22 March 2001 - No 4581



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 131, No. 4581: 22 March 2001<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

22 March 2001




Gazette publication arrangements: temporary alteration of deadline

This is the final Gazette of term.
Publication for Trinity Term will begin on 19 April.

Because of difficulties caused by the date of Easter, all copy for the 19 April
Gazette is to be received by 5 p.m. on Thursday, 5 April.


University Health and
Safety
information


Return to Gazette
Home Page






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 22 March 2001: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent
entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



CONGREGATION 19 March


Degree by Resolution

No notice to the contrary having been received, the following resolution is deemed to have
been approved at noon on 19 March.

Text of Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

GUGLIELMO VERDIRAME, Merton College

Return to List of Contents of this section



CONGREGATION 20 March


1 Declaration of approval of unopposed Statute
promulgated on 6 March

No notice of opposition having been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor declared the Statute
concerning the removal of students from the Clinical Students' Register approved.


2 Declaration of approval of Resolutions approving
the conferment of Honorary Degrees

(1) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Civil Law, honoris
causa
, upon WILLIAM GORDON BOWEN (AB Denison; PH.D. Princeton),
President of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, New York, be approved.

(2) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Civil Law, honoris
causa
, upon GRO HARLEM BRUNDTLAND (MD Oslo; MPH Harvard),
Director-General of the World Health Organization, be approved.

(3) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Letters, honoris
causa
, upon PROFESSOR ERIC JOHN ERNEST HOBSBAWM, CH (BA, PH.D.
Cambridge), FBA, Emeritus Professor of Economic and Social History, University of
London, be approved.

(4) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Science, honoris
causa
, upon PROFESSOR TIM BERNERS-LEE, OBE, MA, Honorary Fellow of
Queen's College, 3Com Founders Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, be
approved.

(5) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Science, honoris
causa
, upon PROFESSOR WALTER KOHN (BA, MA Toronto; PH.D. Harvard),
FRS, Professor Emeritus and Research Professor of Physics, University of California at
Santa Barbara, be approved.

(6) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Science, honoris
causa
, upon PROFESSOR SIR GUSTAV NOSSAL, AC, CBE (B.SC.(MED.), MB,
BS Sydney; PH.D. Melbourne), FAA, FRACGP, FRACOG (HON.), FRACP, FRCP,
FRCPA, F.R.C.PATH., FRS, FRSE, FTSE, Professor Emeritus of the University of
Melbourne, be approved.

(7) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of Music, honoris
causa
, upon DAME FELICITY LOTT, DBE (BA London), FRAM, soprano, be
approved.

Return to List of Contents of this section



COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

Decree

Council has made the following decree, to come into effect on 6 April.


Decree (1): Establishment of Rothermere American
Institute

Explanatory note

The following decree provides formally for the establishment of the Rothermere American
Institute and for the various endowments associated with it. Apart from the endowments, the
University has received very generous benefactions towards the capital cost of the building,
including £2.5m from the Rhodes Trustees, some £1.7m from Rhodes Scholars,
£1.5m from the Rothermere Foundation, £1.5m from the Daily Mail and
General Trust, and some £500K from Associated Newspapers.

Text of Decree (1)

1 In Ch. III (Statutes, 2000, p. 253), insert Sect. III:

`Section III. Rothermere American Institute

1. There shall be within the University a Rothermere American Institute.

2. The aims of the institute shall be to provide a focus for the study of the United
States and the colonial territories that preceded it, and to promote an interdisciplinary and
comparative understanding of the nature of the society of that country and the relationship
between the United States and other countries.

3. The University accepts with gratitude the following sums which (together with any
further sums contributed for the same purpose) shall be used to establish funds with the
names shown, the income from which shall be used for the specific elements shown of the
costs of the institute:

(a) from the Rhodes Trustees, the sum of £2m, the net income
of which shall be put towards the general costs of the institute;

(b) from an anonymous benefactor the sum of £1.5m, the net
income from which shall be used to finance a distinguished visitors' programme for the
institute;

(c) from Mr Esmond Harmsworth the sum of $400,000, the net
income from which shall be used to fund a visiting professorship in American Arts and
Letters;

(d) from Mrs Cynthia McLachlan the sum of $533,333, from Mr Edward
Burkhart the sum of $533,333, from the Directors of Wisconsin Central the sum of
$275,208, and from Mr Thomas W. Rissman the sum of $40,938, the net income from
which shall contribute to the costs of the Vere Harmsworth Library of the institute;

(e) from Nigel and Helen Lovett the sum of $100,000 to establish
a fund to be known as the Vere Harmsworth Library Acquisitions Endowment Fund, the net
income from which shall be used for the acquisition of library materials in that library.

4. Income from the funds specified in clause 3 above not spent in any year shall be
carried forward for expenditure in subsequent years.

5. (a) Income from funds established for library purposes
shall be administered by the Curators of the University Libraries. The curators shall have
power to delegate expenditure to the Director of University Library Services and Bodley's
Librarian, such delegation to be reviewed on an annual basis when the director shall report
to the curators all exercises of his or her delegated authority.

(b) Income from funds established for purposes other than support
of the library shall be administered by the Humanities Division (in consultation with the
Social Sciences Division) under such arrangements as Council may from time to time decide
for the governance of the institute.'

2 In Ch. IX, Sect. I, § 27, concerning the Bodleian
Library (p. 601), delete the separate decree concerning the Vere Harmsworth Library
Acquisitions Fund.

Return to List of Contents of this section



LIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE BOARD

Decree

The Life and Environmental Sciences Board, with the approval of the Educational Policy and
Standards Committee of Council, has made the following decree, to come into effect on 6
April.


Decree (2): Establishment of M.Sc. in Medical
Anthropology

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Life and Environmental Sciences
Board, with the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council,
establishes a new one-year taught M.Sc. in Medical Anthropology. The course is intended
to build on the very substantial expertise in these areas which is now available in the Institute
of Social and Cultural Anthropology and that in Biological Anthropology, and it is an
academic priority already identified in the recent General Board review and in the outline
plans drawn up by the new Divisional Board. A sound preparation in relevant fields will be
required, and candidates will be required to sit four written papers and to submit a
dissertation, the requirements for which will be along the lines of those already in place for
the existing M.Sc. course in Social Anthropology. Opportunity is taken also to delete
obsolete references to a faculty board and a committee within the Life and Environmental
Sciences Division.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in 'Examinations and Boards' below.

Text of Decree (2)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 753, l. 9, delete `Committee for
Archaeology' and
substitute `Life and Environmental Sciences'.

2 Ibid., ll. 21, 23, 35, and 37 and p. 754, ll. 1 and 13, in each
case delete `Anthropology and Geography' and substitute `Life and Environmental Sciences'.

3 Ibid., p. 754, after l. 6 insert: `Medical Anthropology
Life and Environmental Sciences'.

4 Ibid., p. 1052, l. 37, after `Ethnology and Museum
Ethnography' insert `, Medical Anthropology,'.

5 This decree shall be effective from 1 October 2001.

Key to Decree (2)

Cll. 1 and 2 substitute references to the Divisional Board for existing references to the
Committee for Archaeology and the Anthropology and Geography Board.

Cl. 3 adds the course in Medical Anthropology to the list of M.Sc. courses.

Cl. 4 provides for the period of office of examiners for the new course.

Return to List of Contents of this section



COMMITTEE ON STATUTES BEFORE THE
PRIVY COUNCIL

Decree

The Committee on Statutes before the Privy Council has made the following decree, to come
into effect on 6 April.


Decree (3): Amendment to the Statutes of Oriel
College

Explanatory note

The following decree, made by the Committee on Statutes before the Privy Council, records
the consent of the University to an amendment to the Statutes of Oriel College as required
under the provisions of the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923.

The effect of the amendment is to empower the college to appoint an Investment Manager.

Text of Decree (3)

The consent of the University is given to the amendment to Statute XV of Oriel College
approved by the Governing Body on 7 February 2001, in so far as such consent is required
by Section 7 (2) of the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923.

Return to List of Contents of this section



DIVISIONAL BOARDS AND BOARDS OF
FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 6 April, see
`Examinations and Boards' below.

Return to List of Contents of this section





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 22 March 2001: University Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent
entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



CONGREGATION 24 April 2 p.m.

¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that written notice of any intention
to
vote against the following resolution, signed by at least two members of Congregation, must
be given to the Registrar by noon on Monday, 16 April (see the Guide
to
Procedures in Congregation cited in the note at the end of `University Agenda'). As 16 April
is Easter Monday, the University Offices will be closed on that day, and it will be assumed
that any notice which has been delivered before the offices reopen at 8 a.m. on 17 April has
been duly given before the statutory deadline.


Voting on Resolution approving the conferment of an
Honorary Degree

That the conferment of the Degree of Master of Arts, honoris causa, upon
KIM
SCOTT WALWYN, MA (MA Cambridge), Lady Margaret Hall, be approved.

¶ Ms Walwyn worked at the Oxford University Press as an Editor, Editorial
Director, and Publishing Director between 1978 and 2000. She played a major role in the
development of the Press's scholarly and general publishing in English Literature, and
oversaw the continued expansion of its scholarly publishing in the Humanities and Social
Sciences. Her natural empathy with the spirit of intellectual endeavour was combined with
the
good commercial judgement and discipline which are essential to safeguard the long-term
future of a learned press.

If the resolution is approved, the honorary degree will be conferred on a date to be
announced.

Return to List of Contents of this section





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 22 March 2001: Notices<br />

Notices


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent
entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



UNIVERSITY PREACHERS


Trinity Term 2001

Thursday, 19 April, at 8 a.m. THE REVD RICHARD SMAIL, Fellow and
Chaplain of Brasenose College. Holy Communion (Latin). At St Mary's.

Sunday, 22 April, at 10 a.m. THE REVD ROBIN GRIFFITH-JONES,
Master
of the Temple Church, sometime Chaplain of Lincoln College. (St Mark's Day
Sermon
.) at Magdalen College.

Sunday, 29 April, at 10 a.m. THE REVD DR LIZ CARMICHAEL, Fellow
and
Chaplain of St John's College. (Ramsden Sermon.) At St Mary's.

Sunday, 6 May, at 10 a.m. THE REVD PROFESSOR DAVID
FERGUSSON,
Professor of Divinity, University of Edinburgh. (Fifth Bampton Lecture: `Moral
formation: the Church's contribution'.
) At St Mary's.

Sunday, 13 May, at 10 a.m. THE REVD PROFESSOR DAVID
FERGUSSON.
(Sixth Bampton Lecture: `Barmen and after: modern doctrines of the state'.)
At
St Mary's.

Sunday, 20 May, at 10 a.m. THE REVD PROFESSOR DAVID
FERGUSSON.
(Seventh Bampton Lecture: `Concepts of a national church'.) At St
Mary's.

Sunday, 27 May, at 10 a.m. THE REVD PROFESSOR DAVID
FERGUSSON.
(Eighth Bampton Lecture: `Establishment: where now?') At St
Mary's.

*Sunday, 3 June, at 10 a.m. THE VEN. JOHN MORRISON, Archdeacon
of
Oxford. (University Sermon—Whit Sunday.) At the
Cathedral
.

*Sunday, 10 June, at 10.30 a.m. MS JANET MORLEY, Secretary for
Adult
Learning of the Methodist Church. (University Sermon—Trinity
Sunday
.)
At Queen's College.

*Sunday, 17 June, at 10 a.m. THE VERY REVD MICHAEL PERHAM,
Dean
of Derby. (Commemoration Day Sermon.) At St Mary's.

Sunday, 24 June, at 10 a.m. BARONESS JAMES OF HOLLAND PARK,
OBE
(P.D. James), Honorary Fellow of St Hilda's College. (St John Baptist's Day
Sermon
.) At Magdalen College.

*On these days Doctors will wear their robes.

Return to List of Contents of this section



ORATION BY THE SENIOR PROCTOR

The following Oration was delivered in Congregation on 14 March by M.D.E.
SLATER, MA, M.PHIL., Fellow of St Edmund Hall, on demitting office as
Senior Proctor.

SENIOR PROCTOR: Insignissime Vice-Cancellarie, licetne Anglice
loqui
?

VICE-CHANCELLOR: Licet.

SENIOR PROCTOR: Mr Vice-Chancellor, I can already perceive the palpable
sigh of relief in this ancient House, that I have not been so rash as to attempt
to emulate my illustrious predecessor and begin this Oration once more in
Latin. So universal was the surprise then that the Proctors might be
maintaining strict tradition, that even the Gazette became confused
and omitted the important opening. But do not relax—an Oration must
also have a middle and an end, and why should I confine myself to Latin?

Indeed I should be particularly well equipped for this task, thanks to a
manuscript which you, Sir, and I approved a few weeks ago at the Delegates
of the University Press: The Hi-Conjugation in Ancient Hittite.
In the opinion of a reviewer `It is impossible to overstate the importance of
this work.' (Maybe so, but I think you will agree that Understanding
Partial Denture Design
ran it a pretty close second in the same meeting.
) I have therefore toyed with the idea of sprinkling this Oration liberally with
Hittite jokes, Sanskrit aphorisms, Chinese proverbs, and Arabic wisdom,
thereby simultaneously managing to torment the House horribly and to exact
a terrible revenge upon the Gazette typesetter. Alas, my linguistic
skills are not up to it—I promise to speak only lingua Anglica,
aestuariensi
.

It is customary in these Orations to attempt to explain the role of the
Proctors, and perhaps to meander playfully through historical anecdotes of the
office. But having consulted many decades' worth of previous Orations, I have
concluded that if the House does not know by now what a Proctor is and does,
it never will, so it is not worth wasting much further breath in that direction.

Furthermore, over the year it has been borne in upon me that my grasp
of Proctorial history is somewhat fragile. In college almost exactly a year ago
I described myself as only the third Proctor from St Edmund Hall— alas,
not even close. I had overlooked among other things the fifteenth century.
With two historian colleagues it would therefore be dangerous to launch out
in that direction either.

I should therefore take the opportunity to say less this year about the
Proctors and more about the University, less about the past and more about the
future, because although this has been a year in which Proctorial functions
have changed but little (of which more later), almost everything else in the
University has changed enormously. I should focus on two main issues: the
external environment and our own internal governance changes.

This year it has seemed frequently that we are living in an institution under
siege: from financial pressures, from politicians and the press, from league
tables and from outside regulatory bodies. One common feature of these
external pressures is that they demonstrate little idea of the real values of a
University, of the genuine values that are worth preserving, as opposed to the
incidental and the transitory, that might be useful in the short run to some
policy or other, or might fit in with some fad which is flavour of the decade.

For very many years, government took little notice of the universities.
Their function as providers of personnel and ideas for the Church no longer
had the political significance of earlier ages. However the experience
particularly of the Second World War demonstrated a similar potential function
in both the military and the civil economic spheres. Government woke up and
began to take an interest again. At first the interest was welcome, being
expressed mainly in money. But unsurprisingly, after the money came the
desire to control the spending of the money. As the money grew and the
`higher education sector' (their terminology not ours) was expanded, the
requirement for control became unstoppable.

