23 March 2000 - No 4544



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 130, No. 4544: 23 March 2000<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

23 March 2000



Gazette publication arrangements

This is the last Gazette of Hilary Term.

Publication for Trinity Term will begin on 27 April. The deadline for receipt
of all items for this issue will be 5 p.m. on Thursday, 13 April.

The next Appointments Supplement will appear with the Gazette of
4 May (deadline: 26 April).


University Health and
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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 23 March 2000: University Acts<br />

University Acts


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HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL


1 Decree

Council has made the following decree, to come into effect on 7
April.


Decree (1): Composition fees (displaced
students)

Explanatory note

Five years ago Council made a decree remitting from the overseas to
the `home' rate the composition fees payable by displaced students
from war-affected areas of the former
Yugoslavia (Decree (2) of 23 March 1995, Gazette, Vol.
125, p. 914). Council considers that it is no longer appropriate for
such remission to be granted automatically, although it is of course
still open to colleges to make applications for remission on behalf
of individual students from the area on the merits of each case. The
following decree accordingly rescinds the earlier provision.

Text of Decree (1)

Decree (2) of 23 March 1995 (Gazette, Vol. 125, p.
914) is hereby rescinded.

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2 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts under
the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. v, cl. 1 (Statutes, 1997,
p. 367) has been accorded to the following persons who are qualified
for membership of Congregation:

DOROTHEA ALETTA KARENINA BANNISTER, European Humanities Research
Centre

ALYSON ELAINE BATEMAN, University Offices

ROBERT JAMES FALSTER, Linacre College

ANDREW BASSIM HASSAN, BM, D.PHIL., Merton College

SIMON IAIN HAY, D.PHIL., Green College

CHERYL HOWES, Christ Church

RUTH WINIFRED KINAHAN, University Offices

CHRISTINE LEES-BAXTER, University Offices

MARIA ELIZABETH LOWRY, Greyfriars

IAN ROBERT PEEDLE, University Offices

JENNIFER ROBYN POTTS, Department of Biochemistry

BARBARA EDITH REVILL, University Offices

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Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added
to the Register of Congregation:



Bannister, D.A.K., MA status, European Humanities Research Centre

Bateman, A.E., MA status, University Offices

Falster, R.J., MA status, Linacre

Hassan, A.B., BM, MA status, D.Phil., Merton

Hay, S.I., MA status, D.Phil., Green College

Howes, C., MA status, Christ Church

Kinahan, R.W., MA status, University Offices

Lees-Baxter, C., MA status, University Offices

Lowry, M.E., MA status, Greyfriars

Peedle, I.R., MA status, University Offices

Potts, J.R., MA status, Department of Biochemistry

Revill, B.E., MA status, University Offices

Warner, V.B., MA, Lady Margaret Hall

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CONGREGATION 21 March


1 Declaration of approval of nomination of
Vice-Chancellor

The nomination of COLIN RENSHAW LUCAS, MA, D.PHIL., Master of Balliol
College, for reappointment as Vice-Chancellor for three years from 1
October 2001, duly made by the Nominating Committee for the
Vice-Chancellorship under the provisions of Decree (2) of 17 February
2000 (Gazette, p. 796), was approved.



2 Declaration of approval of unopposed
Statute promulgated on 7 March

No notice of opposition having been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor
declared the Statute establishing the Degree of Doctor of Clinical
Psychology approved.



3 Promulgation of Statute

A form of Statute was promulgated. No notice of opposition having
been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor declared the preamble carried of the
proposed Statute changing the title of the Rhodes Professorship of
Clinical Pharmacology.



4 Declaration of approval of Special
Resolution authorising expenditure from the Higher Studies Fund

That the Curators of the University Chest be authorised to expend,
from Fund B of the Higher Studies Fund, such sum, initially estimated
at £25K, as is necessary to cover the cost of purchasing a major
Chinese collection, siku quanshu cunmu congshu.



5 Declaration of approval of Special
Resolution approving the conferment of an
Honorary Degree

That the conferment of the Degree of Master of Arts, honoris
causa
, upon GRAHAM PYE, Honorary Fellow of University College, be
approved.

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BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on
7 April, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 23 March 2000: University Agenda<br />

University Agenda


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CONGREGATION 27 March


Degree by Special Resolution

The following special resolution will be deemed to be approved at
noon on 27 March, unless by that time the Registrar has received
notice in writing from two or more members of Congregation under the
provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1997,
p. 15) that they wish the resolution to be put to a meeting of
Congregation.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

DAVID JOHN HUGH COCKAYNE, D.PHIL., Linacre College

ALISON EDWINA DENHAM, D.PHIL., St Anne's College

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CONGREGATION 2 May 2 p.m.

¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that written notice of
any intention to vote against, or any proposed amendment to, the
enacting part of the statute at item 1 below, or of any intention to
vote against the preambles of the statutes at item 2 below or the
special resolutions at item 3 below, or of any intention to speak or
ask a question concerning the Annual Review of the University at item
4 below, signed in each case by at least two members of Congregation,
must be given to the Registrar by noon on Monday, 24
April
(see the Guide to Procedures in Congregation cited in
the note at the end of `University Agenda').


3 Voting on Special Resolutions approving
the conferment of Honorary Degrees

(1) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Civil Law,
honoris causa, upon HIS EXCELLENCY KOFI ATTA ANNAN (BA
Macalester College; M.SC. Massachusetts Institute of Technology),
Secretary-General of the United Nations, be approved.

¶ Mr Annan was appointed Secretary-General of the United
Nations on 1 January 1997. In that capacity, he has performed a
variety of difficult tasks with great diplomatic skill and
distinction, and he is widely admired for his personal qualities as
well as for his untiring work for international peace.

If the special resolution is approved, the honorary degree will be
conferred at a ceremony on a date to be announced.


(2) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Letters,
honoris causa, upon EDWARD WILLIAM BARRY (BA Connecticut),
retiring President of Oxford University Press (USA), be approved.

¶ Mr Barry retires on 31 March 2000 from the Presidency of
OUP (USA), a post which he has held for the past eighteen years.
During that period he has transformed the Press's American publishing
from a relatively modest operation to a major scholarly
enterprise.

If the special resolution is approved, the honorary degree will be
conferred at the degree ceremony on 17 June 2000.



4 Presentation of the Annual Review of the
University

The Annual Review of the University for 1998–9 (Supplement* No.
1 to Gazette Vol. 130, February 2000) will be presented
and may be discussed.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 23 March 2000: Notices<br />

Notices


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or
recurrent entry.]

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CONFERMENT OF THE TITLE OF VISITING PROFESSOR

On the recommendation of the Social Studies Board, the General Board has
conferred the title of Visiting Professor in Economics on J.F.J. TOYE (MA
Cambridge, M.SC., PH.D. London), currently Director of the Globalisation and
Development Strategies Division, UN Conference on Trade and Development,
Geneva, for a period of three years from 1 April 2000.

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DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY

On the recommendation of the Biological Sciences Board, the General Board has
assigned the Department of Biochemistry to R.A. DWEK, MA, D.PHIL., D.SC.,
Fellow of Exeter College, and Professor of Glycobiology, for a period of five
years from 1 October 2000.

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ANDREW LEVENS TRAVEL BURSARY 2000

The Bursary has been awarded to EDWARD JOSEPH TYERMAN, New College.

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BRISTOL-MYERS SQUIBB PRIZE IN CARDIOLOGY 1999

The Prize has been awarded to FERDIA A. GALLAGHER, New College.

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COMPOSITION OF ELECTORAL BOARDS

The composition of the electoral boards to the posts below, proceedings to fill
which are currently in progress, is as follows:


                                                    Appointed by

E.P. Abraham Professorship of Cell Biology

The President of St John's (Chairman)               Mr Vice-Chancellor [1]
Professor C. Marshall                               Council 
Professor C. Graham                                 General Board 
Dr F. Watt                                          General Board 
Professor K.C. Gatter                               Clinical Medicine Board
Professor H. Waldmann                               Physiological Sciences
                                                      Board
Professor S. Gordon                                 Physiological Sciences
                                                     Board
Professor G. Brownlee                               Lincoln College 
Dr D. Vaux                                          Lincoln College 



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Professorship of Experimental Physics The President of St John's (Chairman) Mr Vice-Chancellor [1] The Principal of St Hugh's ex officio Professor C.E. Webb Council Professor D. Kleppner, MIT General Board Professor W. Sibbett, St Andrews General Board Professor R.A. Cowley Physical Sciences Board Professor C. Jordan Physical Sciences Board Dr J.S. Wark Physical Sciences Board Professor Sir Keith O'Nions St Hugh's College

[1] Appointed by Mr Vice-Chancellor under the provisions of Tit. IX, Sect. III,
cl. 2 (Statutes, 1997, p. 67).

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ORATION BY THE SENIOR PROCTOR

The following Oration was delivered in Congregation on 15 March by R.H.A.
JENKYNS, MA, M.LITT., Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall, on demitting office as
Senior Proctor.

SENIOR PROCTOR: Insignissime Vice-Cancellarie, maiores nostri
imperaverunt ut procuratores orationem suam dicerent Latine; et haec lex,
diutius in oblivionem lapsa, forsitan in usum reducenda esse videatur.
Quapropter—sed murmur opicorum ad aures meas pervenit. Licetne Anglice
loqui?

VICE-CHANCELLOR: Licet.

This is the moment at which, like released hostages dragged before the
world's media, the Proctors emerge blinking into the sunlight after a year
chained to the same desk to give some account of themselves, swearing eternal
friendship but feeling, just possibly, that they can manage the next fortnight
without each other's daily company. My few words of Latin provide me with
a peg on which to hang the trivial curiosity that for the second year running
one of the triumvirate of Proctors and Assessor has come from the Sub-faculty
of Classical Languages and Literature and another from the Department of
Engineering Science (to which I add the equally trivial note that this year
both Oxford and Cambridge have had a Proctor married to a clergywoman).
Sometimes the Proctors come from similar backgrounds: a few years back the
pair of them went on to write a book together. That is unlikely to happen this
time, unless there is a demand for Ancient Greek for Engineers.
The Proctors and Assessor are expected to learn about the University as a
whole, and the chance that each of us comes from a quite different part of it
has been happily educative.

The Assessor is the first psychiatrist to have held his office. This has been
serendipitously useful in a position which carries especial responsibility for
welfare; and the Proctors, given some of the letters they get, have had reason
to think at times that the Assessor should be a psychiatrist always. The
current Assessor is also the first to have been installed in the magnificent
purple that you see today. So splendid is his raiment that the Proctors have
become quite used to hearing people enquiring in a whisper who those men
are with the Assessor. The Assessor himself reports that when he wears his
gown people come up to stroke him, but my own belief is that they do that
anyway.

As a trio, we can claim an unenviable distinction. As the years pass, you must
have noticed that Proctors start to look older. It is no illusion. This team has
collectively been the oldest ever: none of us would have been eligible before
the recent raising of the age limit, and one of us needed a notwithstanding
decree even so. For the first time all three of the triumvirate are eligible to
celebrate the end of their term by going on a Saga holiday together.

Glad though we have been to hold our offices, one may still feel that there is
some loss here. Everyone understands the pressures that lead younger dons
to be unwilling to involve themselves in administration. Equally, one can
appreciate why Heads of Divisions and executive Pro-Vice-Chancellors need to
be people of long experience; they are excellent appointments every one. But
the fact remains that the new Council of the University seems set to have
only one member under the age of fifty, except insofar as the Proctors and
Assessor provide some leavening. Heads of college too have got older, which
is odd in an era when they have become more likely to leave before their
retiring age. When I came up as an undergraduate there was still a college
head who had been elected in his thirties, and there used to be a few in their
forties, but a college head under fifty-five is now a rarity. We need the newer
voices as well as the elder statesmen; so I hope that future Proctors will not
too often be like us.

Not everything is getting older. In the last century University College
celebrated the thousandth anniversary of its foundation by King Alfred (when
the Master of Balliol is alleged to have sent the Master of Univ a box of
cakes, rather charred). But last year Univ wouldn't admit to more than 750;
and now that the scaffolding is down from its High Street frontage it can be
observed that the once grey stones of this Zsa Zsa Gabor among colleges have
become quite blonde. The college generously asked us to join them for the
visit by Her Majesty the Queen. The worthies gathered outside St Mary's to
greet her displayed enough variety of dress to keep an ethnographer happy
for months: university officials in gowns and mortar-boards, the clergy in
their surplices, City dignitaries in fur and chains, the Lord Lieutenant in
military uniform, the High Sheriff in his Little Lord Fauntleroy velvet and
breeches, and a Superintendent of Police in crash helmet and fluorescent
yellow jacket. The college's festivities, splendid and yet friendly, did it high
honour.

Many colleges have offered us hospitality, and we thank them warmly. The
President and Fellows of Magdalen invited us to the top of their tower on May
Morning. Though this fulfilled a long-standing ambition of mine, I confess that
I had been expecting to be shivering in a light drizzle. But the day was
exquisite, and the sight of the mists drifting among the trees and a big red
sun rising over Headington Hill remains a magical memory. The music too was
enchanting. Nor was this the last splendour of the morning, for the Fellows
had invited us, with members of the two police forces, to breakfast in the
common room. The sight of a policeman who has been up since three in the
morning putting himself outside a full English breakfast is, as they say across
the Atlantic, awesome.

Readers of Don Marquis may remember the story of the worm which had a low
view of robins, until he was eaten by one; then, as he was assimilated into the
bird's interior he began to feel like a robin, and see the point of robins for
the first time. In the past I may have thought, very occasionally, that the
Proctors themselves believed in their importance, but I had not supposed that
this view was shared by anyone else; however, I too, as I was ingested by
Wellington Square and began to feel the enzymes acting on my outer surfaces,
started to think that yes, these Proctors are quite something after all. What
I do believe is that the Proctorship is a valuable institution, and that we have
the balance of powers and constraints about right. Last summer we had
support for this view from a most satisfactory source, when one of
Cambridge's recent Proctors spent a few days visiting our office and admiring
our arrangements.

He was rightly impressed by the quality of our support. Indeed, we could not
have done our job without the help of many people. We have thanked them
elsewhere and in other ways; even so, we must express our great gratitude
once more to Dr Brian Gasser, Clerk to the Proctors, and Mrs Mason, the
Assistant Clerk. We should also mark the departure of the Marshal, Mr
Roberts, to a new job, and thank him for his years of dedicated and energetic
service. The Proctors are hired, in part, to see the seamy side of life, but a
charm of the job has been the sheer niceness of our colleagues—the staff
of the Proctors' Office, the bulldogs, the bedels, and the various officers in
the administration with whom we have worked. We have been impressed by the
dedication of our senior officers, though concerned at the very long hours
which too many of them put in. As an academic, I start with the prejudice
that bureaucracy should be minimised, and so I hope to be believed when I
say that the administration is not overstaffed; indeed, parts of it are clearly
under-resourced. Moreover, the Proctors at present have more immediate
support than the Vice-Chancellor, and it is good that something is being done
about that. Let me add that we have much appreciated the time that he has
given to us, and enjoyed our weekly meetings.

Many people have asked me over the past year what the Proctors do. I had
supposed that at least our disciplinary functions were well known, and so was
surprised by the young man who, on being told that I was the Senior Proctor,
asked if the Junior Proctor was an undergraduate. But it is appropriate for
the Proctors to be obscure functionaries: deans of colleges soon learn that
they are often doing their job best when their colleagues are unaware that
they are doing anything at all, and similarly, some of the matters which have
given us most satisfaction remain entirely private. The Proctors' role as
ombudsmen is as important as their disciplinary duties, and usually takes a
larger part of their time. On the disciplinary side, as also in handling
complaints, the Proctors have the advantage of the time and space for
thorough investigation. Last summer the press reported that two leading
universities had got into difficulties through examiners penalising candidates
on the grounds of collusion. It was some comfort to reflect that this particular
awkwardness could not have arisen here, where examiners refer such
suspicions to the Proctors.

