23 May 1996

University Acts

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 18 May

Conferment of Honorary Degree

The Degree of Master of Arts, honoris causa, approved by Special Resolution of Congregation on 19 March 1996, was conferred upon SIR ASHLEY PONSONBY, BT, KCVO, MC.

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CONGREGATION 20 May

Degree by Special Resolution

No notice to the contrary having been received under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1995, p. 13), the following resolution is deemed to have been approved at noon on 20 May.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

FIONN PATRICK EDWARD DUNNE, Hertford College

ANNE WATSON, Linacre College

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HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL 20 May

1 Decrees

Council has made the following decrees, to come into effect on 7 June.

List of the decrees:

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Explanatory note to Decree (1)

No notice of opposition having been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor will declare carried at the meeting of Congregation on 28 May Statute (1), establishing the Degree of Master of Business Administration, which was promulgated on 14 May (see `University Agenda' below). Council has accordingly made the following decree, which gives effect to consequential changes.

[For text of Decree (1) see `University Agenda', Gazette, 25 April 1996.]

Explanatory note to Decree (2)

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Law Board and with the concurrence of the General Board, increases membership of the electoral board for the Vinerian Professorship of English Law from seven to nine, in line with the recommendations of the Working Party on Statutory Posts, by addition of one further member appointed by each of the Law Board and the General Board.

Decree (2)

In Ch. VII, Sect. III, § 177, cl. 2 (Statutes, 1995, p. 436), delete items (5)–(7) and substitute: `(5), (6) two persons appointed by the General Board of the Faculties;

(7)–(9) three persons appointed by the Board of the Faculty of Law.'

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Explanatory note to Decree (3)

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Literae Humaniores Board and with the concurrence of the General Board, establishes a new trust fund, the Grocyn Fund, with money raised under the Development Campaign.

Decree (3)

In Ch. IX, Sect. I (Statutes, 1995, p. 583), insert new § 133 as follows and renumber existing § 133 as § 134: `§ 133. Grocyn Fund

1. The University accepts with gratitude from the Trustee of the Campaign for Oxford Trust Fund donations received, and such further sums as shall be contributed for the same purpose, to establish a fund to be known as the Grocyn Fund, the net income of which shall be applied to promote the teaching and study of Ancient Greek and Latin Languages and Literature.

2. The Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores shall be the board of management for the fund.

3. Council shall have power to amend this decree from time to time, provided that the main object of the fund, as defined in clause 1 above, is always kept in view.'

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Explanatory note to Decree (4)

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Modern History Board and with the concurrence of the General Board, accepts a benefaction from Mr A.H.M. Kirk-Greene for the maintenance of a prize in Modern African History, to be awarded on the basis of performance in the Final Honour School of Modern History and the associated joint schools.

Decree (4)

In Ch. IX, Sect. I (Statutes, 1995, p. 600), insert new § 194 as follows and renumber existing §§ 194–5 as §§ 195–6:

`§ 194. Kirk-Greene Prize

1. The University accepts with gratitude a gift of £1,250 from Mr A.H.M. Kirk-Greene, sometime Lecturer in the Modern History of Africa.

2. The gift shall be invested to form a fund, the net income of which shall be used for the maintenance of a prize to be called the Kirk-Greene Prize in Modern African History. The fund shall be administered by the Board of the Faculty of Modern History.

3. The prize shall be awarded on the basis of the best performance in the area of Modern African History in the Final Honour School of Modern History and the associated joint schools, provided that suitable candidates present themselves.

4. Council shall have power to amend this decree from time to time, provided that the main object of the fund, as stated in clause 2 above, is always kept in view.'

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Explanatory note to Decree (5)

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Biological Sciences Board and with the concurrence of the General Board, replaces the Preliminary Examination in Biology with Honour Moderations and a (resit) Preliminary Examination in Biological Sciences. The new course is intended to give students an understanding of all the main fields of Biology in order to prepare them for more advanced study in selected areas in the Final Honour School. Examination will be by written papers and assessment of records of class, laboratory, and practical work. The decree also provides for the appointment of an additional external examiner in the Final Honour School, to increase the scope of subjects covered and to reduce the workload on each of the external examiners.

Associated changes in regulations, and further changes to the syllabus for the Honour School of Natural Science (Biological Sciences) to increase the range of coverage of biological topics, were set out in Gazette No. 4398, 25 April 1996, pp. 1014–15.

Decree (5)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 23, after l. 10 insert: `Biological Sciences,'.

2 Ibid., l. 32, delete `Biology' and substitute `Biological Sciences'.

3 Ibid., p. 24, l. 41, delete `or in Biology,'.

4 Ibid., p. 25, after l. 4 insert new cl. 6 as follows and renumber existing cll. 6–15 (from p. 25, l. 5 to p. 26, l. 1) as cll. 7–16: `6. A candidate may enter his or her name for the Preliminary Examination in Biological Sciences not earlier than the third term from his or her matriculation.'

5 Ibid., p. 26, after l. 24 insert: `Biological Sciences;'.

6 Ibid., p. 28, after l. 29 insert:

`Honour Moderations in Biological Sciences

The subjects of the examination, the syllabus, and the number of papers shall be as prescribed by regulation from time to time by the Board of the Faculty of Biological Sciences.'

7 Ibid., delete from p. 76, l. 43 to p. 77, l. 28 and substitute:

`Preliminary Examination in Biological Sciences

1. The subjects of the examination, the syllabus, and the number of papers shall be as prescribed by regulation from time to time by the Board of the Faculty of Biological Sciences.

2. The Chairman of the Moderators for Honour Moderations in Biological Sciences shall designate such of their number as may be required for the Preliminary Examination in Biological Sciences.'

8 Ibid., p. 976, ll. 22–3, delete `the Preliminary Examination in Biology' and substitute `Honour Moderations in Biological Sciences'.

9 Ibid., p. 987, delete l. 24 and substitute: `in Biological Sciences in Honour Moderations and the Preliminary Examination for two years;'.

10 Ibid., p. 993, delete l. 31 (i.e. the thirty-first line on the page, on which the lines have been incorrectly numbered in the 1995 edition) and substitute: `Up to eight for Honour Moderations in Biological Sciences, of whom as many as required shall also be Moderators for the Preliminary Examination in Biological Sciences.'

11 Ibid., p. 995, l. 25 (i.e. the twenty-fifth line on the page, on which the lines have been incorrectly numbered in the 1995 edition), delete `eight' and substitute `nine'.

12 This decree shall be effective from 1 October 1996.

Key to Decree (5)

Cll. 1 and 6 establish Honour Moderations in Biological Sciences as a First Public Examination.

Cll. 2, 5, and 7 re-establish the existing Preliminary Examination in Biology as a Preliminary Examination in Biological Sciences, to serve as the resit for the new Honour Moderations examination.

Cll. 3 and 4 establish the entry time for the Preliminary Examination in Biological Sciences.

Cll. 8–10 provide for the appointment of moderators and examiners for the First Public Examinations in Biological Sciences.

Cl. 11 provides for the appointment of an additional external examiner in the Second Public Examination.

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Explanatory note to Decree (6)

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Oriental Studies Board and with the concurrence of the General Board, is necessitated by the introduction of a mandatory year abroad for students of Hebrew (Course II) and the consequent lengthening of that course to four years.

Associated changes in regulations were set out in Gazette No. 4398, 25 April 1996, p. 1020.

Decree (6)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 128, l. 16, after `Arabic' insert `or Hebrew'.

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Explanatory note to Decree (7)

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Theology Board with the support of the Oriental Studies Board and with the concurrence of the General Board, establishes a one-year course in the study of religion for the degree of M.St., for a limited period of five years in the first instance. The course is intended to exploit Oxford's excellent resources in the study of religion, and will provide an academic grounding in the study of religion and an understanding of two religious traditions. Examinations will be by written papers and viva.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in `Examinations and Boards' below.

Decree (7)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 660, after l. 28 insert:


`Study of Religion    Theology'.

2 Ibid., p. 968, ll. 42–3, after `Philosophical Theology,' insert `in the Study of Religion,'.

3 Ibid., p. 976, l. 39, after `Philosophy,' insert `for the examinations in the Study of Religion for the Degree of Master of Studies,'.

4 This decree shall be effective from 1 October 1996.

Key to Decree (7)

Cl. 1 inserts the Study of Religion into the list of examinations for the degree of M.St.

Cll. 2 and 3 provide for the appointment of examiners.

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Explanatory note to Decree (8)

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the General Board, introduces a three-month time limit from the date of the oral examination for a research degree for the completion of minor corrections. This is proposed to deal with the increasing number of cases in which minor corrections are left unfinished and the examination process is therefore incomplete. Where candidates can show good cause why corrections cannot be completed within this time, an extension of three months may be given by the faculty board or committee concerned. If corrections are not completed within these periods, a student's status will automatically lapse and he or she will be required to apply for reinstatement and to pay a reinstatement fee in order to complete the examination process.

Decree (8)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 770, l. 43, concerning examination of M.Litt. students, after `report' insert `. If the candidate has not completed these corrections within three calendar months of the date of the oral examination, his or her name shall be removed by the Secretary of Faculties from the Register of Students for the Degree of Master of Letters, provided that the board may, on good cause shown by the candidate, grant an extension of time of three further calendar months in which the candidate may fulfil this requirement before the removal of his or her name from the Register. No subsequent extension shall be granted, but it shall be open to a candidate who has failed to fulfil this requirement within those three or six months in total, as the case may be, to apply to the board for reinstatement as a Student for the Degree of Master of Letters, with the support of his or her society and supervisor, upon submission to the Secretary of Faculties of a copy of his or her thesis incorporating the required corrections, and upon payment of such reinstatement fee as may from time to time be prescribed by Council by decree. Permission to supplicate shall not be granted until this fee has been paid'.

2 Ibid., p. 780, l. 4, concerning examination of students for the M.Sc. (by Research), after `report' and insert `. If the candidate has not completed these corrections within three calendar months of the date of the oral examination, his or her name shall be removed by the Secretary of Faculties from the Register of Students for the Degree of Master of Science by Research, provided that the board may, on good cause shown by the candidate, grant an extension of time of three further calendar months in which the candidate may fulfil this requirement before the removal of his or her name from the Register. No subsequent extension shall be granted, but it shall be open to a candidate who has failed to fulfil this requirement within those three or six months in total, as the case may be, to apply to the board for reinstatement as a Student for the Degree of Master of Science by Research, with the support of his or her society and supervisor, upon submission to the Secretary of Faculties of a copy of his or her thesis incorporating the required corrections, and upon payment of such reinstatement fee as may from time to time be prescribed by Council by decree. Permission to supplicate shall not be granted until this fee has been paid'.

3 Ibid., p. 792, l. 4, concerning examination of D.Phil. students, after `report' insert `. If the candidate has not completed these corrections within three calendar months of the date of the oral examination, his or her name shall be removed by the Secretary of Faculties from the Register of Students for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, provided that the board may, on good cause shown by the candidate, grant an extension of time of three further calendar months in which the candidate may fulfil this requirement before the removal of his or her name from the Register. No subsequent extension shall be granted, but it shall be open to a candidate who has failed to fulfil this requirement within those three or six months in total, as the case may be, to apply to the board for reinstatement as a Student for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, with the support of his or her society and supervisor, upon submission to the Secretary of Faculties of a copy of his or her thesis incorporating the required corrections, and upon payment of such reinstatement fee as may from time to time be prescribed by Council by decree. Permission to supplicate shall not be granted until this fee has been paid'.

4 Ibid., p. 1047, l. 37, after `D.Phil.' insert `, or on reinstatement on the Register of Students for the degree of M.Litt., M.Sc. (by Research), or D.Phil.,'.

5 This decree shall be effective from 1 October 1996.

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Explanatory note to Decree (9)

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Clinical Medicine Board and with the concurrence of the General Board, inserts the requirement for candidates for admission to the Second Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Medicine to have passed the Qualifying Examination in Medical Sociology or to have pursued a course of study in the medical sciences which includes the subject of medical sociology.

Decree (9)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 860, l. 9, after `Examination' insert `and the Qualifying Examination in Medical Sociology'.

2 Ibid., l. 12, after `Examination' insert `and the Qualifying Examination in Medical Sociology'.

3 Ibid., l. 16, after `Medicine' insert `and the Qualifying Examination in Medical Sociology'.

4 Ibid., p. 864, l. 3, after `admission' insert `to the Second Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Medicine and'.

5 Ibid., l. 4, delete `University of' and substitute `Universities of Cambridge and'.

6 This decree shall be effective from 1 October 1999.

Key to Decree (9)

Cll. 1–4 insert the requirement to have passed the Qualifying Examination in Medical Sociology, or to have pursued a course of study in the medical sciences which includes the subject of medical sociology, for admission to the Second Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Medicine.

Cl. 5 inserts the Clinical School of the University of Cambridge as requiring the Qualifying Examination in Medical Sociology for entry.

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Decree (10)

Notwithstanding the provisions of Ch. III, Sect. LXII, § 4, cl. 2 (Statutes, 1995, p. 310), Council may assign the Sub-department of Particle and Nuclear Physics to Dr G. Myatt for a period of one year from 1 October 1996.

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Decree (11)

Notwithstanding the provisions of Ch. III, Sect. LXII, § 4, cl. 2 (Statutes, 1995, p. 310), Council may assign the Sub-department of Particle and Nuclear Physics to Professor S. Cooper for a period of three years from 1 October 1997.

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Decree (12)

Notwithstanding the provisions of Ch. VII, Sect. I, § 5. B, cl. 5 (Statutes, 1995, p. 367), Council may assign the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory to Professor M.L.H. Green for a period of two years from 1 October 1996.

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Decree (13)

Notwithstanding the provisions of Tit. X, Sect. i, proviso ( h) (Statutes, 1995, p. 74), Professor J.G.A. Pocock may be appointed as Sir Isaiah Berlin Visiting Professor in the History of Ideas for 1996–7.

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2 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts under the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. vi, cl. 1 (Statutes, 1995, p. 345) has been accorded to the following persons who are qualified for membership of Congregation:

 

ROBIN BRUNNER-ELLIS, New College

SIÂN MERYL GRIFFITHS, Department of Public Health and Primary Care

RONALD SPENCER KIDD, University Offices

JOHN ROBERT LEHANE, Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics

GÁBOR GYÖRGY LIBERTINY, Nuffield Department of Surgery

ANNEKE LUCASSEN, D.PHIL., Wolfson College

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3 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of Congregation:

Brunner-Ellis, R., MA status, New College
Carmichael, E.D.H., BM, MA, D.Phil., St John's
Dunne, F.P.E., MA, Hertford
Griffiths, S.M., MA status, Department of Public Health and Primary Care
Kidd, R.S., MA status, University Offices
Lehane, J.R., MA status, Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics
Libertiny, G.G., MA status, Nuffield Department of Surgery
Lucassen, A., MA status, D.Phil., Wolfson
Wasserstein, B.M.J., MA, D.Phil., St Cross
Watson, A., MA, Linacre

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BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 7 June, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

University Agenda

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 27 May

Degree by Special Resolution

The following special resolution will be deemed to be approved at noon on 27 May, unless by that time the Registrar has received notice in writing from two or more members of Congregation under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1995, p. 13) that they wish the resolution to be put to a meeting of Congregation.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

SEAN PAUL NEE, Lady Margaret Hall

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CONGREGATION 11 June 2 p.m.

