects.'

DR J.J. BINNEY
24 May: `The bar in the Milky Way.'

DR B. SIMONS, Cambridge
7 June: From Anderson localisation to quantum chaos.'


Astrophysics colloquia

The following colloquia will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Nuclear and Astrophysics Lecture Theatre.

For details of the Halley Lecture, to be given on 7 May, see above.

Conveners: Dr M.D. Lacy and Dr A.E. Lynas-Gray.

DR K.P. SCHRÖDER, Cambridge
30 Apr.: `Late stellar evolution and coronal activity.'

DR D. FIELD, Bristol
14 May: `Masers: galactic and extragalactic.'

DR N. TRENTHAM, Cambridge
21 May: `Dwarf galaxies in clusters.'

DR R. ROLLESTON, Belfast
28 May: `Studies of early-type stars in our own galaxy and in the Magellanic Clouds.'

DR E.T. HARLAFTIS, St Andrews
4 June: `Understanding X-ray binaries: the black hole, the companion star, and the accretion disk.'

DR E. KUULKERS, ESTEC
5 June: to be announced.

DR R. MARDLING, Monash
11 June: `Circularisation in tidal capture binaries.'

DR S.E. RIDGWAY
18 June: to be announced.

DR P. PODSIADLOWSKI
9 July: `Chaotic orbital evolution in binaries.'


Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory

DR T. JONES, Imperial College, will give a seminar at 2.15 p.m. on Monday, 29 April, in the Lecture Theatre, the Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory.

 

Subject: `Atomic views of epitaxial growth of semiconductors.' No further seminars have been arranged because of the Hinshelwood Lectures, to be given by Professor K.B. Eisenthal (see Gazette of 18 April, p. 945).

 


Dyson Perrins Laboratory

The following lectures will be given at 4 p.m. on the days shown in the Dyson Perrins Lecture Theatre.

PROFESSOR PHILIP D. MAGNUS, University of Texas at Austin
Mon. 13 May: `Enediyne antitumor agents.' (Robert Robinson Lectures 1996)
Tue. 14 May: `Taxanes. A completely different strategy.'(Robert Robinson Lectures 1996)
Wed. 15 May: `Hypervalent iodine chemistry and the development of unusual reactions. Part I.' (Robert Robinson Lectures 1996)
Thur. 16 May: `Hypervalent iodine chemistry and the development of unusual reactions. Part II.' (Robert Robinson Lectures 1996)

DR G.H. WHITHAM
Thur. 30 May: `A forty-year retrospective.'

PROFESSOR JONATHAN L. SESSLER, University of Texas at Austin
Thur. 6 June: `Anions, cations, expanded porphyrins, and DNA.' (Andy Derome Lectures 1996)
Fri. 7 June: `Non-covalent electron transfer model systems.' (Andy Derome Lectures 1996)

PROFESSOR A. IAN SCOTT, Texas A&M University
Mon. 10 June: `Genetically engineered synthesis: in-vitro reconstruction of biosynthetic pathways.' (Royal Society 1996 Bakerian Lecture)

 


SOCIAL STUDIES

DR WARREN J. MITOFSKY, former director, Elections and Surveys Unit, CBS News, New York, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 2 May, in the Large Lecture Room, Nuffield College.

Convener: B.E. Shafer, MA, Mellon Professor of American Government.

 

 

Subject: `Public polls, pseudo-polls, and the 1996 election.'


PROFESSOR C. BICCHIERI, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, and the LSE, will hold a seminar at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 30 April, in the Clay Room, Nuffield College.

Subject: `Corruption cycles.'


The State of the Union: issues in contemporary British democracy

The following meetings will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in St Antony's College.

Conveners: A.H. Brown, MA, Professor of Politics, Dr Calum Macdonald, MP, and Ms Emma Nicholson, MP.

MR M. CAMPBELL, MP, and MR B. JENKIN, MP
30 Apr.: `Defence: the last refuge of national sovereignty?' (Chair: Dr Macdonald)

MR J. BIFFEN, MP, and LORD PLANT, Master, St Catherine's College
7 May: `Westminster: time for another Great Reform Act?' (Chair: Ms Nicholson)

MR P. SHORE, MP, LORD KINGSLAND, and MR G. RADICE, MP
14 May: `Europe and the UK: time to call a halt to ever-closer union?' (Chair: Lord Dahrendorf)

MR P. MANDELSON, MP, AND MS S. MCDONALD, Channel 4
21 May: `Are the mass media undermining British democracy?' (Chair: Dr Macdonald)

DR J. HENDRON, MP, and MR R. MCCARTNEY, MP
4 June: `Northern Ireland: what is to be done?' (Chair: Ms Nicholson)

MR E. GARNIER, QC, MP, DR MACDONALD, and MS NICHOLSON
11 June: `The state of the Union.' (Chair: Professor Brown)


Violence in postcolonial Africa

PROFESSOR TERENCE RANGER will give the following lectures at 11 a.m. on Mondays in St Antony's College (66 Woodstock Road).
29 Apr.: `Violence and terror in the Zimbabwean Liberation War.'

6 May: `Violence in South Africa.'

13 May: `Violence in the Sudan.'

20 May: `Violence in Uganda.'

27 May: `Violence in Liberia and Sierra Leone.'

3 June: `Violence in Rwanda.'

10 June: `Zimbabwe in the 1980s.'


African Research Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Tuesdays in St Antony's College (66 Woodstock Road).

Conveners: T.O. Ranger, MA, D.Phil., Rhodes Professor of Race Relations, and Dr Phyllis Ferguson.

N. OERMAN
30 Apr.: `Anglicanism and the state in South Africa to 1914.'

J. NHONGO
7 May: `Rural women and the guerilla war in eastern Zimbabwe.'

S. RICH
14 May: `NGOs in Zimbabwe: advocates and imbongi.'

B. LINDGREN, SOAS and Uppsala
21 May: `Ndebele identity and naming.'

M. LEOPOLD
28 May: `Drawing a margin: violence, knowledge, and ivory in the Lado enclave, 1894–1914.'

R. WATSON
4 June: `Constructing citizenship: nineteenth- century Ibadan in Johnson's The History of the Yorubas.'

A. KING
11 June: `Returning soldiers and post-war politics in Southern Rhodesia.'


Race, nation, and ethnicity

The following seminars will be held at 11 a.m. on Thursdays in the New Room, St Antony's College (note: new venue).

Conveners: T.O. Ranger, MA, D.Phil., Rhodes Professor of Race Relations, and P. Alexander (Ph.D. London), Research Fellow, St Antony's College.

PROFESSOR Z. LAYTON-HENRY, Warwick
25 Apr.: `Immigration and the Heath Government.'

E. BURTON, West of England
2 May: `Religion and resistance among African–Caribbean people in Britain, with particular reference to Bristol.'

F. KOLARU, West of England
9 May: ` "Long journey home": cross- generational identities among African–Caribbean women in Bristol.'

R. CARTER, Worcester College of Higher Education
16 May: `Identity, immigration, and race-making: Britain and the United States compared.'

DR O. IGWARA
23 May: `Ethnicity, nationalism, and genocide: the case of Rwanda.'

PROFESSOR RANGER and DR ALEXANDER
30 May: `New directions in research on ethnicity: reports from two conferences.'


African Affairs Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Middle East Centre, 68 Woodstock Road.

Conveners: T.O. Ranger, MA, D.Phil., Rhodes Professor of Race Relations, Dr Wendy James, and Dr Phyllis Ferguson.

M. VAUGHAN
25 Apr.: `Behaving badly: slave trials in colonial Mauritius.'

PROFESSOR RANGER
2 May: `Africa in the age of extremes: the irrelevance of African history?'

A. JEGA, Bayero University, Kano
9 May: `Nigerian intellectuals and academics in the struggle for democracy.'

K. ANDERSEN, Aarhus
16 May: `Konkomba religion and identity.'

DR FERGUSON
23 May: `Understanding war and building the future: northern Ghana, 1994 and beyond.'

O. IGWARA
30 May: `Religious nationalism in Nigeria.'

H. TEREFE
6 June: `The impact of displacement on women and children in Ethiopia.'

N. FARAH
13 June: `Somali refugees.'


The Social Study of Religion

The following seminars will be held at 10.30 a.m. on Wednesdays in the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies, the Church of St Philip and St James, Woodstock Road.

Conveners: T.O. Ranger, MA, D.Phil., Rhodes Professor of Race Relations, Chris Sugden, Oxford Centre for Mission Studies, and Susan Hawley, Mansfield College.

J. INGLEBY, Oxford Centre for Mission Studies
1 May: `Education as a missionary tool in nineteenth-century India.'

I. SATYAVVATA, Oxford Centre for Mission Studies
8 May: `The fulfilment motif in the engagement of Christian theology and other religions in India.'

B. LEPPER, Somerville College
15 May: `Education, gender, and conversion in eastern Zimbabwe, 1890–1918.'

DR A. EYRE, Westminster College
22 May: `Religion, politics, and development in Malaysia.'

S. GRANBERG, Oxford Centre for Mission Studies
29 May: `A critical examination of African leadership and leadership effectiveness among Christian churches in Meru.'

L. NEWMANN, Oxford Centre for Mission Studies
5 June: `Mission from the margin: West Indian missionaries to West Africa in the nineteenth century.'

PROFESSOR P. CLARKE, King's College, London
12 June: `Anti-syncretist trends in Catholic–Candombleé relations in Brazil.'

 


RESEARCH LABORATORY FOR ARCHAEOLOGY AND THE HISTORY OF ART

The following seminars will be held at 10.30 a.m. on Thursdays in the Library, the Research Laboratory for Archaeology.

Convener: M.S. Tite, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Archaeological Science.

 

I. KAKOULLI
2 May: `Scientific investigation of ancient painting technologies.'

R. CRESSWELL, Australian National University
9 May: `An Iron Age: direct dating of iron artefacts.'

S. VAUGHAN, Bristol
30 May: `Proposals for putting materials analysis in its archaeological place: examples from recent Aegean research.'

S. PATEL
13 June: `Analysis of flint and obsidian using secondary ion mass spectrometry.'


BODLEIAN LIBRARY

Oxford Seminars in Cartography

P. BARBER, Deputy Map Librarian, British Library, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 23 May, in the Schola Astronomiae et Rhetoricae, Schools Quadrangle, Bodleian Library.

Subject: `Something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue: maps in the collection of Sir Robert Cotton, 1571–1631.'


COMPUTING LABORATORY

Numerical Analysis Group

Differential equations, computational mathematics, and applications seminars

The following seminars, arranged jointly by the Numerical Analysis Group and the Oxford Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, will be held on Mondays in the Lecture Theatre, the Computing Laboratory. They will take place at 4 p.m., with the exception of the 16 May meeting, which will take place at 5.15 p.m.

Conveners: S.D. Howison, MA, M.Sc., D.Phil., University Lecturer (CUF) in Mathematics (telephone: (2)70500, e-mail: sam.howison@math.ox.ac.uk), and E. Süli, MA, University Lecturer in Numerical Mathematics (telephone: (2)73880, e-mail: endre@comlab.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR M. SCHONBEK, California
25 Apr.: `On backwards self-similar solutions to the Navier–Stokes equations.'

PROFESSOR A. SPENCE, Bath
9 May: `The numerical solution of differential- algebraic-integral equations.'

DR M. AUSLOOS, Liege
16 May: to be announced.

PROFESSOR V.M. ENTOV, Moscow
6 June: `Free boundary problems in the theory of porous media.'


Joint Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminars

The following seminars, arranged jointly by the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the Numerical Analysis Group, will be held on Thursdays. They will take place at 4 p.m. in the Lecture Theatre, the Computing Laboratory, with the exception of the 9 May meeting, which will be held at 2 p.m. in the Atlas Centre, the RAL.

Enquiries may be addressed to Dr Endre Süli (telephone: Oxford (2)73880, e-mail: endre@comlab.ox.ac.uk), or, for the RAL meeting, to Dr Jennifer Scott at the RAL (telephone: 01235 445131, e-mail: sct@letterbox.rl.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR J. BARLOW, Penn State and University of Manchester
2 May: `Multifront computation with the orthogonal factors of sparse matrices.'

DR I. SMITH, Liverpool
9 May: `A comparative study of solution strategies for domain decomposition re-ordered systems.'

PROFESSOR M. STYNES, Cork
16 May: `Optimal approximability of solutions of singularly perturbed two-point boundary value problems.'

DR J. THUBURN, Reading
30 May: `Multidimensional flux-limited advection schemes.'

PROFESSOR R. KLEIN, Wuppertal
13 June: `Applications of asymptotic analysis in the design of numerical schemes for singular limit regimes in fluid mechanics.'


Programming Research Group

Strachey Lecture

GORDON PLOTKIN will deliver the Strachey Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 30 April, in the Lecture Theatre, the Computing Laboratory.

Subject: `Denotational semantics: an unbalanced perspective?'


OXFORD CENTRE FOR HEBREW AND JEWISH STUDIES

Seminar in Modern Jewish History

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Seminar Room, the OCHJS.

Convener: D. Rechter (MA Melbourne, Ph.D. Jerusalem), Fellow of the centre.

PROFESSOR D. DASH MOORE, Vassar College
30 Apr.: `When Jews were GIs.'

PROFESSOR YAACOV RO'I, Tel Aviv
14 May: `Jews and Judaism in the post-war Soviet Union.'

PROFESSOR W.D. RUBINSTEIN, Wales
28 May: `The myth of rescue: British and American plans for the rescue of Jews in Nazi-occupied Europe, 1941–5.'

DR K. STERN
11 June: `The failure of Jewish emancipation in nineteenth-century Poland.'


Thursday evening discussion group

The following informal lectures will be given at 8.15 p.m. on Thursdays in the Seminar Room, the OCHJS.

PROFESSOR U. SHARVIT, Bar-Ilan University
25 Apr.: `Jewish music: social expression of struggles.'

DR D. GERA, Ben-Gurion University
2 May: `Organising the past.'

MR J. FEDER, Keter Publishing House
9 May: `Are we the People of the Book? The Israeli book culture.'

DR E. LOMSKY-FEDER, Hebrew University
16 May: `Interplay between personal memory and collective memory of war: life stories of Israeli men.'

PROFESSOR D. PASSOW, Hebrew University
30 May: `Yiddish: the language of Jewish ideas and ideologies.'

DR C. SHACHAM, Haifa
6 June: `Female images of the Odyssey as cultural markers in modern Hebrew women's poetry.'


OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC STUDIES

The transmission of learning in the Islamic world

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the OCIS, George Street.

PROFESSOR R. MOTTAHEDEH, Harvard
1 May: `An overview of Islamic education in western Asia.'

DR F. ZIMMERMANN
8 May: `The period of translations.'

DR E. SAVAGE-SMITH
15 May: `The exchange of medical and surgical ideas between Islam and Europe.'

DR E. ROGAN
22 May: `Ottoman education in late nineteenth- century Damascus.'

PROFESSOR E. KARIC, Sarajevo
29 May: `Qur'anic exegesis in Bosnia.'

