23 April 1998 - No 4471



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 128, No. 4471: 23 April 1998<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

23 April 1998





University Health and
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<br /><br /><br /><title><br /> Oxford University Gazette, 23 April 1998: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

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HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL


1 Decrees

Council has made the following decrees, to come into
effect on 8 May.

List of the decrees:


Decree (2): Change in title of
second Professorship of Economics

Explanatory note

No notice of opposition having been given, Mr
Vice-Chancellor will declare carried, without holding the
meeting of Congregation on 28 April, Statutes (2)
renaming the new Professorship of Economics after Sir
John Hicks and (3) establishing a Nuffield Professorship
of Pathology, which were promulgated on 24 March (see
`University Agenda' below). Council has accordingly made
the following decrees, which give effect to consequential
changes.


Text of Decree (1)

[See Gazette, 5
March 1998
, Decree annexed to Statute (1)]

Text of Decree (2)

[See Gazette, 5
March 1998
, Decree annexed to Statute (2)]

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2 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of
Arts under the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. v, cl. 1
(Statutes, 1997, p. 367) has been accorded
to the following persons who are qualified for membership
of Congregation:

KAREN SORINA ANDERSEN, University Offices

SUZANNE ELIZABETH ASPDEN, Pembroke College

REZA BANAKER, Harris Manchester College

JACQUELINE BOULTWOOD, Department of Cellular Science

TERENCE DOUGLAS BUTTERS, Department of Biochemistry

VINCENZO CERUNDOLO, Nuffield Department of Medicine

GEORGE WILLIAM CHERRY, D.PHIL., Pembroke College

ROGER DAVID COX, Faculty of Clinical Medicine

GRAHAM GEORGE CUNNINGHAM, Oriental Institute

TIMOTHY ANDREW ORVILLE ENDICOTT, M.PHIL., St
Catherine's College

JOCELYNE MARIE ROGODY HUGHES, St Catherine's College

CECILE JULIER, Faculty of Clinical Medicine

SIMON PATRICK KEEFE, Christ Church

SUSAN ELISABETH MANLEY, Nuffield Department of
Clinical Medicine

SUSAN MARY OXBURY, Lady Margaret Hall

JACQUELINE PALACE, Department of Clinical Neurology

EVA PERERA MANEIRO, Faculty of Medieval and Modern
Languages

FRANCES MARY PLATT, Department of Biochemistry

PAULINE MARY RUDD, Department of Biochemistry

ROBIN MAXWELL RUSSELL, Nuffield Department of
Anaesthetics

JULIE EILEEN SCOTT-JACKSON, D.PHIL., St Cross College

CHRISTOPHER SHARP, Faculty of Clinical Medicine

VERONICA MARY WOOD, University Offices

ZHICHAO ZHANG, St Antony's College

GABOR GUSZTAV ZOLYOMI, Oriental Institute

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3 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have
been added to the Register of Congregation:

Andersen, K.S., MA status, University Offices

Aspden, S.E., MA status, Pembroke

Banaker, R., MA status, Harris Manchester

Boultwood, J., MA status, Department of Cellular Science


Butters, T.D., MA status, Department of Biochemistry

Cerundolo, V., MA status, Nuffield Department of Medicine


Cherry, G.W., MA status, D.Phil., Pembroke

Cox, R.D., MA status, Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Craufurd-Smith, R., MA, Trinity

Cunningham, G.G., MA status, Oriental Institute

Endicott, T.A.O., MA status, M.Phil., St Catherine's

Gleadle, J.M., BM, MA, D.Phil., Merton

Gray, M.A., MA, D.Phil., Kellogg

Hughes, J.M.R., MA status, St Catherine's

Julier, C., MA status, Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Keefe, S.P., MA status, Christ Church

Manley, S.E., MA status, Nuffield Department of Clinical
Medicine

Oxbury, S.M., MA status, Lady Margaret Hall

Palace, J., MA status, Department of Clinical Neurology


Perera Maneiro, E., MA status, Faculty of Medieval and
Modern Languages

Platt, F.M., MA status, Department of Biochemistry

Rudd, P.M., MA status, Department of Biochemistry

Russell, R.M., MA status, Nuffield Department of
Anaesthetics

Scott-Jackson, J.E., MA status, D.Phil., St Cross

Sharp, C., MA status, Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Wood, V.M., MA status, University Offices

Zhang, Z., MA status, St Antony's

Zolyomi, G.G., MA status, Oriental Institute

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BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into
effect on
8 May, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 23 April 1998: University<br /> Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

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issue



CONGREGATION 27 April


Degree by Special Resolution

The following special resolution will be deemed to be
approved at noon on 27 April, unless by that time the
Registrar has received notice in writing from two or more
members of Congregation under the provisions of Tit. II,
Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1997, p. 15) that
they wish the resolution to be put to a meeting of
Congregation.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the
following:

KATHLEEN WEIL-GARRIS BRANDT, All Souls College

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CONGREGATION 28 April


Notice

The meeting of Congregation is cancelled. The sole
business comprises questions to which no opposition has
been notified and in respect of which no request for an
adjournment has been received, and Mr Vice-Chancellor
will accordingly declare the statutes approved and the
preambles adopted without a meeting under the provisions
of Tit. II, Sect. iii, cl. 11 (Statutes,
1997, p. 8).

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CONGREGATION 28 May


Elections


Botanic Gardens, Curators of the: two vacancies

Equal opportunities Committee: one vacancy

Examination Schools, Curators of the: one vacancy

General Board of the Faculties: two from arts/ social studies
faculties, two from science faculties

Hebdomadal Council: three vacancies

Visitatorial Board Panel: three vacancies

¶ Nominations in writing for the elections on 28
May, by two members of Congregation, will be received by
the Head Clerk at the University Offices, Wellington
Square, up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 4 May, and similar
nominations by six members of Congregation up to 4 p.m.
on Monday, 11 May.

Council has decided that nominations should show for
each signatory the name and college or department in
block capitals. Any names which are not so shown may not
be published. At least one nomination in respect of each
candidate must be made on an official nomination form.
Copies of the form are obtainable from the Head Clerk
(telephone:

(2)70190; e-mail:
Philip.Moss@admin.ox.ac.uk).

Notes on the bodies concerned

The Curators of the Botanic Garden are
responsible, under Council, for the direction and control
of the Garden and of the Arboretum at Nuneham Courtenay,
including the appointment of the Superintendent of the
Garden, and for their finances.

The Equal Opportunities Committee is
responsible to Council and the General Board:
(a) for co-ordinating and monitoring steps taken
by the University to prevent racial and sexual
discrimination in the fields of employment and student
admission; (b) for advising the appropriate
university bodies on general issues relating to equality
of opportunity; and (c) for investigating, at
the request of Council and the Board, matters relating to
equality of opportunity. (The committee does not deal
with individual complaints.)

The Curators of the Examination Schools
are responsible to Council and the General Board:
(a) for supervising the Schools and for their
finances; (b) for providing and managing the
facilities in the Schools for examinations, lectures,
etc.; and (c) for matters relating to the
organisation of examinations within the Schools and
associated premises.

The General Board of the Faculties is
responsible, under Council, for the academic
administration of the University, with the duty of
considering and supervising all matters connected with
the University's research and teaching activities. It has
control of the greatest part of the University's general
budget. The Board meets weekly during term; much of its
work is conducted through committees (e.g. Planning and
Development, Graduate Studies), on which its members are
expected to serve if invited to do so.

The Hebdomadal Council is the
University's chief executive body, with statutory
responsibility for the administration of the University
and for the management of its finances and property. It
has oversight of the General Board's exercise of its
responsibility for the academic administration of the
University, as well as dealing with the relationship
between the University and all external bodies. Council
submits resolutions and statutes to Congregation for
approval, and has the power to make decrees (which may be
opposed in Congregation). Council meets fortnightly
during term, and twice in the Long Vacation. It has a
number of major committees, on which its members are
expected to serve if invited to do so.

The Visitatorial Board is responsible
for making recommendations to the Vice-Chancellor (or
other appropriate officer) on serious disciplinary cases
involving members of the academic or academic- related
staff. (It does not have responsibility for dealing with
incapacity on medical grounds, or complaints against the
Vice- Chancellor himself or herself.) Four members of
the board, as from time to time constituted to consider
an individual case, are selected by lot from a panel of
twelve persons elected by Congregation. The board is
chaired by a person with professional legal experience
who is appointed by the High Steward of the University.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 23 April 1998: Notices<br />

Notices


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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CONFERMENT OF THE TITLE OF VISITING
PROFESSOR

On the recommendation of the Physical Sciences Board, the General

Board has conferred the title of Visiting Professor in the
Principles of Engineering Design (Royal Academy of Engineering)
on E.
BOOTH, C.ENG., FICE, FISE (MA Cambridge), independent consultant
engineer, for a period of three years from 1 April 1998.

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HEADSHIP OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY

On the recommendation of the Biological Sciences Board, the
General Board has assigned the department to P. HARVEY, MA,
D.SC.,
Fellow of Jesus and Professor of Zoology, for a period of five
years
from 1 October 1998.

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ROCHE PRIZE IN LABORATORY MEDICINE 1998

The Prize has been awarded to STUART F.W. KENDRICK.

Proxime accesserunt: PAUL A. COHEN and MARC L.
GUTENSTEIN.

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CLASSICAL HONOUR MODERATIONS PRIZES 1998

Hertford Prize: DELPHINE M. STRAUSS, Balliol
College

First De Paravicini Prize: DAVID M.L. THOMAS,
Balliol College

Second De Paravicini Prize: LUKE B.T. HOUGHTON, Merton
College

Proxime accessit: CHARLES E.L. GOLDSMITH,
Balliol Collegep

Honourable mention: KATHERINE C. HARLOE,
Magdalen College

Harold Lister Sunderland Prize: JONATHAN W.
KIRKPATRICK and DELPHINE M. STRAUSS, both of Balliol College
(joint award)

Honourable mention: LISA J. CATER, Merton
College

Prize for Comparative Philology: GABRIELLE M.
HIGGINS, Merton College

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RHODES TRUSTEES

The Rhodes Trustees have appointed DR JOHN ROWETT, Fellow and
Tutor of Brasenose College, to be Secretary of the Trustees and
Warden of Rhodes House from 1 September 1999.

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GENERAL BOARD REVIEW OF THE DEPARTMENT
OF STATISTICS

The General Board has appointed a committee to review the
Department of Statistics. The committee's terms of reference are:

(a) to review the research and teaching activities
of the Department of Statistics, and the future direction these
activities might be expected to take, having regard to
international standards of excellence;

(b) to review the department's `service' provision
for users in other disciplines taking account of appointments not
held within the department;

(c) to review the organisational and management
structures of the department, including its relationship with the
Mathematical Sciences Board, and to review such matters as
planning, accommodation, and future space needs;

(d) to make recommendations, bearing in mind
constraints on the level of resources likely to be available.

The membership of the review committee is:

Dr J.M. Landers, All Souls (Chairman)

Professor Niels Keilding, University of Copenhagen

Professor Frank Kelly, FRS, University of Cambridge

Professor Adrian Smith, Imperial College, London

Dr P. Clifford, Department of Statistics

The committee would welcome written comments on matters falling
within its terms of reference. These should be sent to the
secretary to the review committee, Miss C.L. Lee, University
Offices, Wellington Square, by Friday, 8 May.

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PROPOSALS FOR HONORARY DEGREES TO BE
CONFERRED AT THE ENCAENIA IN 1999, AND FOR DEGREES BY DIPLOMA

Council's Advisory Committee for Degrees by Diploma and Encaenia
Honorary Degrees gives preliminary consideration both to
proposals received from members of Congregation for the
conferment of degrees by diploma upon royal personages and heads
of state on occasions other than Encaenia, and to proposals for
the conferment of Encaenia honorary degrees. The current
membership of the committee is: Dr P.A. Slack, Principal of
Linacre (Pro-Vice- Chancellor, in the chair); Dr A.M. Bowie,
Queen's (Assessor 1998–9, ex officio); Dr R.
Goodman, St Antony's (Assessor 1997–8, ex officio);
Professor J. Griffin, Balliol (Public Orator, ex
officio
); Mr A.B. Atkinson, Warden of Nuffield; Professor
I.C. Butler, Christ Church; Professor R.A. Cowley, Wadham;
Professor Sir John Grimley Evans, Green College; Professor C.A.R.
Hoare, Wolfson; Professor S.D. Iversen, Magdalen; Dr J.M. Rawson,
Warden of Merton; Professor A.J. Ryan, Warden of New College. The
committee finds it helpful to be able to review all proposals
together, in a standard format. Members of Congregation who wish
to make suggestions to the committee about honorary degrees to
be conferred at the Encaenia in 1999 are therefore asked to do
so on a special proposal form, a copy of which will be found
printed in this Gazette, after `Advertisements'
below (further copies of the form are also obtainable from Miss
J.M. Noon at the University Offices, Wellington Square). It will
be possible to download a copy of the form from the
Administrative Information Web site
(www.admin.ox.ac.uk/encaenia/), though the form must be returned
as hard copy, under strictly confidential cover, to Miss Noon.
Completed forms should be returned to her not later than Friday,
8 May 1998. There is a special form for proposals for degrees by
diploma, copies of which are available from Miss Noon.

Members of Congregation wishing to suggest candidates are asked
in particular to note the following points:

(a) under Council's standing orders, no member of
Council or of the advisory committee shall forward to that
committee or propose directly to Council the name of any person
for any honorary degree unless he or she is prepared personally
to recommend that the conferment of such a degree be seriously
considered;

(b) while informal soundings within the University
on any proposal will often be desirable, every effort should be
made to ensure that publicity is not at any stage given to any
proposal for the conferment of an honorary degree.

The advisory committee will report to Council early in Michaelmas
Term, submitting a short-list of candidates for further
consideration. Council will then decide which proposals should
be referred to its Committee on Honorary Degrees. The final list
of proposed honorands, drawn up by Council in the light of the
latter committee's report, will be submitted to Congregation for
approval in accordance with the requirements of Tit. II, Sectt.
vi and viii (Statutes, 1997, pp. 14–16).

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WORKING PARTY ON ACCESS

At the end of Michaelmas Term the Vice-Chancellor set up a
Working Party on Access to Oxford. The terms of reference of the
Working Party are as follows:

(i) to analyse the present composition of the undergraduate
and postgraduate body of the University; and in the light of its
findings,

(ii) to consider the most effective means of ensuring a broad
diversity of students in terms of social and educational
background, gender, age, personal circumstances, and ethnic,
regional, and national origin, and the appropriate conditions of
successful study of such students, having regard always to
preservation of Oxford's academic standards and particular
academic purposes; and

(iii) to report upon other mechanisms by which this University
might usefully participate in a `learning society', having
similar regard to its academic standards and purposes; and

(iv) to submit a report, with recommendations, not later than
the end of Trinity Term 1998, for consideration by Council, the
General Board, and the Conference of Colleges.

Colleges and faculties are being written to separately for their
views on a number of access-related matters, but any member of
the university who would like to comment on any aspect of the
Working Party's remit is most welcome to do so. Comments should
be sent to the Secretary of the Working Party, Miss Jane Minto,
Oxford Colleges Admission Office, University Office, Wellington
Square, Oxford OX1 2JD, by Monday, 18 May.

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COMPOSITION OF ELECTORAL BOARDS

The composition of the electoral boards to the posts below,
proceedings to fill which are currently in progress, is as
follows:

May Professorship of Medicine


                                        Appointed by

Professor Sir Richard Southwood

(Chairman) Mr Vice-Chancellor The Principal of Somerville ex officio Professor G. Alberti Council Professor Sir David Weatherall General Board Professor J.I. Bell ex officio Professor K.E. Davies General Board Professor R.E. Phillips Clinical Medicine Board Dr K.A. Fleming Clinical Medicine Board Dr C. Bunch Oxfordshire Health Authority Dr M. Wood Somerville College

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Sir John Hicks Professorship of Economics


The Principal of Linacre (Chairman)Mr Vice-Chancellor
The Warden of Nuffield                  ex officio
Professor D.F. Hendry                   Council
Professor N. Stern                      General Board
Professor R.W. Blundell                 General Board
Professor P.D. Klemperer                Social Studies Board
Professor J.S. Vickers                  Social Studies Board
Dr M. Stevens                           Social Studies Board
Professor C.J.E. Bliss                  Nuffield College

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UNIVERSITY OFFICES


Restriction on vehicle parking

From Saturday, 23 May, any unauthorised vehicles parked in the
parking spaces belonging to the University Offices, Oxford, off
Little Clarendon Street and to the rear of the offices, will be
wheel-clamped. There will be a £30 charge for release.

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WIDOWS OF FORMER MEMBERS OF THE
UNIVERSITY'S PENSION SCHEMES

From time to time the attention of the University is drawn to
individual cases of financial hardship among widows of former
members of the Federated Superannuation System for Universities
(FSSU) and the University of Oxford Employees Pension Scheme
(EPS). Limited resources are available to alleviate proven cases
of hardship and any enquiry should be addressed to the
Superannuation Officer, University Offices, Wellington Square,
Oxford OX1 2JD. All cases are dealt with in the strictest
confidence.

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UNIVERSITY OFFICES

The University Offices will be closed for normal business on
Monday, 4 May, and Monday, 25 May.

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UNIVERSITY MESSENGER SERVICE

The University Messenger Service will not operate on Monday, 4
May, and Monday, 25 May.

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SHELDONIAN THEATRE

The Sheldonian Theatre will be closed on Monday, 4 May, and
Monday, 25 May.

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INSTITUTE OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS
LIBRARY

The Institute of Economics and Statistics Library will be
carrying out a pilot scheme, opening 9.30 a.m.–5 p.m. on
Saturdays of weeks 0–7 of Trinity Term this year.

The library will be operating a skeleton staff on Saturday, so
it may not be possible to fetch items from the closed stack or
answer complex subject-specific queries.

During term the library is open 9.30 a.m.–10 p.m.,
Monday–Thursday, and 9.30 a.m.–7 p.m. on Fridays.

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REPORT OF THE RULES COMMITTEE

The statutory annual meeting of the Rules Committee was held on
6 March 1998, chaired by the then Senior Proctor (Dr M E
Ceadel).

The Committee made the following appointments to the panels from
which members of the Disciplinary Court are drawn by lot:

Congregation Panel

Dr J M A Ashbourn (Wolfson)*

Dr A M Buchanan (St Hilda's)

Dr M J O Francis (Wolfson)

Ms J M Innes (Somerville)

Revd S Innes (Greyfriars)

Dr T S Kemp (St John's)

Dr N J Kruger (St Cross)

Ms J Seymour (Trinity)*

Dr L J Smith (Harris Manchester)

B E Woolnough (St Cross)

Junior Members' Panel

Ms A M Clark (Corpus)

Mr E J Fife (Lincoln)

Ms R E Isba (Somerville)

Mr T Jestadt (St John's)**

Mr J E Metcalfe (Lincoln)

Mr M F Mullins (Queen's)

Mr G Petrochilos (Trinity)

Ms C E Pinches (St Anne's)**

Ms R J Reeves (New)

Mr W G Turner (St John's)

* Name subsequently drawn by lot by the Registrar to serve on
the Court 1998--2000.

** Name subsequently drawn by lot by the Registrar to serve
on
the Court 1998--1999.

The Committee also appointed four local solicitors to the panel
from which Mr Vice-Chancellor selects the Clerk of the University
Disciplinary Court for the forthcoming year. (Subsequent to the
meeting, Mr H W B Mendus was selected for appointment to this
position for a further year.)

The Committee reviewed its Regulations currently in force (Tit.
XI, Sect. VIII; Statutes, 1997, pp. 783--8). In
order to improve the operation of that part of the Regulations
concerning the registration of student clubs, societies and
publications, the Committee agreed to introduce with effect from
Michaelmas Term 1998 the detailed amendments indicated (in bold
face) below. Subject to these amendments, the Committee agreed
that its Regulations should remain in force for the year
commencing Michaelmas Term 1998.

Amendments to the Regulations of the Rules Committee
effective from Michaelmas Term 1998

§ 1. Clubs, societies, and publications

1. Junior Members of the University who form a club, society,
or an organisation for whatsoever purpose (including one for the
publication of a journal, newspaper, or magazine), and who wish
to use the name of the University in its title (or in the title
of a journal, newspaper, or magazine), shall

(a) register with the Proctors; and
(b) obtain the consent of the
Vice-Chancellor. The Vice-Chancellor will not consider
applications for the use of the name of the University until the
club, society or organisation has been registered with the
Proctors for two consecutive terms.

2. The consent of the Vice-Chancellor may be withdrawn or
withheld if he or she sees fit.

3. A club, society, or organisation which does not wish to use
the name of the University in its title may also register with
the Proctors provided it conforms with the regulations in clauses
6, 7 and 8 below.

4. The Proctors may not unreasonably withhold or withdraw
registration.

5. (i) Each club, society, or organisation which
registers with the Proctors shall be designated, as the Proctors
see fit, to be either (a) a non-sports club, society or
organisation (hereafter `non-sports club'), or (b) a
club, society or organisation for sport (hereafter `sports club')
or (c) an organisation for the publication of a journal,
newspaper or magazine, whether in hard copy or electronic format
(hereafter `publication').

(ii) Each such non-sports club and publication shall register
with the Proctors through the Clerk to the Proctors. Each such
sports club shall register with the Proctors through the
Secretary to the Committee for Sport.

(iii) In this regulation, non-sports club, sports club and
publication means the members of the club, society or
organisation concerned.

6. (i) Each non-sports club which registers with the Proctors
shall:

(a) establish a constitution and deposit a copy of
it with the Proctors;

(b) act in accordance with the constitution
established under (a) above;

(c) advise the Proctors promptly
of any changes in the constitution established under (a)
above;

(d) notify to the Proctors not later than the end
of the second week of every Full Term the
programme of meetings and speakers which has been arranged for
that term (e.g. by sending them a copy of its
term-card);

(e) appoint a president (or similar principal
officer) who shall be a matriculated member of the University in
residence for the purpose of fulfilling the requirements of any
statute, decree, or regulation of the University or reading for
any degree, diploma, or certificate of the University or a member
of one of the other institutions listed in
(l) below attending the institution for
the purpose of undertaking a course of study (subject in the
latter case to the member's signing, on election to office, an
undertaking to abide by the provisions of § 1, cl.
6, and to accept the authority of the Proctors
on club matters);

(f) appoint a secretary who shall be a matriculated
member of the University in residence for the purpose of
fulfilling the requirements of any statute, decree, or regulation
of the University or reading for any degree, diploma, or
certificate of the University, or a member of one of the other
institutions listed in (l) below attending the
institution for the purpose of undertaking a course of study
(subject in the latter case to a member's signing, on election
to office, an undertaking to abide by the provisions of §
1, cl. 6, and to accept the authority of the
Proctors on club matters) and who shall keep a proper record of
its activities;

(g) appoint a treasurer who shall be a matriculated
member of the University in residence for the purpose of
fulfilling the requirements of any statute, decree, or regulation
of the University or reading for any degree, diploma, or
certificate of the University or a member of one of the other
institutions listed in (l) below
attending the institution for the purpose of undertaking a course
of study (subject in the latter case to the member's signing, on
election to office, an undertaking to abide by the provisions of
§ 1, cl. 6, and to accept the authority of
the Proctors on club matters) and who shall keep a proper record
of its financial transactions which shall be available for
inspection at the request of the Senior Member or the Proctors;
and shall forward to the Proctors by the end of the
second week of each term a copy of the accounts
for the preceding term signed by the Senior Member for retention
on the Proctors' files;

(h) not appoint several individuals jointly
to hold any of the offices specified in (e),
(f) and (g) nor allow any individual to hold
more than one of these offices at a time;

(i) appoint a member of Congregation as Senior Member who
shall be an ex officio member of its committee;

(j) notify to the Proctors by the end of the
second week of each term the names of its
officers and the names of the members of its
committee;

(k) notify the Proctors immediately of any
changes in holders of the offices specified in (e),
(f) and (g);

(l) admit to membership only members of the
University and at the discretion of its committee, members of
Ruskin College, of Plater College, of Ripon College, Cuddesdon,
of Westminster College, and of St Stephen's
House;

(m) admit to membership, if it so wishes, other
persons not being members of the University, or one of the
institutions listed in (l) above,
provided that non-university members shall not constitute more
than one-fifth of the total membership;
(n) if having a turnover in excess of
£15,000 in the preceding year, or if owing
to a change in the nature or scale of its
activities, confidently expecting to have such
a turnover in the current year, submit its accounts for audit by
the University's auditors (or other auditors approved in advance
by the Proctors). Accounts are to be ready for audit within four
months of the end of its financial year and the
costs of the audit shall be borne by the non-sports
club
. If requested by the auditors the
non-sports club
shall submit accounts and related
material as a basis for a review of accounting procedures, the
cost likewise to be borne by the non-sports
club
.

(o) maintain a register of current members who shall
elect or appoint the officers (including those specified in
(e), (f) and (g)) and who shall have
ultimate responsibility for the activities of the non-sports
club. This register must be made available for inspection by the
Proctors on request. (p) notify the Proctors if the non-sports
club ceases to operate, and at the same time submit a final
statement of acounts.

(ii) Each officer of a non-sports club must, on relinquishing
his or her appointment, promptly hand to his or her successor in
office (or to another member of the club nominated by its
committee) all official documents and records belonging to the
club, together with (on request from the club's committee) any
other property of the club which may be in his or her possession,
and must complete any requirements to transfer authority relating
to control of the club's bank account, building society account
or other financial affairs.

(iii) In exceptional circumstances, at the request of a
non-sports club, the Proctors shall have
discretion to dispense from the requirements of any of
sub-clauses (i) (e), (f), (g),
( h), (i), (j), (l), (m), and
(n)
, subject to such terms and conditions as they may
from time to time see fit to impose.

7. A sports club which wishes to register with the
Proctors shall observe the same provisions as those set out for
non-sports clubs in § 1, cl. 6,
cexcept that\: (i)
in respect of the requirement in 6 (i) (g) for the
treasurer to keep a proper record of its financial transactions
and to submit accounts to the Proctors on a termly basis, a
sports club may with the consent of the Senior Member concerned
elect to vest in its Senior Member the responsibility for keeping
a proper record of its financial transactions and, after having
been registered with the Proctors for three consecutive terms may
submit its accounts annually not later than by the end of the
eighth week of Trinity Term; (ii) in respect of the requirement
in 6 (i) (i) to appoint a member of Congregation as Senior
Member, a sports club may elect to appoint a member of
Congregation as its Senior Treasurer instead; (iii) in respect
of the requirement in 6 (i) (j) to notify the names of
its officers and committee members termly, a sports club may
elect to notify such details annually by not later than the end
of the second week of Michaelmas Term.\

8. (i) A publication which registers with
the Proctors shall

(a) notify to the Proctors by the end of the
second week of each term the names of
its editor or editors and the names of any other
persons who have agreed to assume financial responsibility
and shall promptly notify to the Proctors any changes in
its editor or editors
.

(b) appoint a member of Congregation as its
Senior Member
who shall be kept informed of the
activities of the organisation;

(c) keep a proper record of its financial
transactions which shall be available for inspection at the
request of the Senior Member or the Proctors; and forward to the
Proctors by the end of the second week of each
term a copy of the accounts for the preceding term signed by the
Senior Member for retention on the Proctors' files;

(d) inform the Proctors when publication ceases and
in doing so present a financial statement; and

(e) if having a turnover in excess
of £15,000 in the preceding year, or, owing to a change in
the nature or scale of its activities,
if confidently expecting to
have such a turnover in the current year, shall submit
its accounts for audit by the University's
auditors (or other auditors approved in advance by the Proctors).
Accounts shall be ready for audit within four months of the end
of the financial year of the publication. If requested by the
auditors, the publication shall submit accounts and related
materials as a basis for accounting procedures, the cost likewise
to be borne by the organisation for the publication.

(ii) In exceptional circumstances, at the request of a
publication, the Proctors shall have discretion to dispense from
the requirement of subclauses (i) (b) and (c)
subject to such terms and conditions as they may from time to
time see fit to impose.

9. Any breach of this regulation shall be a
university offence.

10. Failure to comply with this regulation
may result in the non-sports club, sports club or
publication
being deregistered by the Proctors.

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ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM


Vivien Leigh Prize

A prize of £300 is offered by the Ashmolean Museum from the
Vivien Leigh Fund for a two-dimensional work of art on paper, not
exceeding 55 by 40 centimetres, by an undergraduate member of the
University. The work will be chosen, if a work of sufficient
merit is submitted, by the Keeper of Western Art in the Ashmolean
Museum, from work submitted to the Print Room by Wednesday, 17
June, or work exhibited at the annual degree show at the Ruskin
School of Drawing and Fine Art. (Work exhibited at the degree
show should not be submitted to the Museum.) It is a condition
of the award that the winning work be given to the Ashmolean.