1 Promulgation of Statutes

Explanatory note to Statute (1)

The current statute governing procedures in Congregation incorporates changes made in 1991 to enable a meeting, at which the only business due to be conducted consists of items notice of opposition to which must be given in advance, to be cancelled if such notice (or a request for adjournment) has not been received. Should a meeting nevertheless be required, either because of another item or because the Vice-Chancellor considers that an item is `of such general concern to the University as a whole that it would be inappropriate to proceed without an opportunity for further explanation or debate', then the unopposed item must be `declared by the Chairman to be carried without question put'. It has come to notice that a situation could arise in which a non-hostile amendment, acceptable to Council, was proposed (e.g. for clarificatory purposes) and in which there would then have to be a meeting of Congregation even if neither the amendment nor the substantive resolution was in any way controversial. The following statute is accordingly promoted by Council to enable a meeting of Congregation to be cancelled in such circumstances. Because of the possibility that an amendment might be intended as non-hostile by its proponents, and seen as acceptable by Council, but that other members of Congregation might object to it, the proposed change in procedure would provide for alternative arrangements: either, if the urgency of the matter permitted, receipt of an ostensibly non-hostile amendment would cause the postponement of the proceedings on the substantive resolution by at least two weeks, advance written notice would be required of opposition to the amendment, and in the absence of such notice the amended resolution would be declared carried without question put; or, alternatively, the amendment would be put to the House at the meeting at which the resolution was originally to be moved, after which the amended resolution, or the unamended resolution if the amendment failed, would be declared carried without question put (i.e. in neither case would the resolution be put to the House).

At the same time opportunity is taken to provide for Council to be able to decide, at its meeting on the afternoon of the day by noon on which advance notice of opposition to a general resolution must be given in writing, that a general resolution proposed by twelve or more members of Congregation is unacceptable to Council. Under the existing statute, it is necessary for two members of Council to give formal written notice on Council's behalf before noon (unless the timing of the submission of the resolution has enabled Council to decide two weeks previously whether or not the resolution is acceptable to Council), on the basis that this notice would be withdrawn if Council agreed subsequently that the resolution was acceptable to it after all. (The deadline for notice by two or more members of Congregation will remain as noon, since otherwise Council would not necessarily know whether there was any other opposition to the resolution.)

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(1) WHEREAS it is expedient to revise procedures in Congregation in order to enable both an unopposed general resolution and an unopposed amendment to such a resolution to be declared carried without question put, and in order to enable Council as well as members of Congregation to give formal notice of opposition to a general resolution, THE UNIVERSITY ENACTS AS FOLLOWS.

1 In Tit. II, Sect. V (Statutes, 1995, p. 11; Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 1074), insert new cl. 6 as follows and renumber existing cll. 6–13 (pp. 11–12; pp. 1074–5) as cll. 7–14:

`6. Members of Congregation proposing an amendment under the provisions of clause 5 above shall state whether or not the amendment is in their view hostile to the general resolution (that is to say, the amendment is such that if it were not carried the proposers of the amendment would oppose the resolution). If they state that it is not hostile, and if the amendment is acceptable to Council, then Council may decide that proceedings on the resolution and on the proposed amendment thereto shall be adjourned to a meeting of Congregation held not fewer than fourteen days after the meeting at which the resolution was originally to be moved under the provisions of clause 4 above; Council may also, by publication of a notice in the University Gazette not later than the twelfth day before the meeting of Congregation to which the proceedings have been adjourned, require that any two members proposing to oppose the amendment shall give notice in writing to the Registrar to that effect not later than the eighth day before the meeting to which the proceedings have been adjourned, and such notice, if given, shall be published by the Registrar in the University Gazette not later than the fourth day before that meeting. If such notice of opposition, having been duly required, has not been given, and if Council has not decided by 4 p.m. on the eighth day before the meeting at which the resolution was originally to be moved that the proposed amendment is unacceptable to Council, or, if Council has decided that the proposed amendment is unacceptable to it, Council has not also caused a notice to that effect to be published in the University Gazette not later than the fourth day before the meeting, then the amended resolution shall, at the conclusion of proceedings on the amendment and the resolution, be declared by the Chairman to be carried without question put, and the provisions of clause 7 below, and of Sect. III, cl. 10 of this Title, shall not apply to the amendment or the resolution. Alternatively, if proceedings have not been so adjourned, then, subject to the provisions of clause 7 below, the proposed amendment shall, at the conclusion of proceedings on it, be put to the House; if the amendment is carried, the amended resolution shall subsequently, be declared by the Chairman to be carried without question put, while, if the amendment is rejected, the unamended resolution shall subsequently be declared by the Chairman to be carried without question put, and in neither case shall the provisions of clause 7 below, or of Sect. III, cl. 10 of this Title, apply to the resolution.'

2 Ibid., cl. 7, as renumbered, delete `clause 8' and substitute `clause 9'.

3 Ibid., cl. 9, as renumbered, after `oppose the resolution' insert `; or Council may, not later than 4 p.m. on that day, instruct the Registrar to give notice that the resolution is unacceptable to Council'.

4 Ibid., after `Such notice' insert `(whether of opposition by members of Congregation or of unacceptability to Council)'.

5 Ibid. (p. 12; p. 1074), delete `clause 6' and substitute `clause 7'.

6 Ibid., cll. 11, 12, and 13, as renumbered, in each case delete `clause 9' and substitute `clause 10'.

7 Ibid., cl. 13, as renumbered (p. 12; p. 1075), delete `clauses 5–7' and substitute `clauses 5–8'.

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Explanatory note to Statute (2) and to Special Resolution

As colleges were informed individually in Hilary Term, Council has received from Wycliffe Hall a petition for the grant of a licence as a Permanent Private Hall. Council has considered in some detail the current position of the college, including its finances and its future plans, and is satisfied that Wycliffe Hall's request is entirely appropriate. It has noted that all but one of the colleges which have commented on the proposal either support or do not object to it. Council therefore now forwards to Congregation a special resolution, as is required by statute, seeking the consent of Congregation to the grant to Wycliffe Hall of a licence as a Permanent Private Hall and to the name by which the hall is to be called. If Congregation approves the special resolution, Mr Vice-Chancellor will grant the licence with effect from 1 October 1996.

The hall has indicated that it would not wish to increase its current numbers significantly, that the primary function of the hall would continue to be preparation for the Anglican ministry, and that it would not expect to admit students for courses other than in Theology (or related subjects, e.g. joint honour schools involving Theology). The hall intends to admit under the new arrangements primarily those who are preparing for ministry or already engaged in ministry. The hall sees the achievement of Permanent Private Hall status as an enhancement and consolidation of its existing role, in that it would thereby be able to prepare candidates for degrees for which at present it could not (i.e. research degrees) and would be able to carry ministerial training to the highest level. It has also confirmed that it has no ambitions in due course to seek full collegiate status

. Within its total numbers the hall wishes to continue to admit some twenty-five ordinands who would not be presented for matriculation and would not read for any degree, diploma, or certificate of the University. These would be ordination candidates under supervision by the hall under `Bishop's Regulations' rather than any university regulations; the decision to admit them, as well as responsibility for their subsequent teaching and assessment, is the sole responsibility of the hall. In contrast, the admission of those undergraduates who would be presented for matriculation is controlled under the aegis of a committee on which the Theology Board is represented; the students are taught `tutorially' and are examined by the University. The Theology Board is also responsible for the admission of all graduate students. The hall believes, and Council has endorsed that view, that in these circumstances a reasonable case for distinction between ordination candidates and matriculated students can be made. The formal position, however, is that under the provisions of Tit. VII, Sect. VI, § 1, cl. 5 (Statutes, 1995, p. 48),

`... all statutes of the University in which mention is made generally and without distinction of colleges and other societies shall be deemed to include and apply to the members of Permanent Private Halls.'

Under Tit. XI, cl. 1 (ibid., p. 77),

`No person shall be matriculated as a member of the University unless he or she shall first have been made a member of a college or other society, and no person shall continue to be a member of a college or other society unless he or she is presented for matriculation as a member of the University within a period laid down by decree or regulation.'

The association of these two statutes constitute the current requirement that all members of a Permanent Private Hall must be presented for matriculation. Council takes the view, however, that there could be a particular justification in allowing Permanent Private Halls, unlike colleges, and given their particular mission as `religious houses', to have a `distinguishable' group within their membership who were not required to be presented for matriculation, particularly as it is thought that a number of the Permanent Private Halls currently have a body of `religious' or individuals undergoing ordination training associated with them who are not presented for matriculation. Council therefore has reviewed the existing statutory position, and the position at the individual Permanent Private Halls, in consultation with the halls, and puts forward the following statute providing for exemption from the matriculation requirement for certain categories of students, which would then be sanctioned by decree. It is expected that any such decree would set an upper limit on the number of such students and precisely define the categories of non-matriculated students who might be admitted. For its part Wycliffe Hall has confirmed that, should it be granted a licence as a Permanent Private Hall, it would be willing to introduce arrangements under which those of its members who were not presented for matriculation would be subject to Proctorial discipline, a point on which Council (and the Proctors) had expressed concern. Council would expect similar arrangements to apply at any hall granted permission to admit non-matriculated students.

If Congregation approves the special resolution, it will be necessary to amend the existing decree, Ch. V, Sect. XI (ibid., p. 349), under which Wycliffe Hall, along with the other Anglican Theological Colleges associated with the University (St Stephen's House and Ripon College, Cuddesdon), may present a certain number of qualified candidates for specified degrees and diplomas, primarily in Theology and related subjects. This decree, in any case, requires amendment because its provisions expire after 1995-6. The provision has been reviewed by the Theology Board, in consultation with the remaining two Anglican Theological Colleges associated with the University, and it is proposed in cl. 2 of the decree to be made by Council if the special resolution is approved that the provision be extended for a further five years, subject to review at the end of that period, on the same conditions as apply at present, and that the upper limits on numbers, which will now apply to St Stephen's House and Ripon College only (as effected by cl. 3 of the decree), be reduced as shown in cll. 4 and 5 of the decree.

Currently, Council fixes by decree the maximum number of home and EU undergraduates permitted to be presented for matriculation at each of the Permanent Private Halls. Wycliffe Hall has suggested the figure of fifty-five for this limit in its own case, a figure which is acceptable to Council. Cl. 6 of the decree limits this category of student to that number. There is no formal limit on the number of graduate students who may be admitted by a Permanent Private Hall. Wycliffe Hall would envisage a modest increase in the number of graduate students at the hall, primarily through its ability as a Permanent Private Hall to admit research students. (Cl. 1 of the decree removes the now otiose provision under which Wycliffe Hall is deemed to be a society of the University for the purposes of degree ceremonies.)

 

(2) WHEREAS it is expedient to make provision for the Permanent Private Halls to admit certain categories of student (normally non- degree candidates for ordination training) who are not presented for matriculation, THE UNIVERSITY ENACTS AS FOLLOWS.

In Tit. VII, Sect. VI, § 1, cl. 5 (Statutes, 1995, p. 48) after `members of Permanent Private Halls' insert `except as shall be determined otherwise by Council by decree'.

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Explanatory note to Statute (3)

Council has reviewed the provisions of Tit. IX, Sect. VII (Statutes, 1995, p. 68), which deals with the appointment and duties of the Registrar and other officials. As the statute is worded at present, there are two provisions which have become outmoded, to an extent reflecting the position which obtained when the Central Administration was considerably smaller than it is at present. Cl. 12 (p. 70) currently provides that, in addition to the Registrar and the five deputies to the Registrar, there shall be such other staff of the Central Administration as Council, consulting as appropriate, shall consider necessary. While Council would be likely to be consulted on the creation and/or redeployment or realignment of one of the senior posts within the Central Administration, the current mechanism by which the establishment of the Central Administration is controlled is essentially the budget, as approved by Council and the General Board on the recommendation of their joint Resources Committee. It is essential that the budget of the Central Administration should be reviewed from time to time, as with all spending sectors within the University, but Council is content that this should be done, as at present, through the Resources Committee's budgetary mechanism under which expansion may be permitted or reductions imposed. Cl. 1 of the following statute deletes the requirement for Council's approval of posts other than those of the Registrar and the five deputies to the Registrar. This is done on the understanding that the Registrar will continue as a matter of normal practice to consult Council or the Vice-Chancellor on behalf of Council on changes in senior posts (i.e. at ALC 6).

Cl. 15 (p. 71) currently provides that all staff of the Central Administration, other than the Registrar and the five deputies to the Registrar, who are appointed by Council, in consultation as appropriate with other bodies, shall be appointed by the Vice-Chancellor. Cl. 2 of the following statute deletes that requirement and provides that other staff shall be appointed as Council shall determine. As part of the current review, Council has agreed guidelines for the appointment of staff of the Central Administration which include a requirement that all appointments at ALC 6 should be subject to the Vice-Chancellor's approval.

 

(3) WHEREAS it is expedient to amend the current statutory provisions governing the control of the establishment of, and appointment to posts within, the Central Administration, THE UNIVERSITY ENACTS AS FOLLOWS.

1 In Tit. IX, Sect. vii (Statutes, 1995, p. 70), delete cl. 12 and substitute: `12. There shall also be five deputies to the Registrar as follows:

(a) a Secretary of the Chest;

(b) a Secretary of Faculties;

(c) a Surveyor to the University;

(d) a Deputy Registrar (Administration);

(e) a Deputy Registrar (General).'

2 Ibid., cl. 15 (p. 71), delete `The staff referred to ... Buildings Committee' and substitute `Other staff shall be appointed as Council shall determine'.

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2 Voting on Special Resolution consenting to grant of licence as a Permanent Private Hall

That this House consent to the grant of a licence as a Permanent Private Hall to Wycliffe Hall, by which name the hall shall be known.

Decree to be made by Council if the Special Resolution is approved

1 In Ch. I, Sect. I, § 1, cl. 7, concerning admission to degrees (Statutes, 1995, p. 177), after `Cuddesdon;' insert `and', and delete `; and Wycliffe Hall'.

2 In Ch. V, Sect. XI, cl. 1, concerning matriculation for theological courses (p. 349), delete `1995–6' and substitute `2000–1'.

3 Ibid., delete `Wycliffe Hall,'.

4 Ibid., delete `fifty' and substitute `thirty'.

5 Ibid., delete `thirty-six' and substitute `twenty-four'.

6 In Ch. XI, Sect. VII, concerning numbers at permanent private halls (p. 715), after the entry for St Benet's Hall insert:

`Wycliffe Hall    55'.