PROFESSOR R. MOTTAHEDEH, Harvard
5 June: `Ibn Khaldun on education.'


QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

Economic Development Seminar: interdisciplinary aspects of development

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

Details of the 6 June seminar will be announced later.

M. GOLDMAN, World Bank
25 Apr.: `Technology institutions and their contribution to technology development in Asia: results of a World Bank study.'

R. WADE, Sussex
2 May: `Environment and development: marital difficulties at the World Bank.'

C. ADAM
9 May: `Taxation, growth, and conditionality in sub-Saharan Africa.'

G. WHITE, Sussex
16 May: `The democratic developmental state.'

T. DYSON, LSE
23 May: `Population and food: global trends and future prospects.'

J. WEISS, Bradford
30 May: `Cost benefit analysis and development projects: current theory and practice.'


Refugee Studies Programme

Seminars on Forced Migration

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

L. WEIGHILL
1 May: `Refugees in Gaza.'

DR S. GRAHAM-BROWN, Christian Aid
8 May: `The Kurds in Iraq since the 1991 Gulf War.'

DR M. AL-RASHID, King's College
22 May: `Assyian refugees in Great Britain.'

N. SHEHADI, Centre for Lebanese Studies
29 May: `Post-war Lebanese reconstruction.'

DR L. PARSONS
5 June: `Palestinians in Lebanon: an overview.'

DR G. HUNDT, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
12 June: `Counting invisible lives in Gaza.'

DR K. FIRRO
19 June: `Druse migrations 1860 to the present: forced migrations or voluntary movements?'


Foundation Course Modules
Household livelihood and economy

R. CARVER will teach this course on Mondays, 2–4 p.m., in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.


Forced migration and international relations

S. COLLINSON will teach this course on Mondays, 7–9 p.m., in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.


International legal order: human rights and forced migration

DR C. BEYANI will teach this course on Tuesdays, 9.30–11.30 a.m., in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.


Refugees and the refugee experience: a psychodynamic perspective

M. FLORES-BORQUEZ will teach this course on Tuesdays, 2–4 p.m., in the Blackhall Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.


Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women

Richards Lecture

DR HENRIETTA L. MOORE, Reader in Anthropology and Director of the Gender Institute, London School of Economics, will deliver the Richards Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 15 May, in the Taylor Institution.

The Richards Lecture is given in honour of Dr Audrey Richards (1899–1984), formerly President of the Royal Anthropological Institute and of the African Studies Association.

Subject: `Symbolism, sex, and psychoanalysis.'


INSTITUTE OF VIROLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY

The following seminars will be held in the Seminar Room of the institute. They will take place at 4 p.m. on Fridays, with the exception of the meetings to be held at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, 1 May, and Wednesday, 15 May.

PROFESSOR I. MCCONNELL, Cambridge
26 Apr.: `Animal lentiviruses: their relevance to pathogenesis and immunity in HIV.'

PROFESSOR J. SHEAIL, Institute of Terrestrial Ecology, Monkswood
1 May: `Environmental management: a UK historical perspective.'

DR C. ELLIS EVANS, British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge
3 May: `Microbes at extremes.'

DR A. GRAY, Institute of Terrestrial Ecology, Furzebrook
10 May: `Environmental impact of genetically modified crops.'

DR M. ACREMAN, Institute of Hydrology, Wallingford
15 May: `Conflicts of development and conservation of Sahelian flood-plains— research needs to underpin improved management.

PROFESSOR R.M. ELLIOTT, MRC Institute of Virology, Glasgow
17 May: `Reverse genetics of bunyaviruses.'

DR I. JOINT, Plymouth Marine Laboratory
24 May: `Marine microbiology—from the North Atlantic to the Indian Ocean.'

PROFESSOR A. BULL, Kent
31 May: `Microbes, dehalogenation, and biotechnology.'

PROFESSOR P.G. STOCKLEY, Leeds
7 June: `The role of sequence-specified RNA-protein interactions in RNA bacteriophage morphogenesis.'


HARRIS MANCHESTER COLLEGE

Idreos Lectures in Science and Religion 1996

Genetics and theology

PROFESSOR R. COLE-TURNER, Professor of Theology, Memphis Theological Seminary, will deliver the Idreos Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following days in Harris Manchester College.

Wed. 8 May: `The anxiety of change.'
Thur. 9 May: `The humility of hope.'


LADY MARGARET HALL

Philip Maurice Deneke Lecture 1996

THE REVD DR JOHN COOK, President, the Henry Luce Foundation, will deliver the Deneke Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 7 May, in the Talbot Hall, Lady Margaret Hall.

Subject: `Missing the point: a theology of culture in the work of Mondrian, Kandinsky, and Rothko.'


MAGDALEN COLLEGE

Waynflete and related lectures

Oxford and England during the Renaissance and Reformation

PROFESSOR D. DANIELL, Emeritus Professor of English, University of London, and PROFESSOR N. ORME, Professor of History, University of Exeter, will deliver the Waynflete and related lectures at 5 p.m. on the following Wednesdays and Thursdays in the Examination Schools. Admission is free.

In association with the lectures, the Bodleian Library will mount an exhibition of fifteenth- and sixteenth-century books by a number of grammarians who were Masters of Magdalen College School, including William Tyndale and Laurence Thomson.

PROFESSOR ORME
8 May: `Magdalen College and its School.'
9 May: `Oxford and the transformation of English school education 1480–1530.'

PROFESSOR DANIELL
15 May: `Magdalen, William Tyndale, and Renaissance English prose.'
16 May: `Laurence Thomson and the influence of his Revised Geneva New Testament.'


ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

Middle East Centre

Aspects of modern Turkish culture

PROFESSOR FILIZ YENISEHIRLIOGLU, Hacettepe University, Ankara, currently Mustafa Kemal Ataturk Visiting Fellow, University of Cambridge, will lecture at the times shown in the Middle East Centre.

Wed. 1 May, 5 p.m.: `Music in Turkey today: taste and social background.'

Thur. 9 May, 10 a.m.: `Changes from popular to consumer culture in Turkey.'


Hamid Enayat Lecture

PROFESSOR NASR ABU-ZAID, Leiden, will deliver the thirteenth Hamid Enayat Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 9 May, in the New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

Subject: `Reformation of Islamic thought: some questions and some suggestions.'


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR THOMAS NAGEL will deliver the H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture in Jurisprudence and Moral Philosophy (established by the Tanner Lecture Trust), at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 9 May, in room 6, the Examination Schools.

The lecture will be followed by a discussion session, to be held at 4 p.m. on Friday, 10 May, in the Seminar Room, University College.

Subject: `Justice and nature.'


WOLFSON COLLEGE

Public Lecture

DR B. SHEPSTONE, University Lecturer in Radiology, will lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Thursday, 2 May, in the hall, Wolfson College.

Subject: `The radiological diagnosis of early Alzheimer's dementia.'


FRIENDS OF THE PITT RIVERS MUSEUM

Beatrice Blackwood Lecture

HOWARD MORPHY, Curator of Anthropology, Pitt Rivers Museum, will deliver the Beatrice Blackwood Lecture at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, 8 May, in the Inorganic Chemistry Lecture Theatre, South Parks Road. The lecture is open to the public.

Enquiries may be made to Oxford 54281.

Subject: `Hunting art.'


OXFORD MEDIEVAL SOCIETY

DR S. MAPSTONE will lecture at 8.30 p.m. on Thursday, 2 May, in Bostar Hall, University College. Wine will be served from 8.15 p.m. New members are welcome.

Subject: `The Scots, the English, and the French: an Arthurian episode.'


Grants and Research Funding

Contents of this section:

[ Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • *RESEARCH AND EQUIPMENT COMMITTEE
  • RESEARCH SERVICES OFFICE
    • Administrative procedures in respect of externally sponsored research
  • * Pavry and Winchester Thesis Prizes 1996
  • Cyril Foster and related funds for international relations
  • Isaiah Berlin Fund Scholarship 1996–7

RESEARCH SERVICES OFFICE

The Oxford University Research Services Office is based in the University Offices, Wellington Square, and is part of the central university administration.

The office processes and approves all applications to outside bodies for research grants and contracts. It also acts in an advisory capacity for those seeking outside funding or requiring information about specific initiatives (e.g. LINK, Teaching Company, EC research programmes, etc.).

Contracts with industry are negotiated through the Research Services Office which also deals, inter alia, with various intellectual property matters, research-related work covered by purchase orders, consultancy agreements, agreements covering clinical trials and services, and liaison with funding bodies over discretionary pay awards.

The Director of the Research Services Office is Ms June Clark (telephone: (2)70142, e-mail: june.clark@admin.ox.ac.uk).

Other members of the Research Services Office from whom advice may be sought are as follows:

  • Ms Catherine Quinn (telephone: (2)70158, Assistant Registrar (on such matters as research-related and consultancy contracts, industrial liaison, and publications);
  • Dr Richard Liwicki (telephone: (2)80499), Assistant Registrar;
  • Mr Pierre Espinasse (telephone: (2)70043, Administrative Officer (on questions relating to externally funded research grants, European liaison, and EC contracts);
  • Dr Chris Norris (telephone: (2)70011), Administrative Officer and Assistant to the Director;
  • Mr Gavin Plumpton (telephone: (2)80319), Administrative Officer.

Enquiries concerning day-to-day processing of research applications should be addressed to Room 330 (the Research Grants Office), Research Services Office (telephone: (2)70146).

General enquiries may be addressed in the first instance to the Director's Personal Assistant, Ms J. Vicary (telephone: (2)70143), who will be pleased to direct calls to the appropriate member of staff.


Administrative procedures in respect of externally sponsored research

Members of the University are reminded that it is a requirement of the General Board that all applications for externally funded support must be endorsed on behalf of the University through the Research Services Office before they are dispatched to the sponsor, whether or not this is required by the funding body. (This includes, for example, bodies such as the Leverhulme Trust, and other charities and EC programmes which do not specifically ask for administrative authorisation.)

The reason for the requirement is twofold: namely (i) to ensure that the funds being requested are adequate for the purpose and the costing rules of the funding body have been applied correctly, and (ii) to ensure that the University would be in a position to undertake the obligations arising from an award and that these do not contravene University policy.

The detailed arrangements are as follows: applicants for research grants should submit their applications, together with a completed copy of the University's outside grant form (OG12), to Room 330, Research Services Office, University Offices, Wellington Square, telephone (2)70146—leaving three clear working days for them to be processed.

In connection with the acceptance of awards and signature of contracts it should be noted that Statutes, Tit. X, cl. 2, provides that `no official of the University or any other person employed by the University or working in or in connection with any department of or under the control of the University shall in connection with any invention, discovery, or patent, or ... process, or manufacture have authority to make any representations on behalf of the University or to enter into any contract on behalf of the University or to be concerned in any transaction whatsoever in connection therewith on behalf of the University except with the express consent of Council'.

The relevant officials in the Research Services Office have been given authority to approve applications for external funds in support of research and the terms of contracts in straightforward cases under this provision: in more complicated cases, specific authority is necessary.

Enquiries related to any aspect of externally sponsored research should be directed to the Research Services Office, whose staff would be pleased to help.


Cyril Foster and related funds for international relations

1 The Managers of the Cyril Foster and related funds will consider requests from members of the University (M.Litt. and D.Phil. students, and senior members) undertaking research in international relations for modest grants towards travel and related expenses, and, exceptionally, for other purposes. The funds are:

The Cyril Foster Fund: this is intended `for the promotion of international peace and the prevention of future wars'.

Other funds: these, which are strictly limited, are available `for the promotion of research in international relations'.

2 The Managers will in addition make an annual Maurice Latey Award `to assist travel for research by postgraduate students in the fields of politics of international relations working on aspects of democracy, freedom and religion'. Suitable applications for grants under 1 above will automatically be considered for this award. Additional applications are also invited from postgraduate students at British or overseas universities wishing to use the Latey Archive in the Bodleian Library.

 

3 Applications for grants under 1 and 2 are not normally entertained from visiting scholars, from students with probationary status, from students for the M.St. or M.Phil. degree, or from undergraduates. Requests should be made before the expenses are incurred. Attendance at an international conference will not in itself normally be accepted as a sufficient reason for a grant.

Applications should be made on a form available from the Secretary to the Managers of the Cyril Foster and Related Funds (Mrs M. Lyall), Centre for International Studies, Social Studies Faculty Centre, George Street, Oxford OX1 2RL, and should be submitted by the end of the fifth week of each Oxford term. Consideration of applications submitted after that date will normally be deferred until the latter part of the following term. In stating their reasons for application, applicants should make clear how these relate to the terms of reference of the various funds.

Applicants other than senior members are asked to name one referee, normally their supervisor, who should be requested to send in a reference directly to the Secretary to the Managers of the Cyril Foster and Related Funds, Centre for International Studies, Social Studies Faculty Centre, George Street, Oxford OX1 2RL.

 


Isaiah Berlin Fund Scholarship 1996–7

The Board of Management of the Isaiah Berlin Fund now invites applications for the Isaiah Berlin Fund Scholarship which will be tenable during the academic year 1996–7.

Those eligible to apply for the scholarship, which will be of a value of up to £2,500 and which will be tenable for a period of not less than one term during the academic year, are students working for a research degree of the University in the fields of Italian literature and history, including the history of art. The scholarship will be awarded to enable the holder to visit Italy for purposes of study and research in connection with his or her thesis.

Applications, which should be submitted on a form obtainable from the Secretary of the Taylor Institution, 37 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JF, should be returned to him by Friday of the second week of Trinity Term, i.e. by Friday, 3 May.


Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

  • CHANGES IN REGULATIONS
    • 1 Board of the Faculty of Biological Sciences
    • 2 Board of the Faculty of Law
    • 3 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humanities and Oriental Studies
    • 4 Board of the Faculty of Music
    • 5 Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies
    • 6 Board of the Faculty of Physical Sciences
    • 7 Committee for Archaeology
    • 8 Standing Committee for EEM and Related Schools
  • DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE
  • EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties and committees will come into effect on 10 May.

1 Board of the Faculty of Biological Sciences

(a) Honour Moderations in Biological Sciences

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 28, after l. 29 following the decree establishing the Honour Moderations in Biological Sciences, insert:

`1. Each candidate shall offer three papers (each of three hours' duration) corresponding to the first three sections (1–3) of the schedule below.

2.Heads of laboratories, or their deputies, shall make available to the moderators records showing the extent to which each candidate has attended and pursued adequate courses of class work and laboratory work in each of the four sections (1–4) of the schedule below. Candidates shall submit notebooks containing reports, initialled by the demonstrators, of practical or class work in each subject completed during their course of study. These notebooks shall be available to the moderators during the period of the examination and, together with the laboratory and class records, shall be taken into consideration by the moderators in determining the examination result.

3. The moderators will not provide calculators, but will permit the use of any hand-held pocket calculator subject to the conditions set out on p. [ ].


Schedule
1. Organisms

History and present day diversity of organisms. Origin of life, evolution and diversity of procaryotes; algae; aquatic animal groups, both invertebrate and vertebrate. The origin and terrestrial radiation of fungi, green plants, insects and tetrapod animals. The biology and diversity of birds and mammals. The evolution of humans and their impact on the environment.

