22 April 1999 - No 4508



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 129, No. 4508: 22 April 1999<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

22 April 1999


The list of Staff Development courses for Trinity Term was published with
this Gazette. Full details can be found at the
Staff Development Office
site
.


University Health and
Safety
information


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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 22 April 1999: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 29 March


Degree by Special Resolution

No notice to the contrary having been received under the provisions of Tit.
II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1997, p. 15), the following
resolution is deemed to have been approved at noon on 29 March.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

BJARKE MAX FRELLESVIG, Hertford College

TABITTA VAN NOUHUYS, Magdalen College

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HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL


1 Decree

Council has made the following decree, to come into effect on 7 May.

Decree (1): Deprivation of the Degree of Master of Philosophy

Explanatory note

No notice of opposition having been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor will declare
carried at the meeting of Congregation on 27 April the general resolution
depriving a member of the University of the Degree of Master of Philosophy
on the ground of the use of unfair means in an examination for that degree
(see `University Agenda' below). The resolution instructed Council, in
accordance with Ch. I, Sect. I, § 4 (Statutes, 1997. p.
186), to determine by decree the procedure for de-gradation to be followed
in this case. As in the two previous cases of a similar kind, Council
considers that the appropriate procedure would be simply for a notice,
consisting of the following decree, to be published in the
Gazette, with a copy being posted in the Examination Schools.
The decree provides accordingly.


Text of Decree (1)

1 In accordance with the General Resolution approved by
Congregation on 27 April 1999, the member of the University found by the
Proctors to have used unfair means in an examination for the Degree of
Master of Philosophy is deprived of that degree.

2 The procedure for de-gradation shall be for a notice
to be published in the University Gazette, which shall consist
of this decree, and for a copy of this decree to be posted in the
Examination Schools.

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2 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts under the
provisions of Ch. V, Sect. vi, cl. 1 (Statutes, 1997, p. 367)
has been accorded to the following persons who are qualified for membership
of Congregation:

JEAN-BERNARD MARIE ROBERT AUBY, Institute of European and Comparative
Law

PETER JOHN HORTON, Nuffield Department of Surgery

JOYCE MARGARET MARTIN, Computing Services

KATHERINE MARGARET VENABLES, Institute of Health Sciences

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3 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the
Register of Congregation:

Auby, J.-B.M.R., MA status, Institute of European and Comparative Law

Davies, I.N.R., MA, Magdalen

du Sautoy, M.P.F., MA, D.Phil., All Souls

Faith, R.J., MA, St Hilda's

Fisher, Sir H.A.P., MA, All Souls

Forey, M.L.H., MA, D.Phil., All Souls

Frellesvig, B.M., MA, Hertford

Gale, P.A., MA, D.Phil., Wadham

Gardner, J.B., BCL, MA, D.Phil., All Souls

Habakkuk, Sir H.J., MA, All Souls

Hardy, H.R.D., B.Phil., MA, D.Phil., Wolfson

Horton, P.J., MA status, Nuffield Department of Surgery

Martin, J.M., MA status, Computing Services

Merchant, A.C., MA, D.Phil., Christ Church

Morse, Sir C.J., MA, All Souls

Nightingale, P., MA, Lady Margaret Hall

Pannick, D.P., BCL, MA, All Souls

Roberts, K.W.S., MA, Nuffield

Scott, A.J., MA, All Souls

Van Nouhouys, T., MA, Magdalen

Venables, K.M., MA status, Institute of Health Sciences

Wade-Gery, Sir R.L., MA, All Souls

Walker, S.K., MA, All Souls

Wilson, M., MA, D.Phil., Queen's

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BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 7 May,
see `Examinations and Boards' below.




<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 22 April 1999: University Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 26 April


Degree by Special Resolution

The following special resolution will be deemed to be approved at
noon on 26 April, unless by that time the Registrar has received
notice in writing from two or more members of Congregation under the
provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1997,
p. 15) that they wish the resolution to be put to a meeting of
Congregation.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

STANLEY JAN ULIJASZEK, St Cross College

EILEEN WYATT, Lady Margaret Hall

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CONGREGATION 27 April 2 p.m.

1 Declaration of approval of General Resolution
depriving a member of the University of the Degree of Master of
Philosophy

For text of General Resolution see Gazette
25 March.


2 Voting on Special Resolution suspending
legislative procedures

Explanatory note

As announced in the explanatory note to the general resolutions
approving the key points of principle in the second report of the
Joint Working Party on Governance (Gazette, p. 986),
Council has agreed that, following the debate in Congregation on 11
May (and if necessary 18 May), each resolution, and any amendments
proposed by members of Congregation, should be put to a postal
vote.

Under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. III, cl. 7 and Sect. V,
cll. 6 and 9 and Sect. X, cl. 1 (Statutes, 1997, pp. 11,
12, 17; Examination Decrees, 1998, pp. 1129, 1133),
unless a general resolution is opposed or an amendment is proposed to
it, it must be declared carried without question put, and cannot
thereafter be put to a postal vote. Council accordingly submits the
following special resolution permitting each of the resolutions
concerned to be put to a division at the meeting and subsequently to
a postal vote whether or not any notice of opposition or proposed
amendment has been given by the deadline for such notice. The special
resolution also suspends Tit. II, Sect. III, cl. 7 and Sect. V, cl. 8
(Statutes, 1997, pp. 8, 12; Examination
Decrees
, 1998, pp. 1126, 1129) in order to permit the votes on
each of the questions to be taken together at the end of the meeting,
thus avoiding repeated interruptions to the debate.

The procedure will be that the Registrar will read the special
resolution. Under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. VI, cl. 3
(Statutes, 1997, p. 14; Examination
Decrees
, 1998, p. 1131), if twelve or more members of
Congregation signify their objection by rising in their places, the
special resolution cannot be moved; if they do not, the resolution
will be moved, put to the House, and decided on a simple majority.

Text of Special Resolution

That the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. III, cl. 7 and Sect. V, cll. 6,
8, and 9 (Statutes, 1997, pp. 8, 11, 12;
Examination Decrees, 1998, pp. 1126, 1129) be suspended;
and that a division be taken and a postal vote be subsequently held
on each of General Resolutions (1)--(13) which are on the agenda for
the meeting of Congregation on 11 May 1999 (Gazette, p.
986), whether or not any notice of opposition or proposed amendment
to the general resolution has been given by noon on 3 May 1999.

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CONGREGATION 18 May 2 p.m.

¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that written notice
of any intention to vote against, or any proposed amendment to, the
following general resolution, signed by at least two members of
Congregation, must be given to the Registrar by noon on Monday, 10
May (see the Guide to Procedures in Congregation cited in the note at
the end of `University Agenda').


Voting on General Resolution approving new
University Mission Statement

Explanatory note

Some years ago, in compliance with HEFCE requirements, Council drew
up a University Mission Statement which was last published in the
Gazette in the context of the University's strategic
plans and financial forecasts for the period 1993--4 to 1997--8
(Supplement (2) to Gazette No. 4340, 24 October 1994, p.
269).

In the course of the preparation of the long-term corporate plan
for the University which HEFCE has now required institutions to
submit in July 1999, Council has reviewed the existing mission
statement. This comprises twenty-one relatively detailed items, and
Council considers that a more succinct and easily assimilable
document would now be more appropriate. It accordingly submits the
following proposed new version to Congregation for approval.

Text of General Resolution

That this House approve the following new University Mission
Statement.

University of Oxford: Mission Statement

The University of Oxford aims to achieve and sustain excellence in
every area of its teaching and research, maintaining and developing
its historical position as a world-class university, and enriching
the international, national, and regional communities through the
fruits of its research and the skills of its graduates.

In support of this aim, the University will:

—provide the facilities and support for its staff to pursue
innovative research, building upon Oxford's outstanding research
record, by responding to developments in the intellectual environment
and society at large, and by forging close links with the wider
academic world, the professions, industry, and commerce;

—promote challenging and rigorous teaching which benefits from a
fruitful interaction with the research environment, facilitating the
exchange of ideas through tutorials and small-group learning and
exploiting the University's resources in its libraries, museums, and
scientific collections, to equip its graduates to play their part at
a national and international level;

—maintain and make best use of the advantages of its independent
colleges, where members' intellectual and personal development is
fostered within a stimulating, multidisciplinary academic community,
and academic life is strengthened through the provision of
high-quality support services;

—attract students of the highest calibre, from the UK and
internationally, to its undergraduate, graduate, and continuing
education courses, widening access by actively seeking applications
from students from diverse backgrounds and extending further the many
and varied opportunities for life-long learning offered in the Oxford
region and more widely.

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CONGREGATION 27 May


Elections

Buildings Committee: one vacancy (MT
1999–TT 2001
)

Curators of the Examination Schools: one vacancy
(for 3 years from MT 1999)

General Board: two vacancies from art/social studies
faculties; two from science faculties (all for 4 years from MT
1999
)

Hebdomadal Council: three vacancies (for 6
years from MT 1999
)

Delegacy for Military Instruction: one vacancy
(for 4 years from MT 1999)

Curators of the University Parks: one vacancy
(for 6 years from MT 1999)

Curators of the Sheldonian Theatre: two vacancies
(for 6 years from MT 1999)

Visitatorial Board Panel: three vacancies (members
of the University with at least ten years' standing as MA) (for
4 years from MT 1999
)

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¶ Nominations in writing by two members of Congregation
other than the candidate will be received by the Head Clerk at the
University Offices, Wellington Square, up to 4 p.m. on
Monday, 3 May
, and similar nominations by six members of
Congregation other than the candidate up to 4 p.m. on Monday,
10 May
.

Council has decided that nominations should show for each
signatory the name and college or department in block capitals. Any
names which are not so shown may not be published. At least one
nomination in respect of each candidate must be made on an official
nomination form. Copies of the form are obtainable from the Head
Clerk (telephone: (2)70190; e-mail:
Philip.Moss@admin.ox.ac.uk).

In the event of a contested election, a brief biographical note
on each candidate will be published in the Gazette dated
20 May, and voters may wish to wait until they have read these notes
before returning their ballot papers (which will be sent out to
members of Congregation as soon as possible after the closing date
for nominations, and which, after completion, must be received by the
Head Clerk not later than 4 p.m. on 27 May).

General note

It is of course expected that radical changes in the present
committee structures, including Council and the General Board, will
be needed with effect from 2000--1, following final decisions on the
second report of the Joint Working Party on Governance (see
Gazette, pp. 959, 986), and nominations are invited for
the above vacancies on that understanding.

Notes on the bodies concerned

The Buildings Committee is responsible to Council
and the General Board, taking account of university policies and
priorities, for formulating the University's programme for all
building works, for the execution of all building projects, for
maintaining university buildings in a satisfactory condition, and for
allocating space within them. These responsibilities include making
recommendations to Council and the Board: (a) on the choice
of architects and the design, planning, and elevations of all major
building projects; and (b) on the acquisition and allocation
of new sites. The committee has control of a substantial budget.

The Curators of the Examination Schools are
responsible to Council and the General Board: (a) for
supervising the Schools and for their finances; (b) for
providing and managing the facilities in the Schools for
examinations, lectures, etc.; and (c) for matters relating
to the organisation of examinations within the Schools and associated
premises.

The General Board of the Faculties is responsible,
under Council, for the academic administration of the University,
with the duty of considering and supervising all matters connected
with the University's research and teaching activities. It has
control of the greatest part of the University's general budget. The
Board meets weekly during term; much of its work is conducted through
committees (e.g. Planning and Development, Graduate Studies), on
which its members are expected to serve if invited to do so.

The Hebdomadal Council is the University's chief
executive body, with statutory responsibility for the administration
of the University and for the management of its finances and
property. It has oversight of the General Board's exercise of its
responsibility for the academic administration of the University, as
well as dealing with the relationship between the University and all
external bodies. Council submits resolutions and statutes to
Congregation for approval, and has the power to make decrees (which
may be opposed in Congregation). Council meets fortnightly during
term, and twice in the Long Vacation. It has a number of major
committees, on which its members are expected to serve if invited to
do so.

The Delegates for Military Instruction are
responsible for all aspects of co-operation with the Oxford
University Officers' Training Corps, the University Air Squadron, and
the University Royal Naval Unit in providing instruction in military
subjects for members of the University.

The Curators of the University Parks are
responsible, under Council, for the management of the Parks and of
adjacent land owned by the University, including the appointment of
the Superintendent of the Parks, and for their finances. They are
also responsible for the maintenance both of most other gardens
attached to university buildings and of a number of college gardens.
(The sports facilities in the Parks are, subject to the authority of
the curators, in the charge of the University Committee for
Sport.)

The Curators of the Sheldonian Theatre are
responsible, under Council, for the Theatre and for making
arrangements for the conduct of business at the Encaenia. They also
make the building available for other academic and non-academic
purposes. The curators have control of the Theatre's budget, except
in respect of the maintenance of the fabric of the building (which is
the responsibility of the Buildings Committee).

The Visitatorial Board is responsible for making
recommendations to the Vice-Chancellor (or other appropriate officer)
on serious disciplinary cases involving members of the academic or
academic-related staff. (It does not have responsibility for dealing
with incapacity on medical grounds, or complaints against the
Vice-Chancellor himself or herself.) Four members of the board, as
from time to time constituted to consider an individual case, are
selected by lot from a panel of twelve persons elected by
Congregation. The board is chaired by a person with professional
legal experience who is appointed by the High Steward of the
University.

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CONVOCATION 3 and 5 JUNE

Election of Professor of Poetry

The following nomination has been duly received:

PAUL MULDOON

Nominated by:

M.S. Butler, Rector of Exeter

Sir Walter Bodmer, Principal of Hertford

Sir Peter North, Principal of Jesus

A.D. Smith, President of Magdalen

A.J. Ryan, Warden of New College

R.B. Stevens, Master of Pembroke

Lord Plant, Master of St Catherine's

W. Hayes, President of St John's

J.P. Barron, Master of St Peter's

Sir David Smith, President of Wolfson

R.H. Lonsdale, Balliol

N.S. Thompson, Christ Church

M.J. Kooy, Corpus Christi

J. Sloan, Harris Manchester

T.C. Barnard, Hertford

C.D. Brewer, Hertford

R.F. Foster, Hertford

T.N. Paulin, Hertford

E.J. Smith, Hertford

R. Hanna, Keble

A. Phelan, Keble

N.S. Smith, Keble

J.E.M. Poster, Kellogg

C.J. Flint, Linacre

H. O'Donoghue, Linacre

J.L. Fuller, Magdalen

S.J. Hitch, Magdalen

M.S. Griffith, New College

H. Lee, New College

K.J. Leeder, New College

A.D. Nuttall, New College

H.W. Small, Pembroke

S. Byrne, Queen's

P.J. Thompson, Regent's Park

V.A. Gillespie, St Anne's

T.E. Keymer, St Anne's

P.H. Strohm, St Anne's

C.D. Cannon, St Edmund Hall

L.A. Newlyn, St Edmunc Hall

S. Jones, St Hilda's

P.D. Mcdonald, St Hugh's

J.S. Kelly, St John's

J.C.G. Pitcher, St John's

F.J. Stafford, Somerville

P.R. Wheatley, University

J.B. O'Donoghue, Wadham

R.J.C. Young, Wadham

J.H. Stallworthy, Wolfson

J.D. Bradshaw, Worcester

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 22 April 1999: Notices<br />

Notices


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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UNIVERSITY PREACHERS


Trinity Term 1999

Thursday, 22 April, at 8 a.m. THE REVD PHILIP URSELL,
Principal of Pusey House, Fellow of St Cross College, Celebrant. Holy
Communion (Latin). At St Mary's.

Sunday, 25 April, at 10 a.m. THE REVD CANON JOHN
MACQUARRIE, FBA, Emeritus Lady Margaret Professor of Divinity,
Emeritus Student of Christ Church. (St Mark's Day
Sermon
.) At Magdalen College.

Sunday, 2 May, at 10 a.m. THE RT REVD AND RT HON LORD
HABGOOD OF CALVERTON, sometime Archbishop of York. (Fourth
Bampton Lecture: `Varieties of unbelief—moral
autonomy'.
) At St Mary's.

Sunday, 9 May, at 10 a.m. THE RT REVD AND RT HON LORD
HABGOOD. (Fifth Bampton Lecture: `Varieties of
unbelief—all or none'.
) At St Mary's.

Sunday, 16 May, at 10 a.m. THE RT REVD AND RT HON LORD
HABGOOD. (Sixth Bampton Lecture: `Varieties of
unbelief—anorexia religiosa'.
) At St Mary's.

* Whit Sunday, 23 May, at 10 a.m. THE VERY REVD CANON
ROBERT JEFFERY, Sub-Dean and Canon of Christ Church. At the
Cathedral
.

* Trinity Sunday, 30 May, at 10 a.m. MRS SUSAN HOWATCH,
Novelist. At Keble College.

Sunday, 6 June, at 10 a.m. THE RT REVD AND RT HON LORD
HABGOOD. (Seventh Bampton Lecture: `Varieties of
unbelief—the presence of an absence'.
) At St Mary's.

Sunday, 13 June, at 10 a.m. THE RT REVD AND RT HON LORD
HABGOOD. (Eighth Bampton Lecture: `Varieties of
unbelief—believing in belief'.
) At St Mary's.

* Commemoration Sunday, 20 June, at 10 a.m. THE VERY
REVD DR JOHN SIMPSON, Dean of Canterbury. At St Mary's.

Sunday, 27 June, at 10 a.m. THE MOST REVD JEAN-MARIE
CARDINAL LUSTIGER, Archbishop of Paris. (St John Baptist's Day
Sermon.
) At Magdalen College.

* On these days Doctors will wear their robes.

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CHICHELE PROFESSORSHIP OF PUBLIC
INTERNATIONAL LAW

ALAN VAUGHAN LOWE (LL.B., LL.M., PH.D. Wales, MA Cambridge), Fellow,
and Warden of Leckhampton, Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, and
Reader in International Law, University of Cambridge, has been
appointed to the professorship with effect from a date to be
arranged.

Dr Lowe will be a fellow of All Souls College.

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PROFESSORSHIP OF TRANSPLANTATION

PETER JOHN FRIEND (MA, MD Cambridge), University Lecturer, Department
of Surgery, University of Cambridge, Honorary Consultant Surgeon,
Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, and Fellow and Director of Studies
in Medicine, Magdalene College, Cambridge, has been appointed to the
professorship with effect from 1 October 1999.

Mr Friend will be a fellow of Green College.

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CONFERMENT OF THE TITLE OF VISITING
PROFESSOR

On the recommendation of the Mathematical Sciences Board, the General
Board has conferred the title of Visiting Professor in Software
Engineering on M. THOMAS (B.SC. London, HON. D.SC. Hull), Chairman
Emeritus, Praxis Critical Systems Ltd., for the period until 18 April
2003.

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PHYSICAL AND THEORETICAL CHEMISTRY
LABORATORY

On the recommendation of the Physical Sciences Board, the General
Board has assigned the Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory
to PROFESSOR G. HANCOCK, MA, Fellow of Trinity College and Professor
of Chemistry, for a period of one year from 1 October 1999.

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SUB-DEPARTMENT OF ASTROPHYSICS

On the recommendation of the Physical Sciences Board, the General
Board has assigned the Sub-department of Astrophysics to PROFESSOR
J.I. SILK, Fellow of New College and Savilian Professor of Astronomy,
for a period of five years form 1 October 1999.

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SUB-DEPARTMENT OF ATOMIC AND LASER PHYSICS

On the recommendation of the Physical Sciences Board, the General
Board has assigned the Sub-department of Atomic and Laser Physics to
PROFESSOR K. BURNETT, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St John's College and
Professor of Chemistry, for a period of five years from 1 October
1999.

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SUB-DEPARTMENT OF THEORETICAL PHYSICS

On the recommendation of the Physical Sciences Board, the General
Board has assigned the Sub-department of Theoretical Physics to
PROFESSOR D. SHERRINGTON, MA, Fellow of New College and Wykeham
Professor of Physics, for a period of five years from 1 October 1999.

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ROCHE PRIZE IN LABORATORY MEDICINE 1999

The Prize has been awarded to MARTIN W.G. SCOTT-BROWN.

Proxime accesserunt: GARETH J. FORBES and NICOLA L.
JONES.

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PUSEY AND ELLERTON JUNIOR PRIZE

A Junior Prize has been awarded to PHILIP MCCOSKER, St Benet's Hall.

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ORATION BY THE SENIOR PROCTOR

The following Oration was delivered in Congregation on 17 March by
R.W. AINSWORTH, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Catherine's College, on
demitting office as Senior Proctor.

SENIOR PROCTOR: Insignissime Vice-Cancellarie, licetne Anglice
loqui?

VICE-CHANCELLOR: Licet.

SENIOR PROCTOR: This is the moment, I hope you will allow, for the
750th set of Proctors, and the last of the Millennium, not only to
report on matters of interest in our year, but to set these in the
historical context of the activities of our predecessors and our
contemporaries. Contemporary might be regarded as anything beyond the
half-way point, 1623.

I am frequently asked what it is that we do, and this is usually
followed on my part by a very long intake of breath. `Uphold the
statutes' is usually regarded as too trite a representation. `Our
role is partly disciplinary, partly administrative and partly
ceremonial'sounds too boring. The easiest way today is to paint a
picture based on some of the memorable events—perhaps of the
Impressionists' school.

Proctoring, in a way, is an amazingly seasonal job, and this is
reflected by the admission date. In my view mid March is chosen so
that the Proctors, particularly the Junior Proctor, are well and
truly warmed up in every respect by the peak examination season in
June. The Proctors have responsibility to oversee the whole of the
undergraduate and postgraduate system of exams, and I estimate for
Junior Members taking written papers this involves some four thousand
students, six thousand seven hundred papers, twenty thousand hours of
writing, ten thousand bottles of fizz popped, and nine hundred and
twenty four Bulldog hours in trying to keep control outside. For the
Proctors it has meant assessing three hundred and twenty three
medical certificates and seventy eight cases of dyslexia,
scrutinising the appointment of examiners, liaising over exam-
timetabling, policing the invigilation of the exams, and then being
ready for the consequent release of student tension afterwards. Our
predecessors were somewhat smug about the reduction in number of so-
called Schools cases in the Proctors' Court, in their year forty. Our
year has seen a definite increase of `trashing'
offences—fizzing, spraying, splatting of champagne, Ribena,
eggs, syrup, and baked beans. But this year I believe that a greater
degree of sportsmanship has been shown on both sides. The Junior
Proctor has even had me running in pursuit of an undergraduate, and
no doubt our improved statistics are due to my greater athletic
prowess than that shown by my immediate predecessor, Martin Ceadel.
Only a very few students have been churlish enough to try to avoid
Proctorial justice by using such unimaginatively false names as Peter
Pumpkin and Ben Dover, and since the giving of a false name now
counts as obstruction, they usually finish up in a deeper mire.

The Proctors' Court, where we act firstly as investigators, and
then as prosecution, judge, and jury is still withstanding the test
of time. Yes, there is truth in the rumour that the Junior Proctor
practises his lines in front of a mirror every morning. `You have as
much chance of being found not guilty in the Proctors' Court as a
defendant in a Tudor Treason Trial.' Or before proceedings even
begin, `Anyone who has committed the offences you have, would
undoubtedly have the gall to deny them.' Only once in the opening of
a case did I make the mistake of misreading my script by saying
`when you have been found guilty you will have the
opportunity to appeal.' The truth of the matter is that the system
has worked well in that of the 111 cases, only two people were
sufficiently unhappy as to appeal. Interestingly enough, in one case
of use of unfair means in an examination, we decided on an academic
penalty which ultimately was seen as fair by the student and the
college involved, but which was objected to by the examiners, on the
grounds that they thought Proctors could only apply monetary
penalties. Whilst I am quite sure that our logic of the requirement
for this would have won the day, our Clerk had been wise enough to
phrase our decision as a recommendation, which they were able to
accept, thus avoiding a constitutional crisis.

Proceedings in our Proctors' Courts have always started with a
standard piece text where we introduce ourselves to the quivering
party, explaining that we have a duty to uphold the Statutes. The
charge is then read out, always related to the appropriate place in
the Proctors' and Assessor's Memorandum—the bible
of acceptable behaviour. The origin of this tome, which is updated
once a year, relates to the edicts which used to be dispersed as
individual notices throughout the University.

I have done some digging for information in the Archives for my
oration today, but what follows hasn't made it there yet—the
1926 Proctors' Memorandum still sits in our office. I
quail at the workload we would now have if those rules were still in
play:

`An undergraduate may not make an ascent by aeroplane, airship
or balloon, except with the written consent of his parent.'

`Undergraduates are forbidden (under severe penalties) to visit
the bar of any hotel, restaurant or public-house.'

Hotels and restaurants approved by the Proctors included the
Good Luck Tea-Rooms, the Lantern, the Shamrock, and the King's
Arms—some things don't change.

`Undergraduates may not take instruction in dancing except from
teachers licensed by the Proctors, including Miss April Elvey, of the
Dragon School, and Miss Norah Marks, Messrs Taphouses' Rooms.'

`It is expected that undergraduates will not loiter in the
public streets, at coffee-stalls, or at the stage door of a
theatre.'

By 1942, this had been modified to include `shall not
loiter...in motor cars, or to frequent resorts at which undesirable
acquaintances are likely to be made.' Our modern equivalent is what
we call our `no gathering' rule.

How could we have removed the next one—`It is a serious
offence to obstruct or annoy an Officer or Servant of
the University in the discharge of his duty.'

One final comment on the Proctors' Court. Three current Heads of
Houses have confessed to me that they appeared in front of our
predecessors. Sir John Hanson, Warden of Green, was the first to
admit it—fined ten shillings for the late return of a library
book in 1957—when he mentioned it he was obviously still very
shaken by the experience. I'm still trying to remember who the second
was, and the third is sitting very close to me as I speak.

I am afraid our successors will be spending an increasing amount
of time dealing with personal computers and the network, the
information highway. For the benefit of the fifteen hundredth set of
Proctors reading this oration in 2748, a personal computer, to quote
the dictionary definition, is a machine located on the user's desk
capable of storing or processing electronic data, which came into
common use in the late twentieth century for a brief period of three
decades. I wonder when it will be that we will return to scribes
sitting at desks, handwriting their theses?

We have had to deal with e-mail bombings, use of unfair means
involving computers in exams, offensive web pages, harassment by
e-mail, and inappropriate uses of computer accounts, to name but
some. We have taken a serious view of these offences, to send a
message round the community, as evidenced in the statistics
accompanying the printed version of this oration.

Of course, Senior Tutors and examiners are always a joy to deal
with, not least because of the polish that is always expended on any
letter sent to the Proctors. `Mr X, who is entered for the
Preliminary Examination in Y, has managed to mash his thumb by
indulging in some sort of sporting activity. He cannot write. It is
not obvious to me that this will be much of a disadvantage to him,
but in order to give him the benefit of any doubt we would be
grateful for permission for him to take the examination using a word
processor. We are aware of the regulations which require any word
processor to have almost all of its brain removed, but we do not
think that this by itself means that the word processor could write
the prelim.'

I have drawn from W.A. Pantin, Oxford Life in Oxford
Archives
(1972), for some of what follows.

From the moment of earliest mention in 1248, the two Proctors
represented the two Nations in Oxford, the Senior, the Southerners,
and the Junior the Northerners. Then like now they took an active
part in supervising the exercises for degrees at every stage, keeping
a register of all those who broke the statutes, being present at
public examinations, and collecting and pronouncing graces of
candidates for degrees. They administered the oath to new Masters,
and still do, such that inter alia they could
be called on to quell a riot with `Siste per fidem.' This has been
much used by us outside the Exam Schools when large cohorts have
finished their last exams, to universal blank looks.

The Proctors were also the ancestors of the University Chest
Office, rendering income and expenditure accounts, way ahead of any
Vice-Chancellor's accounts. To start with there were few
commitments—the cost of larger projects, such as the nave of St
Mary's and the Divinity School, being met by special appeals. In the
fourteen hundreds the average income was £58 mostly from fees
for degrees and fines. Expenditure was incurred in terms of paying
for the University scribe (the Registrar—£2 13s 4d per
annum), distribution to poor scholars, and (having the right
priorities) with some 10 per cent going on the annual audit feast
which lasted three days. Last week's Proctors' Dinners were much more
modest, although perhaps the University has an event somewhat similar
to the audit feast—the Tenants' Dinner. In earlier times our Land
Agent would collect the rents from the University farms on or near
Lady Day, travelling round on horseback to visit, and if successful
in raising the rent, would treat the tenants in some local hostelry.
The dawn of banking has seen a change, and now we hold an annual
Tenants' Dinner, this year in Wadham, to mark this event. It wasn't
until unkind Vice-Chancellor Tresham from Christ Church secured Queen
Mary's benefaction somewhere around 1550 that the Vice-Chancellor's
Accounts were inaugurated, and the power of the Proctors began to
wane, in some respects.

The Hart report of the late 1960s introduced a number of checks
on our power. For instance, Charles Caine (Junior Proctor in 1965)
told me at the Tenants' Dinner that at the end of a Proctors' Court,
if the misdemeanour had been sufficiently serious, it was a case of
`away you go laddie.' Now there is a Court of Appeals. Proctor Caine
also told us that the fines from the Proctors' Court went into the
Motor Transport Account, and that when it was large enough, they blew
it on a very shiny five speed automatic Riley. (This seems
incidentally to be remarkably at variance with a slightly earlier
generation of Proctors, who according to Mr Livingstone, the Vice-Chancellor's
recently retired chauffeur, used to travel by Lambretta
scooters). Now the Proctors can no longer use fines for their own
benefit, although we have succeeded in taking through Council this
year a reform which allows the fines to go to some University based
good cause. When we floated our idea of fines reform to our Clerk,
however, we caught him momentarily in best Sir Humphrey Appleby mode.
`I am afraid, Sir' (it has always been `Sir' on the few occasions we
have had disgreements), `I cannot recommend that, for two reasons,'
came the immediate response. `On the one hand you might be inclined
to fine more, knowing it was going to a good cause, and secondly you
might be encouraging the undergraduates to transgress more for the
same reason.' In the event, this year £6,400 goes to the Blind
Recording Service of the Bodleian Library.

To be serious for a moment, our Clerk, Brian Gasser, has been a
most valued member of staff. He has chomped his way through an
enormous workload of papers, advice, and help rendered, and tried
valiantly to keep us under control. We most certainly would have sunk
very rapidly without him and his very hard working staff, Caroline,
Joely, and Justine. Linda Mason, Assistant Clerk to the Proctors
(Examinations), has an incredible workload at the peak exam season,
and for most of the rest of the year, and her reputation for ready
pearls of wisdom to hard-pressed chairmen of Examiners is most justly
deserved.

Again like the countless generations of our predecessors,
because of our role as Curators of the Parks, the Botanic Gardens,
the Examination Schools, the Sheldonian Theatre, Visitors of the
Taylorian, the Ashmolean, the Pitt Rivers, the Museum, Delegates of
the Press, of Military Instruction, we have had many memorable tours
of inspection. Particular impressions which remain in my mind include
a visit to the University Arboretum where we heard that the Education
Officer, Louise Allen, holding a post previously funded by the
Friends of the Botanic Garden and now supported by the Kleinwort
Benson Charitable Trust, saw 5,000 schoolchildren last year, and was
asked for advice from Kew Gardens as to how Oxford managed these
hoards so successfully.

Exposing these children to the work of the University is also
seen as important to our access mission. We have been impressed by
the behind-the-scenes work in the restoration services of the
Ashomolean and Bodleian, in the Legal Accessions Unit, the
Counselling Service, OUSU, and by projects such as the New
Dictionary of National Biography
, an OUP project run expertly
by Professor Colin Matthew which has just reached its halfway stage
(with 27,000 articles) ahead of schedule, with publication due in
2002.