7 This decree shall be effective from 1 October 1996.

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CONGREGATION 19 June

1 Encaenia

Mr Vice-Chancellor invites Pro-Vice-Chancellors, Heads of Houses, Doctors of Divinity, Civil Law, Medicine, Music, Letters, and Science, the Proctors, the Assessor, the Public Orator, the Professor of Poetry, and the Registrar to partake of Lord Crewe's Benefaction to the University, meeting him in the Hall of Jesus College at 10.45 a.m. on Wednesday, 19 June. Thence they will go in procession to the Sheldonian Theatre, where will be spoken the Oration in Commemoration of the Benefactors of the University according to the intention of the Right Honourable Nathaniel, Lord Crewe, Bishop of Durham.

 

Note. Pro-Vice-Chancellors, Heads of Houses, and Doctors who propose to accept Mr Vice-Chancellor's invitation, and to be present in the Sheldonian Theatre, are requested to inform his Secretary at the University Offices, Wellington Square, not later than Wednesday, 12 June.

2 Honorary Degrees

Doctor of Divinity

THE RT REVD AND RT. HON. THE LORD HABGOOD, PC (MA, PH.D. Cambridge), formerly Archbishop of York

Doctor of Civil Law

HIS EXCELLENCY SIR ROBERT YEWDALL JENNINGS, QC (MA, HON. LL.D. Cambridge), formerly Whewell Professor of International Law, University of Cambridge, and formerly Judge, and President, of the International Court of Justice

Doctors of Letters

PROFESSOR WALTER BURKERT (DR.PHIL. Erlangen), Emeritus Professor of Classical Philology, University of Zürich

SIR NORMAN ROBERT FOSTER, RA, RDI, RIBA, FSCD, FAIA, architect

MRS DORIS MAY LESSING, author

PROFESSOR AMARTYA KUMAR SEN, MA (MA, PH.D. Cambridge), FBA, formerly Fellow of All Souls College and Drummond Professor of Political Economy, Professor of Economics and Philosophy and Lamont University Professor, Harvard University

Doctors of Science

PROFESSOR SIR JAMES BLACK (MB, CH.B. St Andrews), FRCP, FRS, Honorary Fellow of Wolfson College, Professor of Analytical Pharmacology, King's College School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of London

PROFESSOR SIR GEOFFREY WILKINSON (B.SC., PH.D. London), FRS, Honorary Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall, Emeritus Professor of Inorganic Chemistry, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, University of London

¶ Arrangements for admission to the Sheldonian Theatre, which will be by ticket only, are published in `Notices' below.

Notices

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

Lectures

Contents of this section:

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NEWTON–ABRAHAM LECTURE

PROFESSOR ARTHUR M. BROWN, Vice-President, Research MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, Newton–Abraham Professor 1995–6, will deliver his Newton–Abraham Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 12 June, in the Lecture Theatre, the Department of Pharmacology.

Subject: `The genes of excitability.'

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MAURICE LUBBOCK MEMORIAL LECTURE

DR D. CRABB, Rover Group Ltd., will deliver the twenty-second Maurice Lubbock Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 31 May, in Lecture Room 1, the Department of Engineering Science.

Subject: `A history of the automobile engine, 1970–2014.'

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O'DONNELL LECTURE IN CELTIC STUDIES 1995–6

PROFESSOR DONATIEN LAURENT, Directeur de recherche, CNRS, and Directeur du Centre de recherche bretonne et celtique, Université de Bretagne occidentale, will deliver the O'Donnell Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 30 May, in Room 2, the Taylor Institution.

Subject: `Ronan's eyes: duality tamed in Breton folk culture.'

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CLINICAL MEDICINE

Nuffield Department of Orthopaedic Surgery: clinical research seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Mondays in the Lecture Theatre of the department.

Conveners: J. Kenwright, BM, MA, Nuffield Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, and M.J.O. Francis, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in Orthopaedic Surgery.

DR N. LOVERIDGE, Cambridge
3 June: `Growth hormone and bone through the ages.'

DR T. CAWSTON, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge
24 June: `The role of cytokinesin promoting cartilage degradation and its relevance in rheumatic diseases.'

DR J. COMPSTON, Cambridge
1 July: `Some mechanisms of drug effects in osteoporosis.'

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Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology: lunch-time seminars

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Mondays in the Library, the Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology.

Convener: J.J. Harding, MA status, University Research Lecturer.

DR R. SAFA
3 June: `Melatonin and retinal ischaemia.'

MR R. MCCORD
10 June: `Role of protein kinase C in retinal ischaemia.'

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CLINICAL MEDICINE AND PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

The following lectures will be given on Friday, 28 June, in the Lecture Theatre, the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology.

Convener: S. Gordon, MA, Glaxo Professor of Cellular Pathology.

DR N. MAEDA, North Carolina at Chapel Hill
1 p.m.: `Using mice to study atherogenesis.'

PROFESSOR O. SMITHIES, North Carolina at Chapel Hill
2.30 p.m.: `Gene targeting for studying hypertension.'

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LITERAE HUMANIORES

David Lewis Lecture

PROFESSOR MICHAEL JAMESON, Crossett Professor of Humanities Emeritus, Stanford University, will deliver the David Lewis Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 29 May, in the Garden Quad Auditorium, St John's College.

Subject: `The rituals of Athena Polias in Athens.'

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MODERN HISTORY

The recent history of the Oxford Science Area

DR P.W. KENT, Emeritus Student of Christ Church and formerly Dr Lee's Professor of Chemistry, will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 29 May, in Linacre College.

Conveners: R. Fox, MA, D.Phil., Professor of the History of Science, and J.J. Roche, D.Phil., Linacre College.

 

Subject: `Carbohydrates at Oxford: "linked sweetness long drawn out".'

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ORIENTAL STUDIES

PROFESSOR INDIRA PETERSON, Mount Holyoke College, will lecture at 3 p.m. on Thursday, 6 June, in Lecture Room 1, the Oriental Institute.

Convener: R. Gombrich, MA, D.Phil., Boden Professor of Sanskrit.

 

Subject: `Sanskrit farces from eighteenth-century Tanjavur.'

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SOCIAL STUDIES

PROFESSOR HARRISON C. WHITE, Columbia, will lecture at 4 p.m. on Friday, 31 May, in Barnett House, Wellington Square.

Convener: M. Hechter, MA, University Lecturer in Sociology.

 

Subject: `Markets, hierarchies, and social networks.'

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ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM

Lectures in association with exhibition: `Ruskin and Oxford'

The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on the days shown in the Lecture Theatre, the Ashmolean Museum. They are given in association with the current exhibition `Ruskin and Oxford', which will be open until 15 September.

PROFESSOR J. BURROW, Professor of European Thought
Tue. 28 May: `The Lamp of Memory: Ruskin and the Victorian sense of the past.'

THE VERY REVD JOHN DRURY, Dean of Christ Church
Thur. 30 May: `Ruskin on religion and art.'

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UNIVERSITY COUNSELLING SERVICE

Annual Conference

Understanding and working within organisational change

The annual conference will be held on Friday, 21 June, in St Catherine's College. Details and application forms are available from the Conference Secretary, the University Counselling Service, 11 Wellington Square, Oxford (telephone: Oxford (2)70300). Details of speakers are given below.

SIR DOUGLAS HAGUE, Associate Fellow, Templeton College: `Can university cultures be changed?'

JON STOKES, Director, Tavistock Consultance Service, Tavistock Clinic, London: `Do organisations have minds?'

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DEPARTMENT OF THE HISTORY OF ART

The literacy of vision

The following public lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the main Lecture Hall, the Taylor Institution.

PROFESSOR M.JAY, Berkeley (Astor Visiting Lecturer)
29 May: `Returning the gaze: the American response to the French critique of ocularcentrism.'

PROFESSOR D. PETHERBRIDGE, Royal College of Art
5 June: `Drawing: the illegitimacy of skill.'

PROFESSOR L. JORDANOVA, York
12 June: Historians and their images.'

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MUSEUM OF THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE

Delta Lecture

PROFESSOR S. LINDQVIST, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 28 May, in the Danson Room, Trinity College.

Subject: `The bricks and mortar of science.'

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QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

Seminar in Contemporary South Asia

`Meals ready': rural markets and the business of food

The UK première of a film of this title, directed by S. Sarkar in collaboration with Barbara Harriss-White, will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursday, 30 May, in the Blackhall Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House. The film-showing will be followed by a discussion.

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CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE

F.W. Bateson Memorial Lecture 1997

DR E. GRIFFITHS, University Lecturer in English and Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, will deliver the F.W. Bateson Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 19 February 1997, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `The disappointment of Christina G. Rossetti.'

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TRINITY COLLEGE

Richard Hillary Memorial Lecture

NADIME GORDIMER will deliver the Richard Hillary Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 31 May, in the St Cross Building.

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WESTMINSTER COLLEGE

Issues in the social scientific study of (religious) experience

The Alister Hardy Religious Experience Research Centre will hold a conference on this topic on Friday, 7 June, 10 a.m.–3 p.m., in Westminster College.

The cost of attendance is £15. Bookings should be addressed, before 4 June, to Laurence Brown, Religious Experience Research Centre, Westminster College, Oxford OX2 9AT (telephone: Oxford 243006).

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Grants and Research Funding

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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RESEARCH SERVICES OFFICE

The Oxford University Research Services Office is based in the University Offices, Wellington Square, and is part of the central university administration.

The office processes and approves all applications to outside bodies for research grants and contracts. It also acts in an advisory capacity for those seeking outside funding or requiring information about specific initiatives (e.g. LINK, Teaching Company, EC research programmes, etc.).

Contracts with industry are negotiated through the Research Services Office which also deals, inter alia, with various intellectual property matters, research-related work covered by purchase orders, consultancy agreements, agreements covering clinical trials and services, and liaison with funding bodies over discretionary pay awards.

The Director of the Research Services Office is Ms June Clark (telephone: (2)70142, e-mail: june.clark@admin.ox.ac.uk).

Other members of the Research Services Office from whom advice may be sought are as follows:

  • Ms Catherine Quinn (telephone: (2)70158, Assistant Registrar (on such matters as research-related and consultancy contracts, industrial liaison, and publications);
  • Dr Richard Liwicki (telephone: (2)80499), Assistant Registrar;
  • Mr Pierre Espinasse (telephone: (2)70043, Administrative Officer (on questions relating to externally funded research grants, European liaison, and EC contracts);
  • Dr Chris Norris (telephone: (2)70011), Administrative Officer and Assistant to the Director;
  • Ms Kathryn Dally (telephone: (2)80319), Adminstrative Officer.

Enquiries concerning day-to-day processing of research applications should be addressed to Room 330 (the Research Grants Office), Research Services Office (telephone: (2)70146).

General enquiries may be addressed in the first instance to the Director's Personal Assistant, Ms J. Vicary (telephone: (2)70143), who will be pleased to direct calls to the appropriate member of staff.

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Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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APPOINTMENT OF EXAMINERS

The following have been appointed:

SECOND PUBLIC EXAMINATION

Honour School

Oriental Studies

Egyptology with Coptic

R.B. PARKINSON, MA, D.PHIL., Queen's

For Trinity Term 1996

EXAMINATIONS OPEN TO NON-MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY

Master of Theology (except at Westminster College)

C.C. ROWLAND, MA, D.PHIL., Queen's
P.S. FIDDES, MA, D.PHIL., Regent's Park

Both from Hilary Term 1996 to Hilary Term 1997

J.D. WEAVER, MA, Regent's Park
D.G. MOSS, MA, St Anne's
J. ROSE (M.SC. Surrey)
G.W. WOOLFENDEN, MA status, Ripon College, Cuddesdon
R.J. COGGINS, BD, MA, Exeter

All from Hilary Term 1996 to Hilary Term 1999

Note. In the periods of office shown above reference to any term should be understood as indicating the first day of Full Term.

APPOINTMENT OF MODERATOR pro hac vice

The Vice-Chancellor and Proctors have appointed D.S. RICHARDS, MA, Fellow of St Cross College as a Moderator in Arabic for the Preliminary Examination in Oriental Studies to be held in Trinity Term 1996 pro hac vice (vice Dr R.C. Ostle, granted leave of absence).

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ANNUAL ELECTIONS OF MEMBERS OF BOARDS OF FACULTIES

Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine (7 June)

The following nominations have been duly received by 4 p.m. on Tuesday, 14 May (the closing date for nominations by two electors):

Official Members

1. D.H. BARLOW, MA, Nuffield Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

 

2. J.I. BELL, MA, Nuffield Professor of Clinical Medicine

Nominated by:

P. Foëx, Pembroke
P.J. Morris, Balliol

 

3. A.J. BRON, MA, Margaret Ogilvie's Reader in Ophthalmology

Nominated by:

J.J. Harding
J.M. Tiffany, St Cross

 

Ordinary Members

1. A.H. THOMSON, MA status

Nominated by: D.B. Dunger
A. Wilkinson, All Souls

 

2. D.A. WARRELL, MA, D.SC., DM, Fellow of St Cross

Nominated by:

B.J. Britton, Green College
J.M. Holt, Linacre

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Election of one official member

An election will be held on Thursday, 27 June to fill a vacancy for an official member (vice Professor G.K. Radda, resigned), to hold office from the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1996 until the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1997.

Nominations in writing by two electors will be received by the Secretary of Faculties at the University Offices up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 3 June, and nominations by six electors up to 4 p.m. on Tuesday, 18 June.

The following nomination has been duly received by the closing date for nominations by two electors (published in Gazette of 13 June):

P.C. NEWELL, MA, Head of Biochemistry Department elect

Nominated by:

G.K. Radda, Merton
K.E. Davies, Keble

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MODERN HISTORY

Election of one ordinary member

An election will be held on Thursday, 27 June to fill a vacancy for an ordinary member (vice Dr J.M. Wormald, resigned), to hold office from the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1996 until the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1997.

Nominations in writing by two electors will be received by the Secretary of Faculties at the University Offices up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 3 June, and nominations by six electors up to 4 p.m. on Tuesday, 18 June.

The following nomination has been duly received by the closing date for nominations by two electors (published in Gazette of 13 June):

J.H. HOWARTH, MA, Fellow of St Hilda's

Nominated by:

M.J. Ingram, Brasenose
J.M. Wormald, St Hilda's

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Election of one ordinary member

An election will be held on Thursday, 27 June to fill a vacancy for an ordinary member (vice Dr J.F. Morris, resigned), to hold office from the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1996 until the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1997.

Nominations in writing by two electors will be received by the Secretary of Faculties at the University Offices up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 3 June, and nominations by six electors up to 4 p.m. on Tuesday, 18 June.

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL STUDIES

Election of two ordinary members

An election will be held on Thursday, 27 June to fill two vacancies for ordinary members (vice Miss G.R. Peele and Dr M.F.E. Philp, resigned), to hold office from the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1996 until the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1997.

Nominations in writing by two electors will be received by the Secretary of Faculties at the University Offices up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 3 June, and nominations by six electors up to 4 p.m. on Tuesday, 18 June.