2. Cells and Genes

Machinery of the cell: structural features of the building blocks of life; enzymes and metabolism; structure and function of membranes; mitochondria, chloroplasts and energy transduction; the cytoskeleton; the extracellular matrix; interactions between cells; cell division and growth.

Genetics: Mendelian and population genetics; genetics of multicellular and unicellular organisms; molecular genetics; recombinant DNA; the gene at work.

3. Populations

Interrelationships of organisms and their interactions with the physical environment. Competition, co-operation, predator-prey and host-parasite interactions. The nature and origin of species and their interactions as communities. Energy flow, bio-geochemical cycles and biotic structure of ecosystems.

4. Computing and data handling

Hands-on introduction to computers; use of files, printers, word-processing and spreadsheets. Introduction to the importance of quantitative methods in biology. Descriptive statistics and graphical representations of data.

Frequency distributions. Populations and samples. Sampling distribution of the mean, standard errors, confidence intervals. Estimation and hypothesis testing. The Central Limit theorem. The Binomial, Poisson and Normal Distributions.'

2 Ibid., delete p. 77, l. 30 to p. 79, l. 37 and substitute:

`1. Three written papers shall be set in the examination, corresponding to the first three sections of the Schedule for Honour Moderations in Biological Sciences.

2.Paper 1 will be on topics specified in Section 1: Organisms of the Schedule for Honour Moderations in Biological Sciences.

Paper 2 will be on topics specified in Section 2: Cells and Genes of the Schedule for Honour Moderations in Biological Sciences.

Paper 3 will be on topics specified in Section 3: Populations of the Schedule for Honour Moderations in Biological Sciences.

3. The questions set may be of an elementary and straightforward nature.

4. A practical examination and/or a computer/data handling exercise may be set in the case of candidates deemed to have an inadequate record of practical or class work.'

(b) Honour School of Natural Science (Biological Sciences)

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, delete p. 441, l. 35 to p. 442, l. 43, and substitute:

`1. Evolution and Systematics

2.Quantitative Methods

3. Animal Biology I

4. Animal Biology II

5. Plant and Microbial Biology I

6. Plant and Microbial Biology II

7. Environmental Biology I

8. Environmental Biology II

9. Cell and Developmental Biology I

10. Cell and Developmental Biology II

11. The Biology of Animal and Plant Disease I

12. The Biology of Animal and Plant Disease II. Candidates will be required to take seven written papers as follows: Papers (1) and (2) together with three papers from the group (3), (5), (7), (9), (11) and two papers from the group (4), (6), (8), (10), (12). Candidates offering paper (4) must also offer paper (3); candidates offering paper

(6) must also offer paper (5); candidates offering paper (8) must also offer paper (7); candidates offering paper (10) must also offer paper (9); candidates offering paper

(12) must also offer paper (11). Each paper shall be of three hours' duration. Papers (3), (5), (7), (9) and (11) will examine the second year coursework. Papers (4), (6), (8), (10), and (12) will examine second and third year coursework. In all papers knowledge of first year coursework will be assumed.

Candidates will be required to offer a written report on a project in any area of biology. The project report shall be submitted on or before 12 noon on the Friday of the sixth week of the term preceding that in which the examination is held. It must be addressed to `The Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG, for the Chairman of Examiners for the Honour School of Natural Science (Biological Sciences)'. Each project report shall be accompanied by a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that the project report is the candidate's own work. This certificate shall be submitted separately in a sealed envelope addressed to the Chairman of Examiners. No report will be accepted if it has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another Honour School or degree of this University, or for a degree of any other institution.

2.Candidates shall submit notebooks containing reports, initialled by the demonstrators, of practical work completed during their course of study. These notebooks shall be available to the examiners on or before noon on Friday of the first week of the term in which the examination is held. Each notebook shall be accompanied by a sealed envelope (bearing only the candidate's examination number) containing a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that the notebook submitted is the candidate's own work. Heads of laboratories or their deputies shall make available to the examiners records showing the extent to which a candidate has attended and pursued an adequate course of practical work. The examiners shall take this evidence into consideration in determining the examination result.

3. Candidates shall be required to carry out field work and attend such vacation courses as are approved from time to time by the Sub-faculty of Biology.

4. Any candidate may be examined viva voce.

5. The examiners will not provide calculators, but will permit the use of any hand-held pocket calculator subject to the conditions set out on p. [ ].

Schedule of Subjects
1. Evolution and Systematics

Evolution as the central theme of biology. Methods and data of phylogeny reconstruction. Biogeography. Macroevolutionary change; origin of the major groups, extinction, punctuated equilibrium. Adaptation. Comparative Method. Natural selection. Units of selection. Molecular evolution. Evolution of sex. The modern synthesis.

2. Quantitative Methods

Principles and practice of the application to biology of (i) statistics and (ii) mathematical and computer modelling.

3. and 4. Animal Biology

The structure, function, evolution and behaviour of animals. Control and information systems, homeostasis and biomechanics of movement. Life history strategies and evolution of mammals. Evolutionary, causal and developmental aspects of animal behaviour. The biology of social behaviour including the evolution of aggression, co-operation and communication. Mate choice and kin selection. Behavioural ecology. Perception, learning and decision-making in animals. The genetics of behaviour. Neurobiological bases of behaviour.

5. and 6. Plant and Microbial Biology

The biological diversity of plants and microorganisms, including aspects of their ecology and evolution, structural and functional characteristics, life histories, reproduction, taxonomy and systematics, physiology and biochemistry, genetics and molecular biology, biotechnology, and also the importance of interactions between plants and micro-organisms.

7. and 8. Environmental Biology

Methods in ecology including the description and analysis of plant and animal communities. Ecology and conservation biology examining the genetic and population consequences and possible remedies for biodiversity loss. The ecology of forest and agricultural systems. Studies of major causes and biological consequences of global environmental change. The theory and practice of wildlife resource management.

9. and 10. Cell and Developmental Biology

Mechanisms operating to co-ordinate cellular changes in the development of tissues and organs and complete animal and plant forms. Regulation of cell division and differentiation. Environmental signals coordinating and modulating development. Regulation of gene expression. Techniques of genetic modification used in the study of cellular and developmental processes.

11. and 12. Biology of Animal and Plant Disease

The biology, epidemiology and control of animal and plant disease. The biology of macro- and micro-parasites, host genetics and disease resistance. Molecular genetics of plant and animal parasites, epidemiology and control of disease. Modelling disease and vector-borne disease.'

(c) Pass School of Biological Sciences

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 454, delete ll. 2–8 and substitute:

`Candidates shall be subject to the regulations specified in clauses 1–4 for the Honour School of Natural Science (Biological Sciences) save that, respecting clause 1 of those regulations, they shall be required to offer a total of five written papers. These shall be papers (1) and (2), together with two papers from the group (3), (5), (7), (9), (11), and one paper from the group (4), (6), (8), (10), (12). The permitted combinations of optional papers shall be as specified in that clause.'


2 Board of the Faculty of Law

Honour School of Jurisprudence

(i) With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 260, after l. 17 insert:

`Course 1. [Until October 1998 Candidates shall be examined in eight standard subjects, viz. 1, 2, 3, 4, and four from 5–23.] [From October 1998 Candidates shall be examined in eight standard subjects, viz. 1, 2, 3, 4, and four from 5–23; and one special subject; provided that candidates may substitute any two special subjects for one of the standard subject papers 5–23.]

`Course 2. [Until October 1999 Candidates shall be examined in eight standard subjects, viz. 1, 2, 3, 4, and four from 5–23.] [From October 1999 Candidates shall be examined in eight standard subjects, viz. 1, 2, 3, 4, and four from 5–23; and one special subject; provided that candidates may substitute any two special subjects for one of the standard subject papers 5–23.]

STANDARD SUBJECTS'.

2 Ibid., p. 261, l. 2, delete `two' and substitute `three'.

3 Ibid., delete ll. 5–6.


(ii) With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 261, after l. 4 insert:

`SPECIAL SUBJECTS

A list of special subjects approved by the Board of the Faculty of Law from time to time by regulation published in the Gazetteshall be posted in the Law Faculty and sent to college tutors, together with individual specifications and examination methods, not later than the beginning of the [until 1 October 1997 sixth] [from 1 October 1997 eighth] term before that in which the Honour School examination will be held. Depending on the availability of teaching resources, not all special subjects will be available to all candidates in every given year. A list of possible special subjects is given below.

1. European Community Competition Law;

2.European Community Social, Environmental and Consumer Law;

3. Lawyers' Ethics;

4. Introduction to the Law of Copyright and Moral Rights.'


3 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humanities and Oriental Studies

Regulations for Philosophy in some of the Honour Schools

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 481, l. 28, after `Mathematics and Philosophy,' insert `Oriental Studies,'.

2 Ibid., p. 487, l. 32, delete `132, and 133' and substitute `and 132 may be offered only by candidates in Literae Humaniores and Oriental Studies, and subject 133.'


4 Board of the Faculty of Music

Honour Moderations in Music and the Preliminary Examination in Music

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 70, delete ll. 7–30 and substitute:

`Each candidate will be required to offer papers 1–4 and one of the options in paper five.

1. Techniques of Composition

A three-hour paper which will test basic compositional techniques in the context of eighteenth-century idioms. In Section A candidates will be required to elaborate two parts above a bass in a Baroque idiom OR to write a fugal exposition in three parts, plus episode (using related material) and first middle entry, again for trio. In Section B candidates will be required to complete an excerpt from a string quartet (the first violin part being given).

2. Analysis

A three-hour paper which will test the ability to produce analyses of the formal, structural, and motivic aspects of two pieces. Candidates will be required to write two essays; one on a piece from the early eighteenth century and one on a piece from the later eighteenth century. The essays will allow candidates to display their own interests in analytical method.

3. History of Music

A three-hour paper divided into two sections. Section A will comprise questions on general issues relating to the study of music history. Section B will comprise questions on six topics of a thematic nature. Candidates will be required to answer four questions, at least one from section A and at least two from Section B. The Board of the Faculty of Music shall approve, and publish each year by notice in the Faculty of Music not later than the end of the Hilary Term a list of the topics to be examined in the following academic year.

4. Keyboard skills

A practical examination in score reading and playing from a figured bass.

5. Options

Candidates must choose one from the following:

(a) Source Studies and Performance Practice

A three hour paper.

(b) A portfolio of compositions

Candidates are required to submit two compositions: a vocal setting and a purely instrumental piece. A piece may be a single movement from a projected longer work. All work submitted must have been composed since the first day of Michaelmas Term in the academic year in which it is to be examined.

(c) Performance

A solo performance of some 10–12 minutes in length.

(d) Extended essay

An essay of 4,000–5,000 words on a subject to be chosen in consultation with the candidate's tutor.

The Board of the Faculty of Music will approve and publish by notice in the Faculty of Music not later than the end of the Trinity Term in the academic year preceding that in which the material is to be examined, an indicative list of possible titles for extended essays. This list is intended as guidance for tutors and candidates, not as an exhaustive list of acceptable titles.'


5 Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies

(a) Honour School of Oriental Studies

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 458, l. 44, after `Chinese' in the list of Main Subjects, insert `Classics'. 2 Ibid., l. 46, after `Armenian' in the list of Additional Languages, insert `Classics'.

3 Ibid., after `Prakrit' in the list of Additional Languages, insert `Sanskrit'.

4 Ibid., p. 459, l. 1, after `offering' insert `Classics,'.

5 Ibid., p. 461, l. 5, after `Armenian' insert `Classics'.

6 Ibid., p. 464, after l. 42 insert:

`Classics

Candidates will be required to offer five of the following subjects (i)–(xxiv), and also three papers on one of the additional languages Akkadian, Arabic, Aramaic and Syriac, Armenian, Coptic, Egyptology, Hebrew, Old Iranian, Pali, Persian or Sanskrit.

Candidates who have satisfied the Moderators in Course IA, IB, or IC of Honour Moderations in Classics or of the Preliminary Examination in Classics must offer (i) and (v) as two of their five subjects; they may not offer (xxiii), (xxiv), Second Classical Language.

Other candidates not offering (xxiii), (xxiv), Second Classical Language must include at least two of subjects (i)–(xv), of which one must be either (i) or (v); they may offer both (i) and (v) if they wish.

Subject (xxiii), (xxiv), Second Classical Language counts as two subjects. Candidates offering it must also offer either (i) or (v), and may offer both. Note: It cannot be guaranteed that university lectures or classes or college teaching will be available on all subjects in every academic year. Candidates are advised to consult their tutors about the availability of teaching when selecting their subjects.

(i) Greek Literature of the Fifth Century bc (one paper of three hours (commentary and essay) with an additional paper (one-and-a-half hours) of translation) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.1].

(ii) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.2]

Either(a) Early Greek Hexameter Poetry

or(b) Greek Lyric and Elegiac Poetry

or (c) Pindar and Bacchylides.

(iii) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.3]

Either (a) Aeschylus

or (b) Euripides.

(iv) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.4]

Either (a) Thucydides and Rhetoric

or (b) Plato

or (c) Greek Comedy Old and New (not to be offered in combination with subject (viii)(a), Greek New Comedy and Roman Comedy)

or (d) Hellenistic Poetry.

(v) Latin Literature of the First Century bc (one paper of three hours (commentary and essay) with an additional paper (one-and-a-half hours) of translation) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.5].

(vi) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.6]

Either (a) Latin Didactic Poetry

or (b) Latin Satire

or (c) Latin Historiography.

(vii) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.7]

Either (a) Cicero the Orator

or (b) Horace

or (c) Ovid

or (d) Seneca and Lucan.

(viii) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.8; in each case version (i) is the only version available to candidates who have satisfied the Moderators in Course IA, IB, or IC of Honour Moderations in Classics or of the Preliminary Examination in Classics]

Either (a) Greek New Comedy and Roman Comedy (not to be offered in combination with subject (iv)(c), Greek Comedy Old and New)

or (b) Ancient Literary Criticism

or (c) The Ancient Novel.

(ix) Greek Textual Criticism [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.9].

(x) Latin Textual Criticism [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.10].

(xi) Homer, Iliad[Honour Moderations in Classics Course IA, paper I]. (This subject may not be offered by candidates who have satisfied the Moderators in Course IA, IB, IC, or IIB of Honour Moderations in Classics and may not be offered in combination with subject (ii)(a), Early Greek Hexameter Poetry.)

(xii) Virgil, Aeneid. Translation and essay questions will be required; commentary questions will be optional. (This subject may not be offered by candidates who have satisfied the Moderators in Course IA, IB, IC, or IIA of Honour Moderations in Classics.)