However a paradox lies at the heart of this development. A University's
mission is knowledge and truth, if not for their own sake, at least on their own
terms. It is incidental to that main mission that the qualities developed by a
University education have also proved to be of enormous value in prosecuting
wars and in keeping the peace, in developing an economy and in running a
welfare state. Defining the principal role of `higher education' in terms of what
are in fact its by-products, as has now become almost universally the rule in
policy circles, will almost certainly be fatal to the notion of a genuine
University—and will be similarly fatal to the output of its by-
products—in a very short space of time.

The only real defence of the University can come from within; it no
longer comes from outside. The increasing targeting of public finance towards
specific by-products, performance appraisal entirely in terms of those by-
products, the consequent requirements to bureaucratise teaching and research,
all demonstrate where help is very definitely not to be found.

It is particularly galling for state-educated academics with state-educated
children, to observe the attempt to use universities as proxy instruments of the
social engineering which the government has itself so signally failed to deliver.
The statistics of access are indeed outrageous, but neither the statistics nor
other evidence justify the wholesale denigration of this and other universities'
admissions policies. As parents, it is quite clear to us what the fundamental
problem is, and public posturing and incentives such as post-code dowries are
only tinkering with it. One cannot help but feel that the public money used in
this way would be better spent improving secondary education itself than in
encouraging wasteful competition among universities in a self-defeating
numbers game. If the Chairman of Marks and Spencer appeared on the
Today programme to explain that the problems of M&S were
due to biased customers refusing to take their products, and could be solved
by a little leverage being applied to the recalcitrant customers, he would be
laughed to scorn and rightly so.

If we are to help ourselves, we need to be much better organised, which
brings me to the second main theme: the internal governance changes,

In our first term our diaries had a somewhat relentless routine: 11 a.m.
Committee X, followed by farewell lunch and valedictory photograph; 2 p.m.
Committee Y, followed by farewell tea and valedictory photograph; 5 p.m.
Committee Z, followed by farewell dinner and valedictory photograph. No
doubt future archaeologists of the visual record will debate whether these two
omnipresent, mysterious but smiling men were insiders who had developed a
remarkable stranglehold over the ancien régime of the
University in the late twentieth century, or were alien outsiders who double-
handedly destroyed its entire administration in the space of a single summer.

We were then able to observe the birth and infancy of the new
dispensation: the new Council, the divisions, PRAC, EPSC, and other new
committees. The benefits of these will not be immediate; much, particularly
finance, is still under discussion. But our general impression is one of
enormous energies being released. There are great problems still to be faced
in the short run; some people feel that the current financial exigencies have
come at the worst possible time for the move to divisionalisation. I do not
think so. On the contrary, I think that divisionalisation will ease the path out
of these financial exigencies. Predictably the initial share-out of money within
the new system is a hard-fought issue, and equally predictably nobody will get
quite what they believe they deserve. The current overall shortage of money
of course accentuates that conflict, but in the larger scheme of events the initial
share-out is not the most important factor. Far more important are the rules
whereby divisions are given greater ownership over their resources, given more
power to decide their own priorities, given greater freedom to look for and
retain additional resources. If we get these right, the future will look very
different from the present.

It is too early to say how the new Council will ultimately shape up. By
design it does not meet as frequently as its predecessor, so we have not
observed many meetings. Already the presence of external members is being
felt. It was the intention to free Council to allow it to concentrate more on
strategic thinking—certainly there has been no shortage of strategic
initiatives.

PRAC is where the serious money decisions are to be made. PRAC was
initially entrusted with the raising of a RAM (or is it a Golden Calf? Some
certainly hope it will be a goose that lays the golden eggs.). However the
conflicting calls of too many would-be shepherds initially confused and
destabilised the RAM, which was then entrusted to an inner priesthood,
RAWG. RAWG held its rituals more frequently, and sometimes very
appropriately, courtesy of the Rector, in the Smoke-Filled Room at Lincoln
College. Only yesterday the smoke began to turn white. There is still work to
be done, but this week has seen a real move forward, and a resolution is now
in sight.

EPSC has yet fully to find its feet. It has a difficult balancing act to
perform. On the one hand it must resist the temptation to claw back
immediately to the centre all the academic powers that have been devolved to
divisions. On the other there is a very real danger of loss of the academic
coherence that defines a university. There is also a danger of being
administratively overwhelmed by the demands of external scrutiny, QAA in
particular, so that the power to plot our own academic course slips from our
own hands and we become merely reactive to outside demands.

The new Personnel Committee has moved rapidly forward on some of
the difficult issues that have perplexed its predecessor committees for some
time: notably ULNTFs, and pay flexibility in general. The latter, combined
with divisionalisation, would make a very significant change to the university
landscape over the next few years. It is of course controversial, and provided
this year's Proctors with an eleventh-hour taste of Congregation when they had
resigned themselves to missing this particular experience.

We have observed all the new divisions in action. They each have a
different character, which is all to the good. We will not embarrass them by
saying too much. The Medical Division meets in Wellington Square at an
unconscionably early hour. At first we thought that this was meant to minimise
the possibility of Proctorial attendance, then more charitably that it stemmed
from a desire to return swiftly to their patients. In fact we understand that the
real reason is that unless they complete their business early in the morning, all
the car-parking spaces on the Headington site are taken. Maths and Physical
Sciences lives up to its macho stereotype—no female faces here, blunt
talking, and big money to play for. Life and Environmental Sciences wastes
neither life nor environment, with business dispatched more rapidly than I
would have thought conceivable by (of course) a former Senior Proctor, around
an exceptionally small table. Social Sciences give the impression of a teenager
at last given some control over its life, but impatient for more, and resentful
with it. Humanities (about which I shall say something more serious shortly)
displays an almost exact parity of the sexes and meets in the dignified, but
decayed and depressive grandeur of the Delegates' Room in the Clarendon
Building—I wonder whether they know that its eighteenth-century
nickname was Golgotha (a jibe at the Heads of House who met there).

Alongside the divisions stand the Academic Services, the libraries,
museums, collections, and IT networks. It is one of the Proctors' more pleasant
duties to serve on their governing committees, and thereby to appreciate the
astonishing breadth of the University's activities. Here too we have observed
the same outpouring of energy and the same lack of funds. Their financial
problems are in many ways more difficult than those of the divisions. A
serious backlog of work to be made up, niggardly funding from government
agencies, less obvious avenues for additional income generation, the possibility
of a squeeze by the powerful divisions in the University's resource allocation
process, all contribute to a more fragile position. Perhaps the most immediate
visible symptom of this is the current concern over library opening hours.

Governance changes have affected the colleges too. The need to confront
the new divisional system and the need to monitor the effects of the agreement
on college fees, have led to a pulling-together of the network of inter-college
committees around a strengthened Conference of Colleges. College Senior
Tutors and College Bursars have been assigned to the various divisions to
provide a college input to those decisions where a college dimension is
particularly important. These developments may prove no less significant to
decision-making in the `Collegiate University' (surely one of the new buzz-
words) than the University's own reforms.

Generally then we see divisions approaching their tasks with a sense of
purpose and some reason for long-term optimism. However we are least happy
at the situation of Humanities. They are still largely homeless, their non-staff
resources are small so that control over them is not such an advantage to be
prized, their ability to generate external research grants and additional income
is much more limited than in the sciences, and government initiatives have
discriminated against them. Their most notable resources, libraries and
collections, are similarly under pressure. It is here that the University must be
most concerned about morale problems and must not forget that, despite our
justifiable pride in our successes in science and technology over recent
decades, the University's enduring reputation has been founded on the
Humanities and that its global comparative advantage almost certainly still lies
there.

A colleague on one of the major university committees observed that he
could understand the logic of all the governance changes except why the
Proctors were still there (he obviously had not been reading his decades'-worth
of Orations). An answer at one level soon became apparent—so that the
majority on all important university committees should be constituted by
former Proctors who are instantly able to set such contributions into the
perspective that they so richly deserve. But more seriously, the devolution of
powers away from the centre—and we must devolve powers away from
the centre—in fact increases the need for an institution such as the
Proctors. Without such a function there would be a dangerous vacuum at the
centre, to be filled only by administrators without an academic input. Proctors
can provide some centripetal balance to the centrifugal forces, helping to
maintain the coherence of a single system which would otherwise be in danger
of fragmentation. Furthermore the rotation of Proctors is a safeguard against
the rebuilding of permanent forms of centralisation.

This year was also the year of the Human Rights Act, the Data Protection Act,
and QAA requirements on Complaint and Appeal Procedures in Higher
Education Institutions. There is also concern in some student quarters about the
status of the University Police. All these matters have demanded a considerable
amount of thought this year, and we have taken legal advice and made some
consequent adjustments to procedures. Although there are some well-known
difficulties, particularly the traditional lack of separation of functions (advice,
investigation, prosecution, adjudication), it must also be remembered that in
many ways our procedures are and always have been streets ahead of those in
most other higher education institutions, particularly in their independence, in
their ability to provide redress, and in their attention to the rights of all
concerned. The overall aims of all these outside requirements are ones which
we as a University already share and should not wish to resist; they can
however seem problematic where their detailed provisions seem
disproportionate in their particular application to us. But in such cases we
either have to argue our case for disproportionality with the relevant body or
adapt to it, and adaptation is not impossible—we can even go some
considerable way to meet the separation of functions concern.

I should also add, since it may not be apparent to outsiders, that the
present-day Proctors' Office functions far more as a complaints system than its
traditionally-perceived disciplinary role, and that the statutory powers of the
University Police are more of an advantage to the student population than a
disadvantage.

Another way in which the outside law impinges on our duties is through
judicial review. As in society at large, disgruntled complainants are
increasingly likely to seek judicial review of adverse decisions. There are
several stages to this process and until this year no complainant had succeeded
in advancing beyond the stage of application to judicial review proper.
However this year saw the first full judicial review of a Proctorial adjudication:
the court comprehensively upheld the decision of my predecessor, Senior
Proctor Jenkyns, and confirmed the powers of the Proctors as we understand
and exercise them. Unfortunately that particular case continues along a
different avenue. Another case was turned down at the application stage, and
a third is still in the application process. Clearly we must expect a steady
stream of judicial reviews in the future.

This year the Proctors have had to deal with a moderate amount of political
protest. This is a healthy trend which is entirely to be welcomed. The Proctors
only become concerned when rights are infringed or University regulations
breached. A potentially worrying development is the increasing involvement
of pressure groups outside the University, some with a reputation for
unpeaceful protest. Our high public profile makes us an attractive vehicle
through which to achieve publicity for their own ends. Web-sites on the
Internet allow demonstrations to be mobilised quickly from a wide geographic
area, and from an unpredictable constituency. The University must at all costs
protect freedom of speech and the concomitant right of its members to hear
speakers.

I alluded earlier to the metaphorical state of siege under which we live;
sometimes at controversial meetings in the Examination Schools we
experienced it literally. I pay tribute to the members of the University Police
and the Security Services, and to the staff of the Schools and elsewhere who
helped to ensure that no meeting was cancelled throughout the year. Despite
our best efforts though, one speaker was assaulted, and some perfectly \bona
fide\ lecture-goers were excluded by our prudential restrictions. We apologise
to them. On a lighter note, so efficient was our defence of the building on one
occasion that when the demonstrators had gone home we had to call for
assistance to let ourselves out.

Our last weeks were marked by an occupation of the Divinity School and
its aftermath. Proceedings have not been completed, so I shall say no more,
except to record that the behaviour of the occupiers, unlike in some previous
occurrences, was good. We have had in general good relations with student
officers throughout our term of office, and regret this latest turn of events.

If a Proctor's life is generally fun, it is also at times heart-rending. Behind so
many complaints and appeals lie personal tragedies and struggles against
appalling odds. Only occasionally can we make a significant difference to the
fundamental problems; often we are powerless spectators. This term alone the
University has lost three students in tragic circumstances, and I was particularly
privileged to attend a moving memorial gathering in Lincoln College for Leo
Blockley, drowned in a rowing accident in Spain. Individual members of our
staff make great contributions when such tragedies strike, and they are to be
especially commended.

The Senior Proctor traditionally deals particularly with financial matters, and
as a college Bursar this has for me been an interesting part of the job. He signs
all the large cheques, and one certainly gets a better class of cheque in the
University than in college—most of which seem to go to boost the
economy of a small village in Buckinghamshire. I have noticed that I still seem
to sign as a Curator of the Chest—surely incorrectly, as they were
abolished in the summer, and of course I have a photo to prove it.

Two years ago, on the occasion of a visit by the Prime Minister, our
predecessors, noting that he had not yet taken his MA, felt obliged to warn him
that as a junior member he was still under their jurisdiction while in Oxford.
This year there were reports in the press of interesting activities undertaken by
Mr William Hague in his undergraduate years. The Proctors took the
opportunity at a reception of making discreet enquiries of a distinguished
benefactor who appeared from the press reports to have some knowledge of
these events. Unfortunately he proved equally discreet.

It is said that a soldier's experience of war is one of almost permanent
boredom, punctuated by occasional bouts of terror. Similarly a Proctor's life
seems at times to be an interminable round of committees, but occasionally
explodes into a riot of simultaneous crisis. The Junior Proctor remembers
particularly one morning, waiting not without qualms for his appointment with
a senior member who wished to make a fierce complaint against a department
of the University. The outer doorbell rings and said complainant is ushered in
amid an aura of incandescent rage. Twenty seconds later the phone rings: it is
his favourite vexatious litigant, demanding an immediate interview under the
terms of Title X, Paragraph Y, Clause Z, or the Lord Chief Justice's life will
be hell. Two minutes of desperate trying to get a word in edgeways, while
holding personal complainant at bay. The other phone rings: it is the Schools,
who have discovered a case of cheating and require the Junior Proctor's
attendance on the double. One begins to see why the University is largely run
by former Junior Proctors.

This year the Assessor has done much good work on surveying and improving
provisions for disabled students. In this he has been particularly helped by
OUSU officers and other junior members. Among other things, the financial
position of Disability Advisers has been made more secure, and the Blind
Recording Service has been rehoused and re-equipped. Administering Hardship
Funds is another of his important and difficult tasks, and he has helped to
bring into being the new Vice-Chancellors' Fund which aims to assist
deserving research students as they near completion. Graduate financial
hardship is a particular and increasing concern: UK government funding is
insufficient, and foreign graduates (who face high fees) are often vulnerable to
political and economic convulsions in their home regions. The Assessor now
carries a significant caseload of individual students in difficulty. The Proctorial
fines collected this year will be donated to the University Hardship Fund.