The following nominations have been duly received by the closing date for nominations by two electors (published in Gazette of 13 June):

M.E. CEADEL, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of New College
I.S. MCLEAN, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Nuffield

Nominated by:

M.F.E. Philp, Oriel
T. Smith, St Hilda's

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CHAIRMEN OF EXAMINERS

TRINITY TERM 1996

Preliminary Examinations

Modern History and Modern Languages (Part I, Modern Languages): A.R. GOODDEN, MA, Fellow of St Hilda's

Modern History and Modern Languages (Part II, Modern History): D.A. PARROTT, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of New College

Modern Languages: A.R. GOODDEN, MA, Fellow of St Hilda's

Oriental Studies: M.A. COLLIER, MA, Fellow of All Souls

Philosophy and Modern Languages: A.R. GOODDEN, MA, Fellow of St Hilda's

Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology: I.D. THOMPSON, MA, Student of Christ Church

Theology: J.F. ASHTON, MA, D.LITT., Fellow of Wolfson

Honour Moderations

Music: D.E. OLLESON, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Merton (address: Music Faculty)

Oriental Studies: B.W.F. POWELL, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Keble (address: Oriental Insitute)

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Second Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Medicine

Year 3: J.I. BELL, DM (address: Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital)

Master of Philosophy

Qualifying Examination in International Relations: S.K. HAZAREESINGH, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Balliol

Qualifying Examination in Management Studies: L.P. WILLCOCKS, MA, Fellow of Templeton

Qualifying Examination in Politics:] m.f.e. philp, ma, m.phil., Fellow of Oriel

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Master of Studies

Oriental Studies: M.D. GOODMAN, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Wolfson (address: Oriental Institute)

Certificates

Foundation Certificates in English Language and Literature, first and second year: D.S. DE C. GRYLLS, Fellow of Kellogg

Foundation Certificate in Social and Political Science, first and second year: P.D. DAVIES, MA, M.LITT., FELLOW OF KELLOGG

 

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties and committees will come into effect on 7 June.

1 Board of the Faculty of Theology

M.St. in the Study of Religion

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 703, after l. 35 insert:

`Study of Religion

1 Each candidate will be required to follow a course of instruction for three terms and present himself or herself for examination in three subjects as set out in the syllabus.

2 Candidates intending to offer a 10,000-15,000 word essay should make a written application for approval for the essay topic

(and, where required in the regulations, for permission to substitute the essay for a paper) to arrive at the Graduate Studies Office not later than the Monday of fifth week in Hilary Term. In cases where there is some doubt about the acceptability of the proposal candidates are asked to submit their applications earlier if possible. All applications should be accompanied by a recommendation from the supervisor. The essay must be typewritten and sent to the Chairman of Examiners for the Degree in M.St. in the Study of Religion, c/o the Clerk to the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, either at least fourteen days before the first day of the examination or at least twenty eight days before the first day of Michaelmas Full Term following the examination. Candidates intending also to offer three short essays in place of an examination paper must give notice of their intention not later than the Monday of fifth week in Hilary Term. They must submit their essays at least fourteen days before the day of the examination.

3 Each candidate will be required to present himself or herself for an oral examination unless individually dispensed by the examiners.

4 The oral examination shall be held at two points in the year: within three weeks after the written examination for those candidates who submit 10,000-15,000 word essays before the examination or who do not submit such essays, and in the last week of September or the first week in October for those who submit such essays at the end of the Long Vacation. Candidates must notify examiners of their intention to submit early or late when seeking approval of their essay topic. [The examiners may make the marks awarded to candidates known to the Director of Graduate Studies where they need to be known for the purpose of grant applications, but the pass list shall be issued following the completion of the whole examination in September or October.]'

SYLLABUS

Candidates shall offer three papers:

1. The Nature of Religion

2 and 3. Two papers selected from papers on the major texts and doctrines of (a) Buddhism, (b) Christianity, (c) Islam, (d) Judaism, or (e) any other paper that may from time to time be approved by the Board of the Faculty of Theology.

Candidates who have degree qualifications which include a study of a particular religious tradition may not offer that tradition as one of their papers.

An essay of 10,000-15,000 words may be offered in place of one paper.

The Nature of Religion

The aim of this paper is to examine the main classical and contemporary approaches to the study of religions, the problems involved in comparative study of religions, and the relation between religious belief, theology and the study of religions.

1. Students should know the work of key figures in the study of religions, the main attempts to define religion and the problems of defining religion. The works of J.G. Frazer (The Golden Bough), Edward Tylor, Rudolf Otto, Evans-Pritchard and Cantwell Smith are important in this respect.

2. They should be aware of the differing approaches to the study of religion in phenomenology, anthropology, sociology, psychology, philosophy and theology. By the use of examples, the strengths and limits of each approach should be investigated.

3. They should be aware of the major explanations that have been offered of religious belief, particularly by Durkheim, Freud, Feuerbach and Jung, and of the problems in giving such general explanations.

4. They should be aware of some major authors who have attempted comparative studies in religion, and the problems of such comparative studies. They should be aware of some of the issues involved in claims for religious truth and rationality, and attitudes to religious conflict and diversity. Relevant authors for study would be John Bowker, Ninian Smart, John Hick, Paul Knitter and Max Müller.

They should have sufficient data to take an informed view of the place of religion in the modern world.

The subject is to be studied by the use of texts from amongst the following:

Friedrich Schleiermacher, Speeches on Religion (CUP, 1988).
Rudolf Otto, The Idea of the Holy (Penguin, 1959).
Eric Sharpe, Understanding Religion (Duckworth, 1983).
Ninian Smart, The Phenomenon of Religion (Macmillan 1973).
Ian Markham, A Reader in World Religions (Macmillan 1995).
John Hinnells, New Dictionary of Religions (Penguin 1995).
Emile Durkheim, Elementary Forms of Religious Life (Allen and Unwin 1967).
Max Weber, The Sociology of Religion (Boston, Beacon Press, 1956).
E.E. Evans-Pritchard, Theories of Primitive Religion (Clarendon Press, 1965).
Sigmund Freud, The Future of an Illusion, and Totem and Taboo (in Complete Works, Hogarth Press, 1927 and 1913, respectively).
Sir James Fraser, The Golden Bough (abridged, Macmillan 1922) William James, The Varieties of Religious Experience (Collins 1960).
J. Waardenburg, Classical Approaches to the Study of Religion (Mouton, 1973).
Frank Whaling, Contemporary Approaches to the Study of Religion (Mouton, 1984).
G. Van der Leeuw, Religion in Essence and Manifestation (Harper and Row, 1967).
John Hick, An Interpretation of Religion (Macmillan, 1989).
Paul Knitter, No Other Name? (SCM, 1985).
John Bowker, The Sense of God (SCM, 1987).
Wilfred Cantwell Smith, The Meaning and End of Religion (Harper and Row, 1962).

(a) Buddhism

The earliest Buddhist doctrine and practice will be studied against the background of the early Upanishads and other religious movements in north-east India round the 5th century BCE. Practice includes both meditation and monastic life. The primary source is the Pali Canon supplemented by the commentarial literature of the Theravadin tradition.

(b) Christianity

The major themes of Christian theology will be considered in their historical context and with special reference to their use by twentieth-century theologians.

Texts:

(a) Augustine, The City of God, selected passages (Everyman 1957).
Anselm, Cur Deus Homo? (St Anselm: Basic Writings, Open Court, 1962).
Aquinas, Summa Theologiae, selected passages (Greyfriars, 1964-).
Calvin, Institutes of the Christian Religion, selected passages (Eerdmans, 1989).
Schleiermacher, The Christian Faith (T. and T. Clark, 1989) Rahner, Foundations of Christian Belief (Darton, Longman and Todd, 1978).
Barth, Church Dogmatics 2,1 (T. and T. Clark, 1937).

(b) Deuteronomy and the Gospel of Matthew, either in the original or in translation.

(c) Islam

The paper will consist of a broad introduction to Islamic history and religion from the Prophet Muhammad to the modern period, with particular emphasis on the formative period (7th to the 11th century, CE).

Candidates will cover the following topics in lectures and tutorials:

1. Muhammad and the Arabian milieu

2. Qur'an

3. Hadith

4. Law

5. Theology

6. Sects

7. Sufism

8. Islam and other monotheisms

9. Modern Islam

(d) Judaism

Jewish religion and thought since 70 CE with reference both to its historical development and to Judaism in the modern world.

Selections from the texts below will be assigned by the course tutor not later than the beginning of Michaelmas Term:

MISHNA: tractate Berakhot
MEKHILTA: on the Ten Commandments
Twersky, I. (ed.) A Maimonides Reader. (New York: Berhrman House, 1972.)

Other recommended books

Urbach, E.E. tr. I. Abrahams. The Sages. (Cambridge MA and London: Harvard University Press. 1987.)
Saadia Gaon. The Book of Beliefs and Opinions, tr. Samuel Rosenblatt. (New Haven: Yale University Press and London: Oxford University Press, 1948.)
Scholem, Gershom G., Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism. (New York: Schocken Books, 1954.)
Jacobs, Louis. Principles of the Jewish Faith: An Analytical Study. (London: Vallentine, Mitchell, 1964.)
Rubenstein, Richard, After Auschwitz: history, theology and contemporary Judaism. Second ed. (Baltimore and London: John Hopkins University Press, 1992.)

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2 Committee on Continuing Education and Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences

Postgraduate Certificate in Software Engineering

With effect from 1 March 1996 (for first examination in 1996)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 921, and following the regulations for the Postgraduate Certificate in Evidence-based Health Care, insert:

`Software Engineering

1. Course

(a) The course will consist of lectures, tutorials, seminars, and classes in the theory and practice of Software Engineering, together with periods of practical experience in approved work centres. The course may be taken over a period of not less than nine months, and not more than eighteen months.

(b) The subjects of the course of study will include: appropriate mathematics, specification and design, and programming.

2.Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in the following:

(a) Attendance at a minimum of four short courses;

(b) Submission of four written assignments, based on modules chosen from those in the Schedule for the M.Sc. and Postgraduate Diploma in Software Engineering, following discussion and agreement with the academic director of the course.

The assignments under (b) will be forwarded to the examiners for consideration by such dates as the examiners shall determine and shall notify candidates.

3. Candidates may be required to attend a viva voce examination at the end of the course of studies.

4. The examiners may award a distinction to the candidates for the certificate.

5. The standing committee for the M.Sc. in Software Engineering shall have the discretion to permit any candidate to be exempted from submitting one and one only of the written assignments under 2 (b) above, provided the standing committee is satisfied that such a candidate has undertaken equivalent study, of an appropriate standard, normally at another institution of higher education.'

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3 Committee for the School of Management Studies

Master of Business Administraton

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 756, following the decree establishing the Degree of Master of Business Administration, insert:

`REGULATIONS CONCERNING THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

1. Candidates must follow for thirty-two weeks a course of instruction in Management Studies as prescribed and will, when entering the examination, be required to produce a certificate from their society to this effect. The examination will be in four parts as follows:

2.Part I: Qualifying examination

(a) The examination shall consist of one written paper. Questions will be set on the fundamental concepts and techniques of management including finance and accounting, managing services and products, people and organisations, strategic management. There will also be questions on the economic and industrial context, quantitative methods and information management.

(b) The paper shall be set and administered by the examiners appointed to examine for the MBA. It shall be held once each year, on Friday of the last week of Michaelmas Full Term.

(c) Entries must be made on the appropriate form, obtainable from the School of Management Studies by Friday of the third week of Michaelmas Full Term.

(d) Candidates who fail the examination will be permitted to retake it on one, but not on more than one subsequent occasion. A resit examination will be held at the beginning of Hilary Full Term. No candidates shall enter for Part II of the examination until he or she has already passed the Part I examination.

3. Part II: Written assignments Candidates must complete eight written assignments of no more than 4,000 words, each of which will count for assessment purposes. They must complete one assignment for no less than each of five courses which must be selected from the list of core courses detailed in Schedule A and one assignment for each of three advanced elective courses which they are required to choose from the list of such courses which will be published annually by the Deputy Director (MBA) before the last Friday of Michaelmas Term. Two copies of each assignment must be submitted to the Chairman of Examiners for the MBA, c/o the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by noon on Monday of the Eleventh Week of the Term in which the lecture course is taken. One copy of the assignment will be retained by the examiners. The other will be returned to the candidate with written comments.

4. Part III: Final examination

(a) No candidate shall enter the final examination unless he or she has already passed the qualifying examination. There shall be three written papers.

(b) One paper shall be taken in Trinity Term, and shall be on advanced electives. Candidates will be expected to answer one question from each of three sections.

(c) All candidates also must sit two general papers on Management to be taken at the end of the final session.

5. Part IV: Business project report Candidates will be required to complete to the satisfaction of the examiners an eight-week period of supervised placement in an approved organisation between the end of Trinity Full Term and the beginning of the final period of residence in September. Competence will be examined by means of reports from a candidate's placement supervisor, and from the sponsoring firm, by a report by the candidate of the period of placement, and by presentation by the candidate of the report during the final session. The report shall not exceed 15,000 words. All reports on projects must be submitted by noon on the first Monday of the final session in the year in which the Part II examination is taken. The report must be accompanied by a statement, submitted in a separate sealed envelope, that it is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated. The report must be addressed to the Chairman of Examiners for the MBA, c/o Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford. Candidates must submit two copies of each project report. Successful candidates will be required to deposit one of these copies in the library of the School of Management Studies. The report will be held on a restricted access basis in view of possible commercial sensitivities.

6. Candidates may also be required to attend an oral examination which may be on one or more of the candidate's final examination, written assignments, and placement report.

7. The examiners may award a distinction to candidates for the Degree.

SCHEDULE A

(a) Managing Financial Resources

Financial reporting and its regulations; sources of company information; structure and interpretation of financial statements; financial analysis and company valuation. Accounting for management, cost behaviour and analysis; financial planning and control systems, including performance measurement. Sources of finance and financial systems; capital structure and the cost of capital; taxation; dividend policy; investment appraisal. Portfolio theory and asset pricing models; market efficiency and anomalies; options and derivatives; mergers and takeovers.

(b) People and Organisations

Theories and concepts of organisation behaviour, industrial relations and human resource management; leadership; technology; work design; organisational change; culture; diversity; power; groups; motivation; employee involvement; collective representation; the role of trade unions; the management of human resources and industrial relations; strategies, structures, and styles; methods of job regulation; pay systems; comparative approaches to the management of employees; contemporary developments.

(c) Managing Services and Products

Concepts of products and services and the role which marketing and operations management may play in manufacturing and service organisations; the product life-cycle, the marketing of services; market analysis, marketing research and marketing information; market segmentation and positioning; the buying behaviour of individuals and organisations; direct marketing, promotion and marketing communications; pricing; product management and new product development; distribution and marketing; vertical integration and capacity investment; technological innovation; inventory management; planning and control issues; customer service and the management of product and service quality.