It is sometimes noted as an oddity that the Proctors act as both prosecutors
and judges. Curious though it may seem, this actually has an inhibiting effect:
if you are to judge a case, you have to be pretty measured in how you quiz
the accused. It is a further safeguard that every student charged with a
major offence has the right to have the case heard by the Disciplinary Court
instead of the Proctors, and that there is an automatic right of appeal to the
Disciplinary Court for anyone whom the Proctors find guilty of such an
offence. In this last year not a single defendant opted for the Disciplinary
Court, and only one appealed to it. In fact, the system is one that can really
only work by consent, and it seems to be generally accepted as modest, quick,
and fair.

The Junior Proctor and I were interviewed by Isis; the subsequent
article described us as `friendly and mild-mannered men', which we thought
could do us a lot of damage. So we were cheered to read an item in The
Times
Diary a few weeks later, well up to that column's usual standards
of inaccuracy, describing some wretched malefactor being `dragged before the
Proctors'. That, we felt, was more like it. We are following our predecessors
in donating the money raised in fines to the Bodleian's recording service for
the blind, but we have to report that the takings are sharply down. A
breakdown of all offences will be appended to the printed version of this
oration.

We tried to police the Schools in the summer with a light touch (to borrow a
phrase which we have heard somewhere else), and it is good to report that
the number of fines for misbehaviour has dropped considerably. For particular
reasons there was more traffic in Merton Street than usual this year, and the
University Police did very well to maintain safety, good order, and good
humour. The celebrations which became a serious embarrassment to the
University some years ago now seem mostly harmless, and even charming.
Friends come down to the Schools with their flowers, bottles, and balloons,
and most of them behave well.

I cannot claim that there was no over-exuberance. It will be recalled that
Bertie Wooster (a Magdalen man) thought that no boat race night was complete
until he had relieved a rozzer of his helmet. We, for our part, would dearly
like to know what has become of that bowler hat; if it is returned to the
Proctors' Office, no questions will be asked. The offenders who were booked
and summonsed paid their debt to society with a good grace. One finalist
remarked to us that appearing before the Proctors was one more Oxford
experience, and we advised her to tell the tale to her grandchildren. Another
explained that he could not have been spraying champagne, as it was a very
expensive champagne, and he would not have wished to lose a drop. His
college was—but no, I leave you to guess.

I have to admit to taking on the Proctorship without knowing what all the
duties were. One is to protect the person of the Chancellor when he is in
Oxford; this obligation does not extend to the Vice-Chancellor. I have sung the
Latin litany, a duty now regulated by decree but formerly laid upon the
Proctors by Statute I. The Senior Proctor is Chairman of the Radcliffe Square
Committee, and in that capacity I was asked to permit a camel in the square.
I thought I had spotted the obvious typo: of course, the word should be
`camera'. But no, Cleo the camel was to walk from Oxford to Cambridge for
charity, and she took her photocall on the day before Encaenia, strict
instructions having been given that she should leave no memory of her
presence. A fetching photograph later appeared of Cleo meeting the Vice-
Chancellor. A cat may look at a king; and a camel may look at a Vice-
Chancellor in a way that no one else would dare. Cameras did appear later in
the year when the Square saw the erection of a guillotine, complete with
headman and tricoteuses. This was nothing to do with the
Proctors' disciplinary function; enquiries should be addressed to the Bursar
of Brasenose.

I had not realised either that the University Police are a true police force
constituted by Act of Parliament, and a few years older than the Metropolitan
Police. It has been odd to appear, in the minds of a few students, as Baron
Scarpia; patrolling outside the Schools it has felt more like Dixon of Dock
Green. But since a few students claim that the existence of the University
Police is a source of grievance, we want to say, with emphasis, that on the
contrary, it is a lucky privilege. It is fortunate for some minor miscreants
that they can be shielded from the full brunt of the civil power; and it is
useful for the Thames Valley Police that opportunities for friction between
them and the student body are minimised. Our police had a particularly trying
time during the occupation of Oxenford House, borne with admirable patience.

This was an unwelcome episode. It should be said, though, that 99 per cent
of our students had nothing to do with it. We have also demonstrated that the
University will be resolute in dealing with such things: once it became clear
that the protesters would not leave quickly, we got a court order and the
bailiffs escorted them out. Since then, we have devised a means by which
future occupiers can be swiftly and condignly punished, but though we had
it ready to use on a couple of occasions, the campaign fizzled out. It remains
a mystery why people who say that they want the University's support
against the government should seek to damage it. The non-payment of tuition
fees is not a disciplinary offence, and so has not fallen under the Proctors'
jurisdiction, but it is satisfactory to note that this year, as last, the
University has achieved 100 per cent compliance. From now on non-
payment—that is to say, delayed payment—will be for exhibitionists
only.

Student protest has had its lighter side. During the Prime Minister's Romanes
Lecture, a handful of the audience removed their jumpers to reveal teeshirts
bearing an obscene slogan; but with a nice sense of the proprieties they put
their gowns back on, obscuring half their message, so that their chests now
read CU EE. I leave this fragmentary inscription for future epigraphers to
puzzle over.

I was also charmed to find that one of our present enragés
used the e-mail name spiritof68. I am reminded of finding in the Children's
Bookshop a series called How They Lived Then: cA Roman Soldier\,
A Medieval Peasant, An Aztec Warrior, and A
Teenager in the Sixties
. `So,' I told myself, `— you're history.' As
a member of that heroic generation, I am bound to feel that the agitators of
today need advice on tactics. Here is some for free. Don't choose an obscene
slogan—that is not the way to get Middle England on your side. Don't
attack your natural allies. Don't hang out a banner saying `Blair could you
afford to study here today?', since the answer is obviously yes. Do use the
power of language: remember how the community charge was damned by the
label `poll tax', and call the tuition fee a study tax. Don't ask the University
to give up £7 million or more a year, because however feeble it may be,
it cannot comply. Instead, give your adversary a chance to allow you one or
two small victories to keep the momentum going: demand student
representation on the committee administering the Prendergast Bequest; insist
that tea is served at Council. And if you occupy a building, don't pinch
things.

The Assessor has reviewed the University and colleges' very extensive
provisions for health, welfare, and financial aid, and his report should form
a basis for further co-ordination and development. Together the three of us
have substantially revised the contents and appearance of PAM,
the Proctors' and Assessor's Memorandum. PAM had
grown flabby over the years and needed to slim. We have pruned and
clarified, cutting out confusions and repetitions; we have also renamed the
book Essential Information for Students, and produced it in a more
compact format with a smart laminated cover; `Please keep this book' its cover
pleads, and we hope that it does now look worth keeping. It is much
improved, though more could still be done.

One pleasure of a Proctor's life is the experience it affords of the immense
and diverse vitality of this place. I cannot describe and celebrate all the
corners into which we have put our noses, but something might be said of the
museums, parks, and gardens, which have given us especial enjoyment. We
have added the word `perlustrate' to our vocabulary. We perlustrated the
magnificent new Eastern print room in the Ashmolean; and our perlustration
of the Botanical Gardens on a fine afternoon in June must be reckoned the
least exacting of all the year's duties. The museums are loud with activity.
The Pitt Rivers Museum's main building will reopen in a few days' time. The
Museum of the History of Science, for the past year Oxford's most exciting
hole, will reopen rather later. The University Museum of Natural History has
had great success with school visits and in attracting new sources of funds.
We were taken behind the scenes and shown the Hope Collection of
Entomology, where the main problem (we were told) was to prevent any insects
getting in; we also saw an office adorned with two enormous Pre-Raphaelitish
wall paintings by the Revd Richard St John Tyrwhitt, Vicar of St Mary's and
author of the uplifting novel Hugh Heron, Christ Church, a work
designed to counteract the deleterious influence of Mr Pater of Brasenose.

The Ashmolean has been full of life. The display of Dutch genre paintings from
the Mauritshuis was the most spectacular loan exhibition here that I can
remember. The Gino Severini exhibition, lately ended, was also exceptionally
interesting. The Chinese paintings gallery is under construction, and there are
rumours of yet greater things. And since it is so hard to publicise things in
this complex place, let me put in an advertisement for the evening opening of
the museum one day a week in Trinity Term, a happy experiment which is to
be repeated this summer.

We have a special affection for the Botanical Gardens. The enthusiasm and the
joie de vivre of the Horti Praefectus and his deputy the
Procuratrix (one of us) have enchanted us; both the gardens themselves and
the educational programme (the main problem of which is its excessive
popularity) have seemed to us a model of how to make a real contribution both
to the university and the community around us on a very modest budget.

We have watched the University getting a great deal of publicity, not all of
it favourable. There was much fuss when a particularly ill-designed league
table put Oxford in third place. Some of the factors on which we were marked
down are ones on which we might take positive pride: the provision of
facilities through colleges, the large proportion of undergraduate teaching
undertaken by established and sometimes very distinguished academics, our
refusal to bump up the numbers of Firsts. The whole thing was a bit of a
joke, really; but you have to see the serious side. Against all probability,
people do sometimes believe what they read in the papers, and a constant
drizzle of carping comment could be damaging.

But on the whole I take a bullish view of all this nonsense, for a reason
brought home to me in the summer. The Senior Proctor's oration would
presumably be incomplete if it did not include an essay on what he did in the
holidays; so let me reveal that I went walking in Colorado, where the highest
mountains are mostly named, with striking lack of romance, after top
universities. There are Mount Harvard, Mount Yale, Mount Columbia, Mount
Princeton, and—a gracious gesture—Mount Oxford. Mount Oxford is not
quite as lofty as the others. Still, one is pleased to have been included.
Perhaps one is no less gratified to see who has been left out. The moral, I
suggest, is that we have, in vulgar terms, the best brand name of all. It is
not news that we top the table for research income, because it is expected of
us; it is not news that another university comes third. It is a nuisance that
we need to devote more thought and resources to publicising ourselves, but
we should not lack confidence in the product. But I add one reflection: we
think a great deal about the competition from the United States, and sometimes
we may even overestimate the power and magnetism of American universities,
but we do much less thinking about Europe: we believe that we are way ahead
of Continental universities, at least in the education of students, and there
seems to be an assumption around that this will always be the case. That
might be unwise.

This has been a fascinating time at which to be a Proctor, thanks in part to
the coincidence of governance reform with the change in the relation between
colleges and central University caused by the disappearance of the
undergraduate college fee. Tennyson had the words for it: `All ages are ages
of transition,' he said; `but this is an awful moment of transition.' Our
successors will see the new system in; our year has been dominated by
preparations for the change. So—a valediction to the Hebdomadal Council.
Those who think of it as the Abdominal Council may not be entirely wrong: its
style has perhaps been not so much strategic as digestive. Soon its augustly
senatorial, post-prandial ruminations will be no more. The new Council will
surely be less of a senate and more of a cabinet, stocked with Secretaries of
State from the big spending ministries.

Custom does not provide for the Chairman of the General Board to deliver an
oration—in this year, a funeral oration—so perhaps I should say a few
words at these obsequies too. I believe that the General Board has served the
University well: it has brought together dons from diverse disciplines to
arbitrate the claims of the various faculties—if I may judge from brief
experience—fairly and without partisanship. I have greatly admired the
command of complex business shown first by Dr Black and then by Dr Walker,
who nobly took up the office for a last, transitional year—the Kerensky
of our revolution, but a Kerensky who has turned into a commissar.

Becoming a Proctor in mid-year is like entering the cinema twenty minutes
before the end of the film: it is hard to pick up the plot. Nor is it always
easy to grasp the committee process by which business is digested by being
passed like the cud from one stomach to another (I am not sure why these
metaphors keep recurring—perhaps it says something about the Proctorial
lifestyle). The University has been busy abolishing old committees and
inventing new ones. I am not totally convinced that the Divisions will be as
streamlined as is intended. I hope that there will be enough scope for
executive decision on lesser matters; perhaps the divisional boards and their
committees might start by planning how to meet less often.

For me at least it has been hard, under our old system, to identify
opportunity cost. The divisions will be able to see with greater clarity that
if they spend their money on one thing, they cannot spend it on another. One
reason for pleasure in seeing the Press's profits rising again is the
opportunities that it gives us. The £60 million transfer from reserves is
a unique event, but vital in underwriting our future; and the enhanced
revenue transfers guaranteed for the next three years make new initiatives
possible. The very idea of merit payments is unwelcome to some, but whatever
one's views on their intrinsic desirability, they have now become a necessity.
The retention policy adopted by the University of Bologna in the Middle Ages
was to threaten any professor over fifty who accepted a job elsewhere with
death. It didn't work even then, and anyway the scheme wouldn't get past
HEFCE. For the sake of recruitment and retention we have to introduce merit
payments if we are to remain among the world's best universities. And another
thing: we shall need to accept, almost all of us, that other people will be paid
more than ourselves. There, maybe, is the rub.

The use of Press revenues to support overseas graduates is more obviously
appealing. The last year has taught me how much the provision for graduate
students has improved in recent years, but also how much more will have to
be done. Colleges, faculties, and administration will all need to work on this.
The allocation of applicants to colleges, for instance, needs to be speeded up;
there may be some tough choices required here.

These problems can be solved. I leave office with the strong conviction that
except on the shortest term the interests of the University and the colleges
are the same. This may seem a statement of the glaringly obvious; if so, well
and good. Perhaps it may seem a little less banal if put like this: in
negotiations between the colleges and the central university, the aim should
be to identify where the common interest lies. Here the omens appear good.
Fund-raising by colleges and University seems set to go forward in a spirit
of harmony. This should not be a difficult matter: all that we really need is
trust and the open exchange of information. The General Board's proposals to
colleges may provoke much disagreement at least over detail, but what no one
can deny is that there has been more movement in the last few months than
in as many years before; and there appears to be a widespread recognition
that in broad terms the Board's initiative is in everybody's interest. As a
former Senior Tutor, I certainly welcome the establishment of the relationship
between colleges and faculties and between colleges and the University on a
clearer, firmer basis.

A less encouraging experience has been to see the full extent to which
decisions are influenced by the need to look good in the eyes of outside
bodies. It is right that we should be accountable; but the inadequacies of the
present arrangements are too familiar to need rehearsal. It is hard to be
sanguine, but there have been a few signs that regulatory bodies may yield
to firm and reasoned argument. We need to form alliances, for this and many
other reasons. The most effective alliance, I suspect, would be a very small
one—perhaps just two or three of the London colleges, Cambridge, and
ourselves.

One thing which we have not done much is to attend Congregation; this event
has been recorded regularly in our diaries, and as regularly been cancelled.
The debate on governance was a big event: only about 96 per cent of
Congregation stayed away. On the one other occasion when a Congregation had
to be held, for procedural reasons, no one came, except for extras brought in
from the University Offices. But this does not mean that Congregation is
insignificant. Like the Roman republic, we boast a mixed constitution. It used
to be presumed that the democratic element in the Roman constitution was a
sham, but our Camden Professor has cogently argued that it did really matter
that Roman magistrates had to seek popular election (though one might also
bear in mind the dark saying of an earlier Camden Professor, that behind the
façade of every constitution there lurks an oligarchy). In comparable
terms, it is important that Congregation exists. The debate did take place and
was reported in the Gazette; and the postal vote is a
very potent instrument. The University will need to adapt continuously in the
years to come, and it will not be able to do so unless the public opinion of
the academic body as a whole supports these changes. In a significant sense,
it really is up to us all.