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CONCERT


St John's College and Colin Carr

STEVEN ISSERLIS (cello) and THOMAS ADES (piano) will perform the
following at 8.30 p.m. on Monday, 11 May, in the Garden
Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's College: Bach, Sonata No. 2 for
Gamba, and Suite No. 3 for unaccompanied cello; Suk, Ballade and
Serenade, op. 3, No. 1; Janacek, two pieces from On an
overgrown path
, piano solo; Kodaly, Sonata, op. 4; Barber,
Sonata.

Admission is free. Programmes will be available from the Porters'
Lodge, St John's, but are reserved for members of the college
until 2 May. Each programme will be valid as an admission ticket
until 8.20 p.m. Any vacant seats will be filled from the door
during the last ten minutes before the concert starts.

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FACULTY OF MUSIC


Opera performance

The Minister, a one-act opera by Professor Roger
Scruton, will be performed in the Holywell Music Room, conducted
by Jonathan Williams, at 8.30 p.m. on Friday, 1 May. Tickets,
costing £15 and £12 (student concessions £5), may
be obtained from Blackwell's Music Shop or at the door. For
further details, telephone 01666 510 327.

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section



ASHMOLEAN LIBRARY


Arrangements during the construction
of the Sackler Library, summer 1998–summer 2000

Revised notice

The Committee for the Ashmolean Library advises readers that
construction of the Sackler Library, on a site immediate west of
the Library, is scheduled to begin in the first week of July
1998, for completion in the late summer of 2000. The Committee
has been advised that working conditions will vary according to
the stage of adjacent construction, but should be tolerable for
the majority of the time. It regrets the inconvenience to readers
from the inevitable disruption and noise, and is taking all
practicable steps to keep disruption to a minimum.

The project involves the replacement of the Griffith Institute,
and the decanting of its holdings into adjacent accommodation for
the construction period. Decanting activities will be spread over
a period from the second week in September 1998 until 9th
October, resulting in different parts of the collections being
inaccessible for different periods. Initially the Ancient Near
Eastern books will be moved to the basement of the Oriental
Institute, followed by decanting of the Egyptological holdings
into the houses of 2, and 4-6 St. John's Street in late
September. All other sections of the Ashmolean's collections will
remain on site.

Building works will be required within the Ashmolean Library to
(1) block various windows to reduce construction noise from the
adjacent site, and (2) replace the ancillary entrance and toilets
currently provided by the Griffith Institute in a new temporary
entrance into Room 1, accessed from the adjacent (Cast Gallery)
lane.

The works relating to (1) involve blocking in the mezzanine
windows into Room 1 and the Haverfield room, with associated
ventilation provisions. These works are provisionally programmed
to affect the Haverfield Room for three days during 6 - 8 July,
and Room 1 during 8 - 10 July. During these periods, reading in
each space will not be practicable, but it is hoped to maintain
some access to most book stacks.

Works relating to (2) will involve construction work immediately
outside room 1 for a period of up to 6 weeks, starting in late
August 1998, during which some noise is inevitable. At some dates
during September, much of Room 1 will need to be closed for one
day to allow some readers' places and shelving to be
repositioned, and separately for up to three further days, to
allow the new entrance doorway to be formed, and possibly a new
book hoist to be installed.

A one day total closure of the Library will be required due to
a complete electrical shut-down, associated with the provision
of a new electrical substation, and the transfer of supplies to
all surrounding buildings. This is scheduled for Wednesday 4th
November.

Programmes for these and other secondary works will be refined
in due course, and readers advised as soon as dates are
finalised, as will any changes to the programme.

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FACULTY OF ORIENTAL STUDIES


University Instructorship in Turkish

Applications are invited for a new instructorship in Turkish in
the Oriental Studies Faculty, tenable for five years from 1
October 1998. Applicants should have a native command of Turkish
and be fluent in English. They should have completed a first
degree in Turkish, linguistics, or the teaching of English, and
should preferably have experience of teaching Turkish as a
foreign language.

The instructor will be expected to give between fifteen and
twenty hours of instruction per week in full term. The full
duties are set out in the further particulars, which all
applicants are asked to consult and which can be obtained from
the office of Dr A.M. Knowland, Secretary to the Board of the
Faculty of Oriental Studies, Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane,
Oxford OX1 2LE (telephone; Oxford (2)88202, fax: (2)78190, e-
mail: orient@orinst.ox.ac.uk), to whom formal applications naming
three referees (seven typed copies, or one only from candidates
overseas) should be sent by Friday, 1 May.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 23 April 1998: Lectures<br />

Lectures


Contents of this section:

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INAUGURAL LECTURES


Regius Professor of Modern History

PROFESSOR R.J.W. EVANS will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5
p.m.
on Monday, 11 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `The language of history and the history of
language.'

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section



Harold Vyvyan Harmsworth Professor of
American History

PROFESSOR ERNEST R. MAY will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5
p.m.
on Tuesday, 12 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Shaping forces in American foreign policy.'

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section



CYRIL FOSTER LECTURE

H.E. ROLF EKÉUS, Swedish Amabassador to the USA and
Chairman,
UN Special Commission on Iraq, 1991–7, will deliver the
Cyril
Foster Lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 4 May, in the Examination
Schools.

Subject: `The UN Security Council and weapons of mass
destruction in Iraq.'

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section



CHERWELL--SIMON LECTURE 1998

SIR MARTIN WOOD, OBE, FRS, Deputy Chairman, Oxford Instruments
PLC,
will deliver the Cherwell-Simon Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Friday,
8
May, in Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building, South
Parks
Road.

Subject: `Superconductivity, eighty-seven years
on—where's it going?'

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section



CLARENDON LECTURES IN ECONOMICS 1998

Game theory, experimental economics, and theoretical
computation

PROFESSOR ALVIN E. ROTH, University of Pittsburgh, will deliver
the
Clarendon Lectures in Economics at 5 p.m. on the following days
in
the Gulbenkian Theatre, the Institute of Economics and
Statistics,
the St Cross Building.

Mon. 27 Apr.: `Matching phenomena in labour
markets.'

Tue. 28 Apr.: `Some engineering aspects of the
design of
labour markets.'

Fri. 1 May: `Learning and fairness.'

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section



CLARENDON LECTURES IN MANAGEMENT STUDIES
1998

Managing innovation and change

PROFESSOR DAVID TEECE, Mitsubishi Bank Professor, Haas School of
Business, University of California, Berkeley, will deliver the
Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies at 5 p.m. on the
following
days in the Examination Schools.


Tue. 5 May: `The knowledge economy and
intellectual
capital management.'

Wed. 6 May: `Innovation and business
organisation.'

Thur. 7 May: `Intellectual property, technology
strategy, and public policy.'

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section



GAISFORD LECTURE

DR C. SOURVINO-INWOOD, Reading, will deliver the Gaisford
Lecture at
5 p.m. on Thursday, 21 May, in the Garden Quad Auditorium, St
John's
College.

Subject: `Euripidean tragedies and Athenian religion.'

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section



HENSLEY HENSON LECTURES IN THEOLOGY
1997–8

The Christ of history and the open society

THE REVD DR ALAN TORRANCE, Director of the Research Institute in
Systematic Theology and Senior Lecturer in the Department of
Theology
and Religious Studies, King's College, London, will deliver the
Hensley Henson Lectures at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Examination
Schools.

30 Apr.: `The open society and the challenge of
religious diversity.'

7 May: `Christ and the question of criteria.'

14 May: `The body of Christ and the reconciled
mind.'

21 May: `The Church and the mediation of the open
society.'

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section



WILDE LECTURES 1997–8

The religion of the apostle Paul

DR JOHN ASHTON, formerly University Lecturer in New Testament
Studies, will continue the Wilde Lectures at 5 p.m. on the
following
Mondays in the Examination Schools. Each lecture will be followed
by
discussion.

27 Apr.: `Paul the apostle.'

4 May: `Paul the charismatic.'

11 May: `Paul the possessed.'

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section



SPEAKER'S LECTURES IN BIBLICAL STUDIES
1997–9

Theory of primitive Christian religion

PROFESSOR GERD THEISSEN, Professor of New Testament Theology,
University of Heidelberg, will continue his first series of
Speaker's
Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination
Schools.

Mon. 4 May: `The two basic values of the primitive
Christian ethic: love of neighbour and renunciation of
status.'

Tue. 5 May: `Dealing with power and possessions in
primitive Christianity.'

Wed. 6 May: `Dealing with wisdom and holiness in
primitive Christianity.'

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section



O'DONNELL LECTURES 1998

DR NICHOLAS WILLIAMS, Department of Modern Irish, University of
Dublin, will deliver the O'Donnell Lectures at 5 p.m. on the
following days in the Hall, the Taylor Institution.

Thur. 21 May: `Gaeilge, Gàidhlig,
Gaelg—the
origins of Manx.'

Fri. 22 May: `Nebbaz Gerriau dro tho
Carnoack—a few
words about Cornish.'

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section



BESTERMAN LECTURE 1998

PROFESSOR ROBERT DARNTON will deliver the inaugural Besterman
Lecture
at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 28 May, in the Hall, the Taylor
Institution.

Subject: `Policing poetry in Paris, 1749.'

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section



HALLEY LECTURE 1998

PROFESSOR VERA C. RUBIN, Carnegie Institution of Washington, will
deliver the Halley Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 19 May, in the
Lecture Theatre, the University Museum.

Subject: `What Halley didn't know about the
universe.'

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section



RADHAKRISHNAN MEMORIAL LECTURES
1997–8

India's Raj: indigenous components and the imperial
construction
of India

PROFESSOR ROBERT FRYKENBERG will deliver the Radhakrishnan
Memorial
Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination
Schools.

Wed. 29 Apr.: `Baniyas, Chettiars, and Dubashis:
mercantile contributions to India's construction.'

Mon. 4 May: `Sepoys, Naukars, and Sawars: military
contributions to India's conquest.'

Mon. 11 May: `Nayakas, Rayats, and Zamindars:
political
contributions to India's constitution.'

Mon. 18 May: `Munshis, Pandits, and Vakils:
cultural
contributions to India's consolidation.'

Wed. 20 May: `Mandalas, Mamul, and Namak:
ideological
contributions to India's consensus.'

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section



ASTOR VISITING LECTURE

PROFESSOR H. FOLEY, Barnard College, will lecture at 5 p.m. on
Thursday, 7 May, in the Garden Quad Auditorium, St John's
College.

Subject: `Clytemnestra's apology.'

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section



PROFESSOR OF POETRY

Three poets: D.H. Lawrence, Robert Lowell, Ted Hughes

PROFESSOR JAMES FENTON will lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in
Lecture
Theatre 2, the St Cross Building.

14 May: `D.H. Lawrence.'

21 May: `Robert Lowell.'

28 May: `Ted Hughes.'

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section



DAVID LEWIS LECTURE

PROFESSOR P. BRIANT, Toulouse, will deliver the third annual
David
Lewis Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 20 May, in the Garden Quad
Auditorium, St John's College.

Subject: `Greek epigraphy and Achaemenid history:
from
Sardis to Xanthos.'

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section



JOHN LOCKE LECTURES 1998

PROFESSOR L. SKLAR, Michigan, will deliver the John Locke
Lectures at
5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St
Cross
Building. There will be a discussion class following the lectures
at
11 a.m. on Fridays in the Lecture Room, the Sub-faculty of
Philosophy.

29 Apr.: `Critical philosophy within science.'

6 May: `On what there isn't.'

13 May: `Idealisation and representation.'

20 May: `Theoretically fundamental
idealisations.'

27 May: `Transience and belief.'

3 June: `Theories about theories.'

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section



ANTHROPOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY

ESCR Research Programme in Transnational Communities:
Conceiving
transnational activity

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Fridays in the
Upper
Lecture Theatre, the School of Geography.

PROFESSOR M. ALBROW, Roehampton Institute

8 May: `Frames and transformations in
transnational
studies.'

PROFESSOR S. STRANGE, Warwick

15 May: `Mad money: transnational financial
connections.'

PROFESSOR L. SKLAIR, LSE

22 May: `Transnational practices and the
analysis of
the global system.'

PROFESSOR A. PORTES, Princeton

29 May: `Globalisation from below: the rise of
transnational communities.'

PROFESSOR Z. BAUMAN, Leeds

5 June: `Ethic networks in a networked
world.'

PROFESOR S. CASTLES, Wollongong

12 June: `New migrations, ethnicity, and
nationalism
in south-east and east Asia.'

PROFESSOR R. COHEN, Warwick

19 June: `Transnational social movements: an
appraisal.'

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section



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, PHYSIOLOGICAL
SCIENCES

History and philosophy of biology

The following lectures, which are intended to be of wide
interest,
will be held at the times shown in the Sherrington Room, the
Department of Physiology. Graduates and undergraduates are
welcome to
attend. Further details may be obtained from Dr T.J. Horder,
Department of Human Anatomy (telephone: (2)72189).

PROFESSOR P. SINGER, Monash

Thur. 14 May, 4 p.m.: `Ethics and the treatment
of
animals.'

DR H. KAMMINGA, Cambridge

Tue. 19 May, 5 p.m.: `Medical models of
causation:
the case of the discovery of vitamin deficiency diseases.'

PROFESSOR J. DURANT, Imperial College, London

Tue. 26 May, 5 p.m.: `Public participation in
science policy making: the case of the new genetics.'

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CLINICAL MEDICINE

Oxford Clinical Neurosciences Lectures

The following lectures will be given at 11.30 a.m. on Fridays
in
the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

DR F. COWAN, Imperial College School of Medicine

3 Apr.: `Magnetic resonance imaging of the
preterm
brain—a review of current developments.'

DR D. STEVENS, Gloucestershire Royal Hospital

15 May: `Neurology services in the twenty-first
century.'

DR J. LAND, the National Hospital

12 June: `The mitochondrial electron transport
chain, the final common target in neurodegenerative
disease?'

DR G.D. SCHOTT, National Hospital

17 July: `Managing central pain.'

PROFESSOR R. DOLAN, Institute of Neurology

18 Sept.: `Neurobiology of human
emotion—perspective from functional imaging.'

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section


Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology: guest lectures

The following lectures will be given at 5.30 p.m. on Mondays in
Oxford Eye Hospital Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

Convener: A.J. Bron, FRCS, Professor of Ophthalmology
and
Head of Department.

MR B. JAMES, Stoke Mandeville Hospital

27 Apr.: `Vascular factors in glaucoma.'

MISS B. BILLINGTON, Royal Berkshire Hospital, Reading

11 May: `Making the most of residual sight.'

MR T.J. FFYTCHE and MR D.H. FFYTCHE, London

18 May: `A coherent and functional examination
of
the visual system.'

DR G.A. SHUN-SHIN, Wolverhampton Eye Infirmary

8 June: `Light at the end of the
tunnel—endoscopic.'

MR M. POTTS, Bristol Eye Infirmary

15 June: `Thyroid eye disease.'

MR J. SHILLING, St Thomas's Hospital, London

22 June: `Veins I have seen.'

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section


Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology: seminars

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on the days shown
in
the Library, the Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology. With the
exception of the first meeting (to be held on Tuesday, 5 May),
the
seminars will take place on Mondays.

Convener: J.J. Harding, MA status, Professor of
Ocular
Biochemistry.

DR M. NASH

5 May: `Effect of NMDA on expression of retinal
protein: growth factors and cyclooxygenases.'

MR J. SALMON

18 May: `Glaucoma.'

DR R. SAFA

1 June: `Effects of ischaemic-like insults to
the
retina.'

DR J. WOOD

8 June: `The influence of zinc on cultured
human
retinal pigment epithelium.'

DR B. DERHAM

15 June: `[alpha]-crystallin: a molecular
chaperone.'

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section


Nuffield Department of Surgery

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in
the
Seminar Room, the Nuffield Department of Surgery, Level 6, the
John
Radcliffe Hospital.

P. OPENSHAW, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College
School of Medicine at St Mary's, London

28 Apr.: `T cells and virus-induced lung
disease.'

K. MAINPRIZE, Wrexham Park Hospital

5 May: `Immunological and prognostic factors
in
colorectal cancer.'

J. PHILLIPS-HUGHES

12 May: `Bedside insertion of tunnelled central
venous catheters.'

H. CHEN

19 May: `Control of neuroendocrine
differentiation
in medullary thyroid and small cell lung tumours.'

DR A. MCKENZIE, Cambridge

26 May: `Interleukin-13 in Th2 cell
responses.'

G. SADLER

2 June: `What's new in endocrine surgery.'

R. CORNALL

9 June: `Signalling in B cell tolerance
induction.'

A. MOWAT, Glasgow

16 June: `Antigen presentation and the
induction of
oral tolerance.'

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section


Haematology seminars

The following seminars will be held at 12 noon on Tuesdays in the
Haematology Seminar Room, Level 4, the John Radcliffe
Hospital.

DR C.H. POYNTON, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff

5 May: `Biophenotypic leukaemia—a
redundant
term?'

PROFESSOR A.V. HOFFBRAND, Royal Free Hospital, London

12 May: `Iron chelation: recent advances.'

DR A. GRAY, Princess Margaret Hospital, Swindon

19 May: `Liposomes in haematology—promise
and
practice.'

PROFESSOR H.G. PRENTICE, Royal Free Hospital, London

26 May: `Immunotherapy of leukaemia.'

DR P. BOLTON-MAGGS, Alder Hey Children's Hospital, Liverpool

9 June: `Management of childhood ITP.'

DR P.L.F. GIANGRANDE, Oxford Haemophilia Centre

16 June: `Management of pregnancy in carriers
of
haemophilia.'

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section



CLINICAL MEDICINE, PHYSIOLOGICAL
SCIENCES

The following seminars will be given at 4.30 p.m. on Thursdays
in the
Lecture Theatre, the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology.

Convener: H. Waldmann, BM, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
Pathology.

DR J. MCCAFFERTY, Cambridge

30 Apr.: `Antibodies from phage display as
genomics
tools and therapeutic agents.'

DR T. OEGESCHLAGER, Marie Curie Research Institute

7 May: `Regulation of transcription initiation
by
RNA polymerase II.'

PROFESSOR Z. WERB, UCAL, San Francisco

14 May: `Matrix metalloproteinase gelatinase
B, a
key regulator of angiogenesis and apoptosis.'

S. BALCH and DR J. MAHONEY

21 May: `New macrophage molecules on
display.'

PROFESSOR J. COLLINGE, Imperial College School of Medicine

28 May: `Molecular biology of human prion
disease.'

PROFESSOR R. WEISS, Institute of Cancer Research, Chester Beatty
Laboratories

11 June: `Novel human and pig retroviruses.'

DR G. MACPHERSON

18 June: `Antigen uptake and delivery to T and
B
cells by dendritic cells: activation or tolerance?'

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section



COMMITTEE FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY AND
GENERAL LINGUISTICS

PROFESSOR R. LASS, Cape Town, will read a paper at 2.15 p.m. on
Tuesday, 28 April, in the Centre for Linguistics and Philology.

Conveners: A.E. Morpurgo Davies, MA, Professor of
Comparative Philology, and J.H.W. Penney, MA, D.Phil., University
Lecturer in Classical Philology.

Subject: `Morphology and mothers-in-law:
you
and thou in Early Modern English.'

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section


General Linguistics Graduate Seminar

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held
at
4.45 p.m. on Fridays in the ground-floor seminar room, 47
Wellington
Square.

Conveners: J.T. Higginbotham, MA, Professor of
General
Linguistics, and D.F. Cram, MA, University Lecturer in
Linguistics.

PROFESSOR P. BLOOM, Arizona

1 May: `How children learn the meanings of
words.'

PROFESSOR S. LAPPIN, SOAS

8 May, 2 p.m.: `An underspecified
constraint-based
semantics for vague quantifiers.'

DR D. LEWIS

15 May: `From modal adverbial to discourse
connective in present-day English.'

PROFESSOR P. TRUDGILL, Lausanne

22 May: `Language contact and the function of
linguistic gender.'

PROFESSOR R. HICKEY, Essen

29 May: ` "It takes all types": on
special
kinds of language change.'

PROFESSOR K. HALE, MIT

5 June: `The Misumalpan causative construction
and
s-structure argument fission.'

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section



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

Romantic realignments (graduate seminar)

The following seminars will be held at 5.15 p.m. on the days
shown in
the Morris Room, Exeter College.

DR D. WORRALL, St Mary's University College
Tue. 28 Apr.: `Tom and Jerry meet
The
Castle Spectre
: the cultural politics of Romantic
Period
Gothic drama.'

DR N. LEASK, Cambridge

Thur. 14 May: `Southey's Madoc:
the
Romantic epic and imperialism.'

PROFESSOR J. BATE, Liverpool

Wed. 27 May: `Nest and shells: towards a
phenomenological ecopoetics.'

DR T. FULFORD, Nottingham–Trent University

Wed. 10 June: `Sex, scandals, and imperial
heroes:
the army and navy in Coleridge, Southey, and Austen.'

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section



LAW, SOCIAL STUDIES

The function of law in the international community

The following seminars will be held at 8.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in
the
Habakkuk Room, Jesus College.

Conveners: Dr G.S. Goodwin-Gill, MA, D.Phil., Rubin
Director of Research, Dr A.J. Hurrell, MA, M.Phil., D.Phil.,
University Lecturer in International Relations, and E.A. Roberts,
MA,
Montague Burton Professor of International Relations.

PROFESSOR FRIEDRICH KRATOCHWIL,
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität,
München

28 Apr.: `The nature of international
iorms.'

PROFESSOR BENEDICK KINGSBURY, New York University

5 May: `Is the sovereign state in decline in
international law?'

PROFESSOR JOHN JACKSON, University of Michigan

12 May: `The World Trade Organization and
sovereignty.'

D. BETHLEHEM, London School of Economics and Political Science

19 May: `Law and politics in the International
Court
of Justice's 1996 Advisory Opinion on Nuclear Weapons.'

DR GUY GOODWIN-GILL, PROFESSOR ROBERTS, and DR MATTHEW GIBNEY

26 May: `International refugee law and the
refugee
problems of the 1990s.'

MS JILL BARRETT, Office of Legal Adviser, Foreign and
Commonwealth
Office

2 June: `The realities of law-making at the
United
Nations.'

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section



LITERAE HUMANIORES

The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on the days shown
in
Corpus Christi College.

Convener: M. Winterbottom, MA, D.Phil., Corpus
Christi Professor of Latin.

PROFESSOR NIKLAS HOLZBERG, Munich

Thur. 30 Apr.: `Ter quinque
volumina
as
carmen perpetuum: the division into books in
Ovid's
Metamorphoses.'

DR A. VARDI, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Mon. 4 May: `An anthology of early Latin
epigrams? A
ghost reconsidered.'

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section


Gareth Evans Memorial Lecture 1998

PROFESSOR W. KUENNE, Hamburg, will deliver the Gareth Evans
Memorial
Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 26 May, in the Gulbenkian Lecture
Theatre, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `Simple truth and alethic realism.'

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section



LITERAE HUMANIORES AND CORPUS CHRISTI
CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF GREEK AND ROMAN ANTIQUITY

PROFESSOR RICHARD THOMAS, Harvard, will lecture at 5 p.m. on
Tuesday,
28 April, in the Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College. The
lecture
will be followed by refreshments.

Conveners : S.J.Harrison, MA, D.Phil., University
Lecturer (CUF) in Classical Languages and Literature, and
M.Winterbottom, MA, D.Phil, Corpus Professor of Latin.

Subject: ``Virgil in a Cold Climate: Europe's Poet
in
Europe's Crisis.'

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section



MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

Department of Statistics: Probability, Statistics and
Operations
Research Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Thursdays in
the
Department of Statistics. Details of the 18 June seminar will be
announced later.

Conveners: P. Clifford, MA, Reader in Mathematical
Statistics, and A.M. Etheridge, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer
(CUF) in Mathematics

DR M. STEPHENS

30 Apr.:`Bayesian analysis of mixtures with an
unknown number of components: an alternative to reversible
jump
methods.'

DR A.M. ETHERIDGE

7 May.:`A probabilistic approach to some
explosive
semilinear heat equations.'

PROFESSOR P. GRAMBSCH, Minneapolis

14 May.:`Luteinizing hormone pulsatility in
depressed women: comparison of data analysis methods.'

PROFESSOR L.N. TREFETHEN
21 May.:`Eigenvalues and card shuffling: the cutoff
phenomenon in Markov chains.'

PROFESSOR M. KIMMEL, Rice

28 May. :` Population dynamics coded in DNA:
history
of growth and migrations of modern humans.'

PROFESSOR E.B. HOOK, Berkeley

4 June.:`Applications of capture--recapture
analysis
to epidemiology.'

PROFESSOR R. HARTLEY, Keele

11 June.: `Modelling the demand for lottery
tickets.'

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section


Oxford Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics

Differential equations and applications seminars

The following seminars will be held on Thursdays. The first
meeting
will be held at 3 p.m. in the Computing Laboratory Lecture
Theatre;
subsequent meetings will be held at 5 p.m. in the Common Room,
Dartington House. The co-ordinators are J.R. Ockendon, S.D.
Howison,
and P.D. Howell (telephone: (2)70506).

PROFESSOR A. NEWELL, Warwick

30 Apr.: `Semiconductor lasers and Kolmogorov
spectra.' (Differential Equations, Computational
Mathematics and Applications joint OCIAM/NA Group
Seminar
)

PROFESSOR J. NOHEL, ETH, Zurich

7 May: `The dynamics of degenerate
reaction–diffusion equations modelling flows of certain
non-
Newtonian fluids.'

PROFESSOR M.J. WARD, UBC

14 May: `Metastability: analysis and
applications.'

PROFESSOR P. BLYTHE, visiting DAMPT, Cambridge

21 May: `Flame paths and the Clarke
equation.'

PROFESSOR J.-M. VANDEN-BROECK, Wisconsin

28 May: `Some effects of surface tension on
nonlinear free-surface flows.'

DR P. VAINSHTEIN, visiting University College, Dublin

4 June: `Streaming at large Reynolds number and
its
effects on shear flow, heat transfer, and ignition.'

PROFESSOR A.M. STUART, Stanford

11 June: `Ergodic properties of numerical
approximations to Markov chains.'

PROFESSOR L.M. HOCKING, University College, London

18 June: `Spreading in a porous medium.'

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section



MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

Paget Toynbee Lectures on Dante 1998

PROFESSOR PATRICK BOYDE, FBA, Cambridge, will lecture at 5 p.m.
on
Mondays 27 April, 4 May, and 11 May, in Room 2, the Taylor
Institution.

Convener: J.R. Woodhouse, MA, D.Litt.,
Fiat–Serena
Professor of Italian Studies.

Subject: `Human vices and humanity's virtues in
Dante's
Comedy.'

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section


Graduate Seminar in Spanish Studies: Lorca Centenary I

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
Taylor Institution.

Conveners: I.D.L. Michael, MA, King Alfonso XIII
Professor of Spanish Studies, and D.G. Pattison, MA, D.Phil.,
Reader
in Spanish.

E.A. SOUTHWORTH

28 Apr.: `Lorca and theatre architecture'
(illustrated).

DR J. LONDON

5 May: `The Fascist Lorca.'

PROFESSOR A. ANDERSON, Michigan

19 May: to be announced.

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section


Lecture (German studies)

DR N. SAUL, Trinity College, Dublin, will lecture at 2.15 p.m.
on
Thursday, 21 May, in Room 2, the Taylor Institution.

Conveners: K.F. Hilliard, MA, D.Phil., University
Lecturer in German Literature, and C.J. Wells, MA, University
Lecturer in Germanic Philology and Medieval German Literature.

Subject: `Kleist's bodies.'

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section


Brecht Centenary in Oxford: `Streit und Gelächter': a
seminar on Brecht's poetry

The following seminars, which will be accessible to an English-
speaking audience, will be held at 5.15 p.m. on Thursdays in
Lecture
Room 6, New College.

Conveners: T.M. Kuhn, MA, and K.J. Leeder, MA,
Faculty
Lecturers in German.

DR D. CONSTANTINE

30 Apr.: `Brecht's sonnets.'

DR D. MIDGLEY, Cambridge

7 May: `The poet in Berlin: Brecht's city
poetry of
the later 1920s.'

MRS H. BROWN

14 May: ` "cVom ertrunkenen
Mädchen" / "The drowned girl" in
Baal and the Hauspostille.'

PROFESSOR R. SPEIRS, Birmingham

21 May: ` "Vom armen bb" /
"Of poor bb" and others.'

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section



MODERN HISTORY

Modern European Jewish History Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Mondays
in the
European Studies Centre (70 Woodstock Road), St Antony's
College.