We have crawled over the Radcliffe Camera, the Observatory,
through the underground tunnel at the Bodleian, and around every nook
and cranny in the Schools. What a joy it has been to be forced to
explore Jackson's creation, built between 1876 and 1882. The poor
undergraduate, facing the traditional Le Mans start to examinations,
has no stomach for gazing admiringly at the quality of the interior
design, the marble, tiled and cast-iron fireplaces, the portraits
staring down, including that of Kaiser Wilhelm II, given an honorary
doctorate in 1908 and especially positioned in the South School to
invigilate over European History papers until his invigilation career
was prematurely halted in 1914 by early retirement. Neither really
does the examiner have the inclination to absorb the
environment—too busy worrying about all the scripts which have
to be marked. But the Proctors, their minds set to neutral gear
whilst waiting to police the ending of an exam session or prior to a
Proctors' swoop, can take in the features of the Jackson design. How
many of you know that it was used as a military hospital in the First
World War, and that the operating theatre and resuscitation stone
cells in the basement remain untouched, complete with a lead-lined
bath tub for sluicing out the corpses? The fact that ours must be the
only University in the country with a recuperation room in our
examination building could be a useful addition to our next HEFCE
report—worth some extra funding? The Schools cost £180,000
to build with regular contributions coming from the Press—mainly
profits from the publication of the Revised Version of the New
Testament.

Personally, I have found the termly meeting of the Committee for
the Archives amongst the many interesting and unsung meetings, not
least because of Mr Walter Mitchell's termly report indexing the
records of the Chancellors' Court. Some of his material gives a
tantalising snap-shot of proctorial life over the years:

`In 1587, a proctor had to suffer rough treatment, when a man
apprehended for drinking at the scandalously late hour of 9:45 turned
violent. "Upon the suddayn Philip Coles gave mr proctor a great
blowe on the face with his fiste. Wherwith mr proctor being moved
told hym that since he used hym so, he should go with hym
[sc. To prison], and so pulled hym one. And the said
Philip thruste mr proctor agaynst the dore and toke hym by the throte
and he tore mr proctors panes of his hose and thrust hym with his
elbowe in the stomake." ' The culprit seems to have got away
with an apology.

The earliest reference to spectacles in the records occurs in
1617, when a dying bedel is described as attempting in vain to use a
pair, in order to read his will.

November 1791–April 1792: `No business done this term owing
to the Vice-Chancellor and Assessor being confined with the Gout'.

The records of the nineteenth century shed light on the trades
which surrounded undergraduates and academics alike: ink-sellers,
japanners, auctioneers, breech-cleaners, and bacon-sellers, with a
victualler who was also a stay-maker, but the Proctors' trade of 1852
seemed reassuringly familiar in its triviality. Two undergraduates
had been prosecuted for driving a horse and tandem when permission
had only been given for a gig. The case was brought to trial in order
to prove the guilt or innocence of two Wadham men who had been
rusticated by the Junior Proctor for a supposed breach of discipline
in driving a tandem with two improper females.

The monitoring of Undergraduate Clubs has required a
considerable effort from both the Assessor and our Clerk, and on the
Sports side, a far-reaching review by the Committee for Sport chaired
by Proctor Macmillan has reported. My impression in visiting
Freshers' Fair was that it had not changed one jot in atmosphere from
last time I had been there as a Fresher nearly thirty years ago. I
suppose the nature of undergraduate societies has largely changed
from the social clubs proliferating in the 1880s, from Mr Mitchell's
records: the Friskers, Myrmidons, Busters, Flickerers, Nondescripts,
no doubt reflecting the change in social profile of those coming up
to Oxford. Now we have the Strategic Studies Club, the Historical
Society, the Belly Dancing Club (Senior Member from St Hilda's), and
the Guild of Assassins, one of whose members momentarily came into
the Proctors' sights, for triggering the call-out of the Police Armed
Response Unit, toting what turned out to be a plastic machine-gun.

We have had our trials and tribulation, too. I can report that
the Bulldogs are in good form with four full-time, and thirty-four
special constables, and that the last Senior Proctor of the
Millennium has refused to countenance the replacement of the bowler
hat with the flat-cap. I shan't forget the image of Bulldog Harvey,
megaphone to his lips outside Schools, shouting `Don't spray it,
drink it.' It has been encouraging that the student body has on
several occasions expressed their gratitude for the behaviour and
presence of the Bulldogs, most notably at the recent sit-in at the
Examination Schools over the government's introduction of the
£1,000 fee, to the extent that a signed thank-you note to the
constables was sent by all the occupiers. How strange it was for the
Junior Proctor and me together with the Registrar and our legal
advisers to be closeted in one of Jackson's fine rooms, whilst we
tried in vain for hours to negotiate an early end to the occupation.
The only constructive side of the afternoon was the time available to
examine in minute detail the features of the room. I wonder what
Jackson would have made of it? His design for the railings was
obviously not intended to keep the media away from attempting to
photograph the process. It had its amusing moments, though. When the
electricity to the sockets in the lobby was turned off, there was a
moment when the sit-in was projected as a work-in, the argument being
put that electricity was required for their lap-top computers, so
that they could continue to work. Nothing whatsoever to do with the
fact that they wanted to use their electric kettles for a brew.

The battle between Universities and Government over the
£1,000 fee was fought and lost two years ago, and it has been
most puzzling to me that there is any mileage whatsoever seen in
attacking Oxford University over it. Pointless disruption has been
caused to the good burghers of Oxford, relations with Thames Valley
Police have been strained, and the poor Bulldogs lost a night's sleep
when the Schools were occupied overnight. Incidentally, as I
addressed the occupiers in the School, trying to encourage them out
before nightfall, a Bulldog overheard the comment `Don't believe a
word this guy is saying; he's obviously a trained, skilled
negotiator.' No such training was given to me at last year's Senior
Proctors' Dinner.

Other troublesome areas have included the occupation of the old
LMS station prior to its removal to make way for the new Said
Business School. Tunnelling expertise had been imported from Newbury
Common by the occupiers, and it was with much relief that we
witnessed the start of the well-planned and executed operation to
clear it, lead by the Under Sheriff of Berkshire, thankfully with no
injuries incurred. It was in a sense a Black Letter Day in that the
national media chose the same day to run on their front page
headlines a case of use of `unfair means in an examination.' The
cheating was something which had been dealt with by us, and the
sentence was subsequently upheld in the Court of Appeal. In our view,
it should not have been within the bounds of national interest, any
more than any other Proctors' case over the last three-quarters of a
Millennium has been, and there was at least a potential of it fouling
up the Proctorial process—presumably not what was desired.

Pantin talks about how remarkable it is that the powers and
functions of the Proctors have survived continuously, both in the
period of oligarchy and the period of nineteenth-century `reform',
unlike those of Congregation which waned for two hundred years. From
the Middle Ages the Proctors had a veto of any motion in Congregation
or Convocation, illustrating according to Pantin the predominance of
young Arts men over the learned Doctors. It was used in 1845 to block
a motion condemning John Henry Newman's Tract XC, and
there was a possibility of it being used in 1899 to deny an honorary
degree to Cecil Rhodes. One wonders when or whether it was done away
with—it could still be mighty handy to exercise it. Our dealings
with Congregation have been limited to a debate related to the issue
of governance of the University, following the Working Group report
on Governance, post the North Commission. Congregation will still be
the ultimate authority, but there may well be a much welcomed
streamlining of committee structures, an integrating of the roles of
Hebdomadal Council and General Board. If the reforms are handled
correctly, there may well be significant devolution of decision
taking in a downwards direction, within an over-arching structure
provided centrally.

Our duties involve the Proctors and Assessor sitting on some 108
committees, most of which fortunately do not meet once a week. I draw
to our successors' attention one meeting they shouldn't miss. It is
the Standing Committee on Standing
Committees—innocuous sounding, but a real focus of power. This
is the committee which meets once a year to populate all the other
committees, and a proper place for the wielding of the Proctorial
spanner.

Dress and ceremonial have given us some moments of light relief.
The Proctors have three sets of official robes. The best set is kept
in the Clarendon Building ready for degree ceremonies, together with
ermine hoods, given by an old member in the last century who had
Hudson Bay Company connections. The hoods are irreplaceable, legally
at any rate, and are whipped off our backs and locked in the safe the
moment a degree ceremony is over. The set in reasonable condition
remains in the University Offices for our attendance at the relevant
committees, whilst the worst set is kept in the Examination Schools
in case we become embroiled in flying baked beans and flour. Luckily
we avoided this year, but one of our Pro-Proctors took a direct hit
from a considerable quantity of flour. We tried to mete out due
punishment, but the person involved was from London University. I
must also report at this stage that this year has seen the adoption
of a new robe for the Assessor, modelled on the stylish Proctor's
garb, but in Byzantine Purple, as befits a Classicist. The Vice-
Chancellor has been much obsessed with encouraging the Assessor to
wear matching pink socks as part of his subfusc, but to no avail yet.

The Marshal has the major role of organising all pomp and
circumstance, at which he is a true professional, in terms of
checking that all is well on ceremonial occasions, particularly in
terms of timing and dress. Our year has seen the re-enactment of the
regular Encaenia skirmish between the Chancellor and the Marshal, in
terms of speed of procession, this time all the way along The Broad.
The Chancellor wants to speed up, and the Marshal to slow down. This
is a difficult battle for the Chancellor to win since the Marshal is
in front of him, but there are usually plenty of sotto
voce
`For God's sake, hurry up man.'

The last Vice-Chancellor also enjoyed exercising the Marshal,
usually in terms of spotting candidates with improper subfusc at
degree ceremonies, and blaming the Marshal. `The young lady on the
front row was wearing bottle-green tights.' We have witnessed an
indelible mark left on the Marshal. At one of our early ceremonies,
whilst assembling in the Napoleon Room beforehand (so named mainly
because of the collection of Napoleonic relics housed in there, and
not just because the VC robes there), the Marshal proudly boasted to
our current Vice-Chancellor that he was ready to deal with any
improperly dressed ladies, that he had gone out and bought three sets
of black tights, and opened his jacket to show them. The Vice-
Chancellor drily observed that unfortunately his radio-microphone was
already switched on, and that that remark would have been broadcast
to all the assembled parents in the Sheldonian Theatre.

Pantin talks about academic funerals or memorial celebrations
being not just ceremonial tributes, but a representation of one of
the basic assemblies of the University, a solidarity between the
living and the dead. Three very different occasions remain in my
mind. The first was a memorial celebration of the life of Sir Isaiah
Berlin, held in the Sheldonian Theatre, with Alfred Brendel playing
passionately. The second was a traditional service in Christ Church
Cathedral for Sir John Thompson, combining three elements of his
service as Lord Lieutenant of Oxfordshire, commander of the
Oxfordshire Yeomanry, and a significant benefactor to the University.
He had also been Chairman of Barclays Bank—the inventor of the
Barclaycard—and a Steward of the Jockey Club. Buglers bugled,
Lord Oaksey spoke (mainly about the horses Sir John had owned), and
Christ Church choir sang the Battle Song of the
Republic
. The third was a Memorial Service for Philip
Holdsworth, former Master of St Benet's Hall, held in the chapel
there, where the solidarity between the living and the dead was
demonstrated in Benedictine contemplation.

Certainly the pleasurable side of Proctoring includes the
disparate nature of the special events we attended—the Gladstone
Centenary commemorations, the opening lecture in the American
Institute series, `The Secret Tapes of the Cuban Missile Crisis', the
launch of the Oxford -Intel initiative in the House of Commons and 11
Downing Street, to name but some.

In terms of the first of these, the Gladstone event, Professor
Colin Matthew, editor of the Gladstone Diaries, had had
the idea of marking the centenary of Gladstone's death with an
exhibition of Gladstone memorabilia in the Bodleian, a service at St
Mary's when Lord Runcie preached, and a concluding dinner at Christ
Church. It was both a salutary experience to hear a recording of
Gladstone's voice being played in Christ Church hall, and a delight
to sample Bombe Gladstone, the only dish dedicated to Gladstone. The
recording had been made by Thomas Edison on 22 November 1888 in the
house of J.T. Knowles in London, a well-known editor of intellectual
journals, whereas Bombe Gladstone had emerged from the kitchens of
the Savoy Hotel in the 1880s, then under the direction of Auguste
Escoffier. We heard how Gladstone had been a bright spark as a
student, wanting his viva to go on for longer than the examiners
wanted. This energy continued throughout his life and at the age of
85 he had wheel-barrowed many loads of his papers the three-quarters
of a mile between his castle and St Deiniol's Library, set up to make
his books and some of his papers publicly available.

Oxford used to have a reputation for being slow to accept
new-fangled ideas, and being good at stopping their applications
here. I suppose one of the best-known examples with a long term
impact was the failure to grasp the advent of railways with
enthusiasm, committing us to a century and a half of changing trains
at Didcot for all points West. I suppose our part in this attitude
has been our marked reluctance to accept the idea of the use of
video-conferencing for examination by viva voce, ... yet. How could
the examination be considered to be public? Would we need terminals
in every faculty so that people could stand in front of screens in
their subfusc to observe the process? How would we know that it
really was the right person being examined? Would they have to put
their thumb print on the screen? (Incidentally, how do we know now?)

Another first in terms of stopping things was the closure of
Magdalen Bridge on May Morning. This decision was taken because of
the huge volume flow rate of water in the Cherwell (ten times the
norm) which prevented the Police Underwater Search Unit from sweeping
the river-bed for all the items of hardware (old beds, supermarket
trolleys, the odd Mini car) which might cause injury to anyone
foolish enough to jump in. The police were also of the view that if
someone did jump in at Magdalen, such was the velocity of the stream
that they would be fished out in Cowley, although I didn't think the
river went anywhere near Cowley. We were apprehensive about the
reaction of the expected 3,000 congregating at the far side of the
bridge, about whether they would be able to reach the point where the
action was happening. OUSU were most helpful and responsible, and in
the event the most alarming moment was being on top of Magdalen Tower
when the bells started. The sight and sensation of two-feet-thick
walls moving in time to the swings was more than my engineering
instincts could cope with, and I was unable to advise my colleagues
whether the safest action was to stand by the walls or in the middle
of the roof, being reduced to a wreck.

But elsewhere we have seen Oxford marching on at great pace in
many areas. We have maintained our position as the top research
university in the country, assessed by HEFCE, whilst still
maintaining an obsessive interest in the developing undergraduate
curricula and maintaining an affordable tutorial system. Oxford is
seen as having a most efficacious technology transfer system with
Isis Innovation acting as the midwife in the process of giving birth
to new spin-out companies. It has been astonishing to see the extent
to which the University is committed at the moment to its new
buildings programme. Buildings underway and being converted include
the new St Cross Social Sciences Centre, the Said Business School,
the Rothermere American Institute, the Sackler Library, the Begbroke
Technology Centre, with distinct possibilities of an Islamic gallery
extension at the Ashmolean, and a new chemistry building in addition
to these. The Government's JIF initiative has spawned a whole raft of
proposals and raised expectations well beyond a sustainable level,
and we have witnessed the care which has been taken in attempting to
deal with proposals from across the University in a fair manner,
whilst ensuring that proper financial prudence is maintained. It
would be very easy to get carried away.

And then there is the Poetry List. I did contemplate bucking the
national and local trend, and perhaps my duties, by not mentioning
it, but I supposed that that was unrealistic given the ear-bashings I
have had in the street, at dinner parties, the University Church, and
many many other places. I shall be very brief. The Proctors and
Assessor are ex officio Delegates of Oxford University
Press, and the Senior Proctor is a member of Finance Committee,
essentially the Board of Directors, although it is accountable to the
Delegates. This apparently contorted structure has withstood the
pressures (and hence demonstrated the wisdom of its creation) of the
fierce public debate over the Poetry List. We greatly welcome the
resolution of the controversy with an imaginative and constructive
solution which appears to satisfy the requirements of most
protagonists, and for which the Secretary of the Delegates and Chief
Executive, Henry Reece, and the Chairman of Finance Committee
together with the English Faculty deserve hearty congratulations. The
Press is regarded as a department of the University, though some
regard it as the first spin-out company. During the course of the
year every view has been expressed to me in terms of how it should be
regarded. Some have said that it is a multi-billion pound company
which should be totally privatised immediately, others that it should
be floated with the University retaining a controlling share of
equity, whilst many feel that is unthinkable that the University
should expect any return whatsoever. What is clear is that it
currently operates with two themes in mind. Firstly its academic and
scholastic profile brings great credit to the University, and
secondly its strength derives also from having commercial objectives.
Undoubtedly the flagship projects are the Third Edition of the
Oxford English Dictionary and the New Dictionary
of National Biography
(which will be published to time in
2002), but it is also surely of great credit to that institution that
it is market leader in English language teaching, and a considerable
force in publishing for schools in the UK and overseas.

I believe that the overcoming of the crisis this year has
demonstrated that the mechanisms are in place for its management in
appropriate style, given, as I have said earlier, that a complete
spectrum of opinion in terms of future direction will certainly be
found in this academic community. I wish the Delegates well for the
future, and for the rest of our community, I recommend a return to
their primary sources for all scholars still tempted to pick up their
quills and write on the subject of the Press to the Oxford
Magazine
.

Time for a few concluding headlines:

Most unusual case: My prosecution of the Junior Proctor for
smoking in Academical Dress before the Gladstone Centenary Dinner.

Most University offences committed, by college: St Hugh's.

Most University offences committed, by subject: PPE.

Most tantilising story, on the occasion of The Needle and Thread
Dinner at Queen's. The final act of hospitality was the passing
around of a Loving Cup, in the form of

an especially concocted college ale contained in the Founder's Horn.
This container is a long horn mounted on silver bands supported on a
pair of silver pheasants' feet, and presented to the college by the
founder in 1360. A number of guests were somewhat worried, because
the horn was so old, about the possibility of spores of the bubonic
plague still remaining in the narrow end of the container. I was also
interested in the recipe for the ale, and asked the Provost whether
it was a college brew. He told me how important a tradition it had
been at Queen's over the six centuries for the traditional recipe and
method to be carefully maintained and passed down. The last custodian
of the knowledge had been butler Jack, who being seriously ill in
hospital had had a visitation from the highest college authorities,
with a view to their receiving his important knowledge of recipe and
method. Jack seemed pleased to see them, as they explained their
presence to him. When he was ready to proceed, they lent forwards
with their notebooks poised to catch his last precious but feeble
words—`Clear off.'

With that simple imperative, it is certainly time for us to
quit.

Return to List of Contents of this section


PROCTORIAL YEAR 1998/99

Summary of Offences

(totals for 1997/98 given in brackets)

Breach of Examination Regulations (Using unfair means) 5 (4)

1 Overall mark to be reduced by 1 class to determine final result.
2 @ £50

1 Expelled - appeal made to Disciplinary Court against
sentence - dismissed

1 (case in progress)

Breach of Rules Committee Regulations (Conduct after
examinations) 65 (40)

1 @ £25

37 @ £35 (+ in 1 case `damages'of £5.99)

12 @ £40

2 @ £30

3 - case dismissed

1 - not guilty

6 @ £50

3 @ £60

Breach of Rules Committee Regulations (Harassment) 6 (0)

6 (0) 1 - Rusticated 1 year

1 @ £80

1 @ £150

3 case withdrawn

Breach of University Regulations (Occupation/attempted occupation
of University/College property) 1 (0)

1 @ £60

Breach of University Regulations (Obstruction) 18 (1)

1 @ £80

2 @ £35

1 @ £150

6 @ £65 (1 with letter of apology)

1 @ £40

1 @ £60

2 @ £75

1 - letter of apology

1 - case withdrawn

1 @ £70

1 @ £25

Breach of University Regulations (Misrepresentation)

1 (1) 1 - Expelled

Breach of University Regulations (Disruption of administration
and misrepresentation) 1 (0)

1 @ £250

Breach of University Regulations (Computer Misuse) 12 (6)

1 Rusticated 1 year/fined £200

1 @ £500/computer access withdrawn

1 @ £50

1 @ £125

2 @ £75

1 @ £60

1 @ £300

1 @ £150

1 @ £100

1 @ £200

1 @ £250

Breach of University Regulations (Removal/defacement of library
books) 0 (4)

Breach of University Regulations (`Fly-posting') 0 (1)

Other 2 (0)

1 @ £150

1 @ £200

Total number of offences: 111 (157)

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MEMBERSHIP OF THE UNIVERSITY DISCIPLINARY
COURT

At its statutory Hilary Term meeting the Rules Committee established
the panels of Members of Congregation and Junior Members from which,
in accordance with Title XIII of the Statutes, the Registrar draws
names by lot to fill vacancies on the University Disciplinary Court.
The following appointments to the Court have been made with effect
from Trinity Term 1999:

Congregation

Dr D.S. Fairweather (Corpus Christi), two years, vice
Professor R. Jacoby.

Junior Members

Ms C.S. Thomas (Jesus), and Mr R.J. Thomas (St Anne's), one year,
vice Mr T. Jestadt and Ms C.E. Pinches.

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PROPOSALS FOR HONORARY DEGREES TO BE
CONFERRED AT THE ENCAENIA IN 2000, AND FOR DEGREES BY DIPLOMA

Council's Advisory Committee for Degrees by Diploma and Encaenia
Honorary Degrees gives preliminary consideration both to proposals
received from members of Congregation for the conferment of degrees
by diploma upon royal personages and heads of state on occasions
other than Encaenia, and to proposals for the conferment of Encaenia
honorary degrees. The current membership of the committee is: Dr P.A.
Slack, Principal of Linacre (Pro-Vice-Chancellor, in the chair); Dr
R.A. Mayou, Nuffield (Assessor 1999–2000, ex officio);
Dr A.M. Bowie, Queen's (Assessor 1998–9, ex officio);
Professor J. Griffin, Balliol (Public Orator, ex officio);
Mr A.B. Atkinson, Warden of Nuffield; Professor I.C. Butler, Christ
Church; Professor R.A. Cowley, Wadham; Professor Sir John Grimley
Evans, Green College; Professor N.J. Hitchin, New College; Professor
S.D. Iversen, Magdalen; Dr J.M. Rawson, Warden of Merton; Professor
A.J. Ryan, Warden of New College. The committee finds it helpful to
be able to review all proposals together, in a standard format.
Members of Congregation who wish to make suggestions to the committee
about honorary degrees to be conferred at the Encaenia in 2000 are
therefore asked to do so by sending in proposals which provide
information under the following headings:

Name and title of nominee;

Date of birth;

Degrees and membership of learned societies (e.g. FRS, FBA);

Honorary degree proposed;

Oxford college (if any);

University connection (if any) (e.g. Honorary Fellow, Old Member);

Basic biographical details;

Main achievements;

Brief statement as to why it would be particularly appropriate for
Oxford to confer an honorary degree at the present time;

Nominee's address for correspondence;

Marital status of nominee;

Name and address of proposer;

Signature and date.

The information should not exceed two A4 pages.

Proposals should be sent to Miss Noon, University Offices, Wellington
Square, not later than Friday, 14 May 1999. There is
a special form for proposals for degrees by diploma, copies of which
are available from Miss Noon.

Members of Congregation wishing to suggest candidates are asked in
particular to note the following points:

(a) under Council's standing orders, no member of Council
or of the advisory committee shall forward to that committee or
propose directly to Council the name of any person for any honorary
degree unless he or she is prepared personally to recommend that the
conferment of such a degree be seriously considered;

(b) while informal soundings within the University on any
proposal will often be desirable, every effort should be made to
ensure that publicity is not at any stage given to any proposal for
the conferment of an honorary degree.

The advisory committee will report to Council early in Michaelmas
Term, submitting a short-list of candidates for further
consideration. Council will then decide which proposals should be
referred to its Committee on Honorary Degrees. The final list of
proposed honorands, drawn up by Council in the light of the latter
committee's report, will be submitted to Congregation for approval in
accordance with the requirements of Tit. II, Sectt. VI and VIII
(Statutes, 1997, pp. 14–16).

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ACADEMIC STAFF—WORKING TIME
REGULATIONS 1998

The General Board has agreed the following form of words to cover the
contractual position of all university academic staff in the light of
the Working Time Regulations 1998.

`Those holding academic posts are able to determine the duration of
their own working time in accordance with the terms of the Working
Time Regulations 1998, and are therefore exempt from the majority of
the requirements of those regulations. Although an annual leave
entitlement for such staff is not defined in absolute terms, the
annual salary paid and the number of working days in each leave year
shall incorporate the applicable requirements of the regulations that
all employees are entitled to a minimum of twenty days of paid annual
leave inclusive of all public holidays.'

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SALARIES OF CLINICAL ACADEMIC STAFF

Approval has been given for the implementation at Oxford of an
increase in clinical academic salaries in line with the salary awards
for 1999 decided by the Doctors' and Dentists' Review Body.

The new rates provide for a 3.5 per cent increase, with effect from 1
April 1999, on all salaries and scale points except the current scale
and salary point of £59,040, which will receive a further
£500 in addition to the 3.5 per cent to reflect the increase
awarded to the maximum of the consultants' pay scale in NHS
scales.

Payment will be made in April.

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EDUCATIONAL RECORDING AGENCY


Survey of off-air recording

This notice is to inform members of the University about a survey
of educational recordings in which the University is obliged to
participate this year, and to request co-operation in collecting the
necessary information.

The University (including its constituent colleges) is covered by
an Educational Recording Agency (ERA) Licence to record radio and
television broadcasts and cable programmes for educational use,
without infringing copyright. The University pays about £24,000
per annum for this licence.

It is a condition of the licence that institutions may be
required to maintain for a specified period of time details of radio
and television recordings made under the licence and to return this
information to the ERA. Oxford University has been selected to take
part in ERA's survey during the period 1 September 1998 to 31
August 1999
and the University is therefore asking all staff
for assistance in collating the information required.

In each department and college, and some faculty offices, an
individual has been nominated as the local co-ordinator for the
survey. All staff are asked to give details to the most appropriate
co-ordinator of all recordings of radio and television programmes
which they make for educational purposes whether at home, in the
University, or elsewhere. The information required is the title,
date, and channel of the programme, and the location where the
recording was made. As statistics have to be returned by the
University at the end of every month, it is important that a co-
ordinator is informed as soon as possible after a recording is made.

The identity of the local co-ordinator should be publicised in
each department, college, and (where appropriate) faculty office. If
it is not clear, the departmental administrator, senior tutor, or
faculty office administrator should be able to identify the co-
ordinator. In cases of difficulty, details of recordings can be
passed instead to the University's central co-ordinator, Miss
Catherine Long, at the ETRC (telephone: (2)70529, e-mail:
catherine.long@etrc.ox.ac.uk). It is, of course, necessary to pass
information about recordings only to one co-ordinator; there is no
need, for example, to inform both a college co-ordinator and a
faculty co-ordinator but simply the one which is most convenient.

Please note that ERA are likely to visit the University at some
stage during the survey period and to monitor the information
returned against recordings held by the University. It is therefore
important that the required information is collected carefully and
that recordings are available for inspection if necessary. It is also
important to note the requirement (which is general and not just for
the period of the survey) that each recording should be labelled with
the date and time, and with the statement that `This recording is to
be used only for educational purposes'.

It is hoped that the survey will not cause too much
inconvenience, and the full co-operation of members of the University
would be appreciated.

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EUROPEAN HUMANITIES RESEARCH CENTRE


Change of address

The Centre, under the directorship of Professor Malcolm Bowie, FBA,
All Souls, fosters advanced research in the humanities. It places a
special emphasis on the interdisciplinary dimension of humanities
research and brings together, by way of its academic programmes,
scholars from Europe and further afield. The Centre has a thriving
publications programme under its Legenda imprint.

The Centre has now moved to 76 Woodstock Road, St Hugh's College,
Oxford OX2 6LE (telephone: Oxford (2)84680, fax: (2)84681, e-mail:
enquiries@ehrc.ox.ac.uk, Internet: www.ehrc.ox.ac.uk).

The editorial address of the Legenda publications programme will
remain the Taylor Institution, 47 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JF.

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WIDOWS OF FORMER MEMBERS OF THE
UNIVERSITY'S PENSION SCHEMES

From time to time the attention of the University is drawn to
individual cases of financial hardship among widows of former members
of the Federated Superannuation System for Universities (FSSU) and
the University of Oxford Employees Pension Scheme (EPS). Limited
resources are available to alleviate proven cases of hardship and any
enquiry should be addressed to the Superannuation Officer, University
Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD. All cases are dealt with
in the strictest confidence.

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ELDON LAW SCHOLARSHIP 2000

The Board of the Faculty of Law announces that the Eldon Law
Scholarship, value not less than £4,500 per annum, is awarded
annually to be held for up to two years. Candidates must be members
of the University of Oxford who: (a) have passed the
examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts or for the Degree of
Bachelor of Civil Law or for the Degree of Magister Juris; and
(b) have been placed in the First Class in one or other of
these examinations or in Honour Moderations or have gained one of the
Chancellor's Prizes; and (c) intend to follow the profession
of the Law; and (d) have applied for one of the scholarships
either before, or within two years next following, the date of their
call to the Bar.

Candidates will be required to sign a declaration that they intend to
practise at the Bar in the United Kingdom.

Until they have been called to the Bar, scholars must produce proof
that they have regularly kept their terms, unless prevented by
illness, at one of the Inns of Court.

In general the policy of the awarding committee is to give preference
to a candidate who has completed his or her Oxford education and is
completing the vocational stage of training prior to entry into
pupillage.

Applications, accompanied by a curriculum vitae, must be
sent to the Head Clerk (on a form obtainable from him), University
Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD, not later than Friday, 29
October 1999, in a sealed envelope marked `Eldon Scholarship
Application'. The representatives of the board will summon to
interview at Oxford on Saturday, 22 January 2000, those candidates
they wish to see.

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WINTER WILLIAMS LAW PRIZES 1999

The Board of the Faculty of Law invites entry for the Prizes which
will be awarded in 1999 on the basis of essays, of not more than
5,000 words, submitted on one of the following subjects:

1. What effect do you consider the Human Rights Act 1999 will have
on judicial review of administrative action after it comes into force
in 2000? How far do you consider these effects to be desirable?

2. What is wrong with trusts for non-charitable purposes?

3. Are estoppel rights over land property rights?

The First Prize is of £400, the Second Prize is of £200.
Grants to a total of £200 may be made to unsuccessful ca
ndidates who have done meritorious work. The prizes will be awarded
only if entries of sufficient merit are received.

The essays (two typed copies) must be sent to the Head Clerk,
University Offices, Wellington Square, by 30 September 1999. There is
no entry form, but each essay must be accompanied by: (i) a statement
from the candidate's college that he or she is, on 30 September 1999,
an undergraduate member of the University who has not exceeded the
tenth term from matriculation, and is reading for the Honour School
of Jurisprudence; (ii) a declaration that the essay is the
candidate's own unaided work and that it has been submitted to any
other person for advice, assistance, or revision.

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ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM


Concerts

The following concerts will be given at 6.30 p.m. on Wednesdays in
the Ashmolean Museum. Tickets, costing £15 each, may be obtained
from the Playhouse Box Office, Beaumont Street (telephone: Oxford
798600).

16 June: Chinese music performed by the London Chinese
Orchestra.

21 July: Indian music performed by Shard Sahai on the
tabla.

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Vivien Leigh Prize

A prize of £300 is offered by the Ashmolean Museum from the
Vivien Leigh Fund for a two-dimensional work of art on paper, not
exceeding fifty-five by 40 centimetres, by an undergraduate member of
the University. The work will be chosen, if a work of sufficient
merit is submitted, by the Keeper of Western Art in the Ashmolean
Museum, from work submitted to the Print Room by 17 June or work
exhibited at the annual degree show at the Ruskin School of Drawing
and Fine Art. It is a condition of the award that the the winning
work be given to the Ashmolean.

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ASHMOLEAN LIBRARY


Arrangements during the construction of the
Sackler Library, summer 1998–summer 2000

The Committee for the Ashmolean Library advises readers that the
construction of the Sackler Library is proceeding on a site
immediately to the west of the present main library. It is expected
that working conditions in the library will remain tolerable
throughout most of the construction period, but there may be times
when it becomes necessary for health and safety reasons to close or
partially close the library at short notice. The Committee regrets
any resulting inconvenience to readers and is taking all practicable
measures to minimise disruption.