The Proctorship is one of rather few jobs to which one's successor is
appointed before one takes up office. The life of a Proctor is as the life of a
mayfly, and our evening is now drawing on. What happens to Proctors after
their demise? A glance at the membership of the new Council, as of the list
of past Chairmen of the General Board, confirms that past Junior
Proctors are the hard men who rule our world. They may enter office quiet
and amiable, but after a term of final honour schools they are as blades of
tempered steel. I had supposed, for my own part, that once my year was up,
I should be a free man, but I am now more conscious of the risk of being
called back to chair the Paperclips Subcommittee of the Working Party on
Stationery Resource Allocation. The ghosts of Proctors past haunt the
corridors of Wellington Square; and once a year, around the middle of March,
more of these spirits emerge from their collegiate obscurities to inhabit for an
hour the crepuscular spaces of the Convocation House. In a few moments we
too shall be among them. Like all Proctors, we hand on to our successors a
few pieces of unfinished business; we wish them well, as we wash our own
hands of the cares and charms of office. That may be a fitting metaphor with
which to end; for the Latin for `proctor' is `procurator', and had I continued
this oration in the learned language with which I began, I should the more
easily have been able to observe that the most famous person to bear our
title, the most egregious procurator of them all, was Pontius Pilate.


Proctorial year 1999--2000

Summary of Offences (totals for 1998--9 given in brackets)

Breach of Examination Regulations (Using unfair means) 5 (5)

1 To fail in 1999 finals. May re-enter in 2000, for `pass' degree only, provided
college agrees to put forward. To be examined on 1999--2000 syllabus. May not
carry marks forward from 1999.

1 Examiners to disregard essay in Part 1 of examination, and
in that section
award a mark which is average of remaining 2 essays submitted for
assessment. Examiners also to reduce eventual degree classification by 1 class
when Part 2 of examination taken.

1 Examiners to disregard plagiarised essay and award mark
which is average
of mark for 2 remaining essays. Assuming requirements of Part 1 of
examination have been fulfilled, may proceed to Part 2. Examiners also to
reduce by 1 class eventual degree classification, if successful in Part 2.*

1 Examiners to award no marks for all practical work
submitted during MT
1999, but award marks for HT and TT 2000 work in usual way, so enabling
maximum of 40 marks for practical instead of 60.

1 To fail in graduate taught-course examination and expelled
from membership
of the University.


Breach of Rules Committee Regulations (Conduct after examinations) 47 (65)

1 fine @ £40

39 fines @ £35

4 fines @ £50 (+ in 1 case `damages' of £10)

3 not guilty


Breach of University Regulations (obstruction) 4 (18)

1 fine @ £60

1 fine @ £40

2 Charge withdrawn


Breach of University Regulations (Computer misuse) 6 (12)

1 fine @ £100

1 reprimand and warning re future conduct

4 fines @ £50


Breach of University Statutes (Misuse removal of library books) 3 (0)

1 fine @ £60

1 fine @ £40 (+ `damages' of £16)

1 fine @ £10 (+ `damages' of £10)


Breach of University Statutes (Harassment) 1 (6)

1 fine @ £100


Breach of University Statutes (engaging in violent behaviour) 1 (0)

1 fine @ £50


Breach of University Statutes (disorderly/offensive behaviour) 4 (0)

3 fines @ £65

1 fine @ £500


Breach of University Statutes (Occupation) 0 (1)


Breach of University Statutes (misrepresentation/disruption of

administration) 0 (2)

Other 0 (2)

Total Number of Offences: 71 (111)

*Verdict overturned on appeal to the University Disciplinary Court, September
1999.

Arising from an offence of Breach of Examination Regulations dealt with in the
Proctorial Year 1998--9, a member of the University was deprived of the
degree of M.Phil. by Congregation in Trinity Term 1999.



QUEEN'S COLLEGE


Organ Recitals

Recitals in the series `Bach at Queen's 2000' will be given on the following
days in the chapel, Queen's College. A series brochure is available, price
£2.50 (telephone: Oxford (2)79173).

Recitals marked with an asterisk
will be given at 8 p.m. (admission £5, concessions £3). Other recitals
take place at 1.10 p.m. (admission free, but a retiring collection is taken).

Wed. 10 May: RUPERT GOUGH.

*Thur. 11 May: JAMES O'DONNELL.

Wed. 17 May: ANN ELISE SMOOT.

Wed. 24 May: DAVID DUNNETT.

*Thur. 25 May: JOHN BUTT.

Wed. 31 May: TIMOTHY BYRAM-WIGFIELD.

*Wed. 7 June: MARTIN SCHELLENBERG.

*Thur. 8 June: HANS FAGIUS.

Wed. 14 June: CLIVE DRISKILL-SMITH.

Wed. 21 June: ANDREW REID.

*Thur. 22 June: DAVID SANGER (Clavierübung Part III).

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BODLEIAN LIBRARY


Closure of the Upper Reading Room, Long Vacation
2000

The Upper Reading Room of the Old Bodleian Library will be closed for the
whole of the Long Vacation, from Saturday, 24 June, to Sunday, 8 October
inclusive. The closure is required to carry out essential building works as
part of the Bodleian Old Library Development project, and will result in the
full renovation and modernisation of the facilities in the Upper Reading
Room.

The Lower Reading Room, Duke Humfrey's Library, the Radcliffe Camera, and
New Bodleian Library reading rooms will be open. However, there will be noise
and disruption associated with the building work in the Old Library, and it
is anticipated that all reading rooms will experience increased pressure on
seats and services. Normal access to the Old Library building may also be
affected.

Alternative arrangements for consulting the English and History open shelf
material from the Upper Reading Room are likely to be as follows.

The open shelf collections will be removed from the Upper Reading Room and
the vast majority of material will be housed for the duration of the closure
on G Floor of the New Bodleian Library Bookstack. Once there, all of this
material will be available to readers through the book ordering system or,
when appropriate, by obtaining stack access to G Floor. However, none of this
material will be available during the book moves at the beginning and end of
the closure: this is likely to be for a period of two weeks in both cases.

In order that a small number of heavily used items should remain on open
access during the Summer closure, temporary shelving will be erected in the
public corridor near the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (PPE) Reading
Room and adjacent to the Map Reading Room in the New Library. The available
shelf space will be about 80 metres.

The area known as the gallery (annexe) of the PPE Reading Room will be
rearranged to accommodate a book reserve and seating for readers from the
Upper Reading Room. This area will be known as `Upper Reserve in PPE'. A
full book delivery service will operate to the reserve.

More information about the closure of the Upper Reading Room may be
obtained from the Reader Services Department, Bodleian Library, Broad Street,
Oxford OX1 3BG (telephone: Oxford (2)77161 e-mail:
reader.services@bodley.ox.ac.uk, Internet: http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk).



Closure of the Lower Reading Room, Long Vacation
2001

The Lower Reading Room of the Old Bodleian Library will be closed in turn for
the whole of the Long Vacation 2001. Details about alternative arrangements
for readers will be posted nearer the time. Further information may be
obtained from the Reader Services Department (details above).

University staff, Bodleian readers, and other visitors are asked to bear these
closures in mind when planning their use of the Library and its collections.
The library regrets the inconvenience caused by this essential work.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 23 March 2000: Lectures<br />

Lectures


Contents of this section:

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INAUGURAL LECTURES


Action Research Professor of Clinical
Neurology

PROFESSOR G.C. EBERS will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on
Tuesday, 9 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Multiple sclerosis—a complex trait
paradigm.'

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Harold Vyvyan Harmsworth Professor of
American History

PROFESSOR R.W. WINKS will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on
Thursday, 18 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `To stimulate to some action: the Harmsworth
Professorship, 1920–2000.'

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WEIDENFELD VISITING PROFESSOR OF EUROPEAN
COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 1999–2000

Literature and the gods

ROBERTO CALASSO will deliver this series of lectures at 5 p.m. on
Wednesdays and Thursdays of first, second, third, and fourth weeks of
Trinity Term, in the Examination Schools.

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HALLEY LECTURE 2000

PROFESSOR SIR ALAN COOK, FRS, formerly Master of Selwyn College and
Emeritus Professor of Natural Philosophy, Cambridge, will deliver the
Halley Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 16 May. The venue will be
announced later.

Subject: `Edmond Halley and the magnetic field of the
Earth.'

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CHERWELL–SIMON LECTURE 2000

PROFESSOR FRANCIS HALZEN, Director, Institute for Elementary Particle
Physics Research, University of Wisconsin—Madison, will deliver
the Cherwell–Simon Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Friday, 9 June. The
venue will be announced later.

Subject: `Neutrino astronomy: Antarctic dreams.'

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HENSLEY HENSON LECTURES IN THEOLOGY
1999–2000

Sacraments, Ceremonies, and Stuart Divines: sacramental theology
and liturgy in England and Scotland, 1603–62

THE REVD DR BRYAN SPINKS, Professor of Liturgical Studies, Yale
University, will deliver the Hensley Henson Lectures at 5 p.m. on the
following Mondays in the Examination Schools.

1 May: `Lex ritualis, lex credendi? From Hampton Court
to the Five Articles of Perth.'

8 May: `Calvinist consensus and Patristic Reformed
Sacramentalism, and the débâcle of the 1637 Book of
Common Prayer.'

15 May: `Baptismal controversy, the Westminster
Assembly, and the Royal Episcopal Divines.'

22 May: `Keeping the mean and ignoring the theologians?
Sacraments and the 1662 Book of Common Prayer.'

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WILDE LECTURES IN NATURAL AND COMPARATIVE
RELIGION

Evil and superfluity: two arguments against the existence of God

PROFESSOR P. VAN INWAGEN, John Cardinal O'Hara Professor of
Philosophy, University of Notre Dame, Indiana, will deliver the Wilde
Lectures in Natural and Comparative Religion at 5 p.m. on the
following days in the Examination Schools.

Tue. 2 May: `Two arguments for the non-existence of
God.'

Thur. 4 May: `The idea of God.'

Fri. 5 May: `God and science.'

Tue. 9 May: `God and evil.'

Thur. 11 May: `The vast amount of evil.'

Fri. 12 May: `Horrors.'

Tue. 16 May: `Belief and evidence.'

Thur. 18 May: `The presumption of atheism.'

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O'DONNELL LECTURES IN CELTIC STUDIES 2000

DR N. EDWARDS, School of History and Welsh History, University of
Wales, Bangor, will deliver two O'Donnell Lectures on the following
subject, at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 11 May, and Friday, 12 May, in the
Examination Schools.

Subject: `Early medieval stones and stone sculpture in
Wales: context and connections.'

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JAMES P.R. LYELL LECTURES IN BIBLIOGRAPHY

Set in print: the fortunes of an idea,
.1450–1800

DR D. MCKITTERICK, Cambridge, will deliver the Lyell Lectures in
Bibliography at 5 p.m. on the following days in Lecture Theatre 2,
the St Cross Building.

Thur. 4 May: `The printed word and the modern
bibliographer.'

Wed. 10 May: `Dependent skills.'

Thur. 11 May: `A house of errors.'

Wed. 17 May: `Perfect and imperfect.'

Thur. 18 May: `Re-evaluations.'

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CARLYLE CLASSES IN CLASSICAL POLITICAL
THOUGHT

The politics of Plato's Republic

DR M. SCHOFIELD, Cambridge, will give the following lecture and
seminars at 2 p.m. on the days shown in All Souls College. The series
will end with a general discussion session, at 2 p.m. on Monday, 22
May.

Mon. 1 May: `The noble lie.' (Lecture)

Tue. 2 May: `Utopia and the idea of community.'
(Seminar)

Mon. 8 May: `Rule by philosophers: knowledge, virtue,
and power.' (Seminar)

Tue. 9 May: `Economic man: property and human nature.'
(Seminar)

Mon. 15 May: `Plato the feminist?'
(Seminar)

Tue. 16 May: `A city fit for Socrates: the politics of
Quietism.' (Seminar)

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ANTHROPOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY

Oxford Seminars in Cartography

RALPH HYDE, London Guildhall Library, will give a seminar at 5 p.m.
on Thursday, 25 May, in the School of Geography.

Subject: `Parish maps of London, 1686–1900:
recording an overlooked source.'

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CLINICAL MEDICINE

Oxford Clinical Neurosciences Lectures

The following lectures will be given at 11.30 a.m. on Fridays in the
Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

DR A. ZEMAN, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh

12 May: `Consciousness.'

PROFESSOR A.J. THOMPSON, Institute of Neurology

9 June: `Neurorehabilitation in MS: does it
work?'

DR R. KNIGHT, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh

14 July: `Update on CJD.'

DR J. MORROW, Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast

15 Sept.: `Epilepsy, drugs, and pregnancy.'

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Oxford Eye Hospital: Oxford teaching programme

The following lectures will be given on Mondyas. Unless otherwise
indicated, they will take place in the Lecture Theatre, the Oxford
Eye Hospital, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

Convener: A.J. Bron, MA, Clinical Professor and Margaret
Ogilvie's Reader in Ophthalmology.

27 March

DR P. FRITH

2 p.m.: Fluorescein angiogram teaching.

MISS H. WICKS

2.30 p.m.: Orthoptic case presentation.

DR B. MCDONALD

3.45 p.m.: Neuropathology.

3 April

DR P. FRITH

2 p.m.: Fluorescein angiogram teaching.

MR K. IKRAM

2.30 p.m.: Presentation.

MR J. ELSTON

3.45 p.m.: Neuro-ophthalmology.

10 April

DR P. FRITH

2 p.m.: Fluorescein angiogram teaching.

MR J. ELSTON

2.30 p.m., Radiology Department, Radcliffe
Infirmary
: Neuroradiology.

V. MEHTA

3.45 p.m.: Orthoptic Hess Charts.

17 April

DR P. FRITH

2 p.m.: Fluorescein angiogram teaching.

Orthoptics Department, Oxford Eye Hospital

2.30 p.m.: Presentation.

MR R. MALHOTRA

3.45 p.m: Presentation.

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Uterine Contractility Symposium

This symposium will be held from 9.30 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 May, in
the Nuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, the John
Radcliffe Hospital. Further information may be be obtained from Dr
Andrés López Bernal (telephone: Oxford 220982, e-mail:
alb@ermine.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR S. THORNTON, Warwick

10 a.m.: `Oxytocin antagonists for toxolysis:
clinical and scientific considerations.'

PROFESSOR S. WRAY, Liverpool

10.30 a.m.: `Physiological basis of
contractility.'

DR E. LINTON

11.30 a.m.: `CRH and parturition.'

DR N. EUROPE-FINNER, Newcastle

12 noon: `Expression of CREB, CREM, and AFT Cyclic
AMP Transcription Factors in the human myometrium during
pregnancy and labour.'

DR R. TRIBE, St Thomas's Hospital, London

2 p.m.: `Calcium signalling in myometrial
cells.'

DR M. TAGGART, Manchester

2.30 p.m.: `Caves, stores, and asphyxiation:
E–C coupling in the myometrium.'

DR R. KHAN, Nottingham

3 p.m.: `Potassium channels in the human
myometrium.'

PROFESSOR R. IVELL, Hamburg

3.30 p.m.: `Oxytocin receptor gene regulation.'

PROFESSOR B. SANBORN, Texas at Houston

5 p.m.: `Hormones and calcium; mechanisms
controlling uterine contractile activity.' (Litchfield
Lecture
)

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MODERN HISTORY


Special Faculty Lecture

PROFESSOR I. KERSHAW, Sheffield, will deliver the annual Special
Faculty Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 5 May, in the Examination
Schools.

Subject: `Why did Nazi radicalism not subside?'

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PHYSICAL SCIENCES

PROFESSOR HANS FRAUENFELDER, Los Alamos National Laboratory, will
lecture at 2.15 p.m. on the following days in the NAPL Lecture
Theatre.

Mon. 3 Apr.: `The energy landscape and dynamics of
proteins.'

Tue. 4 Apr.: `Myoglobin is an allosteric enzyme.'

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ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM

PROFESSOR A. BLANKERT, Slade Professor, University of Cambridge, will
lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 4 April, in the Lecture Theatre, the
Taylor Institution. Admission is free.

Subject: `Johannes Vermeer as a narrator.'