We must of course record our thanks to the many people who have helped and
supported us throughout the year. One of the wondrous advantages of
becoming a Proctor is to appreciate working in an environment with proper
support—these days we could not function at all without it. Brian Gasser
our Clerk and Linda Mason as Assistant Clerk have steered us away from our
more catastrophic errors; in the office Joely, Caroline, Mary (who has alas
been lost to Harris Manchester) and Bob (who has replaced her) have kept
things working smoothly and cheerfully. Joely and Caroline's e-mail style does
much to dispel the old view of the Proctor's Office as a formal and severe
institution to be approached with some fear and anxiety. `Dear Michael (never
Dear Mr Scroggins), The Senior Proctor regrets that he cannot hang, draw,
and quarter you as agreed at 10.45 on Wednesday—could you do 3 p.m.
on Thursday instead? Hope this is alright, Cheers, Joely.'

We should also like to thank the University Marshal and the Constables,
the Bedels, the Verger, and the members of the Security Services for all their
assistance over the year. Whether at ceremonial occasions or on policing duties
they have always been good company, no matter how annoying the task.
Particularly we say farewell to Mike Simpkins, who assures us he retired
during the course of the year—however as he still turns up regularly we
are a little perplexed, and even worried—maybe this is required of us too?

We record a particularly warm welcome to the new Marshal, Richard
Hartley, who has come to the University from the police in Hereford and
Worcester. It seemed at first that his one great advantage to us would be that
there would be at least one member of staff who would know less than
us—unfortunately that has turned out not to be the case, and he has
handled an action-packed first year with aplomb, although at times he must
look back to his more restful career in the police with some regret. One piece
of information we have successfully kept from him so far is the traditional role
of the University Marshal at the end of this ceremony, where the Marshal
processes backwards in front of the new Proctors reciting the Statutes in Latin,
to ensure that by the time they regain their colleges they will be fully seized
of their duties, minimising the period of inter-regnal anarchy.

We of course owe an enormous debt to staff in the University Offices,
in faculties and departments and in colleges. We have relied on them, imposed
on them, crossed swords with some, but have always been impressed by the
dedication with which they approach their duties, sometimes under quite
impossible conditions. To single out is invidious and we would not do so, but
this year we must make one exception: Philip Moss, who has helped
generations of Proctors in his thirty-two years as Head Clerk, also retires this
year. It is unnecessary in this House to speak of his admirable qualities, nor
could I do them justice in the time available, but we are very pleased to note
that there will be another occasion for a fuller recognition of them.

We are grateful too to our Pro-Proctors, Stephen Blamey, Andrew Kahn,
Jorn Leonhard and Stephen Tucker. If we have imposed on them they have
borne it in good humour. To our partners and our families we offer sincere
apologies for all they have had to put up with.

This year has seen an entirely unconstitutional addition to the Proctorial
strength in the form of Procuratrix Minima. A member of
Somerville (nursery), she was able to attend the office at beginning and end of
day, and soon became adept at entangling the anglepoise lamps, covering both
Proctors' desks with yellow post-it slips, and indulging a particular fascination
with the disabled loo in the Proctors' corridor. Alas her career was cut short
mid-year by graduation from Somerville and consequent move to advanced
studies at St Andrew's First School Headington; nevertheless the experiment
has been declared a success and even now the Clerk to the Proctors is drawing
up a list of electoral rotation for college nurseries—doubtless to be
followed in short order by the design of another (small) gown in yet another
velvet hue.

Finally I must record a personal debt to my two colleagues. One
peculiarity of the Proctorial system is being plucked from the individualistic
life of a college tutor and being placed into a demanding and intimate working
relationship with two arbitrarily chosen colleagues. How will it work? Will we
get on? Well, we did. When assembling teams in industry and commerce,
management consultants like to play various bonding games. I can recommend
to them the mutual terror of standing on top of Magdalen Tower on May
Morning as it sways beneath your feet to the rhythm of several tons of bells,
heralding the advent of the summer which you know you will not now live to
see. Somehow we survived that and subsequently shared many enjoyable
experiences. I particularly remember the capacity of the Assessor's `sensible
drinking' coat pockets at the Twickenham Rugby match (yes, we also
witnessed a year of unparalleled sporting triumphs), and the Junior Proctor's
advice on how to pronounce Gallic names at degree ceremonies was a real life-
saver.

The Proctors also carry the burden of many of the University' dark secrets.
For instance we have discovered that you, Sir, after an exhausting day' struggle
on our behalf against the genuine forces of darkness, like nothing better than
to stretch out in front of the telly for the latest gripping episode of Buffy
the Vampire-Slayer
. Alas we mortals cannot aspire to such advanced
tastes—in the early hours of the morning Procuratrix Minima
and I chill out on Dexter's Laboratory and the Power-Puff
Girls
.

But enough—it is time to go. I can see from your eyes that you
would have preferred the Sanskrit aphorisms.

For a year we have been allowed to fool ourselves that we were the centre of
the universe; now we see that we were only inter-galactic debris, a record for
the astronomers of a particular small moment in the evolution of a giant
system. We wish it well, and we wish our successors well.

Return to top of this document


Proctorial year 2000–1

Summary of Offences

(totals for 1999–2000 given in brackets)

                                    
                                                                           
                                             Number of 
Offence                                      cases          Result

Breach of Rules Committee Regulations        
(conduct after examinations)                  18 (47)        1 @£20
                                                             1 @ £25
                                                             10 @ £35
                                                             1 @ £40
                                                             5 @ £50

Breach of University Statutes (damage to
and defacement of university property:
library books)                                1 (0)          1 @ £50 (+ £150          
                                                               'Damages')
Breach of Examination Regulations
(using unfair means)                          1 (5)          1 `Expelled'

Breach of University Statutes
(disorderly/offensive behaviour)              2 (4)          1 @ £10
                                                             1 @ £50

Breach of University Statutes
(obstruction)                                 4 (4)          1 @ £35
                                                             3 @ £40

Breach of Rules Committee Regulations
(failing to disperse)                         1 (0)          1 `Charge Dismissed'

Breach of University Statutes 
(failed to answer to Proctors' Summons)       1 (0)          1 @ £35

Breach of University Statutes
(Computer misuse)                             13 (6)         6 @ £20
                                                             1 @ £25
                                                             1 @ £30
                                                             2 @ £65
                                                             1 @ £120
                                                             1 `Reprimand'
                                                             1 Rusticated Sine
                                                                Die (inc. for                      
                                                               failing to appear)

Breach of University Statutes
(falsification of university 
document)                                    1 (0)           1 @ £50

Breach of University Statutes
(engaging in violent behaviour)              2 (1)           1 @ £65
                                                             1 @ £150

Breach of University Statutes
(misuse/removal of library 
books)                                       0 (3)           —

Breach of University Statutes
(harassment)                                 0 (1)           —

Breach of University Statutes 
(occupation and disruption)                  14 (0)          1 @ £25
                                                             1 @ £40
                                                             9 @ £50
                                                             1 @ £60
                                                             1 @ £65
                                                             1 `Charge Dismissed'

Total number of 
offences                                     58 (71)

Cases referred to the University Disciplinary Court: none.      



RULES COMMITTEE


Changes in regulations

  • § 1. Clubs, societies, and publications
  • § II. Motor vehicles
  • § III. Defacement of property
  • § IV. Behaviour after examinations
  • § V. Overseas Activities
  • § VI. Rowing on the river

    The Rules Committee, acting in accordance with Title XIII of the Statutes, met
    in Hilary Term and reviewed its regulations relating to the conduct of Junior
    Members. The following regulations are to be in force for the year
    commencing 1 October 2001 (representing amendments to Decree XI, Section
    VIII). The principal changes are:

    Part 1, cl. 6 (i) (l): replacing the previous reference to
    `Westminster College' (now obsolete) with `members of the Westminster
    Institute of Oxford Brookes University who are registered to read for degrees
    or other qualifications validated by the University of Oxford'; and extending
    entitlement to full membership of registered clubs and societies to persons on
    the Register of Visiting Students.

    cl. 7 (i) (g): amendments, on safety and insurance grounds, to the
    provisions relating to sports clubs' administrative and coaching appointments.

    Part II: inclusions of explicit reference to wheel-clamping as a penalty for
    unauthorised parking of motor vehicles.

    Part V: the previous regulation covering overseas sports tours is extended to
    include the Thursday and Friday immediately preceding Full Term (when
    colleges may require Junior Members to attend collections etc). Also, on safety
    and insurance grounds, the regulation has been broadened to cover the
    activities of non-sports clubs also and to introduce a requirement for clubs to
    notify their plans for activities taking place overseas and to follow directions
    relating to matters such as health and safety, insurance.

    Part VI, cl. 1: the list of graduate colleges whose resident Junior Members are
    exempted from the prohibition of rowing at certain times of the morning
    during Full Term has been extended to include Kellogg College.

    Return to top of this page


    Regulations of the Rules Committee as at 1
    October 2001

    § 1. Clubs, societies, and publications

    1. Junior Members of the University who form a club, society, or an
    organisation for whatsoever purpose (including one for the publication of a
    journal, newspaper, or magazine), and who wish to use the name of the
    University in its title (or in the title of a journal, newspaper, or magazine),
    shall

    (a) register with the Proctors; and

    (b) obtain the consent of the Vice-Chancellor. The Vice-
    Chancellor will not consider applications for the use of the name of the
    University until the club, society or organisation has been registered with the
    Proctors for two consecutive terms.

    2. The consent of the Vice-Chancellor may be withdrawn or withheld if he
    or she sees fit.

    3. A club, society, or organisation which does not wish to use the name of
    the University in its title may also register with the Proctors provided it
    conforms with the regulations in clauses 6, 7, and 8 below.

    4. The Proctors may not unreasonably withhold or withdraw registration.

    5. (i) Each club, society, or organisation which registers with the Proctors
    shall be designated, as the Proctors see fit, to be either (a) a non-
    sports club, society or organisation (hereafter `non-sports club'), or
    (b) a club, society, or organisation for sport (hereafter `sports
    club') or (c) an organisation for the publication of a journal,
    newspaper, or magazine, whether in hard copy or electronic format (hereafter
    `publication').

    (ii) Each such non-sports club and publication shall register with the
    Proctors through the Clerk to the Proctors. Each such sports club shall register
    with the Proctors through the Head of the Sports Department.

    (iii) In this regulation, non-sports club, sports club and publication means
    the members of the club, society or organisation concerned.

    6. (i) Each non-sports club which registers with the Proctors shall:

    (a) establish a constitution and deposit a copy of it with the
    Proctors;

    (b) act in accordance with the constitution established under
    (a) above;

    (c) advise the Proctors promptly of any changes in the
    constitution established under (a) above;

    (d) notify to the Proctors not later than the end of the second
    week of every Full Term the programme of meetings and speakers which has
    been arranged for that term (e.g. by sending them a copy of its term-card);

    (e) appoint a president (or similar principal officer) who shall
    be a matriculated member of the University in residence for the purpose of
    fulfilling the requirements of any statute, decree, or regulation of the
    University or reading for any degree, diploma, or certificate of the University
    or a member of one of the other institutions listed in (l) below
    attending the institution for the purpose of undertaking a course of study
    (subject in the latter case to the member's signing, on election to office, an
    undertaking to abide by the provisions of § 1, cl. 6, and to accept the
    authority of the Proctors on club matters);

    (f) appoint a secretary who shall be a matriculated member of
    the University in residence for the purpose of fulfilling the requirements of any
    statute, decree, or regulation of the University or reading for any degree,
    diploma, or certificate of the University, or a member of one of the other
    institutions listed in (l) below attending the institution for the
    purpose of undertaking a course of study (subject in the latter case to a
    member's signing, on election to office, an undertaking to abide by the
    provisions of § 1, cl. 6, and to accept the authority of the Proctors on
    club matters) and who shall keep a proper record of its activities;

    (g) appoint a treasurer who shall be a matriculated member
    of the University in residence for the purpose of fulfilling the requirements of
    any statute, decree, or regulation of the University or reading for any degree,
    diploma, or certificate of the University or a member of one of the other
    institutions listed in (l) below attending the institution for the
    purpose of undertaking a course of study (subject in the latter case to the
    member's signing, on election to office, an undertaking to abide by the
    provisions of § 1, cl. 6, and to accept the authority of the Proctors on
    club matters) and who shall keep a proper record of its financial transactions
    which shall be available for inspection at the request of the Senior Member or
    the Proctors; and shall forward to the Proctors by the end of the second week
    of each term a copy of the accounts for the preceding term signed by the
    Senior Member for retention on the Proctors' files;

    (h) not appoint several individuals jointly to hold any of the
    offices specified in (e), (f), and (g) nor
    allow any individual to hold more than one of these offices at a time;

    (i) appoint a member of Congregation as Senior Member who
    shall be an
    ex officio member of its committee;

    (j) notify to the Proctors by the end of the second week
    of
    each term the names of its officers and the names of the members of its
    committee. Inform the Proctors if it is to be disbanded and in doing so present
    a financial statement;

    (k) notify the Proctors immediately of any changes in holders
    of the offices specified in (e), (f), and (g);

    (l) admit to membership only members of the University,
    those whose names are on the Register of Visiting Students and, at the
    discretion of its committee, members of Ruskin College, of Plater College, of
    Ripon College, Cuddesdon, St Stephen's House, and members of the
    Westminster Institute of Oxford Brookes University who are registered to read
    for degrees or other qualifications validated by the University of Oxford;

    (m) admit to membership, if it so wishes, other persons
    not
    being members of the University, or one of the institutions listed in
    (l) above, provided that non-university members shall not constitute
    more than one-fifth of the total membership;

    (n) if having a turnover in excess of £15,000 in the preceding year,
    or if owing to a change in the nature or scale of its activities, confidently
    expecting to have such a turnover in the current year, submit its accounts for
    audit by auditors approved in advance by the Proctors. Accounts are to be
    ready for audit within four months of the end of its financial year and the costs
    of the audit shall be borne by the non-sports club. If requested by the auditors
    the non-sports club shall submit accounts and related material as a basis for a
    review of accounting procedures, the cost likewise to be borne by the non-
    sports club;

    (o) maintain a register of current members who shall elect or appoint
    the
    officers (including those specified in (e), (f), and
    (g)) and who shall have ultimate responsibility for the activities of
    the non-sports club. This register must be made available for inspection by the
    Proctors on request;

    (p) notify the Proctors if the non-sports club ceases to operate, and
    at the
    same time submit a final statement of accounts.

    (ii) Each officer of a non-sports club must, on relinquishing his or her
    appointment, promptly hand to his or her successor in office (or to another
    member of the club nominated by its committee) all official documents and
    records belonging to the club, together with (on request from the club's
    committee) any other property of the club which may be in his or her
    possession, and must complete any requirements to transfer authority relating
    to control of the club's bank account, building society account, or other
    financial affairs.

    (iii) In exceptional circumstances, at the request of a non-sports club, the
    Proctors shall have discretion to dispense from the requirements of any of
    subclauses (i) (e), (f), (g),
    (h),
    (i), (j), (l), (m), and (n), subject to such
    terms and conditions as they may from time to time see fit to impose.