The project involves the replacement of the Griffith Institute,
and the decanting of its holdings into adjacent accommodation for the
construction period. The Ancient Near East holdings are now available
to readers in the basement of the Oriental Institute Library; the
Egyptological holdings are now accessible through No. 6 St John
Street. All other sections of the Ashmolean's collections will remain
on the existing site. Access to the Library remains via the Ashmolean
Museum when the Museum is open ( Tuesday–Friday, 10 a.m.–5
p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m.–1 p.m.). At all other times access is
through the new entrance opposite the Cast Gallery, which replaces
the former Pusey Lane entrance.

The remaining basement level of the Griffith Institute building
is scheduled for demolition in two phases : the first is currently
programmed to occur between 31 May and 12 June 1999 and the second
between 16 August and 31 August 1999. The library will remain open
during these periods, but excessive noise, particularly during
mornings, may lead to some disruption of normal library service.

During the latter period all parts of the library (together with
the Ashmolean Museum) will be closed for one complete weekday to
allow a major transfer of electrical supply cables. The date of this
closure will be posted in the Gazette and on the Sackler
Web site as soon as it is finalised. Some shorter electrical
shutdowns may be required shortly thereafter.

The construction is currently expected to be completed by July
2000 with a view to opening the building for readers in time for the
following Michaelmas Term. Readers are hereby warned that the
movement of the library stock into the new building will involve an
extended period of disruption during the Long Vacation of 2000 as
sections of the library become progressively inaccessible. Further
details of this will be announced as they become available.

Further information is available on the the Sackler Library Web
site at http://www.classics.ox.ac.uk/sackler.html.

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WOLFSON CHILDCARE SCHOLARSHIP

Applications are invited for the Wolfson Childcare Scholarship, to be
held at an Oxford University nursery (the Mansion House Nursery,
Summertown House, and Bradmore Road Nursery). The scholarship was set
up as a result of the generosity of the Wolfson Family Charitable
Trust and is administered by the University's Childcare Committee.

Matriculated undergraduates and graduates of the University wholly or
mainly pursuing their studies, and employees of the University and
colleges, will be eligible to apply for the scholarship. The value of
the award is likely to vary from year to year, according to the
financial circumstances of the successful applicant, but may cover up
to half the cost of nursery fees (but not extra charges for meals,
etc.). The award will be made for one child, and for one year in the
first instance. The scholarship is only tenable at a university
nursery and can only be awarded to an applicant whose child already
has a place, or for whose child an application form has been
submitted.

Application forms for the Wolfson Childcare Scholarship can be
obtained from the Childcare Officer, University Offices, Wellington
Square, Oxford OX1 2JD. All scholarship forms must be returned to the
Childcare Officer by Friday, 17 September.

Nursery application forms are available from the Childcare Officer
and from the Nursery Managers, the Mansion House Nursery, Summertown
Nursery, Summertown House, Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6QW. (Please
enclose a stamped addressed envelope.)

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UNIVERSITY CLUB


Wine-tastings

The following wine-tastings will be held at 5.45 p.m. on Wednesdays
in the University Club, 6 South Parks Road. All members and their
guests are welcome, the fee being £2 per person.

28 Apr.: Spanish wines.

2 June: Wines for summer drinking.

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MAISON FRANÇAISE


The Library

The library at the Maison Française d'Oxford, Norham Road,
Oxford OX2 6SE (telephone: (2)74224), is a study and information
centre for students and teachers of French, and for all those
interested in French culture and society.

It has a wide range of books (41,000 volumes), periodicals (including
Le Monde and Libération), a
selection of cassettes, records, and videos, and Dossiers de
presse
on various contemporary topics such as the environment,
education, and immigration. The social sciences section is currently
being expanded.

Everyone is welcome to join the library and take advantage of these
resources. Subscription fees for the academic year are: books
£2.50, cassettes £2.50, videos £20.

The library's opening hours are: Tuesday–Friday, 10 a.m.–6
p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.–12.30 p.m.

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ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY TEACHERS

The Association of University Teachers is both a professional
association and a trade union, committed to the advancement of
university education and research. At the national level, the AUT is
the recognised union for academic and academic-related staff. Besides
its concern for more general questions of university education and
research, the AUT negotiates salary levels and conditions of
employment with the Committee of Vice-Chancellors and Principals.

The Oxford branch of the AUT is open for membership to
university and college employees, whether academic or
academic-related. It has over 900 members. It is the official body
with which the University discusses priorities and problems bearing
on education and research, and negotiates solutions to them.
Discussions between the Oxford AUT and university officers occur
formally once per term at a meeting of a Joint Consultative
Committee, but there are many other informal meetings to discuss
particular problems, including those affecting the conditions of
employment of academic and academic-related staff, such as the
`waiver clause' for those employed on contract grants. The local AUT
also provides confidential advice on problems relating to terms and
conditions of employment.

Application for membership and other enquiries can be made to
Mrs Anne Hendry, Administrative Secretary, Oxford AUT, New Barnett
House, 28 Little Clarendon Street, Oxford OX1 2HY (telephone and fax:
(2)70418, e-mail: aut@ermine.ox.ac.uk) (9.30 a.m.--4.30 p.m.,
Tuesday–Thursday).

Enquiries may also be directed to the following: Kit Bailey
(Honorary Secretary), Department of Plant Sciences (telephone:
(2)75090); Denis O'Driscoll, Department of Biochemistry (telephone:
(2)75260); Arthur Marsh (Personal Cases), St Edmund Hall (telephone:
(2)74170).

The Trinity Term meeting will be held on at 1.15 p.m. on
Tuesday, 25 May, in Blackhall, Queen Elizabeth House, 21 St Giles'.
All AUT members and non-members will be welcome.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 22 April 1999: Lectures<br />

Lectures


Contents of this section:

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INAUGURAL LECTURES


Professor of Numerical Analysis

PROFESSOR L.N. TREFETHEN will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m.
on Monday, 26 April, in the Examination Schools. The Vice-Chancellor
will be present.

Subject: `Scientific computing: the finite, the infinite,
and the future.'

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Rhodes Professor of Race Relations

PROFESSOR W. BEINART will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on
Thursday, 6 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `African history, environmental history, and
race relations.'

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J.R.R. Tolkien Professor of English
Literature and Language

PROFESSOR P. STROHM will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on
Thursday, 13 May, in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `Chaucer's Troilus as temporal
archive.'

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Harold Vyvyan Harmsworth Professor of
American History

PROFESSOR A. BRINKLEY will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on
Tuesday, 18 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Imagining the twentieth century: perspectives
from two fins-de-siècle.'

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Drue Heinz Professor of American Literature

PROFESSOR R. BUSH will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on
Thursday, 27 May, in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building.

Subject: `American voice/American voices.'

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CHERWELL-SIMON MEMORIAL LECTURE 1999

PROFESSOR CARL E. WIEMAN, University of Colorado, will deliver the
Cherwell-Simon Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Friday, 11 June, in Lecture
Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building, South Parks Road.

Subject: `Bose–Einstein condensation: revealing
the quantum world using ultra-low temperatures.'

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HALLEY LECTURE 1999

PROFESSOR ROBERT E. WILLIAMS, Distinguished Research Scholar, Space
Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Maryland, will deliver the
Halley Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 18 May, in Lecture Theatre A,
Zoology/Psychology Building, South Parks Road.

Subject: `Probing the universe with the Hubble Space
Telescope.'

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CYRIL FOSTER LECTURE 1999

PROFESSOR G. BEST will deliver the Cyril Foster Lecture at 5 p.m. on
Thursday, 29 April, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Peace conferences and the century of total war:
the 1899 Hague Conference and what came after.'

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O'DONNELL LECTURE 1999

DR PRYS MORGAN, Reader in History, University of Wales, Swansea, will
deliver the O'Donnell Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 6 May, in the
Hall, the Taylor Institution.

Subject: ` "Among our Ancient Mountains ..."
(the appreciation of Welsh mountainscape in the eighteenth and
nineteenth centuries).'

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D.M. MCKENZIE LECTURE

PROFESSOR L. RAINEY will deliver the fourth annual D.M. McKenzie
Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 26 May, in Lecture Theatre 2, the St
Cross Building.

Subject: `The cultural economy of modernism.'

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MYRES MEMORIAL LECTURE

DR O. RACKHAM, Cambridge, will deliver the Myres Memorial Lecture at
5 p.m. on Monday, 10 May, in the McGregor-Matthews Room, New College.

Subject: `Trees and timber in Greek history.'

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TIMES LECTURE

PHILIP HOWARD will deliver the Times Lecture at 5 p.m.
on Wednesday, 28 April, in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building.

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CLARENDON LECTURES IN ECONOMICS 1999

Strategic asset allocation: portfolio choice for long-term
investors

PROFESSOR J.Y. CAMPBELL, Harvard University, will deliver the
Clarendon Lectures in Economics at 5 p.m. on the following days in
the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the Institute of Economics and
Statistics, the St Cross Building.

Tue. 4 May: `Who should buy long-term bonds?'

Wed. 5 May: `Is the stock market safer for long-term
investors?'

Thur. 6 May: `Investing for retirement.'

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CLARENDON LECTURES IN MANAGEMENT STUDIES
1999

The determinants of corporate governance

PROFESSOR M. ROE, Milton Hawler Professor of Business Regulation,
University of Columbia School of Law, will deliver the Clarendon
Lectures in Management Studies at 5 p.m. on Monday, 10 May, Tuesday,
11 May, and Wednesday, 12 May, in the Examination Schools. The
lectures will be open to the public, and admission is free.

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SIR ISAIAH BERLIN LECTURES IN THE HISTORY
OF IDEAS

The ideals and practice of scientific objectivity

PROFESSOR L. DASTON, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science,
Berlin, Sir Isaiah Berlin Visiting Professor in the History of Ideas
1998–9, will lecture at 5 p.m. on the days shown in the St Cross
Building.

Tue. 27 Apr. `Can objectivity have a history?'

Thur. 29 Apr.: `Objectivity versus truth.'

Thur. 20 May: `A short history of the fact.'

Tue. 25 May: `Art and science opposed.'

Thur. 27 May: `Objectivity among the historians.'

Tue. 15 June: `Objectivity and the cosmic
community.'

Professor Daston will be available to meet students at the following
times, in Corpus Christi College: Wednesday, 28 April, 9–11
a.m.; Friday, 21 May, 11 a.m.–1 p.m.; Wednesday, 26 May, 11
a.m.–1 p.m.; Wednesday, 16 June, 9–11 a.m.

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HUSSEY LECTURES ON THE CHURCH AND THE ARTS
1999

JOHN TAVENER, composer, will deliver the Hussey annual lecture at 5
p.m. on Tuesday, 11 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Hymn of entry.'

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ANTHROPOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY

School of Geography: centenary lectures

The following lectures will be given in the School of Geography as
part of the celebration of the School's centenary in 1999. With the
exception of the lectures on 7 May, all will begin at 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR A. GOUDIE

30 Apr.: `The geomorphology of the Oxford region.'

SIR JOHN HOUGHTON

7 May, 2.15 p.m.: `Global climatic
change' (Discussant: Dr R. Washington).

PROFESSOR A. SCOTT

7 May, 3.45 p.m.: `Global economic change'
(Discussant: Dr E. Swyngedouw).

DR J. LANGTON

14 May: `The changing geography of poor relief in
rural Oxfordshire: 1772–1834.'

DR H. VILES

21 May: `Traffic, air pollution, and Oxford's
cultural heritage.'

DR M. MORECROFT

28 May: `Wytham Woods: the world's most studied
woods in a century of global change.'

J. ASHDOWN, Oxford City Conservation Officer

4 June: `A celebration of change in the historic
city of Oxford.'

DR J. RYAN and DR D. RYAN

11 June: `Performing place: the Oxford Pageant of
1907.'

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Fertility and Reproduction Seminars

The following seminars will be given at 11 a.m. on Mondays in the
Seminar Room, the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology.

DR A. CORNWALL, Sussex

26 Apr.: `Looking for a child: coping with
infertility in Ado-Odo, south-west Nigeria.'

DR R. INGHAM, Southampton

3 May: `Variations in sexual risks amongst young
people in Europe.'

DR O. CAMPBELL, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

10 May: `The shifting paradigm for safe motherhood
programmes in developing countries.'

DR M. UNNITHAN, Sussex

17 May: `Women's agency and reproductive health in
Jaipur District, Rajastan.'

DR C. COLLINS, Oxfam

24 May: `Reproductive rights and reproductive
wrongs.'

DR H. MONTGOMERY

31 May: ` "Real" parents and
adoption—a work in progress.'

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ESRC Research Programme `Transnational Communities'

Transnational religious communities: Muslim and Hindu movements
and networks

The following seminars will be given at 2 p.m. on the days shown in
the Senior Common Room, the School of Geography. Unless otherwise
indicated, they will take place on Thursdays.

Conveners: S.A. Vertovec, MA, D.Phil., Director,
Transnational Communities, C.G. Clarke, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
Urban and Social Geography, and D.J. Parkin, MA, Professor of Social
Anthropology.

PROFESSOR P. LUBECK, University of California, Santa Cruz

29 Apr.: `Global Islam.'

PROFESSOR P. VAN DER VEER, Amsterdam

6 May: : `Cosmopolitanism, secularism, and
transnational religion.'

PROFESSOR D.F. EICKLEMAN, Dartmouth College

13 May: `Shifting centres and emerging peripheries:
the changing political geography of Muslim transnationalism.'

PROFESSOR W. SCHIFFAUER, Europa University Viadrina, Frankfurt

20 May: `Islamism in the Diaspora: the fascination
of political Islam among second-generation German Turks.'

DR R. BAROT, Bristol

27 May: `Local, global, and transnational: the case
of the Swaminarayan movement.'

DR J. CESARI, New York

3 June: `Islam in the west: the issue of pluralism
in the context of globalisation.'

DR C. BHATT, Essex

10 June: `Ideologies of indigenism.'

DR J. PISCATORI

Fri. 18 June: `On transnational religious
communities.'

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BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Department of Plant Sciences

The following research talks will be given at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in
the Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Plant Sciences.

Convener: S.A. Hill, MA, University Lecturer in Plant
Science.

PROFESSOR M. SCHULER, Illinois

22 Apr.: `Plant P450 mono-oxygenases involved in
herbicide and phenylpropanoid metabolism.'

PROFESSOR W. FRIEDMAN, Colorado

6 May: `The evolutionary origin of flowering
plants: an examination of Darwin's "abominable
mystery".'

PROFESSOR P. CRANE, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

13 May: `The history of angiosperm diversity.'

PROFESSOR P. DIGGLE, Colorado

20 May: `What do cannibal toads and plants have in
common?'

DR M. HOOKS, Glasgow

27 May: `Immersed in oil: lipid mobilisation in
Arabidopsis.'

PROFESSOR G. LINDSEY, Glasgow

3 June: `Organelle and complex-specific isoforms of
dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), a key component of the
family of 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes.'

DR K. WILLIS

10 June: `The driving mechanisms of plant
evolution: past, present, and future.'

DR B. JUNIPER

17 June: `Forty interesting years.'

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Genetics, past, present and future

The following seminars will be given at 12.30 p.m. on Thursdays in
the Large Lecture Theatre, the Department of Biochemistry.

PROFESSOR M.S. DAWKINS

29 Apr.: `Genes and behaviour.'

PROFESSOR C.J. LEAVER

13 May: `Transgenic plants: the next green
revolution?.'

DR M. EDWARDS, Oxagen

27 May: `Biotechnology in medicine.'

PROFESSOR B.C. SYKES

10 June: `Genetics and medicine in the golden age.'

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CLINICAL MEDICINE

Institute of Health Sciences

The following research seminars will be held at 12.30 p.m. on
Thursdays in the Institute of Health Sciences, Old Road, Headington.
The 20 May seminar will be held in the Board Room; other seminars
will be held in the Teaching Suite.

Conveners: Jon Emery and Premila Webster.

DR A. STEWART, Cambridge

22 Apr.: `The new genetics and public health.'
(IHS Guest Lecture)

M. GINSBERG, Oxford Health Promotion—BHF Health Promotion Group

29 Apr.: `What systematic reviews leave out: taking
workplace health promotion from theory to practice for the
British Heart Foundation.'

DR J. WELLS, Health Services Research Unit

6 May: `Putting trials into practice—the story
of mammography.'

DR S. STEWART-BROWN, Health Services Research Unit

13 May: `Evaluation school health promotion
intervention.'

DR M. DAWES

20 May: `Is white coat hypertension safe?'

PROFESSOR R. SECKER-WALKER, ICRF General Practice Research Group

27 May: `A community-based intervention to help
women quit smoking.'

DR P. ONG, GIFTS of Health, Health Services Research Unit

3 June: `Complementary medicine utilisation.'

PROFESSOR M. VESSEY

10 June: `Overview of the Oxford–FPA
contraceptive study.'

K. ZONDERPLAN, Department of Public Health

17 June: `How common is pelvic pain in women?
Evidence from a general practice database.'

DR M. MURPHY, ICRF General Practice Research Group

24 June: `The unintended consequences of sub-
fertility treatments.'

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Nuffield Department of Surgery

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
Seminar Room, Level 6, the John Radcliffe Hospital.

DR B. SEDDON, Division of Molecular Immunology, NIMR, Mill Hill

27 Apr.: `Generation, specificity, and mode of
action of regulatory T cells that prevent autoimmunity.'

DR L. TAAMS, Royal Free Hospital, London

4 May: `Anergic T cells as active regulators of
immune responses.'

DR G. HALE

11 May: `Elimination of the immunogenicity of
therapeutic antibodies.'

DR D. ROBINSON, National Heart and Lung Institute, London

18 May: `IL-5 in asthma and receptor regulation
during eosinophil development.'

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Clinical endocrine and metabolic meetings

The following meetings will be held at 12.45 p.m. on Wednesdays in
the Committee Room, Green College.

PROFESSOR P. DONNELLY

28 Apr.: `Statistical challenges in gene
hunting.'

DR J. MIELL, King's College, London

5 May: to be announced.

DR E. BARRETT-CONNOR

12 May: `The HERS Study.' (Provisional
title
)

DR D. DUNGER

26 May: `The Oxford Regional Prospective Study of
Childhood Diabetes.'

DR E. DUNCAN

2 June: ` "...and the hip bone's connect to
the ...": a linkage study in osteoporosis.'

DR F. KARPE, Karolinska Institute, Sweden

9 June: `Genetic variability as a determinant of
postprandial lipoprotein metabolism.'

DR B. MORLEY, Imperial College, London

16 June: `Mapping lupus susceptibility genes in the
mouse.'

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CLINICAL MEDICINE, PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the
Lecture Theatre, the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology.

Convener: H. Waldmann, BM, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
Pathology.

DR S. FOSTER, Sheffield

29 Apr.: `Coping with life's stresses: response
mechanisms in the pathogen Staphylococcus
aureus
.'

PROFESSOR N. MITCHISON, University College, London

6 May: `Genetic variation in the immune response: a
clue to therapy?'

G. WRIGHT

13 May: `A novel macrophage protein which interacts
with the lymphoid/neuronal OX-2 antigen.'

DR J. HINTON

20 May: `Nucleoid-associated proteins, gene
expression, and virulence in Salmonella
typhimurium.
'

P. GOUGH

27 May: `Scavenging for results: the molecular
pathology of the human macrophage scavenger receptor (SR-A).'

DR T.N.C. WELLS, Director, Serono Pharmaceutical Research Institute,
Geneva

3 June: `Chemokines, glycosaminoglycans, and their
role in disease.'

DR R. WOOD, ICRF Clare Hall Laboratories

17 June: `Nucleotide excision repair in human
cells.'

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COMMITTEE FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY AND
GENERAL LINGUISTICS

PROFESSOR R. LASS, Cape Town, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 6
May, in the Centre for Linguistics and Philology, Walton Street.

Convener: A.E. Morpurgo Davies, MA, Professor of
Comparative Philology.

Subject: `Reflections on (uni)directionality in
linguistics.'

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LITERAE HUMANIORES

BRANKO KIRGIN, Archaeological Museum, Split, will lecture at 5 p.m.
on Thursday, 29 April, in the Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's
College.

Convener: N. Purcell, MA, University Lecturer (CUF) in
Ancient History.

Subject: `Discovering the island of Diomedes? Palagruza
and the archaeology of the ancient Adriatic.'

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Archive of performances of Greek and Roman drama

PROFESSOR M. SMETHURST, Pittsburgh, will lecture at at 2.15 p.m. on
Friday, 30 April, in the auditorium, Magdalen College.

Conveners: O.P. Taplin, MA, D.Phil., Professor of
Classical Languages and Literature, and E.M. Hall, MA, D.Phil.,
University Lecturer (CUF) in Classical Languages.

Subject: `The Japanese presence in Ninagawa's
Medea.' (With videotape of a production of Yukio
Ninagawa's
Medea)

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David Lewis Lecture 1999

PROFESSOR S. COHEN, Ungerleider Professor and Director of Judaic
Studies, Brown University, will deliver the David Lewis Lecture at 5
p.m. on Wednesday, 26 May, in the Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St
John's College.

Subject: `Hellenism in unexpected places.'

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MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

Department of Statistics: probability, statistics, and operations
research seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Thursdays in the
Department of Statistics.

Convener: P. Clifford, MA, Reader in Mathematical
Statistics.

PROFESSOR S. LAURITZEN, Aalborg

29 Apr.: `Causal inference from graphical
models.'

DR R. CHANDLER, UCL

6 May: `Climate change detection using generalised
linear models—a case study from the west of Ireland.'

PROFESSOR D. MATTHEWS, Waterloo

13 May: `Sunlight, green cells, and black boxes:
developing a stochastic model of photosynthesis.'

DR J. ANSELL, Edinburgh

20 May: `The use of non-parametric methods to
assess the performance of repairable systems.' (Seminar
organised jointly with the Southern Operations Research
Group
)

DR A. ATKINSON and PROFESSOR F. CRITCHLEY, Birmingham

27 May: `Some aspects of influence analysis.'

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MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

Goethe's voices—voices on Goethe

A Goethe day, to mark the 250th anniversary of the poet's birth, will
be held on Saturday, 15 May. The morning session will take place in
St Giles' House; the afternoon session will take place in the
Margaret Ogilvie Theatre, St Anne's College.

Conveners: T.J. Reed, MA, Taylor Professor of the German
Language and Literature (morning session), and F.J. Lamport, MA,
Faculty Lecturer in German.

Morning session: Goethe on sex and politics (two
discussions introduced by short papers from visiting speakers)

PROFESSOR E. BOA, Nottingham, and DR M. BELL, King's College, London

9.15 a.m.: `Love and the sexes in Goethe.'

DR N. BOYLE, Cambridge, and DR J. WILLIAM, St Andrews

11.15 a.m.: `Goethe and politics.'

Afternoon session (2.15–5.45 p.m.). Readings from
Goethe's plays and poems, to include scenes from Faust,
Egmont, and Iphigenie auf Tauris.

Lieder-recital

UTA BUCHHEISTER (mezzo-soprano), winner of the 1997 Vienna Schubert
Prize, will give a recital of settings of Goethe poems at 8 p.m. in
the Jacqueline de Pré auditorium, St Hilda's College. Tickets
are free to members of the University on application to the Modern
Languages Faculty Office, 37 Wellington Square. Early application is
recommended.

A public seminar on Goethe's poetry and other texts will be held in
Michaelmas Term. Details will be announced later.

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Graduate seminar in Spanish Studies

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in Room 3,
the Taylor Institution.

Conveners: I.D.L. Michael, MA, King Alfonso XIII
Professor of Spanish Studies, and R.W. Fiddian, MA, Reader in
Spanish.

PROFESSOR E. MCGRADY, Virginia

27 Apr.: `Erotic imagery in early modern Spanish
literature.'

DR J. EDWARDS

4 May: `Ecclesia quasi reformanda:
Fray Bartolomé Carranza in the England of Mary Tudor.'

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MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES, MODERN
HISTORY

Language and history

The following interdisciplinary seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on
Tuesdays in Oriel College.

Conveners: Robert Evans, Suzanne Romaine, and Gerald
Stone.

P. BURKE, Cambridge

27 Apr.: `The language of politeness in early
modern Europe.'

S. ROMAINE

4 May
: `Indigenous concepts of nationhood and history.'

G. STEDMAN JONES, Cambridge

11 May: `History, language, and Thomas Carlyle.'

P. BARKER, Reading

18 May: `The Sorbian language and the post-war
development of Germany.'

L. WRIGHT, Cambridge

25 May: `Linguistic depositions of sixteenth- and
seventeenth-century Londoners deported to Virginia.'

I. MACLEAN

1 June: `Res et verba in the legal
language of the Renaissance.'

G. ESTRAIKH, Oxford Institute for Yiddish Studies

8 June: `Soviet Yiddish and Yivo Yiddish; two
trends in the modern history of Yiddish language planning.'

R. EVANS

15 June: `Language and state building: the case of
the Habsburg monarchy.'

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MODERN HISTORY

Mapping the print culture of eighteenth-century London

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays. The
seminar on 6 May will take place in the History Faculty Graduate
Computing Room; the following two seminars will take place in the
Council Room, Mansfield College.

Conveners: Dr J. Raven, Mansfield College, and Dr J.
Cardwell, Modern History Faculty.

F. BLACK, Saskatchewan and Loughborough, and B. MACDONALD, Dalhousie

6 May: `Mapping projects and the application of GIS
software.'

PROFESSOR M. TREADWELL, Trent University, Canada

20 May: `The use of pre- and post-land tax records
and the location of London printing houses
.1660–1740.'

PROFESSOR P. CORFIELD and E. GREEN, Royal Holloway College, London

3 June: `The Westminster Historical Database:
performance and potentialities.'

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New approaches to the history of the Second World War

The following seminars, which are open to all, will be held at 2 p.m.
on Thursdays in the Council Room, Mansfield College.

Conveners: Dr Ashley Jackson, Mansfield College, and Mr
Paul Collier, Wadham College, in co-operation with Professor R.J.
O'Neill.

DR JACKSON

29 Apr.: `Pioneers, mutineers, and bombardiers: the
colonial empire at war.'

PROFESSOR A. CAPET, Rouen

6 May: `Writing a comprehensive bibliography of
Britain and the Second World War: an impossible task?'

A. KRYLOVA, Johns Hopkins

13 May: ` "Healing wounded souls":
Soviety identity, gender, and the trauma of the Great Patriotic
War.'

A. HILL, Cambridge

20 May: `German rule and Russian resistance on the
German occupied territories of Russia in Western, Soviet, and
post-Soviet historical writing.'

DR D. O'SULLIVAN, Catholic University of Eichstaett

27 May: `Framing the mind: information and
perception during the Second World War.'

DR K. FEDOROWICH, University of the West of England, and DR R. MOORE,
Sheffield

3 June: `New approaches to prisoner-of-war (POW)
history.'

J. KIRAS, Hull

10 June: ` "By all possible means"? The
implications of the creation and use of Special Operations
Forces in the Second World War.'

MR COLLIER

17 June: ` "Planes, trains, and
automobiles": logistics and the Afrika Korps.'

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Seminar on East Central Europe, nineteenth and twentieth
centuries

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in Oriel
College.

Conveners: R.J.W. Evans, MA, D.Phil., Regius Professor of
Modern History, and D. Rechter (Ph.D. Jerusalem), Research Fellow, St
Antony's College.

G. CHEW, Royal Holloway College, London

30 Apr.: `Musicology and ideology: Zdenek Nejedly
and Czech culture after 1945.'

M. BAAR

7 May: `Liberalism and historiography: the case of
Mihály Horváth (1809–78).'

M. LEVENE, Warwick

14 May: `Armenia 1915, Rumania 1941: a comparison
of genocide across two world wars.'

S. LANDRES

21 May: `When European pasts cloud European
futures: Slovakia since 1848.'

G. BATONYI, Bradford

28 May: `British intelligence in central Europe
during the Second World War.'

A. POLONSKY, Brandeis

4 June: `The new Jewish politics and its
discontents, 1881–1939.'

A. NG

11 June: `World War One and the lost world; the
case of Josef Redlich.'

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Work in Progress—Work in Prospect: research topics from the
Oxford graduate programme in the history of science

This meeting will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Friday, 30 April, in the
History of Science and Technology Seminar Room, the Modern History
Faculty Building.

Convener: Ilaria Meliconi, Linacre College.

The meeting will be an occasion for graduate students in the History
of Science in Oxford to present their work and to learn about their
colleagues' research. Speakers will include Jeremy Vetter, Peter C.
Kjaergaard, Katherine Brading, Tom Schienfeldt, Nathalie Jas, and
Patrick Wallis.

For further information and registration, contact Ilaria Meliconi at
Linacre College (e-mail: ilaria.meliconi@mhs.ox.ac.uk).

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MODERN HISTORY, SOCIAL STUDIES

Seminar in Economic and Social History

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
Hovenden Room, All Souls College.

Convener: N.H. Dimsdale, MA, University Lecturer (CUF) in
Economics.

J. ENOS

28 Apr.: `Sporadic innovation and historical
continuity.'

A. VAN RIEL, Utrecht

5 May: `Postponed conformity: institutional change,
relative prices, and economic growth in The Netherlands,
1800–1913.'

MR DIMSDALE and N. HORSEWOOD, Birmingham

12 May: `Consumption, investment, and wages in late
Victorian Britain.'

R. CROCKETT, Northampton, and A. CROCKETT

19 May: `How people count: a method for estimating
the rounding of numbers in historical sources, as revealed by
the Attendance of the 1851 census.'

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MODERN HISTORY, THEOLOGY

Religion in the British Isles, 1400–1700

The following graduate seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays
in the Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College. Graduate students and
colleagues from other institutions are welcome to attend.

Conveners: C. Haigh, Christ Church, F. Heal, Jesus
College, D. MacCulloch, St Cross College, and J. Maltby, Corpus
Christi College.

DR HAIGH

29 Apr.: `Communion and community: exclusion from
Communion in Post-Reformation England.'

G. WILLIAMS, Swansea

6 May: `Religion and language in Wales,
1500–1642.'

B. THOMPSON

13 May: `The laity, the Church, and property: the
Dissolution in medieval perspective.'

G. WEBBER, Cambridge

20 May: `Hearing the seventeenth century: politics
and religion in the music of William Child (1606–97).'

P. LAKE, Princeton

27 May: `Edmund Campion and the public sphere.'

P. CROFT, Royal Holloway College, London

3 June: `Robert Cecil and Jacobean Recusancy: the
catholic baronets of 1611.'

T. MCCOOG, Jesuit Archives, London

10 June: `Tensions within the Society of Jesus:
Robert Parsons, William Crichton, and the battle over
Elizabeth's successor.'

J. MURRAY, Dublin City University

17 June: `Why the Reformation failed in Dublin:
the influence of the corporate clerical elite.'

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MUSIC

The Composer Speaks

The following composers will lecture at 5 p.m. on the days shown in
the Holywell Music Room. The lectures are free and open to the
public.

Fri. 23 Apr.: JONATHAN HARVEY.

Fri. 14 May: GEORGE BENJAMIN (with a live performance
of his duo Viola, Viola by Ralph Ehlers and
Catherine Manson).

Wed. 19 May: ROBERT SHERLAW JOHNSON.

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ORIENTAL STUDIES

Jewish History and Literature in the Graeco-Roman Period

The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in
Wolfson College.

Convener: M.D. Goodman, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Jewish
Studies.

DR T. RAJAK, Reading

27 Apr.: `Hellenes and barbarians according to
Josephus.'

PROFESSOR P. ALEXANDER, Manchester

4 May: `New light on the "Pierced
Messiah" (4Q285).'

DR S. STERN, London School of Jewish Studies

11 May: `Rabbinic authority in late antique
Palestine: fresh evidence from Zoar.'

PROFESSOR GOODMAN

18 May: `Current scholarship on the First Jewish
Revolt.'

PROFESSOR S. COHEN, Brown University

25 May: `The Blood of the Covenant and the Blood of
the Circumcision.'

DR C. HEMPEL, Cambridge

1 June: `The Qumran Sapiential Texts and the Rule
Books.'

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PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Theoretical Physics Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Fridays in the
Nuclear Physics Lecture Theatre.

