22 February 1996



<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 22 February 1996: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



CONGREGATION 15 February


Election

On Thursday, 15 February, the following was duly elected to hold
office for four years from the first day of Trinity Term 1996:

As a member of the Buildings Committee

D. PALFREYMAN, MA, Fellow of New College

[The votes recorded were: for Ms Chapman, 183; for Mr Palfreyman,
292.]

Return to List of Contents of this section



CONGREGATION 19 February


Degree by Special Resolution

No notice to the contrary having been received under the provisions
of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1995, p. 13), the
following resolution is deemed to have been approved at noon on 19
February.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

CYRIL JENNINGS, MA status, Templeton College

MARTHA CRAVER NUSSBAUM, St Anne's College

ADELE MARGUERITE SMITH, Hertford College

Return to List of Contents of this section



HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL


1 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts under
the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. vi, cl. 1 (Statutes,
1995, p. 345) has been accorded to the following persons who are
qualified for membership of Congregation:

FIONA FRANCES CAMPBELL, University Offices

STUART DERMOT LEE, Computing Services

ETIENNE JEAN PICARD, University College

SIMUKAI WANZIRA UTETE, St Hugh's College

Return to List of Contents of this section



2 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added
to the Register of Congregation:

Campbell, F.F., MA status, University Offices

Kelly, C.H.M., MA, D.Phil., New College

Lee, S.D., MA status, Computing Services

Martin, P.E., MA, St Edmund Hall

Nussbaum, M.C., MA, St Anne's

Picard, E.J., MA status, University

Smith, A.M., MA, Hertford

Utete, S.W., MA status, St Hugh's

Wathen, A.J., MA, New College

Return to List of Contents of this section



CONGREGATION 20 February


Declaration of approval of unopposed Statute
promulgated on 6 February

No notice of opposition having been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor
declared the Statute establishing the Degree of Master of Mathematics
approved.


Promulgation of Statute

A form of Statute was promulgated. No notice of opposition having
been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor declared the preamble carried of the
proposed Statute making formal provision for the exclusion of persons
from access to university facilities and services in appropriate
circumstances.


Declaration of approval of General
Resolution

That this House endorse the introduction of new arrangements for the
making of awards for the recognition of academic distinction or
contribution to academic work of the University under Tit. X, Sect. I
(b) (Statutes, 1995, p. 73, as set out in the
report of the Committee on Academic Salaries (Supplement (1) to
Gazette No. 4388), and in particular

(1) the introduction of three new levels of award, making five in
all, and

(2) the payment, if the Vice-Chancellor deems justified after
appropriate consultation, of permanent awards to professors at the
beginning of their appointments in advance of any regular review
(within a cash-limited sum) of such awards by the Committee on
Non-clinical Professorial Distinction Awards.

Return to List of Contents of this section



BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 8
March, see `Examinations and Boards' below.





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 22 February 1996: University Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



CONGREGATION 26 February


Degree by Special Resolution

The following special resolution will be deemed to be approved at
noon on 26 February, unless by that time the Registrar has received
notice in writing from two or more members of Congregation under the
provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1995,
p. 13) that they wish the resolution to be put to a meeting of
Congregation.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

LORD ATTENBOROUGH OF RICHMOND UPON THAMES, St Catherine's College

Return to List of Contents of this section



CONGREGATION 19 March 2 p.m.


Voting on Special Resolution approving the
conferment of an Honorary Degree

That the conferment of the Degree of Master of Arts, honoris
causa
, upon SIR ASHLEY PONSONBY, BT, KCVO, MC, be approved.

¶ Sir Ashley has served as Lord-Lieutenant of Oxfordshire
from 1980 to 1996, having previously been a Deputy Lieutenant for six
years. He came to Balliol in Hilary Term 1940 but left in 1941 to
serve in the war and was unable to return to the college. As Lord-
Lieutenant he has performed valuable service to the University, not
least in fostering its external relations.

If the special resolution is approved, the honorary degree will be
conferred at the degree ceremony on 18 May 1996.





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 22 February 1996: Notices<br />

Notices


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

  • *Notices of exhibitions, guided tours, etc.:

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    ASSOCIATION OF COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITIES

    ACU Development Fellowships 1996–7

    The University has been invited to make two nominations for the
    Association of Commonwealth Universities Development Fellowships
    1996–7. The purpose of these awards is to help ACU member
    universities with their staff development needs and to develop the
    human resources of their countries. Nominees should be on the staff
    of a university in membership of the ACU, or be working in industry,
    commerce, or public service in a Commonwealth country, and should be
    between twenty-eight and fifty years of age. Preference will be given
    to workers in the following priority subject areas: agriculture,
    forestry, food sciences, biotechnology, development strategies, earth
    and marine sciences, engineering, health and related social sciences,
    information technology, management for change, professional education
    and training, social and cultural development, and university
    development and management. Fellowships will be tenable in any
    Commonwealth country other than that in which the applicant works,
    for up to a maximum of six months. Further details and application
    forms are available from Mrs K. McGuire, International Office,
    University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone:
    Oxford (2)70134). Applications must be returned to the International
    Office by 10 May.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ISIS INNOVATION LIMITED

    2 South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3UB

    Isis Innovation, a wholly-owned company of the University, was
    established in 1988. The company has been formed to exploit know-how
    arising out of research funded by the UK Government through the
    Research Councils and funded by other bodies where the rights are not
    tied. The function of the company is to ensure that the results of
    research bring rewards to Oxford, and to the inventors, who are given
    a financial incentive for exploitation.

    Isis seeks licensees willing to pay lump sums and/or royalties
    for the use of know-how arising out of research. Isis also exploits
    the intellectual property of the University by setting up individual
    companies using venture capital or development capital funds.

    Isis' services are also available to individuals who wish to exploit
    the results of research supported by non-Research Council sources,
    when there are no prior conditions on the handling of the
    intellectual property rights. Isis Innovation has at its disposal a
    small pre-seedcorn fund for paying the costs of protecting
    intellectual property rights and for taking work to a stage where its
    potential can be assessed.

    Isis finds industrial partners to ensure that new ideas can be
    developed for market requirements. The company has established the
    Oxford Innovation Society for major industrial companies, so that
    they can have a window on Oxford technology and an opportunity to
    license and invest where appropriate.

    A brochure explaining Isis' activities is available. Please
    contact the above address, or the telephone and fax numbers given
    below.

    Members of the University should contact Dr James Hiddleston if
    they wish to take advantage of the services that Isis provides.
    (Telephone: (2)72411; fax: (2)72412.)

    Return to List of Contents of this section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 22 February 1996: Lectures<br />

    Lectures


    Contents of this section:

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    INAUGURAL LECTURES


    Chichele Professor of Medieval History

    PROFESSOR R.R. DAVIES will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on
    Thursday, 29 February, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `The matter of Britain and the matter of
    England.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Clifford Chance Professor of European Law

    PROFESSOR B.S. MARKESINIS will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5
    p.m. on Friday, 23 February, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the
    St Cross Building.

    Subject: `The comparatist (or a plea for a broader legal
    education).'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Flick Professor of European Thought

    PROFESSOR J. BURROW will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on
    Tuesday, 7 May, in the Examination School.

    Subject: `A common culture? Nationalist ideas in
    nineteenth-century European thought.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Professor of the History of Art

    PROFESSOR M.J. KEMP will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on
    Thursday, 7 March, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `The Mona Lisa: from science into
    myth.'

    Note: this lecture will be given in the Schools, not in
    the Ashmolean Museum, as previously notified.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    COOKSON PROFESSORIAL LECTURE

    PROFESSOR B. CANTOR will deliver the Cookson Professorial Lecture at
    5.30 p.m. on Thursday, 22 February, in the Bernard Sunley Lecture
    Theatre, St Catherine's College.

    Subject: `Materials processing and component design.'

    Note: in the Gazette of 15 February (p.
    763), this lecture was incorrectly listed as an inaugural lecture.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    CHERWELL-SIMON MEMORIAL LECTURE 1996

    PROFESSOR U. AMALDI, University of Milan and European Laboratory for
    Particle Physics, CERN, will deliver the Cherwell-Simon Memorial
    Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Friday, 24 May, in Lecture Theatre A, the
    Zoology/Psychology Building.

    Subject: `When nothing is something: a history of the
    vacuum.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    HALLEY LECTURE 1996

    PROFESSOR D. GOUGH, Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge,
    will deliver the Halley Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 7 May, in the
    Lecture Theatre, the University Museum.

    Subject: `The seismic structure of the sun.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    JAMES FORD SPECIAL LECTURE IN BRITISH
    HISTORY

    DR M. ASTON, FBA, FSA, F.R.HIST.S., will deliver a James Ford Special
    Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 10 May, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `Obliteration and memory in the English
    Reformation.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    JASPARS MEMORIAL LECTURE

    PROFESSOR W. DOISE, Geneva, will deliver the Jaspars Memorial Lecture
    at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 5 March, in Lecture Theatre C, the
    Department of Experimental Psychology.

    Subject: `Social psychology and human rights.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ANTHROPOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY

    Social Geography Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 9.15 a.m. on Fridays in the
    School of Geography.

    Conveners: G.C.K. Peach, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Social
    Geography, C.G. Clarke, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in
    Urban/Social Geography, and A. Lemon, MA, D.Phil., University
    Lecturer (CUF) in Geography.

    PROFESSOR S. SMITH

    23 Feb.: `Public housing versus social justice.'

    DR A. ROGERS

    1 Mar.: `1991 Census SARs (Samples of Anonymised
    Records): workplace, residence, and ethnicity.'

    DR A. CHARLESWORTH, Cheltenham and Gloucester College

    8 Mar.: `The topography of Claude Lanzmann's
    Shoa: landscape of the Holocaust.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    CLINICAL MEDICINE

    Nuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

    DR TADASHI KIMURA will lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 28 March, in
    the Anne Anderson Lecture Theatre, Level 3, Nuffield Department of
    Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Women's Centre, the John Radcliffe
    Hospital.

    Further information may be obtained from Dr Sylvain Phaneuf
    (telephone: Oxford 221022, e-mail: sphaneuf@immsvr.jr2.ox.ac.uk).

    Subject: `Oxytocin receptor investigation: basic
    molecular research associated with clinical phenomenon.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    LITERAE HUMANIORES

    PROFESSOR M. GHINS, Université Catholique de Louvain, will
    lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Thursday, 29 February, in the Ryle Room, the
    Philosophy Centre.

    Convener: H.R. Brown, MA, University Lecturer in the
    Philosophy of Physics.

    Subject: `A defence of selective scientific realism.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM


    William Cohn Memorial Lecture

    DR MILO C. BEACH, Director, Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M.
    Sackler Gallery, Washington, DC, will deliver the thirty-first
    William Cohn Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 6 March, in the
    Lecture Theatre, the Ashmolean Museum.

    Subject: `The Windsor Castle Padshahnama:
    Shah Jahan's artists and their images of Mughal India.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL STUDIES


    Victor Cook Memorial Lectures

    Education, values, and religion

    DR JONATHAN SACKS, Chief Rabbi, and PROFESSOR SIR STEWART SUTHERLAND,
    FBA, Principal, University of Edinburgh, will deliver the 1996 Victor
    Cook Memorial Lectures at 5.15 p.m. on the following days in the E.P.
    Abraham Lecture Theatre, Green College. The lectures are open to the
    public.