DR M. BERKOWITZ, University College, London

27 Apr.: `The Jewish self-image in the west,
1881–1948.'

PROFESSOR D. CESARANI, Institute of Contemporary History and
University of Southampton

11 May: `Arthur Koestler and the Jewish
Question.'

DR D. FELDMAN, Birkbeck College, London

18 May: `Jews and the state in Britain,
1830–1930.'

E. PEDERSEN

25 May: `German Jewish identity in exile,
1933–45: the case of Henry William Katz.'

DR A. KUSHNER, Southampton

1 June: `Politics and the memory of the
Holocaust.'

PROFESSOR M. GALCHINSKY, Millsaps College

8 June: `Engendering liberal Jews: Jewish women
in
Victorian England.'

DR D. ARIELI-HOROWITZ, Tel Aviv

15 June: `The Jew as "destroyer of
culture" in Nazi ideology.'

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section


History and memory

The following lectures will be given at 2 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
Powicke Room, the Modern History Faculty.

Conveners: R. Harris, MA, D.Phil., University
Lecturer
(CUF) in Modern History, and M.A. Vaughan, MA, Professor of
Commonwealth Studies.

M. CONWAY

28 Apr.: `National myths, public remembrance,
and
private memory: the case of Belgium, 1930–50.'

I. HACKING

5 May: `Travellers without memory.'

Z. WAXMAN

12 May: `The witness in testimony: World War
I to
the Holocaust.'

PROFESSOR VAUGHAN

19 May: `Slavery and Creole memory.'

R. GILDEA

26 May: `The Resistance myth, the
Pétainist
myth, and other voices.'

A. GREGORY

2 June: `Good wars and bad wars: ceremonies of
commemoration in Britain since 1945.'

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section


Seminar in Social and Cultural History, 1500–1800

The following seminars will be held at 8.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in
the
Hovenden Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: R. Briggs, MA, Special Lecturer in Modern
History, and F. Dabhoiwala, MA, D.Phil., Post-Doctoral Research
Fellow, All Souls College.

PROFESSOR O. HUFTON

28 Apr.: `The widow's mite and other
strategies:
funding the Catholic Reformation.'

DR M. LAVEN, Cambridge

5 May: `Nuns and sex in Counter-Reformation
Venice.'

PROFESSOR J. DE VRIES, Berkeley

12 May: `Did a consumer culture emerge before
the
Industrial Revolution?'

PROFESSOR R. DARNTON, Princeton

19 May: `Policing a poem in Paris, 1749.'

DR G. HUDSON, Wellcome Institute, London

26 May: `The body and the state in early modern
England.'

MS A. SHEPHARD

2 June: `Manhood, patriarchy, and economic
status in
early modern England.'

DR N. KENNY, Cambridge

9 June: `Curiositas in German university
disserations, 1652--1714.'

R. WALINSKI-KIEHL, Portsmouth

16 June: `Men as witches and male witch-hunting
in
early modern Germany.'

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section



MUSIC

Lecture-recitals

DR WILLIAM KINDERMAN will give two lecture-recitals on Thursday,
30
April, in the Denis Arnold Hall, the Faculty of Music. The
lectures
will be open to the public.


4.15 p.m.: `A new chronology for Beethoven's
works
of the early 1820s.'

8 p.m.: `Beethoven, Thomas Mann, and the mystery
of Op.
111.'

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section


Lecture

PROFESSOR R. SCRUTON will lecture at 5.15 p.m. on Friday, 1 May,
in
the Denis Arnold Hall, the Faculty of Music, to be followed by
a
reception, courtesy of the Oxford University Press. The lecture
will
be open to the public.

Subject: `Criticising pop.'

Note: for details of an opera by Professor Scruton,
also
to be performed on 1 May, see `Notices' above.

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section


Master-class

ROSALYN TURECK will give a series of master-classes for pianists
and
harpsichordists on Tuesdays of first to fifth weeks, and seventh
week, of Trinity Term, 2–4 p.m., in the Denis Arnold Hall,
the
Faculty of Music.

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section



ORIENTAL STUDIES

DR EMANUELA TREVISAN SEMI, Venice, will lecture at 5 p.m. on
Tuesday,
28 April, in St Cross College.

Convener: G. Abramson, MA, Cowley Lecturer in post-
Biblical Hebrew.

Subject: `Nostalgia and Levantine Jewish writers.'

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section


Jewish history and literature in the Graeco-Roman period

The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in
Wolfson College.

Convener: M.D. Goodman, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
Jewish
Studies.

DR R. ELIOR, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

28 Apr.: `The priestly origins of hekhalot
literature.'

DR J. WEINBERG, Leo Baeck College

5 May: `The concept of the persecuted in
Pesikta
Rabbati.'

DR B. BITTON-ASHKELONY, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

12 May: `Penitence in monastic literature in
late
antiquity: Christians and Jews.'

PROFESSOR L. GRABBE, Hull

19 May: `The reality of prophecy in the Second
Temple period.'

PROFESSOR P. ALEXANDER, Manchester

26 May: `Community rules—Jewish,
Christian, and
pagan: the problem of genre and function in the Serek ha-
Yahad.'

DR D. FALK

2 June: `Community order in the parabiblical
texts
at Qumran.'

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section



PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Theoretical Physics Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in
the
Nuclear Physics Lecture Theatre.

Convener: D. Sherrington, MA, Wykeham Professor of
Physics.

PROFESSOR A. BRANDENBURG, Newcastle

1 May: `Turbulence and dynamos from the
Balbus–Hawley instability.'

DR T. HOLLOWOOD, Swansea

15 May: `Life on the Brane.'

PROFESSOR J.B. PENDRY, Imperial College

29 May: `Quantum friction.'

PROFESSOR W.E. LAMB, Arizona

12 June: `Super-classical quantum mechanics.'

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section


Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory: colloquia

The following colloquia will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the
Main
Lecture Theatre, the Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
Laboratory.

Convener: M.L.H. Green, MA, Professor of Inorganic
Chemistry.

DR A. HARRISON, Edinburgh

27 Apr.: `Model magnetic materials.'

PROFESSOR R.J.P. WILLIAMS

11 May: `The logical connection between
chemistry
and biology.'

DR M. HANNON, Warwick

18 May: `Supramolecular assembly using a simple
approach; from holes in materials to biomolecular
arrays.'

PROFESSOR P. TASKER

1 June: `Co-ordination chemistry at work in the
winning and working of metals.'

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section


Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory: departmental
seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Mondays in
the
Lecture Theatre, the Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
Laboratory.

DR M.C. MCCARTHY, Harvard

27 Apr.: `Carbon chains and rings in the
laboratory
and in space.'

PROFESSOR T.A. MILLER, Ohio State

4 May: `High resolution spectroscopic studies
of
reactive chemical intermediates and the breaking of their
bonds.'
(RSC Bourke Lecture)

PROFESSOR M.H. ALEXANDER, Maryland

11 May: `Non adiabaticity in chemical
dynamics.'

DR T. COOK, Isis Innovation Ltd.

18 May: ` "Spinning out"—factors
to
consider when starting a spin-out company.'

DR J. WILDT, Institut fur Chemie der Belasteten Atmosphare,
Julich

25 May: `Emissions of volatile organic
compounds
from plants.'

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section


Department of Materials: colloquia

The following colloquia will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Thursdays
in the
Lecture Theatre, the Hume-Rothery Building.

Convener: P.R. Wilshaw, MA, D.Phil., University
Lecturer
in the Electrical and Magnetic Properties of Materials.

DR J.P. NORTHOVER

30 Apr.: `The life and death of an
artefact—application of metallography in
archaeology.'

PROFESSOR D. BATCHELOR, Leeds

7 May: `Raman microscopy of polymers: confocal,
direct imaging, and scanning near field.'
(Interdepartmental Polymer Seminar)

DR J. GREGG

14 May: `The art of hybrid spin electronics.'
(Interdepartmental Condensed Matter Seminar)

PROFESSOR A.-M. SASTRY, Michigan

21 May: `Transport, mechanics, and damage
tolerance
of porous fibrous structures: theory and application.'

PROFESSOR D. PEROVIC, Toronto

28 May: `Control of misfit dislocation
formation at
semiconductor interfaces.'

DR R. FALSTER, MEMC, USA

4 June: `Defect engineering in silicon
substrates
for the giga-bit DRAM era.' (Interdepartmental
Condensed
Matter Seminar
)

PROFESSOR M. MCLEAN, Imperial College

11 June: `Anisotropic creep in single crystal
superalloys: mechanisms, models, and validation.'

DR K.-L. CHOY, Imperial College

18 June: `Innovative processing of ceramic
coatings.'

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section


Earth Sciences Departmental Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Mondays in
the
Earth Sciences Lecture Theatre.

Convener: B.E. Parsons, MA, Reader in Geodesy.

DR R. ARMIJO, Institut de Physique de Globe, Paris

27 Apr.: `What can palaeogeodesy tell us about
deformation in the Anatolia–Aegean region?'

PROFESSOR A. WINTLE, Aberystwyth

11 May: `Luminescence dating—a brief
history of
time from a grain of sand.'

DR P. KILLWORTH, Southampton Oceanography Centre

18 May: `What's going on in ocean
modelling?'

DR S. RUSSELL, Natural History Museum

1 June: `Early solar system time-scales:
evidence
from meteorites.'

PROFESSOR J. PARKES, Bristol

8 June: `A deep bacterial biosphere in marine
sediments.'

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section



PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

The following seminars will be held at 12 noon on Wednesdays in
the
Sherrington Room, the University Laboratory of Physiology.

Convener: J.C. Ellory, D.Sc., Professor of
Physiology.

DR S. BRICKLEY, University College, London

29 Apr.: `Developmental changes in GABA A
mediated
synaptic transmission in the cerebellum.'
(McDonnell–Pew Seminar)

DR R. NAVARETTE, Imperial College School of Medicine

6 May: `The role of excitotoxic mechanisms in
motoneuron degeneration.' (McDonnell–Pew
Seminar
)

DR L.M. HENDERSON, Bristol

13 May: `The proton channel of neutrophilis:
understanting function via mutagenesis.' (Seminar
sponsored
by the Physiological Society
)

PROFESSOR E. FRÖMTER, Frankfurt

20 May: `NaHCO3 cotransport in the
proximal tubule.' (Seminar sponsored by the
Physiological
Society
)

DR D. PRICE, Edinburgh

27 May: `Regulation of forebrain development.'
(Jenkinson Seminar)

PROFESSOR M. ARMSTRONG-JAMES, Queen Mary and Westfield College,
London

3 June: `Plasticity of adult barrel cortex.'
(McDonnell–Pew Seminar)

PROFESSOR B. HENDRY, King's College, London

10 June: `Ras superfamily GTPases and
progressive
renal fibrosis.' (Seminar sponsored by the
Physiological
Society
)

PROFESSOR S. BROWN, MRC Mammalian Genetics Unit and Mouse Genome
Centre

17 June: `The genetics of
deafness—dissecting
the inner ear function.' (Seminar sponsored by the
Physiological Society
)

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section


Department of Human Anatomy: research seminars

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the
Lecture Theatre, the Department of Human Anatomy.

Convener: K.E. Davies, MA, D.Phil., Dr Lee's
Professor of
Anatomy.

PROFESSOR J. HERBERT, Cambridge

1 May: `The stressed brain: synthesising cell
biology, physiology, and behaviour.'

DR S. WILSON, University College, London

8 May: `Regulation of neurogenesis and axon
pathway
formation in the embryonic zebrafish forebrain.'
(Jenkinson
Seminar
)

DR S. WARD

15 May: `Retinol uptake and production of
retinoic
acid in mammalian embryos; the nuts and bolts of a
morphogenetic
signal?'

DR D. WELLS, Imperial College of Medicine, Charing Cross
Hospital,
London

22 May: `Optimisation of gene transfer into
skeletal
muscle.'

DR D. ISH-HOROWICZ, ICRF, Mill Hill, London

29 May: `Gradients and clocks: mechanisms of
segmentation in flies and vertebrates.' (Jenkinson
Seminar
)

PROFESSOR C. TICKLE, University College, London

5 June: `Vertebrate limb development—from
start
to finish.' (Jenkinson Seminar)

MRS R. DEECH, St Anne's

12 June: `Sex, sheep, and ethics.'

DR J. UNEY, Bristol

19 June: `Adenoviral vectors as gene therapy
agents
and to study the mechanisms underlying excitoxic nerve cell
death.'

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section


Pharmacology and anatomical neuropharmacology seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
Lecture Theatre, the Department of Pharmacology.

PROFESSOR A. GEAR, Virginia

28 Apr.: `Blood platelet function: regulation
by
cyclic nucleotides and fluid shear forces.'

PROFESSOR W.A. LARGE, St George's Hospital Medical School, London

12 May: `Properties and roles of chloride
channels
in smooth muscle.'

PROFESSOR H. PERRY

19 May: `The regulation of immune mediated
inflammation in the brain.'

PROFESSOR A. BROWN, MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio

26 May: `Novel peptide modulators of potassium
channels.'

PROFESSOR S. NAHORSKI, Leicester

2 June: `Regulation of metabotropic receptor
mediated Ca2+ signalling in model cells.'

DR R. GREENE

9 June: `Electroneuropathology:
electrophysiology in
models of neuropsychiatric disease.'

DR L.H. CLAPP, University College, London

16 June: `Mechanisms underlying changes in
vascular
reactivity induced by bacterial endotoxin.'

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section



PSYCHOLOGICAL STUDIES

Department of Experimental Psychology

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in
the
Weiskrantz Room (C.113), the Department of Experimental
Psychology.

Conveners: S.D. Iversen, MA, Professor of Psychology,
and
P.E. Bryant, MA, Watts Professor of Psychology.

PROFESSOR F. FINCHAM, Cardiff

28 Apr.: `Psychology and marriage: a match made
in
heaven or hell?'

PROFESSOR M. ZIMMERMAN, Heidelberg

5 May: `The pathogenesis of chronic pain:
dysregulation of the nervous system from molecular to
psychological levels.' (McDonnell–Pew
Seminar
)

DR P. HARRIS

12 May: `From pretence to fiction.'

PROFESSOR J. AGGLETON, Cardiff

19 May: `Reanalysing the anatomy of amnesia.'
(McDonnell–Pew Seminar)

PROFESSOR J. SIEGEL, Delaware

26 May: `Augmenting and reducing of visual
evoked
potentials in high and low sensation seeking humans, cats,
and
rats.' (McDonnell–Pew Seminar)

DR A. ROUTTENBERG, Northwestern University, Illinois

2 June: `Enhanced learning and synaptic
plasticity
in transgenic mouse over-expressing growth protein GAP-43.'
(McDonnell–Pew Seminar)

DR J. TEASDALE, Cambridge

9 June: `Mindfulness, self-attention, and the
prevention of depression.'

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section



SOCIAL STUDIES

Issues, alignments, and campaigns: lessons from recent
Canadia
elections

PROFESSOR R.G.C. JOHNSTON, University of British Columbia, will
lecture at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Clay Room,
Nuffield
College.

Convener: B.E. Shafer, MA, Mellon Professor of
American
Government.

Tue. 5 May: `The centre cannot hold? Party location
and
electoral success.'

Thur. 7 May: `How a party system unravels.'

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section


African Affairs Seminar

Unless otherwise stated, the following seminars will be held at
5
p.m. on Thursdays in St Antony's College.

Conveners: W. Beinart, MA, Rhodes Professor of Race
Relations, A.R. Mustapha, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in
African
Politics, and G.P. Williams, MA, M.Phil., University Lecturer
(CUF)
in Politics.

A. QUAYSON, Cambridge

30 Apr.: `Teaching literature; thinking
politics. A
note on methods.'

K. MEAGHER, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria

7 May: `The Alhazai of modernity: cross-border
trade
and northern Nigeria.'

DR P.N. KOK, Max Planck Institute

14 May, Oakeshott Room, Lincoln College: `Islam
and
the nation state in Africa.' (African Studies
Lecture
)

R. CLINE-COLE, Centre for West African Studies, Birmingham

21 May: `Redefining forestry space: threatened
livelihoods and contrasting landscape visions in colonial
Northern Nigeria, 1939–50.'

M. GOULDING, Warden of St Antony's

28 May: `Peace-making and peace-keeping in the
post-
Cold War Africa.'

R. MARSHALL, SOAS

5 June: `Mediating the global and the local in
Nigerian Pentecostalism.'

R. WATSON

12 June: `The Cloth of the Field of Gold:
material
culture and civic politics in colonial Ibadan.'

A. MAMA, Centre for Research and Documentation, Kano

19 June: `Kakhi in the family: women's
responses to
military authoritarianism in Nigeria.'

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section


Wine, land, and labour in South Africa (Southern African
history
and politics)

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in Queen
Elizabeth House.

G. WILLIAMS

27 Apr.: `The KWV, the minister, and the
champagne.'

L. WOTSHELA

4 May: `Homeland consolidation, settlement
planning,
and community dynamics in the Northern Ciskei.'

J. EWERT, Stellenbosch

11 May: `Taking a reluctant step into
modernity: the
changing labour regime in the South African wine
industry.'

J. HAMMAN, Centre for Rural Legal Studies, Stellenbosch

18 May: `Harbingers of a new future or islands
in an
ocean: land reform initiatives in the South African wine
industry.'

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section


Trust and Information

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held
at 2
p.m. on Thursdays in the Old Library at All Souls College.

Conveners: M. Bacharach, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
Economics, D.
Gambetta, MA, Reader in Sociology, and G. Mackie, MA, Junior
Research
Fellow in Politics, St John's College.

PROFESSOR BACHARACH

30 Apr.: `The problem of trust: a
signal-theoretic
approach.'

T. YAMAGISHI, Hokkaido University

7 May: `Trust as a form of social
intelligence.'

DR MACKIE

14 May: `Marriage conventions and social
trust.'

J. ELSTER, Columbia University

Fri. 22 May, 10 a.m.: `Trust and the emotions.'

D. HAUSMAN, University of Wisconsin

28 May: `Incorporating fairness and trust in
game
theory.'

A. KACELNIK

4 June: `Should you trust your children?
Parent--
offspring conflict and signals of need in young birds.'

P. SEABRIGHT, Cambridge

11 June: `Uniforms and whips: reasons to
trust.'

DR GAMBETTA

18 June: `Trust in signs.'

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section


Special seminar

N. RAM, Editor, Frontline, will speak at this
special
seminar to be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 29 April, in the
Hovenden
Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: A.C. Stepan, MA, Gladstone Professor of
Government, and D.A. Washbrook, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Modern
South
Asian History.

Subject: `India after the elections.'

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section



SOCIAL STUDIES, MODERN HISTORY

Economic History Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
European Studies Centre, St Antony's College, 70 Woodstock Road.

Conveners: P.A. David, MA, Senior Research Fellow,
All
Souls College, C.H. Feinstein, Chichele Professor of Economic
History, J.S. Foreman-Peck, MA, University Lecturer in Economic
History, and A. Offer, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Recent Social and
Economic History.

B. SANCHEZ ALONSO, San Pablo, Madrid

28 Apr.: `Movers and Stayers: Explaining
Regional
Emigration from Spain 1880–1914.'

O. GRANT

5 May: `German migration to the United States
1870–1913.'

P. LAINS, Lisbon

12 May: `Portugal's African Empire
1820–1975.'

A. GODLEY, Reading

19 May: `Enterprise and Culture: Jewish
Immigrants
in London and New York, 1880–1914.'

S.R. EPSTEIN, London School of Economics

26 May: `Craft Guilds, Apprenticeships and
Technological Change in Pre-industrial Europe.'

I. PEPELASIS MINOGLOU, Athens

2 June: `Industrialisation and
Deindustrialisation
in Greece.'

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section



SOCIAL STUDIES, NUFFIELD COLLEGE, ST
JOHN'S
COLLEGE

Colloquium: myopic choice

This interdisciplinary colloquium, which will discuss the
evidence
that choice deviates from orthodox decision theory, and that it
has a
temporal bias towards the present, will be held on Friday and
Saturday, 22 and 23 May, in Nuffield and St John's Colleges.

Conveners: A. Offer, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Recent
Social
and Economic History, and G.L. Mackie (MS Oregon), Junior
Research
Fellow in Politics, St John's College. For further information,
telephone Oxford (2)785979, or e-mail:
avner.offer@nuffield.ox.ac.uk.

Friday, 22 May: Large Lecture Room, Nuffield
College

PROFESSOR A. KACELNIK
4–4.30 p.m.: `Rationality, Risk Sensitivity and Myopic
Discounting in Animal Choice.'

PROFESSOR G. AINSLIE, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical
Center, Coatesville, Pa, USA
5–6 p.m.: `Myopic Choice: What Good are Other
People?'

Saturday, 23 May—morning session: Large
Lecture Room, Nuffield College

PROFESSOR S. LEA and DR P. WEBLEY, University of Exeter
9 a.m.: `The Economic Self.'

PROFESSOR M. CASSON, Reading
10 a.m.: `Myopic Choice and the Economics of
Decision-making.'

PROFESSOR J. ELSTER, Columbia/Paris
11.30 a.m.: `Resisting temptation.'

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section


Afternoon session: New Seminar Room, St John's
College

PROFESOR C. BRADSHAW, Nottingham
2.15 p.m.: `Prospects for Developing a Psychopharmacology
of
Self-Control.'

MR MACKIE
3.15 p.m.: `On the binding nature of promises.'

DR OFFER
4.15 p.m.: `Self-control and Well-being in the USA and UK
since 1945.'

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section



THEOLOGY

Transnational communities, diasporas, and globalisation

The following interdisciplinary seminars will be held at 2 p.m.
on
Fridays in the Lecture Room, Christ Church.

Conveners: J.S.K. Ward, B.Litt., MA, Regius Professor
of
Divinity, and W.M. Morgan, MA, Lecturer in World Religions,
Mansfield
and Westminster Colleges.

DR S. VERTOVEC

1 May: `Three meanings of diaspora and Hinduism
outside India.'

DR G. TER HAAR, Utrecht and Leiden

8 May: `The African religious diaspora in
Europe:
migration and identity.'

RABBI DR NORMAN SOLOMON

15 May: `The dialectic of universal and
particular
in modern Judaism.'

PROFESSOR P. CLARKE, King's College, London

22 May: `Japanese Millenarian movements in
global
perspective.'

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section


Ian Ramsey Centre

Seminars in Science and Theology: the person in genetics and
theology

The following seminars will be given at 8.30 p.m. on Thursdays
in the
Hood Room, St Cross College.

DR K. SHARPE, Cincinatti

30 Apr.: `Human behaviour, genetics, and
theology.'

DR J. POULTON, University Research Fellow (Royal Society),
Paediatric
Department, the John Radcliffe Hospital

14 May: `Mitochondrial DNA, evolution, and
genetic
counselling: doctrinal and ethical dilemmas.'

DR N. MESSER, Queen's College, Birmingham

28 May: `Human cloning and genetic
manipulation:
some theological and ethical issues.'

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section



THEOLOGY, MODERN HISTORY

Religion in the British Isles 1400–1700 (graduate
seminar)

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the
Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College. Further information may be
obtained from Dr Judith Maltby, Corpus Christi College
(telephone:
Oxford (2)76722, e-mail: judith.maltby@ccc.ox.ac.uk).

DR T. FREEMAN

30 Apr.: `The Devil and John Foxe: the genesis
of
Puritan exorcism.'

DR C. WALKER, Newcastle, New South Wales

7 May: ` "Our Prayers are dayly
offered":
Charles II and the Benedictine nuns of Ghent.'

DR A. FORD, Durham

14 May: ` "Making Dead Men Speak":
manipulating the memory of Archbishop James Ussher.'

DR J. DAWSON, New College, Edinburgh

21 May: `Clan Campbell and the Scottish
Reformation.'

DR C. HOLMES

28 May: `James VI and I, the Church of England,
and
witchcraft.'

DR V. BAINBRIDGE

4 June: `The Bridgettines of Syon Abbey and
major
trends in fifteenth and sixteenth century devotion.'

DR C. DURSTON, St Mary's University College, Twickenham

11 June: ` "Setting the Hearts and
Quieting the
Minds of All Good People": the Major Generals, and the
Puritan minorities of Interregnum England.'

DR S. PINCUS, Chicago

18 June: ` "To Protect English
Liberties":
nationalism and religion in the Revolution of 1668–9.'

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section



BYZANTINE STUDIES

Byzantine Studies Seminar

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will be held
at 5
p.m. on Mondays in the New Seminar Room, St John's College.

Conveners: E.M. Jeffreys, B.Litt., MA, Bywater and
Sotheby Professor of Byzantine and Modern Greek Language and
Literature, J.D. Howard-Johnston, MA, D.Phil., University
Lecturer in
Byzantine Studies, and M.C. Mundell Mango, MA, D.Phil.,
University
Lecturer in Byzantine Archaeology and Art.

DR I. BUGAR, Budapest

27 Apr.: `Epiphanius of Salamis: Origenist and
Iconoclast?'

R. PALLAS-BROWN

4 May: `East Roman perceptions of the Avars in
the
mid- and late sixth century.'

DR A. POULTER, Nottingham

11 May: `Defending Constantinople from
space.'

D. MILSOM, and others

18 May: Demonstration of work done by the
project to
computerise the Tchalenko and Creswell Archives.

DR MANGO

25 May: `The Triumphal Avenue of
Constantinople.'

PROFESSOR A. CUTLER, Pittsburg

Friday, 5 June: `True and false: recently
discovered
Byzantine ivories.'

DR MANGO

15 June: `The commercial map of
Constantinople.'

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section



COMPUTING LABORATORY


Programming Research Group

Strachey Lecture

ANTHONY E. SALE, Museums Director, Bletchley Park, will deliver
the
Strachey Lecture at 4.15 p.m. on Tuesday, 5 May, in the Computing
Laboratory Lecture Theatre.

Subject: `World War II code-breaking with the Bombe
and
the Colossus.'

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section



DEPARTMENT FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

Furiae Network

The following lectures will be given at 7 p.m. on Sundays in the
Saddler Room, Rewley House.

S. KEWLEY

26 Apr.: `Japan's foreign economic policy to
the
EU.'

A. AND T. STENHOUSE

17 May: `Impressions of the fifty-three
stations of
the Tokkaido', with demonstration of Japanese calligraphy.

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section



CENTRE FOR CRIMINOLOGICAL RESEARCH

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in
the
Old Library, All Souls College.

Convener: R.H. Hood, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
Criminology.

DR L. ZEDNAR

29 Apr.: `The dynamics of security.'

PROFESSOR R. SPARKS, Keele

6 May: `Penal policy in the 1990s.'

P. CAVADINO, Director of Communications, Penal Affairs
Consortium,
NACRO

13 May: `The new approach to juvenile
justice.'

PROFESSOR J. BALDWIN, Birmingham

20 May: `The Crown Prosecution Service: what
research has revealed.'

DR B. BOWLING, Cambridge

27 May: `Violent racism.'

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section



OXFORD CENTRE FOR HEBREW AND JEWISH
STUDIES

The following public lectures will be held at 8.15 p.m. on
Wednesdays
in the Common Room, Yarnton Manor.

DR S. WILSON, author of Sigmund Freud

29 Apr.: `Is there an Oedipus Complex?'

DR G. KHAN, Cambridge

6 May: `The rise of Hebrew grammatical thought
in
the Middle Ages.'

DR A. ARIELI-HOROWITZ, Tel Aviv, P. COCKBURN, The
Independent
, DR E. HOROWITZ, Bar-Ilan, and PROFESSOR A.
SHLAIM

13 May: `Israel's next fifty years: a
symposium.'

R. NETTLER, OCHJS, and DR S. TAJI-FAROUKI, Durham

20 May: `Intellectual traditions and modern
politics.' (Book launch: Muslim–Jewish
Encounters)

DR C. BERLIN, Harvard University Library

27 May: `Hebrew and Yiddish collections in the
Harvard College Library.'

DR N. DE LANGE, Cambridge

3 June: `The life and thought of Ignaz
Maybaum.'
(Louis Jacobs Lecture Series)

PROFESSOR H. SOLOVEITCHIK, Yeshiva University

10 June: `Responsa as an historical source.'

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section



MUSEUM OF THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE

Collection and comparison in the sciences

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in
the
museum.

DR S. SCHAFFER, Cambridge

29 Apr.: `Collection, curiosity, and Newton's
Principia.'

DR M. WINTROUB, Michigan

6 May: `Museum genealogies and rituals of
power.'

DR S. MUELLER-WILLE, Max Planck Institute, Berlin

13 May: `Collectors, system-builders and
world-wide
commerce: the epistemic functions of collection in Linnaean
botany.'

PROFESSOR I. PETERSON, Mount Holyoke College

20 May: `King Serfoji's Cabinet of Experimental
Science: The German Kunstkammer in eighteenth-century
India.'

PROFESSOR M.H. KAUFMAN, Edinburgh

27 May: `The museum collection of the Edinburgh
Phrenological Society.'

N. WILDING, European University Institute, Florence

3 June: `The collection and the catalogue:
Musaeum
Regalis Societatis and Musaeum Kircherianum.'

D. HARLEY

10 June: `The species of disease and the
destruction
of learned medicine.'

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section



OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC STUDIES

Lecture

H.E. MR SALMAN HAIDER, High Commissioner of India, will lecture
at 5
p.m. on Tuesday, 28 April, in the Centre.