Convener: D. Sherrington, MA, Wykeham Professor of
Physics.

DR M. OPPER, Aston

30 Apr.: `Learning machines beyond neural networks:
a statistical mechanics study.'

PROFESSOR G. EFSTATHIOU, Cambridge

14 May: `The value of the cosmological constant
determined from type Ia supernovae and cosmic microwave
background anisotropies.'

DR A.C.C. COOLEN, King's College, London

28 May: `Statistical physics of neural
networks—what's next?'

PROFESSOR S. SARKAR, King's College, London

11 June: `Entropy approach to quantum chaos.'

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Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

The following colloquia will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Main
Lecture Theatre, the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory.

Convener: M.L.H. Green, MA, Professor of Inorganic
Chemistry.

PROFESSOR S.G. SLIGAR, Illinois

26 Apr.: `The iron-containing enzyme, cytochrome
P450: from genomics to molecular function.'

PROFESSOR G. FERGUSON, Guelph, Ontario

3 May: `Crystal engineering with bis-, tris-, and
polyphenols.'

DR J.S. BRADLEY, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung,
Mülheim an der Ruhr, Germany

10 May: `Non-oxide sol-gel chemistry: molecular
precursors, imide gels, and nitride ceramics.'

PROFESSOR K.R. POEPPELMEIER, Northwestern University

17 May: `Transparent conducting oxides.'

PROFESSOR B.R. HEYWOOD, Keele

24 May: `From Kandinski to Mondrian...template-
directed crystallisation strategies for the fabrication of
inorganic materials.'

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Astrophysics Colloquia

The following colloquia will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
Nuclear and Astrophysics Lecture Theatre.

No colloquium will be held on 18 May, as the Halley Lecture is being
given on that day: for details, see above.

Conveners: H. Tadros and A.E. Lynas-Gray.

DR P. DENISSENKOV, St Petersburg

27 Apr.: `Searching for mixing mechanisms in
stars.'

DR J. LOCKMAN, National Radio Astronomy Observatory

4 May: `The Green Bank Radio Telescope: history,
progress, and scientific programme.'

DR J. LUU, Leiden

11 May: `The new outer solar system.'

DR I. HOOK, Edinburgh

25 May: `Measuring cosmological parameters using
high-redshift type Ia supernovae.'

DR P. SCHNEIDER, MPE Garching bei München

1 June: `Lensing by large-scale structure.'

PROFESSOR D. HELFAND, Columbia

8 June: `Large-scale structure in the radio
universe.'

DR P.W. LUCAS

15 June: `A population of very young Brown Dwarfs
in Orion.'

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Theoretical Chemistry Group Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the New
Chemistry Laboratory Seminar Room.

For details of the S.F. Boys—A. Rahman Lecture (29 April), and
the RSC symposium on 10 May, see `Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
Laboratory' below.

Convener: M.S. Child, MA, Coulson Professor of
Theoretical Chemistry.

PROFESSOR P.A. MADDEN

3 May: `Vibrational motion in network-forming
liquids and glasses.'

DR S.T. BRAMWELL, UCL

17 May: `Spin ice versus the Third Law—does
Ho2Ti207 violate Ernst's postulate?'

PROFESSOR M. ROBERTS, Warwick

24 May: `Relative equilibria and spectra of
molecules.'

DR A. ALAVI, Belfast

31 May: `Ab initio studies of
surface–catalytic reactions.'

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Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory

The following seminars will be held in the Lecture Theatre, the
Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory. Unless otherwise
indicated, they will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Mondays.

DR M. MONS, CEA, Saclay

26 Apr.: `Hydrogen-bonded complexes of jet-cooled
organic molecules with water: structure and energies.'

PROFESSOR A. KUPPERMAN, CalTech

Thur. 29 Apr.: `The effect of the geometric phase
on simple chemical reactions.' (S.F. Boys—A. Rahman
Lecture
)

DR M. SPIRK, Cambridge

3 May: `First principles determination of pH and
pKa of aqueous acidic solutions.'

PROFESSOR R.S. CURL, Rice University

10 May, 2.05 p.m.: `Tunable infra-red laser
spectroscopy.' (RSC Centenary Lecture)

DR F. TEMPS, Kiel

10 May, 3.05 p.m.: `The interaction between
spectroscopy and kinetics: unimolecular reactions.'

DR J.M.C. PLANE, East Anglia

10 May, 4.15 p.m.: `Laser spectroscopy in the
Earth's upper atmosphere.'

DR P.B. DAVIES, Cambridge

10 May, 4.55 p.m.: `Infra-red laser spectroscopy of
new transient molecules containing phosphorus.'

PROFESSOR J.P. SIMONS

17 May: ` "Getting into shape":
conformational landscapes and supramolecular structures.'

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Dyson Perrins Laboratory: seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4 p.m. on Thursdays, unless
otherwise stated. Anyone wishing to have any further information or
to meet any of the speakers should contact George Fleet (e-mail:
george.fleet@chem.ox.ac.uk).

PROFESSOR S. GIBSON, King's College, London

29 Apr.: `Harnessing organometallic
reactivity—progress and plans.' (Lancaster Synthesis
Lecture
)

PROFESSOR A. FURSTNER, Max-Planck Institut für Kohlenforschung,
Mülheim

6 May: `New entries into heterocyclic natural
products.' (Merck Lecture)

DR D. BROWN, Glaxo Wellcome

13 May: `New technological innovation in medicinal
chemistry—implications for training chemists.'

PROFESSOR J. SUTHERLAND, Manchester

20 May: `Studies on the chemical predisposition of
nucleic acids and coded peptides.'

PROFESSOR C. SCHOFIELD

Wed. 26 May: `Studies on the stereoelectronics of
enzyme catalysis and inhibition.'

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PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the
Lecture Theatre, the Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics.

Convener: K.E. Davies, MA, D.Phil., Dr Lee's Professor of
Anatomy.

DR A. KING

30 Apr.: `Plasticity in the neural circuits
responsible for auditory localisation.'

DR D. SATTELLE, Cambridge

7 May: `Molecular and functional diversity in the
nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene family.'

PROFESSOR M. ESIRI

14 May: `Cerebrovascular disease and its
interaction with Alzeheimer's disease in the production of
dementia.'

PROFESSOR R. OLVER, Dundee

21 May: `Foetal lung liquid as a physiological
determinant of lung morphogenesis.' (Jenkinson
Seminar
)

PROFESSOR A. BJÖRKLUND, Lund, Sweden

28 May: `Cell transplantation in Parkinson's
disease: current status and future perspectives.'

PROFESSOR J. JACK

4 June: `Quantal excitatory transmission:
neuromuscular junction and central synapses compared.'

PROFESSOR W. HARRIS, Cambridge

11 June: `Are cell division and cell fate coupled
in the Xenopus retina?' (Jenkinson
Seminar
)

PROFESSOR M. BATE, Cambridge

18 June: `Embryonic behaviour in
Drosophila: assembling the moving
parts.'

(Jenkinson Seminar)

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Pharmacology and Anatomical Neuropharmacology Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
Lecture Theatre, the Department of Pharmacology.

PROFESSOR N.J. PROUDFOOT

27 Apr.: `Ending the message from mammalian
genes.'

DR E.P. SEWARD, Bristol

4 May: `Modulation of the Ca2+ regulated exocytosis
by heterotrimetic G protein coupled receptors.'

PROFESSOR G. HENDERSON, Bristol

11 May: to be announced.

DR P. EMSON, Cambridge

18 May: `Calbindin: a memorable protein.'

PROFESSOR C. WILSON, Tennessee

25 May: `Convergence and divergence of
corticostriatal connections: implications for information
processing.'

PROFESSOR I. WILLIAMS, Bath

1 June: `Chronic hypoxia and lung reactivity.'

PROFESSOR D. FITZGERALD, Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Royal
College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin

8 June: `Cyclo-oxygenase-2: good cop, bad cop.'

PROFESSOR A. DOLPHIN, University College, London

15 June: `Neuronal voltage gated calcium channels:
expression and G protein modulation.'

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PSYCHOLOGICAL STUDIES

Department of Experimental Psychology

The following departmental seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on
Tuesdays in the Weiskrantz Room (Room C.113), the Department of
Experimental Psychology.

Conveners: S.D. Iversen, MA, Professor of Psychology, and
P.E. Bryant, MA, Watts Professor of Psychology.

DR S. DAKIN, Institute of Ophthalmology, London

27 Apr.: `Visual coding of word shape.'
(McDonnell-Pew Seminar)

PROFESSOR B. HOOD, Bristol

4 May: `Naive physics in preschool children.'

PROFESSOR S. HAMPSON, Surrey

18 May: `Inconsistencies in personality
descriptions.'

PROFESSOR R. PASSINGHAM

25 May: `How can visual cues influence action?
Brain imaging studies.'

PROFESSOR M. SIEGAL, Sheffield

1 June: `Where to look ahead for cognitive
development.'

DR J. WILLIAMS, OPTIMA Project

8 June: `Attention in schizophrenia: see the
revolution of the times.'

DR F. SPENSLEY

15 June: `The development of flexibility in
children's drawing.'

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SOCIAL STUDIES

DR P. NIVOLA, Senior Fellow, the Brookings Institution, will lecture
at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 28 April, in the Chester Room, Nuffield
College.

Convener: B.E. Shafer, MA, Mellon Professor of American
Government, and C.O. Jones, MA, Olin Professor of American
Government.

Subject: `Laws of the landscape: how public policies
shape cities in Europe and America.'

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Evidence-based practice

The following seminars will take place at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
Lecture Room, the Department of Applied Social Studies and Social
Research.

Convener: B.L. Hudson, MA, University Lecturer in Applied
Social Studies.

PROFESSOR G. MACDONALD, Bristol

27 Apr.: `The trouble with research.'

PROFESSOR P. RAYNOR, Swansea

4 May: `Evidence-based probation: can it be
done?'

PROFESSOR B. SHELDON, University of Exeter

11 May: `Evidence-based social services.'

PROFESSOR E. GAMBRILL, Berkeley

18 May: `Evidence-based social work in the
USA—conspicuous by its absence.'

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Political philosophy

The following seminars will be given on Tuesdays. With the exception
of the 25 May meeting, they will be held at 5 p.m. in the Wharton
Room, All Souls College.

The 25 May meeting will be held at 8.30 p.m. in Harris Manchester
College. Those wishing to attend are asked to note that seating will
be limited.

Conveners: Professor G.A. Cohen, Dr C. Fabre, and Mr T.
Davidson.

M. OTSUKA, London

27 Apr.: `Political society as a voluntary
association.' (Paper available from the Social Studies
library, and should be read prior to the seminar
)

D. MILLER

4 May: `National self-determination and global
justice.'

A. KELLY, Cambridge

11 May: `What is history? Herzen v.
Turgenev.'

K. GRAHAM, Bristol

18 May: `Collective identification.'

A. SEN, Cambridge

25 May: `Rights, duties, and consequences.'

B. WILLIAMS

1 June: to be announced.

A. WILLIAMS, Warwick

8 June: `Egalitarian justice and personal
responsibility.'

PROFESSOR COHEN

15 June: `Against constructivism.'

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THEOLOGY

Religion in Russia and Romania

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Thursdays in the
Keston Institute, 4 Park Town.

Convener: K.T. Ware, MA, D.Phil., Spalding Lecturer in
Eastern Orthodox Studies.

DR P. WALTERS, Keston Institute

29 Apr.: `Antisemitism in Russia.'

FR. PAISY, St Sergius Lavra, Russian

13 May: `Power and weakness in the Russian Orthodox
Church.'

N. SALUKHOVA, Smolensk, Russia

27 May: `Christian education in Russia.'

R. NOVACOVSCHI, OTEP Scholar, Romania

10 June: `Contemporary Orthodox–Greek Catholic
relations in Romania.'

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Ethical issues in the study of religions

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Blue
Boar Seminar Room, Christ Church.

Conveners: J.S.K. Ward, B.Litt., MA, Regius Professor of
Divinity, and W.M. Morgan, MA, Lecturer in World Religions, Mansfield
College and Westminster College.

DR W. JOHNSON, Cardiff

27 Apr.: `Are Jaina ethics really universal?'

DR J. MICHOT, Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies

4 May: `Creation and ethics: the role of the
Prophet.'

DR L. WOODHEAD, Lancaster

11 May: `Diana and the new humanitarianism.'

DR D. KEOWN, Goldsmiths' College, University of London

18 May: `Buddhism and euthanasia.'

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Ian Ramsey Centre

Seminars in Science and Theology

The following seminars will be held at 8.15 for 8.30 p.m. on
Thursdays in the Hood Room, St Cross College.

PROFESSOR D. BARTHOLOMEW, FBA, formerly Professor Statistics, LSE

6 May: `Misplaced certainty in science and
religion.'

DR A. PEACOCKE, Director, Ramsey Centre

20 May: `Science and the future of theology: some
critical issues.'

PROFESSOR O. O'DONOVAN

3 June: `Creation.'

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ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM

William Cohn Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR R.W. BAGLEY, Princeton, will deliver the William Cohn
Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 5 May, in the Headley
Lecture Theatre, the Ashmolean Museum.

Subject: `Bells, scales, and pitch standards: the
archaeology of music in ancient China.'

Public lecture

LORD ROTHSCHILD will lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 4 May, in the
Taylor Institution Lecture Theatre. Admission is free.

Subject: `The creation of Waddesdon.'

Other lectures

The following lectures will be given at 6.30 p.m. on Wednesdays in
the Ashmolean Museum. Admission is free.

DR C. BROWN

30 June: `Dutch and Flemish paintings in the
Ashmolean.'

DR R. MOOREY

7 July: `Archaeological approaches to the Bible in
the Ashmolean.'

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DONALD BADEN-POWELL QUATERNARY RESEARCH
CENTRE

The following research seminars will be held at 4 p.m. on Mondays at
60 Banbury Road.

DR SARAH MILLIKEN

3 May: `The earliest occupation of Italy: the long
chronology revisited.'

PROFESSOR NICHOLAS ROLLAND, University of Victoria

10 May: `The Lower Palaeolithic peopling of Europe
within the framework of Eurasia: a survey of the anthropic
record and issues in a biogeographic and palaeoecological
perspective.'

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BODLEIAN LIBRARY


Oxford Seminars in Cartography

ROSE MITCHELL, Public Record Office, will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on
Thursday, 6 May, in the School of Geography.

Subject: `Contention the mother of invention: early maps
of England in the Public Record Office.'

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SAID BUSINESS SCHOOL

Interdepartmental Finance Seminars

The following seminars will be held in the Seminar Room, the Said
Business School, the Radcliffe Infirmary. Unless otherwise indicated,
they will take place at 12.30 p.m. on Fridays. Further information
may be obtained from Elaine Durham, the Said Business School, 59
George Street, Oxford OX1 2BE (telephone: Oxford (2)88650, e-mail:
elaine.durham@sbs.ox.ac.uk).

Conveners: Clara Raposo (Said Business School), Hyun Shin
(Economics), and Paul Wilmott (Mathematics).

B. LAMBRECHT, Judge Institute

30 Apr.: `The impact of dept financing on entry and
exit in duopoly.'

J. JACKWERTH, London Business School

7 May, 3 p.m.: `Recovering stochastic processes
from option prices.'

CHENGGANG XU, LSE

14 May: Financial institutions, technological
innovation, and economic growth.'

P. MELLA-BARRAL, LSE

21 May: `Corporate walk-out decisions and the value
of default.'

P. GOMPERS

Thur. 27 May, 5 p.m.: `An analysis of executive
compensation, ownership, and control in closely held firms.'

Z. FLUCK, Stern School of Business

28 May: to be announced.

D. CHAPMAN, Texas

4 June: `The costs of portfolio constraints.'

J. DOW, London Business School

11 June: `The cost of debt for a financial
firm.'

J. EDWARDS, Cambridge

18 June: `Ownership concentrationn and share
valuation in Germany.'

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Conference on financial instability

This conference will be held on 9–10 July in Oxford. It is
organised by the Oxford Financial Research Centre (the University's
newly-established research centre in finance), the Oxford
Review of Economic Policy
, and the European Commission
Training and Mobility of Researchers Network in Financial Markets.

Papers will be given on: the theory of financial crashes; credit
risks; lessons from previous crises; links between financial markets
and the real economy; international policy towards financial
instability; the regulation of financial markets, and experience from
different markets, including the Far East and Scandinavia.

A limited number of places is available. Those interested in
attending should contact Elaine Durham, the Said Business School, 59
George Street, Oxford OX1 2BE (telephone: Oxford (2)88650, e-mail:
elaine.durham@sbs.ox.ac.uk), by 28 May.

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BYZANTINE STUDIES

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the New
Seminar Room, St John's College.

Conveners: E.M. Jeffreys, B.Litt., MA, Bywater and
Sotheby Professor of Byzantine and Modern Greek Language and
Literature, J.D. Howard-Johnston, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in
Byzantine Studies, and M.C. Mundell Mango, MA, D.Phil., University
Lecturer in Byzantine Archaeology and Art.

C. HOLMES, Cambridge

27 Apr.: `Basil II and the
"powerful".'

A MCCABE

4 May
: `A Byzantine bestiary.'

DR A. PALAU

11 May: `Cataloguing the Greek manuscripts in the
Meerman collection in the Bodleian.'

DR S. FRANKLIN, Cambridge

18 May: `Describing writing.'

DR I. KEHRBERG, Jordan

25 May: `Work and play at Jerash. The hippodrome
site as a mirror of city life between the second and the seventh
centuries AD.'

P. FRANKOPAN

1 June: `The Alexiad.'

DR R. WEBB, Princeton

8 June: `Aesthetics of sacred space: narrative,
metaphor, and motion in ekphraseis of church buildings.'

PROFESSOR M. MULLETT, Belfast

15 June: `The Life of Cyril of
Phileotes
by Nicholas Kataskepenos: a study in
hagiographical ossification.'

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INSTITUTE FOR CHINESE STUDIES

Chinese Philosophy Symposia

This meeting, organised by the Centre for Modern Chinese Studies and
the Philosophy Summer School in China (China, Britain, Australia),
will be held on Tuesday, 4 May, and Wednesday, 5 May, in Room 207
(Shaw Room), the Institute for Chinese Studies.

Tuesday, 4 May

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR J. TAO, City University of Hong Kong

4.30 p.m.: `Two perspectives of care: Confucianism
and feminism.' (Response: Dr P. Casal, Keele)

PROFESSOR CHAN WING MING, Hong Kong Baptist University

5.50 p.m.: `The impact of Nietzsche in China.'
(Response: Dr N. Bunin)

Wednesday, 5 May

PROFESSOR XU YOUYU, Institute of Philosophy, CASS

4.30 p.m.: `Liberalism in China.' (Response:
Dr Lin Chun, LSE
)

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR WEI XIAOPING, People's University of China

5.50 p.m.: `Theories of market socialism.'
(Response: S. Olsaretti)

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COMPUTING LABORATORY

PROFESSOR R.M. KARP, University of Washington, will lecture at 4.30
p.m. on Tuesday, 27 April, in the Computing Laboratory.

Subject: `Computation as a tool for understanding
genomes.'

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DEPARTMENT FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

The transmission of knowledge in the digital environment

This workshop will be held in the Pavilion, the Department for
Continuing Education, on Thursday, 13 May, and Friday, 14 May. The
meeting will be chaired by Dr Javier Diaz Noci, Visiting Basque
Fellow, St Antony's College.

Members of the University and public are welcome to attend. There
will be limited availability for lunch on the two days; those wishing
to be added to the list should contact Dr Sandra Ott (telephone:
Oxford (2)70375).

The morning and afternoon sessions on both days will conclude with a
period of discussion.

Further information about the workshop can be obtained from Dr Noci
(telephone: (2)74473).

Thursday, 13 May

DR NOCI

9.30 a.m.: Introduction.

J. ANELAY and C. MCKEE, solicitors, University of Oxford

10 a.m.: `The protection of copyright of digital
material in the common law.'

DR I. HERNANDO, University of the Basque Country, Spain

11 a.m.: `Authors' rights in cyberspace: the
Continental point of view.'

J. DARBY, Department for Continuing Education

2 p.m.: `Access to education via the Internet.'

DR A. ALONSO, University of Caceres, Spain; Basque Studies Society,
Spain

3 p.m.: `Universities, education, and values for
the Internet era.'

Friday, 14 May

T. LIPINSKI, Bodleian Library

10.30 a.m.: `Ye olde digitised papers.'

S. LEE, Centre for the Humanities

11.15 a.m.: `Scoping the future of Oxford's
digitised collections.'

PROFESSOR D. LOPERENA, University of the Basque Country, Basque
Studies Society

2.15 p.m.: `Teaching law on the Internet.'

DR NOCI

3 p.m.: `Electronic books, journals, and newspapers
on the Internet.'

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CENTRE FOR CRIMINOLOGICAL RESEARCH

The following seminars will take place at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
Old Library, All Souls College.

Convener: R.G. Hood, MA, DCL, Professor of
Criminology.

LORD WARNER OF BROCKLEY, Chairman, Youth Justice Board for England
and Wales

28 Apr.: `Changing youth justice.'

PROFESSOR R. SPARKS, Keele

5 May: `Children's notions of justice.'

DR L.A. CURTIS, President, Milton S. Eisenhower Foundation,
Washington, DC

12 May: `Locked in the poorhouse: cities, race, and
poverty in the United States.'

PROFESSOR A. VON HIRSCH, Cambridge

19 May: `Just desserts for juveniles?'

DR C. HOYLE and DR R. YOUNG

26 May: `Restorative justice as practised by the
police in the Thames Valley: preliminary research findings.'

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CENTRE FOR EUROPEAN POLITICS, ECONOMICS,
AND SOCIETY

The coherence of the EU as a polity

A workshop in this series will be held on Friday, 30 April, 2–5
p.m., in the Seminar Room, Nuffield College. All are welcome.

Further information is available from Jane Wyatt, Social
Studies Faculty, and from the Centre's Web site,
http://www.ssfc.ox.ac.uk/cepes/Seminar.html.

Convener: J. Richardson, Director of the Centre.

A. HERITIER, Max Planck Institute, Bonn, and European University
Institute, Florence

2 p.m.: `General interest services in the European
Union.'

M. SMITH, Loughborough

3.30 p.m.: `European Union commercial policy:
between coherence and fragmentation.'

Note: the seminars advertised for 7 May (Pollack) and 14
May (Stone Sweet) have been postponed to Michaelmas Term.

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OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC STUDIES

History, culture, and politics of the Islamic world; Islamic art
and architecture

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies.

Conveners: Dr F.A. Nizami and Dr J. Piscatori.

DR A. MOUSTAFA

28 Apr.: `The science of Arabic calligraphy.'

A. DUNCAN, World of Islam Trust

5 May: `The noble sanctuary: a photographic
appreciation of Haram al-Sharif in Jerusalem.'

PROFESSOR A. SCHIMMEL, Harvard

12 May: `The importance of Arabic calligraphy for
Islamic culture.'

DR R. KANA'AN

19 May: `Carved in stone: Waqf architecture and the
formation of power in Ottoman Bilad al-Sham.'

DR E. ATIL, Smithsonian Institute, Washington

2 June: `Levhi and the surname: the story of an
eighteenth-century Ottoman festival.'

DR P. DONCEEL-VOÛTE, Louvain

9 June: `The Umayyad Palace of Jericho: the wealth
and arts of Khirbet al-Mafjar.'

DR K. AZZAM, Prince of Wales Institute of Architecture

16 June: `Sacred principles of Islamic art.'

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MAISON FRANÇAISE

Grenoble et sa région

The following lectures, marking ten years of Oxford–Grenoble
town twinning, will be given in the Maison Française. They
will be held at 6 p.m. on Tuesdays, with the exception of the meeting
to be held at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, 19 May.

Enquiries should be directed to the Maison Française
(telephone: Oxford (2)74220, e-mail: maison@sable.ox.ac.uk).

R. COOPER

27 Apr.: `Renaissance Grenoble.'

J. WHITELEY

11 May: `Daubigny et le Dauphiné.'

G. SAEZ, Directeur du CERAT, IEP, Grenoble

18 May: `Le gouvernement local en France
aujourd'hui.'

A. JEFFERSON

19 May: `Stendhal's emotional geography.'
(Lecture in English, with texts read in French by Nicole
Gore
)

PROFESSOR R. FOX

25 May: `White coal and dreaming spires: strategies
for science in Grenoble and Oxford, 1800–1940.'

J. SGARD, Université Stendhal–Grenoble III

1 June: `Stendhal, Berlioz, et le paysage
grenoblois.'

P. FRAPPAT, Université Stendhal

8 June: `Grenoble, métropole des sciences.'

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Science and the new century: Britain, France, and Germany,
c. 1900

The following seminars will take place at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the
History of Science and Technology Seminar Room, the Modern History
Faculty Building.

Conveners: Professor R. Fox and Dr N. Jas.

PROFESSOR C. MEINEL, Regensburg

29 Apr.: `Association as mediators: the
state–science–industry relationship in German
chemistry, 1870–1914.'

DR J. HARWOOD, Manchester

6 May: `An institutional landscape in transition:
German science c.1900.'

DR A. RASMUSSEN, Ministère de la Défense, Paris

13 May: `A small world? The forms, spaces, and
languages of international science in 1900.'

DR G. GOODAY, Leeds

27 May: `Measurement at distance: the troubled
world of laboratories and meters 1880–1900.'

DR M. LETTÉ, EHESS, Paris

3 June: `The Society of Arts and its French
counterpart: approaches to the organisation of science and
industrial research, 1880–1914.'

DR MIWAO MATSUMOTO, Tokyo

10 June: `The Royal Navy's role in British
R.&D.: "spin-on" and "spin-off" in a
laissez-faire state.'

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Other lectures

F. POUILLON, Directeur d'Études à l'École des
Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris, will lecture at 5
p.m. on Monday, 26 April, in the Maison Française.

Subject: `Mirrors within mirrors: 150 years of Algerian
painting.'


G. HOWARD, writer, will lecture at 5.15 p.m. on Tuesday, 4 May, in
the Maison Française.

Subject: `The next time you see Paris.'


D. FOUGEYROLLAS-SCHWEBEL, CNRS-Paris-Dauphine, and S. CONDON, INED,
Paris, will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 6 May, in the
Maison Française. The meeting will be chaired by Cathie Lloyd,
Director, Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women, Queen
Elizabeth House.

Subject: `Surveys of violence against women in France:
presentation of the problematic of a quantitative approach.'

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Besterman Lecture

J.-P. DE BEAUMARCHAIS, Rouen, will deliver the Besterman Lecture at 5
p.m. on Monday, 10 May, in the Taylor Institution. The meeting will
be chaired by the Chancellor.

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Other meetings

Unless otherwise indicated, the following meetings, with various
speakers, will be held at the Maison Française.

Fri. 30 Apr., 10 a.m.–6.30 p.m., International Study
Day
: `Is there a European "Third Way"?' (research
programme: `Culture et sociétés: comportements
politiques').

Mon. 10 May, 8 p.m., soirée to mark the bicentenary
of the death of Beaumarchais (with the Voltaire
Foundation)
: `Main droite, main gauche', a dialogue between
Beaumarchais and Voltaire by J.-P. de Beaumarchais, created by
M. Favier and P. Vion.

Sat. 15 May, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.: `Durkheim and the
Durkheimians and the arts at the turn of the nineteenth century'
(British Centre for Durkheimian Studies Study Day I).

Sat. 22 May, 10 a.m.–4.30 p.m.: `Ludwik Fleck,
1896–1961: virologist, survivor, and philosopher'
(International History of Science Study Day).

Sat. 29 May, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.: `Responses to Mauss'
thesis on prayer' (British Centre for Durkheimian Studies Study
Day II).

Sat. 5 June and Sun. 6 June, 9.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m.:
`Regards croisés sur le cinéma brittanique'
(Franco-British colloquium on British cinema).

Thur. 17 June, 10 a.m.–4 p.m., Association for the
Study of Modern and Contemporary France study-day
: `A
propos de Proust' (telephone for information and bookings:
Oxford (2)74220).

Sat. 19 June, 9.30 a.m.–6 p.m., St Hugh's College,
Translation Research in Oxford study-day
: `Traduire la
contrainte' (information from Edith McMorran, St Hugh's;
telephone: Oxford (2)74996, e-mail: maison@sable.ox.ac.uk).

Fri. 25 June and Sat. 26 June: `Rousseau et
l'exclusion' (Maison Française/CNRS-Paris V colloquium).

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QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

South Asia Day

This meeting will be held on Thursday, 27 May, in the Library Wing
Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

Convener: Dr Nandini Gooptu.

M. RAO, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi

11 a.m.: `The Quinacrine sterilisation scandal in
India: some issues.'

M. DAGA, Sussex

12 noon: `From Jati to Rashtra: changing
vocabularies of nationhood in the discourse of Hindi publicists,
1870s–1920s.'

M. HUSSAIN, Gauhati University

2 p.m.: `The Bengalis in Assam and the crisis of
Asamiya national identity.'

M. BASHIR, SDPI

3 p.m.: `The sufi message: its relevance to
sustainable development.'

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Secularism, communalism, and the politics and identity of lower
castes and minorities in India

This one-day workshop will be held on Wednesday, 12 May, in the
Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

The meeting will end with a general discussion at 5.30 p.m. The chair
and chief discussant will be M.S.S. Pandian, Madras Institute of
Development Studies.

Convener: Dr Nandini Gooptu.

R. ARCHER

10 a.m.: `American communalism and Indian
secularism: religion and politics in India and the west.'

R. BAJPAL

11.15 a.m.: `Justifying minority rights in India:
political debates, 1946–86.'

A. MCMILLAN

12.15 p.m.: `Voting in reserved constituencies.'

J. LERCHE, SOAS, London

2.15 p.m.: `Low caste politics in UP: countryside
populism in prosperous times.'

M. SHARMA, Delhi University

3.15 p.m.: `The untouchable present: everyday life
of Musahars in north Bihar.'

J. SHARMA, Cambridge

4.30 p.m.: `Caste politics for urban space amongst
municipal sweepers in New Delhi.'

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Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women

Audrey Richards Commemorative Lecture 1999

DR M. LEACH, Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex,
will deliver the Audrey Richards Commemorative Lecture at 5 p.m. on
Wednesday, 28 April, in the Taylor Institution.

Further details may be obtained from the Centre (telephone: Oxford
(2)73644, fax: (2)73607, e-mail: cccrw@qeh.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `New shapes to shift: war, parks, and the
hunting persona in modern West Africa.'

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Gender and health: healers, carers, and patients

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the
Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

Conveners: Dr Lidia Sciama and Dr Helen Callaway. For
further information, telephone Oxford (2)73644.

DR V. SKULTANS, Bristol

29 Apr.: `Gender and illness narratives in Latvia.'

CHIKAKO OZAWA

6 May: `Gendered enlightenment? Ideology and
practice in a Japanese indigenous psychotherapeutic movement.'

DR R. BARBER

13 May: `Nursing: a gendered profession.'

DR K. LARSEN, Agricultural University of Norway

20 May: `Women with spirits and women without:
perceptions of health and illness in Zanzibar.'

DR S. ROZARIO, Newcastle, Australia

27 May: `Why is childbirth polluting? Bengali
chodi versus Tibetan drib.'

DR P. VITEBSKY, Scott Polar Research Institute, Cambridge

3 June: `Female shamans as facilitators of long-
term psychotherapy in tribal India.'

J. BROWNFOOT, London

10 June: `Caring for dementia patients: voices from
three ethnic minority groups in a London borough.'

DR M. JASCHOK

17 June: `Possessed by a goddess: ethnographic
notes from encounters with a ritual healer from Shaanxhi,
China.'

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WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE

History of tropical medicine and infectious diseases

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Mondays in the
Wellcome Unit.