    7. (i) Each sports club which registers with the Proctors shall:

    (a) establish a constitution and deposit a copy of it
    with the
    Director of Sport. This constitution must include provisions satisfactory to the
    Proctors relating to safety and insurance matters and must provide for the
    sports club to appoint a president (or similar principal officer), a secretary and
    a treasurer as in 6 (i) (e), (f), (g), and (
    h) above; must provide for the club to admit members as in 6
    (l) and (m) above; and must provide for the club to be
    run by a committee on which members of the University, both Senior and
    Junior, are in a majority;

    (b) act in accordance with the constitution established
    under
    (a) above;

    (c) advise the Proctors promptly, through the Director
    of Sport,
    of any changes in the constitution established under (a) above;

    (d) be designated or redesignated by the Proctors, as
    they see
    fit after consulting the Sports Strategy Committee, to be a `foundation sport',
    `development sport', `established sport', or `recognised sport';

    (e) appoint to its committee a Senior Member (who
    shall be
    a person who is a Member of Congregation) through whom the club is
    accountable to the Proctors: in the case of a sports club designated by the
    Proctors to be a `recognised sport' in accordance with (d) above,
    the Senior Member shall be the Director of Sport ex officio, who
    shall be formally responsible for the affairs of each recognised sports club;

    (f) unless designated by the Proctors to be a
    `recognised sport'
    in accordance with (d) above, present to the Proctors, through the
    Director of Sport, annual accounts together with a copy of the club's current
    constitution and list of officers (such accounts to be submitted not later than
    four months after the end of the financial year to which they relate). During
    the first year of registration, a club may however be required by the Proctors
    to submit termly accounts. If having a turnover in excess of £30,000 in
    the preceding year, or if owing to a change in the nature or scale of its
    activities, confidently expecting to have such a turnover in the current year, a
    sports club must submit its accounts for audit by auditors approved in advance
    by the Proctors. Accounts are to be ready for audit within four months of the
    end of its financial year and the costs of the audit shall be borne by the sports
    club. If requested by the auditors, the sports club shall submit accounts and
    related material as the basis for a review of accounting procedures, the costs
    likewise to be borne by the sports club;

    (g) ensure that all paid and unpaid club administrative
    and
    coaching appointments are ratified by the Sports Strategy Committee and that
    all coaches are accredited where appropriate by the relevant national governing
    body.

    (ii) Each officer of a sports club must, on relinquishing his or her
    appointment, promptly hand to his or her successor in office (or to another
    member of the club nominated by its committee) all official documents and
    records belonging to the club, together with (on request from the club's
    committee) any other property of the club which may be in his or her
    possession, and must complete any requirements to transfer authority relating
    to control of the club's bank account, building society account or any other
    financial affairs.

    (iii) Any registered sports club may apply to the Proctors, through the
    Sports Strategy Committee, for permission to co-operate in the establishment
    of a federal structure or representative team.

    (iv) There shall be only one registered club for each sport, with the
    possibility of the club being federal in nature.

    (v) In exceptional circumstances, at the request of a sports club submitted
    through the Director of Sport, the Proctors shall have discretion to dispense
    from the requirements of any of subclauses (i) (a) to
    (g), subject to such terms and conditions as they may from time
    to time see fit to impose.

    8. (i) A publication which registers with the Proctors shall

    (a) notify to the Proctors by the end of the second
    week of
    each term the names of its editor or editors and the names of any other persons
    who have agreed to assume financial responsibility and shall promptly notify
    to the Proctors any changes in its editor or editors;

    (b) appoint a member of Congregation as its Senior
    Member
    who shall be kept informed of the activities of the organisation;

    (c) keep a proper record of its financial transactions
    which
    shall be available for inspection at the request of the Senior Member or the
    Proctors; and forward to the Proctors by the end of the second week of each
    term a copy of the accounts for the preceding term signed by the Senior
    Member for retention on the Proctors' files;

    (d) inform the Proctors when publication ceases and
    in doing
    so present a financial statement; and

    (e) in the event of having a turnover in excess of
    £15,000 in the preceding year, or, owing to a change in the nature or
    scale of its activities, if confidently expecting to have such a turnover in the
    current year, shall submit its accounts for audit by auditors approved in
    advance by the Proctors. Accounts shall be ready for audit within four months
    of the end of the financial year of the publication. If requested by the auditors,
    the publication shall submit accounts and related materials as a basis for
    accounting procedures, the cost likewise to be borne by the organisation for the
    publication.

    (ii) In exceptional circumstances, at the request of a publication, the
    Proctors shall have discretion to dispense from the requirement of subclauses
    (i) (b) and (c) subject to such terms and conditions as
    they may from time to time see fit to impose.

    9. Failure to comply with this regulation may result in the non-sports club,
    sports club, or publication being deregistered by the Proctors.

    Return to top of this page


    § II. Motor vehicles

    No Junior Member of the University shall park a motor vehicle on any land of
    the University without the express permission of the person or body which has
    charge of that land. A motor vehicle parked without such permission may be
    wheel-clamped or towed away and a penalty charge may be incurred.

    Return to top of this page


    § III. Defacement of property

    1. No Junior Member of the University shall intentionally and without
    lawful authority deface any building, wall, fence, or other structure within six
    miles of Carfax, by inscribing thereon any writing or posting thereon any bill.
    Any breach of this regulation will be treated as a university offence. Where the
    offending matter relates to the activity of a club, society, or publication, the
    committee of that club, society, or publication will be held collectively
    responsible.

    Return to top of this page


    § IV. Behaviour after examinations

    1. No Junior Member of the University, other than a candidate presenting
    himself or herself for examination, shall, at any time between the hours of
    12.15 and 1 p.m. or 5.15 and 6 p.m., or between fifteen minutes before and
    thirty minutes after the scheduled time for the completion of a Public
    Examination of the University for ten or more candidates, in the company of
    one or more other persons either:

    (i) gather without the prior permission of the Proctors in a public
    thoroughfare within 300 metres of any place where such an examination is
    being, or has just been, held; or

    (ii) having gathered in a public thoroughfare within one mile of any such
    place, fail to disperse after having been requested to do so by one or more of
    the Proctors, the Marshal, or their constables.

    For the purpose of this regulation, persons shall be regarded as having gathered
    if they assemble, or form part of an assembly, in such a way as to cause, or
    to be likely to cause, obstruction of a public thoroughfare.

    2. (i) No Junior Member of the University shall, in any place or
    thoroughfare to which members of the general public have access within six
    miles of Carfax, throw, pour, apply or use any thing or substance in a way
    which is intended, or is likely, to cause injury to any person, or damage to, or
    defacement or destruction of, any property.

    (ii) No Junior Member shall be in possession of any thing or substance
    with intention to commit an offence under § IV 2(i) of the Regulations
    of the Rules Committee.

    Return to top of this page


    § V. Overseas Activities

    (i) No Junior Member of the University shall participate in any sports tours
    which involve overseas travel during Full Term or the Thursday and Friday
    immediately preceding Full Term without the prior permission of
    (a) the Senior Tutor of that member's college and (b)
    the Proctors. The written permission of the Senior Tutor is to accompany any
    request to the Proctors.

    (ii) No Junior Member of the University shall participate in any activity
    overseas organised by a club or society registered with the Proctors, whether
    during term-time or vacation, unless the plans for such activity have been
    notified at least one calendar month in advance of the date of departure from
    the United Kingdom to (in the case of sports clubs) the Director of Sport or
    (in the case of non-sports clubs and publications) the University Marshal. Each
    Junior Member participating in such activities overseas shall observe any
    conditions imposed by the Proctors on the recommendation as the case may be
    of the Director of Sport or the University Marshal, e.g. relating to the deposit
    of contact addresses, fulfilment of health, safety, and insurance requirements,
    and stipulation of coaches, trainers, or Senior Members to accompany the trip.

    Return to top of this page


    § VI. Rowing on the river

    (i) No Junior Member of the University (other than a Junior Member
    currently in residence at All Souls College, Kellogg College, Linacre College,
    Nuffield College, St Antony's College, St Cross College, Templeton College,
    or Wolfson College) shall participate in rowing on the river between the hours
    of 8.30 a.m. and 1 p.m. from Monday to Friday inclusive during Full Term
    without the prior permission of the Proctors.

    (ii) No Junior Member shall knowingly breach any regulation or instruction
    made by or on the authority of the Director of Sport, by Oxford University
    Rowing Clubs with the consent of the Proctors, or by a responsible external
    body, relating to safety on the river.

    Return to top of this page



    MEMBERSHIP OF THE UNIVERSITY
    DISCIPLINARY COURT

    The following have been chosen by lot, from the panels established by the
    Rules Committee, to serve on the University Disciplinary Court with effect
    from the first day of Trinity Term 2001:

    Congregation Panel: Mr William Swadling (Brasenose), for a
    period of two years (vice Dr Fairweather).

    Junior Members' Panel: Mr Ben Irons (Balliol), for one year
    (vice Mr Goller), and Mr Stefano Mattei (St Hugh's), for one
    year (vice) Mr Sanderson).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    APPOINTMENT OF CLERK OF THE
    UNIVERSITY DISCIPLINARY COURT

    The Vice-Chancellor has appointed H.W.B. Mendus (Simms Solicitors) from a panel
    established by the Rules Committee, to serve as Clerk of the University Disciplinary Court
    for a further period of one year from the first day of Trinity Term 2001.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    BURTON SENIOR SCHOLARSHIP

    The Scholarship has been awarded to YUN-CHI CHEN (B.SC., M.SC.
    National Taiwan University), for a period of two years from 1 October 2001.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ELDON LAW SCHOLARSHIP 2001–2

    The Scholarship has been awarded to EDWARD SAWYER, Lincoln College.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    COMPOSITION OF ELECTORAL BOARD

    The revised composition of the electoral board to the post below, proceedings
    to fill which are currently in progress, is as follows:

    
    Merton Professorship of English Literature
    
                                                Appointed by
    
    Mr Vice-Chancellor                           ex officio
    The Warden of  Merton                        ex officio
    Professor C. Belsey                          Council
    Professor I. Donaldson                       Council
    Dr R.C.S. Walker                             Humanities Board
    Dr J. Pitcher                                English Language and Literature Board
    Professor A. Nuttall                         English Language and Literature Board
    Professor O.P. Taplin                        Literae Humaniores Board
    Professor O. Hufton                          Merton College
    

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    LIBRARY SERVICES


    Trinity Term Special Extended Opening Hours

    In the light of a grant from Oxford University Press to assist with the effects
    of this year's retrenchment it has been possible to continue with the special
    weekend opening extensions at the Radcliffe Science Library and the Radcliffe
    Camera, and to restore Saturday morning opening at the History Faculty
    Library and evening opening at the Politics, International Relations, and
    Sociology Library.

    The Bodleian Law Library continues to receive a grant from
    Lovells Solicitors which will enable its week-end opening arrangements also
    to continue during Trinity Term.

    The details are as follows:

    Radcliffe Science Library

    The Radcliffe Science Library will be open on Sundays, 29 April–June,
    11 a.m.–5 p.m.


    Radcliffe Camera

    The Radcliffe Camera will be open on Saturday afternoons as well as Saturday
    mornings from 21 April to 2 June. The additional hours will be from 1 p.m.
    to 5 p.m.


    Politics, International Relations, and Sociology Library

    The PIRS Library will be able to restore its term-time evening opening to 7
    p.m. from the current 6 p.m.


    History Faculty Library

    The History Faculty Library will open on Saturday mornings, 21
    April–23 June, 9 a.m.–12.45 p.m.


    Bodleian Law Library

    The Bodleian Law Library will be open on Saturdays and Sundays from 21
    April to 10 June. The opening times are: Saturdays, 9 a.m.–5 p.m.;
    Sundays, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. On Saturday, 16 June, opening times revert to
    9 a.m.–1 p.m.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    WOLFSON COLLEGE

    Piano recital

    HELEN ERIKSSON will perform the following works by Chopin at 8 p.m. on
    Saturday, 24 March, in the Hall, Wolfson College: Ballades nos.
    1, 2, 3, and 4; Barcarolle; and Sonata no. 2. Tickets, costing
    £5 (£4 concessions; Wolfson graduate students £2), will be
    available at the door.

    Return to List of Contents of this section





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 22 March 2001: Lectures<br />

    Lectures


    Contents of this
    section:

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue



    INAUGURAL LECTURES


    Dr Lee's Professor of
    Chemistry

    PROFESSOR J. KLEIN will deliver his inaugural lecture at 4.30
    p.m. on Monday, 30 April, in the Physical and Theoretical
    Chemistry Laboratory.

    Subject: `Soft matter: from hieroglyphics to
    biolubrication.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Professor of the Physical
    Examination of Materials

    PROFESSOR D.J.H. COCKAYNE will deliver his inaugural
    lecture at 2.15 p.m. on Thursday, 3 May, in the Sir Martin Wood
    Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon Laboratory.

    Subject: `Exploring the nano-world of
    materials and biology with modern electron microscopy.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Chichele Professor of Public
    International Law

    PROFESSOR A.V. LOWE will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5
    p.m. on Monday, 14 May, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the
    St Cross Building. The subject of the lecture will be announced
    later.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Harold Vyvyan Harmsworth
    Professor of American History

    PROFESSOR T.H. BREEN will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5
    p.m. on Tuesday, 15 May, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `The Lockean Moment: the
    languages of rights on the eve of the American Revolution.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    O'DONNELL LECTURES
    2001

    Scottish Gaelic literature

    PROFESSOR W. GILLIES, Professor of Celtic, University of
    Edinburgh, will deliver the O'Donnell Lectures at 5 p.m. on the
    following days in the Hall, the Taylor Institution.

    Thur. 26 Apr.: `Approaches to Gaelic poetry.'

    Fri. 27 Apr.: `The form and content of Gaelic verse.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    MYRES MEMORIAL
    LECTURE

    PROFESSOR AMÉLIE KUHRT, University College,
    London, will deliver the Myres Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on
    Monday, 7 May, in the McGregor-Matthews Room, New College.

    Subject: `Greeks in Persian and Babylonian
    perspective.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    EMDEN LECTURE

    PROFESSOR R.J. EVANS will deliver the Emden Lecture at 5
    p.m. on Wednesday, 9 May, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `The Germans in British public
    memory since 1945.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    DON FOWLER
    MEMORIAL LECTURE

    PROFESSOR S. HINDS, University of Washington, Seattle, will
    deliver the Don Fowler Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday,
    10 May, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `Material culture: on Cinna, Statius,
    a good book, and a des. res.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    AUNG SAN SUU KYI
    LECTURE

    SIR MARRACK GOULDING will deliver the inaugural Aung San
    Suu Kyi Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 8 May, in the Maplethorpe
    Building, St Hugh's College.

    Subject: `Deliverance from evil.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    LYELL LECTURES IN
    BIBLIOGRAPHY

    The ending of `Alter Orbis': books and learning in twelfth-
    century England

    PROFESSOR P. THOMSON will deliver the Lyell Lectures in
    Bibliography at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in Lecture Theatre 2, the St
    Cross Building.