(d) Strategic Management

Theoretical foundations of strategic management. Structural analysis of industrial and industry dynamics. The resource and capability based view of the firm. Company and competitor analysis. Strategy and organisation. Mergers, acquisitions, and alliances. Corporate governance, stakeholder analysis and ethics. Competitive strategy in different industry environments. The nature and sources of competitive advantage and patterns of competition. Strategic change and its implementation. Strategy evaluation. Competitive and co-operative strategies. Strategic risk management. Corporate strategy and competitive advantage. International strategy and organisation including the globalisation of markets. Strategic innovation, R&D, and technology management. Strategic management in the public sector and not-for-profit organisations. Current issues in strategic management.

(e) The Economic, Social, and Political Environment

The nature and implications of economic, social, and political change and their relationship with business development. Comparative economics; demography and social change; comparative government institutions; change in international relations; corporate government relations.

(f) Business and the Law

The role of law in business. The nature of law and its operation in practice; the legal process; law and discretion. Commercial law, rights and disputes. Business regulation, enforcement and compliance. Business practice, legal advice and the role of the legal profession. International aspects of law and regulation including European law and the Single European Market.

(g) Data Analysis and Computing

Business statistics: Data, measurement, and computing, descriptive statistics; probability distribution; sampling, hypothesis testing, interval estimation; problem laboratory; worked examples in practice; testing differences in mean and proportions; test of goodness to fit; analysis of variance; linear regression; problem laboratory: worked examples in practice; multiple regression; discriminant and cluster analysis; non-parametric methods; problem laboratory: worked examples in practice.

Modelling: Quantitative models in business; linear programming, network models; heuristics; simulation; decision analysis.

Data Analysis Project: A major exercise to model and analyse business data; deliverables; project report.

MIS for Business: Introduction to information systems (soft modelling, decision modelling); information system applications (MIS, EIS, DSS); information system technology, development of user application; future of MIS; business simulation (software).

() Management Skills )h

The practice and where appropriate the theories of business communication and presentations, leadership and small group skills and negotiations.

(i) Industrial Organisation

The price mechanism, resource allocation, and their welfare aspects. Market structures, cost and scale economies, oligopoly, entry empirical studies of pricing and profitability, advertising, product differentiation, innovation, theories of the firm, mergers and vertical integration, public policy towards industry.

(j) Environmental Management

Impact of organisms on the environment; concept of sustainability; impact of the use of energy, conservation and efficiency; nature of pollution and pollution regulation; global scale environmental problems, international environmental agreements; waste disposal principles and concepts; corporate responsibility and environmental issues; business environmental strategies; environmental management systems; techniques of environmental management; environmental auditing, reporting, financial evaluation; current issues in environmental management.

(k) Science and Technology in Business

The study of developments in research in science and technology and their transfer from the laboratory into business. The course will take the form of a series of guest seminars on important developments in research in the University of Oxford and the ways in which research is exploited, including consideration of intellectual property rights.'

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DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF SCIENCE

The Board of the Faculty of Physical Sciences has granted leave to S. FUNG, Keble, to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of Science. A list of the evidence submitted by the candidate is available at the University Offices.

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Biological Sciences

J. HUMPHRIES, Pembroke: `Ray, the father of taxonomic method'.
St Anne's, Wednesday, 5 June, 11.30 a.m.
Examiners: R.G. Lewis, M. Walters.

 

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English Language and Literature

D. EDWARDS, Jesus: `Keats, mythology, and the politics of sexuality'.
Somerville, Tuesday, 28 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: J. Barnard, F.J. Stafford.

Literae Humaniores

C. BRITTAIN, Balliol: `Philo of Larissa and the Fourth Academy'.
Queen's, Monday, 10 June, 4 p.m.
Examiners: S. Bobzien, D.N. Sedley.

 

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Oriental Studies

T.Z. HASAN, St Antony's: `The Mansolea of Uchch and Multan: a study of regional sultanate architecture 1206– 1526'.
Oriental Institute, Wednesday, 29 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: R. Hillenbrand, M. Shokoohy.

 

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Physical Sciences

C.E. ALLEN, Queen's: `A computational and experimental examination of turbine cooling flows'.
Department of Engineering Science, Tuesday, 28 May, 11 a.m.
Examiners: R.C. Darton, D. Lampard.

A. ROBINSON, Brasenose: `The computer simulation of lipid bilayers and biological membranes'.
Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Wednesday, 29 May, 11 a.m.
Examiners: M.S.P. Sansom, D.J. Osgu Thorpe.

 

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Physiological Sciences

A.S. AKHA, Keble: `Signalling through the B lymphocyte antigen receptor'.
University Department of Pharmacology, Tuesday, 28 May, 11 a.m.
Examiners: A. Galione, G.G.B. Klaus.

L.M. WAHL, Wolfson: `Sources of quantal variance in synaptic transmission'.
Balliol, Friday, 31 May, 11 a.m.
Examiners: S. Cull-Candy, D. Noble.

 

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Social Studies

P.F. COVENEY, New College: `Informal investment in Britain: an examination of the investment activities and characteristics of British business angels'.
Templeton, Tuesday, 28 May, 10.30 a.m.
Examiners: W. Wetzel, M.D. Young.

S. JOHNSON, Pembroke: `Strategies for realignment: Japanese opposition politics under a one-party dominant regime 1955–93'.
Lincoln, Friday, 7 June, 2 p.m.
Examiners: D.B. Goldey, I. Neary.

Theology

O.P. RAFFERTY, Christ Church: `The Church, the state, and the Fenian threat, 1861–75'.
Wadham, Friday, 31 May, 4 p.m.
Examiners: D. Kerr, E.J. Garnett.

 

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EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE

The examiners appointed by the following faculty board give notice of oral examination of their candidate as follows:

Physical Sciences

N.A. MARIGHETO, Wolfson: `Optical studies of dilute magnetic semiconductors'.
Clarendon Laboratory, Tuesday, 28 May, 3.30 p.m.
Examiners: P.C. Klipstein, A.M. Glazer.

 

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Colleges, Halls, and Societies

Contents of this section:

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MEMORIAL SERVICE

Christ Church

A Memorial Service for DR CAROLINE FRASER will be held at 3 p.m. on Saturday, 25 May, in Christ Church Cathedral.

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ELECTIONS

Linacre College

To Junior Research Fellowships (from 1 October 1996):

ANGELIKA GABRIELE BÖRSCH-HAUBOLD

UWE CLAUS TÄUBER (DR.RER.NAT. Munich)

MATTHEW CONWAY WHITBY (B.SC. Exeter, PH.D. Nottingham)

To EPA Cephalosporin Junior Research Fellowships (from 1 October 1996):

THOMAS PATRICK BRUTNELL (BS Connecticut, PH.D. Yale)

TIMOTHY MICHAEL GREEN, BA, D.PHIL.

SUSAN MARY LEA, BA, D.PHIL.

To the Imperial Cancer Research Fund Junior Research Fellowship

(from 1 October 1996):

ELAINE DOROTHEA FERGUSON (B.SC., PH.D. Edinburgh)

To Thomas Linacre Studentships (from 1 October 1996):

MARIE-CLAIRE BAKKER

MATTHEW JUKES

To Domus Studentships:

NINA JØRGENSEN

DANIEL LONG

AYLWIN NG

THOMAS PEACOCK

To the Imperial Cancer Research Fund Scholarship (1995--6):

DOMINIC ROTHWELL

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Somerville College

To a Beilby Scholarship in Biological Science:

MADELEINE O'KEEFE, formerly of Kingston College

To an Irene Seymour Instrumental Scholarship in Music:

SAMANTHA CLAIRE BOYLE, formerly of The King's School, Macclesfield

To a Hughes Exhibition in Jurisprudence:

CLAIRE BUTLER, formerly of Biddulph High School, Stoke on Trent

To a Deakin Exhibition in Physiological Sciences:

DANIELLE BERNICE COHEN, formerly of South Hampstead High School, London

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Wolfson College

To Governing Body Fellowships (from 1 October 1996):

DR M.M. CAMPBELL (B.SC., PH.D. Guelph)

THE REVD PROFESSOR C.M. TUCKETT (BA, Diploma, Cambridge, PH.D. Lancaster

To an Emeritus Fellowship (from 1 April 1996):

DR D.H. GATH, MA, D.PHIL., DM (MA Cambridge)

To an Emeritus Fellowship (from 1 October 1996):

DR J.F. ASHTON, MA, D.LITT. (STL Lyons, LSS Rome)

To a Supernumerary Fellowship (from 1 October 1996):

PROFESSOR R. SORABJI, MA, D.PHIL.

To a Research Fellowship (from 1 May 1996):

DR T.W.N. HAINE (B.SC., MA Cambridge, PH.D. Southampton)

To Research Fellowships (from 1 October 1996):

DR L.S. BONHOEFFER, D.PHIL. (Vordiplom, Majister, Munich)

DR O.V. KOLOSOV (MA, PH.D. Moscow)

DR G. MAKIN, D.PHIL. (BA Jerusalem)

To Junior Research Fellowships (from 1 October 1996):

MS J.M.A. ASHBOURN, MA

MS A. ASHWORTH, BA, D.PHIL. (MA Yale)

A. BARENCO (BS Lausanne)

D.R. BROWN (MA, M.PHIL., PH.D. Cambridge)

DR P.J. CARTER, MA, D.PHIL.

DR N. GONIS, D.PHIL. (BA Athens)

MS D. HAVENSTEIN (BA Essex)

R.S.R. MITTER (BA, M.PHIL., PH.D. Cambridge)

MISS H.L. PARISH (MA St Andrews)

DR I.Q.H.C. PHAN, D.PHIL. (DIPL.NAT.-WISS. ETH, Zurich)

MS E. REILLY (MA Ireland)

DR D.S. SHARROCK (B.SC. Leeds, PH.D. Edinburgh)

DR G.L. SHAW (B.SC., M.SC. Auckland, PH.D. Cambridge)

To Charter Fellowships (a.y. 1996--7):

DR R. CHAKRAVARTI (MA, PH.D. Calcutta)

DR D.A. JAMES (MA, PH.D. Witwatersrand)

To Industrial Fellowships (a.ys. 1996--8):

DR P.V. COVENEY, MA, D.PHIL.

DR B.L. EYRE (B.SC., D.SC. Surrey)

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PRIZES

St Hilda's College

Alison Kemp Memorial Prize (German):

HELEN FRONIUS

College Prize (Geography):

ANN KIRKMAN

College Prize (Law):

LORETO MIRANDA

Economics Prize:

GLORIA UDARBE

Eleanor Rooke Prize (English):

JANICE TAY

Evelyn Carr Prize (Classics):

SAMANTHA LINTOTT

Gertrude Easton Prize (History):

EMMA BELL

RACHEL JONES

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Kathleen Chesney Prize (Modern Languages):

KATHERINE BURTON

SARAH GREENWOOD

SOPHIE HOCKENHULL

HELEN SMITH

Margaret Roper Graduate Prize:

KEELY FISHER

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Nuffield Science Prize (Biochemistry):

SARAH JARMIN

KAREN MARTIN

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Nuffield Science Prize (Medicine):

REBECCA POLLARD

Olive Ward Prize (Chemistry):

ELINOR KINMOND

Sybil Eyre Crowe Prize (Politics):

SHEENA ROGERS

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Cole and Cole Prize (Law):

HELEDD WILLIAMS

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Simmons and Simmons Prize (Law):

DELPHINIA TAM

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Somerville College

College Prize in English and Modern Languages:

HELEN LOUISE BAILEY

T.H. Green Prize in Literae Humaniores:

LINDSEY NICOLA CHADWICK

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NOTICE

Campion Hall

Open Days

As part of the Centenary Celebrations, and in conjunction with the exhibition `Treasures of Campion Hall' at the Christ Church Picture Gallery (9 June–7 July), Campion Hall will be open to the public on Sundays 9, 16, and 23 June, 2–5 p.m., allowing access to the Edwin Lutyens buildings and the Charles Mahoney Lady Chapel Murals.

Anyone interested in gaining access on other occasions is requested to contact a member of the Hall.

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Advertisements

Contents of this section:


How to advertise in the Gazette

Terms and conditions of acceptance of advertisements

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Oxford Chamber Music Society

The Kreutzer String Quartet will play the following at 8 p.m. on Sunday, 2 June, in the Holywell Music Room: Smetana, Quartet in E minor; Tippett, Quartet no. 5; Tchaikovsky, Quartet no. 2 in F, op. 22. Tickets £7.50 in advance from Blackwell's, or £7.95 at the door; students and juniors £3.

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Concert

The Soules Harmony—Rodrigo del Pozo (tenor), Geoffrey Baker (recorder), Reiko Ichese (viol), and Christopher Morrongiello (lute): `La Capilla Espana: Iberian and Italian cross- currents in the Renaissance', at 3.30 p.m. on Sunday, 2 June, in St Giles' Church, St Giles', Oxford. Tickets £6 (concessions £4, children £2), from Blackwell's Music Shop or at the door.

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Royal Shakespeare Company

An exhibition of Royal Shakespeare Company commissioned paintings by artist Nick Higgins is on view in the Vaughan Room, Somerville College. Opening times: Mon.–Fri., 12 noon–3 p.m.; Sat. 2–4 p.m.; admission free.

 

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Tuition Offered

The Alexander Technique. Jan Steele, BA, and Janet Sherbourne, MA. Members of the Society of Teachers of the Alexander Technique. Phone for free fact-sheet and brochure. A number of concessionary places for students, etc., are available. Tel.: Oxford 770272.

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Services Offered

Frederick & Sudabeh Hine, private dealers in oriental rugs, runners, and kelims. We keep only handmade articles in traditional designs from Iran, Turkey, and Afghanistan, and, although at warehouse prices, all pieces stocked are of value. Also we have medium and fine grade oriental carpets in sizes to suit not only domestic dwellings but also large institutional and commercial buildings. Business hours: 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Mon.–Sat. Old Squash Court, 16 Linton Road, North Oxford. Tel./fax: Oxford 59396.

Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press---the University Printers: specialising in booklet and publicity material, typesetting, printing, and finishing; Output Bureau provides high-quality output from disk from all major DTP programs onto paper, bromide, colour- separated positive or negative film; high-quality specialist colour copier service. For service, quality, and competitive prices contact Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press, Walton Street, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 514691, fax: 514010.

Jim Crockatt offers you a range of fitted or free- standing bookcases which are elegant in design, robust in construction, decorative in paint, or resplendent in wood—and economical in price. For enquiries, tel.: 01734 744728.

Restoration and conservation of antique furniture by John Hulme. Twenty-five years' experience. All aspects of repair, carcass-work, veneer, inlay, polishing, stain removal, upholstery, cane/rush seating. Furniture-making and copying. Collection and delivery. 11a High Street, Chipping Norton. Tel./fax: 01608 641692.