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CENTRE FOR BRAZILIAN STUDIES


Annual Conference

Brazil 1500–2000: Part I, Government, Economy, Society, and
Politics

The conference will be held on 3–4 April in St Antony's College.
Part II, `Culture and National Identity', will be held in March/April
2001.

Further details, and registration information, may be obtained from
the Centre (telephone: Oxford 554026, fax: 554030).

Monday, 3 April

Session I, Colonial Brazil (10.15 a.m.–12.45 p.m.)

PROFESSOR S. SCHWARTZ, Yale: `Economy.'

PROFESSOR A. WEHLING, IHGB, Rio de Janeiro: `Administration.'

DR J. MONTEIRO, UNICAMP, Campinas: `Indians/frontier.'

DR S. D. CASTRO FARIA, UFF, Niteroi: `Slave economy/society.'


Session II, Nineteenth-/twentieth-century Brazil: state-
building (2–3.30 p.m.)

DR L. SCHWARCZ, USP, Sao Paulo: `Empire.'

PROFESSOR R. LESSA, IUPERJ, Rio de Janeiro: `Republic.'


Session III, Nineteenth-/twentieth-century Brazil: economy
(4–6 p.m.)

PROFESSOR S. TOPIK, California–Irvine: `1830–1930
(coffee).'

PROFESSOR W. SUZIGAN, UNICAMP, Campinas: `1830–1930 (industry).'

PROFESSOR MARCELO DE PAIVA ABREU, PUC, Rio de Janeiro:
`1930–c.1980.'


Tuesday, 4 April

Session IV, Nineteenth-/twentieth-century Brazil: society
(10 a.m.–12.30 p.m.)

PROFESSOR L.F. ALENCASTRO, UNICAMP, Campinas/Paris: `Slave to free
labour/post-abolition race relations.'

PROFESSOR B. FAUSTO, USP, Sao Paulo: `Immigration/ethnicity/labour.'

Speaker to be announced: `Social policy since 1930.'

DR N. DO VALLE SILVA, IUPERJ, Rio de Janeiro: `Social structure and
social change since 1930.'


Session V, Nineteenth-/twentieth-century Brazil:
politics (2–4 p.m.)

PROFESSOR W.G. DOS SANTOS, IUPERJ, Rio de Janeiro: `The liberal
tradition.'

PROFESSOR J. MURILO DE CARVALHO, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro: `The
conservative tradition.'

PROFESSOR L. BETHELL: `The left.'


Session VI, round table on contemporary Brazil: legacies
of the past and future alternatives (4.30–6.30 p.m.)

The following will participate in the discussion: Professor Marcelo
de Paiva Abreu; Professor Boris Fausto; Professor Rogerio Werneck
(PUC, Rio de Janeiro); Professor Jose Murilo de Carvalho; Professor
Wanderley G. dos Santos; and Professor Simon Schwartzmann (IBGE, Rio
de Janeiro).

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STANDING COMMITTEE FOR THE M.ST. IN WOMEN'S
STUDIES


Annual Women's Studies Lecture

PROFESSOR T. LAQUEUR, Berkeley, will deliver the annual Women's
Studies Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 26 May, in the Auditorium, St
John's College.

Subject: `1712 in the history of sexuality and
subjectivity.'

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EXETER COLLEGE


Marett Memorial Lecture

DR P. VITEBSKY, Assistant Director of Research, the Scott Polar
Research Institute, Cambridge, will deliver the Marett Memorial
Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 5 May, in the Saskatchewan Lecture Room,
Exeter College. The subject of the lecture will be announced later.

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KEBLE COLLEGE


Eric Symes Abbott Memorial Lecture

THE REVD CANON DR MARTYN PERCY, Director of the Lincoln Theological
Institute, will deliver the Eric Symes Abbott Memorial Lecture at
5.30 p.m. on Friday, 5 May, in the chapel, Keble College.

Subject: `Knowledge of Angles: how spiritual are the
English?'

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ST EDMUND HALL


Philip Geddes Memorial Lecture

JEREMY PAXMAN will deliver the Philip Geddes Memorial Lecture at 5
p.m. on Friday, 5 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Surviving spin.'

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ST HUGH'S COLLEGE


Henry Rowlatt Bickley Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR ROGER PARKER, Cambridge, will deliver the seventeenth Henry
Rowlatt Bickley Memorial Lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 16 May, in
the Mordan Hall, St Hugh's College.

Subject: `Elisabeth's last act: Verdian history and the
close of cDon Carlos\.'

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Becket Institute

The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
Becket Institute, St Hugh's College.

DR J. ANDERSON

3 May: `National churches in time of change: the
search for recognition in comparative perspective.'

DR A. O'MAHONEY, Heythrop College, University of London

10 May: `The Copts, politics, and
Muslim–Christian relations in modern Egypt.'

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FRIENDS OF THE PITT RIVERS MUSEUM

The following lectures will be given as shown. Visitors are welcome
to attend, but are requested to make a contribution of £2 to the
Friend's Purchasing Fund.

DR I. FINKEL, Assistant Keeper, Department of Western Asiatic
Antiquities, British Museum

Wed. 17 May, Inorganic Chemistry Lecture Theatre, 7
p.m.
: `Tales of the unexpected: board games ancient and
modern.'

J. GILLOW, author and lecturer

Wed. 14 June, Pitt Rivers Research Centre (64 Banbury
Road), 6 p.m.
: `Hill tribes of south-western China.'

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 23 March 2000: Grants and Funding<br />

Grants and Research Funding


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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FACULTY OF MODERN HISTORY AND FACULTY
OF SOCIAL STUDIES


Carlyle Fund

The Committee for the Carlyle Fund offers one research
scholarship in the history of political thought (post-Classical),
broadly defined, tenable from October 2000 for up to four years.
The scholarship will include maintenance at the current level of
British Academy/ESRC awards, all university and college fees at
the Home/EU rate, and a book grant of £400 per annum. The
scholar must be a registered research student of the University
or have applied for admission in October 2000. The scholarship
will be awarded for one year in the first instance; awards for
subsequent years will be subject to annual review by the
committee. The scholar will be required to apply for a British
Academy/ESRC award in the normal way prior to taking up the
scholarship, and (if initially unsuccessful) to reapply in
subsequent years.

Applications should be addressed to Charles Shaw, Secretary to
the Carlyle Committee, University Offices, Wellington Square,
Oxford OX1 2JD, and should include a curriculum
vitae
together with a statement of research interests and
the names and addresses of a supervisor and one other person.
Applications should reach him by 14 April. Candidates should
arrange for their referees to send letters of reference to Mr
Shaw by the same date. Short-listed candidates will be asked to
submit written work by 12 May.

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section





<br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 23 March 2000: Examinations and Boards<br />

Examinations and Boards


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



CHAIRMEN OF EXAMINERS

TRINITY TERM 2000

Preliminary Examinations

Human Sciences: A.J. BOYCE, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of
St John's (address: Institute of Biological Anthropology)

Physical Sciences: M.J.M. LEASK, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow
of St Catherine's (address: Clarendon Laboratory)

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section


Moderations

Physics and Philosophy: G. MYATT, MA, Fellow of
Green College (address: Nuclear and Astrophysics Laboratory)

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section


Honour Moderations

Classics and English: D.C. INNES, MA, D.PHIL.,
Fellow of St Hilda's

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section


Honour Schools

Archaeology and Anthropology: R.H. WARD, MA, Fellow
of Linacre (address: Department of Biological Anthropology)

Economics and Management: K. GRINT, MA, D.PHIL.,
Fellow of Templeton

European and Middle Eastern Languages: A. JONES, MA,
Fellow of Pembroke (address: Institute of Oriental Studies)

Human Sciences: R.H. WARD, MA, Fellow of Linacre
(address: Department of Biological Anthropology)

Mathematics Part II: K.C. HANNABUSS, MA, D.PHIL.,
Fellow of Balliol (address: Mathematical Institute)

Mathematics and Computation: S.A. CAMERON, MA,
Fellow of Keble (address: Computing Laboratory)

Mathematics and Philosophy Part II: K. ERDMANN, MA,
Fellow of Somerville

Natural Science

Biological Sciences: A. GRAFEN, MA, D.PHIL.,
Fellow of St John's

Chemistry Part II: P.W. ATKINS, MA, Fellow of
Lincoln (address: Physical and Theoretical Chemistry)

Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry Part I:
K.G.H. DYKE, MA, Fellow of Wadham (address: Department of
Biochemistry)

Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry Part II:
D.A. HARRIS, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Anne's (address:
Department of Biochemistry)

Physiological Sciences: P.R. COOK, MA, D.PHIL.,
Fellow of Brasenose (address: Sir William School of
Pathology)

Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology: E.T. ROLLS,
MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Corpus Christi (address: Department of
Experimental Psychology)

Theology: S.E. GILLINGHAM, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of
Worcester

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section


Master of Philosophy

Classical Archaeology: J.J. COULTON, MA, Fellow of
Merton (address: Ashmolean Museum)

European Archaeology: B.W. CUNLIFFE, MA, D.PHIL.,
Fellow of Keble (address: Archaeological Institute)

Music: S.L.F. WOLLENBERG, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of
Lady Margaret Hall (address: Music Faculty)

Qualifying Examination in Classical Archaeology:
J.J. COULTON, MA, Fellow of Merton (address: Ashmolean Museum)

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section


Master of Studies

Celtic Studies: T.M.O. CHARLES-EDWARDS, MA, D.PHIL.,
Fellow of Jesus

Classical Archaeology: J.J. COULTON, MA, Fellow of
Merton (address: Ashmolean Museum)

English Local History: K. TILLER, MA, Fellow of
Kellogg

European Archaeology: B.W. CUNLIFFE, MA, D.PHIL.,
Fellow of Keble (address: Archaeological Institute)

Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature: P.J.
PARSONS, MA, Student of Christ Church

Music (Musicology): P.R. FRANKLIN, MA, Fellow of St
Catherine's (address: Music Faculty)

Study of Religion: J.S.K. WARD, B.LITT., MA, Canon
of Christ Church

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section


Diplomas

Legal Studies: J.M. EEKELAAR, BCL, MA, Fellow of
Pembroke

Postgraduate Diploma in European Studies: D.B.
GOLDEY, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Lincoln

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section


Certificate and Bachelor of Theology

M.D. CHAPMAN, MA, D.PHIL., DIP.TH., Tutor of Ripon College,
Cuddesdon

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section


Prize

Violet Vaughan Morgan: J.L. FULLER, B.LITT., MA,
Fellow of Magdalen

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section



STANDING COMMITTEE FOR ENGINEERING,
ECONOMICS, AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED SCHOOLS


Honour School of Engineering, Economics,
and Management Part I 2000

Due to an ambiguity in Examination Decrees and Regulations, 1999,
relating to the need for candidates taking the paper M1
(Introduction to Management) to submit coursework, it has been
decided to remove this need, for candidates taking the paper this
year.

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section



CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations
made by boards of faculties and committees will come into effect on 7 April.


1 Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies

Honour School of Oriental Studies

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 461, delete
l.
19 and substitute:

`1. Unprepared translation from Ottoman and Modern Turkish.

2. Translation into Turkish and essay in Turkish.'

2 Ibid., l. 20, delete `2' and substitute `3'.

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2 Boards of the Faculties of Oriental Studies and
Medieval and Modern Languages

Honour School of European and Middle Eastern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 217, delete
ll.
44–7 and substitute:

`7. Unprepared translation from modern Turkish.

8. Translation into Turkish and essay in Turkish.

9. Turkish history and thought in the nineteenth and
twentieth centuries. The following texts are prescribed for study:

Either Mode A:

M. Cavid Baysun, Tarihö Eserlerden Seìilmis> Eski Metinler
(Istanbul, 1964), pp. 9–18, 36–60, 118–24.

Selected late Ottoman and modern Turkish political documents.*

Selected late Ottoman writings on political and cultural issues.*

Selected modern Turkish writings on political and cultural issues.*

Or Mode B, in which all the texts are presented in Latin script:

Selected late Ottoman and modern Turkish political documents.*

Selected late Ottoman writings on political and cultural issues.*

Selected modern Turkish writings on political and cultural issues.*

The volume of texts set for Mode B will be about 25 per cent greater than
that set for Mode A.

Candidates will be required to translate and/or comment on passages from the
prescribed texts, and to write essays on questions relating either to the texts
themselves and their background, or to more general historical topics.

10. Modern Turkish literary texts

The following texts are prescribed for study:

Either Mode A:

Selected late Ottoman literary texts (post-1860).*

Selected modern Turkish short stories.*

Selected modern Turkish poetry.*

Or Mode B, in which all the texts are presented in Latin script:

Selected late Ottoman literary texts (post-1860).*

Selected modern Turkish short stories.*

Selected modern Turkish poetry.*

The volume of texts set for Mode B will be about 25 per cent greater than
that set for Mode A.

The questions set in the examination will require translation, commentary, and
essays.'

2 Ibid., p. 219, delete ll. 7–19 and substitute:

`5. Unprepared translation from Ottoman and modern Turkish.

6. Translation into Turkish and essay in Turkish.

7. Ottoman history and historical texts, 1300–1700.

The following texts are prescribed for study:

Selected Ottoman documents.*

Naima, Tarih (Istanbul, ah 1281–3), vol. ii, pp. 207–64.

M. Cavid Baysun, Tarihö Eserlerden Seìilmis> Eski Metinler
(Istanbul, 1964), pp. 29–35, 125–29.

Candidates will be required to translate and/or comment on passages from the
prescribed texts, and to write essays on questions relating either to the texts
themselves and their background, or to more general historical topics.

8. Turkish history and thought in the nineteenth and
twentieth centuries.

The following texts are prescribed for study:

M. Cavid Baysun, Tarihö Eserlerden Seìilmis> Eski Metinler
(Istanbul, 1964), pp. 9–18, 36–60, 118–24.

Selected late Ottoman and modern Turkish political documents.*

Selected late Ottoman writings on political and cultural issues.*

Selected modern Turkish writings on political and cultural issues.*

Candidates will be required to translate and/or comment on passages from the
prescribed texts, and to write essays on questions relating either to the texts
themselves and their background, or to more general historical topics.

9. Turkish literary texts: translation and commentary.

Selected Turkish/Ottoman poetry, thirteenth to eighteenth centuries.*

Selected late Ottoman literary texts (post-1860).*

Selected modern Turkish short stories.*

Selected modern Turkish poetry.*

10. Either

(a) Turkish literature: essay questions.

Some of the questions set will relate to the texts prescribed for paper 9, but
others will be of wider scope. Candidates will be expected to demonstrate
knowledge of the general historical development and characteristics of
Ottoman and modern Turkish literature.

or

(b) a special subject, to be approved by the Board of the
Faculty of Oriental Studies.

or

(c) an extended essay, on a topic to be approved by the Board
of the Faculty of Oriental Studies.'

3 Ibid., p. 462, delete ll. 1–16 and substitute:

`4. Ottoman history and historical texts, 1300–1700.

The following texts are prescribed for study:

Selected Ottoman documents.*

Naima, Tarih (Istanbul, ah 1281–3), vol. ii, pp. 207–64.

M. Cavid Baysun, Tarihö Eserlerden Seìilmis> Eski Metinler
(Istanbul, 1964), pp. 29–35, 125–9.

Candidates will be required to translate and/or comment on passages from the
prescribed texts, and to write essays on questions relating either to the texts
themselves and their background, or to more general historical topics.

5. Turkish history and thought in the nineteenth and
twentieth centuries.

The following texts are prescribed for study:

M. Cavid Baysun, Tarihö Eserlerden Seìilmis> Eski Metinler
(Istanbul, 1964), pp. 9–18, 36–60, 118–24.

Selected late Ottoman and modern Turkish political documents.*

Selected late Ottoman writings on political and cultural issues.*

Selected modern Turkish writings on political and cultural issues.*

Candidates will be required to translate and/or comment on passages from the
prescribed texts, and to write essays on questions relating either to the texts
themselves and their background, or to more general historical topics.