Subject: `Post-election India.'

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section


History, culture, and politics of the Islamic world

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in
the
Centre.

DR P. WERBNER, Keele

29 Apr.: `Challenges of citizenship for Muslims
in
Britain.'

DR S. WRIGHT, Birmingham

6 May: `Participation in pre- and
post-revolutionary
Iran: a comparative study.'

DR M. WASIM

13 May: `Sectarianism in Pakistan: the
Shia–Sunni conflict.'

PROFESSOR I. NETTON, Leeds

20 May: `Indiana Jones and the orientalists'
dilemma.'

DR S. VERTOVEC

27 May: `Muslim European youth.'

DR N. LINDISFARNE, SOAS

3 June: `Fencing in Damascus: writing
ethnography,
writing fiction.'

DR P. DRESCH

10 June: `Sectarianism in Yemen: is there such
a
thing?'

PROFESSOR N.A. ZAHRA

17 June: `Egyptian memory and Al-Sayyida Zaynab
in
Cairo.'

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section



MAISON FRANÇAISE

Lectures

Unless otherwise stated, the following lectures will be given at
5.15 p.m. on the days shown in the Maison Française. For
details of the inaugural Besterman Lecture, see above.

LORD JENKINS OF HILLHEAD

Mon. 27 Apr., 8 p.m.: `The idea of Monetary
Union: its origins and development' (meeting of the
Oxfordshire Branch of the European Movement
).

M. BUTOR, writer

Tue. 28 Apr.: `Peinture et écriture.'
(Linked to exhibition of original manuscripts,
`Vanité au miroir', by Daniel Grasiewicz
)

T. HUNKELER, Zurich

Wed. 6 May: `La paille des mots et le grain des
choses: stratégies de dévalorisation chez
Beckett.'

R. RASHED, CNRS

Mon. 11 May: `Arab science and classical
modernity.'

Tue. 12 May: `Descartes entre al-Khayam et
Newton.'

PROFESSOR J.-C. COLLIARD, Paris I

Fri. 5 May: `Les quarante ans de la
Cinquième République: La
Cohabitation—trois expériences.'

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section


Histoire et littérature (France—Ancien
Régime)

The following meetings, organised by the Sub-faculty of French,
Wadham College, and the Maison Française, will be held at
5 p.m. on the days shown.

D. RIBARD, Paris III, and A. VIALA

Wed. 13 May, Maison Française:
`Fontenelle au carrefour: histoire, philosophie, sciences
et
littérature.'

N. SHAPIRA, Paris I, and M. BOMBART, Paris III

Thur. 14 May, Keble College: `L'étrange
Balzac (Jean-Louis Guez de) et l'histoire.'

C. JOUHAUD, EHESS–Paris, and D. BLOCKER, Rouen

Fri. 15 May: `History and literature:
prospects.'

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section


Association for the Study of Modern and Contemporary France

This meeting will be held on Friday, 5 June, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.,
in the Maison Française.

N. MAYER, CNRS: `Nouveaux mouvements sociaux en
France: le cas du mouvement anti-Front National.'

S. WATERS, Leeds: `Les nouveaux mouvements sociaux:
vers une nouvelle forme de citoyenneté.'

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section


Other meetings


Fri. 1 May, 2.30 p.m., Maison Française:
round table on Montesquieu, to mark the publication by the
Voltaire Foundation of Volume I of the Complete
Works
of Montesquieu.

Sat. 16 May–Sun. 17 May, Maison
Française
: `Révolution: arts, sciences,
politique' (Franco-British colloquium).

Sat. 30 May, Maison Française: `Pratiques
et
approches: l'histoire des sciences en action'
(organised with the Museum of the History of
Science
).

Sat. 20 June, St Hugh's College: `Psychoanalysis
and
translation' (organised with Translation Research in Oxford
and the European Humanities Research Centre; details from
Edith McMorran, St Hugh's, (2)74996, or Sue Robinson, Maison
Française, (2)74220).

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section



NISSAN INSTITUTE OF JAPANESE STUDIES

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the
Large Lecture Theatre, the Nissan Institute.

PROFESSOR E. HARARI, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

1 May: `Japan, Israel, and their neighbours:
towards normal peace?'

PROFESSOR MIYAKO SUDA, Gakushuin University

8 May: `Japan's Big Bang: why now? What
effect?'

PROFESSOR K.J. RUFF, Harvard

15 May: `The monarchy of the masses: a theory
of
the post-war Japanese monarchy.'

PROFESSOR B.-A. SHILLONY, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

22 May: `Divinity and gender: the riddle of the
Japanese monarchy.'

S. KEWLEY

29 May: `From crisis to co-operation: the
relationship between the EU and Japan from 1965 to the
present day.'

DR R. KERSTEN, Sydney

5 June: `Neo-nationalism and the "Liberal
School of History".'

DR KWEKU AMPIAH, Stirling

12 June: `In search of heroes: Noguchi Hideo
and
nation-building in Japan.'

PROFESSOR T.J. PEMPEL, University of Washington, Seattle

19 June: `Structural gaiatsu:
international finance and the Japanese political economoy.'

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section



QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

Seminar in Contemporary South Asia

The following talks will be given at the seminarto be held at 2
p.m. on Wednesday, 10 June, in the Library Wing Seminar Room,
Queen Elizabeth House.

Conveners: Dr B. Harriss-White and Dr N. Gooptu.

S. ANANDHI, Indian Social Institute, Bangalore:
`Dalits and the discourse of land rights in Tamilnadu.'

K. SEETA PRABHU, Mumbai: `Social sectors during
economic reforms: the Indian experience.'

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section


Seminar in Contemporary South Asia: South Asia Day

This meeting will be held on Friday, 8 May, in the Library Wing
Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

Conveners: Dr B. Harriss-White and Dr N.
Gooptu.

9 a.m.

S.A. ZAIDI, Karachi: `The failure of local government
in
Pakistan: is democracy responsible?'

A. NIGAM, Centre for the Study of Developing Societies,
Delhi: `Marxism and the post-colonial world: the long
march of a secular doctrine.'

11.15 a.m.

R. CHAKRAVARTY, Sussex: `Globalisation and imaginations
of the nation, state, and market: popular music in
India.'

D. MEHTA, Delhi: `Circumcision, body, masculinity:
ritual wound and sectarian violence.'

2.15 p.m.

I. HIRWAY, Gandhi Labour Institute, Ahmedabad:
`Liberalisation and industrialisation in the regional
context—a study in India.'

M. SWAMINATHAN, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development
Research, Bombay: `Economic growth and the persistence
of child labour: evidence from an Indian city.'

4.30 p.m.

A. SIDDIQA-AGHA, Military Accountant-General's Department,
Pakistan: `Prospects of converting military resources
for human development in a militaristic society: a case
study
of India and Pakistan.'

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section


Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women

Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the
Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House. Further
information may be obtained from the Centre (telephone:
(2)73644).

DR A.M. GOETZ, IDS, Sussex

30 Apr.: `Getting institutions right for women
in development.'

DR C. AWLL-DAVIES, Swansea

7 May: `Women in management in Wales.'

DR C. CONNAL

14 May: `The Devi and the Bandit Queen: a
cross-
disciplinary approach to the question of women's roles.'

DR R. CHOWDREY, Jammu University, India

21 May: `The Indian women's movement and gender
discourse: emerging tensions and responses.'

DR A. MAMA, Rhodes Visiting Fellow

28 May: to be announced.

E. CARY, New Mexico

4 June: `Cooks, rebels, secretaries, and
guerrillas: gender and 1968: Mexico.'

PROFESSOR A. COHEN

11 June: `Politics and the stability of
marriage.'

AKIKO ISHIKAWA

18 June
: `Japanese marriage and gender roles: investing
it with new meanings.'

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section


Barbara E. Ward Commemorative Lecture

DR M. JASCHOK, Monash University, will deliver the Barbara E.
Ward Commemorative Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 20 May, in the
Taylor Institution. Further details may be obtained from the
Centre (telephone: Oxford (2)73644, fax: (2)736707, e-mail:
ccrw@qeh.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `A mosque of one's own—Chinese women,
Islam, and sexual equality (nan-nu pingdeng).'

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section



WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY OF
MEDICINE

Medicine and the middle class

This day conference, supported by the Wellcome Trust, will be
held on Friday, 24 April, in Linacre College. The organiser is
Margaret Pelling, and the speakers will be Jonathan Barry, Anne
Crowther, Hilary Marland, Ross McKibbin, Margaret Pelling, and
Adrian Wilson. Attendance costs £15 (students/unwaged,
£7.50). Booking forms may be obtained from the Wellcome
Unit, 45–7 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE (telephone: Oxford
(2)74600, e-mail: wuhmo@wuhmo.ox.ac.uk).

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section



BRASENOSE COLLEGE


Programme in Hellenic Studies

The following seminars, which have been organised under the co-
ordination of Professor Christos Rozakis, Visiting Fellow in
Hellenic Studies, will be held at 2.15 p.m. on the days shown in
Lecture Room 11, Brasenose College. The general theme of the
seminars is: `The development of human rights through the
jurisprudence of the European Convention's organs: a study of the
case law with regard to south-eastern European states'.

PROFESSOR C. ROZAKIS, Member, European Commission of Human Rights

Mon. 27 Apr.: `The prohibition of torture,
inhuman and degrading treatment (Article 3 of the
Convention).'

PROFESSOR S. TRECHSEL, President, European Commission of Human
Rights

Fri. 8 May: `Protection of the right to life
(Article 2 of the Convention).'

(a)PROFESSOR ROZAKIS; (b) PROFESSOR A.
FRANGOUDAKI AND PROFESSOR T. DRAGONAS, Athens

Fri. 15 May:
(a) The case law.

(b) `A case study of the
educational system applying to the Muslim minority in
Greece.'

DR S. STAVROS, Legal Officer, European Commission of Human
Rights
Mon. 1 June: `Freedom of religion and conscience
(Article 9 of the Convention).'

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section



Tanner Lectures on Human Values 1998

What money can't buy: the moral limits of markets

MICHAEL SANDEL, Harvard, will deliver the Tanner Lectures on
Human Values at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination
Schools.


Mon. 11 May: `Commodification,
commercialisation, and privatisation.'

Tue. 12 May: `Markets, morals, and the public
sphere.'

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section



EXETER COLLEGE


Marett Memorial Lecture

RUTH PADEL will deliver the Marett Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on
Friday, 1 May, in the Saskatchewan Lecture Room, Exeter College.

Subject: `How myth uses us: Greek
"Guyville" and women's rock music.'

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section



GREEN COLLEGE

International Community Health Partnership Seminar: Research
and the developing world—what kind of research is needed?

This seminar will be held on Thursday, 30 April, 2–5 p.m.,
in the college.

DR H. WRIGHT, Oxford Forestry Institute:
`Participatory research—involving the local people.'

MR P. WIFFIN, Regional Pharmaceutical Adviser,
Oxford: `Doing the homework—finding the
evidence.'

MR J. CHURCH, orthopaedic surgeon, Oxford: `Maggots
in medicine—showing they are acceptable to the
developed
world.'

DR L. DULEY, obstetric epidemiologist, Oxford:
`Gaining experience together—multicentre trials.'

DR P. BACON, Oxford Forestry Institute: `Working
together—involving host country institutions.'

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section



Alan Emery Lecture

PROFESSOR V. DUBOWITZ, Emeritus Professor of Paediatrics,
University of London, will deliver the Alan Emery Lecture at 6
p.m. on Wednesday, 20 May, in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the
Radcliffe Infirmary.

Subject: `The floppy infant: from the cradle to the
genes.'

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section



LADY MARGARET HALL

Medico-Legal ethics

SUZELLE SMITH and DON HOWARTH, Senior Partners in Los Angeles law
firm Howarth & Smith, will lecture at 5.15 p.m. on Wednesday,
6 May, in the Talbot Hall, Lady Margaret Hall. Ms Smith and Mr
Howard will be joined in the programme by Professor A.E. Dick
Howard, Professor of Law, University of Virginia, and Mrs Ruth
Deech, Principal, St Anne's College. Those wishing to attend are
asked to contact Elizabeth Jubb (telephone: Oxford (2)74302, e-
mail: liz.jubb@lmh.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `The consequences of implied and denied
consent.'

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section



MANSFIELD COLLEGE

Oxford Centre for the Environment, Ethics, and Society

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
Council Room, Mansfield College. Further information may be
obtained from the Administrator, OCEES, Mansfield College, Oxford
OX1 3TF (telephone and fax: Oxford (2)70886, e-mail:
ocees@mansf.ox.ac.uk).

J. MASON, author, An Unnatural Order and
Animal Factories; activist and attorney

28 Apr: `The animal powers and some
repercussions of domestication.'

THE REVD JONATHAN CLATWORTHY, Vicar of Denstone and Manchester
University

5 May: `Theology and the value of the
world.'

(first of three seminars on Ecology and
Theology
)

R. ATTFIELD, Cardiff

12 May: `Environmental sensitivity and the
critiques of stewardship.' (second of three seminars
on
Ecology and Theology
)

I. BRADLEY, Aberdeen

19 May: `God is Green—or is He? Thoughts
on
Christianity, the churches, and the environment.'
(last
of three seminars on Ecology and Theology
)

C. RODGERS, Aberystwyth

2 June: `Legal mechanisms for promoting nature
conservation in the countryside.'

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section



PEMBROKE COLLEGE


Blackstone Lecture

LORD NOLAN will deliver the twenty-second Blackstone Lecture at
11.30 a.m. on Saturday, 16 May, in the Gulbenkian Lecture
Theatre, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `Government, ethics, and the law.'

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section



ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

Public lecture

PROFESSOR F. LENGER, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, will
deliver a public lecture at 8.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 12 May, in the
New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College

Subject: `Unwelcome traditions: the debate about the
"Völkish" roots of social history in Germany.'

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section


Centre for Indian Studies

Gender in South Asia

This one-day workshop will be held on Friday, 22 May, in Queen
Elizabeth House. Those who require lunch and refreshments during
the workshop are asked to contact Mrs C. Dobree, from whom
further information may be obtained. (telephone: Oxford (2)74559,
e-mail: asian@sant.ox.ac.uk).

Conveners: Professor Judith Brown, Nandini Gooptu.



Session I, 9–10.30 a.m.

:
Historiography
and narratives

R. O'HANLON, Cambridge: `Approaches to the study of
gender in pre-colonial India.'

P. MUKTA, Warwick: `Narratives of poverty.'

Session II, 10.45 a.m.–1 p.m.: Politics

P. JEFFERY, Edinburgh: `Feminist agendas and
women's activism in South Asia.'

S. THAPAR, Warwick: `The domestication of the
public
sphere and politicisation of the domestic sphere.'

R.S. RAJAN: `In India: women, citizenship, and the
crisis of the state.'

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section


Session III: Identities

J. LIDDLE, Warwick: `Feminist orientalism and
the Indian woman: linking the historical to the
contemporary.'

S. ANSARI, Royal Holloway College, London: `Gender,
partition, and Pakistan.'

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section


Session IV, 3.35–5 p.m.: Bodies
(To be followed by general discussion, 5–5.30
p.m.
)

S. ANANDHI: `Reproductive bodies and regulated
sexuality: birth control debates in colonian Tamilnadu.'

M. THAPAN, Delhi: `The body in the mirror: women
and
representation in contemporary India.'

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section



ST EDMUND HALL


A.B. Emden Lecture

SIR MICHAEL HOWARD, Emeritus Professor of Modern History, will
deliver the A.B. Emden Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 5 May, in
the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Fin de siècle: reflections at the
close of the twentieth century.'

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section



ST HUGH'S COLLEGE


Henry Rowlatt Bickley Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR QUENTIN SKINNER, Regius Professor of Modern History,
Cambridge, will deliver the sixteenth Henry Rowlatt Bickley
Memorial Lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 19 May, in the Mordan
Hall, St Hugh's College.

Subject: `The imagery of government in the Italian
Renaissance.'

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section



TRINITY COLLEGE


Richard Hillary Memorial Lecture

P.D. JAMES will deliver the Richard Hillary Memorial Lecture at
5
p.m. on Wednesday, 13 May, in the St Cross Building.

Subject: `Mystery and mayhem: the craft of the
detective story.'

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section



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture 1998

JUSTICE STEPHEN BREYER of the Supreme Court of the United States
will deliver the H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on
Thursday, 7 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `The work of an American constitutional
judge.'

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section



REGENT'S PARK COLLEGE


Centre for the Study of Christianity
and Culture

Unless otherwise indicated, the following lectures will be given
at 5 p.m. on the days shown in Regent's Park College. Further
information may be obtained from Alan Kreider, Regent's Park
College, Oxford OX1 2LB

(telephone: Oxford 288140 fax: 288121,
e-mail: alan.kreider@regents.ox.ac.uk).

A. BRADSHAW, Royal College of Nursing

Thur. 30 Apr.: `The virtue of nursing: the
covenant of care.'

C. TREVETT, Cardiff

Wed. 6 May: `Creating and using the
"heretical" woman: Firmilian's female
ecstatic.'

N. WOOD

Wed. 20 May: `Inculturating Christianity in
post-modern Britain.'

D. FRIESEN, Bethel College, Kansas

Wed. 27 May: `Artisans, citizens, philosophers:
singing God's song in a foreign land as a model for a
theology of culture.'

M. ELLIS, Harvard

Thur. 28 May, 4 p.m.: `Unholy alliance:
religion
and atrocity in our time.'

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section



FRIENDS OF THE BODLEIAN

The following thirty-minute lectures will be given at 1 p.m. on
Wednesdays in the Cecil Jackson Room, the Sheldonian Theatre. All
are invited.

Sandwiches and wine will be served after the lectures at a cost
of £2.50 per person, for which bookings should be made in
advance with Mrs P.M. Sturgis, Membership Secretary, Friends of
the Bodleian, Bodleian Library, Oxford OX1 3BG (telephone: Oxford
(2)77234).

R. CARR

29 Apr.: `The Brotherton Collection: "in
trust for the nation".'

C. FRANKLIN

13 May: `The Bowdlers and their family
Shakespeare.'

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section



ACTION GROUP AT OXFORD ON TEACHING AND
LEARNING ENHANCED BY NEW TECHNOLOGY (OxTALENT)

Special guest lecture

PROFESSOR DIANA LAURILLARD, Open University, will lecture at
11.30 a.m. on Thursday, 4 June, in the Computing Laboratory
Lecture Theatre, the Wolfson Building (north entrance).

Subject: `Rethinking university teaching post-
Dearing.'

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section


Lunchtime seminar series: using the Internet to support
student learning

The following seminars will be held at 12.45 p.m. on Thursdays
in
Rewley House. A buffet lunch will be available from 12.30 p.m.
Those wishing to attend are asked to register by visiting
http://www.tall.ox.ac.uk/oxtalent.html, or by telephoning Maya
Little on Oxford (2)70291.

J. DARBY, Director, Technology-Assisted Lifelong Learning
(TALL), Department for Continuing Education, and R. MCINTYRE,
Information Manager, TALL

30 Apr.: Introduction and overview.

DR B. BARNETT, Vice-President, Paul G. Allen Virtual Educational
Foundation, Washington, USA

7 May: `Virtual learning.'

J. DARBY

14 May: `Continuing Education's Technology-
Assisted Lifelong Learning programme.'

N.S. GARDNER and DR M. NEWDICK, Department for Continuing
Education

21 May: `North American case studies.'

S. MURISON-BOWIE, Director, Interactive Learning, Oxford
University Press

28 May: `A publisher's perspective.'

R. MCINTYRE

11 June: `How to create an Internet course.'

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section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 23 April 1998: Grants and Funding<br />

Grants and Research Funding


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



ELDON LAW SCHOLARSHIP 1998

The Board of the Faculty of Law announces that the Eldon Law
Scholarship, value not less than £4,000 per annum, is awarded
annually to be held for up to two years. Candidates must be members
of the University of Oxford who:

(a) have passed the examination for the Degree of
Bachelor of Arts or for the Degree of Bachelor of Civil Law or for
the Degree of Magister Juris; and

(b) have been placed in the First Class in one or other
of these examinations or in Honour Moderations or have gained one
of the Chancellor's Prizes; and

(c) intend to follow the profession of the Law; and

(d) have applied for one of the scholarships either
before, or within two years next following, the date of their call
to the Bar.

Candidates will be required to sign a declaration that they intend
to practise at the Bar in the United Kingdom. Until they have been
called to the Bar, scholars must produce proof that they have
regularly kept their terms, unless prevented by illness, at one of
the Inns of Court.

In general the policy of the awarding committee is to give
preference to a candidate who has completed his or her Oxford
education and is completing the vocational stage of training prior
to entry into pupillage.

Applications, accompanied by a curriculum vitae, must
be sent to the Head Clerk (on a form obtainable from him),
University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD, not later
than Friday, 30 October 1998, in a sealed envelope marked `Eldon
Scholarship Application'. The representatives of the board will
summon to interview at Oxford on Saturday, 23 January 1999, those
candidates they wish to see.

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WINTER WILLIAMS LAW PRIZES 1998

The Board of the Faculty of Law invites entry for the Prizes which
will be awarded in 1998 on the basis of essays, of not more than
5,000 words, submitted on one of the following subjects:

1 `The Unfair Terms in Consumer Contracts
Regulation 1994 has introduced two new standards of invalidity into
British contract law, contravention of "good faith"; and
"significant imbalance".' Are these standards `new'? To
what extent are they justifiable?

2 `The concept of "voluntary assumption of
responsibility" as a general principle of liability for pure
economic loss seems an oddity in the context of liability rules in
tort which are undoubtedly imposed by law and appear to be
distinctly involuntary.' Discuss.

3 `It is a fundamental and uncontroversial
proposition that because the equitable jurisdiction to enforce
trusts depends upon the conscience of the holder of the legal
interest being affected, such person cannot be a trustee of the
property if and so long as they are ignorant of the factors which
are alleged to affect their conscience.' Discuss.

4 `...the law as to notice as it may affect
purchasers of unregistered land, whether contained in decided
cases, or in a statute...has no application even by analogy to
registered land' per Lord Wilberforce in Williams &
Glyn's Bank v. Boland
[1981] AC 487, 504. Is this either an
accurate or a realistic statement of the law?

The First Prize is of £400, the Second Prize is of £200.
Grants to a total of £200 may be made to unsuccessful
candidates who have done meritorious work. The prizes will be
awarded only if entries of sufficient merit are received. The
essays (two typed copies) must be sen to the Head Clerk, University
Offices, Wellington Square, by 30 September 1998. There is no entry
form, but each essay must be accompanied by: (i) a statement from
the candidate's college the he or she is, on 30 September 1998, an
undergraduate member of the University who has not exceeded the
tenth term from matriculation, and is reading for the Honour School
of Jurisprudence; (ii) a declaration that the essay is entirely the
candidate's own unaided work and that it has not been submitted to
any other person for advice, assistance, or revision.

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GREEN MORAL PHILOSOPHY PRIZE 1999

Candidates for the prize are invited to submit to the Secretary of
Faculties not later than 1 December 1998 specific
subjects relating to Moral Philosophy for approval by the Board of
the Faculty of Literae Humaniores.

Dissertations, on subjects approved by the faculty board, should be
typewritten, distinguished by a motto, and accompanied by a sealed
envelope bearing the motto and containing the author's name,
address, and date of matriculation, and should not exceed 60,000
words. Each candidate must certify that his or her dissertation has
not been published in book form and that it has not been submitted
for a degree of any university. Dissertations should be sent to the
Graduate Studies Office, University Offices, Wellington Square,
Oxford OX1 2JD, before 1 March 1999.

All candidates must, previous to that day, have been admitted to or
have qualified for the Degree of Master of Arts.

The value of the prize is in the region of £2,500.

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JUNIOR MATHEMATICAL PRIZES

Not more than four prizes, each of a value not exceeding £200,
may be awarded each year, if candidates submit work of sufficient
merit. One prize may be awarded by the examiners in the Honour
School of Mathematics; one prize may be awarded by the examiners in
the Honour School of Mathematical Sciences; and one prize may be
awarded by the mathematical examiners in each of the Honour Schools
of Mathematics and Computation and of Mathematics and Philosophy
for outstanding performance in the mathematical papers. The value
of the prizes within the above limits will be determined by the
examiners. No special application is required.

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PAVRY AND WINCHESTER THESIS PRIZES 1998

The Board of the Faculty of Social Studies proposes to award two
prizes in Michaelmas Term 1998, provided that there are candidates
of sufficient merit. Both of these prizes are awarded for
successful theses (M.Phil., M.Litt., or D.Phil.) in the faculties
of Social Studies, Law, or Modern History.

The Dasturzada Dr Jal Pavry Memorial Prize (£500) is for a
thesis on a subject in the area of international peace and
understanding.

The Bapsybanoo Marchioness of Winchester Prize (£500) is for
a thesis on international relations, with particular reference to
the area of human rights and fundamental freedoms.

Candidates should apply in writing to the Secretary to the Managers
of the Cyril Foster and Related Funds, Centre for International
Studies, Social Studies Faculty Centre, George Street, Oxford OX1
2RL , not later than 12 noon on Friday, 24 July 1998. Applications
must include a copy of the thesis, together with a short abstract,
and a letter supplying (a) the candidate's name, college
and degree; (b) the names of the candidate's examiners and
supervisor(s) (not applicable to M.Phil. candidates); (c)
a clear indication for which one of the two prizes the candidate is
submitting the thesis; (d) an address for communication
should the candidate not be returning to the University in
Michaelmas Term.

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CYRIL FOSTER AND RELATED FUNDS FOR
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

1 The Managers of the Cyril Foster and Related
Funds will consider requests from members of the University
(principally M.Litt. and D.Phil. students, and senior members)
undertaking research in international relations for modest grants
towards travel and related research expenses, and, exceptionally,
for other purposes. The main funds are:

(a) The Cyril Foster Fund: this is intended for `the
promotion of international peace and the prevention of future
wars'.

(b) The Alastair Buchan Subsidiary Fund: this fund,
which is strictly limited, is intended for `the promotion of
research in international relations'.

(c) The Oxford Project for Peace Studies Fund: this
fund, which is strictly limited, is intended for `the study of the
nature of peace and of the methods by which peace can be developed
and extended'.

Applications for grants under these funds are not normally
entertained from vi siting scholars, from students with
probationary status, from students for the M.Sc. degree, or from
undergraduates. Applications from M.Phil. students will only be
considered if an exceptional case is made. Requests should be made
bef ore the expenses are incurred. Attendance at an international
conference will not in itself normally be accepted as a sufficient
reason for a grant.

2 Graduate students (including M.Sc. or
M.Phil.) can also apply for the annual Maurice Latey Award `to
assist travel for research by postgraduate students in the fields
of politics or international relations working on aspects of
democracy, freedom and religion'. Suitable applications for grants
under 1 above will automatically be considered for this award.
Additional applications for small research grants are also invited
from postgraduate students at British or overseas universities
wishing to use the Latey Archive in the Bodleian Library.

3 Applications for grants under 1 and/or 2
above should be made on a form available from the Secretary to the
Managers (address below), and should be submitted by the end of the
fifth week of each Oxford term. Consideration of a pplications
submitted after that date will normally be deferred until the
latter part of the following term. Candidates are asked to state
the name of the fund/s to which they are applying, and to clarify
the relevance of their project to the purpose of the particular
fund. Graduate students applying for research grants are also asked
to name one referee, normally their supervisor, who should be
requested to send a reference directly to the Secretary to the
Managers.

4 Applications are also invited for the annual
Royal Bank of Canada Research Scholarship. This award, of a value
of £1,000, is available to any graduate student of the
University (including M.Sc. or M.Phil.) to cover costs of research
outside the UK on `international relations with special reference
to Canada'. Letters of application should be submitted by the end
of fifth week of Trinity Term. There is no application form, but
candidates should state college, course, and supervisor, and they
should give a brief outline of their thesis topic and proposed
research.

5 All requests for application forms,
correspondence, and references should be addressed directly to Mrs
Marga Lyall, Secretary to the Managers of the Cyril Foster and
Related Funds, Centre for International Studies, Social Studies
Faculty Centre, George Street, Oxford OX1 2RL.

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ROYAL BANK OF CANADA


Research Scholarship in International
Relations

Applications are invited for the annual Royal Bank of Canada
Research Scholarship in International Relations.

This award, of a value of £1,000, is available to any graduate
student of Oxford University (including M.Sc. and M.Phil.) to cover
costs of research outside the UK on international relations with
special reference to Canada. It is administered by the Committee
for the Cyril Foster and Related Funds, under the overall direction
of the Social Studies Faculty Board.

There is no application form, but candidates should state their
college, course, and supervisor, and they should indicate what they
hope to achieve if the application is successful.

Letters of application should be submitted by the end of fifth week
of Trinity Term (29 May) to Mrs Marga Lyall, Secretary to the
Managers of the Cyril Foster and Related Funds, Centre for
International Studies, Social Studies Faculty Centre, George
Street, Oxford OX1 2RL.