Conveners: M.J. Dobson, MA, D.Phil., Acting Director, M.
Malowany (Ph.D. McGill), Research Officer, and N.L. Stepan, MA,
Senior Research Fellow, the Wellcome Unit.

B. GREENWOOD, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

26 Apr.: `History of meningitis in Africa.'

F. GLYN DAVIES

3 May: `History of an epizootic disease in Africa:
Rift Valley Fever.'

C. ABELS, University College, London

10 May: `Public health in Latin America: 1900 and
the new millennium.'

J. ILIFFE, Cambridge

17 May: `East African doctors.'

D. ARNOLD, School of Oriental and African Studies

24 May: `Social context of malaria in late colonial
India.'

M. VAUGHAN

31 May: `Smallpox, slavery, and revolution: 1792 in
þle de France (Mauritius).'

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BRASENOSE COLLEGE


Tanner Lectures on Human Values 1999

Representation: democratic theory and social surveys

PROFESSOR S. VERBA, Department of Government, Harvard University,
will deliver the Tanner Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following days in
the Examination Schools.

Mon. 10 May: : `Social theory and social science:
two cultures?'


Tue. 11 May: `Citizens in democracies and
democratic citizens.'

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EXETER COLLEGE


Marett Memorial Lecture 1999

PROFESSOR M. GOODMAN will deliver the Marett Memorial Lecture at 5
p.m. on Friday, 30 April, in the Saskatchewan Lecture Room, Exeter
College.

Subject: `Explaining religious change.'

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GREEN COLLEGE

Computation, medicine, and mind

The following lectures will be held at 6 p.m. on Thursdays in the
Lecture Theatre, the Computing Laboratory, the Wolfson Building,
Parks Road.

PROFESSOR D. NOBLE

13 May: `Building virtual bodies on
supercomputers.'

PROFESSOR M. BRADY

20 May: `Robotics meets medicine: understanding
breast cancer images.'

SIR ANDREW HUXLEY, Cambridge

27 May: `Computing the action potential: the early
days.'

SIR ROGER PENROSE

3 June: `Is there more to the mind than
computing?'

PROFESSOR D. MICHIE, Edinburgh

10 June: `Alan Turing's "Child Machine"
project.'

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KEBLE COLLEGE


Eric Symes Abbott Memorial Lecture

THE RT. HON. DAME ELIZABETH BUTLER-SLOSS will deliver the Eric Symes
Abbott Memorial Lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Friday, 7 May, in the chapel,
Keble College.

Subject: `Who is to judge? The role of the judiciary
in ethical issues.'

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LADY MARGARET HALL

Canada Seminars

MR DON MURRAY, Senior Correspondent, CBC, and MS ANN MACMILLAN,
London Correspondent, CBC, will give a seminar at 5.15 p.m. on
Thursday, 29 April, in Lady Margaret Hall. There will be an
opportunity to meet the speakers informally afterwards over drinks.
All are welcome. Further information may be obtained from Elizabeth
Jubb (telephone: Oxford (2)74302, e-mail: liz.jubb@lmh.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `Are Canadians interested in Abroad?'

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MAGDALEN COLLEGE


Waynflete Lectures

Seminal events in the evolutionary history of plants

PROFESSOR N. FRIEDMAN, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado,
USA, will deliver the Waynflete Lectures at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in
the Grove Auditorium, Magdalen College.

28 Apr.: `The study of evolutionary history:
insights from Queen Victoria.'

5 May: `The origin of photosynthesis and how Earth
turned green.'

12 May: `The colonisation of land and the origin of
organismic complexity.'

19 May: `The origin of flowering plants: an examination
of Darwin's "abominable mystery".'

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MANSFIELD COLLEGE

Celebration of the 400th anniversary of the birth of Oliver
Cromwell

PROFESSOR J. MORRILL, FBA, Vice-Master, Selwyn College, Cambridge,
will lecture at 5.45 p.m. on Sunday, 25 April, in the chapel,
Mansfield College. The lecture will be open to all members of the
University and to the public.

Subject: `Oliver Cromwell and godly Englishmen.'

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ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

Empire, race, and culture

The following seminars, sponsored by the African Studies Seminar of
St Antony's College, and the Humanities Research Centre, Oxford
Brookes University, will be held at 5 p.m. (unless indicated
otherwise) on Wednesdays. The first two meetings will be held in the
Humanities Research Centre, Oxford Brookes University; the remaining
meetings will be held in the Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's
College.

Conveners: W. Beinart, A. Jackson, D. Lowry, and J.
Ryan.

A. JACKSON

28 Apr., 8 p.m.: `Race and empire: colonial troops
in an imperial army.'

K. FLINT

5 May: `Images of Native Americans in British
literature.'

E. BOEHMER, Leeds

12 May: `Anthologising colonial literature.'

N. LEYS STEPAN, Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine

19 May: `Images of disease in early twentieth-
century Brazil.'

M. CHAMBERLAIN, Oxford Brookes

26 May: `Narratives of Caribbean migration.'

J. RYAN

2 June: `Exposing darkness: photography, missionary
activity, and the Congo Free State.'

E. EDWARDS

9 June: `Professor Huxley and the Colonial Office:
photography and the races of the empire.'

H. CALLAWAY

16 June: `Institutional racism? Flora Shaw's
journalism promoting the Empire.'

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Workshop: the Mandela campaigns

This one-day workshop will be held on Saturday, 1 May, 10.30
a.m–4 p.m., in the Fellows' Dining Room, St Antony's College.
Speakers will include Mary Benson, Rusty Bernstein, Anthony Sampson,
Mike Terry, Alan Brooks, Clive Nelson, and Paul Brannen.

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African Studies Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays. Unless
otherwise indicated, they will take place in the Fellows' Dining
Room, St Antony's College.

For details of Professor Beinart's inaugural lecture (6 May), see the
beginning of the `Lectures' section.

A day conference of the Britain–Zimbabwe Society will be held on
Saturday, 12 June, in St Antony's College. Details may be obtained
from David Maxwell, Department of History, Keele University
(telephone: 01782 583197, e-mail: hia00@cc.keele.ac.uk).

Conveners: Professor W. Beinart, J. McGregor.

D. GILFOYLE and D. NELL

29 Apr.: `Wildlife conservation and game farming in
the Cape.'

T. MKANDAWIRE, Director, UNRISD, Geneva

13 May, Lincoln College: `Thinking aobut
developmental states in Africa.' (Annual African Studies
Lecture
)

D. PANKHURST, Bradford

20 May: `Thinking the impossible—land reform
in Namibia.'

K. MIDDLETON

27 May, Middle East Centre, 68 Woodstock Road:
`French colonial power and prickly pear in Madagascar.'

S. ELLIS, Leiden

3 June: `The natural environment and the economics
of war in Liberia.'

D. BROCKINGTON, Cambridge

10 June: `The creation and maintenance of
biodiversity at Mkomazi Game Reserve, Tanzania.'

Either R. GROVE, Australian National University,
or J. MCGREGOR, Reading

17 June, Middle East Centre, 68 Woodstock Road: to
be announced.

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European Studies Centre

Italian history and politics in the twentieth century

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the
European Studies Centre, 70 Woodstock Road.

Conveners: Dr Ilaria Favretto and Professor David
Hine.

PROFESSOR D. SASSOON, Queen Mary and Westfield College, London

26 Apr.: `Some reflections on mass culture in
Italy.'

DR FAVRETTO

3 May: `Italian socialism: another Italian
"anomaly"?'

DR S. GUNDLE, Royal Holloway College, London

10 May: `Beauty contests and political conflict in
postwar Italy.'

DR J. FOOT, University College, London

17 May: `Immigration and the city: Milan and mass
migration, 1950–99.'

PROFESSOR D. MACK SMITH

24 May: `Fascism and historiography from De
Felice.'

DR M. GILBERT, Bath

31 May: `An Italian revolution? Reflections upon
the political transition in Italy 1989–90.'

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Russian and East European Centre

Russian politics and society: Soviet and post-Soviet

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the
Lecture Theatre, the New Building, St Antony's College.

Conveners: Professor Archie Brown and Dr Stephen
Whitefield.

PROFESSOR G. BRESLAUER, Berkeley

26 Apr.: `Yel'tsin as Patriarch.'

PROFESSOR BROWN

3 May: `The study of Soviet politics and the
politics of Soviet studies in Britain.'

J. KAHN

10 May: `A federal façade: Russia's
republics in transition.'

PROFESSOR E. MICKIEWICZ, Duke University, North Carolina

17 May: `Russian television and Russian
viewers.'

DR A. OBOLONSKY, Institute of State and Law, Moscow

24 May: `How to create a modern bureaucracy for
modern Russia.'

PROFESSOR A. STEPAN

31 May: `Russian federalism in comparative
perspective.'

PROFESSOR SHUGO MINAGAWA, Hokkaido University

7 June: `Perspectives on Russian clientelism.'

T. TROXEL

14 June: `Parliamentary power in Russia,
1994–8.'

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Topics in Russian-Jewish history and culture

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
New Room, ground floor of the Hilda Besse Building, St Antony's
College.

A. BURGESS

28 Apr.: `From folk to modernity: Jewish artists in
Russia before the Holocaust.'

PROFESSOR C. ABRAMSKY

26 May: `Hebrew poetry in Russia, 1917–27.'

PROFESSOR J. KLIER

9 June: `The Russian pogroms of 1881–2:
decoding the discourse of violence.'

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ST CROSS COLLEGE


Visiting Fellow Lecture 1999

PROFESSOR DR H. RIKHOF, Catholic University of Utrecht, will deliver
the Visiting Fellow Lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 10 May, in the
Examination Schools.

Subject: `Changing perspectives: approaching the
Trinity.'

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ST JOHN'S COLLEGE

Ian Woolf Lecture

DR P. NURSE will deliver the Ian Woolf Lecture at 5.15 p.m. on
Friday, 7 May, in the Auditorium, St John's College.

Convener: Professor D. Kwiatkowski.

Subject: `Life and the reproduction of cells.'

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TRINITY COLLEGE


Richard Hillary Memorial Lecture 1999

SEBASTIAN FAULKS will deliver the Richard Hillary Memorial Lecture at
5 p.m. on Wednesday, 12 May, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the
St Cross Building.

Subject: `Something happened: how narrative helps
tell the time.'

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WESTMINSTER COLLEGE


Wesley and Methodist Studies Centre

Graduate seminars 1998–9

The following seminars will be held at 6.30 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
Church and International House, Westminster College.

S. VALENTINE

28 Apr.: `John Bennett.'

A. CHEATLE

26 May: `William Sangster.'

S. MANN

23 June: `John Fletcher and Christian perfection.'

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FRIENDS OF THE BODLEIAN

The following thirty-minute lectures will be given at 1 p.m. on the
days shown in the Cecil Jackson Room, the Sheldonian Theatre. All are
invited.

Sandwiches and wine will be served after the lectures at a cost of
£2.50 per person, for which bookings should be made in advance
with Mrs P.M. Sturgis, Membership Secretary, Friends of the Bodleian,
Bodleian Library, Oxford OX1 3BG (telephone: Oxford (2)77234).

DR F. WOOD

Wed. 5 May: `Did Marco Polo go to China?'

DR S. BENDALL

Tue. 8 June: `The mapping of college estates in
Tudor and Stuart Oxford.'

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FRIENDS OF THE PITT RIVERS MUSEUM

Beatrice Blackwood Lecture

DR J. RAWSON will deliver the Beatrice Blackwood Lecture, the annual
public lecture of the Friends of the Pitt Rivers Museum, at 7 p.m. on
Wednesday, 12 May, in the Inorganic Chemistry Lecture Theatre, South
Parks Road.

Subject: `Ancestral spirits and extraordinary deities:
religious change in ancient China.'

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OXFORD IMMUNOLOGY GROUP

PROFESSOR RICHARD FLAVELL, Yale University School of Medicine, will
give a seminar at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, 28 April, in the Sir William
Dunn School of Pathology. The meeting will be chaired by Dr Anton van
der Merwe.

Further details of the meetings of the Oxford Immunology Group can
be found at http://www.molbiol/OIG.

Subject: `The regulation of CD4 T-cell differentiation.'

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ACTION GROUP AT OXFORD ON TEACHING AND
LEARNING ENHANCED BY NEW TECHNOLOGY (OxTALENT)

Design and development of multimedia and the Web for teaching and
learning

PROFESSOR D.J.B. ROBEY, Reading, member of HEFCE's Teaching Quality
Enhancement Fund Committee, will be the guest presenter at a meeting
to be held at 11.30 a.m. on Friday, 14 May, in the Computing
Laboratory, Wolfson Building.

Subject: `Future national teaching and learning policies:
the role of IT.'


`How to...' series

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
Language Centre, 12 Woodstock Road. The aim of the presentations is
to demonstrate how information technology can be used to enhance
aspects of learning and teaching.

J. DEMPSTER, Warwick

12 May: `How to enhance learning through
technology: addressing the needs of a research-led university.'

D. WILKINSON, Oxford Brookes

19 May: `How to put lecture notes on the Web.'

B. KNURSHEED, Learning Technologist, TaLL

26 May: `How to develop an Internet-based course:
the Department for Continuing Education's Certificate Course in
Computing via the Internet.'

R. O'TOOLE, Information Technologist, TALL

2 June: `How to select and use Web-based tools for
on-line learning.'

P. JOYCE, Learning Technologist, TALL

9 June: `How to manage on-line course development.'

K. HARRISON, Chemistry

16 June: `How to create and use on-line tests.'

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 22 April 1999: Grants and Funding<br />

Grants and Research Funding


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or
recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



ARTS AND HUMANITIES RESEARCH BOARD RESEARCH
LEAVE SCHEME

1999–2000

The Arts and Humanities Research Board has announced details of a new round
of awards under its research leave scheme for academic staff in the
humanities. Awards are for one term, to be held during the year 2000.

Applications should be submitted through the college (for CUF and special
non-CUF lecturers); or through the University (for other university academic
staff). However, approval for all applications from academic staff holding joint
appointments must be obtained from the faculty board in question,
the General Board, and the college before they are forwarded to the AHRB.

Application forms and further details about the scheme are available from
senior tutors or from the appropriate faculty board secretaries. The academy's
closing date for the receipt of applications is 31 October.

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MODERN HISTORY


Grants from the Arnold, Bryce, and Read Funds

Grants may be made to assist in meeting travel, publication, and other
expenses incidental to the pursuit of a definitive piece of historical
investigation, to members of the University who are pursuing a course of full-
time study. Applications for support in the Long Vacation and Michaelmas Term
will be considered at the end of Trinity Term, and those for support in Hilary
and Trinity Terms at the end of Michaelmas or Hilary Terms as appropriate.
This does not apply to Ancient History, for which support may be obtained
from the Craven Committee.

Application forms may be obtained from the faculty's Graduate Secretary at
the address below.

Complete forms, together with a confidential recommendation from your
supervisor, should be returned to the Graduate Secretary by Friday of
seventh week of term preceding the vacation or term in which you will incur
the expenses. (Please ask your supervisor to hand you such a recommendation
in a sealed envelope, with the supervisor's signature across the flap.)

Applications from those reading BA courses will be considered only in the most
exceptional circumstances, and in the allocation of the monies available priority
will always be given to applications from those engaged in graduate research.

Applicants should note that retrospective applications cannot be entertained,
and also that students will be eligible for support from the above funds only
once in any one academic year.

Enquiries and applications should be addressed to Hubert M. Stadler, Graduate
Secretary, Modern History Faculty, Broad Street, Oxford OX1 3BD, who is
acting as Secretary to the Board of Management of the Arnold, Bryce, and
Read Funds.

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Bryce Research Studentship and Lothian
Studentship in History 1999

If suitable candidates present themselves, elections will be made to a Bryce
and Lothian Studentship with effect from Michaelmas Term 1999.

The studentships are tenable for one year, either at Oxford, or, with the
consent of the Board of Management, elsewhere. The maximum value of either
studentship will be £5,600—but any other emoluments accruing to the
student during the tenure of the studentship will be taken into account. The
Board of Management reserves the right to determine the value of any award
within the maximum in the light of all the circumstances.

Candidates must be members of the University who are pursuing research in
either Ancient or Modern History for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. By
the date on which they would take up the studentship, they must have been
admitted to, and not have lost subsequently, full D.Phil. status, but must
normally not have exceeded the tenth term since registration as graduate
students of the University.

Applications must include: (a) a brief statement of the academic
career, including attainments and qualifications; (b) a brief statement
on the programme of work in History (Ancient or Modern) which the candidate
proposes to undertake; (c) two confidential references (please ask
your referees to hand you their references in a sealed envelope, with their
signature across the flap); (d) a statement of any other emoluments
held or being applied for by the candidate.

While all applicants will be considered on their academic merits, sympathetic
consideration may be given to applicants who are advanced in their research,
and whose research would seriously suffer from an interruption through lack
of funding.

Applications, including the two sealed references (one set only, as the Board
of Management will consider each applicant for any of the awards in its gift),
should be received by Hubert M. Stadler, Graduate Secretary, Modern History
Faculty, Broad Street, Oxford OX1 3BD, no later than Friday, 11 June.

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RADHAKRISHNAN MEMORIAL BEQUEST

The trustees of the bequest may make small grants to students at Oxford who
are citizens of the Republic of India, and who, because of unexpected
difficulties, need financial assistance to complete the qualifications for which
they are registered. Grants will not normally be awarded to those near to the
beginning of their course of study. Application forms may be obtained from
Mrs A. Slater, the Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE. the closing
date for receipt of applications is Friday, 4 June.

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SASAKAWA FUND

Applications are invited for grants from the Sasakawa Fund, to be applied to
`the advancement within the University of knowledge and understanding of
Japan by way of academic contact and exchange between members of the
University and citizens of Japan'. Further details may be obtained from the
Mrs A. Slater, the Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE, to whom
applications should be returned by the end of the fourth week in each term.

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HAYTER FUND

Grants from the Hayter Fund are made to holders of established university
posts for travel and research purposes connected with the languages and the
economic, social, and political development of the following areas: the former
Soviet Union and eastern Europe, the Middle East, Africa, south Asia, east
Asia, and Latin America. Application forms and further details may be obtained
from Mrs A. Slater, the Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE. The
closing date for applications is the end of fifth week in each term.

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PETER LIENHARDT MEMORIAL FUND AND PHILIP
BAGBY BEQUEST

The Board of Management for these funds is considering making small grants
to applicants in the following categories: students registered for degrees at
the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology who need funds for research
purposes; and, from the Peter Lienhardt Memorial Fund only, other individuals
working in the field of social anthropology who wish to carry out some
particular project within the University. The terms of reference of the Philip
Bagby Bequest specify that grants from that fund must encourage the
comparative study of the development of urban, literate cultures in accordance
with anthropological principles and methods. Application forms may be obtained
from Mrs Alix Slater, the Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE, and
completed forms should be returned to her no later than 4 May.

Applicants are advised that the Board of Management is unlikely to be
able to meet commitments requiring expenditure before August 1999.

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UNIVERSITY OF TURKU, FINLAND


Travel grants

The University of Turku is offering two travel grants, of 3,000 Finnish Marks
each, for undergraduate or postgraduate studies at the University of Turku
in the 1999–2000 academic year. Attachments at the University of Turku
must last between three months and one academic year. Courses may be
followed in either English or Finnish, although preference will be given to
applicants who can follow instruction in Finnish. Postgraduate studies can
usually be pursued in English.

Application forms and further information are available from the International
Office (telephone: (2)70241). Applications should be submitted to the
International Office by 5 May. One application will be selected and sent to the
University of Turku for the final selection. Successful candidates will be
notified by 30 June.

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BRITISH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE IN GERMANY

The Scholarship Foundation of the British Chamber of Commerce in Germany
is offering a limited number of scholarships, of various amounts, for British
nationals studying at graduate or undergraduate level, who intend to study
at a German university for the 1999-2000 academic year.

Application forms are available from the British Chamber of Commerce in
Germany Foundation, Severinstrasse 60, D-50678 Cologne, Germany (telephone:
00 49 221 31 4458, fax: 00 49 221 31 5335). Completed application forms should
be submitted before 30 June.

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ANGLO-SPANISH SOCIETY TRAVEL PRIZE 1999

The Anglo-Spanish Society is please to offer a prize of £500 for travel
to Spain aimed at developing a knowledge and understanding of Spain today
and of its history and culture. The prize is open to members of the University
whose performance in Spanish in the Preliminary Examination in Modern
Languages or in one of the joint courses involving Modern Languages in
Trinity Term 1999 is judged by the Moderators to be meritorious. The names
of the three candidates who achieve the best results will be put to the
Society, and they will receive invitations to apply for the Prize.

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<br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 22 April 1999: Examinations and Boards<br />

Examinations and Boards


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations
made by boards of faculties and committees will come into effect on 7 May.

Return to List of Contents of this section



1 Board of the Faculty of Anthropology and
Geography

Master of Philosophy in Social Anthropology

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 634, l. 44
and
l. 46, after `himself' insert `or herself'.

2 Ibid., l. 48, delete `general field of social anthropology
theory' and substitute `field of theory in social and cultural anthropology'.

3 Ibid., p. 635, l. 1, delete `in methods in social' and
substitute `consisting of two Parts: Part I relating to methods in social and
cultural'.

4 Ibid., l. 5, delete `his' and substitute `the'.

5 Ibid., after `He' insert `or she'.

6 Ibid., l. 7, delete `his' and substitute `the'.

7 Ibid., l. 8, delete `the'.

8 Ibid., l. 9, after `his' insert `or her'.

9 Ibid., l. 10, delete `in'.

10 Ibid., l. 12, delete `Second' and substitute `second'.

11 Ibid., l. 22, after `him' insert `or her'.

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2 Board of the Faculty of Biological Sciences

(a) Pass School of Natural Science

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 427, delete
ll.
6–10 and substitute:

`Pass School of Natural Science (Molecular and Cellular
Biochemistry)

The candidate will be required

(i) to satisfy the examiners in four written papers of his or her
choice from among Papers I–VI for Part I of the Honour School of Natural
Science (Molecular and Cellular Biocheistry);

(ii) to pursue a course of laboratory work as specified in Part I of the
Honour School of Natural Science (Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry) and to
satisfy the examiners therein.
No candidate for the Pass School will be eligible to continue to Part II.'

2 Ibid., p. 427, delete ll. 11–17 and substitute:

`Pass School of Natural Science (Biological Sciences)
The candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in (i) Parts
A and B of the examination for the Honour School of Natural Science (Biological
Sciences);

(ii) Subject 2 of the Honour School of Natural Science (Biological Sciences);
and

(iii) One subject (two papers) chosen from subjects 3–7
of the Honour School of Natural Science (Biological
Sciences).

All candidates must pursue a course of practical work and exercises in
Quantitative Methods as specified for the Honour School of Natural Science
(Biological Sciences) and must satisfy the examiners therein. They will also be
required to carry out field work and attend such vacation courses as are
approved from time to time by the Sub-
faculty of Biology.'

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(b) Honour School of Natural Science (Biological Sciences)

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 408, delete
ll.
28–39 and substitute:

`Each candidate must complete a course assignment on each of the two
major subjects, from within 3–7, which they intend to offer in Part C.
The assignment will be in a format specified by the course convener on a
topic proposed by the student and approved by the Chairman of the
Sub-faculty of Biology. The approval of assignments shall be given not later
than Friday of the eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term of the academic
year in which the examination is taken.'

2 Ibid., in ll. 52–3, delete from `The project report'
to
`Trinity Full Term' and substitute `The project report shall be submitted on
or before 12 noon on the Friday of week 6 of Hilary Full Term'.

3 Ibid., p. 409, delete ll. 21–36 and substitute:

`Course assignments must be the candidate's own work. In the case of the
Part A essay, candidates will be expected to work completely independently.
In the case of the assignment submitted in Part B, candidates may discuss the
proposed topic, the sources available, and the method of presentation with an
adviser. This adviser must also read and comment on a first draft.
Assignments shall be of not more than 3,000 words, excluding any tables,
figures, or references.

Assignments (two copies) must be legibly typed or word- processed on one
side only of A4 paper, held firmly in a stiff cover, and submitted as follows:
Part A: by noon on Friday of the first week of the Michaelmas Full Term of
the academic year in which the examination is taken;
Part B: by noon on Friday of the week before the Trinity Full Term of the
academic year in which the examination is taken;
addressed to "The Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG for
the Chairman of the Examiners in the Final Honour School of Natural Science
(Biological Sciences)".'

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3 Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Regulations governing transfer and confirmation of status

With effect from 1 October 1999

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 844, delete
ll.
42–8 and substitute:

`Students for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy seeking confirmation of
their status in accordance with the provisions of Sect. viii, § 4, cl. 2
shall submit the title of
the thesis, a brief summary of the thesis, and an account in not more than
500 words stating how much of the
thesis is complete and how much remains to be done (with an estimate of the
completion date). If confirmation of
status is not approved on this evidence, the Applications Committee of the
Clinical Medicine Board will appoint
assessors to consider the case. The assessors shall interview the candidate
and report in writing to the Applications Committee.
Candidates shall normally apply for confirmation of status not later than the
end of the ninth term from their admission as a research student'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 29–31 and substitute:

`Students seeking admission to status of degree of Master of Science (by
Research) should submit the material specified in Sect. vii, a, § 3, cl. 1,
normally within three or four terms from admission as a research student. In
addition, under the terms of Sect. vii a, § 3, cl. 2, the Applications
Committee of the Clinical Medicine Board requires the student to submit a
report of not more than 1,500 words, specifying the title of the thesis, and
giving an outline of the proposed research. Further details may be found in
the Notes of Guidance for Grudatue Students issued by the
Applications Committee'.

3 Ibid., delete ll. 34–40 and substitute:

`Students seeking admission to the status of degree of Doctor of Philosophy
shall submit the material specified in Sect. viii, § 3, cl. 1, normally within
four terms from ad-
mission as a research student. The written work required under Sect. vii,
§ 3, cl. 2 shall be a report of not less than 1,000 words specifying the
title of the thesis and outlining the progress to date of the research and
plans for future study.

The student's report shall be considered by two assessors appointed by the
Applications Committee of the Clinical Medicine Board, neither of whom shall
normally be the students' supervisor. The process of assessment shall normally
include an interview by the assessors of the student or a presentation at a
suitable seminar by the student. In either case, the assessors shall submit a
report in writing to the Applications Committee, making a recommendation as
to whether the application for transfer to D.Phil. status should be granted.
Further details may be found in the Notes of Guidance for Graduate Students
issued by the Applications Committee'.

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4 Board of the Faculty of English Language and
Literature

(a) M.Phil. in English Studies

With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 577, in l. 33 after `courses.' insert
`Not all courses may be available in any given year.'

(b) M.St. Research Methods in English

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 696, l. 13, delete `by Monday of
the first week of Hilary' and substitute `by Friday of the sixth week of
Hilary'.

(c) D.Phil. in English

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 853, at the end of l. 5 delete `.'
and insert `, or the tenth term after the candidate's
admission to M.Phil. student status'.

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5 Board of the Faculty of Law

(a) Regulations Concerning the Status of Probationer Research
Student and the Degrees of M.Litt., M.Sc. by
Research, and D.Phil.

With effect from 1 October 1999

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 858, after l. 41 (as amended by
the changes published in the Gazette on 24 September 1998, p. 18),
insert:

`5. Confirmation of D.Phil. status

With the exception of those who are exempt from the requirement of
confirmation by reason of having attained the status of D.Phil. student after
having obtained the
degree of M.Phil., all candidates for the D.Phil. must apply for confirmation of
that status by the end of the sixth term from their admission to research
graduate status or, at the latest, by the end of the second week of the
seventh term. The Graduate Studies Committee of the Law Board
requires to see, in addition to the completed application form supplied by the
Graduate Studies Office, (a) a provisional contents page for the
thesis, and (b) a short statement of the content of each chapter.
These statements must not exceed 200 words on each chapter and must
indicate whether or not the chapter has been completed either in draft or in
final form. The Committee may grant the application or refer it back for
resubmission. No further resubmission is permitted after the end of the
candidate's ninth term.'

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(b) M.St. in Legal Research

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 685, l. 27,
delete `should normally be of from 25,000–30,000 words' and substitute
`must not exceed 30,000 words and should not normally be less than 25,000
words'.

2 Ibid., p. 686, delete ll. 12–24.

3 Ibid., l. 25, re-number (5) as (3).

4 Ibid., ll. 26–7, delete `sub-paragraph (3)' and
substitute `paragraph 7'.

5 Ibid., after l. 42 insert:

`The board may not permit the candidate to supplicate for the degree
unless and until the Director of the Course in Legal Research Method, failing
whom the Director of Graduate Studies (Research), has certified that the
candidate has satisfied or been exempted from the requirements of that
course.'

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(c) M.Litt. and D.Phil.

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 857, delete l. 6 and substitute
`must not exceed 50,000 words and should not normally be less than 40,000
words and D.Phil. theses must not exceed 100,000 words and should not
normally be less than 75,000 words,'.

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(d) Bachelor of Civil Law

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 896, ll. 14–15, delete `No
thesis shall exceed 25,000 words' and substitute `Theses must not exceed
30,000 words and should not normally be less than 25,000 words'.

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(e) Bachelor of Civil Law and Magister Juris

(i) With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 911, l. 31, delete `should not
exceed 12,500 words' and substitute `must not exceed 12,500 words and should
not normally be less than 10,000 words'.

(ii) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, after l. 15
insert:
`Advanced Criminal Law;'.

2 Ibid., after l. 23 insert: `European Employment Law;'.

3 Ibid., delete l. 25.

4 Ibid., after l. 26 insert:

`International Economic Law and Labour Rights;
International Environment Law;'.

5 Ibid., after l. 27 insert: `Philosophical Foundations of
Property Rights'.

6 Ibid., after l. 41 insert:

`1. Advanced Criminal Law

The course will examine general principles of criminal
liability and their philosophical foundations, including the principles of
responsibility, blame, and justifications.', and re-number 1 to 8 as 2 to 9.

7 Ibid., p. 909, after l. 5 insert:

`10. European Employment Law

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the measures and associated
activity pertaining to employment or employment-related social policy which
have been adopted or are proposed to be adopted by the European
Communities or by the Council of Europe, and of the implementation of
European Community employment law in member states of the European Union.',
and renumber 9 as 10.

8 Ibid., delete ll. 26–32.

9 Ibid., after l. 40 insert:

`12. International Economic Law and Labour Rights

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the procedures and
functions of the International Labour Organisation, and more generally of the
role of labour standards in the normative structures of world trade

13. International Environmental Law
This course will examine the rules of international law
relating to the environment.', and renumber 12 as 14.

10 Ibid., after l. 46 insert:

`15. Philosophical Foundations of Property Rights

The course will examine the concept of property and arguments for and
against the introduction or maintenance of property institutions. Both classical
and modern property theorists will be discussed. Implications for different
kinds of resource-holding and for particular features of property law will be
investigated.', and renumber 13–17 as 16–20.

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(f) M.Phil. in Law

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 904, ll. 39–40, delete `of up
to 25,000 words' and substitute `must not exceed 30,000 words and should not
normally be less than 25,000 words'.

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6 Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores

(a) Bachelor of Philosophy

(i) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1988, p. 545, l. 20,
delete `board' and substitute `Graduate Studies Committee in Philosophy'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 22–4 and substitute:

`to have taken the examination. If a candidate has already failed the
examination once, he or she is asked to inform the Graduate Studies Committee
in Philosophy that he or she intends to retake the examination by the Friday
of the fifth week of the Michaelmas Term of the academic year in question.'

3 Ibid., l. 26, after `references' insert:

`on a subject proposed by the candidate in consultation with his or her
supervisor, and approved by the Graduate Studies Committee in Philosophy.
A subject and thesis title must be submitted to the Committee not later than
the Friday of the fifth week of the Trinity Term preceding that in which the
examination is to be taken. Requests for permission to make later changes to
the thesis title should be submitted, with the support of the candidate's
supervisor, to the Director of the Graduate Studies in Philosophy as soon as
the candidate has decided to seek such permission. The thesis is'.