    26 Apr.:`A clash of cultures? The impact of the
    Norman Conquest.'

    3 May: `The production of books in monastic
    scriptoria.'

    10 May: `Books for secular institutions and
    individuals.'

    17 May: `Cultural subregions and
    networks.'

    24 May: `England and the twelfth-century
    Renaissance.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    LITERAE HUMANIORES

    John Locke Lectures in Philosophy

    Structure and perspective: an empiricist view

    PROFESSOR B. VAN FRAASSEN, Princeton, will deliver the John
    Locke Lectures at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Gulbenkian Lecture
    Theatre, the St Cross Building.

    24 Apr.: `The visible world.'

    1 May: `Structural realism and the
    phenomena.'

    15 May: `Weyl's paradox and Carnap's lost
    world.'

    22 May: `Metaphysical oblivion: realism's
    return.'

    29 May: `Metaphysics abandoned: realism
    evaded.'

    5 June: `I, structure/perspective.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    MEDICAL SCIENCES

    Seminar

    DR J. BENCZIK, University of Helsinki, will give a seminar at 1
    p.m. on Thursday, 5 April, in the Seminar Room, the Research
    Institute, the Churchill Hospital.

    Convener: J.W. Hopewell, MA status,
    Director of Radiobiological Research, Churchill Hospital Research
    Institute.

    Subject: `Correlation of MRI and histological
    changes in the brain after photon and epithermal neutron
    irradiation: pre-clinical studies related to BNCT.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Oxford Clinical Neurosciences Lectures, Trinity Term

    The following lectures will be given at 11.30 a.m. on Fridays in
    the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

    PROFESSOR D.H. MILLER, NMR Research Unit, Institute of
    Neurology

    20 Apr.: `MRI to study the natural
    history and treatment of MS.'

    DR R. LANE, West London Neurosciences Centre, Charing Cross
    Hospital

    11 May: `Heterogeneity in chronic
    fatigue syndrome.'

    DR C. CLARKE, Division of Neuroscience, City Hospital,
    Birmingham

    15 June: `The future of dopamine
    agonists in Parkinson's disease.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    MEDIEVAL AND
    MODERN LANGUAGES

    Research seminar in early modern French literature and
    culture

    The following seminars will be held at 5.15 p.m. on Thursdays in
    the New Seminar Room, St John's College.

    CAROL CLARK

    26 Apr.: `Luigi Riccoboni: a fellow-
    professional looks at Molière.'

    JOHN D. LYONS, Virginia

    10 May: `The practice of imagination:
    embodied thought in seventeenth-century France.'

    CHRISTIAN BELIN, Université de Montpellier, Paul
    Valéry

    24 May: `L'imaginaire dans
    Les Pensées.'

    CATHY JONES, Oxford Brookes

    7 June: `Form and fragmentation in
    Guillaume de La Tayssonière's Amoureuses
    Occupations
    .'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    SOCIAL SCIENCES

    Evidence-based practice

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in
    Barnett House, Wellington Square. Details of the first meeting (24 April) are not available
    at present. Details of the final meeting (15
    May) will be announced later.

    Convener: J.E. Lewis MA, Barnett
    Professor of Social Policy.

    PROFESSOR B. SHELDON, University of Exeter

    1 May: `The effectiveness of
    community care services.'

    A. NEWMAN, Barnardo's

    8 May: `What works in child
    protection.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    DEPARTMENT OF
    BIOCHEMISTRY


    Rodney Porter Memorial
    Lecture

    STANLEY PRUSINER, Director of the Institute for
    Neurodegenerative Diseases and Professor of Neurology and
    Biochemistry, University of California, San Francisco, will deliver
    the fourth Rodney Porter Memorial Lecture at 4 p.m. on
    Thursday, 31 May, in the University Museum of Natural History.
    Enquiries may be directed to Pauline Rudd (telephone: (2)75340),
    Fran Platt (telephone: (2)75725), or Kieran Clarke (telephone:
    (2)75255).

    Subject: `The mad cow crisis.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    CENTRE FOR
    BRAZILIAN STUDIES

    Postponement of conference

    The Third Annual Oxford Globo Conference, on `Preparing Brazil
    for the twenty-first century: a new consensus? A new agenda?',
    due to have been held on 19 and 20 March, will now take place on
    21 and 22 May. Further details will be announced later.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    OXFORD CENTRE FOR
    HEBREW AND JEWISH STUDIES


    David Patterson Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 8 p.m. on Wednesdays in
    the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton
    Manor.

    The OCHJS minibus will depart from the Playhouse, Beaumont
    Street, at 6.40 p.m. and 7.45 p.m. and return from Yarnton Manor
    at 9.45 p.m. Single fare: £1.35 (students (£1).

    Convener: G. Abramson, MA, Cowley
    Lecturer in Post-Biblical Hebrew.

    PROFESSOR J. ROTH, Claremont McKenna College

    25 Apr.: `Into the arms of strangers:
    ethical dilemmas during and after the Holocaust.'

    PROFESSOR A. STEINWEIS, Nebraska

    2 May: `The "antisemitism of
    reason": Nazi research on Jews and Judaism.'

    PROFESSOR M. HART, Florida International University

    9 May: `Franz Boas as German,
    American, Jew.'

    PROFESSOR D. GOODBLATT, California

    16 May: `Tribes with flags and
    imagined communities: on Jewish nationalism in
    antiquity.'

    PROFESSOR J. MAGNESS, Tufts University

    23 May: `The archaeology of
    Qumran.'

    RABBI ELIAHU KLEIN, Institute of Jewish Meditation,
    Chochmat Haluv, Northern California

    30 May: `Kabbalah of creation: Isaac
    Luria's earlier mysticism.'

    PROFESSOR I. SHAHID, Georgetown University

    6 June: `Byzantium and the Arabs in
    late antiquity: from the fourth to the seventh century.'

    M. BOHM-DUCHEN, art historian

    13 June: `Gender, trauma, creativity:
    in search of Charlotte Salomon.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    OXFORD CENTRE FOR
    ISLAMIC STUDIES

    HIS EXCELLENCY MR ALIJA IZETBEGOVIC, former
    President of Bosnia, will lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Monday, 2 April,
    in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `Bosnia on the historical frontier.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    MAISON
    FRANÇAISE

    Cancellation of meeting

    The European Movement Open Forum on `European
    Union—fact or fiction', with Chris Huhne, MEP, due to have
    taken place on 23 March, has been cancelled.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ALL SOULS COLLEGE


    Chichele Lectures

    All Souls and the end of the Ancien
    Régime
    , c.1750–1870

    The Chichele Lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the
    Old Library, All Souls College.

    DR J. DAVIS, Warden

    18 May: `Founder's kin.'

    THE REVD PROFESSOR JOHN MCMANNERS, Chaplain

    25 May: `Bishop Heber.'

    DR S. GREEN, Fellow

    1 June: `W.H. Fremantle and the
    destruction of the Ancien Régime in
    All Souls.'

    8 June: `Epitaph to the Ancien
    Régime
    : Montagu Burrows and The
    Worthies of All Souls
    .'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Foreign Policy Studies
    Programme

    The United States and East Asian security

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the
    Old Library, All Souls College.

    Conveners: Professor Joseph Nye and
    Professor Robert O.'Neill.

    PROFESSOR NYE

    26 Apr.: `The US, East Asia, and the
    Pacific: challenges and prospects.'

    DR YUEN FOONG KHONG

    3 May: `Will the US fight over
    Taiwan?'

    PROFESSOR O.'NEILL

    10 May: `Working with the United
    States: an allied perspective.'

    PROFESSOR M. YAHUDA, LSE

    17 May: `China's security
    perspectives on Asia and the Pacific.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    BALLIOL COLLEGE

    Leonard Stein Lectures

    PROFESSOR ILAN PAPPE, Haifa University, will deliver the
    Leonard Stein Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following days in the
    Examination Schools.

    Thur. 3 May: `Demythologising the
    foundational myths of the Jewish State: 1948 in the eyes of
    the present.'

    Fri. 4 May: `Israel and Palestine in the post-
    Oslo era: the peace camp in search of an agenda.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Smithies Lectures

    PROFESSOR GEORGE HAY, Visiting Fellow, will deliver the
    Smithies Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following days in Balliol
    College.

    Thur. 10 May: `Competition law in the
    twenty-first century: an introduction.'

    Fri. 11 May: `The intersection of law and
    economics: modern history, future trends.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Visiting Fellows' Lectures

    The following lectures will be given by Visiting Fellows at 5 p.m.
    on the days stated in Balliol College.

    PROFESSOR O. GJELSVIK

    Mon. 21 May: `Free will.'

    Tue. 22 May: `Weak will.'

    PROFESSOR S. SCHARENGUIVEL

    Thur. 31 May: `Resolving custody
    disputes between named parents: the development of South
    African and Sri Lankan law.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    EXETER COLLEGE


    Marett Memorial Lecture

    PROFESSOR J. MALLORY, Belfast, will delive the Marett
    Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 27 April, in the
    Saskatchewan Lecture Room, Exeter College.

    Subject: `The cultural worlds of the
    Indo-Europeans.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    MAGDALEN COLLEGE


    Waynflete Lectures

    Seeing the Grail: the dynamics of a medieval myth

    PROFESSOR M. ALISON STONES, University of Pittsburgh,
    will deliver the Waynflete Lectures at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in
    the Grove Auditorium, Magdalen College.

    2 May: `The manuscript tradition:
    Chrétien de Troyes and his continuators, the
    Lancelot-Graal, Parzival and the Tavola Ritonda: concealing
    and revealing.'

    9 May: `The cultural context I: sacred
    objects, chosen people—the Chalice of the Lord, Joseph
    of Arimathea, the Maries, and the Grail Winners.'

    16 May: `The cultural context II: sacred
    places and quests—France, Britain, and the Holy
    Land.'

    23 May: `Structures and transformations:
    patterns of rejection and reception—patrons and
    makers.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    MANSFIELD COLLEGE

    BISHOP JOHN S. SPONG will lecture as follows in the chapel,
    Mansfield College. The lectures will be followed by
    discussion.

    Wed. 23 May, 4 p.m.: `Casting aside the
    traditional Christian mythology.' (Worship at 6
    p.m.
    )

    Thur. 24 May, 7.30 p.m.: `Developing a
    new Christ mythology for the twenty-first century.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ST JOHN'S COLLEGE


    Woolf Lecture

    PROFESSOR N. WHITE, Director, Wellcome Trust Research
    Unit, Bangkok, will deliver the Woolf Lecture at 6 p.m. on
    Tuesday, 27 March, in the Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St
    John's College.

    Subject: `Drugs against malaria: the parasite
    fights back.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    TRINITY COLLEGE


    Richard Hillary Lecture

    IAN McEWAN will deliver the Richard Hillary Lecture at 5 p.m.
    on Wednesday, 2 May, in the St Cross Building.

    Subject: `Literature and human nature.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    OXFORD
    ENGLISH DICTIONARY
    FORUM

    RAYMOND HICKEY, University of Essen, will lecture at 5 p.m.
    on Monday, 26 March, in Rewley House.

    Subject: `The lexicon of Irish English from
    a modern perspective.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    TRANSLATION
    RESEARCH IN OXFORD

    Anatomy of laughter/traduire le rire

    This international and interdisciplinary conference, held in
    association with the Maison Française, the European
    Humanities Research Centre, and the French Embassy, will be held
    in St Hugh's College, 13–16 September.

    Topics will include: the physics and metaphysics of laughter; the
    colour of laughter; laughter and the architecture of hysteria;
    laughter and carnival in Bakhtin; Darwinian perspectives on
    translatability and laughter; why can't you tickle yourself?; black
    humour; Jewish humour; puns/calembours,
    etc.

    Speakers will include: Susan Bassnett, Laurent Bazin, Anthea Bell,
    Sarah Blakemore, Ranjit Bolt, Malcolm Bowie, Peter Bush, Ted
    Cohen, Jean-Michel Déprats, Susan Greenfield, Terry
    Hale, Mike Holland, David Krakauer, Adam Phillips, Walter
    Redfern, Willibal Ruch, Aline Schulman, Jean-Claude Sergeant,
    Shashi Tharoor, Gérard Toulouse, and Alain Viala.

    Entertainment: an evening of theatre (Arlequin),
    and a Magic Lantern show.

    Further details are available from Edith McMorran, St Hugh's
    College, Oxford OX2 6LE (e-mail: edith.mcmorran@st-
    hughs.ox.ac.uk), or Elizabeth Mansour (telephone: Oxford
    378139). Details can also be found on the TRIO Web site,
    http://www.trio.org.uk.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 22 March 2001: Grants and Funding<br />

    Grants and Research Funding


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    SASAKAWA FUND SCHOLARSHIPS

    Applications are invited from students who have been accepted by
    the University to undertake a research degree in Michaelmas Term
    2001 as Probationer Research Students or D.Phil. students. The
    scholarships are to be awarded to applicants who are Japanese
    nationals currently on a course or starting a course at the
    University, or alternatively to students from the UK or other
    countries currently on a course or starting a course at the
    University which requires some period of study in Japan. Up to
    two awards of up to £5,000 will be made for one year in the
    first instance, and may be renewed for a maximum of three years,
    subject to satisfactory progress. The closing date for
    applications is 1 May.

    Candidates are asked to send a letter of application, a
    curriculum vitae, and details of their proposed
    research or course of study to the Secretary of the Sasakawa
    Fund, the Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE
    (telephone: Oxford (2)78225, fax: (2)78190, e-mail:
    alix.slater@orinst.ox.ac.uk). Each applicant should arrange for
    two referees to submit references to the secretary by the same
    date.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section





    <br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 22 March 2001: Examinations and Boards<br />

    Examinations and Boards


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent
    entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    CHAIRMAN OF EXAMINERS

    The Vice-Chancellor desires to call the attention of all examiners to the
    provisions of Ch. VI, Sect. ii.c, § 1, clauses 1--3, which require
    examiners in all university examinations to appoint one of their number to act
    as Chairman, to notify the appointment to the Vice-Chancellor, and to publish
    it in the University Gazette.

    He desires that these appointments shall be notified to the Clerk of the Schools
    who will inform the Vice-Chancellor and see that notice of them is duly
    published in the University Gazette.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    EXAMINATION SCHOOLS


    Accommodation for lectures

    Professors, Readers, and University Lecturers who wish to lecture in the
    Schools next term are asked to make a booking by the end of the current term.

    When booking, please indicate the number of students expected to attend the
    lecture; this information is essential if the total is expected to exceed
    100.

    All lectures should start on the hour, and afternoon lectures should finish by
    6 p.m. To allow room for changeovers, lecturers should arrange to complete
    their lecture by five minutes to the hour.

    Owing to examination requirements in Trinity Term, lecture rooms are only
    fully available in first, second, and third weeks.