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HAYTER FUND

Grants from the Hayter Fund are made to holders of established
university posts for travel and research purposes connected with
the languages and the economic, social, and political development
of the following areas: the former Soviet Union and eastern Europe,
the Middle East, Africa, south Asia, east Asia, and Latin America.
Application forms and further details may be obtained from the
Secretary of the Hayter Committee, the Oriental Institute, Pusey
Lane. The closing date for applications is the end of fifth week in
each term.

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RADHAKRISHNAN MEMORIAL BEQUEST

The trustees of the bequest may make small grants to students at
Oxford who are citizens of the Republic of India, and who, because
of unexpected difficulties, need financial assistance to complete
the qualifications for which they are registered. Grants will not
normally be awarded to those near to the beginning of their course
of study. Application forms may be obtained from the Secretary of
the Radhakrishnan Memorial Bequest, the Oriental Institute, Pusey
Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE. the closing date for receipt of applications
is Friday, 5 June.

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SASAKAWA FUND

Applications are invited for grants from the Sasakawa Fund, to be
applied to `the advancement within the University of knowledge and
understanding of Japan by way of academic contact and exchange
between members of the University and citizens of Japan'. Further
details may be obtained from the Secretary of the Board of
Management of the Fund (Miss Emma Wilson), the Oriental Institute,
Pusey Lane, to whom applications should be returned by the end of
the fourth week in each term.

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<br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 23 April 1998: Examinations and Boards<br />

Examinations and Boards


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



CHAIRMEN OF EXAMINERS

TRINITY TERM 1998

Honour Moderations

Modern History and Economics: E.H.H. GREEN, MA,
Fellow of Magdalen

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Honour Schools

European and Middle Eastern Languages: A. JONES, MA,
Fellow of Pembroke (address: Oriental Institute)

Human Sciences: D.A. COLEMAN, MA, Fellow of Queen's
(address: Department of Applied Social Studies)

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section


Master of Philosophy

European Archaeology: B.W. CUNLIFFE, MA, D.PHIL.,
Fellow of Keble (address: Archaeological Institute)

European Literature: R.A. COOPER, MA, D.PHIL.,
Fellow of Brasenose

Qualifying Examination in Russian and East European
Studies
: H. SHUKMAN, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Antony's

Sociology: A.H. HALSEY, MA, Fellow of Nuffield

Corrigenda

Classical Archaeology: D.C. KURTZ, MA, D.PHIL.,
Fellow of Wolfson (address: Ashmolean Museum)

Qualifying Examination in Classical Archaeology:
D.C. KURTZ, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Wolfson (address: Ashmolean
Museum)

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section


Master of Studies

Anthropological Archaeology: P.J. MITCHELL, MA,
D.PHIL., Fellow of St Hugh's

European Archaeology: B.W. CUNLIFFE, MA, D.PHIL.,
Fellow of Keble (address: Archaeological Institute)

European Literature: R.A. COOPER, MA, D.PHIL.,
Fellow of Brasenose

Slavonic Studies: G.C. STONE, MA, Fellow of
Hertford

World Archaeology: C. GOSDEN, MA, Fellow of St Cross
(address: Pitt Rivers Museum)

Corrigendum

Classical Archaeology: D.C. KURTZ, MA, D.PHIL.,
Fellow of Wolfson (address: Ashmolean Museum)

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section


Diploma

Special Diploma in Social Administration and Social
Studies
: P.T. DAVID, MA, M.LITT., Fellow of Kellogg

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section



DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE

The Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine has granted leave
to M.W. MANSFIELD, Green College, to supplicate for the Degree
of Doctor of Medicine.

The evidence submitted by the candidate was entitled: `The
interaction of genetic and environmental vascular risk markers
in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and
their first degree relatives'.

The Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine has granted
leave to E.M. RICHARDS, St Peter's, to supplicate for the Degree
of Doctor of Medicine.

The evidence submitted by the candidate was entitled:
`Assessment and treatment of thrombocytopenic bleeding in liver
transplant recipients'.

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section



EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR
OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give
notice of oral examination of their candidates as
follows:

Biological Sciences

N. RAHMAN-HUQ, Hertford: `A study of microvascular brain basement
membrane'.

Glycobiology Institute, Friday, 22 May, 10 a.m.


Examiners: R.A. Dwek, H.M. Charlton.

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section


Medieval and Modern Languages

I.P. WASSENAAR, St John's: `Self-justification and its uses for
Marcel Proust's A la recherche du temps perdu'.

Wadham, Friday, 1 May, 11.30 a.m.


Examiners: C.M. Howells, E.J. Hughes.

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section


Modern History

T.M. DICKIE, Balliol: `Commerce and experience in the
seventeenth-century Mediterranean: the market dynamics,
commercial culture, and naval protection of English trade to
Aleppo'.

Keble, Friday, 8 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: I.W. Archer, H.G. Roseveare.

G. PAULSSON, St Antony's: `Hiding in Warsaw: the Jews on the
"Aryan side" in the Polish capital, 1940–5'.

Wolfson, Wednesday, 29 April, 3 p.m.


Examiners: W. Brus, R. Bessel.

I. ST JOHN, Nuffield: `A study of the problem of work effort in
British industry, 1850 to 1920'.

Examination Schools, Friday, 8 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: H. Gospel, S. Tolliday.

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section


Oriental Studies

M. MILWRIGHT, St Cross: `Trade and patronage in Middle Islamic
Jordan. The ceramics of Karak Castle'.

Oriental Institute, Monday, 27 April, 2.15 p.m.


Examiners: J. Raby, D. Pringle.

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section


Physical Sciences

A. ELEND, Merton: `Alpha,alpha-disubstituted glycines: asymmetric
synthesis'.

Dyson Perrins Laboratory, Thursday, 7 May, 11 a.m.


Examiners: G.W.J. Fleet, D.W. Knight.

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section


Psychological Studies

M. JUKES, Linacre: `Talking about the past and its effect on
children's event memory'.

Department of Experimental Psychology, Monday, 22 June, 11 a.m.


Examiners: P.E. Bryant, J. Morton.

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section


Social Studies

K. BAER, Nuffield: `Reinventing democrats: the Democratic
Leadership Council and the attempt to change the public
philosophy of the Democratic Party, 1981–96'.

Worcester, Thursday, 28 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: A.J. Ware, N.W. Polsby.

R. MACEY-DARE, St Cross: `Exchange rate barriers, target zones,
and option pricing'.

Balliol, Wednesday, 29 April, 2.15 p.m.


Examiners: D. Vines, M. Miller.

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section


Committee for Educational Studies

AKITO OKADA, St Catherine's: `Equality of opportunity in postwar
England and Japan: a comparative study of educational policy,
1944–70'.

Examination Schools, Friday, 1 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: C. Brock, I.Neary.

S.A. RANDELL, Oriel: `Parents, teachers, pupils: different
contributions to understanding pupil needs?'.

Examination Schools, Wednesday, 3 June, 10 a.m.


Examiners: G. Walford, M. Hughes.

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section



EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER
OF SCIENCE

The examiners appointed by the following faculty board give
notice of oral examination of their candidate as
follows:

Biological Sciences

A. POOL, Lady Margaret Hall: `An investigation of the factors
which affect cell fate choice in D.discoideum'.

Department of Biochemistry, Friday, 1 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: J.P. Armitage, J.F. Clarke.

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section



CHANGES IN REGULATIONS


With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in
regulations made by boards of faculties and committees will come
into effect on 8 May.



1 Board of the Faculty of Anthropology and Geography
(a) Transfer from Probationer Research Student status to D. Phil.
status
With immediate effect
1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 852, l. 22, delete `normally
takes place not later than' and substitute `shall
normally take place in'.
2 Ibid., l. 23, after `student' insert:
`, except that for research students who already hold an M.Sc.
degree the transfer will normally take place during the second
term after admission. Apart from exceptional circumstances, this
transfer will not take place later than the fifth term after
admission as a research student. For transfer to be approved, the
student is required to demonstrate promise of his/her ability to
produce a satisfactory D.Phil. thesis on the intended topic. For
this purpose, the
student will submit three copies of the following two pieces of
evidence to the Professor of Biological Anthropology:
(i) Evidence that, over a period of at least two terms, he/she
has successfully carried out a programme of research in an area
relevant to his/her proposed D.Phil. topic: and
(ii) A written piece of work of approximately 4,000 words,
exclusive of bibliography, tables, and appendices, that describes
the proposed research plan for his/her D.Phil. This research plan
shall normally be submitted in the format of a research grant
application.
On receiving the application the Professor will consult with the
student's supervisor(s) and appoint two assessors, neither of
whom will be the the student's supervisor(s). Normally, one of
the assessors will be appointed from within the department while
the second assessor will be appointed from outside the
department.
  After both assessors have read the submitted work the student
will be interviewed by a committee consisting of both assessors
and the student's supervisor(s), and chaired by the Professor.
Following the interview, the two assessors will submit to the
Board, a reasoned written report supporting their
recommendation.'
3 Ibid., l. 23, delete `. The form of written work to be
submitted by candidates for'.
4 Ibid., delete ll. 24--6.
5 Ibid., l. 27, delete `to students by the department.'



(b) Confirmation of D.Phil. status
In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 852, delete ll. 32--6 and
substitute:
`between the sixth and eighth term following admission to
graduate status. Apart from exceptional circumstances, this
transfer may not take place later than the ninth term following
admission to graduate status. The student will be required to
give evidence confirming that the research already accomplished
gives promise of the ability to produce a satisfactory D.Phil.
thesis on the intended topic and that submission of the D.Phil.
thesis is anticipated to occur within the next two terms. For
this purpose, the applicant must submit to the Professor of
Biological Anthropology three copies of a typed report describing
in approximately 3,000 words, exclusive of bibliography, tables,
and figures, the aims and methods of the proposed thesis and
summarising the results obtained so far. The student shall also
append an outline of the proposed thesis including an indication
of the topics to be covered in individual chapters. On receiving
the application, the Professor will consult with the stud
ent's supervisor(s) and appoint two assessors, neither of whom
shall be the student's supervisor. Normally, the same two
assessors who were appointed to review the student's application
for transfer from PRS status, will be appointed to review the
application for confirmation of D.Phil. status. After both
assessors have read the script the student will be interviewed
by a committee consisting of both assessors and the student's
supervisor(s), and chaired by the Professor. Following the
interview the two assessors will submit to the Board a reasoned
written report supporting their recommendation. A student whose
first application is unsuccessful may be given one further
opportunity to apply for confirmation, but if the second
application is
unsuccessful he or she shall be required to seek transfer
to M.Sc. status.'



(c) Preparation and submission of theses
1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 853, l. 42, after
`Anthropology' insert `(except for Biological Anthropology---see
below)'.
2 Ibid., after l. 46 insert:
`D.Phil. theses submitted by students in Biological Anthropology
should normally be not more than 40,000 words in length
(approximately 140 sides of A4 paper), exclusive of bibliography,
appendices, diagrams, and tables. In certain circumstances, and
particularly where the work for the thesis is non-laboratory
based, the permission of the Board can be sought to exceed this
limit. One, or more scientific papers may form all, or part, of
an acceptable thesis, provided that in combination with a
separately written introduction, general discussion and general
conclusions, they constitute a continuous theme. Joint papers may
only be included in the body of the thesis if the supervisor
certifies that the student's contribution represents a major
portion of the paper, and further that this inclusion was
approved by the Board at the time D.Phil. status was confirmed.
Scientific papers, joint or otherwise, may be included as
appendices in a thesis without prior approval.'



2 Board of the Faculty of Biological Sciences

M.Sc. in Forestry and its Relation to Land Use
With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)
1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 766, insert after l. 4:
`The Board of the Faculty of Biological Sciences shall elect for
the supervision of the course an Education Committee which shall
have power to arrange lectures and other
instruction and to advise the faculty board on matters concerning
its responsibility for the syllabus and examination.'
2 Ibid., ll. 43--9, as amended by Gazette, p. 444, delete `The
essay must be submitted not later than noon on the Monday of the
noughth week of Hilary Full Term' and substitute
`The essay must be submitted not later than noon on the Monday
of the first week of Hilary Full Term'.



3 Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Second Examination for the Degree of BM
With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)
1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 928, delete ll. 34--7 and
substitute:
`Accident and Emergency, Clinical Geratology, Neuro-logy,
Neurosurgery, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Oph-
thalmology, Orthopaedic Surgery, Otolaryngology,
Paediatrics, Palliative Medicine, Primary Health Care,
Psychiatry, and Public Health Medicine.'
2 Ibid., ll. 38--9, delete `(including Child Health and Clinical
Genetics)'
3 Ibid., l. 39, after `Psychiatry,' insert `Public Health and
Primary Health Care,'.
4 Board of the Faculty of English Language and
Literature
(a) M.Phil. in English Studies
With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)
1 in Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 592, delete ll. 8--10 and
substitute:
`12. The Archaeology of Early Anglo-Saxon England. (This paper
will be identical with the paper of the same title of the M.St.
In European Archaeology and will be examined by written paper as
specified in paragraph 4(a) of the regulations for the M.St. in
European Archaeology.'

(b) Honour School of English Language and Literature

(i) With immediate effect
1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 206, l. 18, delete `Subject
III. (c) (13)' and substitute III. 14 (b)'.
2 Ibid., p. 210, l. 50, after `Humaniores' insert `Subject III.
14 (b)'.



(ii) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 205, delete ll. 5--13 and
substitute:
`Candidates may offer any one of the Special Authors from the
list for the year concerned which will be published in the
University Gazette by the beginning of the fifth week
of the Trinity Term two years before the examination.'
2 Ibid., delete l. 14 on p. 205 to l. 43 on p. 206 and
substitute:
`8. Special Topics (an extended essay of not more than 6,000
words) (see introduction to regulations for Course I).
In all Special Topics, candidates will be expected to show such
historical and/or contextual knowledge as is necessary for the
profitable study of the periods, genres, authors, or topics
concerned. Candidates should show knowledge of more than one
author.
Candidates may offer one of the following:
(a) The English Novel
(b) The English Drama
(c) English Prose
(d) The History and Theory of Criticism
(e) American Literature from 1800 to the present day
(f) Women's Writing
(g) The Genres of Poetry
(h) Any one of the Special Topics from the list for the year
concerned, including specified Course II options, which will be
published in the University Gazette by the beginning of the fifth
week of the Trinity Term one year before the
examination.'
3 Ibid., p. 206, l. 17, delete `Subject III(c)(13)]' and
substitute `Subject III. 14(b)]'.



5 Boards of the Faculties of English Language and
Literature and Literae Humaniores


Honour School of Classics and English

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000).

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 136, delete ll. 6--8 and
substitute:
`(d) any of the Special Authors from the list for the year
concerned which will be published in the University Gazette by
the beginning of the fifth week of the Trinity Term two years
before the examination (extended essay).
2 Ibid., delete ll. 9--10 and substitute:
`(e) Special Topics, subjects (a), (b), (c), (e), (f), (g), (h)
(extended essay).'



6 Boards of the Faculties of English Language and
Literature and Modern Languages

Honour School of English and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 197, delete ll. 45--7 and
substitute:
`(iii) Special Topics (an extended essay of not more than 6,000
words) [Honour School of English Language and
Literature, Course I, Subject 8].'



7 Board of the Faculties of Modern History and English Language
and Literature

Honour School of Modern History and English

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

As in 4(b)(ii) above.



8 Board of the Faculty of English Language and
Literature

Honour School of English Language and Literature

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 202, ll. 25--6, delete `and,
in the case of Subject 8 (o), which genre he or she offers'.
2 Ibid., l. 27, after `List C' insert `and, in the case of B.5
and B.6, whether he or she intends to offer (an) extended
essay(s) or to sit (the) three-hour paper(s)'.
3 Ibid., delete from `except that' on l. 41 to `Literature' on
l. 44.
4 Ibid., p. 203, delete from `for Subject 7' on l. 7 to `(w)' on
l. 8 and substitute `for both Subject 7 and Subject 8, to all
candidates,'.
5 Ibid., delete ll. 26--33 and substitue:
`Candidates are warned (i) that in the papers for Subjects 3--6
they must not answer questions on individual authors of whom they
offer a special study for Subject 7, (ii) that they must avoid
duplicating, in their answers to one paper, material that they
have already used in answering another paper or in the extended
essay under Subject 7 or Subject 8 and must show knowledge, in
each of the papers for Subjects 3--6, of other literary genres
than that of which they offer a special study for Subject 8.'
6 Ibid., delete from l. 48 on p. 206 to l. 3 on p. 207 and
substitute:
`(a) Subject B.9 Renaissance Special Authors (as defined in
Course I, Subject 7(b) for the year concerned) and B.10 Special
Topics will be assessed by extended essay. Candidates who do not
offer B.9 may instead offer B.6 Middle English
Literature. Candidates who do not offer B.10 may instead offer
either B.5 Old English Literature as an extended essay, or C.7
Old Norwegian and Icelandic Literature, or C.10 Old French
Literature to c.1400, or C. 14 Classical Literature (C.7, C.10,
and C.14 assessed by extended essay). Candidates may offer B.5
or B.6 either by extended essay or by three-hour examination;
they will be required to indicate on their entry form which
method they choose, and will not be permitted to vary from this.'
7 Ibid., p. 207, l. 6, delete `B.5,'.
8 Ibid., l. 8, insert `B.5,' before `B.10'.
9 Ibid., p. 208, ll. 33--4 and ll. 38--9, in each case, delete
`(an extended essay of not more than 6,000 words)' and
substitute:
`(one paper or an extended essay of not more than 6,000 words
(see introduction to Course II))'.
10 Ibid., p. 209, l. 1, delete `9. Spenser and/or Milton' and
substitute:
`9. Renaissance Special Authors (as defined by Course I, Subject
7(b) for the year concerned)'.
11 Ibid., delete ll. 7--15 and substitute:
`(a) The English Drama
(b) English Prose
(c) The History and Theory of Criticism
(d) Women's Writing
(e) The Genres of English Poetry
(f) Medieval and Renaissance Romance
(g) Scottish Literature before 1600
(h) Any one of the Special Topics in the medieval period, and for
the year concerned, which will be published in the University
Gazette by the beginning of the fifth week of the Trinity Term
one year before the examination.'
The list of themes for B.10(a), (b), (c), (d), (e) and (h) will
be the same as those set for Course I (Subjects 8(b), (c), (d),
(f), (g), (h)).'
12 Ibid., p. 211, after l. 17, insert:
`14 Classical Literature (an extended essay of not more than
6,000 words (see introduction to regulations for Course II)).
Candidates will be expected to have studied one of the forms
specified below in Greek and/or Latin Literature (and should
specify their choice on their entry form).
(i)     Epic
(ii)    Tragedy
(iii)   Comedy
(iv)    Satire
(v)     The Novel
Candiates may confine themselves to a single author.'



9 Boards of the Faculties of English Language and
Literature and Literae Humaniores

Honour School of Classics and English

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 As in 8 above.
2 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 136, delete ll. 4--31 and
substitute:
`(b) Shakespeare (Course I, Subject 2);
(c) the History, Use, and Theory of the English Language (Course
I, Subject 1);
(d) any of the Special Authors from the list for the year
concerned which will be published in the University Gazette by
the beginning of the fifth week of the Trinity Term two years
before the examination (Course I, Subject 7) (extended essay);
(e) Special Topics subjects (a), (b), (c), (e), (f), (g), (h)
(Course I, Subject 8) (extended essay):
(f) the History of the English Language I: Old English and early
Middle English (Course II, Subject A.1);
(g) the History of the English Language II: Late Middle
English and Modern English (Course II, Subject A.2);
(h) Old English Texts (Course II, Subject A.3);
(i) Old English Philology (Course II, Subject B.1);
(j) Middle English Dialectology (Course II, Subject B.2);
(k) Modern English Philology (Course II, Subject B.3);
(l) Linguistic Theory (Course II, Subject B.4);
(m) Old English Literature and Its Background (Course II, Subject
B.5) (one paper or extended essay);
(n) the Archaeology of Anglo-Saxon England, seventh to ninth
centuries ad (Course II, Subject B.11);
(o) Gothic (Course II, Subject C.1);
(p) Old Saxon (Course II, Subject C.2);
(q) Old High German (Course II, Subject C.3);
(r) Middle High German (Course II, Subject C.4);
(s) Old Norse (Course II, Subject C.5);
(t) Old Norse Texts (Course II, Subject C.6);
(u) Old French (Course II, Subject C.8);
(v) Old French Texts (Course II, Subject C.9);
(w) Medieval Welsh (Course II, Subject C.11);
(x) the Latin Literature of the British Isles: from the Origins
to the Norman Conquest (Course II, Subject C.13);
(y) Medieval and Renaissance Romance (Course II, Subject B.10 (f)
(extended essay);
(z) Scottish Literature before 1600 (Course II, Subject
B.10 (g)) (extended essay).



10 Boards of the Faculties of English Language and
Literature and Modern History

Honour School of Modern History and English

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

As for the Honour School of English (see 8 above).



11 Boards of the Faculties of English Language and
Literature and Modern Languages

Honour School of English and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

As for the Honour School of English (see 8 above).



12 Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores

(a) Regulations for Philosophy in some of the Honour Schools

Regulations for Particular Honour Schools: Literae
Humaniores

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 469, l. 33, after Modern
Philosophy:' insert `101'.
2 Ibid. l.37, after `Modern Philosophy:' insert `101'.



(b) Honour School of Literae Humaniores

(i) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 266, after l. 18 insert `101
History of Philosophy from Descartes to Kant'
2 Ibid., delete l. 24.
3 Ibid., p. 273, after l. 26 insert:
`(d) The Reception of Greece and/or Rome in British Literature,
1830--1900
There will be four topics:
1. The Reception of Homer.
2. The Reception of Greek Drama (Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripedes,
Aristophanes).
3. The Reception of Virgil and Horace.
4. Roman Historical Fictions, with special reference to
Lytton, The Last Days of Pompeiii, Macaulay, Lays of Ancient
Rome, and Pater, Marius the Epicurean.
The examination paper will contain questions on all four topics
in Section A, and a broad range of more general questions in
Section B. Candidates will be required to answer  four questions,
including at least one from section B; they will be required to
show knowledge of the reception of either Greece (topics 1 and
2) or Rome (topics 3 and 4), but will have the opportunity to
show knowledge
of both. English authors whose works may be considered include
Arnold, the Brownings, Pater, Ruskin, and Tennyson.'



(ii) With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in
1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 275, l. 16, delete, `Wednesday
of the second week' and replace with, `Wednesday of the first
week'.
2 Ibid., l. 19, delete, `fifth week' and replace with `third
week'.



(iii) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 258, l. 32, delete, `i.1 Greek
History from 776 BC to 479 BC, with' and insert `i.1 The Early
Greek World and Herodotus' Histories 776 BC to 479 BC, with'.
2 Ibid., p. 259, l. 1, delete `i.2 Greek History form 479 BC to
403 BC, with' and insert, `i.2 Thucydides and the Greek World:
479 BC to 403 BC, with'.
3 Ibid., l. 18, delete, `i.3 Greek History from 403 BC to 336 BC,
with' and insert, `i.3 The End of the Peloponnesian War to the
Death of Philip II of Macedon: 403 BC to 336 BC, with'.
4 Ibid., l. 43, delete, `i.4 Roman History from 240 BC to 134 BC,
with' and insert, `i.4. Rome and the Mediterranean and the
Histories of Polybius: 240 BC to 134 BC, with '.
5 Ibid., p. 260, l. 21, delete, `i.5 Roman History from 133 BC
to 50 BC, with' and insert, `i.5 The End of the Roman Republic:
Cicero and Sallust: 133 BC to 50 BC, with'.
6 Ibid., l. 46, delete, `i.6 Roman History from 49 BC to AD 54,
with' and insert `i.6 Rome, Italy and Empire under Ceasar, the
Triumvirate and early Principate: 49 BC to AD 54, with'.
7 Ibid., p. 261, l. 32, delete, `i.7 Roman History from AD 54 to
AD 138, with' and insert `i.7 The World of Tacitus and Pliny:
politics and culture: AD 54 to AD 138, with'.



(iv) With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in
1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 258, after l. 3 insert:
`III.14(b): Medieval Latin'.
2 Ibid., move ll. 41--4 to after the heading `i.i Greek History
from 776 bc to 479 bc, with' (ibid., l. 32), from which `, with'
should be deleted, and insert afterwards:
`The following texts are prescribed for study in translation
(apart from those sections listed above), and candidates will be
expected to show knowledge of these texts in their answers.'
3 Ibid., p. 259, move ll. 14--17 to after the heading `i.2 Greek
History from 479 bc to 403 bc, with' (ibid., l. 1), from which
`, with' should be deleted, and insert afterwards:
`The following texts are prescribed for study in translation
(apart from those sections listed above), and candidates will be
expected to show knowledge of these texts in their answers.'
4 Ibid., p. 259, move ll. 35--42 to after the heading `i.3 Greek
History from 403 bc to 336 bc, with' (ibid., l. 18), from which
`, with' should be deleted, and insert afterwards:
`The following texts are prescribed for study in translation
(apart from those sections listed above), and candidates will be
expected to show knowledge of these texts in their answers.'
5 Ibid., p. 260, move ll. 14--20 to after the heading on 
p. 259  `i.4 Roman History from 240 bc to 134 bc, with' (ibid.,
p. 259, l. 43), from which `, with' should be deleted, and insert
afterwards:
`The following texts are prescribed for study in translation
(apart from those sections listed above), and candidates will be
expected to show knowledge of these texts in their answers.'
6 Ibid., p. 259, l. 45, replace `below' with `above'.
7 Ibid., p. 260, move ll. 30--45 to after the heading `i.5 Roman
History from 133 bc to 50 bc, with' (ibid., l. 21), from which
`, with' should be deleted, and insert afterwards:
`The following texts are prescribed for study in translation
(apart from those sections listed above), and candidates will be
expected to show knowledge of these texts in their answers.'
8 Ibid., p. 261, move ll. 21--31 to after the heading `i.6 Roman
History from 49 bc to ad 54, with' (ibid., p.260, 
l. 462), from which `, with' should be deleted, and insert
afterwards:
`The following texts are prescribed for study in translation
(apart from those sections listed above), and candidates will be
expected to show knowledge of these texts in their answers.'
9 Ibid., p. 262, move ll. 10--17 to after the heading on 
p. 261 `i.7 Roman History from ad 54 to ad 138, with' (ibid., p.
261, l. 32), from which `, with' should be deleted, and insert
afterwards:
`The following texts are prescribed for study in translation
(apart from those sections listed above), and candidates will be
expected to show knowledge of these texts in their answers.'
10 Ibid., p. 262, l. 49, replace `Demosthenes XI' with 
Demosthenes VI'.
11 Ibid., p. 265, l. 13, delete `1995' and substitute `1998'.
12 Ibid., p. 271, in ll. 13, 26, and 37, delete `Plutarch, On the
study of poetry 1--8' and substitute: `Plutarch, On the study of
poetry 1--9'.



(v) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 262, delete ll. 19--20, and
replace with `Candidates who offer two or more Greek or Roman
History period papers (i.e. two or more papers under A) may also
offer one of the following (one three-hour paper).'



(c) Honour Moderations in Classics

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000) 

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 30 delete l. 25 and
substitute: `10. Lysias 1, 10, 16, 24 and Demosthenes 54'.
2 Ibid., p. 40, delete l. 40 and substitute: `2. Lysias 1, 16,
24'.



(d) Preliminary Examination in Classics

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 70 delete l. 38 and
substitute: `(d) Lysias 1, 10, 16, 24 and Demosthenes 54'.
2 Ibid., p. 71, delete l. 38 and substitute: `(d) Lysias 1, 10,
16, 24 and Demosthenes 54'.



(e) M.Phil. in Greek and/or Roman History

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 618, ll. 8--9, delete `(with
detailed study of the original sources)'.
2 Ibid., ll. 14--15, delete `(with detailed study of the original
sources)'.
3 Ibid., l. 17, delete `(with detailed study of the original
sources)'.
4 Ibid., l. 23, delete `(with detailed study of the original
sources)'.
5 Ibid., l. 26, delete `(with detailed study of the original
sources)'.
6 Ibid., ll. 32--3, delete `(with detailed study of the original
sources)'.
7 Ibid., l. 36, delete `(with detailed study of the original
sources)'.
8 Ibid., ll. 41--2, delete `(with detailed study of the original
sources)'.
9 Ibid., l. 48, delete `(with detailed study of the original
sources)'.