Tax advice and accountancy. We specialise in assisting professionals and small businesses with all tax and accounting matters. Fast, personal service at competitive rates. Contact Dr Charles McCreery. Tassano & Co., 118 Banbury Road, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 513381.

Finders Keepers à La Carte—a new concept: a selection of services available to tenants of Finders Keepers rental properties, designed to enhance comfort, convenience, and enjoyment whilst renting Finders Keepers' properties. Call us for your menu. Finders Keepers Ltd., 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE (tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 56993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk); also 27 St Clement's, Oxford OX4 1DJ (tel.: Oxford 200012, fax: 204844, e- mail: stclements@finders.co.uk).

Furniture: individual pieces and fitted furniture designed and made by Piers Roberts from workshops in Thame. From tables, chairs, cabinets, desks to fitted bedrooms, kitchens, studies. For the home, office, or garden. Tel.: 01844 218929 or 201325.

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Domestic Services

Paris: accommodation offered in return for after- school child care, from Sept. for at least one school year. French family living in Oxford and returning to Oxford seeks nanny for after-school child care for 2 children (4 and 6); accommodation is a pleasant self-contained studio in a quiet area in the centre of Paris (13th arrondissement). Ideal for students wanting to study French in Paris for one year or more. Sylvie Glaser. Tel.: Oxford 54098 (evenings and weekends), or 281322 (working days).

Au pair wanted, for 1 year from Sept., to help look after a very friendly 5-year-old boy, especially in the evenings and the weekends. Tel.: Oxford 511585.

Housekeeper, part-time, Park Town, June: min. of 4 mornings and 2 afternoons/early evenings per week plus more at times. Flexibility useful. Job includes kids' care (8 and 11 years), driving, cook a bit, shop, clean, etc. Tel.: Oxford 515292.

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford 726983 or Abingdon 555533.

 

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Situations Vacant

Oxford English Dictionary: Assistant Editors, Etymology and General. A number of additional editorial staff is required to assist in the comprehensive revision of the Oxford English Dictionary. The successful applicants will be involved in revising the text of the OED, researching the history and development of words, and preparing new etymologies for the dictionary. Applicants must have a first or upper-second class degree in an arts subject, and be able to work accurately, logically, and rapidly through complex text. An ability to distinguish very fine shades of meaning and the capacity to assimilate broader concepts in a wide range of disciplines are essential. Applicants should be able to demonstrate a thorough grounding in the history of English. Particular experience in the study of Middle or Early Modern English would be an advantage. All posts are based in Oxford, and will be offered on ten-year, fixed-term contracts. Starting salary £14,094 plus supporting benefits. Closing date: 30 May. Apply with current c.v. and handwritten covering letter (two copies), quoting reference 899, to Nicholas Parkhouse, Personnel Officer. Oxford University Press, Walton Street, Oxford OX2 6DP.

Department of Zoology---Animal Behaviour Research Group: part-time (15 hours p.w.) Secretary required to provide general secretarial support to faculty and students in an often busy office; also some special projects such as updating databases and helping to prepare grant applications. Candidates should have excellent word-processing skills, preferably Apple Macintosh, and be thoroughly versed in general office procedure. The post is on the clerical and library grade C3 scale (salary pro rata to £10,276--£11,895). Hours of work 2--5 p.m. Applications, including the names and addresses of two referees, should be sent to Dr Marian Dawkins, Animal Behaviour Research Group, by Friday, 31 May. Department of Zoology, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS.

Oxfordshire Mental Health Information Research: Research Analyst (Health Information) required, initially for 12 months. We are a small team involved in research on information strategies in Mental Health Units. Ideal candidates will have knowledge of health services, databases, statistical packages and mapping software, and good communication skills. Training provided. Part-time work possible. Flexible hours. For a job description and application details write to Cathy Lines by 24 May. Oxfordshire Mental Health Information Research, Littlemore Hospital, Littlemore, Oxford OX4 4XN.

Modern Languages Teacher. Magdalen College School requires, for Michaelmas Term 1996 as a one-term appointment, a Modern Languages Teacher to teach German throughout the school, including the sixth form, and some Lower School French. Applications, with a full c.v. and the names, addresses, and telephone numbers of two referees, to the Master, Magdalen College School, Oxford OX4 1DZ, from whom further details may be obtained. Tel.: Oxford 242191.

Part-time native Spanish teacher sought to impart classes on Spanish language and culture to bilingual (Spanish–English) children aged 7–11. Two hours p.w., during school year starting in Sept. Candidates should send their c.v. to Dr P. Garcia-Bellido, 47 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JF (from whom further particulars may be obtained) by 14 June. Interviews are expected to take place two weeks later. Tel.: Oxford (2)70490, fax: (2)70757.

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Houses to Let

Available from 1 Sept. for long let, delightful, furnished detached house in quiet cul-de-sac in North Oxford within easy reach of colleges and the city centre. Kitchen fully equipped, breakfast-room, lounge, dining-room, study; 3 double bedrooms, bathroom, separate shower-room, beautiful, mature rear garden; front garden and driveway with car-port and garage. Suit visiting academic family. £1,000 p.c.m. Tel./fax: Oxford 66404 (Pam Crane).

Holton: unfurnished house to let; fitted kitchen, 3 reception rooms, 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, curtains, fitted carpets, garden, double garage. £1,500 p.c.m. Mrs Price. Tel.: Oxford 874095 (10 a.m.–5 p.m. weekdays).

Four-bedroom detached house, well furnished, North Oxford, cul-de-sac ending in Cutteslowe Park; large well-equipped kitchen, laundry/storage-room with washer/drier; 3 reception, 2 bath; lovely garden; wheelchair adapted; near buses. From late July, for one year. £1,100 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 515119.

Our 4-bedroom semi-detached house is available to let for 1 year from July. In excellent condition throughout with all mod. cons.; fully furnished; secluded garden; situated conveniently for universities and hospitals. £825 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 240017.

North Oxford , within the ring-road: new self- contained luxury accommodation available from 1 July; very quiet with lovely views and patio; near convenient bus route; suit visiting academic, single or couple. Regret no children, smokers, or pets. £575 p.c.m.. Tel.: Oxford 515085.

Oxford city centre: unfurnished 2-bedroom house; min. let 6 months; parking area; garden back/front; lounge/diner, kitchen, cloakroom, store-room, 2 bedrooms, bathroom/shower; c.h. £700 p.m. exc. bills. Tel.: Oxford 69609.

Old Headington: charming wisteria-covered early Victorian cottage; furnished with antiques; 2 bedrooms, 2 sitting- rooms (or third bedroom), conservatory style kitchen/dining-room; modern bathroom; 90-ft rear garden with fishpond, summerhouse, and purpose-built barbecue; 5 minutes' walk to the John Radcliffe. Available from second week in Aug. for any period up to 1 year. Rent in region of £795 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 310674 (evenings); if no reply, 52698; e-mail: vessey@molbiol.ox.ac.uk.

Shotover, 3 miles from Oxford centre: partly-furnished 5-bedroom house; bathroom, shower, 2 w.c.s, kitchen with Aga, dining- and living-rooms, c.h., d.g., 1-acre garden, garage. From 1 July, £1,100 p.c.m. inc. garden upkeep. Tel.: Oxford 69800.

Charming cottage on edge of village approximately 12 miles north-west of Oxford. Double bedroom plus spare bedroom/study. Furnished and equipped to a very high standard, country antiques, washer/drier, c.h., beams, inglenook fire. Very private walled garden. Suit caring non-smoking couple. Available for short lets till mid-July and longer-term after mid-Aug. Tel.: 01608 684700.

Central North Oxford---Tackley Place: spacious and comfortable 5/6-bedroom Victorian house on 4 floors, with 2 bathrooms; fully furnished; conveniently located for city centre, colleges, hospitals, and schools---ideal for a visiting academic family. Available Aug. for 12 months. QB Management. Tel.: Oxford 64533, fax: 64777.

Central North Oxford: house available mid-July--end Dec.; close to schools, colleges, all faculties; comfortable family home on 3 floors; would suit visiting academic. £1,200 p.c.m. Tel./fax: Oxford 514606, e-mail: syrdn@warwick.ac.uk.

Three-bedroom detached house with garage in secluded drive in North Oxford available Sept.–end of June, for visiting academics only. £925 p.c.m. inc. of council tax. Tel.: Oxford 722630.

Only the best is good enough for Finders Keepers' clients and tenants. We aim for 100 per cent in everything we do. We are an `Investor in People' and National Winners of the Best Letting and Management Company Award for the second consecutive year---call us to find out why the best is not the most expensive. Finders Keepers Ltd., 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE (tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 56993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk); also 27 St Clement's, Oxford OX4 1DJ (tel.: Oxford 200012, fax: 204844, e-mail: stclements@finders.co.uk);or why not visit our Web site at http://www.finders.co.uk.

An Englishman's home is his castle—so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Please telephone or fax us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 64533, fax: 64777.

 

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Flats to Let

Upper Wolvercote: 2-bedroom flat in quiet position inside the ring-road; frequent bus route; well-equipped fully-furnished first-floor flat with c.h., garage, etc.; would suit professional couple, non-smoking preferred. Available late July. £625 p.c.m. Rent negotiable for long-term let of 2–3 years. Tel.: Oxford 59802.

Wytham Abbey, Oxford: spacious 3-bedroom 2-bathroom apartment on 2 floors, part of listed manor house situated 3 miles from city centre and lying in 3,000 acres of countryside. Fully equipped and luxuriously appointed. Available from 1 Sept. Tel.: Oxford 247200, fax: 724762.

Central North Oxford, 10 minutes from city centre: delightful and very comfortable flat available in quiet, civilised family house: large double bedroom, single bedroom, drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom. Off-street parking, garden. Available now for short or let. Regret no children or pets. Tel.: Oxford 52400.

 

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Summer Lets

Family house in Summertown available for visitors, 21 July–2 Sept. Sleeps 4–5. Children welcome. Reasonable rent. If interested in whole period or part write to or telephone Ms J. Manessi, 58 Stratfield Road, Oxford OX2 7BQ. Tel.: Oxford 59534.

Central North Oxford: spacious, detached house in quiet residential area available 3–31 Aug.; excellently located 5 minutes from shops and 10 minutes from city centre—also on main bus route; 5 bedroooms, 2 bathrooms, 2 reception rooms, large kitchen/diner; fully equipped with microwave, dish-washer, etc.; pretty, secluded garden. £450 p.w. all inc. Tel.: Oxford 511231, fax: 791782.

Large, elegant house in central London, Notting Hill Gate area, available Aug. for 1 month; 3 double bedrooms, extra sofa-bed in living- room, 3 bathrooms, patio garden, telephone, fax, 2 TVs. Weekly cleaner included in price. Owners abroad with children. Ideal occupants academics visiting with family or friends. Must care for house and furniture, preferably no smoking, clean and tidy; the house is elegantly furnished and very dear to its owners. Use of family car considered. £600 p.m. Marina and Paul Wallace. Tel./fax: 0171-727 0323.

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Accommodation Offered

North Oxford —short let: independent male graduate to share quiet house with gate to Port Meadow. Rent £55 inc. Tel.: Oxford 515379.

Mature, non-smoking woman sought to share large house in central North Oxford from beginning of Oct. to end of Dec. Two rooms and w.c.; share kitchen, bath, and shower. £350 p.c.m. to inc. gas and electricity. Tel.: Oxford 510054.

Bed-and-breakfast available in very comfortable house in central North Oxford: an exclusive, quiet, leafy area within walking distance of all main university buildings, city centre, parks, river, shops, pubs, and restaurants. Each room has central heating, colour TV, microwave oven, tea- and coffee-making facilities. Very moderate terms. Tel.: Oxford 57879.

Large bedsit to let in east Oxford: c.h., own cooking facilities and fridge, shared bathroom, optional telephone line; central Oxford 10 minutes; suit non-smoking female with references. Available 1 June, £260 p.m. inc. Second bedsit also available. Tel.: Oxford 242075.

Alternative medicine centre. Space available. Therapy and treatment rooms. Consulting and counselling rooms. Every facility. Very moderate rates. Central North Oxford. Tel. for further details: Oxford 511111 (9 a.m.–12 noon).

 

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Accommodation Sought

d'Overbroeck's is now looking for more good family and self- catering accommodation in North Oxford for A-level students from Sept. We need to arrange accommodation for our existing students before the end of June and are particularly interested in self-catering rooms or flatlets within private houses which may be available from Sept. Rents are paid through the college. Tel.: Oxford 310000.

Health professional/academic from Australia (Oxford graduate) on 6-month contract, July–Dec., looking to house-sit in Oxford for all or part of that time. Conscientious houseperson. Paul Goodman. Tel.: Oxford 247343.

Two American scholars need housing July–Aug.; would prefer house-sitting; cat lovers. Dr Colin J. Davis, History Dept., University of Alabama; tel.: +1 205 934 5634; e-mail: cdavis@sbs.uab.edu. Also, South African scholar requires accommodation Mon.–Thur., 24 June–14 July. Dr Susan Parnell, Geography Dept., University of Witwatersrand; tel.; +27 11 403 7281, e-mail: 017sup@cosmos.wits.ac.za. Or for either of these tel. Dr P. Alexander: Oxford 73632.

Visiting professor and family (4 people) seek furnished apartment or house in central Oxford, 18–25 Aug. Please contact (a) Manuel Arellano, or (b) Olympia Bover. (a) Tel. Madrid: 341 429 0551, fax: 341 429 1056, e-mail: arellano@cemfi.es; (b) tel.: 341 338 5979.

Visiting fellow with wife and child seeks 3-bedroom flat or small home, preferably in East Oxford/St Clement's area, from end Aug. 1996 to summer (c.July) 1997. Oxford references available. Dr Reuven Amitai-Preiss, Institute of Asian and African Studies, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91905, Israel. Fax: 972-2-322545, e-mail: amitai@hum.huji.ac.il.

Top-quality apartment required. Money no object. Two beds; city centre; fully equipped and quality furnishings, etc., a must. No agency fees. Retained client pays our fee. Premier. Tel.: Oxford 792299.

Feel confident letting your property in Oxfordshire with Brooks, one of Oxford's longest-established Property Management Companies. Formerly the property management department of E.J. Brooks and Son. Tel.: Oxford 728597, fax: 794606.

Premier have a fine selection of short lets for overseas visitors. We also require substantial executive style detached furnished/unfurnished in any area, rent level £2,000 p.c.m., 2/3-year let, for US visiting lady. Call Jan Bartlett at Premier. Tel.: Oxford 792299.

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management are one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us. Tel.: Oxford 64533, or fax: 64777.

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Accommodation Exchange

Lovely family house in Summertown (just north of Oxford city centre) offered for 3–6 weeks any time 20 July–3 Sept. (flexible) in exchange for Manhattan apartment; conveniently located close to shops, bus stop (5 mins. drive) to city centre; 2 bedrooms, office, living-room, kitchen, dining-room, conservatory, 1 bathroom, 2 w.c.s, washer/drier, dishwasher, TV, garden, off-street parking; lodger resident (own floor, bathroom); cleaner weekly. Require apartment in safe building (doorman/upper West Side or East Side preferred) for 1 adult and 2 children (1 bedroom sufficient) with kitchen, bathroom, TV, air conditioning. Tel.: Oxford 512847, fax: 515335; e- mail: 101642.2251@compuserve.com.