    Overhead and 35-mm projectors and a limited number of video and LCD
    projectors are available if booked twenty-four hours in advance. Microphones
    are provided in the Writing Schools.

    Short equipment familiarisation sessions (of ten to fifteen minutes' duration)
    can be arranged at convenient times. Please contact the Schools (details below)
    if you wish to arrange a familiarisation session.

    All enquiries in respect of lecture bookings, facilities, and equipment should
    be addressed in the first instance to Martin Batchan (telephone: (2)76901,
    e-mail: martin.batchan@admin.ox.ac.uk).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF
    THEOLOGY


    Honour School of Theology and
    Philosophy and Theology, Paper 11: Further Studies in History and Doctrine

    Under the provisions of paper (11) of the Honour School of Theology
    (`Further Studies in History and Doctrine') (Examination
    Decrees
    , 2000, p. 531), the Board of the Faculty of Theology hereby
    publishes the list of theologians (with texts) on which questions will be set in
    the examination in 2002.

    (a) Origen

    Origen on First Principles, Book I, trans. G.W. Butterworth
    (Peter Smith, 1973).

    Prayer, trans. Rowan Greer in An Exhortation to
    Martyrdom
    , etc. (Paulist Press: Classics of Western
    Spirituality
    series, 1979).

    Prologue to the Commentary on the Song of Songs, trans.
    Rowan Greer, ibid.


    (b) Augustine

    Confessions, Book 10, trans. H. Chadwick (OUP, 1991).

    Concerning The City of God against the Pagans, Book 14,
    trans. R.W. Dyson (CUP, 1998).

    On the Trinity, Book 10, trans. John Burnaby, in
    Augustine, Later Works, Library of Christian
    Classics
    , vol. VIII (SCM Press, 1955).


    (c) Aquinas

    Summa Theologiae Ia, qq. 1–3, 13, 44–6;
    IaIIae, qq. 109–14; IIaIIae, qq. 1–2, 23–7; IIIa, qq.
    2–6, 46–9 (Blackfriars edition, vols. 1, 2, 3, 8, 30, 31, 34, 48,
    54).


    (d) Luther 1500–1525

    E. Gordon Rupp and B. Drewery, Martin Luther: Documents of
    Modern History
    (Edward Arnold, series, 1970), pp. 1–10,
    15–41, 54–82, 100–2, 107–19, 121–9).

    Three Treatises, second revised edition (Fortress Press,
    Philadelphia, 1970).


    (e) Calvin

    G.R. Potter and M. Greengrass, John Calvin: Documents of Modern
    History
    (Edward Arnold, 1983), pp. 1–109.

    Institutes of the Christian Religion, trans. F.L. Battles:
    Library of Christian Classics, vols. XX, XXI (SCM Press,
    1961), bk. 1, chs. i–v; bk. 3, chs. xxi, xxiii; bk. 4, chs. ii, ix, xii
    (Sections 1–13), xx.


    (f) Schleiermacher

    On Religion. Speeches to its Cultured Despisers, Speeches
    1, 2, and 5 (CUP, 1988).

    The Christian Faith, sectt. 13–19 and 92–105
    (T. and T. Clark, 1968).


    (g) Newman

    Apologia Pro Vita Sua (Penguin, 1994).

    Fifteen Sermons Preached before the University of Oxford
    (University of Notre Dame Press, 1997), x, xi, xiii, xv.

    An Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, 1878
    edition (University of Notre Dame Press, 1989), chs. 1–5.

    Newman the Theologian: A Reader, ed. I. Ker (Collins,
    1990), pp. 66–122, 199–275.


    ( h) Barth

    `The Strange New World Within the Bible' in The Word of God and
    the Word of Man
    (Hodder and Stoughton, London, 1928), pp.
    28–50.

    Church Dogmatics, I/1, § 1 (T. and T. Clark,
    Edinburgh, 1976), pp. 3–24.

    Church Dogmatics, IV/1, § 59 (T. and T. Clark,
    Edinburgh, 1956), pp. 157–357.


    (i) Tillich

    Systematic Theology, vol. 1: Introduction, and vol. 2 (SCM
    Press, 1978), or (J. Nisbet and Co.), vol. 1, 1953, and vol. 2, 1957.


    (j) Bonhoeffer

    The Cost of Discipleship, SCM, 1959 (twentieth impression,
    2000), 33--68.

    Life Together, SCM, 1955 (nineteenth impression, 1998),
    7--26.

    Ethics, SCM, 1955 (seventh impression, 1998), 194--230.

    Letters and Papers from Prison, SCM enlarged edition, 1971
    (eighth impression, 1999): `After Ten Years' (pp. 3--17); letters to E. Bethge
    (pp. 278--87, 324-- 9, 343--7, 357--61).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

    With the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, and where
    applicable, of the
    Humanities and Social Sciences Boards, the following changes in regulations made by
    divisional boards, boards of faculties, and the Standing Committee for Engineering,
    Economics, and Management and Related Schools will come into effect on 6 April.


    1 Life and Environmental Sciences Board

    (a) Master of Science: Biology (Integrative Bioscience)

    With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 760, l. 40, insert the following sentence at the
    end of 3(i):

    `Candidates shall not deal with substantially the same
    material in their essays submitted for different topics'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (b) Master of Science by Coursework

    With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 784, l. 43, delete
    `Board of the Faculty of Anthropology and Geography' and substitute `Life and
    Environmental Sciences Divisional Board'.

    2 Ibid., p. 785, l. 42, delete `Board of the Faculty of
    Anthropology and Geography' and substitute `Life and Environmental Sciences Divisional
    Board'.

    3 Ibid., p. 796, l. 29, delete `Board of the Faculty of
    Anthropology and Geography' and substitute `Life and Environmental Sciences Divisional
    Board'.

    4 Ibid., p. 807, after l. 7 insert:

    `1. Candidates must follow a course of instruction in Medical Anthropology for at least
    three terms, and will, when entering for the examination, be required to produce a certificate
    from their supervisor to this effect.

    2. Candidates will be required to present themselves for written
    and, where invited, oral examinations, and to submit three copies of a dissertation in
    prescribed form on an approved topic as defined below.

    3. The written examination will consist of four papers on the
    syllabus described in the Schedule.

    4. Each candidate will be required to submit a dissertation of
    approximately 10,000 words, on a subject selected in consultation with the supervisor and
    approved by the Chairman of Examiners. The proposed title of the dissertation together with
    a paragraph describing its scope and the supervisor's written endorsement, must be submitted
    to the Chairman of Examiners by Monday of the first week of Trinity Term.

    5. Three typewritten copies of the dissertation must be
    delivered not later than noon on the second Monday in September in the year in which the
    examination is taken, to the Chairman of the Examiners, M.Sc. in Medical Anthropology,
    c/o Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford.

    The examiners shall retain one copy of the dissertation of each candidate who passes
    the examination for deposit in the departmental library.

    6. An oral examination, if held, may be on the candidate's
    written papers, or dissertation, or both.

    7. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the
    whole examination.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Schedule

    Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in four papers as follows:

    1. Concepts of disease, illness, health, and medicine in global
    perspective

    The scope of this paper includes the following topics: epidemiology, global distribution of
    disease patterns, co-existence of alternative therapeutic or healing systems, phenomenology
    of the body, and cross-cultural concepts of health, pain, illness, disease causation, diagnosis,
    and cure. Topics analysed from conjoined biological and socio-cultural perspectives include
    human growth and personhood, adaptability, nutrition, health and social
    inequality, reproduction and fertility, disease identification, and epidemiology. Issues
    associated with informed consent; preparation of research proposals.

    2. Theory and practice of bio-medicine and of other medical systems

    The scope of this paper includes the impact of different medical systems on the health of
    populations, issues of public health and policy on a comparative and global basis, including
    specific campaigns (e.g. that eliminating smallpox in South Asia and attempts to characterise
    and treat AIDS). It draws on ethnographies of particular societies to illustrate and test
    theoretical claims in medical anthropology, covering different ways in which people manage
    fertility, reproduction, death and disease, patient–healer relations, the explanatory roles
    of divination, herbalism, alternative therapies, dramatherapy, religion, shamanism, sorcery,
    and culturally defined concepts of risk,
    vulnerabilty, fate, and evil.

    3. Critical medical anthropology

    The scope of this paper includes a critique of the assumptions and methods of this sub-field
    of anthropology and
    of its links with other fields and disciplines, including the place of material culture in
    medicine. Critique of the Cartesian mind–body dichotomy and methodological
    problems specially affecting medical anthropology; fieldwork and data collection methods;
    quantitative and qualitative techniques; cultural property and indigenous rights; preparing
    research proposals; ethical issues.

    4. Ecological and bio-medical anthropology

    The scope of this paper includes consideration of the concept of well-being as being broader
    than conventional concepts of health and comprising ecological, biological, and socio-cultural
    perspectives; relationships between bio-
    diversity, ecological change, and changing patterns of
    disease, diagnosis, and cure; the role of economic transformation in health and environmental
    issues; changing relationships between diet, nutrition, infection, human growth, and chronic
    disease; pharmacology and genomics in research and practice; health and ethics.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    2 Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board

    (a) Honour School of Metallurgy and Science of Materials

    (i) With effect from October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 426, l. 27, delete
    `advanced'.

    2 Ibid., ll. 41–2, delete `or who have completed an
    approved course of instruction in a foreign language'.

    3 Ibid., p. 427, delete ll. 4–9 and substitute:

    `Candidates shall be required to submit a portfolio of
    Engineering and Society coursework containing one essay or report on each of three
    approved topics specified by
    the sub-faculty of Materials, as follows: (a) a management case study, AND
    (b) a safety assessment, AND (c) EITHER `the engineering
    profession' OR an alternative approved topic; except that candidates who have completed an
    approved course of instruction in a foreign language shall be required to submit one essay
    or report on a safety assessment. Written work shall be typed and each essay or
    report shall have not more than 2,000 words. A list of
    alternative approved topics shall be'.

    4 Ibid., p. 428, l. 3, delete `Advanced option' and substitute
    `Option'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (ii) With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 427, l. 7 [as amended by (a)
    above], delete `2,000' and substitute `3,000'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (iii) With effect from October 2003 (for first examination in 2004)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 428, l. 26, delete
    `and' and substitute `,'.

    2 Ibid., l. 29, after `investigation' insert `, and a description of
    the engineering context of the investigation'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (b) Honour School of Engineering Science

    (i) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 170, l. 30, delete `Cams and equivalent
    mechanisms' and substitute `Gear trains'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (ii) With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 168, l. 17, delete `2,000' and substitute
    `3,000'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    3 Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board and
    Social Sciences Board

    Honour School of Materials, Economics, and Management and Related Studies

    With effect from October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 273, l. 22, delete `advanced'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    4 Social Sciences Board

    Final Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

    (i) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 486, l. 38, after `show knowledge' insert `(in
    at least two answers)'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (ii) With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 485, delete ll. 22–9 and
    substitute:

    `207. Russian Government and Politics

    Candidates will be required to show knowledge of government and politics both in the Soviet
    Union (with particular reference to the period from the end of the Stalin era
    in 1953 to the end of the USSR in 1991) and in post-Soviet Russia. Major objects of study
    are the power structure and the changing relationships between political institutions under
    Communism and post-Communism, the process
    of political transformation of the Soviet system, and the post-Soviet transition. Specific
    attention is devoted to
    political leadership, the development of representative institutions, the national question and
    federalism, the relationship between economic and political power, political parties and
    interests, ideology, and political culture.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    5 Board of the Faculty of Law

    (a) Final Honour School of Jurisprudence

    With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 243, delete ll. 11, 12.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (b) Bachelor of Civil Law and Magister Juris

    With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 943, delete l. 16.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    6 Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores

    Philosophy in all Honour Schools including Philosophy

    With effect from October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 471, delete ll. 19–26 and substitute:

    `130. Either (a) Plato, Republic.

    Candidates will be expected to have read books I, IV–VII, X in Greek (Burnet, Oxford
    Classical Text), and books II–III, VIII–IX in translation (Grube, revised Reeve,
    Hackett). There will be a compulsory question containing passages for translation and
    comment from the books read in Greek; any passages for comment from the remaining books
    will be accompanied by a translation.

    Or (b) Plato, Theaetetus and
    Sophist.

    Candidates will be expected to have read both dialogues in Greek (Duke et al., Oxford
    Classical Text). There will be a compulsory question containing passages for translation and
    comment.

    131. Either (a) Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics.

    Candidates will be expected to have read books I–III, IV–VII, X in Greek
    (Bywater, Oxford Classical Text), and books IV–V, VIII–IX in translation
    (Irwin, Hackett second edition). There will be a compulsory question containing passages for
    translation and comment from the books read in Greek; any passages for comment from the
    remaining books will be accompanied by a translation.

    Or (b) Aristotle, Physics.

    Candidates will be expected to have read the work in Greek (Ross, Oxford Classical Text).
    There will be a compulsory question containing passages for translation and comment.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    7 Board of the Faculty of Management

    (a) Preliminary Examination in Economics and Management

    With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 73, l. 10, after `management.' insert
    `Candidates may be charged for the provision of study packs.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    (b) Honour School of Economics and Management

    With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 162, l. 31, after `Schedule A.' insert
    `Candidates may be charged for the provision of study packs for these compulsory subjects.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    8 Standing Committee for Engineering, Economics,
    and Management and Related Schools

    Honour School of Engineering, Economics, and Management

    With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first Part I examination in 2003)

    In Examination Decrees, 2000, p. 182, delete ll. 14–28, and renumber
    items 3 and 4 which follow as items 2 and 3.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE

    The Medical Sciences Board has granted leave to YUK-MING DENNIS LO, Christ Church,
    to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.

    The evidence submitted by the candidate was entitled: `Molecular analysis of non-host
    cell-free DNA in human plasma and serum'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF
    DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

    The examiners appointed by the following divisional board, faculty boards, and committees
    give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

    Medical Sciences

    H. REDDY, Trinity: `Cortical reorganisation and plasticity: applying fMRI to study
    disease'.

    Department of Physiology, Friday, 30 March, 11 a.m.


    Examiners: J. Stein, A.J. Thompson.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Biological Sciences

    I. DUNAND-SAUTHIER, Keble: `Characterisation of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe sum
    1+ gene'.

    Brasenose, Tuesday, 27 March, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: N.J. Proudfoot, S. Morley.

    M. MARKOPOULOS, Green College: `The role of certification in supporting
    Community-based Forest Enterprise (CFE) in Latin America'.

    Oxford Forestry Institute, Wednesday, 4 April, 10.30 a.m.


    Examiners: J.E.M. Arnold, M. Simula.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Medieval and Modern Languages

    L. ASFOUR, New College: `The Sterne debate in France, 1760–1800'.

    Trinity, Thursday, 5 April, 10 a.m.


    Examiners: G.J. Mallinson, F. Ogée.

    P.S. DARUKHANAWALA, St John's: `Communication and hope in Thomas Bernhard's
    later prose writings'.