(f) M.St. in Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 692, l. 24, replace `Friday
of the fifth week of Hilary Full Term' with `Friday of the first
week of Hilary Full Term'.
2 Ibid., in ll. 27--9, after `OX1 4BG' insert `.'.
3 Ibid., delete `to reach him by noon on the sixth week of the
Trinity Full Term in which the examination is to be taken.' and
substitute: `At least two essays must be submitted by noon on the
Thursday of the fifth week of Hilary Full Term; any others should
be submitted by noon on the Thursday of the sixth week of Trinity
Full Term. (Candidates may choose to submit a dissertation as
described in D below by noon on the Thursday of the fifth week
of 
Hilary Full Term instead of two essays.)'.
4 Ibid., pp. 692--3, delete ll. 45--3 and replace with:
`(b) Intermediate Greek. There will be one three-hour paper.
Candidates will be expected to be familiar with An Anthology of
Greek Prose, ed. D.A. Russell (Oxford University Press 1991),
Nos. 5, 9, 12, 15, 17, 18, 19, 23, 24, 26, 33, 34, 38, 40, 41,
43, 44, 47, 64, 66, 78, from which a selection of passages will
be set for translation.
Candidates will also be expected to translate from two of the
following texts: (i) Herodotus I. 1--94 [ed. Hude, OCT]; (ii)
Plutarch, Life of Antony 1--9, 23--36, 71--87 [ed. Pelling,
Cambridge University Press]; (iii) Euripides, Bacchae [ed.
Diggle, OCT]. Alternative texts for translation under this head
may be offered by agreement with the Graduate Studies Committee.'
5 Ibid., p. 693, delete ll. 14--15.
6 Ibid., l. 17, replace `III(c)1' with `III.9'.
7 Ibid., l. 19, replace `III(c)2' with `III.10'.
8 Ibid., after l. 29 insert:
`(ix) Computing and Classical Literary Studies. This option will
be examined by means of a project.'
9 Ibid., in l. 30 replace `(ix)' with `(x)'.
10 Ibid., delete ll. 33--8 and substitute:
`(i) Homer, Iliad. Passages for translation will be set from
books 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 16--18, 21--4.
(ii) Aeschylus, Oresteia. Passages for translation will be set
from Agamemnon, Eumenides.
(iii) Virgil, Aeneid. Passages for translation will be set from
books 1--8.
(iv) The iambic and lyric poetry of Horace. Passages for
translation will be set from Odes 1--4.
(v) Greek historiography, with Herodotus I and Thucydides VII.
Passages for translation will be set from Hdt. I. 1--119 and
Thus. VII. 27--end.
(vi) Cicero, de Oratore III and Orator, and Quintilian,
Institutio XII. Passages for translation will be set from Cicero
de Or. III. 1--148, 208--30; Cicero Orator 1--139; Quintilian
XII. Preface, 1--2 and 10'.
11 Ibid., l. 43, delete `or comment'.
12 Ibid., p. 694, l. 12, after `. . . is to be taken' insert:
`(unless it has been submitted in Hilary Term instead of two
pre-submitted essays as specified in 3 above).'.



(g) M.St. in Greek and/or Roman History

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 Ibid., p. 695, delete ll. 1--9 and substitute:
`A
(i) Elementary Greek. There will be one three-hour paper,
consisting of passages of Greek which will test knowledge of
Attic grammar and competence in translation from Greek into
English.
(ii) Intermediate Greek. There will be one three-hour paper.
Candidates will be expected to be familiar with An Anthology of
Greek Prose, ed. D.A. Russell (Oxford University Press 1991),
Nos. 5, 9, 12, 15, 17, 18, 19, 23, 24, 26, 33, 34, 38, 40, 41,
43, 44, 47, 64, 66, 78, from which a selection of passages will
be set for translation.
Candidates will also be expected to translate from (i) Herodotus
I. 1--94 [ed. Hude, OCT] and (ii) Plutarch, Life of Antony 1--9,
23--36, 71--87 [ed. Pelling, Cambridge University Press].
Alternative texts for translation under this head may be offered
by agreement with the Graduate Studies Committee.
(iii) Latin
(iv) French
(v) German
(vi) Italian
(vii) Any other language which the candidate has satisfied the
Graduate Studies Committee in Ancient History is relevant to
their other papers including any dissertation.'
2 Ibid., ll. 30--1, delete `(with detailed study of the original
sources)'.
3 Ibid., ll. 36--7, delete `(with detailed study of the original
sources)'.
4 Ibid., l. 39, delete `(with detailed study of the original
sources)'.
5 Ibid., l. 45, delete `(with detailed study of the original
sources)'.
6 Ibid., ll. 47--8, delete `(with detailed study of the original
sources)'.
7 Ibid., p. 696, ll. 3--4, delete `(with detailed study of the
original sources)'.
8 Ibid., l. 7, delete `(with detailed study of the original
sources)'.
9 Ibid., ll. 12--13, delete `(with detailed study of the original
sources)'.
10 Ibid., ll. 20--1, delete `(with detailed study of the original
sources)'.



(h) M.Phil. in Greek and/or Roman History

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 617, delete l. 32 and
substitute:
`(i) Intermediate Greek, as prescribed for the Master of Studies
in Greek and/or Roman History, Paper A (ii).'



13 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and Medieval and
Modern Languages

Honour School of Philosophy and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 475, l. 26, delete `four' and
substitute `three'.
2 Ibid., delete ll. 32--4.
14 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and Modern
History
Honour Moderations in Ancient and Modern History
With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)
In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 27, l. 24, after `History;' add
`or Historiography: Tacitus to Weber, as specified for Honour
Moderations in Modern History;'.



15 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and English
Language and Literature

Honour School of Classics and English

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 140, delete ll. 17--18 and
substitute:
`(g) The Reception of Greece and/or Rome in British Literature,
1830--1900
There will be four topics:
1. The Reception of Homer.
2. The Reception of Greek Drama (Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides,
Aristophanes).
3. The Reception of Virgil and Horace.
4. Roman Historical Fictions, with special reference to Lytton,
The Last Days of Pompeii, Macaulay, Lays of Ancient Rome, and
Pater, Marius the Epicurean.
The examination paper will contain questions on all four topics
in Section A, and a broad range of more general questions in
Section B. Candidates will be required to answer four questions,
including at least one from section B; they will be required to
show knowledge of the reception of either Greece (topics 1 and
2) or Rome (topics 3 and 4), but will have the opportunity to
show knowledge of both. English authors whose works may be
considered include Arnold, the Brownings, Pater, Ruskin, and
Tennyson.'



16 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and Medieval and
Modern Languages

Preliminary Examination in Philosophy and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 96, delete ll. 31--3 and
substitute:
`(1) Introduction to Philosophy (two papers of three hours each)
I: General Philosophy
This shall be studied in connection with Descartes' Meditations
on First Philosophy, trans. Cottingham, Cambridge University
Press. This paper, while not being confined to the detailed views
of Descartes, will be satisfactorily answerable by a candidate
who has made a critical study of the text. There will be no
compulsory question containing passages for comment.
II: (a) Moral Philosphy and (b) Logic
Candidates will be required to answer four questions, which may
be taken from section (a), section (b), or both. (a) Moral
Philosophy shall be studied in connection with Mill,
Utilitarianism. This section of the paper, while not being
confined to the detailed views of Mill, will be satisfactorily
answerable by a candidate who has made a critical study of the
text. There will be no compulsory question containing passages
for comment. (b) Logic: As specified for the regulations for the
Preliminary Examination for Philosophy, Politics and Economics.'



17 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and Modern
History

Honour School of Ancient and Modern History

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 126, ll. 31--2, delete `, as
specified for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores (i.10)',
and insert `. The following texts are prescribed for study in
translation; compulsory passages for comment will be set:
Arrian, Anab asis (Loeb, Brunt),
Diodorus Siculus xvi.89, 91--95; xvii--xx (Loeb),
Plutarch, Lives of Alexander, Eumenes and Demetrios 1--27 (Loeb),
M.N. Tod, Greek Historical Inscriptions II nos. 177, 182, 184--5,
190--2, 197, 202,
W. Dittenberger, Sylloge Inscriptionum Graecarum 312, 332
(translations of these inscriptions are available from the
Classics Office, 37 Wellington Square),
P. Harding, Translated Documents of Greece and Rome 2: From the
End of the Peloponnesian War to the Battle of Ipsus (Cambridge
University Press, 1985) nos. 102--40.
Optional passages in Greek for comment will be set from: Arrian,
Anabasis VII (Loeb, Brunt).'
2 Ibid., p. 126, ll. 33--4, delete `, as specified for the Honour
School of Literae Humaniores (i.11)', and insert `. The following
texts are prescribed for study in translation; compulsory
passages for comment will be set:
Sallust, Catilina (Loeb),
Cicero, In Verrem (Actio I) (Loeb),
De Imperio Cn. Pompei (Loeb),
Pro Sestio 97--137 (Loeb),
In M. Antonium Philippica XI (Loeb),
Pro Murena (Loeb),
In Catilinam IV (Loeb),
Epistulae ad Atticum i.1, 2, 13, 14, 16, 17, 19; ii.1, 2, 16, 18;
iv.1, 3, 5,; v.16 and 21; vi.1 and 2; vii.7, 9, 11; viii.3 and
11; ix.6A, 10, 11A, 18; x.8 (incl. A and B); xi.6; xii.21 and 40;
xiii.19 and 52; xiv.1, 12, 13, 13A and B; xv.1A and 11; xvi.7,
8 and 11 (Loeb),
Epistulae ad Familiares i.1, 8, 9; ii.12; iii.6 and 7; iv.4, 5;
v.1, 2, 7, 12; vi.6; vii.3, 5, 30; viii.1, 5, 6, 8, 13, 14, 16;
ix.16 and 17; x.24 and 28; xi.3, 20, 27, 28; xii. 3 and 5; xiii.1
and 9; xiv.4; xv.1, 4, 5, 6, 16, 19; xvi. 12 (Loeb),
Epistulae ad Quintum fratrem ii.3, 15; iii. 5 and 6 (Loeb),
Epistulae ad M. Brutum 17, 25 (Loeb),
Brutus 301--33 (Loeb),
De Oratore i.137--59, 185--203; ii.30--8 (Loeb),
Orator 113--20, 140--6 (Loeb),
De Re Publica i.1--18, 58--71 (Loeb),
De Legibus ii.1--33; iii.1--49  (Loeb),
Tusculanae Disputationes i.1--8  (Loeb),
De Divinatione ii.1--24; 136--50  (Loeb),
De Natura Deorum i.1--13; iii.1--10  (Loeb),
De Officiis i.1--60; ii.1--29, 44--60, 73--89 trans. Griffin and
Atkins (Cambridge), Cornelius Nepos, Atticus (Loeb).
Optional passages in Latin for comment will be set from: In
Catilinam I (Loeb), De Finibus I 1--12 (Loeb, pending Reynolds
OCT).'




18 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and Theology

M.Phil. in Philosophy and Theology

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 641, after l. 4 insert:
`The Examiners may award a Distinction for excellence in the
whole examination.'



19 Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences

(a) M.Sc. in Computation

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 741, ll. 48--9, delete `by the
end of Hilary Term' and substitute `no later than the first
Monday in Trinity Full Term'.
2 Ibid., p. 742, ll. 10--12, delete from `Candidates will' to `in
Computation'.



(b) M.Sc. in Geometry, Mathematical Physics, and 
Analysis

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 767, l. 50, delete `topics'
and substitute `topic'.
2 Ibid., p. 768, ll. 4--5, delete `and on the classwork
associated with topics in Schedule 1,'.
3 Ibid., delete l. 13 and substitute `lecturers before the 
beginning of Trinity Term in the year of examination.'
4 Ibid., l. 24, delete `differential equations on manifolds,'.
5 Ibid., delete ll. 29--34 and substitute:
`Lie groups and Lie algebras. Ideals, solvable and semisimple Lie
algebras. The Killing form, Cartan's criteria. Cartan
subalgebras, maximal tori. Root systems and their properties.
Weyl groups, Weyl chambers, and Dynkin diagrams. Outline of the
classification of simple Lie algebras over C. The classification
of compact Lie groups.'
6 Ibid., l. 40, delete `end of the Trinity Term' and substitute
`beginning of the Michaelmas Term'.
7 Ibid., l. 41, delete `preceding that'.



20 Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern 
Languages

Honour School of Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 394, delete ll. 1--5 and
substitute:
`(3) Quevedo, with a special study of "Infierno", "El mundo por
de dentro", "Sue–o de la muerte", in Sue–os y discursos (ed. J.O.
Crosby, Castalia); La cuna y la sepultura, and Espa–a defendida
(Preliminaries and Chapter 5 only), in Obras completas, I: Prosa
(ed. F. Buend’a, Aguilar); Poes’a varia (ed. J.O. Crosby,
C‡tedra), nos. 16--30, 35--53, 71--83, 97--106, 127--33, 160--1;
El busc—n (ed. D. Yndur‡in, C‡tedra).'
2 Ibid., delete ll. 13--17 and substitute:
`(1) Gil Vicente, with a special study of Auto da Alma, Auto da
Feira, Farsa de Ins Pereira, Farsa dos Almocreves, O Triunfo do
Inverno, Dom Duardos.'
3 Ibid., p. 397, after l. 32, add:
`(6) Clarice Lispector, with a special study of Perto do Cora‹o
Selvagem, A Paix‹o segundo G.H., A Hora da Estrela.'



21 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern 
Languages and English Language and Literature

Honour School of English and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 20 above).



22 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern 
Languages and Literae Humaniores

(a) Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages

(b) Honour School of Philosophy and Modern Languages



With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 20 above).



23 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern 
Languages and Modern History

Honour School of Modern History and Modern 
Languages

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 20 above).



24 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern 
Languages and Oriental Studies

Honour School of European and Middle Eastern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 20 above).



25 Board of the Faculty of Modern History

(a) M.St. in Modern History

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 704, l. 18, after `his' insert
`or her'.


2 Ibid., delete ll. 21--3 and insert:
`The syllabus shall comprise: I, two extended essays of up to
5,000 words; II, a written examination paper; and III, a
dissertation of up to 15,000 words.
Teaching may not be available for all periods and subjects every
year, and candidates are advised to enquire when they submit
their applications for admission.
I. Extended essays'.
3 Ibid., ll. 24, 38, and p. 705, l. 1, delete `one paper' and
substitute `two essays'.
4 Ibid., p. 705, l. 11, after `II' insert `An examination paper
in the area of study elected under I above'.
5 Ibid., after ll. 13, 15, insert a blank line.
6 Ibid., delete l. 18, and renumber (ii) and (iii) on ll. 19 and
20 as (i) and (ii) respectively.
7 Ibid., l. 20, delete `social'.
8 Ibid., p. 706, delete ll. 9--20 and insert:
`III Dissertation
A dissertation of not more than 15,000 words on a topic falling
within the scope of the period chosen by the candidate for the
extended essays under I above.
4. Candidates shall make written application for the approval of
the essay and dissertation topics, to reach the Chairman of
Examiners for the M.St. in Modern History, c/o The Clerk of the
Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than
Monday of the fifth week of Hilary Term. All applications should
be accompanied by a recommendation from the supervisor. Two
typewritten copies of the essays and of the dissertation must be
sent to the Chairman of Examiners at the address above, at least
fourteen days before the first day of the examination.'
9 Ibid., l. 21, before `Candidates' insert `5.'.
10 Ibid., l. 23, before `The examiners' insert `6.'.
11 Ibid., l. 25, before `A candidate' insert `7.'.
12 Ibid., ll. 27--9, delete `essay has been . . . that part of
the examination' and substitute:
`dissertation has been of satisfactory standard may re-submit the
same piece of work, while a candidate who has reached a
satisfactory standard on both the extended 
essays and written examination paper will not be required to
retake those parts of the examination.'



(b) Honour School of Modern History

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 332, l. 38, after `400)' insert:
`; Theses on Feuerbach; The German Ideology, chap. I (vol. I, pp.
13--80 of Marx and Engels, Selected Works, in 3 vols. (London
1969); The Civil War in France (ibid., vol. II, pp. 202--44)'.



26 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and 
English

Honour School of Modern History and English

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)
As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 25 (b) above).



27 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and 
Literae Humaniores

Honour School of Ancient and Modern History 

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)
1 As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 25 (b) above).
2 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 127, ll. 12--13, delete
`Chairman of the Board of the Faculty of Modern History'
and substitute `Chairman of the Examiners, Honour School of
Modern History'.



28 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and 
Medieval and Modern Languages

Honour School of Modern History and Modern 
Languages

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)
As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 25 (b) above).



29 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Social Studies

(a) Honour School of Modern History and Economics

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 25 (b) above).


(b) Honour School of Modern History and Politics

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)
As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 25 (b) above).



30 Board of the Faculty of Modern History 
Honour Moderations in Modern History 

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 53, delete ll. 35--6 and
substitute:

`Suger, The Deeds of Louis the Fat, tr. R.C. Cusimino and J.
Moorhead (Washington DC, 1992)'.
2 Ibid., delete ll. 39--40, and substitute:
`A Monk's Confessions. The Memoirs of Guibert of Nogent, tr. P.J.
Archambauld (Philadelphia, 1996)'.
3 Ibid., l. 49, delete `"Raoul of Cambrai" and'.
4 Ibid., after l. 15, insert:
`Raoul of Cambrai, ed. and tr. by S. Kay (Oxford, 1992) pp. 3--
329.'
5 Ibid., p. 55, delete ll. 33--5, and substitute:
`P. Duplessis Mornay, Vindiciae contra tyrannos, ed. and tr. G.
Garnett (Cambridge, 1994).'



31 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and English

Honour Moderations in Modern History and English

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

As for Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 30 above).



32 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Literae
Humaniores

Honour Moderations in  Ancient and Modern History 

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

As for Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 30 above).



33 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and  Modern
Languages

Preliminary Examination in Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)
As for Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 30 above).



34 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Social Studies

Honour Moderations in Modern History and Politics

With effect from 1 October 1999(for first examination in 2000)
As for Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 30 above).



35 Board of the Faculty of Music

Honour School of Music

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 404, l. 17, after `any part of
List C', insert:
`except that certain combinations may not be permitted from time
to time; these will be notified to candidates by the third week
of the Michaelmas Term in the academic year preceding that in
which the examination is to be taken'.



36 Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies

(a) Honour School of Oriental Studies

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)
In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 448, after l. 3 insert:
`(l) the formation and historical context of the Talmuds.'



(b) Preliminary Examination in Oriental Studies

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 94, l. 12, delete `1'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 14--20.



(c) Preliminary Examination in Oriental Studies (Persian)

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 95, delete ll. 9--13 and
substitute:

`(i) Prepared and unprepared texts for translation from Persian.
Texts: Selected Modern Texts, ed. Gurney.
(Copies are available from the Oriental Institute.)'



(d) M.St. 


With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 708, after l. 12 insert
`Requirements'.
2 Ibid., l. 15, delete `the'.
3 Ibid., l. 16, delete `third term' and substitute `Trinity
Term'.
4 Ibid., delete ll. 21--3 and substitute:
`2. The examination is in three parts. For the first part
candidates may choose between two options, mode A or B.'
5 Ibid., l. 40, after `D.Phil.' insert `, subject to the approval
of the faculty board.'.
6 Ibid., ll. 40--2, delete `discussing methods, including the
sources and methods of analysis to be used for the thesis.'
7 Ibid., p. 709, l. 1, delete `Each' and substitute `For the
second part of the examination each'.
8 Ibid., l. 3, delete `of the essay'.
9 Ibid., l. 5, delete `an' and substitute `the'.
10 Ibid., l. 12, delete `fourth' and substitute `sixth'.
11 Ibid., l. 12, delete `the third term' and substitute `Trinity
Term'.
12 Ibid., l. 14, delete `Papers' and substitute `Examination
papers'.
13 Ibid., l. 14, after `shall' insert `normally'.
14 Ibid., l. 14, delete `in accordance'.
15 Ibid., delete ll. 15--16 and substitute `in the eighth week
of Trinity Term'.
16 Ibid., l. 17, delete `Candidates' and substitute `For the
third part of the examination candidates'.
17 Ibid., l. 19, delete `the' and substitute `all'.
18 Ibid., l. 22, delete `the second term' and substitute 
`Hilary Term'.
19 Ibid., l. 26, after `written' insert `examination'.


(e) M.Phil. in Oriental Studies (Egyptology)

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 633, l. 13, after `board.' 
insert:
`One paper in the special field will be set as a take-home
 examination. The answer or answers for this examination should
be typed and presented in  proper scholarly form. Candidates will
be informed as to which paper is to be examined as a take-home
on Friday of Eighth Week of the Hilary Term preceding the Final
examination; conventions for the setting of the paper will be
released at the same time. The question paper for the take-home
examination will be distributed to candidates in the Oriental
Institute at 10 a.m. on Monday of First Week in Full Term in the
term in which the final examination is to be offered. The
completed examination must be handed in to the Clerk of the
Examination Schools no later than 12 noon on Monday of Second
Week. The completed paper should not exceed 5,000 words in
length.'



(f) M.Phil. in Oriental Studies (Modern Middle Eastern Studies)

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 634, l. 45, after
`commencement of the course:' insert `A candidate with an
intermediate level of proficiency (the equivalent of two to three
years of study) in Arabic may offer Advanced Arabic.'
2 Ibid., p. 635, l. 3, after `Arabic' insert `or Advanced
Arabic'.
3 Ibid., l. 4, delete `elementary'.
4 Ibid., after `comprehension' insert `(Persian currently is not
available.)'.
5 Ibid., l. 19, after `permitted' insert `(Persian currently is
not available); or, for candidates who offered Advanced Arabic
for the Qualifying Examination, one language paper in Arabic
based on prose composition, translation from Arabic to English,
and reading comprehension, for which the use of a dictionary will
be permitted;'



(g) M.St. in Modern Jewish Studies

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 706, l. 38, delete `:' and
substitute:
`. Candidates will be examined by written examination 
except that in lieu of a written examination in one subject a
candidate may elect to submit an essay of not more than 8,000
words on the subject of his or her choice. Such a subject must
be approved by the Committee for Graduate Studies of the Oriental
Studies Board not later than at its last meeting in Hilary Term
of the year in which the candidate takes the M.St. examination.
Two typed copies of the essay must be delivered to the Clerk of
the Schools on 
Friday of the Fifth Week of the Trinity Term in which the
examination is written.'
2 Ibid., delete ll. 39--45.
3 Ibid., p. 707, l. 2, delete `1948' and substitute `1945'.
4 Ibid., delete ll. 5--6 and substitute:
`(8) Introduction to Modern Jewish Sociology
(9) Yiddish literature and culture.
(10) Muslim-Jewish Relations in the Modern World.
(11) Modern Jewish Politics.'



37 Boards of the Faculties of Oriental Studies and 
Theology

(a) M.Phil. in Eastern Christian Studies


With immediate effect 

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 576, after l. 5, insert:

`III The examiners may award a Distinction for excellence in the
whole examination.'



(b) M.Phil. in Judaism and Christianity in the 
Graeco-Roman World

With immediate effect 

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 623, after l. 11, insert:
`III The Examiners may award a Distinction for excellence in the
whole examination.'



38 Board of the Faculty of Psychological Studies

D.Phil.

With immediate effect 

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 888, after l. 32 insert as new
paragraph:
`A set of scientific papers that concern a common subject may
exceptionally constitute an acceptable D.Phil. thesis, but only
if with the addition of an introduction, general discussion, and
general conclusions they constitute a continuous theme. Joint
papers may  not be included unless the supervisor certifies the
extent of the candidate's own contribution. Joint papers may be
included as appendices in a thesis.  Approval to submit a thesis
using this format should be sought from the faculty board (via
the Chairman, Psychological Studies Graduate Studies Committee,
c/o Graduate Studies Office, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD)
as soon as possible after admission and not later than the date
at which the appointment of examiners is requested.'



39 Board of the Faculty of Social Studies

Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 486, delete ll. 35--44 and
substitute:
`Risk, uncertainty and information; the firm and market
structures; welfare economics, externalities, public goods and
the sources of market failure; the distribution of 
income; trade and protection; applications of microeconomics to
public policy issues.
The paper will contain both theoretical and applied questions,
and candidates will be required to answer two questions of each
type. The topics to be examined under the rubric of applications
of microeconomics to public policy issues will be announced by
the chairman of the Sub-faculty of Economics not later than
Trinity Term each year for the examination two years later.'



40 Board of the Faculty of Theology

(a) Master of Theology

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 792--3, delete ll. 48--9 on
p. 792 and ll. 1--11 on p. 793, and insert:
`1. The title of the proposed dissertation, together with a
summary, must be submitted for approval by the Master of Theology
Studies Committee in the final term of Part I of the course. The
committee shall approve a supervisor for the writing of the
dissertation.
2. The dissertation (two copies) shall be submitted to the
Chairman of Examiners, M.Th. in Applied Theology, c/o the Clerk
of the Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG, not later than 12
noon on the Friday before 1 October following the ninth term in
which a candidate's name has been on the register if the course
is being taken full-time, or the twelfth term if part-time.
3. The thesis must be printed or typed on one side of the paper
only, with a margin of 3 to 3.5 cms on the left-hand edge of each
page, and must be securely and firmly bound in either hard or
soft covers. Loose-leaf binding is not acceptable.
4. The completed dissertation must be accompanied by 
a signed statement by the candidate that it is his or her own
work except where otherwise indicated. This statement must be
submitted separately in a sealed envelope 
addressed to the Chairman of Examiners for the M.Th. in Applied
Theology at the above address.
5. All candidates are required to present themselves for a viva
voce examination unless individually dispensed by the examiners.
6. Certain successful theses, on the recommendation of the
examiners, should be deposited in the Theology Faculty Library.
The library copy of the thesis must be in a permanently fixed
binding, drilled and sewn, in a stiff board case in library
buckram, in a dark colour, and lettered on the spine with the
candidate's name and initials, the degree, and the year of
submission.'



(b) M.Phil. in Theology

With immediate effect 

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 666, after l. 48, insert:
`The Examiners may award a Distinction for excellence in the
whole examination.'



41 Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art

Final Examination in Fine Art

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)
1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 533, l. 2, after `A portfolio
of drawings' insert `in any medium'.
2 Ibid., l. 7, delete `Either, (a) to' and substitute `To'.
3 Ibid., l. 19, delete `,' and substitute `.'.
4 Ibid., delete ll. 20--1.
5 Ibid., in l. 25, delete `(a)'.
6 Ibid., in ll. 42--5 delete `Any candidate who . . . of these
regulations.'



42 Standing Committee for EEM and Related Schools

(a) Honour School of Engineering, Economics, and 
Management

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first Part I examination in 
2000 and Part II examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 183, l. 9, delete `M' and
substitute `paper M1'.
2 Ibid., delete ll. 40--3 and substitute:
`M1 Introduction to Management
Optional papers
The list, from which papers in Group M may be selected, and the
syllabus or each, shall be approved by the Sub-
faculty of Management Studies and published in the Gazette by the
Chairman of the Standing Committee not later than the end of the
Trinity Full Term of the academic year preceding the year of the
examination of Part II.'
3 Ibid., p. 184, after l. 28 insert:
`  Candidates for paper M1 will be required to submit a case
study essay, not exceeding 2,000 words in length. The essay shall
be submitted to the Chairman of Examiners, Honour School of
Engineering, Economics, and Management, c/o Clerk of Schools,
Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG not later than
noon on Friday of the fourth week of the Trinity Term of the year
in which the Part I examination is taken. The material must be
the candidate's own work and the candidate shall sign a
certificate to this effect. This certificate shall be placed in
a sealed envelope bearing the candidate's examination number and
presented with the essay.'
4 Ibid., l. 34, delete `M2, M3, M4, and Group C' and substitute
`from the list of optional M papers published annually and from
Group C,'.
5 Ibid., p. 186, delete ll. 7--40 and substitute:
`M1 An Introduction to Management
Historical context; organisational behaviour; strategic
management; technology and operations management; accounting;
finance; marketing.'



(b) Pass School of Engineering, Economics, and 
Management

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first Part I examination in 
2000 and Part II examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 187, ll. 9--10, delete
`(Organisational Behaviour and Human Resource Management)' and
substitute `(Introduction to Management)'.



(c) Honour School of Materials, Economics, and 
Management

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first Part I examination in
2000 and Part II examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 282, l. 24, delete
`Organisational Behaviour and Human Resource Management' and
substitute `Introduction to Management'.
2 Ibid., after l. 41 insert:
`  Candidates for paper M1 will be required to submit a case
study essay, not exceeding 2,000 words in length. The essay shall
be submitted to the Chairman of Examiners, Honour School of
Materials, Economics, and Management, c/o Clerk of Schools,
Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG not later than
noon on Friday of the fourth week of the Trinity Term of the year
in which the Part I examination is taken. The material must be
the candidate's own work and the candidate shall sign a
certificate to this effect. This certificate shall be placed in
a sealed envelope bearing the candidate's examination number and
presented with the essay.'
3 Ibid., p. 283, delete from `M2' on l. 20 to `Management' on l.
22 and substitute `or one of the M papers, as specified for Part
II of the Honour School of Engineering, Economics, and
Management, other than M1'.
4 Ibid., delete ll. 23--31.