(xiii) Either (a) The Conversion of Augustine [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.14(a)].

or (b) Medieval Latin [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.14(b)].

or (c) The Latin Works of Petrarch, with special study of Africa (ed. N. Festa, Florence, 1926), Books I, II, V, VII, IX. Candidates will also be expected to have read Vita Scipionis(in La vita di Scipione l' Africano, ed. G. Martillotti, Milano-Napoli, 1954), and to show acquaintance with Petrach's major Latin works (e.g. Rerum memorandum libri (ed. G. Billanovich, Florence, 1945), De secreto conflictu curarum mearum, De vita solitaria, Epistolae familiares(in F. Petrarca, Prose, ed. G. Martillotti, P.G. Ricci, E. Carrara, E. Bianchi, Milano-Napoli, 1955)).

or (d) Procopius, with special study of Bellum Persicum1.24, 2.22-3; Bellum Gothicum 4.20, 4.29-35; Historia Arcana6–12 (all in Dewing's Loeb edition).

(xiv) Greek Historical Linguistics [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.11]. (This subject may be combined with one but not more than one of (xv), (xvi), and (xvii).)

(xv) Latin Historical Linguistics [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.12]. (This subject may be combined with one but not more than one of (xiv), (xvi), and (xvii).)

(xvi) Historical Linguistics and Comparative Philology [Honour Moderations in Classics Course IA, paper V, VI F(1)]. (This subject may not be offered by candidates who offered it in Honour Moderations in Classics or in the Preliminary Examination in Classics. It may be combined with one but not more than one of (xiv), (xv), and (xvii).)

(xvii) General Linguistics and Comparative Philology [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.13]. (This subject may be combined with one but not more than one of (xiv), (xv), and (xvi).)

(xviii) Either (a) Greek History from 776 bc to 479 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.1; not to be offered in combination with subject (xix)(a), The Greeks and the Mediterranean World c.950 bc–500 bc].

or (b) Greek History from 479 bc to 403 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.2].

or (c) Greek History from 403 bc to 336 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.3].

or (d) Roman History from 240 bc to 133 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.4].

or (e) Roman History from 133 bc to 50 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.5].

or (f) Roman History from 49 bc to ad 54 [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.6].

or (g) Roman History from ad 54 to ad 138 [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.7].

Note: Candidates offering any of subjects (xviii) (a)–(g) must also offer the associated translation paper set in the Honour School of Literae Humaniores. (xix) Either (a) The Greeks and the Mediterranean World c.950 bc–500 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject IV.1; not to be offered in combination with subject (xviii)(a), Greek History from 776 bc to 479 bc].

or (b) Greek Archaeology and Art c.500 bc–323 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject IV.2].

or (c) The Archaeology and Art of Roman Italy in the Late Republic and Early Empire [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject IV.3].

or (d) Cities and Settlement in the Roman Empire [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject IV.4].

(xx) Either subject 130 or subject 131 or subject 132, as specified in Regulations for Philosophy in some of the Honour Schools.

(xxi) Modern Greek Poetry [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.14(c)]. (This subject is available only to candidates offering subject (i), Greek Literature of the Fifth Century bc who are offering neither (xiii)(d), Procopius nor (xxiii), (xxiv), Second Classical Language.)

(xxii) Thesis. Any candidate may offer a thesis in Classics, or in a subject linking Classics and their Additional Language, in accordance with the Regulation on Theses in the regulations for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores, save that references there to the Honour School of Literae Humaniores shall be deemed to be references to the Honour School of Oriental Studies (with Classics as Main Subject) and that the Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores shall consult the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies as appropriate. Candidates who offer two of subjects (xiv)–(xvii) may not also offer a thesis in Philology or Linguistics.

(xxiii), (xxiv) (see introductory notes) Second Classical Language [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject V.1 and V.2]. (Candidates who offer Second Classical Language must offer either both subjects in Greek or both subjects in Latin, and may not offer either subject in the same language as they offered in Course IIA or IIB of Honour Moderations or the Preliminary Examination in Classics.)'

7 Ibid., p. 465, l. 6, after `Syriac,' insert `Classics,'.

8 Ibid., p. 468, l. 13, after `Syriac,' insert `Classics,'.

9 Ibid., p. 472, l. 27, after `Armenian,' insert `Classics,'.

10 Ibid., p. 473, l. 49, after `4.' insert `(For candidates offering Old Iranian, Pali, or Prakrit as additional language)'. 11 Ibid., p. 474, after l. 19 insert:

`Either'.

12 Ibid., after l. 21 insert:

`Or

8, 9, and 10. Three papers on Classics as an additional language.' 13 Ibid., p. 476, l. 26, after `Arabic,' insert `Classics,'. 14 Ibid., after l. 48 insert: `Or (for candidates offering Classics as main subject) Selected texts (list available from the Oriental Institute)'.

15 Ibid., p. 477, l.3, after `offering' insert `Classics,'. 16 Ibid., l. 15, after `Arabic,' insert `Classics,'. 17 Ibid., l. 46, after `Arabic,' insert `Classics,'. 18 Ibid., p. 478, l. 4, after `offering' insert `Classics or'. 19 Ibid., after l. 14 insert:

`Classics (for candidates offering Arabic, Egyptology, Hebrew, Persian or Sanskrit as main subject). [1]

Candidates will be required to offer three of the following subjects (i)–(xxiv). Candidates not offering (xxiii), (xxiv), Greek or Latin for Beginners must include at least two of subjects (i)–(xv), of which one must be either (i) or (v); they may offer both (i) and (v) if they wish.

Subject (xxiii), (xxiv), Greek or Latin for Beginners counts as two subjects.

Candidates offering this must offer as their third subject one of (i), (ii), (iii), (iv), (xi), (xiv), (xviii) (a)–(d) and (xx) if offering Greek, or one of subjects (v), (vi), (vii) (xii), (xv) and (xviii) (e)–(g) if offering Latin.

Note: It cannot be guaranteed that university lectures or classes or college teaching will be available on all subjects in every academic year. Candidates are advised to consult their tutors about the availability of teaching when selecting their subjects.

(i) Greek Literature of the Fifth Century bc (one paper of three hours (commentary and essay) with an additional paper (one-and-a-half hours) of translation) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.1].

(ii) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.2]

Either (a) Early Greek Hexameter Poetry (not to be offered in combination with subject (xi), Homer, Iliad)

or (b) Greek Lyric and Elegiac Poetry

or (c) Pindar and Bacchylides. (iii) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.3]

Either (a) Aeschylus

or (b) Euripides. (iv) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.4]

Either (a) Thucydides and Rhetoric

or (b) Plato

or (c) Greek Comedy Old and New (not to be offered in combination with subject (viii)(a), Greek New Comedy and Roman Comedy)

or (d) Hellenistic Poetry.

(v) Latin Literature of the First Century bc (one paper of three hours (commentary and essay) with an additional paper (one-and-a-half hours) of translation) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.5].

(vi) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.6]

Either (a) Latin Didactic Poetry

or (b) Latin Satire

or (c) Latin Historiography. (vii) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.7]

Either (a) Cicero the Orator

or (b) Horace

or (c) Ovid

or (d) Seneca and Lucan. (viii) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.8]

Either (a) Greek New Comedy and Roman Comedy (not to be offered in combination with subject (iv)(c), Greek Comedy Old and New)

or (b) Ancient Literary Criticism

or (c) The Ancient Novel.

(ix) Greek Textual Criticism [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.9].

(x) Latin Textual Criticism [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.10].

(xi) Homer, Iliad [Honour Moderations in Classics Course IA, paper I; not be offered combination with subject (ii)(a), Early Greek Hexameter Poetry].

(xii) Virgil, Aeneid. Translation and essay questions will be required; commentary questions will be optional.

(xiii) Either (a) The Conversion of Augustine [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.14(a)].

or (b) Medieval Latin [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.14(b)].

or (c) The Latin Works of Petrarch, with special study of Africa (ed. N. Festa, Florence, 1926), Books I, II, V, VII, IX. Candidates will also be expected to have read Vita Scipionis (in La vita di Scipione l' Africano, ed. G. Martillotti, Milano-Napoli, 1954), and to show acquaintance with Petrach's major Latin works (e.g. Rerum memorandum libri (ed. G. Billanovich, Florence, 1945), De secreto conflictu curarum mearum, De vita solitaria, Epistolae familiares (in F. Petrarca, Prose, ed. G. Martillotti, P.G. Ricci, E. Carrara, E. Bianchi, Milano-Napoli, 1955)).

or (d) Procopius, with special study of Bellum Persicum 1.24, 2.22-3; Bellum Gothicum 4.20, 4.29-35; Historia Arcana 6–12 (all in Dewing's Loeb edition).

(xiv) Greek Historical Linguistics [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.11].

(xv) Latin Historical Linguistics [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.12].

(xvi) Historical Linguistics and Comparative Philology [Honour Moderations in Classics Course IA, paper V, VI F(1)].

(xvii) General Linguistics and Comparative Philology [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.13].

(xviii) Either (a) Greek History from 776 bc to 479 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.1].

or (b) Greek History from 479 bc to 403 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.2].

or (c) Greek History from 403 bc to 336 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.3].

or (d) Roman History from 240 bc to 133 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.4].

or (e) Roman History from 133 bc to 50 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.5].

or (f) Roman History from 49 bc to ad 54 [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.6].

or (g) Roman History from ad 54 to ad 138 [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.7]. Note: Candidates offering any of subjects (xviii) (a)–(g) must also offer the associated translation paper set in the Honour School of Literae Humaniores.

(xix) Either (a) The Greeks and the Mediterranean World c.950 bc–500 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject IV.1].

or (b) Greek Archaeology and Art c.500bc–323 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject IV.2].

or (c) The Archaeology and Art of Roman Italy in the Late Republic and Early Empire [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject IV.3].

or (d) Cities and Settlement in the Roman Empire [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject IV.4].

(xx) Either subject 130 or subject 131 or subject 132, as specified in Regulations for Philosophy in some of the Honour Schools.

(xxi) Modern Greek Poetry [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.14(c)]. (This subject is available only to candidates offering subject (i), Greek Literature of the Fifth Century bc who are offering neither (xiii)(d), Procopius nor (xxiii), (xxiv), Greek or Latin for Beginners.)

(xxii) Thesis. Any candidate may offer a thesis in Classics, or in a subject linking Classics and their Main Subject, in accordance with the Regulation on Theses in the regulations for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores, save that references there to the Honour School of Literae Humaniores shall be deemed to be references to the Honour School of Oriental Studies (with Classics as an Additional Language) and that the Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores shall consult the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies as appropriate.

(xxiii), (xxiv) (see introductory notes) Greek or Latin for Beginners. [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject V.1 and V.2, Second Classical Language]. (Candidates who offer Greek or Latin for Beginniners must offer either both subjects in Greek or both subjects in Latin.)'

20 Ibid., p. 478, l. 15, after `offering' insert `Classics or'.

21 Ibid., l. 22, after `offering' insert `Classics or'.

22 Ibid., l. 29, after `Arabic' insert `,Classics'.

23 Ibid., l. 31, after `Hebrew.' insert `Candidates taking Classics may offer either (a) Biblical and Mishnaic or (b) Medieval Hebrew.'

24 Ibid., p. 479, l. 22, after `offering' insert `Classics or'.

25 Ibid., l. 26, after `(ii)' insert `either (a) Questions on the content of the Old Persian texts and their historical background or (b)'.

26 Ibid., l. 35, after `offering' insert `Classics or'.

27 Ibid., after l. 39 insert:

`For candidates offering Classics as main subject:

3. Prepared texts, with questions on contents.'

28 Ibid., l. 40, after `Arabic' insert `, Classics'.

29 Ibid., p. 480, after l. 15 insert:

`Sanskrit (for candidates offering Classics as main subject). The following papers will be set:

1. Sanskrit unprepared translation.

2.Questions on Sanskrit language and literature.

3. Prepared texts, with general questions.

(Lists of texts available from the Oriental Institute).'

(b) Honour School of Oriental Studies (Hebrew)

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 459, delete ll. 8–10 and substitute:

`Candidates offering Hebrew shall take one of the following courses:

Course I : Candidates will be examined in accordance with the regulations set out below.

Course II : Candidates will be examined in accordance with the regulations set out below. Candidates offering Hebrew Course II as their main subject will be required to spend a period of at least one academic year on an approved course of language study in Israel.'

2 Ibid., p. 467, after l. 39 insert: `Either, for Hebrew only,'.

3 Ibid., delete ll. 40–2 and substitute:

`Candidates for Course I will be required to offer nine papers. Candidates for Course II will be required to offer nine papers, a compulsory Special Subject, and an oral examination. They will be expected to carry out during their year abroad such work as the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies may require. This will include two substantial essays or a dissertation not exceeding 15,000 words, in addition to such programmes of reading and written work in preparation for the examination as their tutors/the Oriental Studies Board may prescribe.

1. (for Course I ): Hebrew composition and unprepared translation.

(for Course II ): Essay in modern Hebrew and unprepared translation.'

4 Ibid., p. 468, delete ll. 5–8 and substitute:

`10. (for Course I): Candidates who so desire may offer any special subject as may be approved by the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies. Applications for the approval of options must be submitted to the board not later than Monday of the second week of the Michaelmas Term preceding the examination. (for Course II): Candidates shall offer a special subject, to be approved by the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies. Applications for the approval of options must be submitted to the board not later than Monday of the second week of the Michaelmas Term preceding the examination.'

5 Ibid., after l. 8, insert: `11. (for Course II) Spoken Hebrew. [2]


(c) Pass School of Oriental Studies

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 481, l. 6, delete `Candidates must offer six papers in one of the' and substitute `(a) Candidates not offering Classics as their main subject must offer six papers in one of the other'.

2 Ibid., after l. 19 insert:

`(b) Candidates offering Classics as their main subject must offer either two or three of the subjects prescribed for Classics as a main subject in the Honour School of Oriental Studies (including at least one of (i) and (v)), subject to the restrictions there placed upon choice of subjects; and in addition either all three or two (as the case may be) of the papers prescribed for one of the additional languages that may be offered with Classics in the Honour School, subject in the latter case to the approval of the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies.'

3 Ibid., p. 481, l. 20, before `All' insert `(c)'.

4 Ibid., l. 23, before `All' insert `(d)'.


6 Board of the Faculty of Physical Sciences

Honour School of Natural Science (Metallurgy and Science of Materials)

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 446, l. 2, after `Supplementary Subjects' insert `, or who have completed an approved course of instruction in a foreign language,'.

2 Ibid., after l. 33 insert: `5. A candidate may, as an alternative to offering one or more Supplementary Subjects, take a course of instruction in a foreign language. A candidate proposing to be assessed on competence in a foreign language must have the proposal approved by the Chairman of the Sub-faculty of Materials or deputy, and by the Director of the Langauge Centre or deputy.'


7 Committee for Archaeology

(a) M.St. in Classical Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 672, after l. 8 insert `Candidates admitted in Michaelmas Term 1996 may take the examination according to the 1995 regulations .'

2 Ibid, pp. 672–3, delete ll. 18–50 and ll. 1–11, and substitute:

`4. The written examination shall comprise three subjects:

(a) one subject on a period selected from Schedule A below, to be examined by written paper;

(b) two subjects selected from Schedules A–C. [Not more than one subject may normally be taken from Schedule C.] Each of these subjects may be examined, at the candidate's choice, either by two pre-set essays (each of 5,000 words) or by written paper.