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Accommodation Sought to Rent or Exchange

Sydney: family on UK sabbatical Jan.–June 1997 seeks house-swap or rent. We offer lovely detached house on quiet street; 2 large beds, 2 small beds/study, kitchen/family/dining area, double living-room, 2 baths; best appliances f & f; large garden; pool. Lovely inner harbourside suburb, close shops, schools, bus, ferry, 10 minutes drive/bus downtown. We require well-equipped 2–3-bed/study house in Oxford/area, close to shops, primary school, rail station. Douglas Tomkin. Fax: 00 612 330 8877, e-mail: douglas.tomkin@uts.edu.au.

Jerusalem: academic family seeks house-swap or rent July/Aug., for 6–12 months; we offer lovely fully-equipped apartment to sleep 5; huge balconies; views; heating; close to shopping, transport, schools, health centre; 5 minutes' drive to university, 10 minutes to centre and sight-seeing. Car-swap possible. We seek 4-bedroom furnished accommodation, North Oxford, Headington, Kidlington, etc. Dr B. Czaczkes. Fax: 00 972 2 881341, e-mail: msbc @pluto.huji.ac.il.

 

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Holiday Lets

Sympathetically restored traditional Cretan town house in heart of old Rethymnon; fully equipped, inc. TV, automatic washing machine, patio with barbecue, and library with English novels; sleeps 4 (1 double, 1 twin); very quiet location with view of the Fortress, but close to bus station, shops, and beaches. £160–£190 p.w. Tel.: Oxford 69630.

Greece: charming independent houses to let on the beautiful island of Scopdos from £60 per person p.w. Tel.: 00 30 424 22947, fax: 00 30 424 23057.

Lot Valley, France: comfortable, well-equipped house in attractive village of Montcuq, 25 km south-west of Cahors; courtyard, balcony; sleeps 4 + 2; still some summer dates available. From £170 p.w. Tel.: Oxford 54286 (evenings and weekends).

Mojacar Beach, Almeria: charming 2-bedroom flat, sleeps 4, all mod. cons., washing-machine, air conditioning; 2 terraces and large 2nd-floor terrace with magnificent views; swimming-pool; walking distance to beach; riding school and supermarket close by. £150--£280 p.w. Tel.: Oxford 373995 or (2)70472.

Montmartre: charming furnished 3-room flat; sunny, calm, facing private garden; c.h., fireplace, lift, interphone; situated on bus and Metro routes; good area for shops/restaurants. FF 6,500 p.m. inc. charges. Tel.: 00 41 22 731 16 04 (day), or 00 41 22 738 31 79 (evening).

Dordogne, near Bergerac: holidays for 2 in artist's secluded converted pool-side barn. Brochure. £200 p.w. Tel.: 00 33 53.61.25.73.

Portugal, Obidos: attractive self-contained house/apartment in lovely, quiet, unspoilt rural area 90 kms north of Lisbon overlooking lagoon and 2 miles from sea; ideal for bird-watching, walking, horse-riding. Rent c.£50 per person per week. Tel.: 00 351 62 979534, or 0171-352 3144.

Provence—Mormoiron: period farmhouses to let on English- run vineyard. Beautiful countryside. Avignon 10 minutes. 2–8 people. Tel.: 33 90.61.88.78, fax: 33 90.61.98.05.

French Alps: beautiful family flat to rent; sleeps 6–8; 3 bedrooms, living-room with fireplace, kitchen, bathroom, separate w.c., fully equipped and furnished; every room accesses beautiful terrace (80 sq. yds.); telephone, TV, view, indoor garage; in Morzine-Avoriaz, 1 hour's drive to Geneva airport, 1/2-hour's drive to Thonon-Evian; all mountain sports available; tennis; Olympic swimming-pool; ice-rink. FF 4,500 p.w., May–Nov. Mrs Rovet. Tel.: 33 1 30.82.26.13, fax: 33 1 30.82.23.39; e- mail: jrovet@world-net.fr.

Paris: edge of Latin Quarter, room in quiet comfortable flat, available May–end of Aug. FF 4,000 per fortnight, less if long-term. Mrs Rovet. Tel.: 33 1 30.82.26.13, fax: 33 1 30.82.23.39; e-mail: jrovet@world- net.fr.

Casa Quintino: old Tuscan farmhouse in peaceful countryside with distant views of ancient Etruscan town of Volterra; 20 minutes from San Gimignano, 1 hour Florence, Siena, Pisa; 3 bedrooms (sleeps 7 comfortably); fully equipped kitchen. Available from 15 June, £250–£450 p.w. Tel.: Oxford 727394 (evenings).

 

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House for Sale

Headington: detached house, 3 years old, close to hospitals and both universities; 2 reception rooms plus spacious study, family size fitted kitchen, utility room, 3 bedrooms, 1 en-suite plus family bathroom, gas c.h., d.g., burglar and fire alarms, garage, gardens, ample parking; light and airy; excellent decorative order; close to local and London bus routes. £149,950. Tel.: Oxford 744404. n

 

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Diary

Contents of this section:

Academic Staff Seminars: places should be booked in advance through the Staff Development Office, University Offices, Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

For the full list of courses, see the Staff Development Programme supplement.

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Friday 24 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `An introduction to ancient Egypt', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

 

 

FRANCO-BRITISH SEMINAR: `Electoral behaviour in Britain and France—the 1994 European election and attitudes towards the European Union in France and Britain', Maison Française, 2 p.m. (places to be booked one week in advance).

 

CLINICAL MEDICINE Faculty Board annual elections (7 June): nominations by six electors to be received at the University Offices by 4 p.m.

PROFESSOR U. AMALDI: `When nothing is something: a history of the vacuum' (Cherwell–Simon Memorial Lecture), Lecture Theatre A, Department of Zoology, 4.30 p.m.

C. GOLDSTEIN: `A theorem of Fermat and its contexts—sociological, historical, and mathematical readings', Maison Française, 5.15 p.m. (admission free, but places to be booked one week in advance).

 

AN EVENING of music and poetry from the court of François I, Maison Française, 8.15 p.m. (tel. for reservations one week in advance: (2)74220).

 

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Saturday 25 May

BATE COLLECTION of Musical Instruments Open Day (National Museums Week), 10 a.m.–5 p.m.

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Sunday 26 May

PROFESSOR HUGH WILLIAMSON preaches, Cathedral, 10 a.m.

BIRANDA FORD plays violin works by Beethoven, Schubert, Kreisler, and Franck, the hall, Balliol, 9 p.m.

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Monday 27 May

UNIVERSITY OFFICES closed (today only).

PROFESSOR M.A. NUSSBAUM (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor): `The descent of love: Joyce's Ulysses' (lecture series: `Ascents of love: desire and the good in the Western philosophical/literary tradition'), Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, St Anne's, 5 p.m.

 

DR TESSA RAJAK: `In and out of the Bible: Greek additions to the biblical text' (Grinfield Lectures—second series: `The Septuagint as a cultural document'), Collier Room, Regent's Park College, 5 p.m.

 

DR C. STRAY: `Idiosyncrasy and idiolexis in Victorian England: the Mushri–English Dictionary' (OED Forum meeting), Rewley House, 5 p.m.

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Tuesday 28 May

ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Dealing with the media (radio): introductory', 9.30 a.m. (see information above).

WOMEN TUTORS' GROUP meeting, Old Bar, Mansfield, 1 p.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The Romans in Oxfordshire', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

CONGREGATION meeting, 2 p.m.

 

 

DR P. BEAL: ` "The virtuous Mrs Philips" and "that whore Castlemaine": Orinda and her apotheosis, 1664–8' (James P.R. Lyell Lectures in Bibliography: `In praise of scribes: manuscripts and their makers in seventeenth-century England'), St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. BURROW: `The Lamp of Memory: Ruskin and the Victorian sense of the past' (first of two lectures in association with current exhibition `Ruskin and Oxford'), Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean, 5 p.m.

 

G. PALMER: `Lactation' (Women's Studies Committee seminars: `Policy, practice, and power: issues in human female reproduction'), Wolfson Hall, Somerville, 8.30 p.m.

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Wednesday 29 May

PROFESSOR M. JAMESON: `The rituals of Athena Polias in Athens' (David Lewis Lecture), Garden Quad Auditorium, St John's, 5 p.m.

T. BRIGHOUSE and S. RANSON: `Affirming the comprehensive ideal: the organisation of comprehensive education in the future', Department of Educational Studies, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR S. JACKSON: `High achievers from the care system: lessons for policy' (Nuffield Women's Group seminars: `Women, poverty, and social policy'), Seminar Room, Nuffield, 5 p.m.

N. SHEHADI: `Post-war Lebanese reconstruction' (Refugee Studies Programme: Seminars on Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

THE ALLEGRI STRING QUARTET (with Catherine Pierard, soprano), plays works by Haydn, Stravinsky, and Schoenberg, Holywell Music Room, 8 p.m. (tickets £8/£6, from Blackwell's Music Shop; student tickets £4, from Blackwell's or the Music Faculty).

D. BANERJEE: `The importance of women in the world of Rabindranath Tagore', and readings of translations of Tagore's poetry by K.K. Dyson (joint meeting of the Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women and the South Asian Studies Group), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 8 p.m.

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Thursday 30 May

L. HOECKLIN: `Social welfare, the family, and gender ideology in southern Germany' (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Gender and development—protest and politics'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. LAURENT: `Ronan's eyes: duality tamed in Breton folk culture' (O'Donnell Lecture in Celtic Studies), Room 2, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

THE VERY REVD JOHN DRURY: `Ruskin on religion and art' (second of two lectures in association with current exhibition `Ruskin and Oxford'), Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean, 5 p.m.

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Friday 31 May

MAISON FRANÇAISE study-day: `Histoire de la CGT: cent ans de syndicalisme en France' (Association for the Study of Modern and Contemporary France) (places to be booked one week in advance).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The Athenian Acropolis', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Methods of assessment', 2 p.m. (see information above).

DR D. CRABB: `A history of the automobile engine, 1970–2014' (Maurice Lubbock Memorial Lecture), Lecture Room 1, Department of Engineering Science, 5 p.m.

 

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Sunday 2 June

THE REVD CANON IAIN MACKENZIE preaches, Queen's, 10 a.m.

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Monday 3 June

FRANCO-BRITISH SEMINAR: `Electoral behaviour in Britain and France—class and religious voting in France and Britain', Maison Française, 2 p.m. (places to be booked one week in advance).

M. WATTHEE-DELMOTTE: `Poésie française et freudisme: les modalités d'une rencontre', Maison Française, 5.15 p.m. (admission free, but places to be booked one week in advance).

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Tuesday 4 June

DR J. HENDRON, MP, and MR R. MCCARTNEY, MP: `Northern Ireland: what is to be done?' (lecture series: `The state of the Union: issues in contemporary British democracy'), St Antony's, 5 p.m.

DR V. BERAL: `Reproductive cancers: the effects of contraception and child-bearing on cancer risk' (Women's Studies Committee seminars: `Policy, practice, and power: issues in human female reproduction'), Wolfson Hall, Somerville, 8.30 p.m.

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Wednesday 5 June

DR C. VOGLER: `Money and the household' (Nuffield Women's Group seminars: `Women, poverty, and social policy'), Seminar Room, Nuffield, 5 p.m.

DR L. PARSONS: `Palestinians in Lebanon: an overview' (Refugee Studies Programme: Seminars on Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

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Thursday 6 June

H. CRAWLEY: `Seeking sanctuary—women and asylum in Britain' (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Gender and development—protest and politics'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

J. BAUDRILLARD: `Mondialisation, universalité et singularité', Maison Française, 5.15 p.m. (admission free, but places to be booked one week in advance).

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Friday 7 June

ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Managing and developing effective teams', 9.15 a.m. (see information above).

 

 

P. HUNT: `L'Europe peut-elle avoir une politique méditerranéenne?', European Studies Institute, 70 Woodstock Road, 5 p.m. (admission free, but places to be booked through Maison Française one week in advance).

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Saturday 8 June

PEMBROKE COLLEGE exhibition: `Best of Pembroke'—art and silver exhibition including works by Bacon, Frink, Piper, and Rodin, in the Rockefeller Room, Sir Geoffrey Arthur Building (off Abingdon Road), 11 a.m.–3 p.m. (Tickets £1.50. Tel. for details: (2)76417.)

DEGREE conferments, Sheldonian, 11.30 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.

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Sunday 9 June

THE RT REVD MARK SANTER preaches, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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Monday 10 June

MAISON FRANÇAISE debate: `Souvenir du communisme, avenir du marxisme?' (various speakers), 5 p.m. (admission free, but places to be booked one week in advance).

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Tuesday 11 June

CONGREGATION meeting, 2 p.m.

MR E. GARNIER, MP, DR C. MACDONALD, MP, and MS E. NICHOLSON, MP: `The state of the Union' (final lecture in series: `The state of the Union: issues in contemporary British democracy'), St Antony's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. HULL: `The role of biology in the philosophy of biology' (Oxford History and Philosophy of Biology Programme), Sherrington Room, Department of Physiology, 5 p.m.

DR A. MCPHERSON: `Menopause' (Women's Studies Committee seminars: `Policy, practice, and power: issues in human female reproduction'), Wolfson Hall, Somerville, 8.30 p.m.