    Further information may be obtained from Professor Richard Pring,
    Department of Educational Studies.

    DR SACKS

    Wed. 28 Feb.: `Religion and civil society.'

    Thur. 29 Feb.: `Education and a community of value:
    the Jewish experience.'

    PROFESSOR SUTHERLAND

    Tue. 12 Mar.: `Diagnosis?'

    Wed. 13 Mar.: `Prognosis? Cure?'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    MAISON FRANÇAISE

    PROFESSOR N. SCHAPPACHER, Université de Strasbourg I
    (Université Louis Pasteur), will lecture at 5.45 p.m. on
    Monday, 26 February, in the Maison.

    Subject: `Some remarks on the history of Fermat's Last
    Theorem.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE

    The medical sciences and medical refugees in Britain
    1930s–1950s

    The following symposium will be held on Friday, 1 March, in the
    Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 47 Banbury Road.

    Convener: P.J. Weindling, MA, University Research
    Lecturer.

    Persons interested in attending the symposium should contact Dr K.
    Decker (telephone: Oxford (2)74609), or Dr Weindling (telephone:
    Oxford (2)74603).


    10 a.m.:

    DR WEINDLING: ` "Up hill and down dale":
    aims and achievements of the Medical Refugees Project.'


    10.15 a.m.–11.15 a.m.:

    DR K. DECKER: `Privileged refugees? Medical
    scientists and the Society for the Protection of Science
    and Learning.'

    DR D. PYKE, Royal College of Physicians: `Ludwig
    Guttmann: a case study.'


    11.30 a.m.–1 p.m.:

    DR T. TANSEY, Wellcome Institute for the History of
    Medicine, London: `Henry Dale and the support of
    medical research.'

    DR H. KAMMINGA, Cambridge Institute for the History of
    Medicine: `Refugees and Cambridge biochemistry.'


    2–3 p.m.:

    DR J. HARWOOD, University of Manchester:
    `Using the émigré scholars' experience to
    illuminate academic cultures.'

    DR G. BEALE, Edinburgh: `Charlotte Auerbach and the
    discovery of mustard gas mutagenesis.'


    3.15–4 p.m.:

    DR J. STEWART, Oxford Brookes: `Medical
    refugees and the Socialist Medical Association.'


    4.15–5.15 p.m.:

    DR M. HUBENSTORF, Free University, Berlin, and DR
    WEINDLING: `The involvement of refugee biologists and
    physicians in eugenics and sexology.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    MANSFIELD COLLEGE

    PROFESSOR N. BROWN will lecture at 8.30 p.m. on Monday, 4 March, in
    the chapel, Mansfield College.

    Professor Brown is the Academic Consultant to the Government's
    thirty-month comprehensive review, to be completed in the autumn, of
    Britain's BMD options.

    Subject: `Ballistic missile defence for Britain?'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    NUFFIELD COLLEGE


    Centre for European Studies

    Institutional change in Europe: the Intergovernmental Conference
    1996

    The following lectures will be given at 10 a.m. on Fridays in the
    Chester Room, Nuffield College.

    Convener: J.J. Hesse, MA, Jean Monnet Professor of
    European Institutions and Politics.

    G. MATHER, MEP, Director, European Policy Forum, Strasbourg/London

    23 Feb.: `The Intergovernmental Conference: the
    European Parliament's perspective.'

    U. KALBFLEISCH-KOTTSIEPER, Committee of the Regions, Brussels

    1 Mar.: `Representing sub-national interests in the
    European Union: the Committee of the Regions.'

    W. HUTTON, Assistant Editor, the Guardian

    8 Mar.: `Monetary union: risks and options.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE


    European Studies Centre

    Portuguese Studies Workshop

    The workshop will be held on Saturday, 24 February, 9.30 a.m.–5
    p.m., in the European Studies Centre, 70 Woodstock Road.

    Conveners: D.B. Goldey, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer
    (CUF) in Politics, and H.G. Martins, MA, University Lecturer in the
    Sociology of Latin America.

    MANUEL VILLAVERDE CABRAL, Instituto de Ciências Sociais

    9.30 a.m.: `Political change in contemporary
    Portugal.'

    DR GOLDEY

    11.15 a.m.: `The recent parliamentary and
    presidential elections.'

    LUÍS REIS TORGAL, Universidade de Coimbra

    2 p.m.: `Cinema e propaganda no Estado Novo.'

    R. ROBINSON, Birmingham

    3.30 p.m.: `The CDS/PP.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    OXFORD INNOVATION SOCIETY

    PROFESSOR C. LEAVER will lecture to the Oxford Innovation Society at
    6 p.m. on Thursday, 14 March, in the Department of Pharmacology.
    Admission will be by ticket only, obtainable from Isis Innovation
    (telephone: Oxford (2)72411).

    Subject: `Transgenic plants: the next green revolution?'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    OXFORD MEDIEVAL SOCIETY

    PROFESSOR H. DUGGAN, Charlottesville, Virginia, will lecture at 8.30
    p.m. on Thursday, 29 February, in Bostar Hall, University College.
    Wine will be served from 8.15 p.m. New members are welcome.

    Subject: `Textual scholarship in cyberspace: editing
    Piers Plowman with computers.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 22 February 1996: Grants and Funding<br />

    Grants and Research Funding


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    ORS AWARDS SCHEME 1996

    The ORS Awards Scheme for Overseas Research Students, established by
    the Department for Education and administered by the Committee of
    Vice-Chancellors and Principals, provides awards for the partial
    remission of tuition fees to overseas postgraduate students
    registered for research degrees at UK academic institutions. The only
    criteria for the awards are outstanding merit and research potential;
    other factors, such as means, nationality, and proposed field will
    not be taken into account by the national ORS Committee. The value of
    each award is the difference between the 1996–7 univesity
    tuition fee for a UK/EU postgraduate student and the rate chargeable
    to an overseas postgraduate student for his/her particular course of
    study.

    Further information and application material for the 1996 ORS Scheme
    at the University may be obtained from the International Office,
    University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone:
    Oxford (2)70134). The closing date for applications is 29 April.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    ROYAL BANK OF CANADA RESEARCH SCHOLARSHIP IN
    SOCIAL STUDIES

    An award, of a value of £1,000, is available to a graduate
    student of the University to enable him/her to undertake research in
    banking economics outside the United Kingdom.

    Applications, stating what the candidate would hope to achieve if the
    application is successful, should be sent to the Administrative
    Secretary, Social Studies Faculty Centre, George Street, Oxford OX1
    2RL, by 12 April.

    Return to List of Contents of this section






    <br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 22 February 1996: Examinations and Boards<br />

    Examinations and Boards


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    CHAIRMAN OF EXAMINERS

    The Vice-Chancellor desires to call the attention of all
    examiners to the provisions of Ch. VI, Sect. ii.c, § 1,
    clauses 1, 2, and 3 (Examination Decrees, 1995, p.
    1002–3), which require examiners in all university
    examinations to appoint one of their number to act as Chairman,
    to notify the appointment to the Vice-Chancellor, and to publish
    it in the University Gazette.

    He desires that these appointments shall be notified to the
    Clerk of the Schools who will himself inform the Vice-Chancellor
    and see that notice of them is duly published in the
    University Gazette.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    CHAIRMEN OF EXAMINERS

    TRINITY TERM 1996

    Preliminary Examination

    Economics and Management: C.S. ADAM, MA, M.PHIL.,
    D.PHIL., Fellow of St Cross (address: Institute of Economics and
    Statistics)

    Honour Moderations

    Archaeology and Anthropology: C.H. GOSDEN, MA, Fellow
    of St Cross (address: Pitt Rivers Museum)

    Honour School

    Oriental Studies: P.T. HARRIES, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of
    Queen's (address: Oriental Institute)

    Master of Science

    Computation: J.E. STOY, MA, Fellow of Balliol

    Master of Studies

    Modern Jewish Studies: G. MANDEL, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow
    of Green College (address: Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish
    Studies)

    Diploma

    Theology and BD Qualifying Examination: R.A. CROSS, MA,
    D.PHIL., Fellow of Oriel

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    EXAMINATION SCHOOLS


    Accommodation for Lectures

    Trinity Term 1996

    The Chairman of the Curators of the Schools would be grateful if
    Professors, Readers, and University Lecturers who wish to lecture
    at the Schools in Trinity Term 1996 could inform the Clerk of the
    Schools at the end of the present term. It is necessary to know
    whether a room suitable for an audience of more than one hundred
    persons is required; only the three large writing-schools will
    accommodate more than that number.

    Leave for the use of rooms for lectures will expire at the
    end of the fourth week of Trinity Term.

    Afternoon lectures should normally finish by 6 p.m.

    Attention is drawn to the fact that overhead projection
    equipment and 35-mm projectors are available. When these
    facilities are required the Clerk of the Schools should be
    notified in advance.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

    With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in
    regulations made by boards of faculties and the Standing Committee
    for Engineering, Economics, and Management will come into effect on
    8 March.


    1 Board of the Faculty of Modern History


    (a) Honour Moderations in Modern
    History

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in
    1997)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 66,
    delete ll. 23–37.

    2 Ibid., renumber existing cll. 9–15 as
    1–7.

    3 Ibid., l. 39, delete `358–593' and
    substitute `422–593'.

    4 Ibid., ll. 42–3, delete from `1984)' to
    `265–81' and substitute `1984).'.

    5 Ibid., l. 49, delete `1984), pp. 40–72.'
    and substitute `1984): primary materials on the period before 1914.'.

    6 Ibid., after l. 50 insert:

    `8. Alexander Paterson, Across the Bridges (London,
    1911)

    9. Will Thorne, My Life's Battles (London, 1925) pp.
    1–132.

    10. Robert Smillie, My Life for Labour (London,
    1924), pp. 9– 129.

    11. C.B. Hawkins, Norwich: a social
    study
    (London, 1910), pp. 1–98, 159–214,
    287–316.

    12. Maud Pember Reeves, Round About A Pound A Week p>(Virago edn., 1979).

    13. T.H.S. Escott, England: Its People, Polity and Pursuits
    (London, 1885 edn.), vol 2, pp. 417–49, `Popular
    Amusements'.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    (b) Honour School of Modern
    History

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    1 In Examination Decrees, p. 341, delete l. 43 and
    substitute `11. The American Revolution and Constitution.'.

    2 Ibid., p. 342, after l. 6 insert:

    `21. Nationalism, Politics and Culture in Ireland c.1870–
    1921.'.

    3 Ibid., delete l. 29.

    4 Ibid., delete ll. 31–2 and substitute `17.
    Political Pressures and Social Policy, 1899–1914.'

    5 Ibid., delete l. 34.

    6 Ibid., ll. 30–9, renumber existing cll.
    17, 19, 21, 22, 23, 24, and 25 as 16, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, and 23.

    7 Ibid., l. 43, after `he' insert `or she'.

    8 Ibid., p. 351, delete ll. 29–53 and
    substitute:

    `11. THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND CONSTITUTION

    Merrill Jensen,
    ed., English Historical Documents, vol. ix (General
    Editor, D.C. Douglas) (London, 1965):

    Conduct of Trade, 1774–6, pp. 376–8.