In lieu of one of the subjects in (b) above, candidates may offer, with the permission of the committee, a dissertation of not more than 10,000 words (excluding bibliography and descriptive catalogue or similar factual matter but including notes and appendices). The subject for the dissertation will normally be chosen from the range of the periods or subjects chosen under 4(a) and (b) above, and must be approved by the candidate's supervisor. The proposed title of the dissertation must be submitted for approval by the committee in time for its meeting in the eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination. Two copies typed or printed (the second may be a photocopy) in double spacing on one side only of A4 paper and bound simply or filed securely, must be delivered in a parcel bearing the words `Dissertation for the M.St. in Classical Archaeology' to the Clerk of Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the Monday of the fifth week of Trinity Full Term. Candidates will be required to deposit one copy of the dissertation with the Clerk of the Schools.

Schedule A: Periods

Aegean to 1100
Dark Age, 1200–700
Archaic, 800–480
Classical, 500–300
Hellenistic, 330–30
Late Republican, 200–30 bc
Early Imperial, 30 bc–ad 120
Middle Imperial, ad 70–250
Late Roman, 250–700
Byzantine, 600–1453

Schedule B: Subjects

Archaeology of the Early Greek Polis
Greek architecture
Greek sculpture
Greek vase-painting
Greek burial customs
Anatomy and the Figure in Greek Art
History of Collecting Classical Antiquities
Greek coinage
Myth in Greek art
Greek and Roman wallpainting
Classical and Hellenistic portraits
Art and Cities of Roman Asia
Historical narrative in Hellenistic and Roman Art
Roman portraits
Roman sculpture
Roman architecture
Roman coinage
Topography of Ancient Rome
Archaeology of the Roman Economy
Pompeii and Ostia
Roman North Africa
Cities and Settlement in the Roman Empire
Landscape Archaeology in the Greek and Roman World
Late Roman and Byzantine painting and mosaic
Late Roman and Byzantine architecture
Late Roman and Byzantine minor arts
Late Roman and Byzantine trade
Late Roman and Byzantine coins and seals
Problems of method in ancient art-history
Theory and Method in Greek and Roman archaeology

Schedule C: Other subjects

Any subject offered in the M.St. in Byzantine Studies, Classical Literature, European Archaeology, Greek and Roman History, History of Art, Near Eastern Archaeology, Women's Studies, World Archaeology.

Candidates may apply for other subjects, to be approved by the committee, which shall define their scope and inform both the candidate and the examiners of this definition in writing.

Not all subjects may be available in any one year.'

3 Ibid., p. 673, delete ll. 14–15 and substitute:

`6. Candidates must present themselves for an oral examination as required by the examiners.'

4 Ibid., p. 673, l. 16, delete `Options to be offered by candidates,' and substitute `The period and subjects to be offered by candidates and their chosen method of examination,'.

5 Ibid., p. 673, l. 20 insert:

`8. Candidates intending to offer pairs of pre-set essays in place of one or two written examinations (as specified in 4 above) will select essay topics from a list offered by their supervisor. The proposed titles of the essays must be submitted for approval to the committee in time for its meeting in eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examinations. Candidates must submit their essays by not later than noon on Monday of the fifth week of Trinity Full Term, to the Examination Schools. Essays must be typed or printed'.

6 Ibid., l. 21, renumber existing paragraph 8 as 9.

(b) M.Phil. in Classical Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1998)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 569, delete l. 38 and substitute `Candidates admitted in Michaelmas Term 1996 may take the examination according to the 1995 regulations .'

2 Ibid., pp. 570–1, delete ll. 4–42 and ll. 1–15, and substitute:

`4. All candidates are required:

(a) to satisfy the examiners in a Qualifying Examination identical with that for the degree of Master of Studies in Classical Archaeology and governed by regulations 4–8 for that degree, in the Trinity Full Term of the academic year in which their name is first entered on the Register of M.Phil. students;

(b) to deliver to the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the Monday of the fifth week of Trinity Full Term in the academic year after that in which their name is first entered on the Register for M.Phil. Students, a thesis [3] of not more than 25,000 words (excluding bibliography and any descriptive catalogue or other factual matter, but including notes and appendices) on the subject approved in accordance with regulations 7 and 10 below;

(c) to present themselves for written examination in accordance with regulation 5 below in the Trinity Full Term of the academic year after that in which their name is first entered on the Register for M.Phil. Students;

(d) to present themselves for an oral examination as required by the examiners.

5. The written examination shall comprise one subject chosen from Schedules A–C for the Master of Studies in Classical Archaeology. [Candidates who offered a subject from Schedule C in the qualifying examination may not normally offer another subject from Schedule C.] The subject may be examined, at the candidate's choice, either by two pre-set essays of 5,000 words each, or by a written paper.'

3 Ibid., p. 571, l. 19, delete `chosen from the range of the period or subjects' and substitute `related to the period or subject'.

4 Ibid., p. 571, l. 23 and line 26, delete `the period and subjects' and substitute `the period or subject'.

5 Ibid., p. 571, l. 24, delete `eighth week of the Michaelmas Term' and substitute `eighth week of the Trinity Full Term'.

6 Ibid., p. 571, l. 29, insert:

`9. Candidates intending to offer pairs of pre-set essays in place of the written examination (as specified in 5 above) will select essay topics from a list offered by their supervisor. The proposed titles of the essays must be submitted for approval to the committee in time for its meeting in eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examinations. Candidates must submit their essays by not later than noon on the Monday of the fifth week of Trinity Full Term, to the Examination Schools. Essays must be typed or printed.'

7 Ibid., p. 571, renumber existing paragraphs 9–13 as 10–14.

8 Ibid., p. 571, l. 30, delete `first week' and substitute `eighth week'.

9 Ibid., p. 571, after l. 47 insert:

`15. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'


(c) M.St. in European Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 677, after l. 9 insert: `European Archaeology

1. Candidates for admission must apply to the Committee for Archaeology. They will be required to produce evidence of their appropriate qualifications for the proposed course, which may include their suitable proficiency in relevant ancient or modern languages.

2.Candidates must follow for three terms a course of instruction in European Archaeology.

3. The registration of candidates will lapse on the last day of the Trinity Full Term in the academic year of their admission, unless it shall have been extended by the committee.

4. The written examination shall comprise three subjects;

(a) one subject selected from Schedules A–B to be examined by written paper;

(b) two further subjects selected from Schedules A–B. [Not more than one subject of the three selected may normally be taken from Schedule B.] Each of these subjects may be examined, at the candidate's choice, either by two pre-set essays (each of 5,000 words) or by written paper.

In lieu of one of the subjects in (b) above, candidates may offer, with the permission of the committee, a dissertation of not more than 10,000 words (excluding bibliography and descriptive catalogue or similar factual matter but including notes and appendices). The subject for the dissertation will normally be chosen from the range of subjects chosen under 4(a) and (b) above, and must be approved by the candidate's supervisor. The proposed title of the dissertation must be submitted for approval by the committee in time for its meeting in the eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination. Two copies typed or printed (the second may be a photocopy) in double spacing on one side only of A4 paper and bound simply or filed securely, must be delivered in a parcel bearing the words `Dissertation for the M.St. in European Archaeology' to the Clerk of Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the Monday of the fifth week of Trinity Full Term. Candidates will be required to deposit one copy of the dissertation with the Clerk of the Schools.

Schedule A: Main subjects

Palaeolithic and Mesolithic Europe
Neolithic and Bronze Age Europe
Aegean Archaeology to 1100
The Greeks and the Mediterranean World c.950–500 bc
The transformation of the Celtic World 500 bc–ad 100
Cities and settlements in the Roman Empire
The Archaeology of Roman Italy
Western Europe in the early Middle Ages: 400–900 ad
Late Roman and early Byzantine Archaeology ad 284–700
Byzantium: the transition from Antiquity to the Middle Ages ad 500–1100
Themes in Archaeological Science

Schedule B: Related Subjects

Any subject offered in the M.St. in World Archaeology or Classical Archaeology.

Candidates may apply for other subjects to be approved by the committee, which shall define their scope and inform both the candidate and the examiners of this definition in writing. Not all course options may be available in any given year.

5. Candidates will be expected to show a general knowledge of Ancient History and Geography, so far as they are concerned with their subjects.

6. Candidates must present themselves for an oral examination as required by the examiners.

7. The subjects to be offered by the candidates and their chosen method of examination, duly approved by their supervisors, must be submitted for approval to the committee in time for its meeting in eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination. Notice of options to be offered by candidates must be given to the Registrar not later than Friday of the eighth week of that same term.

8. Candidates intending to offer pairs of pre-set essays in place of one or two written examinations (as specified in 4 above) will select essay topics from a list offered by their supervisor. The proposed titles of the essays must be submitted for approval to the committee in time for its meeting in eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examinations. Candidates must submit their essays by not later than noon on Monday of fifth week of Trinity Full Term, to the Examination Schools. Essays must be typed or printed.

9. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'


(d) M.Phil. in European Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1998)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 598, after l. 5 insert:

`European Archaeology

The regulations made by the Committee for Archaeology are as follows:

1. Candidates for admission must apply to the Committee for Archaeology. They will be required to produce evidence of their appropriate qualifications for the proposed course which may include their suitable proficiency in relevant ancient or modern languages.

2.Candidates must follow for six terms a course of instruction in European Archaeology.

3. The registration of candidates will lapse from the Register of M.Phil. students on the last day of Trinity Full Term in the academic year after that in which their name is first entered in it, unless the committee decides otherwise. 4. All candidates are required:

(a) to satisfy the examiners in a Qualifying Examination identical with that for the degree of Master of Studies in European Archaeology and governed by regulations 4–8 for that degree, in the Trinity Full Term of the academic year in which their name is first entered on the Register of M.Phil. students;

(b) to deliver to the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the Monday of the fifth week of Trinity Full Term in the academic year after that in which their name is first entered on the Register for M.Phil. Students, a thesis [4] of not more than 25,000 words (excluding bibliography and any descriptive catalogue or other factual matter, but including notes and appendices) on the subject approved in accordance with regulations 7 and 10 below;

(c) to present themselves for written examination in accordance with regulation 5 below in the Trinity Full Term of the academic year after that in which their name is first entered on the Register for M.Phil. Students;

(d) to present themselves for an oral examination as required by the examiners.

5. The written examination shall comprise one subject chosen from Schedules A–B for the Master of Studies in European Archaeology. [Candidates who offered a subject from Schedule B in the qualifying examination may not normally offer another subject from Schedule B.] The subject may be examined, at the candidate's choice, either by two pre-set essays of 5,000 words each, or by a written paper.

6. The choice of subjects for thesis and examination must be approved by the candidate's supervisor and by the committee, having regard to the candidate's previous experience and to the availability of teaching. The subject for the thesis will normally be related to the subject chosen under regulation 5 above.

7. Candidates will be expected to show sufficient general knowledge of Ancient History and Geography for a proper understanding of their subjects.

8. The subject for examination must be submitted for approval by the committee in time for its meeting in eighth week of the Trinity Full Term of the academic year in which the candidate's name is first entered on the Register for M.Phil. students. Notice of the subject must be given to the Registrar not later than Friday of the eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination.

9. Candidates intending to offer pairs of pre-set essays in place of the written examination (as specified in 5 above) will select essay topics from a list offered by their supervisors. The proposed titles of the essays must be submitted for approval to the committee in time for its meeting in eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examinations. Candidates must submit their essays by not later than noon on the Monday of the fifth week of Trinity Full Term, to the Examination Schools. Essays must be typed or printed.

10. The proposed thesis title must be submitted for approval by the committee in time for its meeting in the eighth week of the Trinity Full Term of the year in which the candidate's name is first entered on the Register for M.Phil. Students.

11. Candidates will normally be expected to undertake a programme of relevant practical work (e.g. excavation, travel, or museum study), to be approved by their supervisors beforehand.

12. Candidates are advised that adequate reading knowledge of an appropriate language or languages (other than English) may be necessary to reach the standard required by the examiners.

13. Candidates will be required to deposit one copy of the thesis with the Clerk of the Schools. Successful candidates will be required to deposit one copy of the thesis in the Ashmolean Library or the Balfour Library, as directed by the examiners. Such candidates will be required to complete a form stating whether they give permission for their thesis to be consulted.

14. If it is the opinion of the examiners that the work done by candidates is not of sufficient merit to qualify them for the degree of M.Phil. but that nevertheless their work is of sufficient merit to qualify them for the degree of Master of Studies in European Archaeology, candidates shall be given the option of resitting the M.Phil. examination under the provisions of Ch. VI, Sect. vi, 2, cl. 4 or of being granted permission to supplicate for the degree of Master of Studies.

15. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'


(e) M.St. in World Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 709, after l. 36 insert:

`World Archaeology

1. Candidates for admission must apply to the Committee for Archaeology. They will be required to produce evidence of their appropriate qualifications for the proposed course, which may include their suitable proficiency in relevant ancient or modern languages.

2.Candidates must follow for three terms a course of instruction in World Archaeology.

3. The registration of candidates will lapse on the last day of the Trinity Full Term in the academic year of their admission, unless it shall have been extended by the committee.

4. The written examination shall comprise three subjects:

(a) one subject selected from Schedules A–B below to be examined by written paper;

(b) two further subjects selected from Schedules A–B [Not more than one subject of the three selected may normally be taken from Schedule B.] Each of these subjects may be examined at the candidate's choice either by two pre-set essays (each of 5,000 words) or by written paper.

In lieu of one of the subjects in (b) above, candidates may offer, with the permission of the committee, a dissertation of not more than 10,000 words (excluding bibliography and descriptive catalogue or similar factual matter but including notes and appendices). The subject for the dissertation will normally be chosen from the range of subjects chosen under 4(a) and (b) above, and must be approved by the candidate's supervisor. The proposed title of the dissertation must be submitted for approval by the committee in time for its meeting in the eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination. Two copies typed or printed (the second may be a photocopy) in double spacing on one side only of A4 paper and bound simply or filed securely, must be delivered in a parcel bearing the words `Dissertation for the M.St. in World Archaeology' to the Clerk of Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the Monday of the fifth week of Trinity Full Term. Candidates will be required to deposit one copy of the dissertation with the Clerk of the Schools.

Schedule A: Main subjects

Palaeolithic Archaeology
The Archaeology of colonialism: prehistoric and recent
Hunter-gatherers past and present in a world perspective
African hunter-gatherers
African farming and states
Regional studies in Australian and Pacific prehistory
Chinese Archaeology
The formation of the Islamic World
Archaeological method and theory

Schedule B: Related subjects

Any subject offered in the M.St. in European Archaeology or Classical Archaeology.

Candidates may apply for other subjects to be approved by the committee, which shall define their scope and inform both the candidate and the examiners of this definition in writing. Not all course options may be available in any given year.

5. Candidates will be expected to show a general knowledge of Ancient History and Geography, so far as they are concerned with their subjects.