    Examination Schools, Wednesday, 11 April, 2.15 p.m.


    Examiners: K.M. Kohl, D. Horrocks.

    D. HOLMES, New College: `Ignazio Silone and "das rote
    Zürich"—writing and internationalism in antifascist exile
    1929–39'.

    St Hugh's, Wednesday, 4 April, 2.30 p.m.


    Examiners: T. Kuhn, L. Parisi.

    J. KEAT, St Hugh's: `Projections in black and white: cinematic construction/construction
    of a cinematic in Czech poetist prose of the 1920s'.

    New College, Tuesday, 17 April, 2.30 p.m.


    Examiners: C.H.M. Kelly, R.B. Pynsent.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Modern History

    C. JANGBAHADOOR, Linacre: `Women and the emergence of the free Indian community
    in Trinidad, 1869–1945'.

    St Antony's, Tuesday, 24 April, 2.30 p.m.


    Examiners: D. Washbrook, M. Chamberlain.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Physical Sciences

    M. BOOTH, Jesus: `Adaptive optics for confocal microscopy'.

    Department of Engineering Science, Wednesday, 28 March, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: L. Solymar, J. Walker.

    J. TRANCIK, Magdalen: `Silk microstructures'.

    St Catherine's, Tuesday, 27 March, 10 a.m.


    Examiners: B.E. Juniper, B.L. Thiel.

    C. VAN DER GAST, University: `Microbial dynamics of metal-working fluids'.

    Department of Biochemistry, Friday, 27 April, 10.30 a.m.


    Examiners: J.P. Armitage, T.P. Curtis.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Physiological Sciences

    M. SMITH, Linacre: `Neuronal cell cycle regulation and
    the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease and related dementias'.

    Warneford Hospital, Thursday, 26 April, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: P. Harrison, D.M.A. Mann.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Social Studies

    J. GARCIA DE POLAVIEJA, Nuffield: `Insiders and outsiders: structure and consciousness
    effects of labour market deregulation in Spain (1984–97)'.

    Nuffield, Tuesday, 27 March, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: A.F. Heath, S. Paugam.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Theology

    D. MARKS, St Hugh's: `Julius Müller's doctrine of sin'.

    Examination Schools, Friday, 30 March, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: G. Sauter, N. Adams.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Committee for Archaeology

    D.L. DAY, St Cross: `The evolution of an archaeological landscape: Dorset from the Iron
    Age to the Anglo-Saxon period'.

    Institute of Archaeology, Tuesday, 27 March, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: B. Cunliffe, K. Dark.

    S. MARZINZIK, Somerville: `Early Anglo-Saxon belt buckles (late fifth to early eighth
    centuries): their classification and context'.

    Ashmolean Museum, Monday, 14 May, 2.30 p.m.


    Examiners: A.G. MacGregor, H. Haerke.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Committee for Educational Studies

    J. MCGONIGLE, Jesus: `Towards a culture of peace: insight into the problems and
    processes of integrating segregated schools in Northern Ireland'.

    Examination Schools, Wednesday, 18 April, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: A. Pendry, D. Lawton.

    AI-PHUONG TON-NU, Green College: `Commercial sexual exploitation of children:
    a study of child prostitution and the preventative roles of education in Vietnam'.


    Examination Schools, Friday, 19 April, 11 a.m.


    Examiners: A. Watson, A. Beatty.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 22 March 2001: Colleges<br />

    Colleges, Halls, and Societies


    Contents of this section:

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    OBITUARY


    Mansfield College

    MICHAEL WALTER CROGGON, 20 November 2000; graduate 1988–2000. Aged 51.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ELECTIONS


    Mansfield College

    To a Supernumerary Fellowship (from 1 March 2001):

    PAUL CHARLES FLATHER
    (MA, D.PHIL.)

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Nuffield College

    To a Professorial Fellowship:

    ROBERT C. ALLEN (BA Carleton, MA, PH.D.
    Harvard), University of British Columbia

    To Postdoctoral Research Fellowships:

    JAVIER GARCIA DE POLAVIEJA (M.PHIL. Madrid), Nuffield College

    OLIVER GRANT, BA, M.PHIL., St John's College

    CHRISTIAN LIST, BA, M.PHIL., Nuffield College

    ELAINE TAN (BA Yale, M.PHIL. Cambridge), St John's College, Cambridge

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    To a Visiting Fellowship:

    GUS O'DONNELL, M.PHIL. (BA Warwick), HM Treasury

    To a non-stipendiary Research Fellowship:

    ROBERT TAYLOR, BA, Employment
    Editor, The Financial Times

    To Associate Membership:

    VERED KRAUS (BA Haifa, MA, PH.D. Jerusalem),
    University of Haifa


    As Librarian:

    ELIZABETH MARTIN (MA Cambridge), Bodleian Law Library

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Pembroke College

    Pre-elected to the Mastership (from 1 July 2001): GILES HENDERSON, CBE, sometime of
    Magdalen College

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    St Hilda's College

    Privilegiate honoris causa: HARVEY MCGREGOR, QC, MA, DCL

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    PRIZE


    Mansfield College

    Collections Prize (HT 2001):

    KEVIN BATES

    Return to List of Contents of this section





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 22 March 2001: Advertisements<br />

    Advertisements


    Contents of this section:



    How to advertise in the
    Gazette


    Terms and conditions
    of acceptance of advertisements

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    Concerts

    Friends of Rewley House Annual Concert: a recital by Tom Poster,
    BBC Pianist of the year, Holywell Music Room, 8 p.m. Cost: £8 (£6 Friends
    of Rewley House and £5 concessions). Information and tickets from: Rewley House
    Reception, 1 Wellington Square, or katharine.nathan@kellogg.ox.ac.uk.

    Oxford Bach Choir with Orchester Gottinger Musikfreunde on
    Tues.,
    3 Apr. at 7.30 p.m., at the Sheldonian Theatre, Ein Deutsches Requiem by
    Brahms. Conducted by Christian Hammer. Tickets £5–£15 from Oxford
    Playhouse Box Office, tel.: 01865 798600.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Photocopier for Hire

    The Oxford University Society is offering for hire a RICOH 7950
    photocopier. It is in excellent condition with a wide range of programmes. Available from
    23 Apr.–28 Feb. 2003, for the whole period or just a part of it. Hire cost is
    £100 p.m. If your dept. is interested, please contact Linda Hunter on: 01865 288088
    (tel.) or 01865 288086 (fax), or e-mail: linda.hunter@admin.ox.ac.uk.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    C.S. Forester Society Meeting

    C.S. Forester Society Meeting in Oxford: Sat., 24 Mar., 5 p.m.,
    Committee Room, Green College. AGM followed at 5.15 p.m. by lecture by Count Nikolai
    Tolstoy (author and historian, stepson and biographer of Patrick O'Brian): `Parallel lives:
    C.S. Forester and Patrick O'Brian.' Members and guests £5. Membership details from
    Dr Colin Blogg, 11 Park Town, Oxford OX2 6SN. Tel.: 01865 512111, e-mail:
    csforester@hotmail.com.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Restoration and Conservation of Antique Furniture

    John Hulme undertakes all aspects of restoration: 30 years experience;
    collection and delivery. For free advice, telephone or write to: The Workshop, 11A High
    Street, Chipping Norton, Oxon., OX7 5AD. Tel.: 01608 641692.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Oxford University Museum of Natural History Shop

    Heralding the approach of spring, our traditional, non-calorific
    assortment of stone eggs is joined by seasonal mugs, botanical cards, and a totally new
    product–nesting tubes for attracting red mason bees to the garden. A 10% discount is
    offered Mon.–Fri., on production of a University card at the start of a transaction.
    Easter closure Thurs., 12 April– Sun., 15 April inc. Otherwise open daily (inc. Easter
    Monday and the May bank holidays), 12 noon–5 p.m. Sales enquiries (2)72961.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Office Space Wanted

    Office space wanted for academic research orgnaisation, from mid-
    Aug, 2-3 rooms with own entrance in central/North Oxford. Contact: Professor R. Duessel,
    tel.: 01865 558772.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Tuition Offered

    Junior English Courses: are you an overseas parent studying or
    working in Oxford, and looking for an English language course for your children at Easter?
    Atlas English is a small, high-quality school which provides Easter course for Juniors from
    11–17 years old, from 26 March–20 April. Central location, qualified teachers
    with long experience of dealing with this age group. Full social activities programme
    included. We also run summer courses from mid-June to Sept. Please contact Stephanie
    Gosling on 01869 247671, or e-mail: atlasenglish@btinternet.com.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Services Offered

    Home typing/secretarial services offered, 15 years office
    experience–legal, medical, general. Audio, copy typing etc. Prompt, efficient, accurate
    service provided. Reasonable charges. Please call Jenny on 01993 813577 and leave a
    message on the answerphone. All calls will be returned.

    Big or small, we ship it all, plus free pick up anywhere in
    Oxford.
    Also 24-hour photocopying, private mailing addresses (24-hour access, and mail forwarding
    world-wide), binding, fax bureau, colour photocopying, mailing services, and much more.
    Contact or visit Mail Boxes Etc., 266 Banbury Rd., Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 514655, fax:
    514656, email: summertown@020.mbe.uk.com.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Domestic Services

    Wanted: nanny/baby-sitter required for 2 girls, age 5 and 6, 3
    p.m.–6 p.m., Mon.–Fri., term times only. Pay by negotiation. Must be loving
    and kind. References required. Didcot area. Please contact Dr Roni McGowan, tel.: 01865
    286938 or (home) 01235 210756, e-mail: roni.mcgowan@ntlworld.com.

    Northern Italian family (from Vicenza), with 2 children, 3 and
    6
    years, offer accommodation and small salary to a girl willing to play and speak English at
    home–3 month minimum. Please respond to: lupi.silvia@libero.it.

    Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your local
    specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also
    carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre- occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental
    rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford 726983
    or Abingdon 555533.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Situations Vacant

    Dutch help-desk staff required, for internet company within established
    market research company for the Dutch helpdesk. Some knowledge and interest in IT and
    the internet so they would understand terms such as ISP's and internet browsers.Successful
    applicants will possess natural confidence, enthusiasm and excellent communication skills,
    and feel comfortable on the telephone. Salary will be paid at an hourly rate of £8 an
    hour, applicants will need to be able to cover a variety of shifts inc. evenings and Saturdays
    (some flexibility), approx. 30 hrs p.w. Please e-mail your c.v., and covering letter to
    Lynne.Hamed@acnielsen.co.uk, or mail ACNielsen, London Road, Headington, Oxford OX3
    9SB. Closing date 30 Mar.

    Elderly doctor is looking for help with driving, housekeeping,
    etc.
    This could be half-time. Could also be residential, with good accommodation available.
    Please tel.: 01865 768925.

    Postgraduate required to teach musculo-skeletal physiology,
    anatomy
    and basic histology to human biology and exercise science 2nd year degree students. Three
    lectures per week for a maximum of 8 weeks starting 25 Apr. Please contact Dr R. P.
    Craven on 01865 483284, e-mail: rpcraven@brookes.ac.uk.

    Part-time Assistant: need for the Oxford University Society for
    interesting work on Oxford University Alumni Travel Programme. Good English and
    computer skills required. Pleasant office, central Oxford: 6–10 hrs p.w. Pay according
    to experience. Please contact, Caroline Harrison, Alumni Travel Administrator on tel.: 01865
    288087, fax.: 01865 288086, e-mail: caroline.harrison@admin.ox.ac.uk.

    The Examination Schools: Room Assistants. We are looking for
    a
    team of people to work full time, inc. some Saturdays, for a 6 week period in Trinity term
    to cover the exam season (14 May–22 June 2001), with a possible extension to 13 July.
    The duties inc. setting up examination rooms, tidying up between sessions, laying out script
    booklets and exam materials, and delivering packages in central Oxford. If you would like
    to apply please send a c.v. and covering letter to the Clerk of the Schools Examination
    Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG. For further information phone the Deputy Clerk
    (Building) on 01865 (2) 76905.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Houses to Let

    Lifestyle Letting and Management, 1 North Parade Avenue, Oxford:
    Foxglove Cottage, Woodstock–£850 p.c.m: spacious, modern, 2-bedroom
    cottage with garage, offered unfurnished. Available late April: North Parade
    Avenue–£420 p.c.m.: 1-bedroom studio annexe to period house in this
    fashionable area, fully furnished. Available now. Contact us for a full list of property: tel.:
    01865 554577, fax: 01865 554578, e-mail: lifestyle-lettings@dial.pipex.com, Website:
    www.lifestyle-lettings.co.uk.

    Large Victorian 3-storey house in central Jericho with small rear
    garden. Large living-room with double aspect, extensive kitchen with breakfast room, 2
    double bedrooms, and 1 single bedroom. Excellent value for visiting academic or
    professional family. Well furnished and fully equipped, this property is available from Mar.
    For more information please contact Julia at Finders Keepers, 226 Banbury Road,
    Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: 01865 311011, or visit the Finders Keepers website
    at www.finders.co.uk.

    Furnished house with garden in St Clements, available to let
    from 1
    May: 2 rooms upstairs (1 with small room off it), 2 downstairs, plus bathroom and kitchen.
    Garden inc. lawn , patio and vegetable patch. Would suit a family , or possibly 3 friends
    sharing. £700 p.c.m. exc. Tel.: 0207 607 1810 before 8 p.m.

    North Oxford spacious detached family house with stone
    mullioned
    windows, and stripped herringbone wooden floors. Hall, beamed sitting-room with open
    fireplace, dining room, kitchen, cloakroom, 4 bedrooms, bathroom, large garden, off-road
    parking, unfurnished. To let for 1-2 yrs from 1 May. £1,650 p.c.m. Tel.: 01865
    512556.

    Exceptional value 4-bedroom detached family house in
    Woodstock.
    Large living-room, dining-room, study and 4 spacious bedrooms. There is a family
    bathroom, shower cubicle off the main bedroom, and a cloakroom downstairs. Fully
    maintained garden backing onto open fields, double garage and alarm system. Available
    furnished and equipped from early April at £750 p.c.m. Please contact Paul at Finders
    Keepers, Witney office. Tel.: 01993 700150 or e-mail: witney@finders.co.uk.

    North Oxford furnished house available from 1 Sept., for 1 year
    or
    less. Charming, quiet, easy to maintain, fully furnished house in Jericho/north Oxford. Walk
    to university, train station, bus station, near Port Meadow, c.h., recently re-decorated,
    secluded garden, 2½ bathrooms, washing machine, dryer, telephone, linen, dishes, 2
    bicycles. Two bedrooms, £990 p.m., or 3 bedrooms, £1,350 p.m. (inc. bedsit
    with separate kitchen and entrance). Contact: OXFORD: J.Mackrell (eves., or mornings 7-8
    a.m.), tel.: 01865 775567; CANADA: A. Gaston, tel.: (613) 745 1368, fax.: (613) 745
    0299, e-mail: Gaston@cyberus.ca.