    Major Exports of the Mainland Colonies, Tables III a, f, g, pp.
    394–5, 400–1.

    The Regulator Movement, pp. 591–608.

    Jared Ingersoll's account of the debate on the Stamp Act, pp.
    650–4.

    The Stamp Act, p. 650.

    The Virginia Stamp Act Resolutions, pp. 669–70.

    Declaration of the Stamp Act Congress, pp. 672–3.

    Accounts of Popular Opposition to the Stamp Act, pp. 673– 85.


    The Declaratory Act, p. 695.

    The Revenue Act, 1767, p. 696.

    The Act suspending the New York Assembly, p. 703.

    The Earl of Hillsborough's letter to Gage on western policy, pp.
    704–6.

    The Massachusetts circular letter, pp. 714–15.

    Resolutions of the Boston Town Meeting, pp. 718–19.

    The Rise of the Popular Party in Massachusetts, pp. 732– 40.


    The Intolerable Acts, pp. 779–85.

    Political Observations without order: Addressed to the People of
    America, 1774, pp. 816–18.

    Lord North's motion on conciliation, pp. 839–40.

    The rejection of North's letter by the second Continental Congress,
    p. 840–1.

    Jefferson's notes on the debates and proceedings [in Congress] on the
    Virginia Resolution of Independence, pp. 868–72.

    John Dickinson's Speech against Independence, pp. 873– 6.

    Memorial of the Presbytery of Hanover Country, 1776, pp.
    549–51.

    D.B. Horn and Mary Ransome, eds., English
    Historical Documents,
    vol. x (General Editor, D.C. Douglas)
    (London, 1965):

    The Treaty of Paris, 1763, pp. 936–42.

    The Treaty of Paris, 1783, pp. 943–4.

    Instructions for the Campaign of 1777, pp. 884–6.

    Lord Cornwallis's account of the siege of Yorktown, 1781, pp.
    893–6.

    Extract from a pamphlet on peace preliminaries, pp. 735–7.

    Adam Smith on the Colonies, 1776, pp. 732–4.

    The Quebec Act, pp. 787–91.

    John Dickinson, Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania, 1768.

    In Dickinson, John, Life and Writings . . . , ed. Paul Leicester
    Ford, (Philadelphia, 1895), Letters I, II, III, IX.

    Jack P. Greene, ed., The Diary of Landon Carter (Charlottesville,
    1965):

    Common Sense, domestic order and Independence, vol. II: 1007,
    1008–9, 1016, 1042–3, 1046, 1049–50.

    Samuel Eliot Morison, ed., Sources and Documents illustrating the
    American Revolution (Oxford, 1962):

    Soame Jenyns, `Objections Considered'.

    The Report of the Board of Trade on the Western Problem.

    Max Beloff, ed., The Debate on the American Revolution, 1761–
    1783 (London, 1972):

    Daniel Dulany, Considerations on the Propriety of imposing taxes on
    the American Colonies . . . , pp. 73–7.

    William Pitt, Speech in the debate on the address, pp. 92–6.


    George Grenville, Speech in the debate on the address, pp.
    97–99.

    William Pitt, Speech in reply to Grenville, pp. 100–5.

    Richard Price, Observations on the nature of Civil Liberty, pp.
    265–70.

    Bernard Bailyn, ed., Pamphlets of the American Revolution (Cambridge,
    Mass., 1964):

    Jonathan Mayhew, `A Discourse concerning unlimited submission', pp.
    203–47.

    James Otis, `The Rights of the British colonies asserted and proved',
    pp. 408–82.

    Richard Bland, `The Colonel Dismounted', pp. 292–354.

    John Philip Reid, ed., The Briefs of the American Revolution (New
    York, 1981):

    Hutchinson to Massachusetts General Court; Answer of the Council;
    Answer of the House; pp. 15–23, pp. 32–44, pp. 53–73.

    Julian P. Boyd, ed., The Papers of Thomas Jefferson (Princeton,
    1950):

    `A Summary View of the Rights of British America', I: 121–
    37.

    A Bill for Establishing Religious Freedom, II: 545–53.

    Report of a Plan of Government for the Western Territory, VI:
    581–618.

    Bruce Kuklick, ed., Thomas Paine: Political Writings (Cambridge Texts
    in the History of Political Ideas) (Cambridge, 1989): Common Sense.


    The Crisis, Number One.

    Ian Harris, ed., Edmund Burke: Pre-Revolutionary Writings (Cambridge
    Texts in the History of Political Ideas) (Cambridge, 1989):

    Conciliation with America, 1775.

    J.R. Pole, ed, The Revolution in America: Document and Commentaries
    (London, 1970):

    The Continental Congress, 1774, pp. 19–23.

    The Association, pp. 24–9.

    The Declaration of Independence, pp. 30–40.

    The Articles of Confederation, pp. 40–56.

    The Constitutional Convention, pp. 169–79.

    Lawrence Shaw
    Mayo, ed., Hutchinson's History of Massachusetts-Bay
    (Cambridge, Mass., 1937):

    III: 82–126 (From the Stamp Act to
    Quartering Act).

    Joseph Galloway, Historical and Political Reflections on the Rise and
    Progress of the American Rebellion (London, 1780), pp. 1– 93.


    [James Madison] Notes of Debates in the Federal Convention of 1787
    Reported by James Madison:


    `A Sketch Never Finished'

    May 29–June 1, June 6, June 9, June 11, June 15–16, June
    18–19, June 30, July 12, July 17, July 19, August 8, August 13,
    August 22, September 17.

    J.R. Pole, ed., The American Constitution For and Against; The
    Federalist and Anti-Federalist Papers (New York, 1987):

    The Federal Farmer.

    Brutus.

    Address of the Minority of the Convention of Pennsylvania.

    A Republican Federalist.

    Agrippa.

    Melancton Smith in the New York Ratifying Convention.

    George Mason.

    Henry Steele Commager, ed., Documents of American History (New York,
    1968):

    The Constitution and Bill of Rights, pp. 139–46.

    Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay, The Federalist,
    numbers 1, 4, 7, 9, 10, 15, 35, 38, 39, 45, 47, 48, 49, 51, 54, 58,
    62, 63, 78, 84.'

    9 Ibid., p. 352, delete ll. 1–53.

    10 Ibid., p. 353, delete ll. 1–29.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    11 Ibid., p. 361, after l. 24 insert:

    `21. NATIONALISM, POLITICS, AND CULTURE IN IRELAND
    c.1870–1921

    Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of themes, rhetoric and
    events in Irish history from the Home Rule period through the
    cultural revival to revolution, guerilla war and the Anglo-Irish
    Treaty, illustrating their answers wherever possible by reference to
    the prescribed texts.

    Prescribed Texts

    1. The Fenian tradition

    John O'Leary, Recollections of Fenians and Fenianism
    (London, 1896; Irish University Press facsimile reprint, 1968), vol.
    ii, chapters i–x.

    John Mitchel, Jail Journal (New York, 1854), chs. i and
    v.

    William O'Brien, `Was Fenianism Ever Formidable?', Contemporary
    Review
    lxxi (1897), pp. 680–93.

    2. Isaac Butt, Federalism, Protestants and nationality

    Samuel Ferguson, `A Dialogue Between the Head and Heart of an Irish
    Protestant' (Dublin University Magazine 1833).

    Proceedings of the Home Rule Conference held at Dublin on 18th, 19th,
    20th and 21st November 1873 . . . (Dublin, 1874), pp. 4–37.

    Isaac Butt's speech proposing Home Rule, 30 June 1874, Hansard iii,
    vol. 220, 700–17.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    3. Land, politics and nationalism

    Michael Davitt, The Fall of Feudalism in Ireland
    (London, 1904), pp. 104–37

    [The New Departure], 193–225

    [Parnell in America], 346–64

    [Phoenix Park Murders], 635–59

    [Parnellism].

    `The New Departure' as printed in New York Herald 26
    October 1879 (reprinted in A.C. Hepburn (ed.), The Conflict of
    Nationality in Modern Ireland: Documents of Modern Irish
    History
    (London, 1980), pp. 41–2).

    Anna Parnell, The Tale of a Great Sham, edited by Dana
    Hearne (Dublin, 1980).

    Report of the Special Commission, 1888, appointed to inquire into
    charges and allegations made against certain Members of Parliament in
    O'Donnell vs Walter, H.C. 1890 (c.1891), xxvii, pp. 1– 119.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    4. Parnellite Home Rule and British party politics

    J.S. Mill, England and Ireland (London, 1868).

    Charles Stewart Parnell's speeches at Cork, 21 January 1885
    (Freeman's Journal, 22 January 1885) and Wicklow, 5
    October 1885 (ibid., 6 October 1885), in E. Curtis and R.B. McDowell
    (eds.), Irish Historical Documents 1172–1922
    (London, 1943), pp. 282–7.

    W.E. Gladstone, `The Irish Question, 1886' in Special Aspects
    of the Irish Question: a series of reflections in and after
    1886
    (London, 1892), pp. 1–56.

    W.E. Gladstone, speech introducing the First Home Rule Bill, 8 April
    1886 (Hansard iii, vol. 304, 1036 ff, reprinted in A. Tilney Bassett,
    Gladstone: Speeches, Descriptive Index and Bibliography
    (London, 1916), pp. 601–44.

    A.V. Dicey, England's Case Against Home Rule (London,
    1886), chs. ii, iv, vii.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    5. Ulster unionism and Catholic nationalism from the 1880s

    T.K. MacKnight, Ulster As It Is (Belfast, 1893), vol.
    ii, chs., ii– vii.

    `An Ulster Presbyterian', Ulster and Home Rule
    (Belfast, 1886).

    Lord Randolph Churchill's speech at Belfast 23 February 1886, in L.J.
    Jennings (ed.), Speeches of the rt. hon. Lord Randolph
    Churchill
    (1889), vol. ii, pp. 1–14.

    Reports from Commissioners, Inspectors and others . . . Disturbances
    in the city of Londonderry, H.C., 1884 (c.3954) xxxviii, pp.
    517–26.

    Rep . . . Belfast Riots Commissions, J.C., 1887 (c.4925) xviii, pp.
    1–23.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    6. Cultural revivalism and national debates in the 1890s

    Standish O'Grady, `The Great Enchantment' in Selected
    Essays
    (Dublin, 1915), pp. 174–87.

    W.B. Yeats, 'Ireland and the Arts', United Irishman, 31
    August 1904. 10 pages Reprinted in Essays and Introductions (London,
    1961).

    W.B. Yeats, `The Celtic Element in Literature', Essays and
    Introductions
    (London, 1961), pp. 213–21.

    Cathleen ni Houlihan in Plays and Controversies (London,
    1927), pp. 1–18.

    John Eglinton, `What Should Be the Subject of a National Drama?' and
    `National Drama and Contemporary Life', and W.B. Yeats, `A Note on
    National Drama' in Literary Ideals in Ireland (Dublin,
    1899).

    Douglas Hyde, `The Necessity of De-Anglicising Ireland' in Sir C.G.
    Duffy et al., The Revival of Irish Literature (London,
    1894), pp. 117–61.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    7. Avant-garde culture and radical politics, c.1900–1910

    Arthur Griffith, The Resurrection of Hungary: a parallel for
    Ireland
    (Dublin, 1904), pp. 75–95, 139–63.