4 Ibid., l. 28, delete `Friday of the seventh' and
substitute
`Wednesday of the sixth'.

5 Ibid., l. 31, after `references' insert `A penalty may be
imposed on any thesis that exceeds the word limit.'

6 Ibid., p. 546, l. 1, delete `The supervisor' and
substitute
`The candidate'.

7 Ibid., l. 2, delete `board' and substitute `Graduate
Studies Committee in Philosophy, with his or her supervisor's support,'.

8 Ibid., l. 3, after `offer it,' insert `and in any case by
the
Friday of the fifth week of the Trinity Term preceding the examination,'.

9 Ibid., after l. 51, insert `A penalty may be imposed on
any
work that exceeds this word limit.'

(ii) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1988, p. 546, delete ll. 37–42 and
substitute:

`(q) Philosophy of Science'.

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(b) Doctor of Philosophy

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 859, l. 13,
after `made'
insert`, except that, for candidates in Philosophy, it should normally be made
in the seventh week of the third term.'

2 Ibid., after l. 13, insert the following new paragraph:

`Students who are completing a relevant M.St. course, including those
holding the status of Probationer Research Student, and who wish to apply for
D.Phil. status on completion of that course, should submit their application

(together with an outline of their proposed research and letter of
recommendation from their supervisor), using the appropriate form, by no
later than the end of the fifth week of the second term of the M.St. course.'

3 Ibid., l. 26, delete `may also' and substitute `should'.

4 Ibid., l. 27, delete `at the discretion of the board'.

5 Ibid., l. 31, after `made.' add `For candidates in
Philosophy
admitted to D.Phil. status after successful completion of the B.Phil. the normal
time for this application is the
seventh week of the third term from admission to D.Phil. status.'

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(c) Master of Studies in Greek and/or Latin Languages and
Literature

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 675, delete
ll.
45–6 and substitute:

`(ii) Greek Textual Criticism (Aristophanes, Peace 1–1126)'.

2 Ibid., p. 676, delete ll. 14–34 and substitute:

`Each of the following options will be examined by (a) one paper
of translation (1H hours) and (b) two pre-submitted essays. The
texts listed are those which should be studied in preparation for the
pre-submitted essays. Passages will be set for translation only from those
texts marked with an asterisk (*). Passages for translation will be set from
the editions listed in the regulations for the Honour School of Literae
Humaniores, whenever applicable. For any option approved under (xxii) the
edition will be specified by the Graduate Studies Committee in Classics.

(i) Early Greek Hexameter Poetry:

*Odyssey V, I–XIII, 92


Odyssey I–IV, XIII, 93–end.


*Hesiod Works and Days (including the bracketed portions);
Theogony.


Fragments of the Epic Cycle (in H.G. Evelyn-White, Hesiod, The Homeric Hymns
and Homerica (Loeb), pp. 480–533)

(ii) Greek Lyric and Elegiac Poetry:

*D.A. Campbell, Greek Lyric Poetry (Macmillan, repr. Bristol Classical Press)
pp. 1–97 (omitting Archilochus 112, 188, Semonides 29, Ibycus 282a);


M.L. West, Delectus ex Iambis et Elegis Graecis (Oxford Classical Text)



Archilochus 23, 188–92, 196, and 196A;


M. Davies, Poetarum Melicorum Graecorum Fragments (Oxford), Stesichorus pp.
154–75 (Geryoneis), Fr. 193, 209, 217, 222(b), Ibycus S151;


M.L. West, Iambi et Elegi Graeci, 2nd edition, vol. 2 (Oxford, 1992) Simonides
Fr. eleg. 11 and 19–20

(iii) Pindar and Bacchylides:

Bacchylides 3, 5, 17, 18


*Pindar, Olympians 2, 3, 6, 12, 14; Pythians 3, 4, 5, 6, 10;


Nemeans 1, 5, 7, 9, 10; Isthmians 1, 2, 5


Pindar frr. 40 (Paean 6), 109, 114, 116, 127 Bowra

(iv) Aeschylus:

Seven against Thebes, *Agamemnon, Choephori, *Eumenides

(v) Euripides:

*Medea, Electra, Heracles, *Ion, Orestes, Hippolytus

(vi) Thucydides and Rhetoric:

*Thucydides I. 20–3, 31–44, 66–88, 139–46; II. 34–65;
III. 1–85; V. 86–116.


Herodotus VII. 8–19.


Gorgias, Helen.


Antiphon, Tetralogies

(vii) Plato:

*Phaedrus; Gorgias

(viii) Greek Comedy (Old and New):

Aristophanes, *Wasps, Birds, Ecclesiazusae


Menander, *Dyscolus, Samia

(ix) Hellenistic Poetry:

*Theocritus 1, 3, 7, 10, 13, 15, 16, 28


*Callimachus, Hymns 1, 5, 6; frr. 1, 67–75, 110, 178, 191, 194, 260 (this last
fr. to be read in Callimachus, Hecale (ed. A.S. Hollis) frr. 69–74); epigrams
2, 4, 8, 13, 16, 19, 21, 25, 27, 28, 29, 30, 41, 43, 46, 50 Pf.


Herodas 4


Apollonius, Argonautica III

(x) Virgil:

*Aeneid, IX–XII


Aeneid, I–VIII

(xi) Latin Didactic Poetry:

Lucretius IV, *VI


*Virgil, Georgics


Ovid, Ars Amatoria

(xii) Latin Satire:

Horace, Satires *I, II


Perseus, Prologus, 1, 5, 6


*Juvenal, 1, 3–6, 14.


Juvenal, 8–11

(xiii) Latin Historiography:

*Sallust, Jugurtha


Livy, Preface, I, XXI


*Tacitus, Histories I

(xiv) Silver Latin Epic:

*Lucan I, *VII, VIII


Statius, *Thebaid IX, Achilleid


Valerius, Argonautica V, VI

(xv) Cicero the Orator:

Pro Sexto Roscio Amerino


*Pro Archia


*Pro Milone


Pro Marcello


*Philippics I, II

(xvi) Horace

Epodes


Odes *II, *IV


*Carmen Saeculare


Epistles *I, II

(xvii) Ovid:

Heroities 18–21


*Metamorphoses I–III


Metamorphoses IV and XII–XV


Fasti IV


*Tristia I

(xviii) Seneca and Lucan:

Seneca, *Phaedra, Thyestes


Lucan *I, *VII, VIII, IX



This subject may not be combined with (xv) (Silver Latin Epic)

(xix) Greek New Comedy and Roman Comedy

Menander, *Dyscolus, Samia


Plautus, Bacchides, *Pseudolos


Terence, *Eunuchus


This subject may not be combined with (viii) (Greek Comedy Old and New)

(xx) Ancient Literary Criticism:

(a) Aristotle, Poetics

(b) Longinus, On the Sublime 1–17, 33–44

(c) Horace, Satires 1.4 and 10, Epistles II. 1 and Ars Poetica

(d) Tacitus, Dialogus

Translation will be of any two of these four sets of texts.

(xxi) The Ancient Novel:

Apuleius, Metamorphoses *I, IV 1–27, *IV 28–VI 24, VI 25–32, IX,
*XI


*Longus, Daphnes and Chloe


Heliodorus, Aethiopica X

(xxii) Any other text or combination of texts approved by the Graduate
Studies Committee in Classics.'

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(d) Master of Philosophy in Greek and/or Latin Languages and
Literature

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 601, l. 23, delete `Euripides,
Andromache' and substitute `Aristophanes, Peace 1–1126'.

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7 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores
and Mathematical Sciences

Honour School of Mathematics and Philosophy

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 294, l. 9,
delete `nine' and substitute `eight'.

2 Ibid., l. 10, delete `four' and substitute `three'.

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8 Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences

(a) Regulations concerning the Degree of D.Phil.

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 864, l. 35,
delete `Word limits' and substitute `Theses'.

2 Ibid., after l. 39 insert:

`Where some part of the thesis is not solely the work of the candidate or
has been carried out in collaboration with one or more persons, the candidate
shall submit a clear statement of the extent of his or her own contribution.'

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(b) M.Sc. in Mathematics and Foundations of Computer Science

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1988, p. 762, l. 31,
delete `lecture'.

2 Ibid., p. 763, l. 4, delete `15 September' and substitute

`1 September'.

3 Ibid., (as amended by Gazette, Vol. 129, p.
296,
change 1, cl. 31), in the fourth sentence of cl. 6, delete `the term during
which the lectures are given.' and substitute `the term during which the
course is given.'

4 Ibid., ll. 22, 24, 25, 28, 29, and 30, delete `lecture'.

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(c) Honour School of Computation

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 153, l. 26,
delete `eight papers' and substitute `seven papers'.

2 Ibid., ll. 27–8, delete `at least four, but no more
than
six papers' and substitute `at least three, but no more than five papers'.

3 Ibid., p. 154, l. 7, delete `Papers I.1, I.2, I.3, I.4, I.6'
and
substitute `those Section I papers so indicated in the Schedule'.

4 Ibid., delete from l. 30 on p. 154 to l. 8 on p. 155 and
substitute:

`Paper I.1: Formal Program Design

No practicals. Paper of 3 hours.

Predicate notation for program specification: connectives and quantifiers.
Example calculations in the predicate calculus. The language of guarded
commands for expressing programs. Assertions, invariants, and variant
functions. Strategies for finding invariants; head and tail invariants. General
programming techniques for developing efficient programs. Examples from
sorting and searching problems.

Procedures and parameter passing. Recursion in procedural programs. Modules
and encapsulation. Data refinement. Example refinements, including use of
hashing and tree structures. Pointer algorithms and their development.
Specification using modules, abstract data types and their operations.

Paper I.2: Compilers and Programming Languages

Practical weight one-sixth. Paper of 2 hours 30 minutes.

Programming language representation: concrete and abstract syntax, context
free grammars. Use of lexer and parser generators. Description of language
semantics by definitional source-level interpreters. Implementation of
expressions and statements in a simple language by postfix code and by simple
machine code; simple optimisations. Language paradigms: imperative
programming, functional programming, logic programming, object-oriented
programming. Applicative and normal order evaluation. Procedures: value, name
and reference parameters, local and non-local variables, static and dynamic
binding. Abstract machines and storage management: activation records, static
and dynamic chains, stacks and heaps. Type systems: static, dynamic and
polymorphic typing.'

5 Ibid., p. 155, l. 15, delete `Implementation: the
implementation language.' and substitute `Implementation of processes.'

6 Ibid., delete ll. 19–34 and substitute:

`Paper I.4: Computer Architecture and Operating Systems

Practical weight one-sixth. Paper of 2 hours 30 minutes.
Computer Architecture: Register Transfer model of processors. Datapaths and
control structures. Comparison of architectural styles for general purpose
computers, including RISC/CISC. Pipelining; pipeline hazards and their
resolution by stalling and forwarding. The hierarchy of storage in a computer;
caches and virtual memory.

Operating Systems: The functions and structure of an operating system.
Processes, synchronisation and simple scheduling. Input/ouput: examples of
hardware and software. Memory management, segmentation and virtual memory.
File systems, and file system management.

Paper I.5: Algorithms and Data Structures

Practical weight one-sixth. Paper of 2 hours 30 minutes.
Graph algorithms: spanning trees, shortest paths, maximum flow. Amortised
analysis. Data structures: hashing, B-trees, efficient heaps, union-find. Sorting
and searching. Pattern matching in strings. Randomised algorithms. Operations
of matrix algebra. Fast Fourier transform. Number-theoretic algorithms and
cryptography.'

7 Ibid., l. 41, insert `ODE' before `initial' and delete `for
ordinary differential equations'.

8 Ibid., l. 42, delete `methods.' and substitute `methods,
Adams methods.'

9 Ibid., l. 48, delete `ordinary differential equations' and
substitute `ODEs'.

10 Ibid., l. 51, delete `Error analysis.'

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(d) Pass School of Computation

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 156, l. 13, after `Section I,' insert
`where so indicated in the Schedule,'.

Return to List of Contents of this section


(e) Honour School of Mathematics and Computation

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 289, l. 38,
delete `nine
papers, or shall take eight papers' and substitute `eight
papers, or shall take seven papers'.

2 Ibid., l. 40, delete `three or four' and substitute `at
least
two, but no more than four'.

3 Ibid., p. 290, ll. 24–5, delete `Papers I.1, I.2, I.3,
I.4,
and I.6' and substitute `the subjects of those papers so indicated in the
Schedule'.

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(f) Pass School of Mathematics and Computation

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 291, l. 17, delete `(except I.5)' and
substitute `where so indicated in the Schedule'.

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(g) Honour School of Mathematical Sciences

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 274, ll.
18–19, delete `Numerical Computation (examined in Paper 01),' and
substitute `those listed in the Schedule below, together with'.

2 Ibid., delete l. 21 and substitute `held.'

3 Ibid., l. 22, delete `nine' and substitute `eight' and
delete
`eight' and substitute `seven'.

4 Ibid., l. 27 delete `two' and substitute `one' and delete
`four' and substitute `three'.

5 Ibid., p. 275, ll. 42–4, delete from `An essay' to
`scripts)' and substitute `Essays should be typed'.

6 Ibid., p. 283, after l. 28 insert:

Paper o2: Extended essay

Paper o6: History of Philosophy from Descartes to Kant (as specified for
subject 101 in Philosophy in all Honour Schools)

Paper o7: Metaphysics and Theory of Knowledge (as specified for subject 102
in Philosophy in all Honour Schools)

Paper o8: Philosophy of Mathematics (as specified for subject 122 in
Philosophy in all Honour Schools)'.

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() Honour School of Mathematics

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 284, l. 30,
delete `nine' and substitute `eight'.

2 Ibid., l. 34, delete `three or four' and substitute `two
or
three'.

3 Ibid., ll. 22–4, delete from `A dissertation' to
`scripts)'
and substitute `Dissertations should be typed'.

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9 Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern
Languages

(a) M.St. in Women's Studies

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 709, delete
ll.
31–2 and substitute:

`(viii) Women's Emancipation and its Adversaries in German and Austrian
Modernism'.

2 Ibid., delete l. 33 and substitute:

`(ix) Women Writers in Medieval France'.

3 Ibid., l. 34, delete `(xi)' and substitute `(x)'.

4 Ibid., delete l. 35 and substitute:

`(xi) Simone de Beauvoir as Theorist and Writer'.

5 Ibid., insert as the following line:

`(xii) Contemporary Francophone Women's Writing'.

6 Ibid., delete l. 43 and substitute:

`(xx) Brazilian and Portuguese Women Writers in the Twentieth Century'.

7 Ibid., delete l. 44 and substitute:

`(xxi) Women in Old Icelandic Literature'.

8 Ibid., delete l. 45.

9 Ibid., l. 46, delete `(xxiii)' and substitute `(xxii)'.

10 Ibid., l. 47, delete `(xxiv)' and substitute `(xxiii)'.

11 Ibid., l. 48, delete `(xxv)' and substitute `(xxiv)'.

12 Ibid., l. 49, delete `(xxvi)' and substitute `(xxv)'.

13 Ibid., l. 50, delete `(xxvii)' and substitute `(xxvi)'.

14 Ibid., l. 51, delete `(xxviii)' and substitute `(xxvii)'.

15 Ibid., l. 710, l. 1, delete `(xxix)' and substitute
`(xxviii)'.

16 Ibid., l. 2, delete `(xxx)' and substitute `(xxix)'.

17 Ibid., on the following line insert:

`(xxx) History, society, and the modern body'.

18 Ibid., delete l. 4 and substitute:

`(xxxii) Gender and Colonialism'.

19 Ibid., on the following line, insert:

`(xxxiii) Women and Politics'.

20 Ibid., on the following line, insert:

`(xxxiv) Feminism and the Social Sciences'.

21 Ibid., on the following line, insert:

`(xxxv) Feminist Ethics'.

22 Ibid., on the following line, delete `(xxxiii<Gamma>
and substitute `(xxxvi)'.

23 Ibid., add:

`7. If the two pieces of written work, submitted for A and B, and/or the
dissertation, submitted for C, fail the examination, the candidate shall not be
granted leave to supplicate for the degree of M.St. Such a candidate is
permitted to resubmit the elements of the examination that have failed to
satisfy the examiners, on one further occasion only. The two pieces of written
work (A and B) shall be resubmitted by noon on the Friday of the first week
of the Trinity Term following their first examination, and the dissertation
(c) shall be resubmitted by not later than noon on the Friday of the
eight week of the Trinity Term following their first examination.'

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(b) Degree of D.Phil.

With effect from 1 October 1999

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 866, delete
ll.
14–17 and substitute:

`(a) Candidates other than those who have already been given
leave to supplicate for the Degree of M.Phil.'

2 Ibid., l. 28, delete `sixth term of research' and
substitute
`ninth term from admission to graduate status'.

3 Ibid., l. 39, insert after `research student.',
`(Note: students reading for the M.St. in European Literature are
considered to be taught-course students.)'.

4 Ibid., l. 49, insert after `M.Phil.':

`(candidates who propose a topic for their D.Phil. which is different from
their M.Phil. topic shall be subject to the regulations under (a)
above)'.

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10 Board of the Faculty of Modern History

(a) M.Phil. in Economic and Social History

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 564, after
l.
3 insert:

`[Until 30 September 2000: candidates admitted in Michaelmas Term 1998 may
take the examination according to the 1998 regulations.]'.

2 Ibid., p. 564, delete ll. 15–19 and substitute:

`(1) Methodological introduction to research in the social sciences and
history.

(2) Either Quantitative methods and computer applications for historians
or Introduction to the history of medicine (this option is open only to those
writing a dissertation in the history of medicine)
or Introduction to the history of science and technology (this option is open
only to those writing a dissertation in the history of science and technology).'

3 Ibid., ll. 27–8, delete `(not ɠyear)'.

4 Ibid., ll. 29–30, after `Schedule I below' insert
`(`Advanced Papers for the M.Phil. and M.Sc. in Economic and Social History')'.

5 Ibid., l. 37, after `Schedule I or' insert `for papers'.

6 Ibid., ll. 40–1, delete `either the choice of themes
or'.

7 Ibid., p. 565, delete ll. 3–7 and substitute:

`or

(ii) A fourth advanced paper selected from Schedule I or from any
additional list of papers for the M.Phil. and M.Sc. in Economic and Social
History approved by the Graduate Studies Committee of the Board of the
Faculty of Modern History and published in the definitive list of Advanced
Papers as set out in Schedule I.'

8 Ibid., l. 15, after `D.Phil.' insert `and follow the
Conventions for the presentation of dissertations and theses of the Board of
the Faculty of Modern History.'

9 Ibid., l. 30, delete `on p. 1092.' and substitute `below
under
the heading `Use of calculators in examinations' in the Special Regulations
concerning Examinations.'

10 Ibid., delete from p. 565, l. 45 to p. 574, l. 12 and
substitute:

`SCHEDULE I

Advanced Papers for the M.Phil. and M.Sc. in Economic and Social History
Advanced Papers are available in the following subject areas:

1. Economic and business history

2. History of science and technology

3. Social history

4. Historical demography

5. History of medicine

A descriptive list of Advanced Papers will be published by the Board of the
Faculty of Modern History in September for the academic year ahead (not all
options may be available in every year). The definitive list of the titles of
Advanced Papers for any one year will be circulated to candidates and their
supervisors and posted on the Faculty Notice Board not later than Friday of
Second Week of Michaelmas Term of the academic year in which the paper is
to be taken.

SCHEDULE II

The paper in a relevant discipline or skill may be:

1. One of the papers from the M.Phil. in Economics.

2. One of the papers from the M.Phil. in Sociology or in
Comparative Social Research.

3. One of the papers from the M.Phil. in Russian and East
European Studies.

4. One suitable paper from another Master's degree under
the auspices of the Faculty of Modern History approved from time to time by
the Graduate Studies Committee of the Board of Modern History.

5. One suitable paper from another Master's degree on
the recommendation of the candidate's supervisor and endorsed by the Course
Director.

Choices under Schedule II have to be approved by the chairman of the
Graduate Studies Committee of the Board of the Faculty of Modern History not
later than Monday of the fourth week of the second Michaelmas Term of the
course. Candidates wishing to take a paper under 1, 2, 3,
or 5 will also need to satisfy the appropriate Graduate Studies Committee of
the relevant faculty board or inter-faculty committee that they have an
adequate background in the subject. Not all options may be available in any
one year.'

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(b) M.Sc. in Economic and Social History

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 731, after
l.
42, insert:

`(See also the general notice at the commencement of these regulations.)
The regulations of the Board of the Faculty of Modern
History are as follows:'.

2 Ibid., p. 732, delete ll. 1–5 and substitute:

`(1) Methodological introduction to research in the social sciences and
history.

(2) Either Quantitative methods and computer applications for historians
or Introduction to the history of medicine (this option is open only to those
writing a dissertation in the history of medicine)
or Introduction to the history of science and technology (this option is open
only to those writing a dissertation in the history of science and technology).'

3 Ibid., ll. 13–14, delete `(not ɠyear)'.

4 Ibid., ll.18–19, delete `Schedule I ɠin the schedule
below' and substitute `Schedule I below (`Advanced Papers for M.Phil. and
M.Sc. in Economic and Social History') or for other papers permitted in
Schedule II below'.

5 Ibid., l. 22, delete `either the choice of themes or'.

6 Ibid., delete ll. 34–43 and substitute:

`I. One advanced paper selected from Schedule I below.

II. Either

(i) one paper in a relevant discipline or skill or sources or
methods selected from Schedule II below;

or

(ii) a second advanced paper selected from Schedule I or from any
additional list of papers for the M.Phil. and M.Sc. in Economic and Social
History approved by the Graduate Studies Committee of the Board of the
Faculty of Modern History and published in the definitive list of Advanced
Papers as set out in Schedule I.'

7 Ibid., l. 51 after `D.Phil.' insert:

`and follow the Conventions for the presentation of dissertations and theses
of the Board of the Faculty of Modern
History.'

8 Ibid., p. 733, l. 6, delete `on p. 1086.' and substitute:

`below under the heading `Use of calculators in examinations' in the Special
Regulations concerning Examinations.'

9 Ibid., delete ll. 15–41, and substitute:

`SCHEDULE I

Advanced Papers for the M.Phil. and M.Sc. in Economic and Social History
Advanced Papers are available in the following subject areas:

1. Economic and business history

2. History of science and technology

3. Social history

4. Historical demography

5. History of medicine

A descriptive list of Advanced Papers will be published by the Board of the
Faculty of Modern History in September for the academic year ahead (not all
options may be available in every year). The definitive list of the titles of
Advanced Papers for any one year will be circulated to candidates and their
supervisors and posted on the Faculty Notice Board not later than Friday of
Second Week of Michaelmas Term.

SCHEDULE II

The paper in a relevant discipline or skill may be:

1. One of the papers from the M.Phil. in Sociology or in
Comparative Social Research.

2. One suitable paper from another Master's degree under
the auspices of the Faculty of Modern History approved from time to time by
the Graduate Studies Committee of the Board of Modern History.

3. One suitable paper in a related skill or discipline other
than those specified in paragraphs 1 to 2 above on the recommendation of the
candidate's supervisor and endorsed by the Course Director.

Choices under Schedule II have to be approved by the chairman of the
Graduate Studies Committee of the Board of the Faculty of Modern History not
later than Monday of the fourth week of Michaelmas Term. Candidates wishing
to take a paper under 1 or 3 will also need to satisfy the appropriate
Graduate Studies Committee of the relevant faculty board or inter-faculty
committee that they have an adequate background in the subject. Not all
options may be available in any one year.'

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(c) M.St. in Historical Research

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 680, after
l.
4, insert:

`The regulations of the Board of the Faculty of Modern
History are as follows:'.

2 Ibid., l. 25, after `a skill involved in the pursuit of
research' insert `(to be demonstrated on historical material relevant to the
candidate's research topic)'.

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(d) M.St. in Historical Research (Medieval History)

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 680, after
l.
51, insert:

`The regulations of the Board of the Faculty of Modern
History are as follows:'.

2 Ibid., p. 681, delete ll. 2–4, and renumber cll.
3–13 as 2–12 respectively.

3 Ibid., l. 15, delete `up to 3,000' and substitute `between
3,500 and 5,000'.

4 Ibid., ll. 16 and 28, delete `3' and substitute `2'.

5 Ibid., l. 17, delete `up to 5,000' and substitute `between
5,000 and 7,000'.

6 Ibid., l. 18, delete `4' and substitute `3'.

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(e) M.St. in Modern History

(i) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, delete from p. 687, l. 6 to
p. 689, l. 20, and substitute:

`The regulations of the Board of the Faculty of Modern
History are as follows:

1. Candidates must satisfy the board that they have
sufficient reading knowledge of the relevant languages to follow the course.

2. Every candidate must follow for at least three terms
a
course of instruction in Modern History and must upon entering for the
examination produce from his or her
society a certificate to that effect.

3. Syllabus
The examination shall comprise: I, three extended essays of between 3,000 and
5,000 words; II, an examination paper; and III, a dissertation of up to 15,000
words.

Teaching may not be available for all periods and subjects every year, and
candidates are advised to enquire when they submit their applications for
admission.

I. Extended essays

Either

(a) three essays in any one of the periods in British or European
History in the list

(i)–(x) below:

Medieval history

(i) British history, 300–1100;

(ii) British history, 1000–1500;

(iii) European history, 300–1100;

(iv) European history, 1000–1500;

Early modern history

(v) British history, 1450–1750;

(vi) European history, 1450–1750;
Modern history

(vii) British history, 1750–1918;

(viii) British history, 1914 to the present;

(ix) European history, 1750–1918;

(x) European history, 1914 to the present;

On application by the candidate's supervisor the Course Convener jointly with
the Director of Graduate Studies shall have power to approve relevant taught
papers from other Masters' courses within the Faculty. A complete list of the
available taught papers in Masters' courses within the Faculty of Modern
History will be posted on the Faculty Notice Board not later than Friday of
Second Week of Michaelmas Term.

or

(b) three essays in any one of the periods in the History of the
British Commonwealth and Empire and South Asian History from the list

(i)–(iii) below:

British Commonwealth History

(i) since c.1840;
South Asian History

(ii) India and the World Economy, 1700–1860;

(iii) Aspects of social change in South Asian History, c.1860 to the present.

II. An examination paper in the area of study elected under I above:

Medieval history, 300–1500

Issues and approaches in medieval history

Political and social thought: Scholasticism and Humanism (see note
(a))

Early modern history, 1450–1750

Methods in early modern history

Modern history, 1750 to the present

Political and social thought

Concepts and methods of imperial history (see note (a))

Quantitative methods and computer applications for
historians (see note (a))

British Commonwealth History

Concepts and methods of imperial history

South Asian History

Concepts and methods in South Asian History

Note (a): These options are only available on application
by the candidate's supervisor, and the choice must be approved by the
Course Convenor jointly with the Director of Graduate Studies.

III. Dissertation

A dissertation of not more than 15,000 words on a topic falling within the
scope of the periods chosen by the candidate for the extended essays under
I above.

4. Candidates should make written application for the
approval of the essay and dissertration topics, to reach the Chairman of the
Examiners for the M.St. in Modern History, c/o The Graduate Office, Modern
History Faculty, Broad Street, Oxford, not later than Friday of the Fourth
Week of Hilary Term. All applications should be accompanied by a
recommendation from the supervisor.

5. Two typewritten copies of the extended essays must
be
sent to the Chairman of the Examiners at the address above, by noon on
Friday of Noughth Week of Trinity Term at the latest.

6. Two typewritten copies of the dissertation must be
sent
to the Chairman of the Examiners at the address above, by noon on Friday of
Sixth Week of Trinity Term at the latest.

7. Candidates must present themselves for an oral
examination if required to do so by the examiners.

8. The examiners may award a distinction to candidates
who
have performed with special merit in all parts of the examination.

9. A candidate who fails the examination will be permitted
to
retake it on one further occasion only, not later than one year after the
initial attempt. Such a candidate whose dissertation has been of satisfactory
standard may resubmit the same piece of work, while a candidate who has
reached a satisfactory standard on both the extended essays and the written
examination paper will not be
required to retake those parts of the examination.'

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 688, l. 2,
as
amended by (1) above, after `

(iii) Aspects of social change in South Asian History, c.1860 to the present'
insert:

`or

(c) three essays in the History of the United States of
America from the eighteenth century to the present;

Topics in the History of the United States of America from the eighteenth
century to the present.'

2 Ibid., after l. 48, as amended by (1) above, after
`Concepts
and methods in South Asian History', insert:

`United States History

Methods and evidence in the History of the United States of America.'

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11 Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies

(a) Research Degrees in Oriental Studies

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 873, l. 50, after `thesis.' insert:

`Candidates who have successfully completed the M.Phil. in Oriental Studies
may be recommended for admission to D.Phil. status on the basis of the results
of the examination, subject to the submission of a satisfactory outline (of not
more than 500 words) of the proposed subject of the thesis. In exceptional
cases, such candidates may be recommended for admission to confirmed D.Phil.
status.'

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(b) M.St. in Modern Middle Eastern Studies

With immediate effect (for first examination in 1999)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 690, l. 27, after `Oxford' delete `.'
and insert: `, not later than the end of the sixth week of Trinity Term.'

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12 Board of the Faculty of Physical Sciences

Research Degrees in Physical Sciences

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 874, l. 32, add:

`The candidate and the supervisor will be required to provide a clear
indication of the proposed time-table for submission of the thesis.'

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13 Board of the Faculty of Psychological Studies

Honour School of Experimental Psychology

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, delete from
l. 33
on p. 217 to l. 40 on p. 218 and substitute:

`A1. Brain and Behaviour



Sensory processing and sensory awareness.


The control of action.


Higher order processing: perception and cognition (association areas).


Neural mechanisms of attention, arousal, and sleep.


Central nervous control of eating and drinking.


Central nervous control of emotion.


Hemisphere differences.


Human neuropsychology: disorders of perception, attention, cognition, and
action.


Functional brain imaging of perception, attention, cognition, and action.

A2. Biology of Learning and Memory

The rules of associative learning: classical conditioning and instrumental
learning, higher-order conditioning, predictability and surprise, and
discrimination learning.


Cognition in animals.


Biological constraints on learning, imprinting.


Comparative studies: learning in invertebrates.


Motivation: reward and punishment, acquired drives and addiction.


The learning of emotional states: frustration, fear, anxiety, conflict, theories
of emotion.


Mechanisms of memory: working memory, long-term memory.


The neurobiology and neuropsychology of memory: consolidation of memory,
neurophysiological mechanism, models of information storage.

B1. Perception

The experimental study of the phenomena and processes of sensation and
perception, their theoretical interpretation, and the contributions of
physiological evidence to our understanding of these processes.
Principles of sensory coding and processing in vision, and interaction between
the senses. Stimulus detection and psychophysics, psychophysical methods,
scaling, categorisation, adaptation, masking, and the limitations of
capacity in all sensory modalities.

Perceptual organisation, categorisation and information processing. The
perception of colour, contrast, depth,
motion, and optic flow. Perceptual adaptation; illusions; perception of pattern,
form, space, objects, time. The perception of pitch, loudness, melody and
auditory direction. Perceptual aspects of memory, attention, imagery, and
language; the construction of the perceptual world, orientation and movement
within it. Theories of perception. Computational approaches to the study of
perception.

B2. Human Information Processing

The analysis and modelling of cognitive processes in skills such as word,
object, and face recognition; reading, writing, and typing; chess.
Cognitive neuropsychology: inferences about normal organisation of perceptual,
cognitive, and linguistic skills from the performance of brain injured subjects.
Attention and the control of action: selective attention and the fate of
unattended information; visual search and scene perception; performance of
concurrent tasks and temporal processing deficits; automaticity, the effects of
practice on performance.