6. Candidates must present themselves for an oral examination as required by the examiners.

7. The subjects to be offered by the candidates and their chosen method of examination, duly approved by their supervisors, must be submitted for approval to the committee in time for its meeting in eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination. Notice of options to be offered by candidates must be given to the Registrar not later than Friday of the eighth week of that same term.

8. Candidates intending to offer pairs of pre-set essays in place of one or two written examinations (as specified in 4 above) will select essay topics from a list offered by their supervisor. The proposed titles of the essays must be submitted for approval to the committee in time for its meeting in eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examinations. Candidates must submit their essays by not later than noon on Monday of the fifth week of Trinity Full Term to the Examination Schools. Essays must be typed or printed.

9. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'


(f) M.Phil. in World Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1998)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 657, after l. 25 insert:

`World Archaeology

The regulations made by the Committee for Archaeology are as follows:

1. Candidates for admission must apply to the Committee for Archaeology. They will be required to produce evidence of their appropriate qualifications for the proposed course including their suitable proficiency in relevant ancient or modern languages.

2.Candidates must follow for six terms a course of instruction in World Archaeology.

3. The registration of candidates will lapse from the Register of M.Phil. students on the last day of the Trinity Full Term in the academic year after that in which their name is first entered in it, unless the committee decides otherwise. 4. All candidates are required:

(a) to satisfy the examiners in a Qualifying Examination identical with that for the degree of Master of Studies in World Archaeology and governed by regulations 4–8 for that degree, in the Trinity Full Term of the academic year in which their name is first entered on the Register of M.Phil. students;

(b) to deliver to the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the Monday of the fifth week of Trinity Full Term in the academic year after that in which their name is first entered on the Register for M.Phil. Students, a thesis1 of not more than 25,000 words (excluding bibliography and any descriptive catalogue or other factual matter, but including notes and appendices) on the subject approved in accordance with regulations 7 and 10 below;

(c) to present themselves for written examination in accordance with regulation 5 below in the Trinity Full Term of the academic year after that in which their name is first entered on the Register for M.Phil. Students;

(d) to present themselves for an oral examination as required by the examiners.

5. The written examination shall comprise one subject chosen from schedules A–B for the Master of Studies in World Archaeology. [Candidates who offered a subject from Schedule B in the qualifying examination may not normally offer another subject from Schedule B.] The subject may be examined, at the candidate's choice, either by two pre-set essays of 5,000 words each, or by a written paper.

6. The choice of subjects for thesis and examination must be approved by the candidate's supervisor and by the committee, having regard to the candidate's previous experience and to the availability of teaching. The subject for the thesis will normally be related to the subject chosen under regulation 5 above.

7. Candidates will be expected to show sufficient general knowledge of Ancient History and Geography for a proper understanding of their subjects.

8. The subject for examination must be submitted for approval by the committee in time for its meeting in eighth week of the Trinity Full Term of the academic year in which the candidate's name is first entered on the Register for M.Phil. Students. Notice of the subject must be given to the Registrar no later than Friday of the eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination.

9. Candidates intending to offer pairs of pre-set essays in place of the written examination (as specified in 5 above) will select essay topics from a list offered by their supervisors. The proposed titles of the essays must be submitted for approval to the committee in time for its meeting in eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examinations. Candidates must submit their essays by not later than noon on Monday of the fifth week of Trinity Full Term, to the Examination Schools. Essays must be typed or printed.

10. The proposed thesis title must be submitted for approval by the committee in time for its meeting in the eighth week of the Trinity Full Term of the year in which the candidate's name is first entered on the Register for M.Phil. Students.

11. Candidates will normally be expected to undertake a programme of relevant practical work (e.g. excavation, travel, or museum study), to be approved by their supervisors beforehand.

12. Candidates are advised that adequate reading knowledge of an appropriate language or languages (other than English) may be necessary to reach the standard required by the examiners.

13. Candidates will be required to deposit one copy of the thesis with the Clerk of the Schools. Successful candidates will be required to deposit one copy of the thesis in the Ashmolean Library or the Balfour Library, as directed by the examiners. Such candidates will be required to complete a form stating whether they give permission for their thesis to be consulted.

14. If it is the opinion of the examiners that the work done by candidates is not of sufficient merit to qualify them for the degree of M.Phil. but that nevertheless their work is of sufficient merit to qualify them for the degree of Master of Studies in World Archaeology, candidates shall be given the option of resitting the M.Phil. examination under the provisions of Ch. VI, Sect. vi, 2, cl. 4, or of being granted permission to supplicate for the degree of Master of Studies.

15. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'


(g) M.St. in Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 1997

In Examination Decrees, 1995, pp. 664–6, delete ll. 43–5, ll. 1–49 and ll. 1–23 (i.e. the first to the twenty-third lines of that page, on which the numbers printed in the 1995 edition are incorrect).


() M.St. in Prehistoric and European Archaeology )h

With effect from 1 October 1997

In Examination Decrees, 1995, pp. 697–8, delete ll. 35–51 and ll. 1–23.

(i) M.Phil. in Prehistoric and European Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 1998

In Examination Decrees, 1995, pp. 638–40, delete ll. 38–50, ll. 1–37 and ll. 1–5.


8 Standing Committee for EEM and Related Schools

(a) Honour School of Economics and Management

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 174, delete ll. 35–9 and substitute:

`Accounting and Finance

The role and nature of accounting. Financial reporting and its regulation. Accounting for management decisions and control. Discounted cash flow and capital project appraisal. Financial planning, financial performance and treasury management. Current issues in accounting and finance.'

(b) Pass School of Economics and Management

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 177, l. 16, delete `Accounting and Control' and substitute `Accounting and Finance'.


Footnotes

[1] Persons who have satisfied the Moderators in Honour Moderations or the Preliminary Examination in Classics may not offer Classics as an additional language without permission from the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies in consultation with the Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores. Such permission, which will be given only for special reasons, must be sought as early as possible, and in no case later than noon on the Friday of the First Week of Michaelmas Term before the examination, by writing to the Chairman of the board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies, c/o University Offices, Wellington Square. Applications must be accompanied by a letter of support from the applicant's society.

Applicants for such permission must state which Course they offered in the First Public Examination. Those who satisfied the Moderators in Course IA, IB, or IC will not be allowed to offer subject (xi), Homer, Iliad, (xii), Virgil, Aeneid, or (xxiii), (xxiv), Greek or Latin for Beginners, and may offer only version (i) of subject (viii)(a), (b), or (c). Those who satisfied the Moderators in Course IIA will not be allowed to offer subject (xii), Virgil, Aeneid or to offer subject (xxiii), (xxiv) in Latin. Those who satisfied the Moderators in Course IIB will not be allowed to offer subject (xi), Homer, Iliad or to offer subject (xxiii), (xxiv) in Greek. Subject (xvi), Historical Linguistics and Comparative Philology may not be offered by candidates who offered it in the First Public Examination.
Return to text


[2] See the general regulation following Ch. VI, Sect. vi, § 4, concerning the preparation and dispatch of theses. Candidates are reminded (i) that two copies are required but that one of these may be a reproduction or carbon copy of the other, provided that any maps, diagrams, or other illustrations in the second copy are adequately reproduced, (ii) that the copy of the thesis deposited in the Ashmolean Library shall be the one containing the original illustrations, and (iii) that work submitted for the Degree of M.Phil. may be subsequently incorporated in a thesis submitted for the Degree of D.Phil.
Return to text
[3] See the general regulation following Ch. VI, Sect. vi, § 4, concerning the preparation and dispatch of theses. Candidates are reminded (i) that two copies are required but that one of these may be a reproduction or carbon copy of the other, provided that any maps, diagrams, or other illustrations in the second copy are adequately reproduced, (ii) that the copy of the thesis deposited in the Ashmolean or the Balfour Library shall be the one containing the original illustrations, and (iii) that work submitted for the Degree of M.Phil. may be subsequently incorporated in a thesis submitted for the Degree of D.Phil.
Return to text
[4] See the general regulation following Ch. VI, Sect. vi, § 4, concerning the preparation and dispatch of theses. Candidates are reminded (i) that two copies are required but that one of these may be a reproduction or carbon copy of the other, provided that any maps, diagrams, or other illustrations in the second copy are adequately reproduced, (ii) that the copy of the thesis deposited in the Ashmolean or the Balfour Library shall be the one containing the original illustrations, and (iii) that work submitted for the Degree of M.Phil. may be subsequently incorporated in a thesis submitted for the Degree of D.Phil.
Return to text

DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE

The Board of the Faculty of Physiological Sciences has granted leave to J.M. PATTISON, Merton, to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
The evidence submitted by the candidate was entitled: `Aspects of the function and regulation of the human chemokine RANTES'.


EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Biological Sciences

P.R. ROMANO, St Hugh's: `Cell-specific expression of the multidrug resistance genes'.
Department of Human Anatomy, Friday, 3 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: C.A.R. Boyd, W.H. Colledge.

P.A. WILLIAMS, Christ Church: `Time-resolved structural studies on macromolecules'.
Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Wednesday, 1 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: D. Richardson, L.N. Johnson.

J.L. WOOD, University: `The role of pH signalling in stomatal responses'.
Department of Plant Sciences, Wednesday, 1 May, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: A.M. Hetherington, J.A.C. Smith.

 


English Language and Literature

C. MONK, Linacre: `Transition magazine and the development and transmission of Modernism'.
St Cross Building, Friday, 3 May, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: J.L. Fuller, L. Kelly.

 


Mathematical Sciences

C.G. NOON, Corpus Christi: `Secondary frost heave in freezing soils'.
Dartington House, Friday, 17 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: J.R. Ockendon, J.T. Holden.

 


Physical Sciences

S.P. JEWSON, Exeter: `Modelling intermediate-term climate variability'.
Department of Physics, Wednesday, 8 May, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: T.N. Stockdale, D.G. Andrews.

M. KYLE, Corpus Christi: `An investigation of photolithographic silver particles on alumina'.
Department of Materials, Tuesday, 30 April, 10 a.m.
Examiners: M.L. Jenkins, J.R. Fryer.

 


Physiological Sciences

GUO-GUANG DU, Worcester: `The role of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ atpase in the regulation of intracellular calcium'.
University Laboratory of Physiology, Saturday, 27 April, 9.30 a.m.
Examiners: J.C. Ellory, C.L.-H. Huang.

K. KIRK, Wolfson: `Transport of organic solutes via anion-selective channels'.
Department of Human Anatomy, Thursday, 2 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: C.A.R. Boyd, R. Motais.

 


Social Studies

C. LUPI, Linacre: `Models of non-stationary economic time series'.
Examination Schools, Wednesday, 15 May, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: A. Banerjee, S.J. Leybourne.

 


Colleges, Halls, and Societies

Contents of this section:

  • OBITUARIES
    • St Edmund Hall
  • MEMORIAL SERVICE
    • Balliol College
  • ELECTIONS
    • Magdalen College
  • NOTICE
    • Oriel College: Lee-Hamilton Prize 1996

Return to Contents Page of this issue


OBITUARIES

St Edmund Hall

DAVID BAND, MA, 28 March 1996; commoner 1961–4. Aged 53.

JOHN MICHAEL EUGEN DOBSON, MA, 28 January 1996; commoner 1968–71. Aged 45.

PROFESSOR RICHARD LESLIE HILL, B.LITT., MA, March 1996; commoner 1922–5. Aged 95.

DAVID MONRO THOMAS, 13 February 1996; commoner 1934–7. Aged 80.

THOMAS DERRICK WESTON, MA, 13 January 1996; commoner 1944–7 and 1950–1. Aged 69.


MEMORIAL SERVICE

Balliol College

A Memorial Service for RICHARD CHARLES COBB, CBE, MA, FBA, will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 4 May, in the University Church of St Mary the Virgin.

Tea will be served in the hall, Balliol College, after the service.


ELECTIONS

Magdalen College

To Visiting Fellowships:

PROFESSOR K.R. BUSBY (1 October–31 December 1996)
DR R.R. PAINE (1 January–15 April 1997)
PROFESSOR R. BOGHOSSIAN (16 April–31 July 1997)
PROFESSOR R. BOTIGHEIMER (16 April–15 June 1997)


NOTICE

Oriel College

The Eugene Lee-Hamilton Prize 1996

The Provost and Fellows of Oriel College offer a prize of £60 for the best Petrarchan sonnet in English submitted by an undergraduate of Oxford or Cambridge, on a subject to be chosen by the candidate. Enjambment between the eighth and ninth lines will be permitted.

No candidate may submit more than one sonnet, nor may the prize be awarded more than once to the same person. The competing sonnets should be sent to the Provost, Oriel College, Oxford OX1 4EW, not later than Monday, 3 June. Each sonnet must be accompaned by a certificate from the Head or a Fellow of the candidate's college, stating that the candidate is an undergraduate.

The winner will have been deemed to have given permission to publish his/her sonnet in the Oriel Record.


Advertisements

Contents of this section:

  • Oxford Chamber Music Society
  • Oxford Art Society Associates Lectures
  • Royal Shakespeare Company
  • Tuition Offered
  • Services Offered
  • Domestic Services
  • Houses to Let
  • Flats to Let
  • Accommodation Offered
  • Accommodation Sought
  • Accommodation Exchange
  • Accommodation Sought to Rent or Exchange
  • Holiday Lets
  • Houses for Sale
  • Retirement Flats for Sale

How to advertise in the Gazette
Terms and conditions of acceptance of advertisements

Oxford Chamber Music Society

Karine Georgian, cello, and Stephen Gutman, piano, will perform the following at 8 p.m. on Sunday, 5 May, in the Holywell Music Room: Stravinsky, Suite Italienne(Pulcinella); Kodaly, Sonata in B minor for solo cello, op. 8; Shostakovitch, Sonata in D minor, op. 40. Tickets £7.50 from Blackwell's Music Shop, £7.95 at the door; students and juniors £3.


Oxford Art Society Associates Lectures

The Oxford Art Society Associates Lectures are held on Mondays twice during each term at the Maison Française, Norham Road. Wine 5.15 p.m., lecture 5.45 p.m. Annual subscription £10. Enquiries regarding membership to the Hon. Secretary. Tel.: Oxford 58603.


Royal Shakespeare Company

The RSC's Oxford office is organising return coach trips to Stratford evening performances. Each £25 ticket includes transport and a free upgrade to best stalls or circle seat. Coaches depart St Giles' at 5.45 p.m. for Macbethon Mon., 13 May, and for As You Like Iton Thur., 17 May. Tel. for bookings (RSC Oxford): Oxford 511434.

 

Tuition Offered

French refresher courses at all levels in beautiful village close to Montpellier, south-west France. Expert tuition by university lecturers with emphasis on conversational French. Pleasant and relaxed atmosphere. Tel. for further information: 0181-341 4081.


Services Offered

Tax advice and accountancy. We specialise in assisting professionals and small businesses with all tax and accounting matters. Fast, personal service at competitive rates. Contact Dr Charles McCreery. Tassano & Co., 118 Banbury Road, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 513381.