43 Standing Committee for Economics and 
Management

Preliminary Examination in Economics and 
Management

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 74, delete ll. 13--18 and
substitute:
`Mathematics: multivariate calculus (total and partial
differentiation and integration of functions of one or more
variables), constrained and unconstrained optimisation, linear
algebra (basic vector and matrix operations), applications to
economics (including utility and profit 
maximisation), applications to management (including planning,
scheduling, and production).
Statistics: descriptive statistics (presentation of data, 
measures of central tendency and dispersion), statistical
inference (elementary probability theory and probability
distributions, sampling estimation and hypothesis testing),
correlation and regression (correlation coefficients,
correlation and causality, ordinary least squares regressions,
statistical inference of simple regression equations),
applications of the above topics in economics or management,
further applications in statistics for management (including
methods for categorical variables and analysis of variance).'



44 Committee for the School of Management Studies
Master of Business Administration

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, (as amended by publication in the
Gazette, Vol. 128, 13 November 1997, p. 368) p. 798, 
l. 29, delete `The first' and substitute `Each'.
2 Ibid., ll. 33--4, delete `and quantitative methods. The second
paper will be of one hour's duration. Questions will be set on'
and substitute `, quantitative methods and'.
3 Ibid., l. 36, delete `paper and substitute `papers'.
4 Ibid., l. 37, delete `. Its' and substitute`and'.
5 Ibid., l. 42, delete `at' and substitute `before'.
6 Ibid., p. 799, l. 7, delete `integrative project' and
substitute `New Business Development project'.
7 Ibid., l. 8, delete `end of Hilary Term. Two' and substitute
`beginning of Trinity Term. Three'.
8 Ibid., l. 38, delete `two' and substitute `three'.
9 Ibid., p. 801, l. 29, delete `Entrepreneurship and Innovation'
and substitute `Innovation and Entrepreneurship'.




45 Committee for Comparative Philology and General Linguistics

(a) M.Phil. in General Linguistics and Comparative Philology

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 611, after l. 4 insert:
`9. The examiners may award a Distinction for excellence in the
whole examination.'



(b) M.St. in General Linguistics and Comparative 
Philology

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 692, after l. 9 insert:
`12. The examiners may award a Distinction for excellence in the
whole examination.'





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 23 April 1998: Colleges<br />

Colleges, Halls, and Societies


Contents of this section:

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issue



OBITUARIES


Christ Church

JACOB MISHA BLACK, MA, 1974; commoner 1958.

ROBERT JOHN BOUFFLER, mid-1980s; commoner 1968.

EUGENE-XAVIER C.W.P. DE LA CHAPELLE (otherwise known
as E.-X.C.W.P. Fletcher), MA; commoner 1960.

IAN ALLEN GRANT GILLIES, MBE, MA, 2 October 1997;
scholar 1940. Aged 75.

EDWARD BIGELOW JOLLIFFE, QC, 18 March 1998; Rhodes
Scholar 1931; aged 89.

JOHN ARTHUR BERNARD KEELING, DFC, MA, August 1997;
commoner 1940. Aged 74.

ANTHONY RALPH WOLRYCHE STANSFELD, MA, 7 March 1998;
scholar 1932.

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section



Corpus Christi College

CHARLES WILLIAM MAGUIRE, MA, 15 April 1995; commoner
1952–5. Aged 61.

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section



Hertford College

KAREN AVENOSO, 25 February 1998; Rhodes Scholar 1988.

RODERICK NEIL CURTIS BENTLEY, 6 June 1998; commoner
1938.

THE REVD FRANCIS JOHN CORNISH, January 1998; commoner
1933.

COLIN MILNER, 1998; commoner 1984.

JOHN GRAHAM PARRISH, April 1997; commoner 1944.

RICHARD SALWEY, 28 April 1996; commoner 1930.

NORMAN THOMAS WILLIAMS, 28 February 1998; commoner
1943.

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section



Lincoln College

CHARLES STEWART FAY, 4 March 1998; commoner 1951–4.
Aged 66.

JOHN RICHARD FLETCHER, 16 December 1997; commoner
1944. Aged 72.

THE HON. BASIL KENWORTHY, TD, February 1998; commoner
1939–48. Aged 77.

JOHN ROGER B. MOSER, 9 February 1998; commoner
1931–4. Aged 84.

JOHN SINCLAIR SHIELDS, 23 December 1997; commoner
1922–7. Aged 94.

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section



Magdalen College

DAVID BECK, 30 January 1997; commoner 1934–7. Aged
80.

KYRIE ALAN CLARK, 26 December 1997; commoner
1928–31. Aged 88.

PETER ROBIN DUGDALE, 9 March 1998; commoner
1946–9. Aged 70.

CHRISTOPHER ST JOHN ELLIS, 18 December 1997; commoner
1939–40. Aged 77.

GERALD NEIL ENGLEFIELD, 13 March 1998; commoner
1989–93. Aged 28.

JAMES WITHAM HITCHON, September 1997; commoner
1943–7. Aged 72.

REGINALD ALFRED LEEDER, 1 March 1998; commoner
1956–61. Aged 62.

FREDERICK PETER MALCOLM HURDIS-JONES, 1997; demy
1941–2. Aged 74.

SIR GEORGE MIDDLETON, 12 February 1998; Doncaster
Scholar 1928–31. Aged 88.

WILLOUGHBY ROLLO NORMAN, November 1997; commoner
1928–31. Aged 88.

NICHOLAS ROBERT PHILLIPS, 10 November 1997; commoner
1978–81. Aged 38.

AUBREY CLARE ROBINSON, 8 December 1997; commoner
1922–5. Aged 94.

MALCOLM HARVEY SMYTH, 2 January 1998; Minor
Exhibitioner 1944–5 and 1946–9. Aged 72.

BRUCE STEVENSON, 12 April 1997; commoner 1958–61.
Aged 57.

ROBERT RYNN STEWART, 30 September 1997; commoner
1935–9. Aged 80.

ROBERT HENRY STEWART THOMPSON, 16 January 1998; senior
demy 1934. Aged 85.

JOHN ERNEST TINNE, 13 November 1996; commoner
1932–3. Aged 83.

JOHN TURNER, 21 September 1997; commoner 1941–3
and 1946–8. Aged 74.

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section



St Edmund Hall

JOSEPH DENIS MILBURN BELL, MA, 25 July 1997; state
scholar 1939–41 and 1945–6. Aged 77.

BRIAN ROBERT FEATHERSTONE, MA, 16 February 1998; commoner
1954–5 and 1962–3. Aged 64.

HERBERT EDWARD POPE, MA, 21 February 1998; exhibitioner
1936–9. Aged 80.

THE REVD DOUGLAS RENE TASSELL, MA, 5 March 1998; commoner
1934–8. Aged 82.

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section



St Hugh's College

DOROTHEA MARY LAYTON, 1 November 1997; commoner
1929–43. Aged 88.

MONDA MATHEWS, 16 March 1998; commoner 1923–6.
Aged 94.

PATRICIA TYLER THOMPSON, 30 January 1998; commoner
1940–3. Aged 76.

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section



MEMORIAL SERVICE


St John's College

A Memorial Service for THE RT. HON. LORD FREDERICK SYDNEY
DAINTON will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 9 May, in
the chapel, St John's College. Tea will be served
afterwards in the college hall.

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section



ELECTIONS


All Souls College

Visiting Fellowships

The following will be in residence for Trinity Term 1998
as Visiting Fellows at All Souls College:

PROFESSOR J. ALEXANDER, New York University

PROFESSOR V. AMBEGAOKAR, Cornell University

PROFESSOR A. BOSWORTH, University of Western Australia

PROFESSOR J. DE VRIES, University of California,
Berkeley

PROFESSOR I. HACKING, University of Toronto

PROFESSOR T. MARMOR, Yale University

PROFESSOR P. RHODES, University of Durham

PROFESSOR L. SKLAR, University of Michigan

PROFESSOR P. VAN PARIJS, Université catholique
de Louvain

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section



Corpus Christi College

To an Honorary Fellowship (with immediate
effect):

PETER LAMPL, MA (MBA London)

To an Official Fellowship and Tutorship in Philosophy
(with effect from 1 October 1998):

JOHN TASIOULAS,
D.PHIL. (BA, LL.B. Melbourne), Lecturer in Jurisprudence,
University of Glasgow

To a fixed-term Teaching Fellowship in Politics (with
effect from 1 October 1998):

ROBIN MICHAEL ARCHER,
MA, D.PHIL. (BA Sydney), Teaching Fellow of the college

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section



Nuffield College

To Honorary Fellowships:

THE RT. HON. LORD BINGHAM OF CORNHILL, MA

PROFESSOR MARTIN FELDSTEIN, MA, D.PHIL.

THE RT. HON. LORD HURD OF WESTWELL, CH, CBE

MR SUDHIR MULJI, MA

VISCOUNT RUNCIMAN, FBA (MA Cambridge)

PROFESSOR AMARTYA SEN, FBA (MA, PH.D. Cambridge)

SIR ADRIAN SWIRE, MA

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section


To Norman Chester Senior Research Fellowships:

PROFESSOR MICHAEL KEATING, MA (PH.D. CNAA), University of
Western Ontario

PROFESSOR PENELOPE CORFIELD, MA (PH.D. London), Royal
Holloway and Westfield College, London

To a Guardian Research Fellowship:

MR DAVID
WALKER (MA Cambridge, MA Sussex), The
Independent

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section


To Prize Research Fellowships:

MR TARANI CHANDOLA, M.PHIL., Nuffield College

MR ALASDAIR CROCKETT (M.PHIL. Cranfield), University
of Leicester

DR CÉCILE FABRE (MA York), Maison
Française

MR DAVID MYATT (B.SC. London), Nuffield College

DR KARMA NABULSI, D.PHIL., St Peter's College

MR CHRISTOPHER WALLACE (M.SC. London), Nuffield
College

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section


To Non-stipendiary Research Fellowships:

DR JOUNI KUHA, MA (PH.D. Southampton), Nuffield College

DR JONATHAN TEMPLE, D.PHIL. Nuffield College

DR GAVIN CAMERON, MA, D.PHIL., Nuffield College

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section



Oriel College

To a Scholarship (from MT 1997):

MISS ANNA MARIE
UPTON, formerly of Leicester Grammar School

To a Scholarship (from TT 1998):

CHRISTOPHER
RICHARD YATES, formerly of Oundle School

To an Exhibition (from TT 1998):

MATTHEW CHARLES
COOK, formerly of Marlborough College

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section



St Anne's College

To a Fulford Junior Research Fellowship:

DR
WILLIAM ALLAN, D.PHIL. (MA Edinburgh)

To an Anna Biegun Warburg Junior Research
Fellowship:

DR PETER KILLWORTH (BA, PH.D. Cambridge)

To an Ioma Evans-Pritchard Junior Research
Fellowship:

MARK LEOPOLD, MA, M.ST.

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section



NOTICES


All Souls College


Visiting Fellowships 1999–2000

All Souls College proposes to elect a number of Visiting Fellows,
for periods up to one year, for the academic year October 1999
to June 2000. These fellowships are intended to enable their
holders to carry out study and research in Oxford, and to
participate in the academic life of the University. Visiting
Fellowships are open in all subjects, and to both men and women.

Preference will be given to candidates who will be between the
ages of thirty-five and sixty-five during the relevant academic
year. Applications will be considered from staff of any
university or other institution of higher learning, and from
other persons who wish to work on problems that can be studied
with the help of the facilities offered by the college and
University. In making its final choice, the college will give
weight to academic quality, the interest and feasibility of the
research project, and to the advantages candidates might derive
from being in Oxford.

Visiting Fellows will be entitled to accommodation, a study in
college, and lunches and dinners without charge. Limited
financial subvention may also be offered in exceptional
circumstances. In certain cases (not at present expected to
exceed one in each year) such assistance may be extended to
include the cost of replacement teaching at the Visiting Fellow's
own institution. Any candidate
desiring to take advantage of this provision should make specific
application to the Dean of Visiting Fellows preferably some time
before the general closing date given below.

Application forms and further particulars may be obtained from
the Dean of Visiting Fellows, to whose secretary all applications
should be addressed (All Souls College, Oxford OX1 4AL).
Applications must be received by 15 September.

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section



Brasenose College and St Anne's
College


Stipendiary Lecturership in Ancient
History

Brasenose and St Anne's Colleges wish to appoint a twelve-hour
Stipendiary Lecturer in Ancient History for one year from 1
October 1998. In certain circumstances renewal for a further year
may be possible. The person appointed, to whom an office will be
made available, will be expected to teach Greek and Roman History
for the Honour Schools of Literae Humaniories and Ancient and
Modern History, to participate in entrance procedures, and to
assist generally in the running of both Schools in collaboration
with the relevant tutors at both colleges.

Salary: £14,329 per annum. Further particulars, including
details of pension provision and lunch and dining rights, may be
obtained from the Senior Tutor, Brasenose College, Oxford OX1 4AJ
(telephone: Oxford (2)77823), to whom applications should be sent
by Friday, 8 May. Applicants should arrange for three referees
to write direct to the Senior Tutor by the same date.

Brasenose and St Anne's Colleges are equal opportunities
employers.

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section



Corpus Christi College


Corpus Christi Visiting Fellowship(s)
1999–2000

Corpus Christi College proposes, if suitable candidates offer
themselves, to elect to a Corpus Christi Visiting Fellowship for
each term in the academic year 1999–2000. The fellowship is
intended for persons of high academic distinction, either from
abroad or from the UK, who wish to pursue academic study and
research as a member of the college. It is tenable for one, two,
or three terms during the year. Preference will be given to
candidates whose work is close to the academic interests of one
or more
fellows of the college.

A Visiting Fellow is entitled to free luncheon and dinner during
all periods when the kitchen is open to full membership of the
senior common room. The college hopes to be able to provide the
fellow with shared study accommodation.

Applicants should write to the President's Secretary, Corpus
Christi College, Oxford OX1 4JF, before 1 November, enclosing a
curriculum vitae, a list of publications, a
programme of work, and the names of three referees. It
is their responsibility to ask their referees to send their
references direct by the same date.

The college exists to promote excellence in education and
research and is actively committed to the principle of equality
of opportunity for all suitable qualified candidates.
xxx

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section



Hertford College


Appointment of EFL Teachers

EFL teachers are required, to teach parties of visiting Japanese
students, for various periods from 18 July to
4 September. Minimum requirements are the RSA
Preparatory Certificate, plus experience.

A fee of £1,100, plus free accommodation, will be
offered for a four-week course.

Letters of application should be sent to the Conference
Secretary, Hertford College, Catte Street, Oxford OX1 3BW, by
Thursday, 30 April.

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section



Jesus College


Appointment of Junior Dean

Jesus College proposes to appoint a Junior Dean for a
period of one year from 1 October 1998, with the possibility of
renewal for a second year. The Junior Dean will be required to
reside in college, free of charge, and will also receive free
meals at the common table, as well as a stipend which, last year,
was £1,035 per annum. There will be a small inflationary
increase for 1998--9. The Junior Dean will assist the Dean and
other college officers in the smooth running of the college.
Applicants, who may be men or women, must be graduates, and it
is expected that they will be pursuing advanced study or
research.

The main responsibility for decanal matters in the college rests
with the Dean, who is a fellow of the college. The current
incumbent is Dr W.R. Moore, who is a Fellow and Tutor in
Engineering Science. In particular, the Junior Dean will normally
be expected to be in college every night during the eight weeks
of full term, both to act in a disciplinary role if necessary,
but also to provide the first point of contact within the college
in case of an emergency occurring during the night. It is a
statutory requirement that a fellow, lecturer, or Junior Dean be
in the college every night from 10.30 p.m. to 7 a.m.; it would,
however, be possible, from time to time, for the Junior Dean to
have a night off by prior arrangement with one of the resident
fellows who could fulfil that requirement.
Applications, including a full curriculum vitae,
should be sent to the Principal, Jesus College, Oxford OX1 3DW,
by Friday, 22 May. Two referees should be asked to write
direct to the Principal by the same date. If the applicant is a
registered graduate student, one of the referees must be the
applicant's university supervisor.

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section



Linacre College


A.J. Hosier Studentship

The Board of Management of the A.J. Hosier Fund proposes to make
election to an A.J. Hosier Studentship which will be tenable at
Linacre College for the academic year 1998–9 and will have
a maximum value of £3,500. Candidates must be honours
graduates of a university in the United Kingdom and be citizens
of the UK, and must have commenced reading or intend to commence
reading in October 1998 for an advanced degree at Oxford in one
of the following subjects: husbandry; agricultural economics or
agricultural statistics; applied agricultural science.

Applications should be made by letter to the Principal, Linacre
College, Oxford OX1 3JA. Candidates are asked to submit a
curriculum vitae and to ask two referees to write
diectly to the Principal by the closing date for applications,
31 May.

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section



Magdalen College


Fixed-term (six-year) Tutorial
Fellowship in Biology

Applications are invited for a fixed-term Tutorial Fellowship in
Biology, tenable from 1 October 1998. The successful candidate
is expected to hold a position in one of the Biology Departments
in the University, such as a Departmental Lecturership or
Postdoctoral Fellowship. The Tutorial Fellowship will be for so
long as the successful candidate holds a position in Oxford, up
to a maximum of six years. The person appointed will have an
active research programme and will be expected to teach for six
hours a week in aspects of animal biology relevant to the degree
course in Biological Sciences. The salary will be according to
age on the scale up to £4,537 per annum, and additional
college allowances will be available.

Further particulars are obtainable from the President's
Secretary, Magdalen College, Oxford OX1 4AU (telephone: Oxford
(2)76101, fax: (2)86730, e-mail: barbara.gordon@
magd.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for completed applications and
references is 5 June.
Magdalen College is an equal opportunities employer.

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section



Mansfield College


Appointment of Junior Dean (Dale
Building)

Applications are invited from graduate students for the Junior
Deanship in the college's fifty-room annexe in St Clement's, for
the academic year 1998–9. A free spacious self-contained
flat, assistance with `on-call' duties, and a £500 per annum
allowance, are offered.

Further particulars may be obtained from the College
Secretary's office (telephone Oxford (2)70982). Applications (in
triplicate) may be made by forwarding a curriculum
vitae
to the College Secretary, Mansfield College, Oxford
OX1 3TF, by the closing date of Saturday, 9 May.
Research Opportunity in Japan

As a result of collaboration between the Oxford Centre for the
Environment, Ethics, and Society, and Kanto Gakuin School
Corporation, the latter has available, free of charge, a research
office (with state-of-the-art computing and communications
facilities) with good low-cost living accommodation for a
visiting scholar for periods of up to three months. The
accommodation is located at Kanto Gakuin's university law school,
forty-five minutes from Tokyo by train. No emolument is available
and visitors will need to meet travel, board, and other
incidental costs. Alternative facilities may be available at
Kanto Gakuin University's main campus in Yokohama.

Further details may be obtained from the Administrator, OCEES,
Mansfield College, Oxford OX1 3TF (telephone: Oxford (2)70886,
e-mail: ocees@mansf.ox.ac.uk).

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Pembroke College


Appointment of Junior Dean

Pembroke College proposes to appoint a Junior Dean for a period
of one year from 1 October 1998, with the possibility of renewal
for a second year. The Junior Dean will be
required to reside in college, free of charge, and will also
receive free meals at high table and a stipend (under review) of
£1,100 per annum, which will be additional to any other
income which the appointee may receive. The
Junior Dean will assist the Dean and other college officers in
the smooth running of the college. Applicants must be graduates,
and it is expected that they will be pursuing
advanced study or research.

Applications, including a full curriculum vitae
and an outline of the academic work which the applicant proposes
to undertake, should reach the Dean, Pembroke College, Oxford OX1
1DW, from whom further particulars may be obtained, by Monday,
27 April. Applicants should inform the Dean of the names,
addresses, and telephone numbers of three referees and arrange
for their referees to write direct to the Dean by Monday, 27
April. If the applicant is a registered graduate student, one of
the referees must be the applicant's university supervisor.

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section



St Hilda's College


Tutorial Fellowship in English
Literature

St Hilda's College proposes to elect an Official Fellow and Tutor
in English Literature, with effect from 1 October 1998, or as
soon as possible thereafter.

Only women are eligible to hold fellowships at St Hilda's
College. This is a provision of the college statutes made under
the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923, and remains
lawful by virtue of section 5 (3) of the Employment Act 1989.

The fellow will hold the title and undertake the full
duties of a University (CUF) Lecturer. No election will be made
by the college unless the University's English Board and General
Board of the Faculties confirm their willingness to confer this
title. No separate application for the title is required. This
is intended to be a permanent
appointment.

Applications are invited from women specialising in English
literature from 1509 to 1832. Expertise in one of
the following areas would be advantageous: Shakespeare;
Renaissance drama; Restoration drama.

Further particulars and a cover sheet for applications should
be obtained from: Miss Fiona Nicks, Academic Office, St Hilda's
College, Oxford OX4 1DY (telephone:
Oxford (2)76815, fax: (2)76816, e-mail: college.office@
st-hildas.ox.ac.uk, Web site: http://www.sthildas.ox.ac.uk).
The closing date for applications (ten copies, or one only from
applicants abroad) is Friday, 8 May. Applicants should send their
applications to the Principal of St Hilda's, c/o Miss Fiona
Nicks, and also ask their referees to write directly to the
Principal, c/o Miss Fiona Nicks, by
that date. It is expected that interviews will be held on
Saturday, 13 June.

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section



St Peter's College


Stipendiary Lecturership in Politics

St Peter's College invites applications for a six-hour
stipendiary lecturership in Politics, in the first instance, for
one year from 1 October 1998. St Peter's admits about ten
students a year to read PPE and also admits about eight students
to take PPE courses as part of its programme for visiting
students from the USA. The lecturer will work with Mr Gavin
Williams, the Tutor in Politics, and Dr Henrietta Leyser, Fellow
for International Students.

The lecturer will be required to teach the PPE Final Honour
School papers `International Relations' and `International
Relations in the Era of the Cold War'. He or she will also be
responsible for arranging teaching for Visiting Students taking
options in politics and international relations. An ability to
contribute to the teaching of a part of the PPE Preliminary
course `Introduction to Politics' and/
or `International Relations in the Era of Two World Wars' or
other options for PPE finals would be an advantage.

Applicants should submit six copies of their applications and
of their curriculum vitae to the College Secretary,
St Peter's College, Oxford OX12 2DL, by Friday, 15 May. They
should ask two referees to send references directly to the
College Secretary by that date.

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Somerville College


Six-hour Lecturership in Inorganic
Chemistry

The college proposes, if a suitable candidate applies, to
appoint a six-hour Lecturer in Inorganic Chemistry for
the academic year 1998–9, beginning on 1 October 1998.
Ability to teach the range of subjects required for the
Final Honours papers Inorganic Chemistry I and 2 and
Advanced Inorganic chemistry is essential.

The appointment will start on point one (£7,136) or point
two (£7,580) on an incremental scale, depending on
experience. The lecturer will be expected to teach six hours a
week.

Applicants should provide a curriculum vitae and
should indicate which options they would be willing to teach.
They should give the names of two referees whom they should ask
to write directly to the Senior Tutor.

Applications and references must reach the Senior Tutor,
Somerville College, Oxford OX2 6HD, by Friday, 15 May.
Somerville College is an equal opportunities employer.

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section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 23 April 1998: Advertisements<br />

Advertisements


Contents of this section:



How to
advertise in the Gazette

"../../../stdg/conds.htm">

Terms and conditions of
acceptance of advertisements

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issue



Study-day

The Post-Modern University: Research,
Teaching, and Application; study-day, 9 June, St Anne's
College. Chair: Michael Scott, Pro-Vice-Chancellor, De
Montfort University. Speakers include Brian Fender, Chief
Executive HEFCE. Details: Donald Tranter, Secretary,
Higher Education Foundation, Harris Manchester College.

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Tuition Offered

Summer Arts Course for 10 to 14
year-olds; range of media inc. photography, ceramics,
painting, drawing, computer graphics. Suitable for all
levels---beginner to advanced. Small groups and
experienced tutors. d'Overbroek's College, 1 Park Town,
Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 310000.

Piano lessons: experienced teacher.
Adults and children. All grades. Beginners welcome. Miss
P. Read, BA (Hons.), LRAM. Jericho. Tel.: Oxford 510904.

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Services Offered

Wise Owl Educational Software: the only
UK children's shareware library, est. 1991. Specialising
in educational programs and games (DOS, Windows 3.1 and
95) for all PCs (XTs to Pentiums). 800+ titles for ages
2--16+. 3.5" and 5.25" media. Free newsletter and advice.
Tel.: 01235 529808 (Mon.--Fri., 9 a.m.--5 p.m.), e-mail
wiseowlsw@aol.com, Web site
http://members.aol.com/wiseowlsw/index.html.

Simple Kitchens and Furniture: kitchens,
free-standing and fitted furniture made to suit you.
Using traditional furniture-making techniques and the
finest materials, our work is built to last. Our
friendly, personal service is second to none. Contact
Thomas Heidkamp, tel.: 01844 353338, for a no-obligation
consuatation.

Afghan carpets: 30 per cent off our
usual modest prices for a limited period to reduce large
stocks of these elegant traditional pieces in
elephant's-foot design. All are 25--50 years old, in a
full range of sizes from 2.54 x 1.97 up to 3.93 x 3.06.
Any colour as long as it's red, ie. pale claret, deep
burgundy, pink, rose, scarlet, or crimson ground. From
only £499 per piece. Frederick and Sudabeh Hine,
tel.: Oxford 559396 (North Oxford).

J. A. Neil Building, established in
Oxford since 1981. Construction, restorations, and new
projects using traditional materials. Quality
stonewalling, masonry, brickwork, paving, and repointing.
Tel.: Oxford 761581.

Persian carpets imported directly from
Iran; new, old, and antique; all sizes. We sell
handknotted Eastern rugs, runners, and cushions of every
description, and offer expert repairs and safe cleaning.
Gallery/warehouse usually open 10 a.m.--6 p.m.,
Mon.--Sat., but ring first if you can. Frederick and
Sudabeh Hine, Old Squash Court, 16 Linton Road, North
Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 559396.

Town and Country Trees: professional
tree surgery, orchard and shrub pruning, planting, and
hedges. Quality work at competitive prices. Fully
insured. Locally based. For a free quotation, please call
Paul Hodkinson. Tel.: 01993 811115.

Cross Counties Counselling and
Psychotherapy Service. Offices: Oxford,
Stratford-upon-Avon, Cirencester. Individuals, couples,
families, groups. Psychoanalytically trained,
holistically oriented, eclectic approach; specialising in
trauma (PTSD), depression, life crisis, relationships,
stress, anxiety, eating disorders, abuse, school-related
problems. Free half-hour consultation with treatment (see
brochure). Barbara A. Martino BA, MSW, CTS,
(licensed/trained UK, USA), tel.: 01386 438010.

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Domestic Services

Wolfson College Day Nursery. Looking for
high quality childcare? Our purpose-built and
well-equipped Day Nursery has had a glowing report from
OFSTED. The nursery is an approved provider within the
national scheme for early years education, and is open
Mon.--Fri., 47 weeks a year. Staff are NNEB qualified. We
have full day (9--5), morning (9--1), and afternoon
(1--5) places for children aged 3 years and over,
available immediately. For further details and
application forms, please apply to the Domestic Bursar's
Secretary, Wolfson College, Linton Road, Oxford OX2 6UD.
Tel.: Oxford (2)74071, fax: (2)74138, e-mail:
peter.luff@wolfson.ox.ac.uk.

Paulina (19), a first-year student of
economics at Prague and daughter of Prof. V. Pták
of Prague University, would appreciate spending her
summer vacation (22 July--31 Aug.) as an au pair in the
family of an Oxford academic. The opportunity to practise
(in moderation) on the piano would also be appreciated,
but is not essential. Contact: Horovice, Ticha Ulice 489,
16800 Czech Republic.

Blue House: a small intimate nursery for
children 2--5 years. Established 10 years. Open
Mon.--Fri., 8.30 a.m.--5.30 p.m., full or half days. NNEB
staff. All pre-school activities, inc. numeracy and
literacy skills to prepare children for school entry. Our
aims are to encourage independence, self-confidence, and
social skills. Safe secluded garden, and conveniently
situated next to South Parks. Details from Kimberley,
tel.: Oxford 247877, or come and visit us.

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Situations Vacant

The English Historical
Review
seeks to appoint a part-time Assistant
Editor, with effect from the end of May. The Assistant
Editor undertakes editorial work, copy-editing, and
proof-reading under the direction of the Editors,
amounting to 18--20 hours p.w., with extra hours required
occasionally. Candidates require good office management
skills, inc. word-processing. They should have experience
of working in an academic environment and possess
excellent verbal and written communication skills.
Further particulars available from Dr J. Stevenson,
English Historical Review, Worcester
College, Oxford OX1 2HB. The closing date for
applications is Friday, 8 May 1998.