Sensory integration, frames of reference, and the representation of space.
Connectionist modelling of cognitive processes.

The role of conscious awareness in information processing.'

2 Ibid., p. 218, delete ll. 48–51 and substitute:

`Mental representation: mental and motor imagery and their relation to
perception, attention, and action; concept formation; schemata.
Problem solving and decision-making: deductive and inductive reasoning;
heurisitics, biases, and statistical reasoning; human rationality; the role of
expertise in problem solving; relation between laboratory studies and
"real world' problem solving.

Cognitive neuropsychology; inferences about the representation and use of
knowledge from the performance of brain-damaged patients.'

3 Ibid., p. 219, in l. 8 delete `deductive and inductive
inference;'.

4 Ibid., delete ll. 15–30 and substitute:

`C1. Social Psychology

The biological and cultural background to social behaviour; comparisons of
animal and human social behaviour; cultural differences in behaviour and
attitudes.

Verbal and non-verbal expression and communication; conversation,
self-presentation, and other aspects of social interaction; social influence,
persuasion and leadership; group performance and group decision-making;
behaviour in organisations; intergroup relations.

Social relationships, exchange processes, interpersonal attraction, aggression,
helping, and co-operation.

Cognitive social psychology; perception, inference, attribution, and explanation;
social representations, attitudes, and beliefs.'

5 Ibid., p. 220, l. 14 after `selection.' insert `Psychology
and
health.'

6 Ibid., delete ll. 15–32 and substitute:

`C4. Psychological Disorders

This course aims to cover a range of psychological disorders. Issues relating
to the definition of abnormality and the classification of psychological
disorders will be highlighted. A number of psychological disorders including
anxiety disorders (panic, phobias, obsessive compulsive disorder), depression,
schizophrenia, and eating disorders will be studied. Each will be considered
in terms of (1) classification, (2) epidemiology, (3) theories of
aetiology/maintenance, and (4) treatment approaches. Empirically derived
theories, including the biological, cognitive, and behavioural will be
considered. The way in which these have been used in the design of
treatments will be outlined. Genetic, sex differences, high risk aspects, and
the effects of social class, culture, and life events will be discussed.'

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14 Board of the Faculty of Social Studies

(a) Confirmation of D.Phil. status

With effect from 1 October 1999

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 880, ll.
29–30 and ll. 46–7, delete `six terms after admission to D.Phil. status'
and substitute: `the ninth term or normally earlier than the sixth term after
that in which he or she was initially admitted
to the status of a Probationer Research Student or to
he status of a student for another higher degree of the
University'.

2 Ibid., l. 37, delete `, where possible,'.

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(b) M.Phil. in Economics

(i) With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 577, l. 12, delete `The Political
Economy of Western Europe, Japan, and the United States' and substitute `The
Economics of OECD Countries'.

(ii) With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 575, l. 5,
after
`of their third year.' insert `In exceptional cases, the Economics Graduate
Studies Committee may permit the deferral of resitting one of the three papers
at the end of the second year until the final examination.'

2 Ibid., ll. 7–9, delete `and may permit deferral of
one
paper. Candidates who retake the first year examination must normally pass
all three papers in order to proceed to the final examination'.

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(c) M.Phil. in Politics

(i) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in
2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 628, after
l.
28, insert:

`Ideas of nationality, its criteria and claims, from the late eighteenth to the
early twentieth century; cultural, political, and ethnic versions of the nation;
the idea of the
nation state; liberal nationalism and the nationalisms of the anti-democratic and
anti-parliamentary right; modern theories of nationalism.'

2 Ibid., l. 31, after `J.-J. Rousseau,' insert `Abbe Sieyes,'.

3 Ibid., l. 33, after `E. Renan,' insert `E.A. Freeman,'.

4 Ibid., ll. 33–4, delete `F. Tonnies, V.I. Lenin, J.V.
Stalin,
B. Mussolini, A. Hitler' and substitute `H.S. Chamberlain, M. Bares, F. Meinecke,
C. Schmitt'.

(ii) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 628, delete ll. 44–5 and
substitute:

`() The History and Politics of South Asia

The political history, political sociology, political institutions, and political
economy of South Asia (India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Bangladesh) since 1947;
the state, political institutions, party politics, and "movement"
politics; conditions for democracy; the politics of gender, class, caste, religion,
and ethnicity; the evolution of political ideologies; social organisation, culture,
and identities as they bear on politics; the politics of
"development".'

(iii) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 630, l. 47
(as
amended by Gazette, 5 March 1998), delete `(u) European Thought'
and insert:

`(u) Issues in Modern European Social and Political Thought'.

2 Ibid., after the entry for (u) insert new section (v) as
follows:

`(v) European Social Thought 1870–1920

The elaboration of concepts of modernity; individualism, secularisation,
rationalisation. Responses to the decline of traditional forms of community. The
critique of modernity: "decadence", mass irrationality, anomie,
bureaucracy. the emphasis of the course will be on locating different versions
of modernity to their cultural and
political contexts.'

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(d) Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1998, delete from p. 476, l. 45 to
p. 477, l. 19, and substitute:

`certain prescribed documents, a schedule of which may be revised
annually. All of these documents will be displayed on the open shelves of the
PPE Reading Room in the Bodleian Library. Any revisions to the schedule shall
apply only to candidates taking the Final Honour School five terms hence, and
if no proposals for revising the schedule have been received by noon on
Friday of week one of
Hilary Term, the previous year's list shall stand. The revised schedule will be
displayed on the PPE syllabus notice-board at the Social Studies Faculty
Centre, George Street.'

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 483, l. 21,
after `integration.' insert `Current problems of the international trading
system.'

2 Ibid., ll. 22–3, delete `Analysis of the international
monetary and trading systems and institutions.' and substitute:

`Behaviour of floating exchange rates: theory and evidence. Optimum
Currency Areas and Exchange Rate Regimes. International Policy Co-ordination
and the International Monetary System.'

3 Ibid., p. 486, ll. 51–3, delete:

`Every candidate who wishes to have his or her thesis
returned is required to enclose with the thesis, in an
envelope bearing only his or her candidate number, a self-addressed sticky
label.'

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15 Board of the Faculty of Theology

(a) Courses for the Degree of Master of Theology and
Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Theology at Westminster College

With effect from 1 July 1999

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 1003, delete ll. 36–8 and
substitute:

`(i) assessed work of between 2,000–2,500 words or
equivalent in area
(i);

(ii) assessed work of between 2,000–2,500 words or equivalent in either
areas
(i) and
(ii) or areas
(i) and
(iii);

(iii) assessed work of between 2,000–2,500 words or equivalent in areas

(i),
(ii), and
(iii).'

Return to List of Contents of this section


(b) Master of Theology

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 775, l. 2, delete `three' and
substitute `two'.

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(c) Master of Studies in Theology

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 703, l. 20,
delete `two copies'.

2 Ibid., in l. 22, delete `either.'

3 Ibid., in ll. 23–4, delete `or at least twenty-eight
days

before the first day of Michaelmas Full Term following the examination'.

4 Ibid., delete ll. 33–42 and substitute `4. The Oral
examination shall be held within three weeks after the written examination'.

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16 Committee for Archaeology

(a) M.St. and M.Phil. in Classical Archaeology, European
Archaeology, and World Archaeology

With effect from1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 554, l. 2,
after
`written paper);' insert:

`Candidates whose work in the Qualifying Examination is judged by the
examiners to be of the standard required for the degree of M.St. in Classical
Archaeology but not of
the standard required to proceed to the second year of the M.Phil. in Classical
Archaeology, may be offered the
option of resitting the Qualifying Examination under
Ch. VI, Sect. vi, § 2, cl. 4, or of being granted permission to supplicate
for the degree of Master of Studies in Classical Archaeology.'

2 Ibid., p. 555, delete ll. 8–13 and substitute:

`14. Candidates whose work in the Final Examination is judged by the
examiners not to be of the standard required for the degree of M.Phil. in
Classical Archaeology but whose work in the Qualifying Examination
nevertheless reached the standard required for the degree of M.St. in
Classical Archaeology, may be offered the option of resitting the M.Phil. Final
Examination under Ch. VI, Sect. vi,
§ 2, cl. 4, or of being granted permission to supplicate for the degree of
Master of Studies in Classical Archaeology.'

3 Ibid., p. 588, l. 5, after `written paper);' insert:

`Candidates whose work in the Qualifying Examination is judged by the
examiners to be of the standard required for the degree of M.St. in European
Archaeology, but not of the standard required to proceed to the second year
of the M.Phil. in European Archaeology, may be offered the
option of resitting the Qualifying Examination under
Ch. VI, Sect. vi, § 2, cl. 4, or of being granted permission to supplicate
for the degree of Master of Studies in European Archaeology.'

4 Ibid., p. 589, delete ll. 12–17, and substitute:

`14. Candidates whose work in the Final Examination is judged by the
examiners not to be of the standard required for the degree of M.Phil. in
European Archaeology, but whose work in the Qualifying Examination
nevertheless reached the standard required for the degree of M.St. in
European Archaeology, may be offered the option of
resitting the M.Phil. Final Examination under Ch. VI,
Sect. vi, § 2, cl. 4, or of being granted permission to supplicate for the
degree of Master of Studies in European
Archaeology.'

5 Ibid., p. 650, l. 19, after `written paper);' insert:

`Candidates whose work in the Qualifying Examination
is judged by the examiners to be of the standard required for the degree of
M.St. in World Archaeology, but not
of the standard required to proceed to the second year of the M.Phil. in World
Archaeology, may be offered the
option of resitting the Qualifying Examination under
Ch. VI, Sect. vi, § 2, cl. 4, or of being granted permission to supplicate
for the degree of Master of Studies in World
Archaeology.'

6 Ibid., p. 651, delete ll. 24–9 and substitute:

`14. Candidates whose work in the Final Examination
is judged by the Examiners not to be of the standard
required for the degree of M.Phil. in World Archaeology but whose work in the
Qualifying Examination nevertheless reached the standard required for the
degree of
M.St. in World Archaeology, may be offered the option of resitting the M.Phil.
Final Examination under Ch. VI,
Sect. vi, § 2, cl. 4, or of being granted permission to supplicate for the
degree of Master of Studies in World
Archaeology.'

7 Ibid., p. 554, l. 35, p. 588, l. 37, p. 651, l. 7, p. 666, l.
25,
p. 670, l. 22, p. 712, l. 12, in each case after `must submit'
insert `two copies of'.

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(b) M.Phil. in Classical Archaeology

With effect from1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 554, l. 34,
delete `Hilary Full Term preceding the examinations' and substitute `term in
which the instruction for that subject is given'.

2 Ibid., l. 36, delete `Friday of the sixth week of Trinity
Full
Term' and substitute `Monday of the second week of the term following that
in which the instruction for that
subject was given'.

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(c) M.St. in Classical Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 665, l. 12,
delete `Friday of the sixth week' and substitute `Monday of the fifth week'.

2 Ibid., p. 666, l. 24, delete `Hilary Term preceding the
examinations' and substitute `term in which the instruction for that subject
is given'.

3 Ibid., l. 27, delete `Friday of the sixth week of Trinity
Full
Term' and substitute `Monday of the second week of the term following that
in which the instruction for that
subject was given'.

Return to List of Contents of this section


(d) M.St. in European Archaeology

With immediate effect (for first examination in 1999)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 670, delete l. 2.

Return to List of Contents of this section



17 Committee for Educational Studies

(a) Regulations Concerning the Status of Probationer Research
Student and the Degrees of M.Litt., M.Sc. by
Research, and D.Phil.

With effect from 1 October 1999

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 851, after
l.
46 (as amended by the changes published in Gazette on 3
December 1998,
p. 452), insert:

`5. Confirmation of status

Confirmation of status must be completed within nine terms of registering for
the first time at the Department of Educational Studies as either an M.Sc.
Educational Research Methodology student or Probationer Research Student.
It is intended to be a comprehensive monitoring of progress towards the final
thesis.

Students' applications for Confirmation of Status will be examined by two
assessors, on the basis of submission of written material and interview with
the supervisor present. The written material to be submitted will consist of:

(i) an abstract of the thesis (one side of A4 paper);

(ii) an outline structure of the thesis, consisting of chapter headings, and
a brief statement of the intended content;

(iii) an outline timetable detailing what work has already been carried out,
and what activities are planned for the remaining stages;

(iv) normally two completed chapters from the thesis in progress (e.g.
literature review; methodology; data anlysis procedures; findings).
If confirmation is not granted on this occasion, students will be allowed a
further term to reapply.'

2 Ibid., l. 47, renumber 5 as 6.

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(b) Postgraduate Certificate in Education at Westminster College

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 999, delete ll. 9–12 and
substitute:

`(a) Teaching Studies 
assignment                             (2,000 word equivalent)

(b) Learning and Assessment 
assignment                             (2,000 word equivalent)

(c) Curriculum assignment I    (3,000 word equivalent)

(d) Curriculum assignment II   (3,000 word equivalent)

(e) Curriculum assignment III  (1,500 word equivalent)

(f) Curriculum assignment IV    (1,500 word equivalent)'. 

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18 Committee on Continuing Education

(a) Postgraduate Certificate in Psychodynamic Counselling

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 972, l. 39,
delete `4,000' and substitute `3,000'.

2 Ibid., l. 43, delete `4,000' and substitute `5,000'.

Return to List of Contents of this section


(b) Postgraduate Diploma in Psychodynamic Practice

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 978, l. 19,
delete `6,000' and substitute `3,000'.

2 Ibid., delete l. 20 and substitute:

`(iii) three elaborated extracts from a candidate's placement log, each of no
more than 3,000 words.'

3 Ibid., l. 27, after `contact' insert `and subsmission of
yearly statements from a candidate's placement supervisor'.

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(c) Postgraduate Certificate in Software Engineering

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 973, delete ll. 9–30
and
substitute:

`1. The Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences, in consultation with
the Sub-faculty of Computation, and the Board of Studies of the Committee on
Continuing Education, shall elect for the supervision of the course a standing
committee which shall have the power to arrange lectures and other
instruction.

2. The course will consist of lectures, tutorials, seminars,
and classes in the theory and practice of Software Engineering. The course
may be taken over a period of not less than one year, and not more than two
years.

3. Every candidate will be required to satisfy the
examiners
in the following:

(a) attendance at a minimum of four short courses;

(b) submission of four written assignments, based on courses
chosen from those in the Schedule for the M.Sc. in Software Engineering,
comprising a programme of study approved by the Programme Director;

(c) a viva voce examination, unless individually dispensed by the
examiners.
The assignments under (b) shall be forwarded to the examiners for
consideration by such dates as the examiners shall determine and shall notify
candidates and tutors.

4. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence
in
the whole examination.

5. The standing committee for the M.Sc. in Software
Engineering shall have the discretion to permit any candidate to be exempted
from submitting one of the total of four assignments required, provided that
the standing committee is satisfied that such a candidate has undertaken
equivalent study, of an appropriate standard, normally at another institution
of higher education.

6. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners may
re-enter
the examination on not more than one occasion which shall normally be within
one year of the initial failure. No written assignment shall be submitted to the

examiners on more than one occasion.'

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(d) Postgraduate Diploma in Software Engineering

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, delete from p. 976, l. 39 to
p. 977, l. 49 and substitute:

`1. The Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences, in consultation with
the Sub-faculty of Computation, and the Board of Studies of the Committee on
Continuing Education, shall elect for the supervision of the course a standing
committee which shall have the power to arrange lectures and other
instruction.

2. The course will consist of lectures, tutorials, seminars,
and classes in the theory and practice of Software Engineering. The course
may be taken over a period of not less than one year, and not more than
three years.

3. Every candidate will be required to satisfy the
examiners
in the following:

(a) attendance at one practical short course and at least
another six short courses;

(b) submission of six written assignments and one practical
assisgnment, based on courses chosen from those in the Schedule for the
M.Sc. in Software Engineering, comprising a programme of study approved by
the Programme Director;

(c) a project report of not more than 5,000 words (including
appendices and footnotes but excluding bibliography) on a topic agreed by the
Programme Director;

(d) a viva voce examination, unless individually dispensed by the
examiners.
The assignments under (b) and the project report under
(c) shall be forwarded to the examiners for consideration by such
dates as the examiners shall determine and shall notify candidates and tutors.

4. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence
in
the whole examination.

5. The Standing Committee for the M.Sc. in Software
Engineering shall have the discretion to permit any candidate for the
postgraduate diploma to be exempted from submitting up to two of the total
of seven assignments
required under 2(b) above, provided that the standing committee is
satisfied that such a candidate has undertaken equivalent study, of an
appropriate standard, normally at another institution of higher education.

6. The standing committee shall have the discretion to
permit
any assignments submitted as part of the course for the Postgraduate
Certificate in Software Engineering, or the Postgraduate Certificate in Object
Technology, to be submitted for the examination for the Diploma. The
corresponding period of study undertaken for the Postgraduate Certificate
shall be counted towards the maximum period of study for the Diploma.

7. If any candidate who is successful in the examination
for
the Postgraduate Diploma in Software Engineering has previously successfully
completed the Postgraduate Certificate in Software Engineering, or the
Postgraduate Certificate in Object Technology, and for that examination has
incorporated the assignments submitted for the Postgraduate Certificate into
the Postgraduate Diploma, then the Postgraduate Diploma will subsume his or
her Certificate.

8. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners may
re-enter
the examination on not more than one occasion which shall normally be within
one year of the initial failure. No written assignment shall be submitted to the

examiners on more than one occasion.'

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(e) M.Sc. in Software Engineering

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, delete from
p.
769, l. 43 to
p. 771, l. 21 and substitute:

`1. The Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences, in consultation with
the Sub-faculty of Computation, and the Board of Studies of the Committee on
Continuing Education, shall elect for the supervision of the course a standing
committee which shall have the power to arrange lectures and other
instruction.

2. The course will consist of lectures, tutorials, seminars,
and classes in the theory and practice of Software Engineering. The course
may be taken over a period of not less than two years, and not more than
four years.

3. Every candidate will be required to satisfy the
examiners
in the following:

(a) attendance at one practical short course and at least
another eight short courses;

(b) eight written assignments, and one practical assisgnment,
based on courses chosen from those in the Schedule for the M.Sc. in Software
Engineering, comprising a programme of study approved by the Programme
Director;

(c) a dissertation of not more than 25,000 words (including
appendices and footnotes but excluding bibliography), on a subject selected
by the the candidate in consultation with the supervisor and approved by the
Programme
Director;

(d) a viva voce examination, unless individually dispensed by the
examiners.

The assignments under (b) and two typewritten or printed copies
of the dissertation under (c) shall be forwarded to the examiners for
consideration by such dates as the examiners shall determine and shall notify
candidates, tutors, and supervisors. The dissertation must be accompanied by
a statement that it is the candidate's own work except where otherwise
indicated.

4. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence
in
the whole examination.

5. The standing committee shall have the discretion to
permit
any assignments submitted as part of the course for the Postgraduate
Certificate in Software Engineering, or the Postgraduate Certificate in Object
Technology, or the Postgraduate Diploma in Software Engineering to be
submitted for the examination for the M.Sc. No more than one calendar year
of study undertaken for the Postgraduate Certificate and/or the Posgraduate
Diploma may be counted towards the minimum period of study for the M.Sc.;
the entire period of study undertaken for the Postgraduate Certificate and/or
the Postgraduate Diploma shall be counted towards the maximum period of
study for the M.Sc.

6. If any candidate who is successful in the examination
for
the M.Sc. in Software Engineering has previously successfully completed the
Postgraduate Diploma, or Certificate, or the Postgraduate Certificate in Object
Technology, and for that examination has incorporated the assignments
submitted for the Postgraduate Certificate or Postgraduate Diploma into the
M.Sc., then the subsequent award will subsume his or her previous award.

7. The standing committee shall have the discretion to
permit
any candidate to be exempted from submitting up to two of the total of nine
written assignments required under 3(b) above, provided that the
standing committee is satisfied that such a candidate has undertaken
equivalent study, of an appropriate standard, normally at another
institution of higher education.

8. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners may
re-enter
the examination on not more than one occasion which shall normally be within
one year of the initial failure. No written assignment shall be submitted to the

examiners on more than one occasion.

SCHEDULE

(i) Software Engineering
Mathematics.

(ii) Specification Methods.

(iii) Specification and Design.

(iv) Object-oriented Programming.

(v) Functional Programming.

(vi) Practical Software Engineering.

(vii) Concurrency and Distributed Systems.

(viii)Software Development Management.

(ix) Requirements Engineering.

(x) Advanced Concurrency Tools.

(xi) Critical Systems Engineering.

(xii) Scalable Parallel Programming.

(xiii)Software Testing.

(xiv) Machine-Assisted Software Engineering.

(xv) Advanced Software Development.

(xvi) Performance Modelling.

(xvii)Any other module as defined by the course director and approved
by the standing committee.

This standing committee shall have the power to add other courses or delete
courses from this list. In June and December each year a list of modules will
be published in the University Gazette. Each such list, which will
have been approved by the standing committee and which will be
a selection from the full set above, will contain those
modules which will be available during the following nine months.'

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(f) M.St. in English Local History

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 668, l. 27,
delete `1920' and substitute `1940'.

2 Ibid., delete l. 28 and substitute:

`(8) The English suburb, 1800–1930.'

3 Ibid., delete l. 30 and substitute:

`(1) Problems in European historical demography, 1560–1914.'

4 Ibid., l. 32, delete `1750' and substitute `1700'.

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(g) D.Phil. in Local History

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 849, delete ll. 6 and 7, and
substitute `before the end of the twelfth term, and at the latest by four
weeks before the end of the eighteenth term, after admission to graduate
status'.

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(h) D.Phil. in Software Engineering

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 849, delete l. 28 and substitute
`end of the twelfth term, and at the latest by the end of the eighteenth term,
after admission to graduate status'.

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19 Inter-faculty Committee for Queen Elizabeth
House

(a) M.Phil. in Development Studies

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 557, l. 40,
delete `Examination' and substitute `Test'.

2 Ibid., ll. 41, 42, and 45, delete `examination' and
substitute
`test'.

3 Ibid., l. 41, delete `papaers' and substitute `papers'.

4 Ibid., p. 558, delete ll. 31–3 and substitute:

`5.5 A candidate who fails to pass the qualifying test may, at the discretion
fo the Inter-faculty Committee for Queen Elizabeth House, be permitted to
retake the test before the beginning of the first week of the next academic
year. The inter-faculty committee can decide whether the retake shall consist
of the whole test or part thereof.'

5 Ibid., l. 34, delete `examination' and substitute `test'.

6 Ibid., l. 42, after `paper.' insert `Candidates who are
required to sit the written paper will do so during September immediately
following the final examination.'

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(b) M.St. in Forced Migration

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 671, ll.
43–4, delete `, for the Admissions Secretary,'.

2 Ibid., l. 44, delete `completing' and substitute
`following'.

3 Ibid., ll. 49–50, delete `Notice of the option must
be
given to the Registrar not later than Friday of the fourth week of that term.'
and substitute `This essay must be submitted by noon on Friday of week eight
of Hilary Full Term.'

4 Ibid., l. 53, after `of Hilary Term.' insert `Students must
submit their essays in week seven in Trinity Term at least 14 days before the
first day of the examinations in week nine.'.

5 Ibid., p. 672, l. 34, after `of the examination' insert `in
week nine of Trinity Term'.

6 Ibid., l. 40, delete `teaming' and substitute `learning'.

7 Ibid., after l. 44 insert:

`Papers III and IV must be the work of the candidate alone and aid from
others must be limited to prior discussion as to the subject and advice on
presentation. Each paper must be presented in proper scholarly form. Each
paper must be presented in two copies, typed in double-spacing on one side
only of quarto or A4 paper, each copy bound or held firmly in a stiff cover,
and must be delivered to the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High
Street, Oxford by the appropriate deadline as indicated in regulations 3 and
4 above.'

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20 Standing Committee for Engineering and
Computing Science

Honour School of Engineering and Computing Science

With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first Part I examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 170, l. 37,
delete `, or ECS6'.

2 Ibid., p. 171, ll. 17–18, delete `, ECS6'.

3 Ibid., p. 173, l. 12, delete `, ECS6'.

4 Ibid., p. 171, delete ll. 27–50 and substitute:

`ECSI Procedural Programming and Numerical Computing

Practical weight: one-sixth. Paper of 2 hours 30 minutes.

Procedural Programming:

Imperative programming constructs, with informal treatment of invariants.
Procedures and modules; their use in the design of large programs. Data
structures, including
arrays, records, and pointers. Basic tools for program development. Case
studies in design of medium-sized programs.

Numerical Computing:

Discretisation of partial differential equations by finite difference, finite
volume, and finite element methods; stability, error analysis, and
implementation issues. Iterative methods; conjugate gradients and multigrid.

ECS2 Functional Programming and Algorithm Design (Honour Moderations in
Mathematics and Computer Science,
Section 4)

ECS3 Compilers and Programming Languages (Honour School of Computer
Science, Paper I.2)

ECS4 Concurrency and Distributed Systems (Honour School of Computer
Science, Paper I.3)

ECS5 Computer Architecture and Operating Systems (Honour School of
Computer Science, Paper I.4)'

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21 Standing Committee for Engineering and
Materials

Honour School of Engineering and Materials

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first Part I examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 184, delete
ll.
34–6 and substitute:

`ME1. Microstructure and Transformations.

ME2. Electronics Properties and Structure.

ME3. Mechanical Properties.'

2 Ibid., delete p. 185, ll. 42–9 and p. 186, ll. 1–3
and substitute:

`ME1. Microstructure and Transformations

Thermodynamics and kinetics, phase transformations, microstructure, diffusion,
surfaces, and interfaces. Engineering alloys.

ME2. Electronics Properties and Structure

Crystallography; quantum and statistical mechanics, bonding, electronic
structure of materials, electrical, optical, and magnetic properties of materials;
physics of semiconductors.

ME3. Mechanical Properties

Crystal defects; hardness, toughness, and strength; plasticity; fracture.
Mechanical properties of polymers and composites. Ceramics, polymers, and
composites.'

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF
PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral
examination of their candidates as
follows:

Biological Sciences

R. LEWIS, Wadham: `Regulation of resistance to beta-
lactam antibiotics in Staphylococcus aureus'.

Department of Biochemistry, Tuesday, 27 April, 2 p.m.


Examiners: J.P. Armitage, P.E. Reynolds.

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Management

K. RUDDLE, Templeton: `Understanding journeys of transformation: new
paradigms in strategic change and enterprise transformation'.

New College, Tuesday, 27 April, 2.30 p.m.


Examiners: R. Whittington, R. Whipp.

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Mathematical Sciences

R. MCPHEE, Worcester: `Compositional logic programming'.

Computing Laboratory, Friday, 30 April, 10 a.m.


Examiners: R.S. Bird, G. Hutton.

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Medieval and Modern Languages

S.L. COANE, Balliol: `"J'écris les choses comme je les vois":
writing the world in the eighteenth-century relation de
voyage
'.

Examination Schools, Tuesday, 25 May, 2.30 p.m.


Examiners: N.E. Cronk, E., Freeman.

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Modern History

J.P.D. COOPER, St Catherine's: `Propaganda, allegiance, and sedition in the
Tudor south-west, c.1497–1570'.

Keble, Friday, 23 April, 2 p.m.


Examiners: I.W. Archer, S.G. Ellis.

C.A. RISTUCCIA, Linacre: `The Italian economy under
Fascism'.

Wolfson, Monday, 26 April, 2 p.m.


Examiners: D. Mack Smith, M. Harrison.

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Physical Sciences

D. HADDAD, St Cross: `Lithospheric flexure and the evolution of Australian
basins'.

Department of Earth Sciences, Thursday, 29 April, 2 p.m.


Examiners: S.P. Hesselbo, D.A. Falvey.

J.L. KNIGHT, New College: `Crown ether and catechol receptors for metal and
anion complexation'.

Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Tuesday, 4 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: D. O'Hare, D. Hall.

J. MANGAL, Brasenose: `Partially-drained loading of shallow foundations on
sand'.

Department of Engineering Science, Thursday, 27 May,
2 p.m.


Examiners: H.J. Burd, W.H. Craig.

W. POKORSKI, Hertford: `M-theory phenomenology'.

Sub-department of Theoretical Physics, Tuesday, 27 April, 2.30 p.m.


Examiners: S. Sarkar, S. Thomas.

A.M. TOMLINSON, Magdalen: `Terahertz detection and electric field domains in
multiple quantum wells'.

Clarendon Laboratory, Thursday, 6 May, 11 a.m.


Examiners: P.C. Klipstein, S.R. Andrews.

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Physiological Sciences

P. CUELLO, Brasenose: `3 end formation of POL II snRNA gene transcripts'.

Instiute of Molecular Medicine, Friday, 23 April, 2 p.m.


Examiners: D.R. Higgs, B. McStay.

C. PIPERI, Linacre: `Structural and functional studies on CD22'.

Department of Biochemistry, Wednesday, 12 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: S.K.A. Law, P.C. Driscoll.

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Social Studies

I.P. KELEMENIS, Nuffield: `Between captivity and freedom: a study of a
resettlement prison'.

Corpus Christi, Thursday, 29 April, 2 p.m.


Examiners: L.H. Zedner, A. Liebling.

N. REDMAN, St Antony's: `Dilemmas of engagement: Estonian, Latvian, and
Lithuanian approaches to relations with Russia, 1992–6'.

Social Studies

Faculty Centre, Monday, 3 May, 2 p.m.


Examiners: E.A. Roberts, R. Allison.

M. TROMBETTA, St Hugh's: `The economic analysis of accounting regulation:
three essays'.

Nuffield, Tuesday, 27 April, 2 p.m.


Examiners: H.S. Shin, P. Grout.

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section





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 22 April 1999: Colleges<br />

Colleges, Halls, and Societies


Contents of this section:

Return to Contents Page of this issue



OBITUARIES


All Souls College, Corpus Christi College,
Magdalen College, Mansfield College, Nuffield College, and St
Antony's College

THE RT. HON. LORD BELOFF (MAX BELOFF), KT., MA, D.LITT., FBA,
F.R.HIST.S., FRSA, 22 March 1999; commoner, Corpus Christi College,
1932–5, Junior Research Fellow 1937–9, Honorary Fellow
1992–9; Senior Demy, Magdalen College, 1935–7; Fellow,
Nuffield College, 1947–57; Gladstone Professor of Government and
Public Administration and Fellow, All Souls College, 1957–74,
Emeritus Fellow since 1980; Supernumerary Fellow, St Antony's
College, 1975–84; Honorary Fellow, Mansfield College.

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All Souls College and Balliol College

HENRY VINCENT HODSON, 26 March 1999; commoner, Balliol College,
1925–8; Fellow, All Souls College, 1928–35.

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Christ Church

WING-COMMANDER NEIL ONSLOW STEELE BAYLEY, DFC, June 1998; commoner.

WALTER GEORGE STEVEN, MA, 9 March 1999; scholar. Aged 81.

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Corpus Christi College

DAVID CHILTON PHILLIPS, THE RT. HON. LORD PHILLIPS OF ELLESMERE, KBE,
KT., MA (PH.D. Wales, HON. D.SC. Leicester, Wales, Chicago, Warwick,
Exeter, Birmingham, Glasgow, Glamorgan, Bath, HON. D.UNIV. Essex),
FRS, HON. FRSE, HON. FRCP, 23 February 1999; Professor of Molecular
Biophysics and Fellow 1966–90, Honorary Fellow 1990–8. Aged
74.

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Exeter College

SIR CHARLES MOTAITE BENNETT, 26 November 1998; commoner 1937. Aged
85.

KENNETH MARTIN COWLEY, OBE, 10 November 1998; commoner 1930. Aged
86.

MAURICE MITCHELL HEGGS; commoner 1926. Aged 91.

COURTNEY ARTHUR RALEIGH RADFORD, 12 December 1998; commoner 1918.
Aged 98.

FREDERICK SOUTHWORTH, 28 February 1999; commoner 1929. Aged 89.