6. Turkish literary texts: translation and commentary.

Selected Turkish/Ottoman poetry, thirteenth to eighteenth centuries.*

Selected late Ottoman literary texts (post-1860).*

Selected modern Turkish short stories.*

Selected modern Turkish poetry.*

7. Either

(a) Turkish literature: essay questions.

Some of the questions set will relate to the texts prescribed for paper 6, but
others will be of wider scope. Candidates will be expected to demonstrate
knowledge of the general historical development and characteristics of
Ottoman and modern Turkish literature.

or

(b) a special subject, to be approved by the Board of the
Faculty of Oriental Studies.'

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3 Board of the Faculty of Theology

(a) Bachelor of Theology

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, delete from
l. 39
on p. 538 to l. 17 on p. 545 and substitute:

`Candidates must take at least twelve papers. In Part 1 candidates must
take all four papers. In Part 2 they must take: two papers from section B;
paper C1; and two papers out of D1, D2, and D3. The Supervisory Committee
may dispense a candidate from individual compulsory papers on the basis of
previous academic work, but not from the total number of papers required.
Details of which subjects may be taken by 5,000 or 7,000 word long essays in
place of written examination papers are given in the syllabus in section B
below.

A.2 Examinations

Candidates will be examined at the end of each academic year of their course
of study. Examination will be held in April or May, beginning on the Monday
of the second week of Trinity Term, and in September or October, beginning
on the second Thursday before Michaelmas Full Term.
Every candidate shall send through his or her college an entry form, showing
the subject he or she intends to take in that year, to the Head Clerk,
University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD, by noon on Friday of
the fourth week of Hilary Term for the May examination, and by noon on
Friday of the seventh week of Trinity Term
for the Autumn examination. All entries shall be accompanied by certification
of college approval and by the examination fee prescribed in Ch. VIII, Sect.
i, § 2 (see
Appendix I).

The examiners may examine the candidate viva voce, no candidate who has
passed in a subject may sit that examination again.

A candidate who has failed in more than two subjects in an examination shall
be deemed to have failed in all the subjects offered at that examination. A
candidate may offer at a subsequent examination a subject or subjects in
which he or she has failed. Normally only one resit will be allowed in each
subject, provided that the B.Th. Supervisory Committee shall have power in
exceptional circumstances and on submission of a case by a candidate's college
to approve a second resit.

A.3 Long Essays

Approval for the subjects proposed for 5,000 and 7,000 word long essays must
be obtained from the B.Th. Supervisory Committee. Applications will be
considered by the committee at three times during the year. The deadlines for
submitting titles to these meetings are respectively: not later than noon on
Friday in week four of Michaelmas Term, in week four of Hilary Term, or in
week seven of Trinity Term. Candidates are advised to seek approval for titles
as early as practicable in advance of the examination. Dated certification of
the committee's approval must be retained for submission with the completed
work.

In the case of long essays offered in place of a written examination paper, the
application for approval of
the essay title must show that the topic is such as will demonstrate knowledge
of a theme in the area concerned, and must be submitted with a note from the
college indicating the other work in the area concerned which the candidate
intends to cover. Certification from the college confirming that this other work
has been satisfactorily completed must accompany the long essay when it is
submitted.

Long essays must be the candidate's own work and accompanied by a
statement from him or her to that effect, and must be typed on one side of
the paper. Long essays must include a bibliography and, where appropriate,
footnotes (only the latter being included in the word count). Candidates may
receive tutorial guidance in the preliminary stages of composition, and tutors
may also read or comment on a first draft.

Long essays must be submitted to the Chairman of the Examiners, Bachelor of
Theology, c/o the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG, not later
than noon on the Friday before Trinity Full Term for work submitted as part
of the May examination, and not later than the
second Monday before Michaelmas Full Term for work submitted as part of the
Autumn examination.

The dated certification of the committee's approval of long essay titles, the
certification from the college confirming that the other work in a subject area
has been satisfactorily completed, and the signed statement from the candidate
that the long essays are his/her own work must accompany the long essays
when submitted for examination. These certificates and signed statements must
be submitted, with the long essays, in a sealed envelope addressed to the
Chairman of the Examiners for the Bachelor of Theology, at the above address.
Note. All communications for the Supervisory Committee for the
Degree of Bachelor of Theology should be addressed to the Secretary of the
B.Th. Supervisory Committee, c/o the Theology Faculty Centre, 41 St Giles',
Oxford OX1 3LW.

B. THE SYLLABUS

[+] assessed by three-hour written examination

[++] assessed by long essay of 5,000 words in Part 1 or 7,000 words in Part
2, along with four college-assessed pieces of work. Candidates must submit the
titles of each long essay and the attendant college-assessed work to the
Supervisory Committee for approval. Together these must cover the syllabus
of the paper or of the option(s) selected.

[§] Assessed by other means, as noted in the rubric.

Note that most papers may be examined by more than one means.
Full-time candidates must attempt all Part 1 papers in their first year. They
may attempt Part 2 papers at any examination session following the first
Trinity Term. Part-time candidates must attempt all Part 1 papers in their
first two years. They may attempt Part 2 papers at any examination session
after their first year, provided they have completed Part 1 or are completing
it in the same
session.

Part 1 papers will be assessed at first year level, and will be given reduced
weighting in considering a candidate's degree classification or certificate
award.

Texts used in written examinations for biblical papers will be: Revised
Standard Version; The Greek New Testament (United Bible Societies, 4th edn.
1993); Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (Stuttgart, 1977).

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PART 1

This part addresses fundamental issues of Biblical Study, Christian Thought
and Christian Ministry, laying a foundation for further study.

SECTION A. Foundation Studies

[+] A.1—Old Testament A

Candidates will study the Historical Books (from 1 Samuel to Nehemiah), the
Prophets and the Psalms, including
issues raised in their study and interpretation. They
will also study in detail at least one of the following texts in English: 2
Samuel 1–12, Isaiah 1–12, Psalms 73–89.

[+] A.2—New Testament A

Candidates will study Matthew and 1 Corinthians, addressing such issues as
methodology in New Testament study, the person and ministry of Jesus, the
context and theology of the authors, and ecclesiological issues. They will also
study in detail either Matthew 5–7, 26–8 and 1 Corinthians 11–15
in English, or Matthew 5–7 in Greek, or 1 Corinthians 11–12 in Greek.

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[+] [++] A.3—Christian Life and Thought

Foundation studies in this discipline can take different routes:

Either [+] [++] A.3.A.—Foundations of Christian Thought

Candidates will study some of the foundational issues
involved in the study of Christian theology including faith, revelation,
Scripture, authority, tradition, development, religious language, and the
relationship of Christian theology to other disciplines.

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Or [+] [++] A.3.B—Development of Christian Life and Thought

Candidates will study the development of Christian life and thought in its
cultural and historical context, including issues of authority, spirituality and
ministry within Christian communities; and sources and forms of theological
reflection and conflict. They should demonstrate some awareness of primary
sources (in translation).

Candidates will study the following foundational period:

(a) First to fifth centuries.

They may also study one of the following periods:

(b) Sixth to eleventh centuries;

(c) Eleventh to fourteenth centuries;

(d) Fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.

Candidates must specify the periods studied on their examination entrance
forms; they cannot subsequently be assessed on these periods in Paper C.2.

[+] [++] A.4—Christian Witness and the Contemporary World

Candidates will study the relationship between Christian faith and
contemporary culture, including religious and secular understandings of
society, environment, personhood, and faith. Candidates will be expected to
reflect on the practice of mission and pastoral care.

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PART 2

SECTION B. BIBLICAL STUDIES

[+] [++] B.1—Old Testament B

Candidates will study the Pentateuch, Joshua, Judges, and the Writings (other
than the Psalms), including issues raised in their study and interpretation.
They will also study in detail either two of the following books in English:
Genesis; Job; Daniel; or Genesis 1–4 and 12–15 in Hebrew. Candidates
who wish to be assessed on texts in Hebrew must take this paper by written
exam.

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[+] [++] B.2—New Testament B

Candidates will study at least two of the following books: John, Romans,
Hebrews; and broader issues of New Testament theology, ethics, and
interpretation. They will study in detail texts from John, Romans, Hebrews in
English; and they may study John 1–3, 6, 17, and/or Romans 5–8 in
Greek. They may also study Mark, Luke, Acts, the Pastoral Epistles, and
Revelation. Candidates who wish to be assessed on texts in Greek must take
this paper by written exam.

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[+] [++] B.3—Biblical Interpretation

Candidates will study Part A or Part B or both.

Part A: Candidates will study: central themes in both testaments such as God,
creation, the people of God, redemption, messiah, community, worship, hope;
and the methodological issues of constructing biblical theology.

Part B: Candidates will study the history and practice of biblical
interpretation, including major contemporary trends.

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SECTION C. DOCTRINE AND HISTORY

[+] [++] C.1—Christian Doctrine

Candidates will study the central doctrines of the Christian church, as set out
in the historic creeds and formulae, including critical reflection on traditional
and recent expositions of these doctrines and engagement with contemporary
theological discussion.

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[+] [++] C.2—Church History

Candidates will study the development of Christian life and thought in its
cultural and historical context, including issues of authority, spirituality, and
ministry within Christian communities; and sources and forms of theological
reflection and conflict. They should demonstrate some awareness of primary
sources (in translation).

Candidates must specify one period for assessment by written exam or long
essay, which must not be one on which they were assessed in Paper A.3.B:

(a) First to fifth centuries;

(b) Sixth to eleventh centuries;

(c) Eleventh to fourteenth centuries;

(d) Fifteenth and sixteenth centuries;

(e) Seventeenth and eighteenth centuries;

(f) Nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

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[+] [++] C.3—Ecclesiology

Candidates will study the theology of the church, including ministry and the
sacraments, in its historical development and contemporary practice.

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[+] [++] C.4—Study of Theology

(Candidates who have taken A.3.A may not take this paper.)

Candidates will study some of the major issues involved
in the study of Christian theology, including faith, revelation, reason,
Scripture, authority, tradition, development, religious language, and the
relationship of Christian thought to other disciplines and other religions.

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SECTION D. PRACTICAL THEOLOGY

[++] D.1—Mission and Ministry

Candidates will study and reflect on issues of mission and ministry. College
assessed essays should demonstrate knowledge of contributory disciplines. The
long essay must be based on a supervised placement of at least twenty-one
days in a church or secular setting in which the candidate shares in the
experiences of those involved, and should contain theological reflection on the
situation.

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[§] D.2—Christian Ethics

This paper will be assessed by two written papers:

(a) Ethics and Faith (three hour examination)

Candidates will study the foundations of Christian moral thought and practice;
contemporary moral and social problems; and the relation of Christian moral
life to faith, witness, and worship.

(b) Ethics and Ministry (two hour examination)

Candidates should demonstrate ethical and pastoral competence in analysis of,
reflection on, and response to a particular situation. This will be a situation
relating to sexuality, marriage, and the family, unless the Supervisory
Committee gives notice otherwise.

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[+][++] D.3—Christian Worship

Candidates will study the history and theology of Christian initiation, the
Eucharist, and daily worship; the place of prayer in worship; non-verbal
aspects of liturgy and their cultural factors; relevant insights from the human
sciences; word and sacrament, liturgical symbolism, and the place of preaching;
worship and the Church's mission; other forms of corporate worship.

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[+] [++] D.4—Christian Spirituality

Candidates will study the history and theology of Christian spirituality
including major traditions and figures; and the relationship of spirituality to:
scripture, liturgy, hymnody, doctrine, and current trends.

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SECTION E. OTHER SUBJECTS

[+] [++] E.1—Christian Mission

Candidates will study the following: the biblical and theological foundations of
mission; the relationship of the Church to the missio Dei; factors in the
contemporary world affecting mission, such as industrialisation, urbanisation,
secularism, pluralism, and new forms of imperialism. These subjects may be
focused through the study
of: the history of Christian mission; the distinction
between mission and evangelism; the encounter with other faiths; issues of
contextualisation; apologetics;
liberation movements; and the work of significant missiologists.

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[+][++] E.2—Christian Faith and Other Religions

Candidates will study methodology in the study of religion; Christian
approaches to other religions; and one religion other than Christianity, chosen
from (and to be specified on the entry form): Hinduism, Buddhism,
post-Biblical Judaism, Islam, or a religion proposed by the candidate and
approved by the Supervisory Committee.

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[+] [++] E.3—Christian Faith and Philosophy

Candidates will study the relationship between Christianity and the Western
philosophical tradition. They will also study relevant issues including: the
relation between reason and revelation; the existence of God; the problem of
evil; non-objective theism; religious language; religious experience;
resurrection and the immortality of the soul.

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[+] [++] E.4—Christian Faith and Science

Candidates will study the relationship between Christian theology and the
development of modern science, including: methodology and epistemology in
science and theology; the origin of the universe and humanity; the quantum
world; the biosphere and ecosystems; and ethical issues of scientific research
and development.

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[+] [++] E.5—Christian Faith and Social Sciences

Candidates will study the relationship between Christian theology and the
social sciences, including such areas as methodology in both disciplines;
sociological and anthropological interpretations of religion; theological and
sociological understandings of social phenomena; sociological understandings
of religious organisation; and theological critiques of social sciences.

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[+] [++] E.6—Christian Faith and Psychology

Candidates will study the contribution of psychological theory to pastoral
theology and pastoral care, in areas such as: developmental theory and the
life cycle; human sexuality; love and attachment; and mental health. They will
also study: major psychological theories and their
critique of religious systems; the counselling movement; the role of the pastor;
the nature of pastoral ministry in
relation to birth, marriage, and death.

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[+] [++] E.7—Canon Law

Candidates will study the sources, history, and theology
of Western canon law or the Eastern canonical tradition or both (to be
specified on the entry form); and current
systems of canons, e.g. the Roman Catholic Code of Canon Law and the Canons
of the Church of England, including an
introduction to comparative issues.

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[++] E.8—Confessional Study

Candidates will study the tradition of a Christian denomination as expressed
in its formularies, liturgy, spirituality, and ethics.

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[+] [++] [§] E.9—Special Subject

Candidates may propose a Special Study and assessment method for approval
by the Supervisory Committee.'

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(b) Regulations of Faculty Boards concerning the status of
Probationer Research Student and the Degrees of M.Litt., M.Sc. by Research,
and D.Phil.

With effect from 1 April 2000

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 899, l. 12,
after `Probationer Research Student', add `(whether studying on a full or
part-time basis[1])'.

[1] [It should be noted that admission to study on a part-time basis in
Theology is reviewed on an annual basis, and is subject to decisions by the
University on the availability of doctoral research by means of part-time
study.]

2 Ibid., l. 21, after `the first year' insert `in the case of
full-time studies and second year in the case of part-time studies.

3 Ibid., after l. 25 insert:

`A student admitted to study on a full-time basis is not permitted to
change the basis of his or her study from full-time to part-time at any stage
of his or her registration as a graduate student.

In assessing applications from candidates seeking to undertake a research
degree through part-time study, the Graduate Studies Committee of the Board
of the Faculty of Theology shall have regard to evidence that:

(i) the candidate is suitable to undertake research at doctoral
level;

(ii) the candidate's personal and professional circumstances are such that
it is both practicable for him or her to fulfil the requirements of the course,
and necessary for him ot her to study on a part-time basis;

(iii) if appropriate, the candidate has the written support of their present
employer for their proposed course of study and its obligations;

(iv) the candidate's proposed topic of research is suitable for part-time
study;

(v) the candidate can meet the attendance requirements relating to
part-time study.