    An Englishman's home is his castle---so the saying goes. We
    cannot
    pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental
    accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB Management
    is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical
    personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful
    service in Oxford. Visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the
    properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or email us
    with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.:
    01865 764533, fax: 764777, email: info@qbman.co.uk.

    Make finding accommodation easy. Finders Keepers have a
    dedicated
    approach to helping you find the right property. Browse through our website for up-to-date
    detailed information on properties available and make use of our interactive database, priority
    reservation service (credit cards accepted), personal service and professional advice. For
    further information please contact Finders Keepers at 226, Banbury Road, Summertown,
    Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: 01865 311011. Fax: Oxford 556993. Email: oxford@finders.co.uk.
    Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Flats to Let

    Luxurious 2-bedroom apartment in a converted stable in the grounds
    of Wytham Abbey, within the quiet and idyllic village of Wytham, 3 miles from central
    Oxford. Shared medieval walled courtyard garden, private car park and permit to walk in
    Wytham Woods. Available fully, partially or unfurnished, preferably for a long-term let.
    Tel.: 01865 726919.

    Flat in Victorian house, Iffley Road, 1 mile city centre: large
    sitting-
    room/kitchen, bedroom, bath/shower. Rent inc. Council Tax, hot water, some c.h.
    £500 p.c.m. (low because not self-contained in daytime). Tel.: 01869 350372.

    Central North Oxford, 10 minutes' walk from city centre,
    University
    Parks, all main university buildings, and very close to the river. Available for short/long lets.
    Three exceptionally well-furnished, comfortable flats in extremely quiet, civilised, large
    Victorian house in this exclusive, leafy, residential Victorian suburb, with large, light, airy
    rooms: (1) Ground-floor, available 1 Aug., 1 double, 1 single bedroom, large drawing-room,
    kitchen, bathroom. (2) First-floor flat available mid-June, second-floor from 1 Dec. Each
    with large double bedroom, large drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom. Off-street parking, large
    secluded garden. Tel./fax: 01865 552400.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Accommodation Sought

    American family coming to Oxford on faculty exchange (2 children,
    ages 7 and 12) wpouild like to sub-let furnished flat in Oxford, preferably North
    Oxford/Summertown or similar, for 4 months, 1 Sept.–31 Dec., 2001. Contact
    Maurice Isserman at: misserma@hamilton.edu, or c/o Dept. of History, Hamilton College,
    Clinton, New York, 13323, USA.

    Two lecturer colleagues, both about to retrain as lawyers, seek
    2-
    (possibly 3-)bedroom house/flat to share for academic year 2001-2. Preferably Jericho, North
    or West Oxford. Please phone or leave message on 07980 757821 or 0775 9452417.

    Visiting American Professor, working in the Dept. of
    Educational
    Studies, seeks 1/2 bedroom accommodation in Oxford area for mid-May–mid-Aug.
    (dates flexible). Furnished preferred but anything considered. Deposit and excellent
    references available. Tel.: 07979 956406, e-mail: lkeiler@richmond.edu.

    Visiting academic from South Africa seeks fully-equipped
    accommodation for self and wife in Oxford area for 4 months, from 1 Sept.–31 Dec.
    Please e-mail: P.Maylam@ru.ac.za.

    Medical Professor, accompanied by his wife, and working at the
    John
    Radcliffe Hospital seeks accommodation in or around Oxford for 5 weeks from the 30 April,
    2001. Two-bedroom flat or house would be ideal but happy to consider anything. For
    further details please contact 01865 220970.

    Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB
    management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise
    in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and ahve a
    constant flow of enquiries from good quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If
    you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice
    without obligation, telephone us: 01865 764533, fax us: 764777, or e-mail us:
    info@qbman.co.uk. Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our web site at:
    http:/www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Accommodation Offered

    Large room in shared garden flat for 2 in East Oxford (Divinity
    Road), available from 1 May. Rent c. £270 p.c.m. plus bills and contribution to
    council tax (where applicable). Phone 01865 (2)76729.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Excellent, quiet, light and spacious studio bedsit, centrally
    situated off
    North Parade. Own entrance from patio-garden, own bathroom with shower, c.h., phone,
    fridge and light cooking facilities. Suitable for 1, professional or mature graduate student,
    non-smoker preferred. £420 p.c.m. inc. bills (except tel. and council tax increment if
    applicable). Tel.: 01865 553294.

    Large, warm, sunny, comfortably furnished 2-bedroom flat, to
    be let
    while we are away on fieldwork, mid-May (poss. earlier)–mid-(possibly late)Sept. Flat
    has well-equipped kitchen, TV, CD and tape player, large bright sitting-room, generously
    sized kitchen and bathroom. Convenient location in Jericho, 5 minutes walk from St. Giles,
    7–10 minutes walk from city centre. Rent £650 (or nearest offer) plus bills.
    Please ring 01865 556204 mornings or evenings.

    Two rooms (bedroom and sitting-room/study) available for rent
    in a
    large house in Oxford (Headington). Close to bus stops, walking distance to
    Churchill/Warneford sites. Suit female postgrad/academic/professional. Non-smokers only.
    £400 p.m. exc. bills. Phone 01865 741666.

    Finders Keepers specialises in managing your home and
    investment.
    With our 27 years' experience we assure you of a high level of service from dedicated and
    professional letting and management teams. Many of our landlords have remained with us
    since we opened and are still reaping the benefits of our high standards of property
    management. If you would like details of our services please contact Finders Keepers at 226
    Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: 01865 311011, fax: Oxford 556993,
    email: oxford@finders.co.uk. Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

    Paying guests, visiting academics, welcomed for short or long
    stays
    in the warm, comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple in exclusive, quiet, central
    North Oxford, within walking distance of all main university buildings, town centre, parks,
    river, shops and restaurants. All rooms have colour TV, tea-/coffee-making facilities,
    microwave, and refrigerator or refrigerator availability, c.h., and independent heating.
    Breakfast included in the very moderate terms. Tel./Fax: 01865 557879.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Accommodation Exchange

    Two/three bedroom house in North or West Oxford wanted for
    professional couple with child—to swop with bright, 3 bedroom, 2 reception, spacious
    garden flat, fully furnished. North London, 8 minutes to tube (zone 2), from Apr. for 12
    months plus. All mod cons. Tel.: 0207 281 8488 or e-mail: Ellie Barnes,
    ellie@newsqu.demon.co.uk, tel.: 020 7281 8466, fax: 087 0054 3929.

    Free Summer holiday accommodation exchange in the US: a
    professor
    from Hingham, Massachusetts, US (Boston area) would like to exchange his home for
    housing accommodation in Oxford this summer. The approximate dates are mid-
    July–mid-Aug., with flexibility on both ends. Basic needs are: 2-3 bedroom house or
    flat, in or around Oxford, and a car (bikes would be an added plus). Please contact:
    adina.henson@anat.ox.ac.uk for queries or further details.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Summer Let

    City-centre house with view of Thames available for 2 months, mid-
    July–Sept. Fully equipped, 3 bedrooms (2 double, 1 single), 2 bathrooms, gas c.h.,
    garden, garage. £1,000 p.c.m. inc. charges, except tel. calls. Tel.: 01865 250462.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Holiday Lets

    Andalucia: El Torcal Natural Park near Antequera. An idyllic
    collection of superior holiday properties, from elegant villas and rustic farmhouses, to small
    romantic character cottages with beamed ceilings and terracotta floors. All administered by
    the award winning country house hotel La Posada del Torcal. Each property has a private
    garden and swimming pool, and stunning views across glorious unspoilt countryside. This
    is authentic rural Spain. Guests of our holiday homes may also take advantage of some of
    the facilities of the hotel such as tennis, horseriding, mountain bikes, aromatherapy massage,
    and restaurant. Tel.: + 34 952031177, fax: + 34 954753534. Website:
    www.andalucia.com/posada-villas, e-mail: eltorcal@mercuryin.es.

    Portugal (Charneca da Caparica): this self-contained flat with
    fully
    equipped kitchen, 1 bathroom with shower, 1 double bedroom, and 1 single bedroom (with
    2 beds), 1 spacious sitting/dining room, and a large roof terrace, is part of a quiet farmhouse
    surrounded by gardens, and is situated only 2kms from several superb, clean and safe
    beaches along the Caparica coast. Ideal location for people in search of a mixture of
    countryside atmosphere and seaside resources, with the advantage of being less than 30
    minutes away from Lisbon by car. Car is essential. Available from May–July, and
    Sept.–Nov. £540 p.c.m., or £135 p.w. Tel. not inc. All linen inc. One
    month/week refundable deposit for damages and for tel. expenses. E-mail:
    madalena.goncalves@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk.

    Northern Portugal: delightful farmhouse with pool set in Port
    Wine
    vineyards with spectacular views over the River Douro. Sleeps 6–8. Tel.: 01296
    748989, e-mail: paberg@quintadelarosa.com, Website: quintadelarosa.com.

    Cornwall, near Sennen Cove: converted barn, sleeps 4,
    comfortable,
    with microwave, washing machine, tumble drier, TV, video. Sea view, small garden.
    £150-£300 p.w. Visit www.hayloftcottage.co.uk, or tel.: 01865 557713.

    French Riviera ground-floor, 2-bedroom, end flat, sleeps 4; at
    Agay
    between St Raphael and Cannes; situated 5 minutes' walk from beach, pool, shops,
    restaurants. South-facing, screened patio, parking alongside, tennis, golf, aquatic sports,
    horse riding nearby. Tel.: 01372 744246.

    Thatched house in historic village near Oxford: ETB 5 Star,
    sleeps
    9/10, 3-acre garden, duck pond, private, luxurious heaven. Website:
    www.oxfordshirecottages.com. Also, in same village, ancient thatched house, sleeps 6/7.
    Spacious, comfortable, ½ acre. Available Easter, Summer. Tel.: 01865 881553.

    Italy, Umbria: `Casa Colonica' on its own road in hills, 5 miles
    NE
    of Assisi, in National Park: superb views, wild life, kitchen/dining/sitting room, 2 double
    bedrooms, large bathroom. Car essential; Lombardia, Lake Como: apartment in village
    house, closely overlooking lake; 25 minutes' from Como city. 1 double bedroom, sitting
    room/kitchenette, bathroom, open terrace. For either let: £300 p.w., £550 per
    fortnight. Tel.: 01865 763886.

    Dordogne and Rome holiday rentals: stone house in an acre of
    garden
    in the Dordogne, France, with a fabulous 270 degree panorama (sleeps 8/10). Also Rome,
    19th-c., country farmhouse with lovely views, 45 minutes' from Rome, and two hours to
    Florence (sleeps 4 with downstairs rooms available to sleep 4 more). Prices vary from
    £250--550 p.w. Private owner. Tel.: 01223 353603 or e-mail: hugobowles@tiscalinet.it
    for details.

    Crete. A traditional Cretan house in old town Rethimno,
    superbly
    renovated to provide space and comfort in beautifully furnished surroundings. Elevated,
    vine-covered, sitting area with brick barbecue---perfect for alfresco dining. It is in a quiet
    area, and close to long, sandy beach, taverns, shops, and the many interesting sights in and
    around this historic area. Sleeps 4 (1 double, 1 twin). Available all year round. All linen,
    electricity and cleaning inc. 2001 rates on request. Tel./fax: Nikolaos Glinias, 0030 831
    56525, e-mail: nglynias@ret.forthnet.gr.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Flat for Sale

    St Thomas Street, Oxford: a unique opportunity to acquire a first-floor
    modern flat in a development close to the city centre, railway station, and Said Business
    School. Entrance hall leading to sitting-room, exceptionally well-equipped kitchen, 2 double
    bedrooms with built-in wardrobes, bathroom with overhead shower, double length garage.
    Entry phone security system to secure Mews courtyard. £198,000. Contact: A. N.
    Lane, 01865 514516 (home), 01865 459204 (home).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Houses for Sale

    Seventeenth-century thatched cottage in Church Hanborough (6 miles
    from Oxford). Two reception rooms with inglenook fireplaces, 4 bedrooms, kitchen/breakfast
    room, utility room, secluded 30ft garden. Excellent thatch. Village pub with good food.
    Regular bus service. No chain. £220,000. Phone: 020 7970 4522 (daytime), or e-mail:
    howards@centaur.co.uk.

    Pleasant, 3-bedroom modern cottage, Tema Valley, 12 miles
    west of
    Ludlow. Large living-room, oil and electric heating, garage, small gardens. Village has rail
    station, P.O., shop, good butcher, garages, 2 pubs. Price £59,500. Fully equipped
    (inc. cutlery, china, pots and pans, machines), and agreeably furnished (all carpets, curtains,
    duvets, bed-linen) at price to be agreed. Ready to move into. Tel.: 01993 812300.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    For Sale

    A1 OUP: this distinctive vehicle registration is now available for sale.
    Please contact Dr Michael Watts by telephone on 01869 331181 anytime, or by e-mail:
    michael@stardancer.org.uk for details.
    n

    Return to List of Contents of this section





    Oxford University Gazette: Appointments, 22 March 2001<br />


    Oxford University Gazette: 22 March 2001

    Appointments


    Vacancies within the University of Oxford:

    The University is an equal opportunities employer

    SCHOOL OF GEOGRAPHY AND THE
    ENVIRONMENT
    University Lecturership in Human Geography
    LECTURERSHIP IN MUSIC
    In association with St Anne's College and St Hilda's College
    CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES
    North Fellowship
    SCHOOL OF ANTHROPOLOGY
    Graduate Studentship in Anthropology

    Note: a complete list of current "http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/ps/gp/">University vacancies is available
    separately.


    Vacancies in Colleges and Halls:

    BALLIOL COLLEGE
    Two-year fixed-term Fellowship in Politics
    BRASENOSE COLLEGE
    Appointment of Admissions Secretary
    CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE
    Lecturership in Latin
    Lecturership in Philosophy
    QUEEN'S COLLEGE
    Lecturership in Philosophy
    ST HILDA'S COLLEGE AND QUEEN'S
    COLLEGE
    Stipendiary Lecturership in Ancient History
    WADHAM COLLEGE
    Stipendiary Lecturership in Ancient History
    GREYFRIARS
    Appointment of Librarian


    Vacancies outside the University of Oxford:

    OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC
    STUDIES
    Junior Research Fellowship in Islamic Law
    CLARE COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE
    Appointment of Dean

    All notices should be sent to the Gazette
    Office, Public Relations Office, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD
    (fax: (2)80522, e-mail: "mailto:gazette@admin.ox.ac.uk">gazette@admin.ox.ac.uk
    ).

    The deadline for the Gazette of 19 April 2001 is 5 p.m. on Thursday, 5 April.



    [
    University of Oxford |
    This week's Gazette |
    Gazette home page |
    Search the Gazette
    ]


    Maintained by
    Oxford University Gazette
    , revised 22 March 2001.