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  • *Notices of exhibitions, guided tours, etc.:

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    SPEECH BY THE PUBLIC ORATOR

    The following speech was delivered by the PUBLIC ORATOR in a Congregation held on Saturday, 18 May 1996, in presenting for the Honorary Degree of Master of Arts

     

    Sir ASHLEY PONSONBY, Baronet, KCVO, MC
    Formerly Lord Lieutenant of Oxfordshire

    Haud ita raro fit ut eorum qui Collegia nostra educationis causa ineunt quibusdam aliquamdiu prius exspectandum sit quam gradum consequantur; huic quem produco parem nescio an neminem invenire possitis, qui in Collegium de Balliolo rite ingressus, cum unum annum nobiscum degisset, ad res graviores gerendas excessit evasit erupit, nunc post annos si dis placet quinquaginta sex (grande mortalis aevi spatium) idcirco redit ut magistri gradum aliquando consecutus e pueris egressus esse videatur. quem olim ex Academiae spatiis discedentem ita inviti vidimus ut ne nos quidem ignoraremus bello quod tunc gerebatur tantum inesse momenti ut studiis nostris iure anteponeretur, praesertim a viro strenuo, viri fortissimi filio; et quidem hic et in Africa et in Italia acerrime pugnavit, vulnera accepit, cruce militari insignitus est. a vexillis dimissus ad rem argentariam se contulit, et cum viris probatissimis; hic quoque homo tam paci quam bello idoneus mox ceteris praestare, a prudentissimo quoque consuli coepit. sed cum satis habere non posset nisi civibus suis et rei publicae inserviebat, ludos nosocomia bibliothecas publicas fovere ac locupletare instituit; plurimis in locis pecuniae publicae custos, hominum egenorum tutor creatus est; illis ascitus est qui ludi magistros in re divina erudiunt; diu ecclesiae Anglicanae inter fiduciarios illo tempore erat cum res pecuniaria bene procedebat. itaque minime mirum est hunc electum esse qui Reginae in comitatu Oxoniensi esset legatus. qui locus ut olim potestatem secum ferebat haud spernendam, rotulorum scilicet custodiam, qua significabatur omnium militum Oxoniensium cura, sic nunc auctoritate omnibus praestat, nam ipsam Reginam repraesentat; quam repraesentavit hic annos septemdecim continuos, sive veterani recensendi erant, sive florum infantumve spectaculum iudicandum, periculosae plenum opus aleae [1], sive homines in scientia negotiisque ingeniosi praemiis afficiendi, sive denique nationum exterarum reges salutandi hospitioque excipiendi, qua in parte nos homines academici saepe admirati sumus huius maiestatem comitate conditam. quid plura dicam? praedium habet dilectum, boves pascit, piscandi studiosus est, musicae vacat; ecce specimen prisci viri sive Britanni sive Romani, qui semper omnia officia, omnia munera perficere expetit quam potest diligentissime. unum addam, hunc ubique concordiae fautorem exstitisse indefessum, in hominum diversorum simultatibus conciliandis, querimoniis compescendis peritissimum.

    Praesento Ashley Ponsonby, Baronettum, Regalis Ordinis Victoriani Equitem Commendatorem, Cruce Militari insignitum, nuper Reginae in Comitatu Oxoniensi legatum, ut admittatur honoris causa ad gradum Magistri in Artibus.

    [1] Horace, Odes ii. 1.7.
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    Paraphrase

    It is not unusual that some of those who enter a College need rather a long time to take their degrees, but Sir Ashley Ponsonby can surely claim something of a record. He entered Balliol, but after only one year he was called away to serve in the War; he now returns no less than fifty six years later to take a degree and formally finish his education as a Master of Arts. Our regret at seeing him cut short his stay in the University was of course tempered by the recognition, even on the part of the most academic of us, that the War must take precedence over study, especially for a man of military talent and military background; and Sir Ashley served with distinction both in North Africa and in Italy, where he was wounded and was awarded the Military Cross. On leaving the army he took up banking, where he showed that he possessed the talent no less for the arts of peace than those of war and soon became a Managing Director of Schroder Wagg. He felt the call of public and charitable service and was active in the cause of many schools, hospitals, and libraries. He has served as Trustee of numerous charities, including the Farmington Trust, which helps teachers with religious education; he was a Church Commissioner for seventeen years, a period when the financial affairs of the Church went well. It thus came as no surprise when he was appointed Her Majesty's Lord Lieutenant of Oxfordshire. Lords Lieutenant used to possess considerable power, the office of Custos Rotulorum carrying with it the general supervision of the military in the county; now it is a position of dignity, but a lofty one, as the personal representative of the Monarch. Sir Ashley has held this exacting position for seventeen years, with all its duties, such as reviewing the Territorials, judging flower and baby shows (a notoriously perilous business), presenting the Queen's Awards for Export and for Technology, and receiving foreign Heads of State. It is in this last capacity that the University has most often been able to admire his blend of dignity and charm. In his private life he has a herd of dairy cattle, he is a keen fisherman, he loves music. He is in fact a model of a type as familiar and as important in Rome as in Britain, of the conscientious and public spirited gentleman. It remains to add only that he is a conciliator, skilled and resourceful in bringing discordant groups and interests into harmony.

    I present Sir Ashley Ponsonby, Baronet, KCVO, MC, recently Lord Lieutenant of Oxfordshire, for the honorary degree of Master of Arts.

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    ROYAL BANK OF CANADA RESEARCH SCHOLARSHIPS IN SOCIAL STUDIES 1996

    The Prize has been awarded to JONATHAN BAYS, Balliol College.

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    CLINICAL MEDICAL SCHOLARSHIPS 1995–6

    Six Hobson Memorial Scholarships, value £225 per annum, tenable for the second and final year of the clinical course, have been awarded to the following:

    CHARLOTTE SOPHIE HANLON, Corpus Christ College and Magdalen College

    DAVID AYODEJI JUSTIN LLOYD, Magdalen College

    ALEXANDER RICHARD LYON, Trinity College

    KATHARINE CLAIRE PIKE, Exeter College and Green College

    LAURA ANNE ROBINSON, Churchill College, Cambridge, and Exeter College

    ARJUNE SEN, Corpus Christi College

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    JUNIOR PAGET TOYNBEE PRIZES 1996

    Prizes have been awarded to NICHOLAS BIRCH, Exeter College, and ELLA- JO MEHTA, St Hilda's College.

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    ENCAENIA

    Sheldonian Theatre

    On the occasion of the Encaenia to be held in the Sheldonian Theatre on Wednesday, 19 June, the Curators of the Theatre propose to allot seats as follows to those who make application (subject to availability):

    (a) One Visitor's ticket each to Heads of Houses, Canons of Christ Church, members of the Hebdomadal Council, and certain other persons holding official positions in the University;

    (b) One Visitor's Ticket to each Professor;

    (c) One ticket to Masters of Arts, Doctors of Philosophy, Masters of Science, Letters, and Philosophy, and Bachelors of Divinity, Civil Law, Medicine, Music, Letters, Science, and Philosophy.

    Applications for tickets in the above categories must be made not later than Monday, 10 June, to:

    The Head Clerk
    University Offices
    Wellington Square
    Oxford OX1 2JD

    Tickets for Bachelors of Arts, Fine Art, and Theology, Masters of Biochemistry, Chemistry, and Engineering, visitors, and members of the University who have not been admitted to any degree will be distributed through college authorities, and all applications for them should be made to the college authorities and not to the Head Clerk.

    The gates and entrances to the Theatre will be opened at 10.45 a.m. and the proceedings will begin at 11.30 a.m. Holders of tickets are requested to be in their places inside the Theatre by 11.15 a.m. Instructions as to entrances are printed on the tickets.

    All members of the University are required to wear subfusc and full academic dress. Doctors will wear their robes and other graduates their hoods.

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    NATIONAL COMMITTEE OF INQUIRY
    INTO HIGHER EDUCATION
    (`THE DEARING INQUIRY')

    Set out below, for the information of members of Congregation, is a press release issued on 10 May by the Department for Education and Employment, giving the membership and terms of reference of the Dearing Inquiry into Higher Education.

     

    Membership and Terms of Reference of the National Committee of Inquiry into Higher Education Announced

    Education and Employment Secretary Gillian Shephard today announced the membership of the National Committee of Inquiry into Higher Education and its terms of reference.

    In answer to a parliamentary question from Mr Keith Mans, MP (Wyre), Mrs Shephard said:

    `The National Committee of Inquiry into Higher Education faces an important and challenging task. Higher education has a vital role to play in raising the levels of the nation's skills and competitiveness and thus enhancing our capacity to generate wealth and to improve our quality of life. The National Committee of Inquiry will make recommendations on how the purposes, shape, structure, size and funding of higher education should develop to meet the needs of the UK over the next 20 years. It will have a significant influence on future generations of students, on the development of universities and colleges, and on the wider economy, society and culture of this country.

    My Rt. Hon. Friends, the Secretaries of State for Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland, and I are therefore grateful to all those who responded to our consultations on the Committee's composition and draft terms of reference. In the light of those responses, we are pleased to appoint the following members:

     

    • Sir Ron Dearing (Chairman)
    • Professor John Arbuthnott, Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Strathclyde
    • Baroness Dean of Thornton-le-Fylde (formerly Brenda Dean)
    • Ms Judith Evans, Director of Corporate Personnel, Sainsbury's
    • Sir Ron Garrick, Managing Director and Chief Executive of Weir Group
    • Sir Geoffrey Holland, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Exeter
    • Professor Diana Laurillard, Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Technology Development) of the Open University
    • Mrs P.A. Morris, Head Teacher, The Blue School, Wells
    • Sir Ron Oxburgh, Rector of Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine
    • Dr David Potter, Chairman of Psion PLC
    • Sir George Quigley, Chairman of Ulster Bank
    • Sir William Stubbs, Chief Executive of the Further Education Funding Council and Rector Designate of the London Institute
    • Sir Richard Sykes, Deputy Chairman and Chief Executive of Glaxo- Wellcome PLC
    • Professor David Watson, Director of the University of Brighton
    • Professor Sir David Weatherall, Regius Professor of Medicine at the University of Oxford
    • Professor Adrian Webb, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Glamorgan
    • Mr Simon Wright, Education and Welfare Officer, Students Union, the University of Wales College of Cardiff

    We are grateful to these members for agreeing to serve on this important Inquiry.

    We are placing a copy of the list of members and the full terms of reference in the Library.'

    National Committee of Inquiry into Higher Education: Terms of Reference

    To make recommendations on how the purposes, shape, structure, size and funding of higher education, including support for students, should develop to meet the needs of the United Kingdom over the next 20 years, recognising that higher education embraces teaching, learning, scholarship and research.

    The Committee should take account of the context in Annexe A.

    The Committee should have regard, within the constraints of the Government's other spending priorities and affordability, to the following principles:

    —there should be a maximum participation in initial higher education by young and mature students and in lifetime learning by adults, having regard to the needs of individuals, the nation and the future labour market;

    —students should be able to choose between a diverse range of courses, institutions, modes and locations of study;

    —standards of degrees and other higher education qualifications should be at least maintained, and assured;

    —the effectiveness of teaching and learning should be enhanced;

    —learning should be increasingly responsive to employment needs and include the development of general skills, widely valued in employment;

    —higher education's contribution to basic, strategic and applied research should be maintained and enhanced, particularly in subjects where UK research has attained international standards of excellence or in Technology Foresight priority areas;

    —arrangements for student support should be fair and transparent, and support the principles above;

    —higher education should be able to recruit, retain and motivate staff of the appropriate calibre;

    —value for money and cost-effectiveness should be obtained in the use of resources.

    The Committee should report by the summer of 1997.

    ANNEXE A: CONTEXT

    The Committee should take account of the following context:

    —demand for higher education from suitable qualified applicants of all ages is growing as more people achieve qualifications at level 3 and more of those who already have higher level qualifications look to upgrade or update them;

    —there is a growing diversity of students in higher education with a growing number of mature entrants, part-timers and women students;

    —higher education continues to have a key role in developing the powers of the mind, and in advancing understanding and learning through scholarship and research;

    —the UK must now compete in increasingly competitive international markets where the proliferation of knowledge, technological advances and the information revolution mean that labour market demand for those with higher level education and training is growing, particularly in business, and that there is a greater premium in the products of the country's research base;

    —many of our international competitors are aiming to improve the contribution their higher education systems make to their economic performance;

    —higher education has a key role in delivering national policies and meeting industry's needs for science, engineering and technology in research and postgraduate training;

    —a flourishing higher education system is important for all sectors of the economy and essential to the NHS and the education service, supplying qualified manpower, research and innovation, and continuing professional development;

    —through scholarship and research, higher education provides a national resource of knowledge and expertise for the benefit of our international competitiveness and quality of life, and provides a basis for responding to social and economic change through innovation and lifelong learning;

    —higher education continues to have a role in the nation's social, moral and spiritual life; in transmitting citizenship and culture in all its variety; and in enabling personal development for the benefit of individuals and society as a whole;

    —higher education is a major contributor to local, regional and national economic growth and regeneration;

    —there are distinctive features of higher education in different parts of the UK;

    —links between higher education and other parts of the education and training system, particularly further education, are increasing in importance;

    —links between higher education in the UK and elsewhere in the world are growing, as the international mobility of students and staff increases;

    —higher education is an important educational export in its own right;

    —new technology is opening up the possibility of new forms of teaching and learning, and higher education is increasingly delivered in the work-place and in the home through distance-learning;

    —the Government has legislated to enable private financial institutions to offer loans to students on similar terms to those offered by the Student Loans Company;

    —there have already been reviews of a number of areas likely to be of interest to the Committee, for example of the national framework of qualifications and of credit accumulation and transfer, of postgraduate education and of the dual support arrangements for research funding.

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    ISIS INNOVATION LIMITED

    2 South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3UB

    Isis Innovation, a wholly-owned company of the University, was established in 1988. The company has been formed to exploit know-how arising out of research funded by the UK Government through the Research Councils and funded by other bodies where the rights are not tied. The function of the company is to ensure that the results of research bring rewards to Oxford, and to the inventors, who are given a financial incentive for exploitation.

    Isis seeks licensees willing to pay lump sums and/or royalties for the use of know-how arising out of research. Isis also exploits the intellectual property of the University by setting up individual companies using venture capital or development capital funds.

    Isis' services are also available to individuals who wish to exploit the results of research supported by non-Research Council sources, when there are no prior conditions on the handling of the intellectual property rights. Isis Innovation has at its disposal a small pre-seedcorn fund for paying the costs of protecting intellectual property rights and for taking work to a stage where its potential can be assessed.

    Isis finds industrial partners to ensure that new ideas can be developed for market requirements. The company has established the Oxford Innovation Society for major industrial companies, so that they can have a window on Oxford technology and an opportunity to license and invest where appropriate.

    A brochure explaining Isis' activities is available. Please contact the above address, or the telephone and fax numbers given below.

    Members of the University should contact Dr James Hiddleston if they wish to take advantage of the services that Isis provides. (Telephone: (2)72411; fax: (2)72412.)

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    WOMEN TUTORS' GROUP

    The next meeting of the Women Tutors' Group will be held at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, 28 May, in the Old Bar, Mansfield College.

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    ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

    Conference: call for papers

    Racialising class, classifying race: labour and difference in the US, Africa, and Britain

    A conference on this subject will be held at St Antony's College from 11 to 13 July.

    It is intended that a selection of the papers presented to the conference will be published as a book. The major themes will include: political transformation and racial division; immigration, segregation, and the workplace; moralities, race, and labour; violence and difference among workers; gender, race, and labour; politics, organisation, and the challenge of whiteness; cross- national comparisons and international connections; creolisation, hybridity, and labour; race and labour in a colonial context; rural cultures, urban workers, and difference.

    The organisers welcome proposals for papers. These should include the paper's title and a single-paragraph summary clearly indicating the paper's principal theme. A curriculum vitae should also be enclosed. Preference will be given to papers which relate to the above topics. In order to allow time for pre-circulation, presenters will be expected to submit their papers six weeks before the conference.

    The closing date for submission of proposals is 23 August. Proposals should be addressed to Labour and Difference, Peter Alexander, St Antony's College, Oxford OX2 6JF. Requests for further information may be e-mailed to: peter.alexander@sant.ox.ac.uk.

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