Jeanne Bliss, landscape designer. A two-hour initial visit: £30. Garden plans. A two-year phased programme. Garden design with colour slides. Tel.: Oxford 515379.

Furniture: individual pieces and fitted furniture designed and made by Piers Roberts from workshops in Thame. From tables, chairs, cabinets, desks to fitted bedrooms, kitchens, studies. For the home, office, or garden. Tel.: 01844 218929 or 201325.

Finders Keepers à La Carte—a new concept: a selection of services available to tenants of Finders Keepers rental properties, designed to enhance comfort, convenience, and enjoyment whilst renting Finders Keepers' properties. Call us for your menu. Finders Keepers Ltd., 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE (tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 56993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk); also 27 St Clement's, Oxford OX4 1DJ (tel.: Oxford 200012, fax: 204844, e- mail: stclements@finders.co.uk).


Stella Campion, gold and silversmith; Goldsmiths' Crafts Council first prize winner 1994. I can design a unique hand- made piece for your anniversary, gifts, or awards. A friendly and efficient service. Gold work and repousséea speciality. Tel.: Oxford 790867.

Frederick and Sudabeh Hine. Persian carpet dealers. We specialise in large and extra-large hand-knotted oriental carpets and runners and our list includes over 100 such pieces from Iran, Turkey, Afghanistan, and China; we can search other importers' stocks for hard-to-find items if necessary. We also keep quantities of traditional hand-made nomadic and village rugs and kelims at warehouse prices. Business hours: 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Mon.–Sat. Old Squash Court, 16 Linton Road, Oxford. Tel./fax: Oxford 59396.

Gardens creatively designed, planted, and maintained. Portfolio available on request. Colin Broad. Tel.: Oxford 882711.

Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press—the University Printers: specialising in booklet and publicity material, typesetting, printing, and finishing; Output Bureau provides high- quality output from disk from all major DTP programs onto paper, bromide, colour-separated positive or negative film; high-quality specialist colour copier service. For service, quality, and competitive prices contact Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press, Walton Street, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 514691, fax: 514010.

Micro Instruments Ltd. are an Oxford-based company whose prime business is in the sales and servicing of optical microscopes and micromanipulation equipment. Holding agencies for Carl Zeiss, Leica, Nikon, Narashige, De Fonbrune, and other leading manufacturers, we have for the past 35 years been able to assist in the selection and supply of equipment for microscopy all over the UK and overseas. For further information and assistance please contact us. Tel.: 01993 883595, fax: 01993 883616.

Professional IT solutions: KGH Computing Solutions offers expert advice on all PC requirements. Particular expertise in database design and implementation (Access, dBase, FoxPro); Local Area Networks (Novell, WFWG, Windows 95) and connection to TCP/IP (University Network); consultancy and specification for new PCs and upgrades. Contact Keith Hatton. Tel.: 01734 625707 (answerphone), or 0850 064387 (mobile); fax: 01734 625708; e-mail: 100415.314@compuserve.com.


Domestic Services

Au pair girl wanted, for 9–12 months from Sept. We are a family of 3 (our daughter will be 5 in Nov.), living in an old farmhouse near Göttingen, an old university town in northern Germany. Driving licence essential, and sharing some of the family's interests—classical music, sports, good food—would be nice. Dr J. Schmidtke, Professor of Human Genetics, Hannover Medical School, D-30623, Hannover. Tel.: 49 (0)511 532 3200, fax: 49 (0)511 532 5865, e-mail: schmidtke@humangenetik.mh-hannover.d400.de.

Children's day nursery—St Paul's Nursery (Somerville College), 119A Walton Street, Oxford, offers full- and part-time places for children aged from 3 months to 5 years within a 12-place nursery, set in a homely environment. For further information, contact Suzanne Hodgson. Tel.: 01543 416616.

 


Houses to Let

Very peaceful, sunny, detached Cotswold stone cottage (Oxford 20 minutes) on ancient farm in Windrush valley. Wonderful views and walks. Furnished/unfurnished; 2 bedrooms, study, oil-fired c.h., insulation, log stove, shed, garage, tennis. Six months min. £600 p.c.m. Tel.: 01993 822152.

17 June–8 July: 4-bed, 2-bath detached house in North Oxford cul-de-sac ending Cutteslowe Park; large lounge overlooking lovely garden; large kitchen; washing-machine, drier. Close to buses. Utilities inc. £200 p.w. Tel.: Oxford 515119.

Headington area: house available, professionals only, from July for 6 months; all modern conveniences; off-road parking; very large garden overlooking golf course. £700 p.m. inc. of bills except telephone. Tel.: Oxford 69609.

Furnished central North Oxford house to let from 1 Oct.; walk to colleges, train station and bus station; near Port Meadow; c.h., recently redecorated, 3 desks, filing cabinets, several large closets, secluded garden, garden furniture, terrace, 3 bedrooms, 1½ bathrooms, washing-machine, drier, telephone, linen, dishes, 2 bicycles. Suitable for visiting academics. £870 p.m. Tel. (J. Mackrell): Oxford 775567 (evenings), or (A. Gaston, Canada): 613 7451368, fax: 613 7450299, e-mail: gastont@nwrc.cws.doe.ca.

Berkeley, California, USA, Sept. 1996–May 1997: house with garage and small yard, 10 minutes' drive from the University of California; 1½ blocks from bus line; 2 bedrooms, living-room, dining-room, 1 bath, washer-drier, porch; fully furnished in quiet, tree-lined neighbourhood in walking distance of shops, stores, bookstores, restaurants. Weather moderate all year round. No pets or smokers. Rent $1,300 p.m. Lynn Rhodes, 726 Neilson Street, Berkeley, CA 94707. Tel.: 510 525 2643.

Only the best is good enough for Finders Keepers' clients and tenants. We aim for 100 per cent in everything we do; on call 24 hours a day, 365 days of the year to offer a caring, comprehensive service. We are an `Investor in People' and National Winners of the Best Letting and Management Company Award for the second consecutive year—call us to find out why the best is not the most expensive. Finders Keepers Ltd., 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE (tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 56993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk); also 27 St Clement's, Oxford OX4 1DJ (tel.: Oxford 200012, fax: 204844, e-mail: stclements@finders.co.uk).

Four-bedroom semi-detached house available for 1 year's rental from late May/June; in friendly neighbourhood in east Oxford, c.1 mile University and hospitals; ideal for a family; in excellent condition throughout with all mod. cons. £900 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 240017 (evenings).

Modern 3-bedroom detached house, 2 miles city centre; kitchen/family room, dining-room, lounge; fully furnished; cat in residence; secluded garden, off-road parking. Available 22 July–4 Sept. Non-smokers. £250 p.w. Tel.: Oxford 744232.

Pleasant furnished house in Risinghurst; 1 single and 2 double bedrooms, lounge-cum-diner, study, gas c.h., appliances; good decorative order; small secluded garden; off-street parking. £595 p.c.m. Dr Basu. Tel.: 01734 860630 or 01734 875123, ext. 4344.

Osney: 3-bedroom terrace house in excellent condition 10 minutes' walk from central Oxford in secluded district by the river. Fully furnished and equipped, gas c.h., fitted kitchen, washing-machine, freezer, fridge, phone, TV, garden with patio and seats. Available July for 1 year. Only visiting academics considered. £700 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 862347.

Headington, close to hospitals, shops, schools, and buses: 3-bedroom bungalow; 1 master bedroom with en-suite shower and w.c., 1 single bedroom, other bedroom/study, family bathroom, gas c.h., attached garage, telephone, security system, sun-lounge, modern fitted kitchen with automatic washing-machine and drier, waste disposal unit. From 1 Aug., £625 p.c.m. Fully furnished. Unsuitable for sharers. Tel.: 01993 881667 or 01993 704858.

Premier offer a fine selection of property for long or short let. Similar properties always required. Competitive fees and the friendliest service in the city. Call Jan Bartlett at Premier, 207 Cowley Road. Tel.: Oxford 792299, fax: Oxford 798087.

Aug.–Dec.: terrace house, east Oxford, c.1 mile from city centre; 3 bedrooms, 2 reception, large kitchen/diner, garden; friendly neighbourhood; all mod cons. £600 p.c.m. plus utilities. Tel.: Oxford 793378 (evenings) or (2)76595 (day).

An Englishman's home is his castle—so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Please telephone or fax us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 64533, fax: 64777.

 


Flats to Let

Spacious well-equipped 2-bedroom modern furnished flat, with garage, etc., to let; North Oxford, near Cutteslowe Park and buses to city centre. Available from late June. £600 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 53100, e-mail: gittins@stats.ox.ac.uk.

Central North Oxford: 2-bedroom apartment with 2 bathrooms, lounge, kitchen-diner, well placed for the academic and business centre; best suited to professionals and mature academics. £675 p.c.m. Available 20 May. Tel.: Oxford 516144.

Spacious sunny 1-bedroom flat; large sitting-room, luxury kitchen with dish-washer, clothes washer and large fridge, good-size bedroom with much hanging space, bathroom with jacuzzi and shower; gas c.h. Available 1 May. £475 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 724840.

North Oxford , near Cutteslowe Park: fully furnished ground-floor flat in modern block available for single person or couple, for up to 1 year from July (min. 3 months); 3 rooms, kitchen, bathroom, garage; only non-smokers acceptable; references required. £500 p.c.m. plus council tax and utilities. Tel.: Oxford 54256, fax: 513723.

Summertown: wanted, 5 responsible sharers for high- quality apartment (single rooms); fully furnished and equipped; available immediately. £175 per person p.c.m. For further details please contact Finders Keepers Ltd., 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE. Tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 56993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk; Internet: http://www.finders.co.uk.

North Oxford : 1 Sept. 1996–30 June 1997, £520 p.m., fully-furnished ground-floor flat; dining-room/study, hall, living-room/study, bedroom, shower-room, kitchen; dish-washer, washing-drying machine, electric stove, etc.; c.h.; car-port; garden. Stone, 266 Moore Street, Princeton, NJ 08540.

Central North Oxford, 10 minutes from city centre: two delightful and very comfortable flats in quiet, civilised family house: (1)—available May: large double bedroom, single bedroom, drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom; (2)—available now: large double bedroom, drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom. Off-street parking, garden. Regret no children or pets. Tel.: Oxford 52400.

 


Accommodation Offered

Central North Oxford: Victorian house available July for 6 months plus; comfortable family accommodation; sleeps 6; £200 p.w. Also central North Oxford, studio flat; suit couple or single person; available shortly, for 6 months plus. £100 p.w. Apply: 123 South Avenue, Abingdon, Oxon.

Bed-and-breakfast available in warm, comfortable house in exclusive central North Oxford, within easy walking distance of city centre, all main university buildings, parks, river, shops, pubs, and restaurants. Every room has tea- and coffee-making facilities, microwave, and colour television. Very moderate terms. Tel.: Oxford 57879.

Alternative medicine centre. Space available. Therapy and treatment rooms. Consulting and counselling rooms. Every facility. Very moderate rates. Central North Oxford. Tel. for further details: Oxford 511111 (9 a.m.–12 noon).

 


Accommodation Sought

Visiting professor seeks small reasonably central furnished flat Sept. 1996–June 1997. Write: Dr E. Sapadin, 512 South Union Street, Burlington, VT 054011.

Two D.Phil.s/part-time lecturers (non-smoking, quiet and tidy women) seek nice, spacious, reasonably-priced, 2-bedroom house; all modern conveniences; prefer central to North Oxford. Tel. Kim: Oxford (2)81600, or Debbie: (2)71670/514326.

Last week in Aug.: parents (University of Glasgow), bride (Brasenose), and bridesmaids need accommodation in Oxford to prepare for wedding. Min. of 3 bedrooms required; meticulous care taken. Contact John or Stella Money. Tel.: 0141-334 3813 (h), or 0141-330 6719 (univ.).

Visiting American professor with family (sister, brother-in-law) seeks to rent 2/3-bedroom furnished house/flat in Oxford (within walking/cycling distance of Queen's College), for 5 weeks, 24 June–29 July. Dr Albert Koppes. Tel.: 001 310 338 7301, fax: 001 310 338 1976, e-mail: akoppes@lmumail.lmu.edu.

Academic Spanish family of 4 (daughters aged 5 and 7) require flat or house to rent 30 June–18 Aug. The family always spend their summers in Oxford and know it well. Tel.: Oxford 513788.

Visiting fellow with wife and two children seeks a flat in Oxford for 6–8 weeks in July–Aug. Contact Dr Avi Shlaim. Tel.: Oxford 56244.

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management are one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us. Tel.: Oxford 64533, or fax: 64777.


Accommodation Exchange

Law student seeks Oxford accommodation, 23 June–4 Aug. Will trade house: 3 bedrooms, 3 bath, office, 2 living areas, sunroom, lovely yards; amenities. Inc. pool, tennis, and golf membership. 4315 Woodcrest Lane, Dallas, TX 75206. Tel.: 214 823 3098, e-mail: ldedman@post.cis.smu.edu.

American professor and wife seek to exchange 3- bedroom, 3-bath house in New Orleans, close to Tulane University, for a 2- or 3-bedroom house close to city centre for 1 year beginning 1 July or 1 Aug. References available. Professor James Kilroy. Tel.: 001 504 865 5261, fax: 001 504 865 6723.


Accommodation Sought to Rent or Exchange

Sydney: family on UK sabbatical Jan.–June 1997 seeks house-swap or rent. We offer lovely detached house on quiet street; 2 large beds, 2 small beds/study, kitchen/family/dining area, double living-room, 2 baths; best appliances f & f; large garden; pool. Lovely inner harbourside suburb, close shops, schools, bus, ferry, 10 minutes drive/bus downtown. We require well-equipped 2–3-bed/study house in Oxford/area, close to shops, primary school, rail station. Douglas Tomkin. Fax: 00 612 330 8877, e-mail: douglas.tomkins@uts.edu.au.

Visiting professor, wife and son seek quiet, three-bedroom house in North Oxford or surrounding area, Aug.–Jan. Off-street parking and washer-dryer preferred. Non-smokers. No pets. British, now based in US. Looking to rent or exchange our well-appointed house in quiet neighbourhood 30 minutes north of New York City. Will take good care of your home. Tel: 1-(914) 365-6631, fax (until 26 April): 1-(914) 365-8150, e-mail: ncb@lamont.ldeo.columbia.edu or (after 26 April) kottie_christieblick@socsd.lhric.org.

Visiting Spanish academic and family (wife and 2 children aged 11 and 9) require accommodation in Oxford area, mid- July–end of Aug. Exchange is a possibility in Lleida (Catalonia, Spain): a new 3-bedroom flat with all mod. cons. Contact Dr Josep Galceran or Dr David Gavaghan. Tel. (DG): Oxford (2)83574, e-mail: gavaghan@comlab.ox.ac.uk; or e-mail: galceran@etsea.udl.es.

Married couple from Pennsylvania State University, USA, seek 1–2-bedroom flat in Oxford or surrounding area for 1 year from mid-Aug. A swap with home in State College PA will also be considered. E-mail: tavener@math.psu.edu; local contact, Tom Mullin: tel. Oxford (2)72337 (w), or 881876 (h); e-mail: mullin@vax.ox.ac.uk.