    Horace Plunkett, Ireland in the New Century (London,
    1904), chs. ii, iv, epilogue.

    W.B. Yeats, `J.M. Synge and the Ireland of his time' (1910; reprinted
    in The Cutting of an Agate and Essays, pp.
    385–425).

    8. The crisis of 1910–16: Ulster, the Empire, the nation

    `An Ulster Presbyterian', Ulster On Its Own: or, an easy way
    with Ireland, being a proposal of self-government for the five
    counties round Lough Neagh
    (Belfast, 1912).

    F.S. Oliver, What Federalism Is Not (London, 1914).

    James Connolly, The Reconquest of Ireland (Dublin,
    1915).

    P.H. Pearse,

    Political Writings and Speeches (Collected Writings\, Dublin
    1920–25, vol. v), pp. 223–55 (`Ghosts'), 261–93 ('The
    Separatist Idea'), 299–334 (`The Spiritual Nation'), 335–72
    (`The Sovereign People').

    Proclamation of the Irish Republic, 24 April 1916 (Alan O'Day and
    John Stevenson (eds.), Irish Historical Documents since
    1800
    (Dublin, 1992), pp. 160–61).

    W.B. Yeats, `Easter 1916' in Michael Robartes and the
    Dancer
    (London, 1921).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    9. The transformation of nationalist politics and the
    rearrangement of Anglo-Irish relations, 1917–21

    Aodh de Blacam, What Sinn Fein Stands For: the Irish republican
    movement, its history, aims and ideals, examined as to their
    significance to the world
    (Dublin, 1921), pp. 149–213
    (`Gaelic Social Ideals'), 214–25 (`The Ulster Question'),
    225–47 (`The Spiritual Aspect of Sinn Fein').

    M. Moynihan (ed.), Speeches and Statements by Eamon de
    Valera
    1917–1973 (Dublin, 1980), pp. 1–6 (Speech at
    east Clare, 1917), 8–12 (`The New Sinn Fein'), 24–46
    (`Appeal to the USA:' Ireland's right to nationhood'), 74–8
    (`Sinn Fein Ard-Fheis 1921: the basis for negotiation').

    `Articles of agreement for a treaty between Great Britain and
    Ireland', 6 December 1921, O'Day and Stevenson, pp. 174–9.

    Dail Eireann Official report: debate on the Treaty between
    Great Britain and Ireland
    (Dublin, 1922), pp. 20–8
    (Griffith, de Valera, Stack, Collins, Childers); 30–42;
    64–6 (O'Kelly); 103–26 (MacSwiney); 152–8 (McEntee);
    180–6 (Markiewicz); 227–34 (Mellowes); 234–6
    (Fitzgerald); 325–34 (Brugha).'.

    12 Ibid., p. 382, delete ll. 1–32.

    13 Ibid., p. 384, delete ll. 1–53 and
    substitute

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    `17. POLITICAL PRESSURES AND SOCIAL POLICY, 1899–1914

    PARLIAMENTARY PAPERS:

    1904, vol. xxxii:

    Report of the Interdepartmental Committee on Physical Deterioration,
    pp. 1–44.

    1906, vol. ix:

    Report and Evidence of the Select Committee on Income Tax: report,
    pp. iii–ix; Snowden's evidence, pp. 107–8; appendix 5, by
    Keir Hardie, pp. 237–9; appendices 13 and 14, by Sir H. Primrose
    and L.C. Money, pp. 252–61.

    Hansard, Fourth Series, vol. 105, cols. 846–966.

    Hansard, Fourth Series, vol. 188, cols. 445–90.

    Hansard, Fourth Series, vol. 190, cols. 564–86.

    Hansard, Fifth Series, vol. 25, cols. 609–57.

    Hansard, Fifth Series, vol. 26, cols. 270–87.

    Hansard, Fifth Series, vol. 62, cols. 65–72.

    Florence, Lady Bell, At the Works: a study of a manufacturing
    town
    (1911 edition).

    Mr Chamberlain's Speeches, ed. C.W. Boyd (1914), vol.
    II, pp. 140–82, 199–218.

    R.S. Churchill: Winston S. Churchill, vol. II, Companion
    part 2, 1907–11, pp. 827–32, 851–4, 862–4,
    875–7, 883–6, 895–8.

    W.A.S. Hewins, The Apologia of an Imperialist (1929),
    vol. I, chs. 3–4.

    Lloyd George's Ambulance Wagon, being the Memoirs of William
    J. Braithwaite
    , 1911–12, ed. Sir H.N. Bunbury (1957),
    chs. 1– 6, 12–14.

    Sir George Newman: The Health of the State (1907), pp.
    108– 33.

    Liberal Publication Department: National Education. Three
    Speeches on the Education Question
    (1913).

    S. Reynolds and R. and T. Wooley, Seems So! A Working-Class
    View of Politics
    (1911), chs. 3, 4, 15, 20.

    C. Booth: Life and Labour of the People in London, Final
    Volume, Notes on Social Influences and Conclusions (1902). Parts I
    and II.

    B.S. Rowntree, Poverty: a study of town life (1901), pp.
    13–145.

    C.F.G. Masterman: The Condition of England (1909), ch. 3
    `The Suburbans'.

    Land Enquiry Committee: The Land. The Report of the Land
    Enquiry Committee
    , i. rural (1913), pp. 43–79; ii. urban
    (1914), chs. 4, 6, 8.

    M. Freeden (ed.): J.A. Hobson. A Reade (1988), extracts
    1. 2 and 2. 1 (`The Social Problem'), 2. 3 (`The Crisis of
    Liberalism'), 2. 4 (`Work and Wealth'), 3. 2 (`The Economics of
    Distribution'), 4. 1 (`Imperialism'), 5. 1 (`The Psychology of
    Jingoism') and 5. 2 (`The Significance of the Budget').

    Original Material in B. Webb: Our Partnership (1948),
    pp. 40–2, 316–491.

    H. Bosanquet: The Poor Law Report of 1909 (1909).

    H.H. Asquith's speech at Cinderford, 8 October 1903, in H.H. Asquith:
    Trade and the Empire: Mr Chamberlain's Proposals
    Examined
    (1903).

    W.H. Beveridge, `Labour Exchanges and the Unemployed', Economic
    Journal
    (March 1907), pp. 66–81.

    Mrs H. Bosanquet: `Wages and Housekeeping', in C.S. Loch:
    Methods of Social Advance (1904), pp. 131–46.

    Fabian Women's Group: Three Years' Work, 1908–1911
    (1911).

    H. Swanwick: The Future of the Women's Movement (1913),
    chs. 6–11.

    The Common Cause, vols. 3–6, 1911–14:
    articles from the series `The ABC of Women's Suffrage', 1 June,
    1911; 10 August, 1911; 5 October, 1911; 25 January, 1912; 1
    February, 1912; 22 November, 1912; 11 April, 1913; 2 May, 1913; 8
    August, 1913; 12 September, 1913; 10 October, 1913; 21 November,
    1913; 6 February, 1914; 13 February, 1914.

    The Anti-Suffrage Review: first issue, December 1908;
    editorial on `Socialism and Woman Sffrage', August 1913; report of
    speech on The Suffrage Movement by Mrs Humphrey Ward, September 1913;
    Review of H. Swanwick: The Future of the Women's Movement, March
    1914.

    C. Pankhurst: The Great Scourge and How to End It
    (1913).

    E. Crammond: `The Economic Relations of the British and German
    Empires', Journal of the Royal Statistical Society,
    lxxvii, 777–807 (1914).

    J.R. MacDonald: The New Unemployed Bill of the Labour
    Party
    (1907).

    J.R. MacDonald and J. Keir Hardie: `The Liberal collapse: the
    Programme of the Independent Labour party', Nineteenth Century
    (January 1899), pp. 20–38.

    Labour Representation Committee, Report of fifth Annual
    Conference
    , appendix I (speech by Hardie).

    Labour Party Special Conference on Parliamentary Policy, 27 January
    1914, Agenda and Report of Debate. The subject should be further
    studied in:

    K. Feiling, Toryism: a political dialogue (1913).

    L.C. Money, Riches and Poverty (1905).

    14 Ibid., p. 385, delete ll. 1–13.

    15 Ibid., p. 386, delete ll. 1–14.

    16 Ibid., pp. 385–9, renumber existing cll. 17,
    20[19], 21[20], 22[21], 23[22], 24[23], 25[24], and 25 as 16, 17, 18,
    19, 20, 21, 22, and 23.

    17 Ibid., p. 342, delete l. 20.

    18 Ibid., renumber existing cl. 8–25 as
    7–24.

    19 Ibid., p. 368, delete ll. 14–46.

    20 Ibid., p. 369, delete ll. 1–49.

    21 Ibid., pp. 370–91, renumber existing cl.
    8–25 as 7–24.

    22 Ibid., p. 340, before l. 49 insert:

    `Candidates with Senior Student status, as defined by decree of
    Council, are required to offer at least one paper in British History
    and one in General History, to be taken from two out of three period
    groups listed above. They should in addition offer either a third
    paper, which may be in British or General History and may be taken
    from any one of the three period groups above, or a thesis in lieu of
    a third paper, in accordance with the detailed regulations stated
    below under VI THESES.'.

    23 Ibid., p. 392, l. 21, delete `a candidate' and
    substitute:

    `the candidate (Senior Students, as defined by decree of Council,
    excepted)'.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    2 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
    History and English Language and Literature


    (a) Honour Moderations in Modern
    History and English

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    As for Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 1 (a)
    above).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    (b) Honour School of Modern
    History and English

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 1 (b) items
    1–21 above).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    3 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
    History and Literae Humaniores


    Honour School of Ancient and Modern
    History

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 1 (b) items
    1–21 above).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    4 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
    History and Modern Languages


    (a) Preliminary Examination in
    Modern History and Modern Languages

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    As for Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 1 (a)
    above).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    (b) Honour School of Modern
    History and Modern Languages

    With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in
    1998)

    As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 1
    (b) items 1–21 above).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    5 Boards of the Faculties of Modern
    History and Social Studies


    (a) Honour Moderations in Modern
    History and Economics

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    As for Honour Moderations in Modern History (see 1 (a)
    above).


    (b) Honour School of Modern
    History and Economics

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 1 (b) items
    1–21 above).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    6 Board of the Faculty of Modern
    Languages


    Preliminary Examination for Modern
    Languages

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 102, delete ll.
    25–6*, and substitute:

    `Tacitus, Annals IV (ed. R.H. Martin and A.J.
    Woodman, Cambridge University Press).'

    *Note: these lines are unnumbered; the lines concerned
    are from `Seneca, Select Letters' to `114, 122'.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    7 Standing Committee for Engineering,
    Economics, and Management and Related Schools


    Honour School of Materials, Economics, and
    Management

    With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 297,
    l. 22, delete `(b) Economics', and insert:

    `(b) Economics (c) Management'.

    2 Ibid., ll. 23–4, delete `E3, Economic Decisions within the
    Firm' and insert `either E3, E4, E5, M2, M3, or M4'.

    3 Ibid., l. 29, after `papers,' insert `E3,
    Economic Decisions within the Firm,'.

    4 Ibid., l. 30, delete, `the optional fourth
    paper for'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF
    PHILOSOPHY

    The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards and committee
    give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

    Anthropology and Geography

    S. KEITA, Linacre: `Aspects of the human biology of sociohistorical
    change in ancient Upper Egypt'.

    Pitt Rivers Museum Research Centre, Monday, 18 March, 11 a.m.