Opportunity for research in Japan:
top-class free office (latest full electronic composition
and communications facilities) with good low-cost living
accommodation available for visiting scholars for up to
three months. Located at satellite law campus of major
Japanese university; Tokyo 45 mins. Visitor would need to
meet board, travel, and other incidental costs; no
emoluments. OCEES, Mansfield College. Tel.: Oxford
(2)70886, e-mail: ocees@mansf.ox.ac.uk.

Pitt Rivers Museum: IT Officer sought;
50% of full time; established post, available
immediately; to work within University Museums' IT
structure, developing and managing the electronic
collections data systems providing user support, and
implementing the IT strategy, inc. future multimedia
developments. Applicants should be graduates with IT
training or demonstrable expertise, particularly in
documentation systems and multimedia. Anthropology or a
related subject would be an advantage. Salary
£15,159--£22,785, pro rata. Applications, inc.
c.v., the names and addresses of 2 referees, and a
daytime telephone number, to the Administrator (from whom
further particulars may be obtained) by 1 May. Pitt
Rivers Museum, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PP.

Group 4 in association with Jesus
College, Oxford is looking to recruit 2 full-time
security officers to work nights and Sundays. £5 per
hour for 48 hours p.w. You will display excellent
communication skills and a professional manner. Reception
skills an advantage. You must also be aged 21--64 and
have a 10 year checkable work record. To apply, please
contact Katherine Jones, tel.: Oxford 244999.

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Houses to Let

An Englishmanþs home is his
castle—so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we
have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking
quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding
area we may be able to help. QB Management is one of
Oxfordþs foremost letting agents, specialising in
lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other
professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and
most helpful service in Oxford. Please telephone or fax
us with details of your requirements and we will do
whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 764533,
fax: 764777.

Summertown, in attractive quiet
location, convenient for shops, schools, buses:
comfortable well-maintained detached house; 4 bedrooms, 2
sitting-rooms, dining-room, study, large kitchen,
breakfast room, bathroom, shower, 2 w.c.s; gas c.h.;
gardens (gardener included); car space. Available from
Sept. to careful non-smoking family. £1,100 p.c.m.
plus bills. Tel.: Oxford 558511.

Furnished Victorian terrace house with
garden, North Oxford, in quiet street close to city
centre. Two bedrooms, 2 reception rooms, fully-equipped
kitchen; gas c.h., coal fire. £750 p.c.m. Tel.:
Oxford 556152 or 554722.

House available for rent next academic
year. Large sitting-room, dining-room, modern kitchen, 2
double bedrooms, 2 studies, 1.5 bathrooms, walled garden,
c.h., washer-drier, dishwasher, fridge, china, linen,
etc. Bottom of Headington Hill, 15--20 minutes' walk from
Bodleian. Available late Aug. 1998--late May 1999.
£900 p.m. Contact Prof. Grundy, 11 Cherwell St,
Oxford OX4 1BG. Tel.: Oxford 242966, e-mail
isobel.grundy@ualberta.ca.

Oxford Waterside, Jericho: brand new
house on prestigious development. Two bedrooms, 1 en
suite shower room, family bathroom, living/dining-room,
beautifully-fitted kitchen with ceramic tiled floor,
downstairs cloakroom. Furnished to high standard. Small
garden; views over Port Meadow. Allocated off-street
parking. Ten minutes' walk to Radcliffe Infirmary and
many University departments, also shops, theatres, etc.
Available for weekly lets or longer as required,
sometimes at short notice. Tel.: Oxford 311124, fax:
311125, e-mail: anae0002@nda.ox.ac.uk.

North Oxford : Edwardian family house in
Bainton Road with 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, breakfast
room/kitchen, living-room, and dining-room. Available
immediately for 1 year. £1,495 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford
302313, e-mail: jane@finders.co.uk.

Central Oxford, Rewley Park, near rail
station (London--Paddington 52 minutes), bus station
(Heathrow 70 minutes), and city centre. Brand new
5-bedroom town house, built to high specification; 3
bathrooms (2 en-suite), 2 reception rooms, modern
kitchen, downstairs w.c., conservatory, small garden,
parking, river/canal view. Available from June.
£2,000 p.c.m. Tel.: 01844 208315, fax: 201511,
e-mail: 100574.451@compuserve.com.

Furnished central North Oxford house to
let for one year or less from 15 Sept. Walk to colleges,
rail and bus station; near Port Meadow; c.h.; recently
redecorated; desks; filing cabinets, several large
closets; secluded garden; 2.5 bathrooms, washing-machine,
drier, telephone, linen, dishes, 2 bicycles. Suitable for
visiting academics. 2 bedrooms, £950 p.m.; 3
bedrooms, £1,250 p.m. (inc. bedsit with separate
entrance). Contact: J. Mackrell, Oxford 775567 (27 May--1
June: 553679); or A. Gaston, Canada: tel. 613 745 1368,
fax: 613 745 0299, e-mail: Tony.Gaston@EC.GC.CA.

Central North Oxford: large attractive
Victorian family house, 5/6 bedrooms, spacious
south-facing kitchen, living-room, parking for 2 cars,
lovely garden; ideally situated for schools, hospitals,
station. Tel.: Oxford 790640.

Superb, modern, architect-designed house
in North Oxford: 4 bedrooms; fully equipped. On bus
routes; 25 minutes' walk to town. Available July and Aug.
Tel.: Oxford 511825 (eve. or Sun.), e-mail:
l.lyons1@physics.ox.ac.uk.

Headington: available 1 Aug.--end Dec.
1998. Comfortable 4-bedroom family house. Kitchen,
dining-room, sitting-room, downstairs cloakroom, 2
bathrooms, box room, large garden, off-street parking.
£950 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 762450, e-mail:
c.foot@physics.ox.ac.uk.

Luxury, unusual, modern house in quiet
road in North Oxford, within ring road, close to bus
route. Stunning views to open countryside. Open plan
design with separate double bedroom and 2 bathrooms.
Small patio garden, off-street parking. Suit visiting
academic/professional couple; regret no children, pets,
or smokers. £1,000 p.m., plus services. Tel.: Oxford
515085.

Central North Oxford:
attractively-furnished, four storey Victorian house in
quiet street, 15 minutes' walk from city centre, quarter
of a mile from river Thames and Port Meadow. Two double
bedrooms and 1 single; 2 bathrooms, 1 with new shower,
both with w.c.; double reception room with wood floor,
oriental rugs, desk; modern pine kitchen/diner with large
table. Dishwasher, fridge, freezer, gas c.h., washing
machine, drier; TV, video, stereo, fax, 3 phones. Garden
with picnic table, chairs, hammock; 4 bicycles. Free
street parking. £950 p.c.m., inc. utilities and
Council Tax. Available 3 Aug.--5 Sept. Dr Josephine
Reynell, tel.: Oxford 513933.

Old Boar's Hill: country cottage to let
from Oct. 1998. Delightfully situated, quiet, 3 bedrooms,
fully-furnished, c.h., all amenities, large secluded
garden. £650 p.c.m. Contact K. Solomon in Italy,
tel.: 39 444 324729. Local contact: tel.: Oxford
512332.

Make finding accommodation a pleasure,
not a chore. Finders Keepers is dedicated to making it
easy for visitors to Oxford to find the right property.
Browse through our Web site for up-to-date detailed
information on properties available and make use of our
interactive database, priority reservation service
(credit cards accepted), welcome food pack, personal
service, and much more. Call us and you will not need to
go elsewhere. For further information contact Finders
Keepers, 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE. Tel.: Oxford
311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk;
Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

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Flats to Let

Upper Wolvercote (North Oxford), light
and spacious self-contained 2-bedroom furnished
maisonette, totally refurbished; beautiful open views of
Port Meadow; accommodation arranged on two levels; gas
c.h.; garage. Available immediately. £650 p.c.m.
Tel.: Oxford 512906.

North Oxford , fully-furnished 1-bedroom
flat overlooking water meadows; sitting-room with
telephone and fax, kitchen with washing-machine and
tumble-drier, shower/bathroom; parking facility.
Available immediately until the end of Aug. £560
p.m. exc. council tax. Tel.: Oxford 736231.

Upper Wolvercote: spacious 2-bedroom
flat with lovely rural views in quiet location yet on
regular bus route to city centre. Fully furnished, with
well-equipped kitchen, c.h., garage, etc. Non-smokers
preferred. Available 1 June for long-term let. £650
p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 559802.

Central North Oxford: spacious 1-bedroom
flat in quiet road. Shared garden. Suit postdoc. couple
or similar. Available now. Tel.: 0171-794 8965.

Park Town, available mid-July:
semi-basement, comfortably furnished; double bedroom,
sitting room, kitchenette with electric cooker and
fridge, tiled bathroom with shower; c.h. throughout;
telephone available. Very quiet house. Prime location, 1
mile from Carfax. Tel. for appointment: Oxford
557400.

North Oxford: available 1 Sept. 1998--31 May 1999,
£550 p.m., fully-equipped ground-floor flat suitable
for 2 adults; dining-room/study; living-room/study,
double bedroom, shower-room, kitchen; dish-washer,
washing/drying machine, electric stove; c.h., car-port,
small garden. Stone, 266 Moore Street, Princeton, NJ
08540, USA. Tel.: 609 921 2717.

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Summer Lets

West Oxford: terrace house in excellent
condition; 3 bedrooms (inc. 1 study-bedroom); 10 minutes'
walk to central Oxford, 5 minutes' walk to station; in
quiet cul-de-sac overlooking playing-field; fully
furnished and equipped (gas. c.h., fireplace, phone, TV
and video, fitted kitchen, washer-drier, fridge, freezer,
microwave). Small garden with sunny patio. Available
1--31 Aug. (dates flexible). £750 p.c.m. Tel.:
Oxford 794232, e-mail: h.j.glock@reading.ac.uk.

Victorian house in North Oxford, 15
minutes' walk from centre; 1 double and 2 single
bedrooms, 2 living-rooms, 2 bathrooms, study with PC and
e-mail. Nice garden. Available 27 July--5 Sept. £275
p.w. or £1,400 for whole 6 weeks. Tel.: Oxford
515077.

North Oxford house to let, 18 July--19
Aug., possibly longer; 3 bedrooms; spacious and
luxurious; looking out onto Port Meadow and Thames. Tel.:
Oxford 556094.

Charming end-terrace house 15 minutes'
walk from centre available for summer let; dates
flexible, approx. 6--10 weeks. Sleeps 4. Study,
dining-room, kitchen-diner, pleasantly furnished.
Delightful garden, sunny patio, off-street parking, handy
for London coach, opposite park. References required.
Tel.: 0171 586 1481, fax: 586 9016, e-mail:
jrarch@btinternet.com.

Sunny Victorian terrace house, Iffley
Fields: 2 reception (period fireplaces), modern kitchen,
bathroom, second w.c., large double bedroom,
bedroom/study (double sofa-bed), utilities cellar,
antiques, stripped bannisters, sanded floors, nice
garden. Mid-June--Oct., £725 p.m. inc. council tax.
Tel.: Oxford 798069 or 01873 810982; e-mail:
ayers@wadham.ox.ac.uk.

City centre house with view of Thames
available for 4 months, June--Sept. Fully equipped, 3
bedrooms (2 double, 1 single), 2 bathrooms, gas c.h.,
garden, garage. £975 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 250462.

Very attractive semi-detached house in
north Summertown; 3 bedrooms, 2 studies, 2 living-rooms
plus kitchen and large conservatory; generous garden with
play equipment. Easily sleeps 5. Ideal for children. Easy
access to Summertown shops and central Oxford. Use of 2
adult and 2 child bicycles. All modern conveniences.
Available 18 Aug.--2 Sept.; some flexibility over dates.
£325 p.w. inc. utilities. Tel.: Oxford 556655.

Summer let in Oxford, live in comfort
near the Thames; c.h.; 4 bedrooms; large split-level
living-room, south-facing garden, dining-room,
fully-equipped kitchen; bathroom with bidet and w.c.;
shower-room with w.c. Available 6 weeks, 22 July--2 Sept.
Price negotiable. Tel.: Oxford 725193.

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Accommodation Offered

Rose Hill: between Rose Hill and Iffley
village: 1 room in a spacious fully-furnished house
shared with 1 tenant. Garden, washing machine, gas c.h.,
living-room, dining-room. In quiet road near shops and
bus stop. Non-smoker only. £295 p.c.m. Available
now. Tel.: Oxford 718909, e-mail:
joseme@earth.ox.ac.uk.

Walk to University departments from a
selection of beautifully-furnished period properties in
central/North Oxford. Finders Keepers has both houses and
apartments available with 2 and 3 bedrooms, from
£950 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 311011, to discuss any
accommodation requirement. E-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk,
Web site: http://www.finders.co.uk

Summer lets: beautifully-presented
first-floor apartment, situated within a short walk of
Summertown shops in North Oxford. Available July--Oct.
1998. Newly built, with 2 good-sized bedrooms (both with
double beds). Interior is very tastefully decorated and
furnished to a high standard. This is just one of a
selection of short let properties Finders Keepers has for
this summer; contact us now for further information.
Finders Keepers Ltd, 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE,
tel.: Oxford 311011, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk.

College-owned properties, available 15
July--11 Sept., centrally located near to university,
well equipped, serviced by college scouts. Can be let as
single properties or individual rooms, sharing
facilities. Tel.: Oxford (2)79082, e-mail:
janet.mead@seh.ox.ac.uk.

Bed-and-breakfast available in the warm
comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple in
exclusive central North Oxford; within easy walking
distance of the city centre and all main university
buildings; a stone's throw from the river, parks,
excellent pubs and restaurants and a 9--9 corner shop.
All rooms have colour TV, microwave, tea- and
coffee-making facilities, c.h., and independent heating.
Refrigerators available. Very moderate terms. Tel./fax:
Oxford 557879, mobile: 0374 434489.

Superb new hotel, 1.5 miles from city
centre. 16 en suite bedrooms; telephone, TV with Sky,
fridge, kitchenette, mini-bar. Parking. Tourist
Board---highly commended; RAC---highly acclaimed; AA---4
Qs. Single £59.50, double/twin £69.50, per room
per night. Discounts for long-stay guests. Marlborough
House Hotel, 321 Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 7NY, tel.:
Oxford 311321, fax: 515329, e-mail:
enquiries@marlbhouse.win-uk.net, Web site:
http://www.oxlink.co.uk/oxford/hotels/marlborough.html.

>

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Accommodation Sought

Going abroad? Or just thinking of
letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxfordþs
foremost letting agents and property managers. We
specialise in lettings to both academic and professional
individuals and their families, and have a constant flow
of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property
in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our
services, or if you simply need some informal help and
advice without obligation, telephone us. Tel.: Oxford
764533, fax: 764777.

Cottage wanted by female Oxford Academic
for 2--4 weeks, end June/early July. Preferably in Brill,
or village south-east of Oxford. Please e-mail:
lucycarp@enter.uu.imul.com.

Accommodation needed for July by US law
professor, teaching at Magdalen. Wife and 2 boys (7 and
10) will accompany for part of stay. Pleasant family
setting is most important. Please reply to Prof. Weiner,
tel.: 517 339 1751, fax: 334 5714, e-mail:
weinerw@cooley.edu.

Canadian professor, wife, and 3 older
children seek 3-bedroom flat for Aug. in quiet area of
Oxford or vicinity; walk/convenient bus to Bodleian.
Rent, or could exchange 4-bedroom A-frame overlooking N.
Saskatchewan River, close to Indian, Metis, deserted
Doukhobor villages. Richard Harris, English University of
Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada S7N 5A5. Tel.: 306 497
2952, e-mail: heorot@sk.sympatico.ca.

Visiting academic and family (1 baby)
seek furnished 3-bedroom house or flat, beginning mid
Sept. 1998 until end Aug. 1999. North Oxford or
Headington preferred. Tel. (Switzerland): 41 1 273 32 04,
fax: 41 1 266 79 84, e-mail: dpezzol@theol.unizh.ch.

Italian physician, wife, and 2 children
(5 and 6) require 2/3-bedroom house/flat convenient for
John Radcliffe Hospital, for 1 year from 1 Sept. 1998.
£600--£800 p.c.m. Contact Dr Andrea Mortara,
tel.: 00 39 385 2471, fax: 385 61386, e-mail:
biblio@fsm.it. Local contact: Mrs Pauline Cowan, Dept. of
Cardiovascular Medicine, tel.: Oxford 220257, fax:
768844.

British diplomat's family seek house to
rent from 9--28 July in Oxford, preferably North. Garden
essential; 3 or 4 bedrooms desired. Dates can be
flexible. Please contact Mrs C. Laing, 4 Charlbury Road,
Oxford OX2 6UT. Tel.: Oxford 559092.

Canadian professor requires
accommodation in Oxford, 20 July--30 Aug. (dates
negotiable). A 2-bedroom house or flat would be ideal.
Professor Nicholas Hudson, Dept of English, University of
British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1. Tel.: 604 684
1661, fax: 604 822 6096, e-mail: nhudson@unixg.ubc.ca.

Professional couple seek accommodation
in central or North Oxford for 3 weeks, mid-Aug.--early
Sept. Quiet, tidy, need a non-smoking house with kitchen
facilities and easy access to central Oxford. Will
negotiate rates. Tel.: Oxford 510439.

Two European couples
(British/German/Polish) seek house-sit or letting for 2/3
months from mid-May. Local Oxford references available.
Tel./fax: Oxford 772015, or Brussels 00 322 649 4433.

Three-bedroom furnished flat or house
sought by academic couple with 2 children (11 and 9),
visiting Wolfson College; early Aug.--mid Jan. 1999.
Preferably North Oxford. Reply to Prof. David Wood, Law
Faculty, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria
3052, Australia. Tel.: +61 3 9344 6192, fax: 9347 2392,
e-mail: d.wood@law.unimelb.edu.au.

Visiting academic seeks 2-bedroom
furnished flat to rent, 22 June--5 Aug., preferably close
to Pembroke/St Peter's. Wife and child (3 years) visiting
part time. Non-smokers, local references available. James
Basker, Columbia University, tel.: 212 531 3732, fax: 663
9169, e-mail: oxbadmin@interport.com.

Academic couple with 2 young children
planning a 1 year sabbatical in Oxford from November 1998
seeks furnished 3-bedroom house with garden, preferably
in North-central Oxford, but other locations considered.
Monthly rental up to £800. Local references
available. Contact Dr Quentin Sattentau, 9 Traverse des
Zephyrs, 13007 Marseille, France, tel./fax: +33 491 26
9494, e-mail: sattenta@ciml.univ-mrs.fr.

House/animal/granny or other sitting
offered by mature woman in exchange, or for reduced rent,
self-contained accommodation; 6 months from Oct. or Nov.
1998. Barbara Ineson, tel.: Oxford 722432 through April
(messages may be left thereafter).

Finders Keepers specialises in managing
your home or investment. We have celebrated 25 years in
Oxford letting and managing properties---try us first!
Many of our landlords have remained with us since we
opened and are delighted with our service---why not pop
in and read their comments? Contact Finders Keepers, 73
Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE. Tel.: Oxfordd 311011, fax:
556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk, Internet site:
http://www.finders.co.uk.

American visiting fellow, spouse, and
boys 12 and 14 seek fully-furnished 3- or 4-bedroom house
in Oxford or environs, from 19 June through 20 Aug. 1998.
Children will be present for 3 weeks only. Please contact
in USA: D. Matthews, 6514 Kalama Road, Kapaa, Hawaii
96746, tel.: 808 821 0479, fax: 808 821 1193, e-mail:
dbm@aloha.net.

Visiting US Law professor seeks
furnished accommodation 26 June--7 Aug. for self and 2
quiet, well-behaved daughters (5 and 9). Local references
available. Jane Winn, SMU School of Law, Dallas, TX
75275, tel.: 214 768 2583, fax: 768 4330, e-mail:
jwinn@mail.smu.edu.

Furnished 3-bedroom house or flat
needed, May and June 1998, for tidy and responsible
visiting fellow (Pembroke College) and family of 4
(children
ages 14 and 10). Please contact Kate or Lowell Turner,
tel.: Oxford 556063, or (2)76440.

Mallams Residential Letting is well
placed to help with your letting and management
requirements. Based in Summertown, we offer a
professional service tailored to your individual
requirements. If you are thinking of letting your
property, please call us. Tel.: Oxford 311006, fax:
311977.

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section



Accommodation Exchange

House exchange US--UK; June.
Three-bedroom house in picturesque Guilford, Connecticut
near beaches, Yale University, 2 hours to NYC, Cape Cod,
Boston. Desire a 2-bedroom house/flat; greater Oxford,
Cambridge, London areas. Tel.: 203 458 1715, fax: 392
6338, e-mail: marsoobian@scsu.ctstateu.edu.

Italian family (1 daughter aged 10)
would like to arrange an exchange with an English family
for 2 weeks. The English family would stay with us for 2
weeks and vice versa. We live in in a town house of
character in a village an hour north of Rome (in the
Sabine hills), 10 minutes from regular train service to
Rome. We speak a little English. For more information
contact Anita Francini, Via Umberto I,4, Forano Sabina
(Rieti). Tel./fax: 0039 765 570498.

Victoria, BC, Canada: beautiful
4-bedroom, 2-storey home. Three sitting-rooms, 3 full
bathrooms, attached double carport, large private patio
and gardens. Five minutes to ocean. Close to University
of Victoria. Would like to exchange home and car for
10--12 months, beginning Sept. 1998. Location flexible.
Tel.: 250 658 5993, fax: 361 4586, e-mail:
greeninv@islandnet.com.

Vancouver family (Univ of British
Columbia professor, wife, and 5-year-old daughter) seeks
to trade houses with another (non-smoking) family for
approx. 3-month period, Apr.--Aug. 1999. We have a
lovely, spacious California-style house, 5 minutes from
UBC, 15 minutes from the downtown, 20 minutes from
Vancouver International Airport, and a short block to a
beautiful sandy beach (Spanish Banks) and other
recreational amenities. We would need a house or large
flat, in Oxford or close by, with reasonably good access
to public transport. Dr T.A. Hutton, 4554 Belmont Avenue,
Vancouver, V6R 1C4, British Columbia, Canada. Tel.: 604
228 9592, fax: 604 822 6164.

Boston, Mass.: USA family looking to
`house swap' with Oxford/Cotswold family; last week in
June or first week in July (or combination). Our house
has up to 6 bedrooms. Two dogs in house complete with
dogsitter. We need 2 bedrooms---2 grown children and 2
parents. Tel. (USA): 001 781 237 3675.

Toronto exchange: spacious 2-bedroom,
2-bathroom flat. Centrally located, fully equipped,
tastefully furnished, light and heat included. Seeking to
exchange for house/flat in North or central Oxford for
18--24 months, beginning July/Sept. 1998. Fax (Moscow): 7
095 921 9491 or (Toronto): 416 972 9179, e-mail:
ioccmoscow@glas.apc.org.

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Accommodation Sought to Rent or
Exchange

Visiting academic and family (3 children
aged 6--10) seek furnished 3/4-bedroom house; North
Oxford or close to John Radcliffe Hospital preferred.
Beginning mid Aug. 1998 for approximately 1 year. Would
consider exchange for 4-bedroom house in central
Auckland, NZ. Tel./fax: 0064 9 6306723, e-mail:
a.fraser@auckland.ac.nz.

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Accommodation Offered to Rent
or Exchange

Summertown: lovely 3-bedroom Victorian
terrace house, fully furnished/equipped, to let or
exchange from summer 1998, for academic year minimum.
Dates/length of let flexible. Two double bedrooms,
office/third bedroom, eat-in kitchen overlooking pretty
garden, 2 reception rooms, 1.5 bathrooms, gas c.h.
Hardwood floors; even a Steinway piano. Near shops, bus,
excellent schools, university, hospitals, etc. Family
owners (professional mother, 2 children) ideally seeking
exchange with New York City academic; require minimum 1
bedroom plus/doorman apartment in Manhattan. Otherwise
£1,100 p.c.m. plus bills. Tel.: Oxford 512847, fax:
515335, e-mail: 101642.2251@compuserve.com.

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Holiday Lets

Delicious Donegal cottage; open fires,
Aga. Sleeps 4–6, overlooking lough, surrounded by
mountains. Ideal for families or couples. Rowing boat,
canoes, and bicycles included; within easy reach of golf
courses, fishing, sandy beaches, horse riding and much
more. From £200. Tel.: Oxford 390402.

Umbria, Italy: luxury flat in tranquil
rural setting. Sleeps 2--4. Large terrace, private
garden, stunning views. Perugia 15 minutes, Assisi 30
minutes, Florence and Siena 2 hours. Tel.: 01252 877155
(eve.).

Provençal fortified farmhouse in
tiny rural village surrounded by lavender fields offers
B&B or half-board. There is also a 3-bedroom apartment
with kitchenette and sitting-room---ideal for
writer/artist or academic on sabatical leave; short or
long stays possible. Contact Karolyn Kauntze, Montsalier,
04150 Banon, France. Tel./fax: 00 33 4 92 73 23 61.

Italy: old Tuscan farmhouse in peaceful
countryside with distant view of ancient Etruscan town of
Volterra: 20 minutes from San Gimignano, 1 hour from
Florence, Siena, and airport at Pisa. Three bedrooms
(sleeps 7), fully-equipped kitchen. Available in Apr.,
May, and Sept. £300 p.w. Tel.: Oxford 727394.

Cadouin, Dordogne. Large village house,
sleeps 12+. Not luxurious, but comfortable. All
amenities. Suitable for 2 families. Beautiful scenery;
perfect swimming nearby. £150--£250 p.w. Tel.:
01743 359726.

Farmhouse accommodation in beautiful
Dordogne countryside between Angoul<Phi> me and
Perigueux. Sleeps 6. Available to rent May--Sept. from
£130 p.w. Tel.: 01295 780641.

Verona outskirts: in exceptionally
beautiful 15th-c. villa, self-contained ground-floor
flat; large double bed-sitting, kitchen/dining and bath
rooms; garden area; parking; frequent buses from door to
city centre. £300 p.w., inc. services and weekly
cleaning. Available from 1 May, except Aug. Tel.: 00 39
452 6499, or (Moore) 01844 238247.

Fethiye, Turkey: new apartments 5
minutes to beach sleeping max. 4; pool, bar/restaurant,
entertainments; English/Turkish owners. From only
£140 p.w. per apartment. Tel./fax: 01202 737202.

Barga, Italy: beautifully-restored
16th-c. Tuscan house in walled Barga; sleeps 6. All mod.
cons, terraces, stunning mountain views, walks, close
Lucca and Florence. Available May/June, late Aug. and
Sept. (autumn in northern Tuscany is spectacular).
Tel./fax: 0171 727 8759 (Baldwin).

Greece: Skopelos Island. Old house to
let in quiet area of Skopelos village, 2 minutes' walk
from the waterfront, with secluded terrace and lovely
courtyard opening out from the kitchen. Two bathrooms.
Sleeps 6--8 comfortably. From £50 per day. Tel.:
01280 848 250 or 847 849.

Idyllic water mill, central France.
Sleeps 8--10. Recently restored; large open fireplace,
ideal for retreat or holiday. Beautiful private riverside
setting, own river swimming, fishing, woodland walks,
tennis, riding, mountain biking nearby. Still available
all year except Aug. Tel./fax: 0181 940 2395.

Northumberland, between the Cheviots and
the sea: stone built cottage in small unspoilt village; 5
miles from Alnwick Castle, and within easy reach of half
a dozen more, and miles of beautiful sea shore.
Sitting-room, 3 bedrooms, kitchen, bathroom. Available
June, July, Aug. Tel.: 01665 579292.

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Student Vacation Exchange

French boy, age 16, would like to attend
British school with English boy for 1--2 months around
June 1998. Could be paying guest with English family or
possible exchange with English boy. Please call 0171 609
4069 for further information.

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Houses for Sale

Cottage for sale in France: Montsoreau,
near Saumur. Superb view over the Loire in an attractive
small village near shops. Downstairs: large
living-room/kitchen, bedroom, washroom/toilet, shower,
workroom/storage space. Upstairs: large bedroom with
study area, en suite bathroom/shower/toilet. Attic (could
be developed); double cellar cut into hillside. Vacant
possession. £30,000 o.n.o. Contact Prof. and Mrs B.
P. Reardon, 6 Impasse des Jonquilles, 14780 Lion-sur-Mer.
Tel./fax: +33 2 31 36 08 56, e-mail:
bryan.reardon@wanadoo.fr.

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Properties for sale at Oxford
Waterside

Central North Oxford/Jericho.
Classically styled homes built by nationally renowned
quality house-builders, Berkeley Homes. Properties
available include: 2-bedroom apartments from
£118,500; 3-bedroom, 2-bathroom houses from
£169,500; 4-bedroom, 3-storey houses with garages
from £275,000. Marketing suite and show homes open
daily, 10 a.m.--5 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 311449, or
726000/515000 (joint selling agents, Savills and Thomas
Merrifield).
n

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