2. Attendance requirements (for part-time students)

Part-time research students are required to attend for a minimum of thirty
days of university-based work each year, to be arranged with the agreement
of their supervisor, for the period that their names remain on the Register of
Graduate Students unless individually dispensed by the Graduate Studies
Committee of the Board of the Faculty of Theology.

3. Confirmation of Probationer Research Student status

A student admitted to Probationer Research Student status on a part-time
basis shall, before the end of the sixth term from his or her admission, attend
an interview with his or her supervisor, the Director of Graduate Studies (or
representative) and one other member of staff in order to confirm
(i) the satisfactory completion of his or her research training, and
(ii) satisfactory progress in making his or her research plans.

Where the interviewers failed to be satisfied on either (i) or (ii) or
both, a further interview shall be held before the end of the ninth term from
the candidate's admission. Where the interviewers remain unsatisfied on either
(i) or (ii) after the second interview, the Board of the Faculty
of Theology may remove the student's name from the
Register of Graduate Students.'

4 Ibid., renumber existing sections 2–4 as 4–6.

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4 Standing Committee for Engineering and
Materials

(a) Honour School of Engineering and Materials

(i) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first Part I examination
in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 188, delete ll. 46–7 and
substitute:

`The examiners will not provide calculators, but will permit the use of one
hand-held pocket calculator as specified in the Honour School of Engineering
Science.'

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first Part II examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 190, delete ll. 15–16 and
substitute:

`The examiners will not provide calculators, but will permit the use of one
hand-held pocket calculator as specified in the Honour School of Engineering
Science.'

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(b) Pass School of Engineering and Materials

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 191, delete ll. 15–16 and
substitute:

`The examiners will not provide calculators, but will permit the use of one
hand-held pocket calculator as specified in the Honour School of Engineering
Science.'

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5 Joint Standing Committee for Human Sciences
(with the concurrence of the Boards of the Faculties of Anthropology and
Geography, Biological Sciences, and Social Studies)

(a) Preliminary Examination in Human Sciences

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 85, delete
ll.
13–18, and substitute:

`An introduction to the evidence for mammalian, primate, and human
evolution.
Principles of mammalian physiology: the cell, body fluids, the cardiovascular
and respiratory systems, reproduction, hunger and thirst, movement, the
senses, and the integrative organisation of the central nervous system.
Principles of ecology: ecosystems, plant and animal communities and numbers,
biotic interaction, the impact of man on the environment.'

2 Ibid., delete ll. 21–32, and substitute:

`Principles of genetics and evoluation illustrated by examples from human
and other organisms.

Mechanisms of evolutionary change: selection and adaptation, evolution of sex,
altruism, kin selection and co-operation. Alternative models of evolution.
The genetic material—its nature, mode of action, and manipulation: the
chromosomal basis of heredity; molecular genetics; mapping the human genome;
sex determination; mutation at the level of the gene and the chromosome.
Mendelian inheritance; genetic variation in populations and its maintenance;
quantitative variation and its genetic basis.'

3 Ibid., l. 47, after `social change;' insert `material culture
and ethnographic resources;'

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(b) Honour School of Human Sciences

(i) With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 236, ll. 12–13, delete `appoint
the elected members of' and substitute `be'.

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in Trinity Term
2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 236, l. 34,
delete `Michaelmas' and substitute `Trinity'.

2 Ibid., ll. 37–40, delete `The practical
examinationÉfor
this paper.' and substitute

`Should a candidate fail the practical examination he or she may resit it in
the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the Final Honour School examinations.
Should a candidate fail the practical examination, he or she shall be deemed
to have failed the whole of paper 4.'

3 Ibid., l. 41, delete `Michaelmas' and substitute `Trinity'.

4 Ibid., l. 42, after `examinations' insert `and the
arrangements for resitting the practical examination, should that be necessary
in any case'.

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(iii) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 236, l. 43,
delete `Social Anthropology', and substitute `Anthropological Analysis and
Interpretation'.

2 Ibid., l. 46, before `subjects', insert `optional'.

3 Ibid., p. 237, delete ll. 17–19, and insert:

`The above optional subjects will normally be available. However, depending
on the availability of teaching resources, it may be that not all optional
subjects will be available to all candidates in every year. Candidates may
obtain details of the choice of optional subjects and any restrictions on
numbers for particular subjects for the following year by consulting lists
posted in the Human Sciences Centre at the beginning of the first week of
Hilary Full Term in the year preceding the final examination. These lists will
also be circulated to Course Directors. The date by which students must make
their choice will be stated in the course handbook'.

4 Ibid., p. 238, delete ll. 17–24, and substitute:

`(a) Anthropological analysis and interpretation

The comparative study of social and cultural forms in the global context: to
include economics and exchange, domestic structures and their reproduction,
personal and collective identity, language and religion, states and conflict,
understanding of biology and environment, historical perspectives on the
social world and upon practice in anthropology.'

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(iv) With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 1999, p. 236, delete ll. 47–9, and
substitute:

`(7), (8) One or two papers chosen from amongst the advanced options
available for the Honour School of Experimental Psychology, subject to any
restrictions set out in the lists of available options published in the first
week of Hilary Term in the year preceding the final examination.'

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF
PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral
examination of their candidates as
follows:

Biological Sciences

Y.M.M. DE OLIVEIRA, Green College: `Investigation of remote sensing for
assessing and monitoring the Araucaria forest region of Brazil'.

Department of Zoology, Wednesday, 12 April, 2 p.m.


Examiners: G.R.W. Wint, G. Foody.

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English Language and Literature

H.J. TOOKEY, Wadham: `Playing a thousand roles: Anais Nin, fictionality, and
femininity'.

St John's, Friday, 28 April, 2.30 p.m.


Examiners: R.L. Bush, L. Marcus.

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Law

H. BARMA, Exeter: `Legal aspects of financial reporting in company law'.

Examination Schools, Thursday, 20 April, 11.30 a.m.


Examiners: P.L. Davies, H. Rajak.

E. MICHELER, St Hilda's: `The transfer of ownership rights in shares at
common law and under CREST'.

Examination Schools, Tuesday, 18 April, 11 a.m.


Examiners: R. Goode, S. Worthington.

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Mathematical Sciences

M. POURMAHDIAN, Wolfson: `Model theory of simple
theories'.

Mathematical Institute, Friday, 7 April, 2.30 p.m.


Examiners: B. Zilber, D. Macpherson.

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Modern History

P.E.T. ARBLASTER, St Peter's: `Current affairs publishing in the Habsburg
Netherlands, 1620–60, in comparative European perspective'.

Examination Schools, Friday, 24 March, 11.30 a.m.


Examiners: R.G. Lewis, J.I. Israel.

P.K. KIDAMBI, Wadham: `State, society, and the labouring poor: some aspects
of the relationship between classes in colonial Bombay, 1890–1920'.

Queen Elizabeth House, Friday, 28 April, 2.15 p.m.


Examiners: N. Gooptu, R.S. Chandavarkar.

A. STARA, Worcester: `Lenoir, Quatremere, and the hermeneutic significance of
the Musee des Monuments Franìais'.

Department of the History of Art, Thursday, 11 May, 11.30 a.m.


Examiners: M.J. Kemp, R. Hooker.

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Music

S. ALLEN, Somerville: `Benjamin Britten and Christianity'.

St Peter's, Wednesday, 5 April, 2.15 p.m.


Examiners: N.J. Marston, D. Mitchell.

D. GOLBY, St Hugh's: `The violin in England c.1750–1850: a case study in
music education'.

Faculty of Music, Monday, 17 April, 2.15 p.m.


Examiners: H.D. Johnstone, R. Stowell.

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Physical Sciences

SUNGWON KHYM, Hertford: `Magneto transport studies of semimetallic InAs/GaSb
structures'.

Clarendon Laboratory, Monday, 27 March, 10.30 a.m.


Examiners: P.C. Klipstein, S.N. Holmes.

C. MORRELL, Trinity: `FTIR emission studies of chemical processes'.

Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Friday,
19 May, 2.15 p.m.


Examiners: M. Brouard, D.E. Heard.

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Social Studies

A. CASARICO, Nuffield: `An economic analysis of pension systems and
reforms'.

Nuffield, Monday, 1 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: H.S. Shin, P. Pestieau.

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section





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 23 March 2000: Colleges<br />

Colleges, Halls, and Societies


Contents of this section:

Note: college vacancies will also be found in the
Gazette's "http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/as/">Appointments Supplement.

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OBITUARIES


St Anne's College

MRS MARGERY BOOTH (née May), 1 March 2000; exhibitioner,
St Anne' Society, 1947–50; Lecturer in French 1954–8, Tutor and
Fellow in French 1958–88, Emeritus Fellow 1988–97, Senior Research
Fellow 1997–2000. Aged 71.

BERNARD HALSTEAD, 29 February 2000; Treasurer 1967–80, Fellow
1977–80, Emeritus Fellow 1980–2000. Aged 84.

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MEMORIAL MEETING


Jesus College

A Memorial Meeting for DON PAUL FOWLER, MA, D.PHIL., will be held at 2.30
p.m. on Saturday, 6 May, in the Examination Schools, followed by tea in the
college.

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MEMORIAL SERVICE


St Hilda's College

A Memorial Service for JANET HIDDLESTON, formerly Fellow of the college, will
be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 29 April, in the Jacqueline du Pré
Music Building, St Hilda's College, followed by tea in the senior common room.

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ELECTIONS


Brasenose College

To a Tutorial Fellowship in Modern History (from 1 October 2000):

DR
ABIGAIL F.F. GREEN (BA, PH.D. Cambridge)

To a Tutorial Fellowship in Management Studies (from 1 October
2000):

CHRISTOPHER D. MCKENNA (BA Amherst, MA Johns Hopkins)

To an Open Exhibition in Physics:

FRASER M. KERR, formerly of
Wilson's School, Wallington

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Hertford College

To Honorary Fellowships:

MRS DRUE HEINZ, DBE

PROFESSOR PAUL LANGFORD, D.PHIL., F.R.HIST.S., FBA

SIR DAVID SPEDDING, KCMG, CVO, OBE

PROFESSOR TOBIAS WOLFF, MA, Doctor of Humane Letters, honoris
causa

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Jesus College

To an Official Fellowship and Tutorship in Economics (from 1 October
2000):

DR STEFAN DERCON, M.PHIL., D.PHIL. (B.PHIL., Licence in
Economics, Catholic University, Leuven), Professor of Development Economics,
Catholic University, Leuven, and Research Officer, Centre for the Study of
African Economies

To a fixed-term Fellowship in Classics (for five years from 1 October
2000):

DR ARMAND J. D'ANGOUR, BA (PH.D. London), Lecturer in Classics,
Oriel College

To a Visiting Senior Research Fellowship (HT 2001):

PROFESSOR R.
HINCHLIFFE, Department of Zoology, University College of Wales, Aberystwyth

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PRIZES


Christ Church

Stanley Robinson Prize in Literae Humaniores:

(joint award)

SOPHIE MELZACK

RICHARD MARTIN

Keith Feiling Prize in Modern History:

KATHERINE JOHNSTON

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NOTICES


BRASENOSE COLLEGE


Tutorial Fellowship in Biological Sciences

Brasenose College wishes to appoint a Tutorial Fellow in Biological Sciences
with effect from 1 October 2000. It is expected that the successful candidate
will already hold a university lecturership or other permanent university
academic post. The person appointed, who will have the use of an office in
Brasenose, will be required to provide six hours of tutorial teaching per week,
and to take a full part in the general life of the college. For a university
lecturer, the joint salary would be on an age-related scale up to a maximum
of £38,412. Additional college allowances are available.
Further particulars may be obtained from the College Secretary (telephone:
Oxford (2)77823, fax: (2)77822,
e-mail: college.office@bnc.ox.ac.uk). Applications should be sent to the Senior
Tutor, Brasenose College, Oxford OX1 4AJ, with details of career and
publications and the names and addresses of three referees, not later than
Friday, 28 April. Applicants should ask their referees to write direct to the
Senior Tutor by the same date, without request from the college.
Brasenose College is an equal opportunities employer.

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CHRIST CHURCH


Appointment of Junior Censor's Secretary

Christ Church wishes to appoint a full-time secretary to the Junior Censor
and assistant to the Censors' Administrator. Salary will be subject to
experience, but the college expects to appoint within grade 4 of the
University's library and clerical scale (within the range
£13,532–£15,664). Other benefits are also offered.
University/college experience would be an advantage as would knowledge of
WordPerfect, and other applications such as Excel and Access.

Further particulars are available from the Censors' Administrator, Christ
Church, Oxford OX1 1DP (telephone: Oxford (2)76157, e-mail:
joyce.millar@chch.ox.ac.uk), who should receive applications, with a
curriculum vitae and the names and addresses of two referees, by
7 April. It is hoped to hold interviews on 12 April and to make an appointment
as soon as possible thereafter.

Christ Church is an equal opportunities employer.

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EXETER COLLEGE


Appointment of Sub-Librarian

Exeter College proposes to appoint a full-time Sub-Librarian, to have
responsibility for the daily running of the college library under the direction
of the Fellow Librarian. If fully qualified, the successful applicant will be
appointed on
a scale equivalent to academic-related grade 2, initially within the first three
points (currently £18,915–£20,811). An appointee who is not yet
fully qualified will start on grade 1, currently £16,286–£18,185.
Lunches will be provided free of charge in the senior common room.

Further particulars may be obtained from the Fellow
Librarian, Dr J.R. Maddicott, to whom applications should be made by
Saturday, 8 April. Applicants should provide the names of two referees, who
should be asked to write directly to Dr Maddicott.

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MERTON COLLEGE


Research Fellowship in Pure Mathematics

Applications are invited for this fellowship, tenable for three years from 1
January 2001, for research in Pure Mathematics including its applications in
computing.

Although this is primarily a Research Fellowship, the fellow will be expected
to give sixteen lectures a year at the Mathematical Institute and a limited
amount of undergraduate teaching. The scale of stipends is from £17,238,
at age twenty-six or under, to £20,811 at age thirty or above. In
addition, the fellow will hold a part-time consultancy at GCHQ, Cheltenham, for
two months each
summer, with a supplementary stipend of £3,000 a
year. Funding will also be available from GCHQ, up to £2,000 per year for
travel expenses. Appointment is restricted to British nationals (and is open to
both men and women).

Further details and application forms can be obtained from the Warden's
Secretary, Merton College, Oxford OX1 4JD (telephone: Oxford (2)76352, fax:
(2)76282, e-mail: moira.wise@merton.ox.ac.uk), The closing date for applications
is 5 May.

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PEMBROKE COLLEGE


Personal assistance required for visually impaired
student

Assistance is required, from 24 April, for a visually impaired undergraduate
reading Theology. The assistance would include sighted-guiding, note-taking,
personal reading, and preparing materials such as texts, hand-outs, and
lecture notes into an accessible form in order to allow the student to work on
an independent basis. Excellent interpersonal skills are required, together with
the ability to co-ordinate day-to-day studies and activities under direction
from the student. Advantages, but not essential, would be: knowledge of
philosophy and theology; previous experience of working with visually
impaired or disabled people; and experience of working in higher education.

Hours by negotiation, full-time or job share. Salary up to £7 per hour.
Applicants should forward a curriculum vitae detailing their career
to date, and a covering letter explaining how they feel their experience and
skills match the selection criteria. This should be should be sent to Jackie
Lewis at Pembroke College, Oxford OX1 1DW (telephone: Oxford (2)76411, e-mail:
jackie.lewis@pmb.ox.ac.uk), no later than Friday, 31 March, with interviews
taking place during the week commencing 10 April. Applicants should
also arrange for two referees to send references to Mrs Lewis to arrive by
the closing date.

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WORCESTER COLLEGE


Lecturership in English Literature 1500–1740

Worcester College invites applications from men and women for a Lecturership
in English Literature 1500–1740 for three years, non-renewable, from 1
October 2000.