    Examiners: P. Ucko, G.A. Harrison.

    Biological Sciences

    R. PAUL, St John's: `The genetic diversity of Plasmodium
    falciparum'.

    Department of Zoology, Thursday, 29 February, 11.30 a.m.

    Examiners: R.H. Ward, R. Carter.

    Clinical Medicine

    C.J. MCCORMICK, Exeter: `An investigation of the interactions between
    plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes and endothelium'.

    Institute of Molecular Medicine, Thursday, 7 March, 2 p.m.

    Examiners: N. Hogg, D. Kwiatkowski.

    English Language and Literature

    S. FRAMPTON, Wadham: `The concept of discovery in witchcraft and the
    theatre in early modern England'.

    Magdalen, Monday, 26 February, 2.15 p.m.

    Examiners: S. Clark, D.G.E. Norbrook.

    Literae Humaniores

    A.-L. ALLWOOD, Lincoln: `The imagination in Hume and Kant'.

    Examination Schools, Wednesday, 17 April, 2.15 p.m.

    Examiners: P.F. Strawson, C. Janaway.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Mathematical Sciences

    S. CURTIS, Somerville: `A relational approach to optimisation
    problems'.

    Computing Laboratory, Monday, 18 March, 10 a.m.

    Examiners: M. Sintzoff, G. Jones.

    Modern History

    N. GURUSHINA, Christ Church: `British private capital exports to
    late imperial Russia'.

    St Antony's, Tuesday, 30 April, 2.15 p.m.

    Examiners: G.G. Jones, M.C. Kaser.

    B.K. SONG, St Antony's: `Poor Law policy and the operation of labour
    markets in Oxfordshire c.1750–1870'.

    Examination Schools, Monday, 4 March, 2 p.m.

    Examiners: M.E. Rose, J.M. Prest.

    Oriental Studies

    K. A.-M. FUNTEK, St Antony's: `Arab nationalism in domestic Egyptian
    politics: 1952–70'.

    Middle East Centre, St Antony's, Monday, 26 February, 11 a.m.

    Examiners: C. Tripp, P. Robins.

    N.N. HAIDER, St Antony's: `The Kishangarh school of painting:
    c.1680–1850 ad'.

    Ashmolean Museum, Monday, 18 March, 2.30 p.m.

    Examiners: R.W. Skelton, P. Mitter.

    J.R. HALLETT, St Antony's: `Trade and innovation: the rise of a
    pottery industry in Abbasid Basra'.

    Examination Schools, Saturday, 2 March, 10 a.m.

    Examiners: J.M. Rawson, J. Johns.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Physical Sciences

    P. DEMETRIOU, St Peter's: `Calculation of cross-sections for
    nucleon-induced pre-equilibrium reactions'.

    Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Monday, 4 March, 10.45 a.m.

    Examiners: A.C. Merchant, R.C. Johnson.

    C.D. SHELDRAKE, St Catherine's: `Unsteady effects in the high
    pressure stage of a model gas turbine'.

    Magdalen, Tuesday, 27 February, 11 a.m.

    Examiners: B.J. Bellhouse, C.T.L. Scrivener.

    J.E. VERLANDER, St Cross: `Basin-scale aeolian stratigraphy: the
    Navajo Sandstone, western USA'.

    Department of Earth Sciences, Thursday, 29 February, 10 a.m.

    Examiners: J.F. Dewey, L.B. Clemmensen.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Social Studies

    A. FORSTER, St Hugh's: `Empowerment and constraint: Britain and the
    negotiation of the treaty on European Union'.

    St Antony's, Monday, 18 March, 2 p.m.

    Examiners: A. Deighton, G. Edwards.

    F. PATRIKEEFF, St Antony's: `Continuity and change in Russian
    politics in northern Manchuria, 1924–31'.

    St Antony's, Tuesday, 19 March, 11 a.m.

    Examiners: M.C. Kaser, A. Wood.

    Committee for Comparative Philology and General Linguistics

    J. STUART-SMITH, Somerville: `The development of the Indo-European
    voiced aspirates in Italic: a philological and phonetic
    assessment'.

    Centre for Linguistics and Philology, Tuesday, 12 March, 2.15 p.m.


    Examiners: K.M. Hayward, D.R. Langslow.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF
    SCIENCE

    The examiners appointed by the following faculty board give notice of
    oral examination of their candidate as follows:

    Biological Sciences

    S. DORRINGTON, Linacre: `A biochemical analysis of CDC2 and cyclin
    in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe'.

    Deaprtment of Biochemistry, Friday, 22 March, 2 p.m.

    Examiners: J.P. Armitage, C.C. Ford.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 22 February 1996: Colleges<br />

    Colleges, Halls, and Societies


    Contents of this section:

    • OBITUARIES


    • ELECTIONS

    • PRIZES
      • St Hugh's College

    • NOTICES:

      • Corpus Christi College

      • Exeter College

      • Mansfield College

      • Oriel College

      • Pembroke College

      • St Antony's College

      • St Catherine'S College

      • Wolfson College

        Return to Contents Page of this issue



        OBITUARIES


        Corpus Christi College

        MAXWELL GOULTER WOOD, MA, 3 September 1995; commoner 1925–8.
        Aged 89.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        St Hilda's College

        HANNAH MARY (ROSEMARY) MORRISON (née Topping),
        B.LITT., MA, 4 February 1996; commoner 1931–5. Aged 82.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Trinity College

        ALISTAIR CAMERON CROMBIE, MA (B.SC. Melbourne, PH.D. Cambridge), FBA,
        9 February 1996; University Lecturer in the History of Science
        1953–83; Fellow 1969–83, Honorary Fellow 1994–6;
        Member, Pontifical Academy of Sciences, 1994–6. Aged 80.

        Corrigendum

        HORACE JOHN FAREBROTHER, 10 January 1996; commoner 1935. Aged 79.

        Note: this replaces the corresponding notice published in
        the Gazette of 15 February, p. 769.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        ELECTIONS


        Merton College

        To Exhibitions:

        R.D. BARLOW, formerly of Shrewsbury School

        MISS A.H. REES, formerly of Queen Elizabeth Maridunum
        Comprehensive School, Carmarthen

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        PRIZES

        St Hugh's College

        Prizes for Collections:

        ALEXANDRA EMILY LOUISE MERCHANT

        JUSTIN WILLIAM SHERWOOD

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        NOTICES


        Corpus Christi College


        Stipendiary Lecturership in Law

        The college wishes to appoint a Stipendiary Lecturer in Law for one
        year from 1 October 1996. The person appointed will be expected to
        engage in undergraduate teaching for at least nine hours per week,
        and in Hilary Term 1997 will be required (with the support of the two
        law fellows of the college) to assume pastoral responsibility for
        undergraduates and graduates reading law. The lecturer will be
        expected to teach at least three, and ideally all, of the following
        subjects: Constitutional Law and Introduction to Law for Law
        Moderations, and Tort and Administrative Law for the Final Honour
        School of Jursiprudence.

        The salary of the lecturer will be
        £11,103 plus a housing allowance of £1,783. Teaching in
        excess of nine hours per week will be remunerated at the current
        tutorial rate. The post is pensionable under USS. The lecturer will
        be a member of the senior common room and will be entitled to free
        lunch and dinner at all times when the college kitchen is open.

        Applications, accompanied by a curriculum vitae, a
        list of actual and forthcoming publications (if any) and the names of
        three referees, should be sent by post to the Senior Tutor, Corpus
        Christi College, Oxford OX1 4JF (fax: Oxford 793121, e-mail:
        college.office@ccc.ox.ac.uk), by 22 March. Applicants should ask
        their referees to write, fax, or e-mail direct to the Senior Tutor by
        the same date. It is hoped to interview short-listed candidates
        during the week beginning 15 April.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Lecturership in Philosophy

        The college proposes to appoint a lecturer in Philosophy with effect
        from 1 October 1996. The post will be tenable for two years. The
        duties of the lecturer will be to teach up to twelve hours weekly for
        any of the Preliminary Examinations and Honour Schools involving
        Philosophy, to undertake tutorial responsibility (including pastoral
        care and the organisation of external tuition) for undergraduates
        reading Philosophy in PPE and PPP, and to take part in admissions.

        The principal areas in which teaching is required are Introductory
        Philosophy for Prelims (Descartes, Mill, and introductory formal
        logic), History of Philosophy from Descartes to Kant, Metaphysics and
        Theory of Knowledge, Ethics and Philosophy of Mind. Candidates should
        specify which of these areas they are prepared to teach, together
        with any other areas of special interest. The ability to teach Greek
        philosophy is not required. The current salary is £12,516 per
        annum (including housing allowance of £1,783 per annum).
        Teaching in excess of six hours per week is remunerated at the
        current tutorial rate. The lecturer will receive a per capita
        entertainment allowance and a book allowance and will be entitled to
        free lunch and dinner in college. The post is pensionable under USS.

        Applications, accompanied by a curriculum vitae and
        the names of two referees, should be sent by post to the Senior
        Tutor, Corpus Christi College, Oxford OX1 4JF (fax: Oxford 793121,
        e-mail: college.office@ccc.ox.ac.uk), by 4 April. They should
        include a brief description of the applicant's research interests
        and a list of actual or forthcoming publications (if any). Applicants
        should ask their referees to write, fax, or e-mail direct to the
        Senior Tutor by that date. It is hoped to interview short-listed
        candidates during the week beginning 13 May.

        The college exists to
        promote excellence in education and research and is actively
        committed to the principle of equality of opportunity for all
        suitably qualified candidates.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Exeter College


        Appointment of College Accountant

        The college seeks a qualified or suitably experienced accountant to
        produce the college's management and final accounts and to be
        responsible for the smooth running of the Accounts Department. The
        successful applicant will be computer-literate and familiar with
        spreadsheet working, and will be required to produce regular
        management information to assist with close control of the college's
        finances. The post carries an annual salary of around £24,650
        plus usual benefits and is pensionable through the Universities
        Superannuation Scheme.

        Applicants should write with a full
        curriculum vitae and the names of two referees to the
        Home Bursar, Exeter College, Oxford OX1 3DP (telephone: Oxford
        (2)79650), from whom further particulars are available. The closing
        date for applications is Tuesday, 27 February, and it is hoped to
        make an appointment as soon as possible after 15 March.

        Exeter
        College is an equal opportunities employer.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Mansfield College


        Stipendiary Lecturership in English

        Applications are invited for the above post from 15 April 1996 to the
        end of Trinity Term 1997. The lecturer will be required to teach for
        papers in Honour Moderations and/or Final Honours in the range of
        English Literature 1509 to the present day, averaging five hours per
        week over the period of employment. The lecturer should have the
        capacity to teach at least two (and preferably three) of the
        following papers: Honour Moderations 1 and 2, Final Honours 2, 4, 5,
        and 6. The salary will be at least £4,909 per annum, with SCR
        membership and dining rights.

        Applications (six copies), with
        details of career, research, and teaching experience should be sent
        to the College Secretary, Mansfield College, Oxford OX1 3BH, by
        Monday, 11 March. Applicants are requested to ask one referee to
        write in support of their application directly to the College
        Secretary by the closing date.