Canadian house in North Bay, Ontario (4 hours' drive to Toronto or Ottawa): faculty member and family (2 adults, 2 teen girls) wish to rent or exchange house for 1–4 weeks, mid- July–mid-Aug. House is between 2 lakes, close to wilderness terrain and parks. Will provide car, canoe, bikes, and friends who will give sightseeing, canoeing, and hiking advice. Alan Sparkes, Nipissing University, PO Box 5002, North Bay, Ontario, P1B 8L7, Canada. Tel.: 001 705 474 3461, ext. 4270; fax: 001 705 474 1947; e- mail: alans@einstein.unipissing.ca.


Holiday Lets

Casa Quintino: old Tuscan farmhouse in peaceful countryside with distant views of ancient Etruscan town of Volterra; 20 minutes from San Gimignano, 1 hour Florence, Siena, Pisa; 3 bedrooms (sleeps 7 comfortably); fully equipped kitchen. Available from 15 June, £250–£450 p.w. Tel.: Oxford 727394 (evenings).

South-west France (Tarn-et-Garonne), traditionally restored farmhouse and outbuildings in peaceful hilltop hamlet with fine views over unspoilt countryside, close to medieval market town; sleeps 8+, small pool, semi-circular garden facing south with trees and some shade. Tel.: Oxford 242034.

Holiday family accommodation, central North Oxford: charming Victorian house, sleeps 6, £280 p.w. Also studio flat for couple, £170 p.w. Both residences centrally heated, washer/driers, microwaves plus conventional cookers, fridge/freezers, colour TVs, linen; telephones optional. Tel.: Oxford 59911.

Coastguard cottage: comfortable, quiet, and fairly isolated cottage on edge of coastal path overlooking Chesil Beach and Lyme Bay at Langton Herring; sleeps 4 + cot; colour TV, record- player, radio. £150–£250 p.w. inc. of electricity for heating, cooking, lighting. Tel: 01608 810563, or write: D. Simon, Little Orchard, Charlbury, Oxon. OX7 3RL.

Italy, outskirts Verona, charming ground-floor flat in fine 15th-c. villa: own entrance, large bed-sitting room, ditto kitchen dining room, secure parking, use of garden area. £250 p.w. inc. all services and weekly cleaning. Vacancies June, July, Aug. Tel. (Moore): 01844 238247, or, in Verona, Contessa Da Sacco: 00 45 526 499.

Peleponnese: unique, recently reconstructed house in the Byzantine Castro of Monemvasia; sleeps 4 (1 double, 2 singles), fully equipped kitchen and bathroom, verandah with views of Cape Malea; under-floor c.h.; open fire. £400 p.w.. Adjacent apartment sleeps 4 also available, £300 p.w. For brochure, tel.: 0181-977 3490 (evenings), or send postcard to: Kate Rendall, Monemvasia 23070, Lakonia, Greece.

Czech Republic, for a holiday full of pleasant surprises; fairy-tale woodland cottage available May–Oct.; 30 minutes Prague; sleeps 4+; wood fires, lake, views, walks, mushrooms, castles, sunshine; abundant food and wine; low prices; English- speaking owner. From £225 p.w. Tel.: 0171-373 0667.

Villa with garden and wonderful views, 40 minutes from Florence; all mod. cons.; swimming and sports facilities nearby; sleeps 8; available late July–mid-Sept. £325 p.w. Lukes. Tel. (Italy): 00 39 55 8428317.

 


Houses for Sale

Portland Road, Summertown: attractive 1930s family house with south-facing garden, in very popular area close to excellent schools, bus route to town, and local shops; large sitting- room, dining-room, big kitchen, 4 bedrooms with built-in wardrobes, bathroom, study in large insulated wooden cabin in garden with own radiator, phone, etc.; period features; gas c.h.; also workshop in garden which is well planted, with a mature walnut tree, pond, flower-beds, lawn, terrace. Possibility of extension. £220,000. Tel.: Oxford 54058, or 226490 (day).

Stanton St John: attractive and comfortable stone- built (1843) detached cottage for sale; 2 double bedrooms, sitting-, dining-, and entrance/breakfast rooms; rural views; gas c.h.; substantial studio/workshop and garage; small secluded garden. £147,500. Tel.: Oxford 351765.

Bungalow overlooking golf course, with beach beyond, 8 miles north of Aberystwyth (where the National Library of Wales is situated) and close to Snowdonia National Park; 3 bedrooms, integral garage, good-size garden. Railway station in village. £79,000. Contact Dr E.A. Livingstone, 15 St Giles', in the first instance. Tel.: Oxford 52867.


Retirement Flats for Sale

Finding cooking and housekeeping tiresome? For a person over retirement age £30,000 will purchase a single- bedroom service flat in a purpose-built block with 24-hour warden cover in Summertown area of Oxford. Contact R.A. Birchall, 20 Plantation Road, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 310091.

 


Diary

Contents of this section:

  • Friday 26 April
  • Saturday 27 April
  • Sunday 28 April
  • Monday 29 April
  • Tuesday 30 April
  • Wednesday 1 May
  • Thursday 2 May
  • Friday 3 May
  • Sunday 5 May
  • Monday 6 May
  • Tuesday 7 May
  • Wednesday 8 May
  • Thursday 9 May

Academic Staff Seminars: places should be booked in advance through the Staff Development Office, University Offices, Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

For the full list of courses, see the Staff Development Programme supplement.


Friday 26 April

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Monarchs in the Museum', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

FRANCO-BRITISH SEMINAR: `Electoral behaviour in Britain and France—the 1992 General Election in Britain and the 1995 Presidential Election in France', Maison Française, 2 p.m. (places to be booked one week in advance).

PROFESSOR R.E. BROWN: `New Testament scholarship and Christianity today' (second of five Martin D'Arcy Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR S. HOWELL: ` "May blessings come, may mischiefs go!": living kinds as agents of transition and transformation among the Lio' (Marett Memorial Lecture), Saskatchewan Lecture Room, Exeter College, 5 p.m.

MAISON FRANÇAISE debate: `Le journalisme politique en France, aujourd'hui' (various speakers), 5 p.m. (admission free, but places to be booked one week in advance).

D. LEBAUD and P. JOURDAN play cello and piano works by Beethoven, Schumann, Liszt, and Brahms, Maison Française, 8.15 p.m. (tel. for reservations one week in advance: (2)74220).


Saturday 27 April

DEGREE conferments, Sheldonian, 11.30 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.


Sunday 28 April

LORD BLAKE preaches the St Mark's Day Sermon, Magdalen, 10 a.m.

ALBERT JULIÀ plays piano works by Mozart and Liszt, Wolfson, 5 p.m. (tickets £4, concessions £2, at the door).

THE LANDOR PIANO TRIO play works by Beethoven, Bridge, and Lalo, the hall, Balliol, 9 p.m.


Monday 29 April

PROFESSOR M.A. NUSSBAUM (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor): `The Christian ascent I: Augustine' (lecture series: `Ascents of love: desire and the good in the Western philosophical/literary tradition'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. GIGNOUX: `The three immortal souls and other human faculties' (Ratanbai Katrak Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

J. BLOT: `The French perception of Bloomsbury', Maison Française, 5.15 p.m. (admission free, but places to be booked one week in advance).

 


Tuesday 30 April

WOMEN'S STUDIES COMMITTEE meeting, Old Bar, Mansfield, 1 p.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Drinking in the past!', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

PROFESSOR Q. SKINNER: `Ancient laughter and modern philosophy' (A.B. Emden Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R.E. BROWN: `New Testament scholarship and Christianity today' (third of five Martin D'Arcy Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

MR M. CAMPBELL, MP, and MR B. JENKIN, MP: `Defence: the last refuge of national sovereignty?' (lecture series: `The state of the Union: issues in contemporary British democracy'), St Antony's, 5 p.m.

G. PLOTKIN: `Denotational semantics: an unbalanced perspective' (Strachey Lecture), Lecture Theatre, Computing Laboratory, 5 p.m.

DR E. GREENHALL: `Control of conception' (Women's Studies Committee seminars: `Policy, practice, and power: issues in human female reproduction'), Wolfson Hall, Somerville, 8.30 p.m.


Wednesday 1 May

DR J. BENSON: `Some illuminated Sanskrit manuscripts in the Bodleian Library' (Friends of the Bodleian thirty-minute lecture), Cecil Jackson Room, Sheldonian, 1 p.m.

 

PROFESSOR M.A. NUSSBAUM (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor): `The Christian ascent II: Dante' (lecture series: `Ascents of love: desire and the good in the Western philosophical/literary tradition'), Schools, 5 p.m.

 

MS CAROLINE BENN and PROFESSOR TED WRAGG: `Affirming the comprehensive ideal: effective schools and effective teachers', Department of Educational Studies, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. GIGNOUX: `Body: anatomy, physiology, and medicine' (Ratanbai Katrak Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR H. LAND: `Care and dependency—reformulating the equation?' (Nuffield Women's Group seminars: `Women, poverty, and social policy'), Seminar Room, Nuffield, 5 p.m.

L. WEIGHILL: `Refugees in Gaza' (Refugee Studies Programme: Seminars on Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.


Thursday 2 May

DR C. GUPTA: `Fundamentalism and the print media in contemporary India' (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Gender and development—protest and politics'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

DR M. SELTMAN: `The algebra of Thomas Harriot: reputation and reality' (Thomas Harriot Lecture), Champneys Room, Oriel, 5 p.m.

 


Friday 3 May

HAKLUYT SOCIETY: `Science and geography in imperial contexts', Modern History Faculty, 2 p.m. (names in advance to Dr F. Fernandez- Armesto, care of Modern History Faculty).

FRANCO-BRITISH SEMINAR: `Electoral behaviour in Britain and France—protest and tactical voting, party identification and volatility', Maison Française, 2 p.m. (places to be booked one week in advance).

 

PROFESSOR R.E. BROWN: `New Testament scholarship and Christianity today' (fourth of five Martin D'Arcy Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. GIGNOUX: `Cosmic elements and theory of microcosm' (Ratanbai Katrak Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. MOKYR: `Famine and mortality: an historical re- examination' (Sir John Hicks Lecture on Economic History), Schools, 5 p.m.

M. RIOT-SARCEY: `Femmes et démocraties', Maison Française, 5.15 p.m. (admission free, but places to be booked one week in advance).


Sunday 5 May

PROFESSOR URSULA KING: `Christian spirituality, Third World theology, and the voices of women: the spiritual significance of otherness' (seventh Bampton Lecture), St Mary's, 10 a.m.

CHRIST CHURCH PICTURE GALLERY exhibition opens: `Jeff Clarke—new work' (until 5 June).


Monday 6 May

UNIVERSITY OFFICES closed (today only).

ANNUAL ELECTIONS of members of faculty boards (except Clinical Medicine), 30 May: nominations by two electors to be received at the University Offices by 4 p.m.

PROFESSOR M.A. NUSSBAUM (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor): `The Romantic ascent I: Emily Brontë' (lecture series: `Ascents of love: desire and the good in the Western philosophical/literary tradition'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. GIGNOUX: `Is there an Iranian Shamanism? (1)' (Ratanbai Katrak Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

 


Tuesday 7 May

PROFESSOR J. BURROW (Professor of European Thought): `A common culture? Nationalist ideas in nineteenth-century European thought' (inaugural lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D.M. KENNEDY (Harmsworth Professor of American History): `Can the United States still afford to be a nation of immigrants?' (inaugural lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR A. SHLEIFER: `Inefficient financial markets' (Clarendon Lectures in Economics: `Inefficient markets'), Schools (East School), 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. GOUGH: `The seismic structure of the sun' (Halley Lecture), Lecture Theatre, University Museum, 5 p.m.

THE REVD DR JOHN COOK: `Missing the point: a theology of culture in the work of Mondrian, Kandinsky, and Rothko' (Deneke Lecture), Talbot Hall, Lady Margaret Hall, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R.E. BROWN: `New Testament scholarship and Christianity today' (last of series of Martin D'Arcy Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

MR J. BIFFEN, MP, and LORD PLANT: `Westminster: time for another Great Reform Act?' (lecture series: `The state of the Union: issues in contemporary British democracy'), St Antony's, 5 p.m.

DR R. DAWKINS: `In praise of reductionist, adaptationist, progressivist, gradualist, neo-Darwinism' (Oxford History and Philosophy of Biology Programme), Sherrington Room, Department of Physiology, 5 p.m.

DR A. STEWART: `Menarche and other issues in adolescence' (Women's Studies Committee seminars: `Policy, practice, and power: issues in human female reproduction'), Wolfson Hall, Somerville, 8.30 p.m.


Wednesday 8 May

FRANCO-BRITISH workshop: `Le transfert de concepts et de pratiques dans les sciences des XXIXe et XXe siècles—sciences biologiques et humaines', Maison Française, all day (tel.: (2)77277 or (2)74220).

PROFESSOR A. SHLEIFER: `Origins of investor sentiment' (Clarendon Lectures in Economics: `Inefficient markets'), Schools (East School), 5 p.m.

DR Z. BRZEZINSKI: `Eurasia: post-imperial dilemmas' (Elliott Lecture), Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. GIGNOUX: `Is there an Iranian Shamanism? (2)' (Ratanbai Katrak Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

ARCHBISHOP EMERITUS J.R. QUINN: `Moral life or moral law' (Thomas More Lecture), Catholic Chaplaincy, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. COLE-TURNER: `The anxiety of change' (Idreos Lectures in Science and Technology: `Genetics and theology'), Harris Manchester, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR N. ORME: `Magdalen College and its School' (Waynflete and related lectures: `Oxford and England during the Renaissance and Reformation'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR S. ARBER: `Women and income inequality in later life' (Nuffield Women's Group seminars: `Women, poverty, and social policy'), Seminar Room, Nuffield, 5 p.m.

DR S. GRAHAM-BROWN: `The Kurds in Iraq since the 1991 Gulf War' (Refugee Studies Programme: Seminars on Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

H. MORPHY: `Hunting art' (Friends of the Pitt Rivers Museum: Beatrice Blackwood Lecture), Inorganic Chemistry Lecture Theatre, 7 p.m.


Thursday 9 May

H. SUMMERFIELD: `Gender and identity in Cambodia' (Centre for Cross- Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Gender and development—protest and politics'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. GOULD: `Something to do with Dionysos' (Gaisford Lecture), St John's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR A. SHLEIFER: `The limits of arbitrage' (Clarendon Lectures in Economics: `Inefficient markets'), Schools (East School), 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR T. NAGEL: `Justice and nature' (Hart Memorial Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. COLE-TURNER: `The humility of hope' (Idreos Lectures in Science and Technology: `Genetics and theology'), Harris Manchester, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR N. ABU-ZAID: `Reformation of Islamic thought: some questions and some suggestions' (Hamid Enayat Lecture), New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR N. ORME: `Oxford and the transformation of English school education 1480–1530' (Waynflete and related lectures: `Oxford and England during the Renaissance and Reformation'), Schools, 5 p.m.