The lecturer will be required to teach English Literature from 1500 to 1740,
for papers 4 and 5 of Course 1 of the Final Honour School of English
Language and Literature, and also the Shakespeare paper. There will also be
an opportunity to teach for optional papers. The lecturer will play a prominent
part in teaching undergraduates reading for joint degrees with English. The
lecturer will also be required to help in examining and interviewing entrance
candidates.

The stint is up to but not more than six hours per week averaged over three
terms. In addition to a salary at
present of £7,667 per annum, the lecturer will receive
certain common room rights (free dinners in term, and free luncheons
throughout the year). USS will be paid for
a lecturer who wishes it.

There are no further particulars for this post. Applicants should provide a
curriculum vitae and the names of two referees, whom they should
ask to write directly to the College Secretary, Worcester College, Oxford OX1
2HB.

Applications and references should reach the College Secretary by 28 April.
Interviews are expected to be on Thursday, 18 May.

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WYCLIFFE HALL


Appointments

Wycliffe Hall, a thriving, energetic, and friendly evangelical Theological College
of the Church of England, and a Permanent Private Hall of the University of
Oxford, seeks to fill three interesting part-time skilled posts, any two of
which might be combined into a full-time position.

Librarian (approximately twenty hours per week): to administer the
college's growing theological library.

External Studies Manager (approximately twenty hours per week):
to administer and head up the college's expanding programme of external
courses.

Research Assistant (twenty hours per week): to work with The
Revd Professor Alister McGrath.

Further details of these posts may be obtained from the College Administrator,
Wycliffe Hall, 54 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PW. Closing date for applications:
12 April.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 23 March 2000: Advertisements<br />

Advertisements


Contents of this section:



How to advertise in the
Gazette


Terms and conditions
of acceptance of advertisements

Return to Contents Page of this issue



Bodleian Shop

See our full range of postcards, greetings cards, and
stationery with a difference! Our `Oxford Views' writing paper, using
engravings from the John Johnson Collection of Printed Ephemera, is printed
in the Bodleian on high quality conservation paper; A4 size, 16 sheets and 16
envelopes, £5.95. Shop open Mon.–Fri., 9 a.m.–5 p.m.(from 1 April
open 9 a.m.– 6 p.m), Sat., 9 a.m.– 12.30 p.m.

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Meeting

Modelling Spatiotemporal Dynamics in Interacting Systems,
Oxford, Mathematical Institute, 31 Mar.,–1 Apr., (sponsored by the London
Mathematical Society). Organiser: P.K. Maini (CMB, Oxford). Tel.: Oxford 280617,
e-mail: maini@maths.ox.ac.uk.

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Oxford Art Society, Members' Exhibition

The Oxfordshire Museum, Fletcher's House, Park Street,
Woodstock, Oxon. Sat., 8 Apr.,–Sun., 7 May (Tues.–Sat., 10 a.m.
–4.45 p.m.; Sun., 2–4.45 p.m.; Bank Holiday Mondays 10 a.m–4.45
p.m.; closed Mon., 10 and Mon., 17 May, and Good Friday).

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Oxford University Newcomers' Club

This club exists to welcome to Oxford the partners and
families of academic visitors and graduate students. Come along to the Club
Room at 13 Norham Gardens any Wednesday morning between 10.30 a.m.and 12
noon, from the week before term starts to the week after term, and
throughout the Summer vacation, and sample our programme of events and
outings.

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Tuition offered

Psychoanalytic Observational Studies. Applications are now
invited for the October 2000 intake for the Tavistock- model Oxford
Observation Course. Modules include a 2-year infant observation, a 2-year
young child observation, ongoing work discussion, and theoretical seminars.
This part-time, largely evening-based, modular course is conducted in small
groups, and can lead to a Postgraduate Diploma/MA from the Tavistock
Clinic/University of East London. For details and application form please
contact Andrea Watson, 12 Rectory Road, Oxford OX4 1BW, tel.: Oxford 243491.
Application should be made before 31 May.

Beginner's Social Bridge: you've limited card skills, but you
want to play social Bridge. An active learning course, including Mini bridge,
bidding, scoring, at City of Oxford Rowing Club, 25 Apr., 10 a.m.–5 p.m.
£40 inc. lunch. Contact R & TS on Oxford 774554.

From 24 June–1 July, on the unspoiled Greek island of
Kithira, a course will be given on `Scriptwriting:Creating Theatre'. This course
is suitable for anyone with an interest in writing for theatre, film, television
or radio, and is appropriate for beginners and more experienced writers alike.
The emphasis will be on the practical process of writing: the island offers an
ideal environment, both for writing, and for testing out of dramatic material.
Course tutor: David Mowat. For further details and brochure phone: 02392
830312. E-mail: info@greekexperience.com, web site:
www.greekexperience.com.

Piano lessons. Experienced teacher; adults and children. All
grades; beginners welcome. Contact Miss P. Read BA (Hons.) LRAM. Tel.: Oxford
510904.

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Services Offered

Town and Country Trees, arboricultural contractors. Tree
surgery, felling, planting, hedges, orchard and shrub pruning, stump removal.
Fully qualified, fully insured. Tel.: 01869 351540, or 01993 811115.

Personal computer consultants, offering expert advice and
tuition for both hardware and software. On site service at home or in the
office. We provide upgrades for most computers, or alternatively, we also
supply our range of personally built, to your specification, KTec computers.
We will also supply or source software to match your requirements. For a
quality service, matched with competitive prices, tel.: Chris Lewis on Oxford
461222, fax: 461333, e-mail: info@kristontec.co.uk.

Big or small, we ship it all, plus free pick up anywhere in
Oxford. Also 24 hour photocopying, private mailing addresses (24 hour access,
and mail forwarding worldwide), binding, fax bureau, colour photocopying,
mailing services, and much more. Contact or visit Mail Boxes Etc., 266 Banbury
Rd., Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 514655, fax: 514656, e-mail:
summertown@020.mbe.uk.com.

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Domestic Services

Do you need a nanny£ All Counties Nannies, qualified
and experienced staff. Full and part-time, permanent and temporary. Newborn,
toddlers, school age. Our aim is to provide the best possible care for your
family. Tel.: Lynda on 01235 524462, mobile: 0402 068165.

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your
local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college.
Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre- occupancy cleaning, flood
cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice,
call Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford 726983 or Abingdon 555533.

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Situations Vacant

St Michael at the Northgate, in Cornmarket Street, the City
Church of Oxford, is looking for a full-time Manager for our Visitor Reception
Centre, and Saxon Tower. Retail experience, organisational ability, artistic flair,
a friendly manner, and an interest in history are essential. Hours 9.30 a.m.-
-
4.30 p.m. (5.30 p.m. in summer), Mon.,– Fri. Realistic salary according to
qualifications and experience. contact Stephen Pix by 'phone or fax on Oxford
242444.

University Drama Officer 2000–1; salary: £10,400 p.a.
Applications are invited for a fixed-term post of University Drama Officer from
self- motivated, recent graduates, or soon to be graduates. Applicants should
have extensive experience of university student theatre and a broad range of
theatre skills. Priority will be given to applications from candidates who have
experience of Oxford University drama. Duties include assisting in
programming the 3 major venues for student productions (the Old Fire Station,
the Burton Taylor Studio Theatre, and the Playhouse); helping students to
plan and publicise their productions, and arranging drrama workshops. The
duration of the post is 12½ months, from 1 Sept. 2000–14 Sept. 2001.
Further particulars can be obtained from Ms Samantha Jones, University
Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (tel.: Oxford 270563, e-mail:
Samantha.Jones@admin.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for receipt of applications is
Fri., 12 May. It is anticipated that interviews will be held in the week
beginning 26 June. The University exists to promote excellence in education
and research. The University is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

St Catherine's College: Appointment of Library Assistant.
Applications are invited for the post of full-time (35 hrs) Library Assistant,
initially on a 2 year contract, to work as an important member of a small team
in the running of this busy College library. After the first 2 years the
contract is expected to be renewed at the level of 35 hrs p.w. in term-time
only (i.e. 3 periods of 10 weeks); however, there is also the possibility that
it would continue full- time at 35 hrs p.w. Duties will include maintaining the
loan system, assisting readers with enquiries, cataloguing and processing new
books and other library duties. Physical fitness will be important as there will
be some shelving and shifting of books. The successful candidate must be
attentive to detail, and should have a proven aptitude on the computer, with
good keyboard skills. A knowledge of automated cataloguing would be useful
(although training will be given in necessary). Salary on the University
Clerical and Library Scale Grade 3, £11,209–£12,976. Further
particulars may be obtained by phoning (2)71707. Applications including a
curriculum vitae, and the names of two referees, together with a contact
telephone number, should be sent by noon on 31 Mar. 2000 to the Librarian,
St Catherine's College Library, Oxford OX1 3UJ. Interviews will be held on
Tues., 4 Apr. St Catherine's College is an equal opportunities employer.

Oxford University Student Union. Part-time Office Assistant,
term time only. Bright, confident, computer literate individual required to join
our team in the Student Union General Office. Preferred applicants will be
familiar with a rangee of computer packages including Word, and capable of
working with minimum supervision. An excellent telephone manner and a
willingness to learn are essential. CV and details of 2 referees should be sent
to: Maria Burgess, OUSU, 28 Little Clarendon Street, OX1 2HU. Closing date for
applications is 13 April 2000. Tel.: Oxford 270777, or e-mail:
enquiries@ousu.ox.ac.uk, for further details.

Oxfordshire Nature Conservation Forum Project Officer.
Temporary (10 mths) to cover maternity leave. Full or part-time negotiable.
£15,000 p.a. pro rata. Starts 1 June 2000. Forging partnerships that will
create a sustainable future for nature, ONCF links over 50 organisations,
charities, government and agriculture. This exciting post demands initiative,
confidence and tact to strengthen relationships with memebrs and the public;
to develop the newsletter and e-mail bulletin; to expand the charity's
fundraising and publicity capacity. A lively writing style, IT and
administrative skills, and the ability to prepare simple financial reports
essential. Knowledge of conservation/the environment, and Oxfordshire an
advantage. Own transport essential. For more details ring Sian Liwicki on
Oxford 407034. Northmoor Trust, Little Wittenham, nr Abingdon, Oxon. OX14
4RA. Closing date: 3 April. Interview date: 14 April.

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Houses to Let

Victorian terrace house, in Grandpont, 10 mins. walk from
city centre. One large double bedroom, 1 bedroom/studio facing south, lovely
open-plan ground floor, fully fitted kitchen with dishwasher, luxury bathroom
with power shower, south facing rear garden. An unusual and inviting house,
ideal for entertaining, no smokers or pets, available now. £850 p.c.m. Tel.:
Oxford 721297.

North Oxford house available from 15 Aug. 2000 for one year
or less. Walk to colleges, train station, and bus station, near Port Meadow,
c.h., recently redecorated, desks, filing cabinets, several large closets,
secluded garden, 2 1/2 bathrooms. washing machine, drier, telephone, linen,
dishes, 2 bicycles. Suitable for visiting academics. Two bedrooms, £960
p.m.; 3 bedrooms, £1250 p.m (inc. bedsit with separate entrance). Tel.: J.
Mackrell (eves.), Oxford 775567, or Canada: A. Gaston, 613 7115 1368, fax 613
7115 0299. E-mail: Tony.Gaston@EC.GC.CA or Gaston@cyberus.ca.

Fully-furnished, 2-bedroom house in Marston. Living room,
gas c.h., gardens, kitchen, microwave, telephone, TV, washing machine. Short
cycling distance to city via University Parks. £625 p.c.m. No smokers, no
pets. Available 1 Apr., initially for at least 6 months, preferably for 1 year.
E-mail: ahmet.oral@materials.ox.ac.uk. Tel.: ++ 90 312 290 1965.

North Oxford , available Aug./Sept., for 11 or 12 months,
superb furnished Victorian terrace, 2 bedrooms, bathroom, living room, study,
maple fitted kitchen/diner, wooden floors, C.h., all mod cons, crockery, linen,
etc., garden. £900 p.c.m Ideal for visiting academics. E-mail:
sandra@pyne.de, for full details.

Temple Cowley, Oxford. spacious, 3- bedroom, newly built,
fully carpeted and curtained, town house (unfurnished) with conservatory,
available for yearly rental from 1 Apr., for non-smokers. Integral garage, and
parking space for 1 other car. Excellent bus service (1 min. walk) to city and
railway station (approx. 15 mins.). Generously proportioned sitting room; 3
double bedrooms; 2 bathrooms (1 en suite); separate cloakroom/WC; large fitted
kitchen with washer/drier, built-in oven and hob, fridge-freezer; French doors
leading to dining room/conservatory. £950 p.c.m. For more information
please contact Katie Enock on + 44 (0) 7940 308765, or Martyn Laycock on +
44 (0) 961 883407; e-mail: beekeeper@bee.co.uk.

Make finding accommodation easy. Finders Keepers have a
dedicated approach to helping you find the right property. Browse through
our website for up-to-date detailed information on properties available and
make use of our interactive database, priority reservation service (credit
cards accepted), personal service and professional advice. For further
information please contact Finders Keepers at 226, Banbury Road, Summertown,
Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: Oxford 311011. Fax: Oxford 556993. E-mail:
oxford@finders.co.uk. Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

An Englishman's home is his castle— so the saying goes.
We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are
seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we
may be able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents,
specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other
professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in
Oxford. Visit our web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all
the properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone,
fax, or e-mail us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever
we can without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 7611533, fax: 764777, e-mail:
info@qbman.co.uk.

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Flats to Let

Central North Oxford, 4 mins. walk from University Parks
and easy walking to University Science Area, libraries and city centre.
Charming and spacious garden flat in quiet residential street, incl. sitting-
room, double bedroom, kitchen with washing machine, bathroom with bath and
shower, plentiful storage space. Gas central heating. Suit single person or
couple. No smokers. Available from July. £740 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 512138;
e-mail:mdy@bioch.ox.ac.uk

A luxury, self-catering, 1 bedroom apartment is available for
short lets, minimum 1 week. Ideal for visiting academics, business people, or
for holidays. Next to the River Thames, yet only 5 mins. walk to the city
centre, it is an ideal location. Recently refurbished to a very high standard
it consists of: 1 double bedroom, a newly fitted bathroom, lounge/diner with
TV, video, sofa/bed etc.; new kitchen with dishwasher, fridge, washer/drier
and microwave. By taking advantage of the sofa/bed it will accommodate up
to 4 people. The price is £500 p.w. incl. fresh linen, and cleaning once
a week, heating and electricity. Oxford Riverside Apartments, tel.: Oxford
310782, fax: Oxford 310649, or: www.oxfordcity.co.uk/accom/pembrok.

Jericho—Great Clarendon Street, Oxford: flat/maisonette
suitable for 3 undergraduates; full c.h. (landlord's certificate, etc.); furnished.
Tenants responsible for gas, water rates, electricity, and telephone. Available
1 July for 12 months. £845 p.c.m. Tel.: 01993 811614, or Oxford 557824.

Central North Oxford, 10 minutes' walk from city centre, all
main University buildings, and parks, and very close to the river. Available
for short/long let. Exceptionally well-furnished, comfortable flats in extremely
quiet, civilised, large Victorian house in this exclusive, leafy, residential
Victorian suburb, with large, light, airy rooms. First-floor flat available now,
large double bedroom, large drawing room, kitchen, bathroom; ground-floor
available from end June, 1 double, 1 single bedroom, drawing room, kitchen,
bathroom. Off-street parking and secluded garden. Tel./fax: Oxford 552400.

Murray Court, Banbury Rd, Oxford. Very spacious (200 sq
yds.), quiet, first floor flat. Three double bedrooms, 2 bathrooms (1 en suite).
Fully furnished to high standard, gas c.h., garage, garden. Within short
walking distance Science Area, University Parks and city centre. Non-smokers
only. Tel.: Brooks Property Management, Oxford 728597, fax: 794606.