        Further enquiries should be directed
        to Dr R. Ballaster, Mansfield College, Oxford OX1 3TF.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Oriel College


        Stipendiary Lecturership in English
        Literature

        The college invites applications for a Lecturership in English
        Literature for the two years from 1 October 1996 to 30 September
        1998.

        The lecturer will be in overall charge of teaching in English
        and in the English sides of the joint schools of English and Modern
        Languages, and Classics and English. He or she will be required to
        teach twelve hours per week across the range of English Literature in
        the period 1500 to the present day (including the main post-1500
        period papers in Mods and Schools).

        There is no age limit for
        applicants. The stipend offered is on the scale £14,500 to
        £16,500 per annum (based on the national scale for university
        lecturers).

        Further details are available from the College
        Secretary, Oriel College, Oxford OX1 4EW (telephone: Oxford
        (2)76543). The closing date for applications is Friday, 1 March.

        Oriel College is an equal opportunities employer.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Pembroke College


        Senior Studentships

        The college proposes to make elections to these studentships. They
        will be tenable for one year from 1 October 1996, with possible
        renewal for a second year. The students will receive an annual
        stipend of £600, above any other awards they may hold. In
        addition they will become members of the senior common room and have
        certain dining rights, and be entitled to dine on high table for up
        to three nights a week during term. The successful candidates will be
        expected to be reading for a research degree of this University, or
        be intending to begin research in October 1996. The studentships are
        restricted to existing members of Pembroke College.

        Two
        studentships are available from October 1996, and may be for arts or
        sciences.

        Applications for the studentships should be addressed to
        the Dean of Graduates, Pembroke College, Oxford OX1 1DW, and must be
        received by Friday, 22 March. Candidates should submit a full
        curriculum vitae, together with an account of their
        research topic (maximum 1,000 words). Candidates are also asked to
        arrange for two referees to submit references on their behalf direct
        to the Dean of Graduates at Pembroke College.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        St Antony's College


        Max Hayward Research Fellowship in Russian
        Literature

        St Antony's College invites applications for the above fellowship for
        the academic year 1996–7. This appointment is normally for young
        scholars at postdoctoral or equivalent stage. Further particulars are
        available from the Secretary, Russian and East European Centre, St
        Antony's College, Oxford OX2 6JF (telephone: Oxford (2)84728,
        e-mail: jackie.willcox@sant.ox.ac.uk). The closing date for
        applications is Friday, 19 April.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        St Catherine's College


        Stipendiary Lecturership/Fellowship by
        Special Election in Law

        The college proposes to appoint a Stipendiary twelve-hour Lecturer in
        Law for three years commencing in October 1996. The position may be
        associated with a Fellowship by Special Election and may be renewable
        for a further two years.

        The lecturer will be required to teach (in
        tutorials and classes) twelve hours per week on average in the eight
        weeks of each full term. He or she will, in addition, be expected to
        play a full role in the running of the Honour School of Law including
        participating in the admissions process, setting and marking college
        examinations, and the pastoral care of undergraduates.

        The
        lecturer would ideally be able to teach three of the following
        subjects: Introduction to Law, Constitutional Law, Criminal Law,
        Roman Law, Tort, Land Law, Administrative Law, and Trusts. However,
        in appropriate circumstances, arrangements could be made for a
        lecturer who was able to teach other subjects for the Final Honour
        School.

        Residential accommodation will be provided free of charge
        if the lecturer chooses to live in college. The lecturer will be a
        member of the senior common room and will receive full common table
        during term and the entrance period and two meals a week during
        vacations. The stipend for 1996–7 will be £14,340 (under
        review), and will be pensionable.

        Applications should be addressed
        to the Senior Tutor, St Catherine's College, Oxford OX1 3UJ, and
        should include the names of two referees. Applicants should ask their
        referees to write directly to the Senior Tutor. Applications and
        references must arrive by Friday, 15 March.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Leathersellers' Company Graduate
        Scholarship 1996

        St Catherine's College proposes, if there is a candidate of
        sufficient merit, to elect a Leathersellers' Scholar with effect
        from October 1996.

        The scholarship will be to the value of
        £2,000 per annum and will be tenable for up to three years. It
        may be held in conjunction with another award and is open to
        graduates of any British university who wish to undertake research in
        the biological, mathematical, physical, or physiological sciences.

        St Catherine's has a large and thriving graduate common room, and
        accommodation is available in college for single scholars in their
        first two years (at the current room charge rate). Limited senior
        common room dining rights are also granted to scholars. There are
        fifteen flats for married graduates nearby.

        Applicants must
        complete an Oxford application form if they have not already done so,
        and they should place St Catherine's as their college of first
        choice. The form should be sent as soon as possible to the Graduate
        Admissions Office as directed. When the dossier is complete, it will
        be sent to the relevant department for consideration. If acceptable,
        it will then be passed on to the college of first choice.

        Those who
        wish to be considered for this scholarship should write to the
        College Secretary, St Catherine's College, Oxford OX1 3UJ, giving a
        brief curriculum vitae and proposed area of research at
        Oxford (there is no application form). Any other means of financial
        support should be stated. In addition, candidates should arrange for
        two people acquainted with their recent academic work to send a
        confidential report direct to the College Secretary before the
        closing date.

        The closing date for application is Friday, 3 May,
        and the college plans to interview short-listed candidates at the end
        of May. Nominations will be submitted to the Leathersellers' Company
        in June 1996.

        St Catherine's College is an equal opportunities
        employer.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Wolfson College


        Wolfson Industrial Fellowships 1996–8

        Wolfson College proposes to make elections (if suitable candidates
        are proposed) to two two-year Wolfson Industrial Fellowships for the
        academic years 1996–8. These fellowships are intended to enable
        those working in industry to come to Oxford to engage in a joint
        research project with a university department.

        The intention is
        that the fellowships should give an opportunity for collaborative
        research which would not otherwise have taken place, but the college
        is prepared to receive proposals in respect of already established
        research projects.

        Proposers will be expected to negotiate an
        agreement with the company by whom the candidate is employed, under
        which the company would continue to pay his or her full salary but
        would permit him or her to spend one-fifth of his/her time on a joint
        research project in Oxford. The college is willing to consider a
        variation from this pattern to suit current conditions or individual
        circumstances. Wolfson College will offer up to £1,000 per annum
        towards any expense reasonably incurred in pursuance of the aims of
        the fellowship. Applications, which should include a curriculum
        vitae
        of the candidate, should be sent to the President,
        Wolfson College, Oxford OX2 6UD, by the closing date, Monday, 1
        April. (There is no application form—applications should be
        marked `WIF'.)

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Godfrey Lienhardt Memorial Fund

        Applications are invited for grants from the fund, which has been
        established by Wolfson College out of a bequest from the late Dr R.G.
        Lienhardt `for the promotion of the Social and Cultural Anthropology
        of Africa south of the Sahara desert but excluding the Republic of
        South Africa'. Those eligible to apply are graduate students of the
        University, and those admitted as graduate students for the coming
        academic year, whose research falls within the specified terms of the
        fund. It is proposed to make one major award of £1,500, priority
        for which will be given to those engaged in field research, and a few
        smaller grants of up to £250.

        Application forms and further
        information may be obtained from the President's Secretary, Wolfson
        College, Oxford OX2 6UD. Applications must be submitted by Friday, 19
        April.

        Return to List of Contents of this section






        <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 22 February 1996: Advertisements<br />

        Advertisements


        Contents of this section:



        How to advertise in the
        Gazette


        Terms and
        conditions of acceptance of advertisements

        Return to Contents Page of this issue



        Oxford Chamber Music Society

        Susanne Stanzeleit, violin, and Julian Jacobson,
        piano, will play the following at 2.45 p.m. on Sunday, 3 March, in
        the Holywell Music Room: Beethoven, Sonata in A minor, op. 23;
        Fauré, Sonata in A, op. 13; Dvorák, Four Romantic
        Pieces
        ; Delius, Sonata no. 3; Liszt, Grand Duo
        Concertant
        . Tickets £7.50 from Blackwell's Music Shop,
        £7.95 at the door; students and juniors £3.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Services Offered

        Freelance personal secretary: confidential
        correspondence, manuscripts, theses, c.v.s; word-processing,
        shorthand, laser printer. Tel.: Oxford 872754.

        Carpentry, joinery, fitted cupboards, doors, etc.,
        undertaken. Prompt, efficient, and sympathetic service at competitive
        prices. R.H. Sprot. Tel.: 01869 345060.

        Frederick and Sudabeh Hine, private dealers in
        Persian carpets and kelims. Traditional tribal, village, and workshop
        pieces in all sizes from Iran, Turkey, and Afghanistan. Old Chinese
        sometimes available. Authenticity guaranteed plus unbeatable prices.
        University discount, goods on approval. Open 10 a.m.–6 p.m.
        every day except Sun. Old Squash Court at rear of 16 Linton Road,
        North Oxford. Tel./fax: Oxford 59396.

        Mallam's: one of Oxfordshire's leading estate agents
        with an outstanding professional reputation. Major provincial fine
        art auctioneers holding frequent general and specialist sales,
        including books. Residential letting and management agents. Head
        Office: Bocardo House, St Michael's Street, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford
        241466.

        Oriental carpets: Persian, Turkish, Afghan,
        Caucasian, and Tribal Chinese carpets and kelims bought and sold,
        cleaned and repaired. We carry a good stock of varied sizes and
        runners in Oxford, and have access to bonded warehouses for larger
        and oversize pieces. Home trial service. We sell Anti-Slip for rugs
        and carpets–stops carpets creeping. Braziers of Oxford, 57 High
        Street, Oxford, and 24 High Street, Wallingford. Tel.: Oxford
        246574.

        Town and Country Trees: professional tree surgery,
        orchard and shrub pruning, planting, and hedges. Quality work at
        competitive prices. Fully insured. Locally based. For a free
        quotation, please call Paul Hodkinson. Tel.: 01993 811115.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Domestic Services

        Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters,
        your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic,
        commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-
        occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For
        free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford
        726983 or Abingdon 555533.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Houses to Let

        Headington, Oxford: 2-bedroom newly-decorated house
        to let; fully furnished and well equipped; small private garden with
        parking area for one car; walking distance of John Radcliffe Hospital
        and Brookes University; shops and buses. Min. let 6 months. £650
        p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 65625 (after 6 p.m.).

        Furnished semi-detached house in Sandhills (3½
        miles from centre, opposite Thornhill Park & Ride for easy access to
        Oxford); 1 double bedroom and 2 single bedrooms (one unfurnished),
        bathroom with electric shower; living-room, dining-room and fitted
        kitchen; gas c.h., fridge, cooker, microwave, telephone; off-street
        parking; garden. £520 p.c.m. Available immediately for 6
        months--1 year. Tel.: Oxford (2)78270, e-mail:
        viv.mcevoy@las.ox.ac.uk.

        North Oxford , within ring-road: new self-contained
        luxury accommodation available from 8 Apr.; very quiet with lovely
        views and patio; near convenient bus route; suit visiting academic,
        single or couple. Regret no children, smokers, or pets. £600
        p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 515085.