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Accommodation Offered

Accommodation in prestigious area of North Oxford. £20
per night for 1 room (with breakfast), or £45 p.w. (self-
catering)–maximum length of stay 3 months. Tel.: Oxford 511657 or 24-hour
fax, Oxford 516452. E-mail:mcadex@gofornet.co.uk.

Summer House-sit. Family home available from 8 July until
middle to end Sept., North Oxford, within ring road. Fully furnished, 4
bedrooms, off-street parking for 2 cars. Interested in having 1 person or
couple house-sit. For further information telephone or fax Oxford 553617.

Islip Village, 8 miles from the city centre. Male/female
required for Mon.,– Fri. (flexible), to share house with 1 other, and a
dog. Large bright room available. Garden and all mod cons. £280 p.c.m.
(bills included). Tel.: Oxford 375629.

Paying guests, visiting academics, welcomed for short or long
stays in the comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple, in exclusive,
quiet, leafy central North Oxford, within walking distance of all main
university buildings, town centre, parks, river, good shops and restaurants.
All rooms have colour TV, tea-/coffee-making facilities, microwave, and
refrigerator and/or refrigerator and deep-freeze availability, c.h., and
independent heating. Breakfast included in the very moderate terms. Tel./fax:
Oxford 557879.

Large room, with shower, available in spacious house, to
share with one other. In Islip village, approx. 8 miles from Oxford (train
station, shops, pubs). £300 p.c.m. inc. bills, exc. phone bills. Tel.: Oxford
373580.

Woodstock Road: light, airy, loft apartment in family home.
Bedroom, sitting-room/study, bathroom, light cooking facilities, car parking.
On main bus and cycle routes to the city centre. £500 p.c.m. (incl. bills,
exc. phone). Tel.: Oxford 552916.

Finders Keepers specialises in managing your home and
investment. With our 27 years' experience we assure you of a high level of
service from dedicated and professional letting and management teams. Many
of our landlords have remained with us since we opened and are still reaping
the benefits of our high standards of property management. if you would like
details of our services please contact Finders Keepers at 226 Banbury Road,
Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: Oxford 556993, e-mail:
oxford@finders.co.uk. Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

Folly Bridge, 6 brand new 1/2 bedroom flats, on the banks
of the River Isis, available from mid-May onwards, either for the Summer, or
for the academic year from Sept. Accommodation consists of 1 double bedroom,
1 study/single bedroom, sitting room, kitchen, and bathroom. All flats are fully
furnished and have magnificent river and Christ Church Meadow views.
£900 or £950 p.c.m. Further details from the Bursar, Hertford College,
tel.: Oxford 279414, or e-mail: peter.baker@hertford.ox.ac.uk.

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Accommodation Sought

A visiting Scottish academic seeks to rent a studio, or a
large room with independent facilities, preferably not too far from the city
centre, from the beg. May–mid-late July. Please contact 01224 643800
(answerphone if out), or e-mail: Dnky0111@aol.com.

Commuting academic seeks bedsit, flat share or small flat,
within cycling distance of city centre. May through July, or long-term.
Tel./fax: 0049 89 2899 6695, or e-mail: gerhard.dannemann@law.ox.ac.uk. (Away
until 7 April).

Wanted - house to rent in Oxford from July, initially short
term only required, so summer let could suit. Please contact Julie Cox at MRC
Harwell on 01235 834393, or e-mail: j.cox@har.mrc.ac.uk

Going abroad£ Or just thinking of letting your
property£ QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and
property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional
individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good
quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details
of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without
obligation, telephone us: Oxford 7611533, fax us: 764777, or e-mail us:
info@qbman.co.uk. Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our web site at:
http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.

Academic family looking for 3-bedroom furnished
accommodation (flat or house) in the Summertown/North Oxford area, mid-
Aug./Sept., for about a year. Contact Marjorie Wallace. Tel.: Oxford (2)75402.

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Accommodation Exchange

A student/writer couple from Iceland looking for a flat in
Oxford in May. Own a very nice flat in centre of Reykjavik and want to swap
flats. contact: Palsdottir/Olafsson. Tel.: 354 552 0126, e-mail: oink@simnet.is
(bragi@nm.is).

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Summer Lets

North Oxford , near St Antony's College and Port Meadow,
15 mins. walk from city centre. Fully furnished Victorian house, 1 double and
2 single bedrooms, 2 living rooms, 2 bathrooms, kitchen, study. Nice garden.
Small friendly cat. Available 30 July–26 Aug. £1,100 for whole 4
weeks. Tel.: Oxford 515077; e-mail: Mollison@40leck.fsnet.co.uk

Late-Victorian terrace house, Summertown,N. Oxford. Available
for 4 month let (May–Aug.). Two reception, 3 bedrooms and study
adjoining largest bedroom, spacious kitchen/dining room. Nice garden.
£1,200 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 556270 for more details or appointment to
view.

City centre house, with view of Thames, available for 4
months, June–Sept. Fully equipped, 3 bedrooms (2 double, 1 single), 2
bathrooms, gas c.h., garden, garage. £1,000 p.c.m. inc. of charges except
telephone calls. Tel.: Oxford 250462.

Large houses to let throughout summer. Ideal for visiting
families or sharers. Seven bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, and fully equipped kitchens,
these properties provide excellent accommodation from July through to Sept.
Located within walking distance of Oxford city centre. For more information
please contact Julia at Finders Keepers, 226 Banbury Road, Summertown,
Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: Oxford 311011, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk, or visit our
web site at: www.finders.co.uk.

Recently renovated house in St John St., central Oxford,
available from 13 May—15 July. Four bedrooms, 2 studies, 2 bathrooms, 3
reception rooms, well equipped kitchen and utility room, garden. Willing to
consider shorter periods. Tel.: Oxford 513009 or e-mail:
Ruth.Harris@new.ox.ac.uk.

Five- and six-bedroom houses to let through the summer,
located in Jericho, providing excellent accommodation for families or visiting
sharers needing to be close to the city centre. These properties are available
fully furnished, and equipped, from the beginning of July through to the end
of Sept. For more information please contact Julia at Finders Keepers, 226
Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: Oxford 31101, or by e-mail
at : oxford@finders.co.uk, or visit our web site at: www.find ers.co.uk.
n

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Holiday Lets

Costa del Sol, spacious maisonette, sea across the road,
swimming pool by the house, 20 year esttablished English community. Leased
from June–Nov. (6 mths) inc. Price negotiable. Contact Oxford 511657, or
fax: Oxford 516452 (24 hrs).

We have the homes - you have the choice. Private owners
rent property in Italy, Spain and Wales. Italy–palatial villa on Lago
Maggiore; characteristic apartment overlooking Lake Como; stone-built
residence on coast, S. Teresa di Gallura, Sardinia. Spain—Bel Epoc villa
with pool, near Sitges/Barcelona. Wales—comfortable family home on Gower
Peninsula. For more information and details of other properties e-mail:
parfitt@dido.net.

Italy, Umbria. Twelfth-century San Orsola, a short distance
Perugia, Todi. Combines charm and comfort in a beautiful settiing of
sunflowers, and rolling Umbrian hills. Bed and breakfast, or self-catering.
Fresh eggs and veg. Tel.: Maria McCourt 0039 075 8748997.

French Riviera, ground-floor, 2-bedroom flat, between St
Raphael and Cannes. Five mins. walk from the beach, pool, shops, restaurants.
Tennis and golf nearby. South-facing private patio; parking alongside. Linen
provided. Reasonable rates. Tel.: Epsom, 01372 744246.

Dordogne and Rome holiday rentals. Stone house in an acre
of garden in the Dordogne, France, with a fabulous 270 degree panorama
(sleeps 8/10). Also Rome, Italy, marble floored flat (4/5) and 19th-c., country
farmhouse with lovely views, 115 mins. from Rome and 2 hrs to Florence
(sleeps 4 with downstairs rooms available to sleep 4 more). Prices vary from
£250–£550 p.w. Private owner. Tel.: 01223 353603 for details.

Pembrokeshire Coast: Farmhouse (4 bedrooms) and Barn (3
bedrooms, 2 bathrooms). Log fires, panoramic views, spectacular cliff walks.
National Trust beaches. £100–£440 p.w. Tel.: Isobel Cox on 01923
856114, or see the photos and other details at: http://gl.home.dhs.org.

South of France, Languedoc, 19th-c. wine-grower's 11-
bedroom mansion in 2 acres of secluded gardens, with pool. For rent from 3
June–1 July. Sleeps up to 18. Thirty minutes from the Med., 50 mins. from
Montpellier, 20 mins. from Beziers. From £1,000 p.w. Tel.: 00334 67 24 88
52, or e-mail: Nicole.Russell@wanadoo.com; web site:
http://www.lamaisonverte.co.uk.

Cornwall—Lizard Peninsula. Self- contained accommodation
in delightful 18th-c. house. Sleeps 5; garden, barbecue area, close to the sea.
Easy access to all the attractions of West Cornwall. For brochure please ring
01326 280216, or e-mail: Peter@hobsonp.fsnet.co.uk.

SW France. Eighteenth-century auberge, 3 storeys, 4
bedrooms, located in a sleepy village surrounded by vineyards, in the foothills
of the Pyrenees. Forty mins. from Carcassone. House period furnished, with
adjacent garden. Tel./fax: 001 212 486 4185; web site:
www.geocities.com/bouriege.

North Cornwall. This lovely old farmhouse
(c.1800) has been caringly divided to provide 2 holiday cottages
of great character. A wonderful setting for nature lovers, the River Allen,
which is a designated site of `special scientific interest', flows past the
meadows of this 10-acre smallholding. Only 5 miles from the coast, a short
drive will take you to the lovely old fishing village of Port Isaac. Polzeath and
Boscastle are within 9 miles. Walkers and cyclists cana enjoy Bodmin Moor and
the Camel Trail is just a short drive. Lounge with woodburner, well equipped
kitchen/diner, 2 bedrooms (1 double, 1 twin), bathroom/w.c. Full night storage
heating. Linen, cot/high chair provided. Regret no pets. £166–
£419 p.w. Tel.: 01208 850280 for more details.

Tranquil Umbria. Luxury flat for 2, to let weekly. Large
shaded terrace, lovely garden, stunning views. Perugia 15 minutes, Assisi 30
minutes, by car. For further information tel.: 01344 779731.

Tuscany. Family-owned Wine Estate, producing highly
recognised wines, olive oil and cheese, offers ancient farmhouse and
apartments, accommodating 2 up to 12 plus. Pool, secluded rural setting, half
hour central Florence. Tel./fax: (0039) 055 824 9120, e-mail: pgklpoggio@ftbcc.it.
`Fattoria Corzano and Paterno'.

Self-catering accommodation 5 minutes walk to city centre.
We have 4-bedroom self-contained flats to let from July to Sept., fully
equipped kitchens for groups or families. Close to shops, restaurants and
buses. A 24-hour lodge with CCTV. Pleasant gardens in tranquil surroundings.
Use of the adjacent sports ground. Washing machines on site. Free off-road
parking. For rates tel./fax Oxford 725364.

Tuscany. Family-owned Wine Estate, producing highly
recognised wines, olive oil and cheese, offers ancient farmhouse and
apartments, accommodating 2 up to 12 plus. Pool, secluded rural setting, half
hour central Florence. Tel./fax: (0039) 055 824 9120, e-mail: pgklpoggio@ftbcc.it.
`Fattoria Corzano and Paterno'.

Crete. A traditional Cretan house in old town Rethimno,
superbly renovated to provide space and comfort in beautifully furnished
surroundings. Elevated, vine-covered, sitting area with brick
barbecue—perfect for alfresco dining. It is in a quiet area, and close to
long, sandy beach, taverns, shops, and the many interesting sights in and
around this historic area. Sleeps 4 (1 double, 1 twin). Available all year round.
£280 p.w., £1,000 p.m. All linen, electricity, and cleaning inc. Tel./fax:
Nikolaos Glinias, 0030 831 56525, e-mail: nglynias@ret.forthnet.gr.

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For Sale

Human Instincts Explained, by Nils K. Oeijord.
Price $10.95, paperback, 144 pp. Published by Vantage Press, Inc., New York.
ISBN: 0-533-13127-8. Human Instincts Explained explains and makes
a
list of the human instincts—for the first time in history.

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<br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette: Diary, 24 March<br /> - 30 April

Diary


Contents of this section:

Academic Staff
Development Programme Seminars
: places should be booked in advance
through
the Staff Development Office, University Offices,
Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

For the full list of courses, see the HREF="http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/training/">Staff Development
ProgrammeWeb site.

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Contents Page of this issue



Friday 24 March

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The founders of the Ashmolean Museum',
1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

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Tuesday 28 March

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Francis Ernest Jackson (1872–1945'
(special exhibition), 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9
a.m.–1 p.m.)

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Friday 31 March

COLLOQUIUM: `Histoire et anthropologie de l'Islam
méditerranéen: Lucette Valensi à l'oeuvre', Maison
Française (continues tomorrow).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Landscape painting', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
£1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

M. COLLINS and K. Stott: clarinet and piano recital of works by Weber,
Brahms, Saint-Saëns, and Poulenc, Jacqueline du Pré Music
Building, St Hilda's, 8 p.m. (tickets £10/£7.50 from Oxford Playhouse,
tel. 798600; information from (2)76821).

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Tuesday 4 April

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM exhibition opens: `Crucifixion 2000'—paintings by
the contemporary Palestinian artist Laila al-Shawa (until 14 May).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Camille Pissarro', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
£1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

PROFESSOR A. BLANKERT: `Johannes Vermeer as a narrator' (Ashmolean
Museum: special lecture), Lecture Theatre, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m. (admission
free).

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Wednesday 5 April

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk (S. Vainker): `Bodhisattva', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
£1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

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Friday 7 April

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Faces: east and west', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
£1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

G. HOWARD: `Literary love affairs in Paris' (lecture given as part of the
Oxford Literary Festival), Maison Française, 5.45 p.m.

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Tuesday 11 April

ACADEMIC STAFF Development Programme seminar: `Recruitment and
selection
for heads of department', 9.30 a.m. (see information
above
).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Baroque art', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50.
Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

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Wednesday 12 April

C. FITHEN: `Ethnicity and the Sierra Leone diamond trade' (Friends of the
Pitt Rivers Museum lecture; donation of £2 requested from visitors), Pitt
Rivers Research Building, 64 Banbury Road, 6 p.m.

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Thursday 13 April

UNIVERSITY GAZETTE: all copy for the 27 April Gazette to be
received by 5 p.m. today.

UNIVERSITY COUNSELLING SERVICE closed (reopens 25 April).

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Friday 14 April

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Crafts of ancient Egypt', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
£1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

SHELDONIAN THEATRE closed (reopens 25 April).

LANGUAGE CENTRE closed (reopens 25 April).

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Tuesday 18 April

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Eighteenth-century Venetian drawings'
(special exhibiton), 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9
a.m.–1 p.m.)

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Thursday 20 April

UNIVERSITY OFFICES closed (reopen 25 April).

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Friday 21 April

ASHMOLEAN LIBRARY closed (reopens 25 April).

BODLEIAN LIBRARY—all buildings closed (reopens 25 April; for
variations, see separate notice in this Gazette).

TAYLOR INSTITUTION LIBRARY closed (reopens 25 April).

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Tuesday 25 April

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Islamic arts and crafts', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
£1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

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Thursday 27 April

ACADEMIC STAFF Development Programme seminar: `Small group teaching',
2 p.m. (see information above).

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Friday 28 April

ACADEMIC STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME SEMINARS: `Gender in teaching',
9.30 a.m., and `Memory skills', 1.30 p.m. (see information
above
).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Seventeenth- and eighteenth-century
dress', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1
p.m.)

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Sunday 30 April

TRINITY FULL TERM begins.

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