        Southmoor Road: fully furnished 3 to 4-bedroom house
        to let mid- Mar.--early June. Rent approx. £200 p.w. plus bills.
        Dr Kenyon. Tel.: Oxford 57649 (home); 240501 (work); 0860 139590
        (mobile).

        Headington: spacious 4-bedroom house, fully
        equipped, c.h., gardens, garage. Convenient for schools and
        hospitals. Available from 1 Sept. for 11/12 months. £850 p.c.m.
        Tel.: Oxford (2)76202 or 61316.

        Charming cottage on edge of village 15 miles
        north-west of Oxford; double bedroom plus spare bedroom/study;
        furnished and equipped to a very high standard; beams, inglenook
        fire; south-facing; very private walled patio garden. Suit caring
        non-smoking couple. Tel.: 01608 684700.

        Well-appointed North Oxford 3/4-bedroom house with
        garden leading to canal available for let from mid-Apr. for 15--18
        months. Spectacular views over the country balance easy access to the
        city via Kingston Road. Furnished or unfurnished lease considered.
        £1,350 p.c.m. J. Noel. Tel.: Oxford 310000 (day) or 58414
        (evenings).

        June–Sept., comfortable house in Oxford with
        lawned garden and friendly cat. Both need attention, so rent
        (£450 p.c.m.) is lower than average. Easy reach of city centre.
        Two beds. Two reception. Tel.: Oxford 751295.

        An Englishman's home is his castle—so the
        saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer
        but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the
        surrounding area we may be able to help. QB management is one of
        Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to
        academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to
        offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Please
        telephone or fax us with details of your requirements and we will do
        whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 64533, fax:
        64777.

        At Finders Keepers each and every caller receives a
        personal service—fast, experienced, and efficient; for overseas
        applicants we offer a Priority Reservation System to ensure a
        suitable property is ready for arrival—meeting individual needs
        is our speciality. Try us first. Call, write, or e-mail for further
        information. Finders Keepers Ltd., 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE
        (tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 56993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk; also
        27 St Clement's, Oxford OX4 1DJ (tel.: 200012, fax: 204844, e-mail:
        stclements@finders.co.uk); Internet site:
        http://www.oxlink.co.uk/business/finders.html.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Flats to Let

        Central North Oxford: luxury fully-furnished flat,
        available now. Large double bedroom, large drawing room, kitchen,
        bathroom; c.h.; off-street parking; large garden. Quiet, civilised
        large family house converted into flats. Regret no children or pets.
        Reasonable rent. Tel.: Oxford 52400.

        Comfortable studio flat in former vicarage in pretty
        village location approximately 5 miles from Oxford city centre;
        recently refurbished; large living/bedroom with superb rural views,
        kitchen, and bathroom. Ideal for single academic/professional.
        £350 p.c.m. Finders Keepers. Tel.: Oxford 200012.

        Attractive 2-bedroom fully-furnished and superbly
        equipped stable flat (building listed grade II) in beautiful rural
        setting 10 miles from central Oxford; parking for 2 cars; close to
        main bus route. Available now. £725 p.m. (6 months min.). Tel.:
        01844 339650.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Summer let

        Spacious recently redecorated Edwardian house: 4
        bedrooms, large playing attic, bathroom, shower-room, w.c., 2
        reception rooms, spacious kitchen plus dining area, large
        sitting-conservatory in peaceful garden, c.h., washing-machine,
        tumble-drier, dish-washer, microwave, TV, video. In Oxford, off
        Banbury Road, close to Parks, shopping centre, swimming-pool, buses
        to Oxford centre. Available 30 July--29 Aug. £300 p.w. Tel.:
        Oxford 511007 (evening), or (2)70490 (day); fax: (2)70757.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Accommodation Offered

        Bed-and-breakfast available in a warm, comfortable
        house in exclusive central North Oxford, within easy walking distance
        of all main university buildings and town centre; a stone's throw
        from parks, river, and several excellent restaurants. Colour TV and
        tea- and coffee-making facilities in all rooms; microwaves available.
        Very moderate terms. Tel.: Oxford 57879.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Accommodation Sought

        Office/study space wanted: co-ordinator of research
        and publication project for a UN environmental treaty body seeks
        space in central Oxford area, preferably furnished and with
        phone-line, in congenial environment. Needed immediately for three
        months, with option for extension. A. Gross. Tel./fax: Oxford 792288,
        or write: 25 Vicarage Road, Oxford OX1 4RB.

        Two mature, house-trained doctors, returning to the
        UK in June, require quality 2+-bedroom period accommodation in
        south-east Oxford, or between Oxford and Reading. Summer let or
        house-sit ideal. Exceptional references supplied. Contact Dr David
        Burgner. Fax: 0061 2 845 3489, e-mail:
        Davidb2@mail.kids.usydedu.au.

        Yale professor on sabbatical seeks large, well-
        appointed furnished family house near Oxford centre for year-long
        rental or exchange starting July. Washer/drier/dish-washer preferred.
        Tel.: 203 432 4932; fax: 203 432 1040.

        Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your
        property? QB Management are one of Oxford's foremost letting agents
        and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and
        professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow
        of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford
        area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply
        need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us.
        Tel.: Oxford 64533, or fax: 64777.

        If you are thinking of letting your property Finders
        Keepers will be delighted to meet you to discuss your
        requirements—without obligation—and to offer expert advice
        based on over 25 years' experience of the Oxford rental market. Call,
        write, or e-mail for further information. Finders Keepers Ltd., 73
        Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE (tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 56993, e-
        mail: oxford@finders.co.uk; also 27 St Clement's, Oxford OX4 1DJ
        (tel.: 200012, fax: 204844, e-mail: stclements@finders.co.uk);
        Internet site: http://www.oxlink.co.uk/business/finders.html.
        n

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Accommodation Exchange

        House exchange, Sept. 1996--June 1997: six-room
        suburban home on golf course in Tucson, Arizona (university town)
        with 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, all appliances, use of two cars, for
        non-smoker house in Oxford--Cambridge area with ground-floor bedroom,
        bathroom. Carey Womble, 1403 Via Ronda Oeste, Tucson, AZ 85715, USA.
        Tel.: 520 296 7388.

        American family of four seeks house- and car-swap in
        Oxford or environs for six or seven weeks in June and July. Our 5-
        bedroom house in McLean, Virginia, is 8 miles from the centre of
        Washington, DC, and very close to all the attractions of mid-Atlantic
        USA: Blue Ridge Mountains, Atlantic beaches, Chesapeake Bay, New York
        City. Garage, Toyota in excellent condition, neighbourhood pool and
        tennis, safe family-friendly subdivision. Tel.: 00 1 703 356 9457, or
        write: A.T. Fleeson, 1359 Snow Meadow Lane, McLean, Virginia 22102,
        USA.

        Visiting American professor with family (sister,
        brother-in-law) seeks to exchange 2-bedroom, large sitting-room, 3-
        bath flat overlooking ocean in Los Angeles, California, suitable for
        2 adults, one or two children of secondary school/university age, for
        2/3-bedroom furnished house/flat in Oxford (within walking/cycling
        distance of Queen's College), for 5 weeks from 24 June to 29 July. Dr
        Albert Koppes. Tel.: 001 310 338 7301, fax: 001 310 338 1976, e-mail:
        akoppes@lmumail.lmu.edu.

        Edinburgh: charming house in quiet avenue at foot of
        Arthur's Seat; 3 bedrooms (sleeps 6/7), 2 bathrooms, lounge, dining-
        room, kitchen, secluded garden; 10 minutes from Prince's Street,
        Royal Infirmary, university; excellent primary school next door. Non-
        smoking visiting fellow and family seek similar in Oxford for
        exchange early Apr.–mid-July. Tel.: 0131-661 5704.


        Holiday Lets

        Greece, island of Hydra, lovely family house to let
        1 May--7 July, and 1 Sept.--1 July 1997; bathroom, w.c., electricity.
        Short lets £200 p.w., long lets £100 p.w. Diana
        Holland-Martin, Sunny Bank, Overbury, Tewkesbury, GL20 7PB. Write, or
        tel.: 01386 725 370 (before 8.30 a.m. or after 6 p.m.).

        Tuscany: small traditional farmhouse set in olive
        groves on hillside overlooking unspoilt valley and Siena (20
        minutes); sleeps 5; simply but comfortably equipped; cleaning
        included; car essential. No pool, but idyllic surroundings. Tel.:
        0171-607 0117.

        Tarn, south-west France: delightful 200-year-old
        character cottage, sleeps 4, swimming-pool, close to Cordes/Albi; the
        best in self- catering accommodation---beamed ceilings, terracotta
        floors, exposed stone walls, beautifully furnished. Weeks available
        in Apr., May, Aug., Sept., Oct. Telephone or fax English owner for
        brochure. Tel./fax: 0033 6333 2173.

        Lake Garda---Dolomites, near Riva-del-Garda in
        peaceful hillside villa with spectacular mountain panorama,
        self-contained accommodation for two, May--Oct. Separate garden
        entrance with patio; private facilities. £45--£50 per
        night. Excursions to the Dolomites, Verona operas, Trento.
        Wine-tastings. English spoken. Tel./fax: 0039 464 518559, or 0171-359
        1629.

        Portugal: Obidos. Attractive self-contained
        house/apartment in lovely, quiet, unspoilt rural area 90 kms north of
        Lisbon overlooking lagoon and 2 miles from sea; ideal for
        bird-watching, walking, horse- riding. Rent c.£50
        per person per week. Tel.: 00 351 62 979534, or 0171-352 3144.

        Provence holiday/sabbatical lets. Luxury 3-bedroom
        apartment on two floors in 17th-c. château; spectacular views
        to the Gorge du Verdon; swimming-pool, tennis, boules; lake for
        sailing, wind-surfing, etc., close by; unspoilt area, wonderful
        walking country. Priced for 2--6. Long or short lets. Available year
        round---great place for winter sunshine with open fire/c.h. too.
        Tel.: 01608 684700.

        Catalonia: well-appointed 3-bedroom house in the
        unspoilt Catalonian village of Regençós (about 60
        miles north-east of Barcelona and 4 miles inland) near Palafrugell;
        several superb beaches within radius of 6 miles; sleeps 6; on 2
        floors, each a self-contained flat with kitchen, bathroom,
        lounge/dining area; ground floor: large double bedroom, upper floor:
        similar double bedroom and further twin-bed room. Attractive roof
        garden with superb views over surrounding countryside. Spanish maid
        visits every Sun. and will cook delicious meals.£1,000 p.c.m.,
        or £300 p.w. Dr Charles Mould. Tel.: 01993 831747, fax: 01993
        831748, e-mail: charles.mould@st-cross.ox.ac.uk.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Houses for Sale

        Grandpont: large family house, in popular and
        friendly area, 10 minutes' walk from city centre, near excellent
        schools and river walks; large reception room, kitchen,
        playroom/dining-room, bathroom, 4 double bedrooms, loft with window,
        front/rear walled garden. £179,950/offers. Tel.: Oxford
        723412.

        Iffley Fields: a high-quality small modern house
        with double bedroom, living-room, kitchen and bathroom, own private
        garden and garage in a small, quiet, and secure courtyard development
        with open views, yet within a half-mile of Magdalen Bridge. Gas c.h.
        and fully carpeted. Available immediately. £62,500. Tel.: Oxford
        739713 (p.m.).

        Return to List of Contents of this section






        <br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette: Diary, 23 February<br /> - 8 March

        Diary


        Contents of this section:

        Academic Staff Seminars: places
        should be booked in advance through the Staff Development Office,
        University Offices, Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

        For the full list of courses, see the HREF="../../supps/3_4373.htm">Staff Development Programme
        supplement.

        Return to Contents Page of this
        issue



        Friday 23 February

        G. MATHER, MEP: `The Intergovernmental Conference: the European
        Parliament's perspective' (Centre for European Studies seminars:
        `Institutional change in Europe—the Intergovernmental Conference
        1996'), Chester Room, Nuffield, 10 a.m.

        DR T. KOHN: `How the past and present have been re-membered on a
        Hebridean island' (Ethnicity and Identity seminar series:
        `Remembering, forgetting, and reconstructing the past'), Institute of
        Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

        ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `An introduction to ancient Egypt',
        1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78000.)

        PROFESSOR B.S. MARKESINIS (Clifford Chance Professor of European
        Law): `The comparatist (or a plea for a broader legal education)'
        (inaugural lecture), Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 5
        p.m.

        MR J. CAMPBELL: `Origins of the English state: conclusion' (final
        lecture in series of Ford's Lectures in British History), Schools, 5
        p.m.

        DR W. BELL: `Will there be books in heaven? Rethinking the future
        of the text' (seminar series: `From text to book: new studies in
        literature and history'), Salter Room, New College, 5 p.m.

        GEN. SIR MICHAEL ROSE: `International peace-keeping: conditions
        for success' (All Souls Foreign Policy Studies Programme: `Lessons
        from Bosnia'), Old Library, All Souls, 5 p.m.

        DR R. MUHR: `Das oesterreichische Deutsch' (lecture), Room 3,
        Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

        P. BURRIN: `La France à l'heure allemande (1940–4)'
        (lecture), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Saturday 24 February

        PORTUGUESE STUDIES WORKSHOP, European Studies Centre, St Antony's,
        9.30 a.m.–5 p.m. (details in `Lectures' above).

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Sunday 25 February

        PROFESSOR URSULA KING: `Christ and Christianity: finding a divine
        centre in a complex universe' (fourth Bampton Lecture), St Mary's, 10
        a.m.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Monday 26 February

        ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Dealing with the media: crisis management',
        9.30 a.m. (see information above).

        PROFESSOR S. JASANOFF: `Worldly politics, earthly knowledge'
        (Environmental Change Unit seminar), Main Lecture Theatre, School of
        Geography, 2.15 p.m.

        PROFESSOR C. GRAYSON: `The title of the Divine
        Comedy
        ' (Paget Toynbee Lectures on Dante), Room 2, Taylor
        Institution, 5 p.m.

        DR G. FARRELL: ` "We'll be able to get plastic sitars in our
        cornflakes soon": Indian music and popular culture in the 1960s'
        (seminar series: `Studies in the social history of music'), Music
        Faculty, 5.15 p.m.

        PROFESSOR N. SCHAPPACHER: `Some remarks on the history of Fermat's
        Last Theorem' (lecture), Maison Française, 5.45 p.m.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Tuesday 27 February

        ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Medieval treasures', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
        £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78000.)

        DR S. GREENFIELD: `Soul, brain, and mind' (Wolfson College
        Lectures: `From soul to self'), Wolfson, 5 p.m.

        P. BOURDIEU and
        J. BOUVERESSE: `Conformismes et résistance'
        (lecture/debate), lecture hall, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m. (tel. for
        details: (2)74220).

        DR S. HUNT: `From Oxford to Ann Arbor and back: Middle English and
        the revision of OED' (OED Forum), Rewley
        House, 5 p.m.

        THE HON. MARTIN LEE: `Countdown to 1997: Hong Kong's 500 days'
        (special seminar), New Lecture Theatre, Nissan Institute, 5 p.m.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Wednesday 28 February

        PROFESSOR D. BROWN: `Slaying the dragon: pattern and particular'
        (Hensley Henson Lectures: `Tradition and transformation—the
        virtue in tradition'), Schools, 5 p.m.

        L. GRAFOVA: `The resettlement of refugees and the forcibly-
        displaced in Russia' (Refugee Studies Programme Seminars on Forced
        Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

        DR J. SACKS: `Religion and civil society' (Victor Cook Memorial
        Lectures: `Education, values, and religion'), E.P. Abraham Lecture
        Theatre, Green College, 5.15 p.m.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Thursday 29 February

        DR S. HUANG: ` "Help wanted": south-east Asia's maid trade'
        (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Issues in
        gender and development'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth
        House, 2 p.m.

        PROFESSOR R.R. DAVIES (Chichele Professor of Medieval History):
        `The matter of Britain and the matter of England' (inaugural
        lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

        PROFESSOR C.A. BAYLY: `Patriotism, commmunity, and colonial rule'
        (Radhakrishnan Memorial Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

        DR J. SACKS: `Education and a community of value: the Jewish
        experience' (Victor Cook Memorial Lectures: `Education, values, and
        religion'), E.P. Abraham Lecture Theatre, Green College, 5.15 p.m.

        PROFESSOR A. CLARE: `Meeting of minds: the import of family and
        society' (Linacre Lectures: `Mind, brain, and the environment'),
        Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building, 5.30 p.m.

        DR F. FERNÁNDEZ-ARMESTO: `Codex Mendoza: this unique
        treasure of the Bodleian Library which belonged to Richard Hakluyt
        casts world history in a new light' (Friends of the Bodleian
        illustrated lecture—joint meeting with the Hakluyt Society),
        Convocation House, 6 p.m. (tel. for tickets (£8/£10):
        (2)77022).

        TIMOTHY WALKER: `Oxford Botanic Garden, here and now' (Botanic
        Garden 375th anniversary lectures: `A retrospective look at the
        future'), Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's, 8 p.m. (admission
        £6; tel. for tickets: (2)76920).

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Friday 1 March

        SYMPOSIUM: `The medical sciences and medical refugees in Britain
        1930s–1950s', Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, from 10
        a.m. (see details in `Lectures' above).

        U. KALBFLEISCH-KOTTSIEPER: `Representing sub-national interests in
        the European Union: the Committee of the Regions' (Centre for
        European Studies seminars: `Institutional change in Europe—the
        Intergovernmental Conference 1996'), Chester Room, Nuffield, 10 a.m.

        H. MALINOWSKA WAYNE: `The letters of Malinowski and his wife'
        (Ethnicity and Identity seminar series: `Remembering, forgetting, and
        reconstructing the past'), Institute of Social and Cultural
        Anthropology, 11 a.m.

        ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The Romans at home', 1.15 p.m.
        (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78000.)

        PROFESSOR R. DARNTON: `Imperial control of native literatures in
        India, 1860–1910' (seminar series: `From text to book: new
        studies in literature and history'), Salter Room, New College, 5 p.m.

        D. BRYER: `The role of non-governmental organisations' (All Souls
        Foreign Policy Studies Programme: `Lessons from Bosnia'), Old
        Library, All Souls, 5 p.m.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Saturday 2 March

        DEGREE conferments, Sheldonian, 11.30 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Sunday 3 March

        PROFESSOR URSULA KING:

        ` "Mysticism-in-Action": an empowering vision of Christian faith
        and love' (fifth Bampton Lecture), St Mary's, 10 a.m.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Monday 4 March

        DR R. GARDNER: `Erosion crisis or environmental self-defence in
        Nepal?' (Environmental Change Unit seminar), Main Lecture Theatre,
        School of Geography, 2.15 p.m.

        PROFESSOR C. GRAYSON: `The message of the Divine
        Comedy
        ' (Paget Toynbee Lectures on Dante), Room 2, Taylor
        Institution, 5 p.m.

        R. CASTEL: `Les métamorphoses de la question sociale'
        (lecture), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

        PROFESSOR N. BROWN: `Ballistic missile defence for Britain?'
        (lecture), the chapel, Mansfield, 8.30 p.m.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Tuesday 5 March

        ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Exploring the Cast Gallery', 1.15
        p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78000.)

        CONGREGATION meeting, 2 p.m.

        PROFESSOR W. DOISE: `Social psychology and human rights' (Jaspars
        Memorial Lecture), Lecture Theatre C, Department of Experimental
        Psychology, 4.30 p.m.

        DR G. STRAWSON: `The sense of the self' (Wolfson College Lectures:
        `From soul to self'), Wolfson, 5 p.m.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Wednesday 6 March

        SANDRA RAPHAEL: `Women and natural history: artists, collectors,
        patrons, scientists' (Friends of the Bodleian thirty-minute lecture),
        Cecil Jackson Room, Sheldonian Theatre, 1 p.m.

        PROFESSOR D. BROWN: `Transformation: Job renewed' (Hensley Henson
        Lectures: `Tradition and transformation—the virtue in
        tradition'), Schools, 5 p.m.

        DR M.C. BEACH: `The Windsor Castle Padshahnama: Shah
        Jahan's artists and their images of Mughal India' (William Cohn
        Memorial Lecture), Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean Museum, 5 p.m.

        PROFESSOR D. LAWTON and
        MS S. TOMLINSON: `Affirming the comprehensive ideal: the
        curriculum', Department of Educational Studies, 5 p.m.

        DR C. BEYANI: `Legal dimensions of forced displacement of
        population groups' (Refugee Studies Programme: Elizabeth Colson
        Lecture), Rhodes House, 5 p.m.

        UNIVERSITY CLUB wine-tasting: `Wines from southern France', 5.45
        p.m. (admission £2).

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Thursday 7 March

        MATRICULATION ceremony, Convocation House, 12.30 p.m.

        DR P. BEVAN: `Women in rural Ethiopia: economic roles and coping
        strategies' (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women seminars:
        `Issues in gender and development'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen
        Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

        PROFESSOR M.J. KEMP (Professor of the History of Art): `The
        Mona Lisa: from science into myth' (inaugural lecture),
        Schools, 5 p.m.

        PROFESSOR C.A. BAYLY: `Patriotism and nationalism in India'
        (Radhakrishnan Memorial Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Friday 8 March

        W. HUTTON: `Monetary union: risks and options' (Centre for European
        Studies seminars: `Institutional change in Europe—the
        Intergovernmental Conference 1996'), Chester Room, Nuffield, 10 a.m.

        PROFESSOR G. COHEN: `Memory for life events: fact or fiction?'
        (Ethnicity and Identity seminar series: `Remembering, forgetting, and
        reconstructing the past'), Institute of Social and Cultural
        Anthropology, 11 a.m.

        ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `History paintings', 1.15 p.m.
        (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78000.)

        J. GARDINER: `The politics of the classics in the 1990s' (seminar
        series: `From text to book: new studies in literature and history'),
        Salter Room, New College, 5 p.m.

        THE RT. HON. DOUGLAS HURD: `A British overview' (All Souls Foreign
        Policy Studies Programme: `Lessons from Bosnia'), Old Library, All
        Souls, 5 p.m.

        C. BURGELIN: `Georges Perec: l'écrivain et l'autobiographe'
        (lecture), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

        CONCERT by the Gould Trio (piano, violin, cello), Garden
        Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's, 8.30 p.m. (admission free).

        Return to List of Contents of this section