ARTHUR BERNARD WALTON, 11 January 1999; commoner 1925. Aged 94.

PROFESSOR QUAIN ZHONGSHU, B.LITT., 19 December 1998. Aged 88.

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Lincoln College

SIR MICHAEL CAINE, March 1999; commoner 1947–50. Aged 71.

GEORGE BARR JACK, March 1999; commoner 1968–72. Aged 52.

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Pembroke College

DONALD FRANCIS MCKENZIE, MA, D.PHIL. (MA new zealand, PH.D.
Cambridge), FBA, 22 March 1999; Reader in Textual Criticism 1986--
89, Professor of Bibliography and Textual Criticism 1989--96; Fellow
1986--96, Supernumerary Fellow from 1996.

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St Anne's College

LADY FRANCES FRANCE (née Palmer); Member of the
Society of Oxford Home-Students 1931–4.

MRS PAMELA GUPTA (née Bennett); Member of the
Society of Oxford Home-Students 1938–41.

MRS HILDA PEWTRES (née Abell); Member of the Society
of Oxford Home-Students 1920–3. Aged 96.

MISS MARGARET PRIOR; Member of the Society of Oxford Home-Students
1941–4.

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St Edmund Hall

MATTHEW AUSTIN CANNING, MA, 11 March 1999; commoner 1949–52.
Aged 69.

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St Hilda's College

KATHLEEN MARIE ANNE ROBERTS (née Popham), B.LITT.,
MA, April 1998; scholar 1932–5. Aged 84.

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St Hugh's College

CHRISTINA SHEILA MARY ABBOTT, 6 September 1998; Gilchrist Scholar
1932–5. Aged 85.

BEATRICE HELEN COLMAN (née Roberts), 31 December
1998; commoner 1926–9. Aged 91.

DAMARIS ILEENE FLETCHER, 14 February 1999; commoner 1938–41.
Aged 79.

OLIVER MARY GORTON (née Shapley), 13 March 1999;
Senior Teachers' Scholar 1929–32. Aged 88.

MARGARET BLANCHE ELIZABETH SHINNIE (née Cloake);
commoner 1928–31.

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Trinity College

ALASTAIR NORMAN BALFOUR, 17 October 1996; commoner 1929. Aged 87.

DENNIS ALLEN COULTER TREZISE HANCOCK, 19 January 1999; commoner
1939. Aged 67.

OLIVER JOHN KEEBLE, 3 March 1999; commoner and Rhodes Scholar
1946. Aged 78.

ALAN JAMES NEVILL YOUNG, 7 February 1999; commoner 1930. Aged 88.

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ELECTIONS


All Souls College

Visiting Fellowships

The following will be in residence for Trinity Term 1999 as Visiting
Fellows at All Souls College:

PROFESSOR JOSEPH CONNORS, Columbia University

PROFESSOR ANTHONY JOSEPH, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot

PROFESSOR VILAYANUR RAMAMCHANDRAN, University of California, San
Diego

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Mansfield College

To Scholarships (MT 1998):

LUKE BOWERY, formerly of Wycliffe College, Stonehouse

PETER CROCKER, formerly of Caterham School

GRAHAM MARTIN, formerly of Mackworth College, Derby

JAMES PITTS, formerly of Borden Grammar School

CHRISTOPHER TANT, formerly of Tring School, Hertfordshire

GREG WALL, formerly of St Mary's Academy, Eire

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To Exhibitions (MT 1998):

VICTORIA BRADFORD, formerly of St Leonars-Mayfield School

BENJAMIN BROWN, formerly of Ryde High School, Isle of Wight

CHRISTOPHER FOSTER, formerly of Winstanley College, Wigan

MATTHEW PAYNE, formerly of St Mary's Sixth-Form College,
Middlesbrough

To an Exhibition (HT 1999):

WILLIAM DANNY, formerly of King
Edward's School, Bath

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St Peter's College

To the Fleming Scholarship in Clinical Medicine:

NIALL KEENAN, Winchester College

LUKE MASSEY, Ampleforth College, York

To College Scholarships:

CLARE GOUDY, formerly of Newman School, Hove

NAOMI HUMPHRIES, formerly of the Weald School, Billingshurst

FLAVIA KENYON, formerly of ILE Caragiale High School, Ploiesti, and
Burcharest University, Romania

ANTOANETA PROCTOR, formerly of Richmond upon Thames College

To a Choral Scholarship:

STEPHEN HICKEY, formerly of St
Olave's Grammar School, Orpington

To an Instrumental Scholarship:

TETSUYA ISHIKAWA, formerly
of Eton College

To College Exhibitions:

JENNIFER BUSH, formerly of Bancroft's School, Woodford Green, Essex

JONATHAN TRUP, formerly of St Paul's School, London

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To Choral Exhibitions:

ELIZABETH BURATTI, formerly of St George's English School, Rome

MARY LUND, formerly of St Margaret's School, Exeter

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PRIZES


Mansfield College

Collections Prizes:

BENJAMIN FRANCIS

ISABELLE THOMAS

ALLANA ROSS

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NOTICES


CHRIST CHURCH


Stipendiary Lecturership in Music

Christ Church proposes to appoint a stipendiary lecturer in Music to provide
nine hours' tutorial teaching per week, for one year from 1 October 1999, with
the possibility of
renewal for a further period of one or two years. The successful candidate
will be an historical musicologist who will be required to teach papers for
Honour Moderations and the Final Honour School, and to assist with
undergraduate admissions and pastoral care. Candidates should have a
developing research profile in a specialist area but will be suitably qualified
to teach across the full breadth of the undergraduate course. They should
make clear in their application which subjects they would be willing to teach.

The successful candidate will work in conjunction with the Tutor in Music,
Stephen Darlington, who teaches the technical and practical elements of the
course, and is also the Cathedral Organist. The salary will be on the first
point of the lecturers' scale, £11,132 per annum (under
review), plus additional allowancs.

Further particulars may be obtained from the Censors' Administrator, Christ
Church, Oxford OX1 1DP, and may be viewed on the college's Web site:
http://www.chch.ox.
ac.uk/jobs/music.html. The closing date for applications is Thursday, 13 May.

Christ Church is an equal opportunities employer.

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CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE


Garside Senior Scholarship

Corpus Christi College proposes to elect a Garside Senior Scholar in
Mathematics, to start in Michaelmas Term 1999. The successful candidate will
normally be reading for a D.Phil. in Mathematics. It is hoped to make an
appointment for two years (for candidates who will be in their second year of
study when they take up the scholarship). The value of the scholarship will
be £1,650 per annum, together with limited dining rights with senior
members: essentially one free lunch per week in term and vacation, and one
free dinner per week in term.

Candidates should send their application to the Tutor for Graduates, Corpus
Christi College, Oxford OX1 4JF,
enclosing a curriculum vitae and examples of work to date, and
should arrange for two named referees to write directly to the college.
Applications and references should arrive at the college no later than Monday,
3 May. It is
expected that interviews will take place in fifth week of Trinity Term.

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Corpus Christi Visiting Fellowship(s) 2000–1

Corpus Christi College proposes, if suitable candidates offer themselves, to
elect to a Corpus Christi Visiting
Fellowship for each term in the academic year 2000–1. The fellowship is
intended for persons of high academic distinction, either from abroad or from
the UK, who wish to pursue academic study and research as a member of the
college. It is tenable for one, two, or three terms during the year. Preference
will be given to candidates whose work is close to the academic interests of
one or more fellows of the college.

A Visiting Fellow is entitled to free luncheon and dinner during all periods
when the kitchen is open and to full membership of the senior common room.
The college hopes to be able to provide the fellow with shared study
accommodation and will provide practical aid in finding accommodation in
Oxford.

Applicants should write to the President's Secretary, Corpus Christi College,
Oxford OX1 4JF, before 1 November, enclosing a curriculum vitae,
a list of publications, a programme of work and the names of three referees.
It
is their responsibility to ask their referees to send their
references direct by the same date.
Corpus Christi College exists to promote excellence in
education and research and is actively committed to the principle of equality
of opportunity for all suitably qualified candidates.

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HERTFORD COLLEGE


Appointment of IT Manager

Hertford College seeks an experienced IT professional to support an extensive
college network system and to provide professional support to fellows, staff,
and students. The salary will be on the university research scale 1A,
c.£21,000–£25,000, plus USS pension scheme.

Further details and an application form are available from the College
Secretary, Hertford College, Catte Street,
Oxford OX1 3BW (telephone: Oxford (2)79423, e-mail:
college.office@hertford.ox.ac.uk).

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Appointment of EFL Teachers

Hertford College seeks to appoint EFL teachers, to teach parties of visiting
Japanese students for various periods from 17 July to 25 September 1999.

A minimum of the RSA Preparatory Certificate, plus
experience, is necessary. A fee of £1,100, plus free accommodation, is
offered for the four-week course.

Letters of application, with a curriculum vitae, should be sent to
the Conference Secretary, Hertford College, Catte Street, Oxford OX1 3BW, by
Thursday, 29 April.

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JESUS COLLEGE


Alun Hughes Graduate Scholarship

Jesus College proposes to award one prestigious scholarship for postgraduate
study and research into the languages and/or cultures of Polynesia or
Micronesia. The scholarship is restricted to candidates who have been
accepted by the University to commence their studies towards the degree of
Doctor of Philosophy with effect from October 1999.

The college will cover a maintenance allowance for a single person equivalent
to an AHRB or ESRC award, university fees at the home and EU postgraduate
student rate, and college fees. Grants will be available for travel, books, and
research costs.

For an application form contact the Tutor for Graduates, Jesus College, Oxford
OX1 3DW (telephone: Oxford (2)79723, fax: (2)79769, e-mail:
tutor.for.graduates@jesus.ox.ac.uk).

The closing date for aplications is Friday, 14 May. Short-listed candidates will
be interviewed at the end of May.

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KEBLE COLLEGE


Research Fellowships and Tutorships in English
and Physics

Keble College proposes to elect two Research Fellows and Tutors, in English
and in Physics, for a period of three years from 1 October 1989, with the
possibility of re-election for a further period of two years. The person
appointed in English will be required to teach for up to five hours per week,
and be able to cover Moderations paper 1 (English Literature from 1832 to
1900); Moderations paper 2 (English Literature from 1900 to the present day);
Moderations options paper (Special authors; Elements of criticial theory and
Critical commentary); and to conduct revision classes in Trinity Term. The
person appointed in Physics will be required to teach for up to four hours
per week, and to be able to cover core subjects in the prelims and Part A
Physics syllabus.

The fellows will not be members of the governing body, but they will be full
members of the senior common room and be entitled to lunch and dinner at
the common table as well as an academic allowance. Shared office space will
also be available. Payment for teaching will be at the rate of £3,038 for
five hours and £2,431 for four hours; in addition, a Research Fellow and
Tutor not in receipt of other financial support will receive a housing allowance
of £2,775. The fellows will be eligible to join USS. Selection will be made
on the basis of teaching capacity in the required field and on research.
Candidates should submit a curriculum vitae, a statement of
research, a covering letter, and the names and addresses of two referees to
the
Warden's Secretary, Keble College, Oxford OX1 3PG, by Monday, 17 May; they
should also ask their referees to write directly to the Warden's Secretary by
the same date.

Keble College is an equal opportunities employer committed to excellence in
teaching and research.

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MERTON COLLEGE


Six-Hour Stipendiary Lecturership in Philosophy

Merton College wishes to appoint a stipendiary lecturer in philosophy, with an
obligation to teach up to an average of six hours per week for the academic
year 1999–2000, and to help with admissions in November/December. The
ability to teach ancient philosophy for Classical Mods and Greats would be an
advantage. The stipend will be (at present rates) £7,868. The appointment
will carry with it membership of the senior common room, and the right to
free meals (lunch and dinner) for most of the year. A shared teaching room
will be provided.

The college expects applicants to have completed at least two years of
graduate work by October 1999 and to be actively engaged in research.

Applicants should provide a brief curriculum vitae, a brief
statement of their research interests, and an account of what teaching they
have done already and would be prepared to do. They should provide names,
addresses, telephone numbers and, where possible, e-mail addresses of two
referees, but should not ask referees to write directly. (The college will take
up references only for short-listed candidates.)

Applications should be sent by post to the Tutorial
Secretary, Merton College, Oxford OX1 4JD, or by fax to
Oxford (2)86500, as soon as possible, and at the latest by Friday, 7 May.
Short-listed candidates may be asked for
interview during the week commencing 17 May.

Informal enquiries may be directed to Dr T. Stoneham (e-mail:
tom.stoneham@philosophy.ox.ac.uk).

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NEW COLLEGE


Harvey McGregor fixed-tem Fellowship in Law

New College proposes to elect to a fixed-term Fellowship in Law for three
years from 1 October 1999. The fellowship
is not renewable. The fellow will be expected to teach
at least three of Constitutional Law, Administrative Law, EC Law, Contract, and
Torts, and to pursue advanced
research. Although this is a fixed-term appointment,
the stipend will be on the college's standard tutorial
fellowship scale.

Application forms and further particulars may be
obtained from the Senior Tutor, New College, Oxford
OX1 3BN (telephone: Oxford (2)79596, fax: (2)79590, e-mail: tuition@new.ox.ac.uk).
The closing date for receipt of
applications and references is Friday, 30 April.

New College is an equal opportunities employer.

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ORIEL COLLEGE


Stipendiary Lecturership in Politics

Oriel College proposes to appoint a full-time Lecturer in Politics for one year
from October 1999. The person appointed will be required to teach twelve
hours a week, give sixteen hours of university lectures in Political Theory,
and to assume full responsibility for organising the
teaching of Politics in college.

Further particulars are available from the College Secretary, Oriel College,
Oxford OX1 4EW (telephone: Oxford (2)76543). The closing date for applications
is Friday,
14 May.

Applicants should write to the College Secretary enclosing a curriculum
vitae
and a brief statement of research interests (seven copies of each)
together with the names of three referees before Friday, 14 May. Candidates
should ask their referees to write direct to the College Secretary by the
closing date.

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College Chaplaincy

Oriel College is seeking to appoint a Chaplain for a five-year period with
effect from 1 October 1999. Applications are invited from men and women in
Anglican priest's
orders. The person appointed will be required to carry out pastoral work
among all members of the college, and will be responsible for the conduct and
oversight of services in the college chapel.

Applications, including the names of three referees, should be sent to the
College Secretary, Oriel College,
Oxford OX1 4EW, from whom also further particulars may be obtained. The
closing date for applications and
receipt of references is Tuesday, 4 May.

Oriel College is an equal opportunities employer.

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QUEEN'S COLLEGE


Lecturership in French

Queen's College proposes to elect a Lecturer in French for one year from 1
October 1999 (renewable). The lecturer will be required to teach twelve hours
per week and the basic stipend will be £14,815 per annum (together with
certain allowances). Applications are invited from candidates with research
interests in some area of French Literature after 1715.

Further particulars and application forms may be obtained from the College
Secretary, Queen's College, Oxford OX1 4AW. The closing date for applications
is 12 May.


Lecturership in Law

Queen's College proposes to elect a part-time stipendiary six-hour Lecturer in
Law for one year from 1 October 1999.

The lecturer will be required to teach up to six hours per week for the
college. The lecturer will be expected to teach either Criminal Law or Roman
Law for Law Moderations, and at least two of Contract, Tort, Trusts, and EC
Law for the Final Honour School of Jurisprudence.

A teaching room is usually available. The stipend is £7,407 per annum
(under review) and the lecturer will be entitled some lunching or dining
rights during extended full term.

Applications should include a curriculum vitae, an indication of
areas of teaching experience, and the names of two referees and should be
sent to the Senior Tutor, Queen's College, Oxford OX1 4AW. The closing date
for applications is 12 May. Applicants should ask their referees to send their
references direct to the Senior Tutor by that date.

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ST ANNE'S COLLEGE


Stipendiary Lecturership in Economics

St Anne's College proposes to elect a twelve-hour Stipendiary Lecturer in
Economics, for one year from October 1999. The lecturer will teach for twelve
hours per week, and act as Director of Studies for those students studying
economics (organising teaching, monitoring student progress, and participating
in admissions).

Candidates should have tutorial teaching experience in the compulsory first-
and second-year economics papers for PPE and Economics and Management,
and the compulsory third- and fourth-year economics papers for Engineering,
Economics, and Management. The remuneration will be at the rate of
£15,735 or £16,655 according to ex-
perience. The stipendiary lecturer will be a member of the senior common room
and will be entitled to free lunches and dinners at high table. There is an
academic allowance of £524 and free BUPA membership.

Further particulars may be obtained from the Senior Tutor's Secretary, St
Anne's College, Oxford OX2 6HS (telephone: Oxford (2)74825, e-mail:
heather.law@st-annes.
ox.ac.uk). Applications (four copies, typewritten), including a curriculum
vitae
and a brief statement of the applicant's research interests, should
be sent to the Senior Tutor, St Anne's College, by 26 April. Applicants should
include one copy of a recent research paper or thesis
chapter. Applicants should also ask two referees to write directly to the
Senior Tutor, St Anne's College, Oxford OX2 6SH, by the same date.

St Anne's College is an equal opportunities employer.

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ST HILDA'S COLLEGE


E.P. Abraham Junior Research Fellowship

Applications are invited for an E.P. Abraham Junior Research Fellowship, for
study in biochemistry, chemistry, medicine, biological sciences, or engineering
science with an application in the aforementioned areas. The appointment would
be for two years from October 1999, with the possibility of renewal for a
further year. The fellowship is open to women graduates of any country.

Further particulars should be obtained from the Sec-
retarial Assistant, Academic Office, St Hilda's College,
Oxford OX4 1DY (telephone: Oxford (2)76815, e-mail:
college.office@st-hildas.ox.ac.uk). The closing date is
30 April.

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ST HUGH'S COLLEGE


Fixed-term (three years) Tutorial Fellowship in
English

St Hugh's College proposes to elect a fixed-term Tutorial Fellow in English
with effect from 1 October 1999. No university post is associated with this
fellowship, and the appointment will be for three years and will not be
renewed.

Applications are invited from those with interests in
literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to the late Middle Ages and the English
language.

Further particulars and application forms may be obtained from the Senior
Tutor, St Hugh's College, Oxford OX2 6LE (fax: Oxford (2)74912) to whom
applications, including a full curriculum vitae, a list of
publications, and the names of three referees, should be sent to arrive by
12 May. Candidates should ask referees to write direct to the
Senior Tutor by the same date.

St Hugh's College is an equal opportunities employer.

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ST PETER'S COLLEGE


Stipendiary Lecturership in Philosophy

Applications are invited for a Stipendiary Lecturership
in Philosophy, for two years from 1 October 1999. The
lecturer will teach for nine hours per week and act as
Director of Studies for undergraduates studying Philosophy (including
organising tuition and participating in
admissions).

Candidates should have experience of giving tutorials on the papers on
History of Philosophy from Descartes to Kant, and Ethics, and should be
prepared to tutor in some other papers. Remuneration will be within the scale
£11,111 to £13,706 per annum. The lecturer will have
senior common room-rights.

Applications, together with a curriculum vitae and the names and
addresses of two referees, should be sent to the College Secretary, St Peter's
College, Oxford OX1 2DL,
by 17 May. Applicants should ask their referees to send
references to the College Secretary by the closing date.

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SOMERVILLE COLLEGE


Fixed-term Tutorial Fellowship in Law

Somerville College proposes to elect a Tutorial Fellow in Law with effect from
1 October 1999, until 30 September 2002. The Somerville appointment is tenable
in conjunction with a University Lecturership (CUF) in the Faculty of Law,
tenable for the same period. The vacancy was created to replace one of the
college's Tutorial Fellows in Law who was granted temporary leave from her
post to take up a chair in European Community Law at the European
University Institute in Florence. Applications are invited from suitably
qualified women and men who can provide teaching in the college in at least
three of the subjects in the Honour School of Jurisprudence (other than
Jurisprudence, Contract, Comparative, and Roman law), two of which should be
core subjects, or two of those subjects and one in the graduate degrees of
BCL and M.Juris. The appointee will also be required to teach for the faculty
within the field of Tort, Corporate Law, Commercial Law, or EC Law (in a
broad sense, including Competition Law). The combined college and university
salary will be according to age on a scale up to £37,113 per annum.
Additional college allowances are available.

Particulars may be obtained from the College Secretary, Somerville College,
Oxford OX2 6HD (telephone: Oxford (2)70619/31, fax: (2)70620, e-mail:
secretariat@somerville.
ox.ac.uk). The closing date for applications is 28 April.

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Lecturership in Engineering

Somerville College wishes to appoint a Lecturer in Engineering from October
1999 for one year, the first term as a Stipendiary Lecturer, the second and
third terms as a
Retaining Fee Lecturer. Applicants will be required to give tutorials to first-,
second-, and third-year engineering students in Thermodynamics and Fluid
Mechanics. Applicants should already have experience of giving tutorials, and
be able to offer teaching in other areas of mechanical engineering.

The salary of the one-term stipendiary lecturer post will be on point 1 or
point 2 of the university scale (£4,938–
£5,245, pro rata), depending on experience. The retaining fee for the two
subsequent terms will be £120 a term, with teaching hours paid at the
outside teaching rates in agreement with the guidelines set by the Senior
Tutors' Committee. The person appointed will be a member of the senior
common room and entitled to a number of meals in college during term.

Further information can be obtained from the College Secretary (telephone:
Oxford (2)70619/31, fax: (2)70620,
e-mail: secretariat@somerville.ox.ac.uk), to whom applications should be sent as
soon as possible and not later than 3 May. Short-listed candidates are likely
to be invited for interview in the week beginning 12 May.
Somerville College is an equal opportunities employer.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 22 April 1999: Advertisements<br />

Advertisements


Contents of this section:



How to advertise in the
Gazette


Terms and conditions
of
acceptance of advertisements

Return to Contents Page of this issue



Oxford Chamber Music Society

Trinity Term Concerts. 9 May, 8.00 p.m.: Vellinger String
Quartet, works by Haydn, Hugh Wood, Mendelssohn. 20 June, 8.00 p.m.: Ian
Fountain (piano), works by Beethoven, Berg, Chopin, Rachmaninov,
Janácek.
Holywell Music Room. Tickets £10; in advance from the Playhouse Box
Office
(tel.: Oxford 798600) £9; concessions £4.50.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Tuition Offered

Piano Lessons: experienced teacher. Adults and children. All
grades. Beginners welcome. Contact Miss P. Read BA (Hons) LRAM, Jericho, tel.:
Oxford 510904.

Pallas: Inter-University Postgraduate Curriculum, LL.M. in
European Business Law, 1999/2000. The Pallas LL.M. programme in European
Business Law is a postgraduate full-time course of 1 year. This programme has
been set up by the law departments of the universities of Barcelona (Spain),
Bologna (Italy), Essex (Great Britain), Konstanz (Germany), LUISS Guido Carli
(Italy), Jean Moulin Lyon 3 (France) and Nijmegen (The Netherlands) in 1995.
The
team of lecturers consists of leading professors and practising lawyers from
various European countries. In Sept. 1999 and Sept. 2000 this course will be
organised again. Host University: University of Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
Working language: English. Tuition costs: EURO 8,865 (approx. NLG 19,500) for
1999/2000 year. Living expenses (accommodation included for 11 months of
study
in Nijmegen): approximately NLG 1,200 (550 EURO) per month for a single
student.
Further information available from Centre for Postgraduate Legal Education,
University of Nijmegen, Faculty of Law, PO Box 10520, 6500 MB Nijmegen, the
Netherlands (attn. Ms Mariëlle Cornielje). Tel.: + 31 24 3613090, fax: + 31
24
3615838, e-mail: cpo@jur.kun.nl.

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Services Offered

Efficient medical secretary offering an efficint, personal, and
reliable secretarial support for professional and medical personnel. With fully-
equipped office (computer, printer, e-mail, Internet). Any job undertaken, copy
or audio work. For further details, please contact Jackie Webster, tel./fax:
Oxford
882499.

West Country artist of national reputation is available to take
commission for portraits in oil at reasonable prices. For more details, tel.:
Oxford
726124.

Jeanne Bliss: garden designer and pruning adviser; colourful
courtyards and roof gardens; Oxford and California. A two-hour initial visit:
£30. Tel.: Oxford 515379.

Research 4 Hire. For details, see
http://www.research4hire.com.

Windows, doors, and conservatories installed with
craftsmanship
and care by Oxford's longest-established double glazing company. A third-
generation family firm, we believe in giving clear practical advice without
pressure or obligation. Proud to have served over 30 university colleges.
Oxford
Double Glazing, tel.: Oxford 248287.

Shipping? Abyssinia to Zanzibar, New York to Newmarket.
Today,
tomorrow, next week? All the best options are at Mail Boxes Etc. Will collect
from
college, home, factory, or elsewhere. Also 24-hour photocopying, secure
mailboxes,
computer workstation, high-grade colour photocopying, faxing, laminating,
binding, etc. 266 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7DL. Contact Justin
Brookes. Tel.: Oxford 514655, fax: 514656, e-mail:
summertown@020.mbe.uk.com.

Tax advice. Ex-KPMG Chartered Accountant specialises in
assisting professionals and small businesses with tax problems including self-
assessment. Convenient North Oxford premises. To receive further information
please tel.: Oxford 513381, e-mail: 100430.145@compuserve.com.

Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press—the University
Printers: specialising in booklet and publicity material, typesetting, printing,
and
finishing. Output Bureau provides high-quality output from disc from all major
DTP programs onto paper, bromide, colour-separated positive or negative film;
high-quality specialist colour copier service. For service, quality, and
competitive
prices contact Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press, Great Clarendon Street,
Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 514691, fax: 514010.

Personal Computer Consultants: we offer expert advice and
tuition for both hardware and software. On-site service at home or in the
office.
We provide upgrades for most computers, or alternatively we now supply our
range of personally-built to your own specifications K Tec computers. We will
also
supply or source software to match your requirements. For a quality service
matched with competitive prices, contact Chris Lewis, tel.: Oxford 461222, fax:
461333.

Town and Country Trees: professional tree surgeons. All
aspects
of arboriculture undertaken including orchard and shrub pruning, planting,
hedge trimming, stump grinding, etc. Quality work at competitive prices. We
are
fully insured. For a free quotation, call Paul Hodkinson. Tel.: 01869 351540.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Domestic Services

Au pair or mature student required by family in Kidlington,
1
June–15 July (our Au Pair has to leave early). You have your own flat.
Experienced driver essential. Must like cats. Children aged 16, 15, 12. For
more
details, tel.: Oxford 513816 (day), 842103 (evening/weekend).

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your
local
specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also
carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood
cleaning/drying,
oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice, call
Grimebusters.
Tel.: Oxford 726983 or Abingdon 555533.

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Situations Vacant

Pembroke College: Accounts Assistant required to work in
small
team reporting to the College Accountant. Primary role will be operation of
College payroll; other duties include petty cash, dealing with student queries,
and assisting with the running of the Sales and Purchase Ledgers. We are
seeking someone who is accurate, numerate, computer literate, and
enthusiastic.
You should possess a minimum of 2 years accounts experience, including
detailed
knowledge of payroll. Salary dependent on qualification and experience, in
range
£11,000–£13,000 for a 37.5 hour week. For details and application
form, please apply to the College Accountant, Pembroke College, Oxford, OX1
1DW,
tel.: Oxford (2)76424. Pembroke College is an equal opportunities employer.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Houses to Let

Summertown, in attractive quiet location convenient for
shops,
schools, buses. Comfortable, well-maintained, detached house; 4 bedrooms, 2
sitting-rooms, dining-room, study, large kitchen, breakfast-room, bathroom,
shower, 2 w.c.s, gas c.h., gardens (gardener included); car space. Available
from
late Aug. to careful non-smoking family. £1,200 p.c.m. plus bills. Tel.:
Oxford
558511.

Beautiful, sunny, quiet, modernised terrace house in central
Headington, close to shops and London coach services, 25-ft. living-room,
upstairs
bathroom, fitted kitchen, fridge-freezer, autowasher, gas c.h., newly-decorated
throughout. £750 p.c.m. plus bills. Available 1 May. Tel.: 01244 675417.

Fully furnished garden cottage in North Oxford to let from
15
May. Delightful 1-(double) bedroom cottage with living-room/kitchen, bathroom,
gas c.h. situated close to Dragon School and Wolfson College. £600 p.c.m.
Tel.:
Oxford 554384.

Family holiday accommodation, central North Oxford: three-
quarters of Victorian terrace house (self-contained); sleeps 6–7;
attractive,
well-equipped rear courtyard; street parking; 10 minutes from city centre; 3
minutes from water meadows and scenic canal route. £400 p.w. inclusive.
Tel.:
Oxford 559911.

Central North Oxford: attractively-furnished 4-storey
Victorian
house in very quiet street, 15 minutes' walk from city centre, quarter mile
from
river Thames and Port Meadow. Two double bedrooms and 1 single. Two
bathrooms
(1 with shower, 1 with bath, both with w.c.). Double reception room with
stripped
pine floor, oriental rugs, and desk. Modern pine kitchen/diner with large
table.
Dishwasher, fridge, freezer, gas c.h., washing machine, drier, TV, bicycles.
Free
street parking. £965 p.c.m. including utilities and Council Tax. Available
24
July–4 Sept. Dr Josephine Reynell, tel.: Oxford 516615, fax: 516616.

Walk to colleges: North Oxford house available from 1 Sept.
1999,
for 1 year or less. Walk to colleges, train/bus stations; near Port Meadow.
C.h.,
recently redecorated, desks, filing cabinets, several large closets, secluded
garden, 2.5 bathrooms, washing machine, drier, telephone, linen, dishes, 2
bicycles. Quiet; suit visiting academics. Two bedrooms: £950 p.m., 3
bedrooms:
£1,250 p.m. (includes bedsit with separate kitchen and entrance). Contact
J.
Mackrell (evenings), tel.: Oxford 775567, or A. Gaston (Canada), tel.: 613 745
1368,
fax: 613 745 0299, e-mail: gaston@cyberus.ca.

Two-bedroom, semi-detached house, Harcourt Hill. Available
for
short to medium term let. Fully furnished and equipped following recent
modernisation. Large open-plan living/dining-room, fitted kitchen, utility room,
study, c.h., parking. Both bedrooms en suite. For details, contact
Ann
Rowcliffe at Westminster College Conference Centre. Tel.: Oxford 253358, e-mail:
a.rowcliffe@ox-west.ac.uk.

City centre house with views of Thames, available for 4
months,
June–Sept. Fully equipped, 3 bedrooms (2 double, 1 single), 2 bathrooms,
gas
c.h., garden, garage. £1,000 p.c.m. inclusive of charges except telephone
calls. Tel.: Oxford 250462.

Old Boars Hill. Available full/part academic year
1999–2000.
Four miles city centre. Hourly bus service. 2/3 bedrooms, 2 reception,
gardens.
£750 p.m. Tel. (before 8 May; USA) 219 287 1449, (after 8 May): Oxford
735305.

Headington: 4-bedroom end-terrace property available 14
July–26 Sept. for visiting professionals, academics, students, or holiday
lets.
Close to frequent bus routes in quiet cul-de-sac. Lounge, dining-room;
kitchen;
bathroom; shower-room; garden; off-street parking. £850 p.c.m. or
£250
p.w. All enquiries welcome. Tel.: Oxford 436858 (h), or 252182 (w).

Summertown: lovely 4-bedroom Victorian house. Through
reception with stripped floors, kitchen/breakfast-room with French doors to
garden, bathroom and en suiteshower room, side access.
Unfurnished—available May onwards. £1,200 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford
511397.

Four-bedroom furnished/unfurnished house beautifully
decorated with wooden floors throughout. The house is in a quiet residential
area, very close to the city centre. £1,200 p.c.m. plus deposit. Available
from
1 Sept./1 Oct. for 1 year. Tel.: Oxford 247708.

Large 4-bedroom North Oxford House in quiet cul-de-sac
ending
in park. Fully furnished. Available mid-Oct.–27 Dec. £1,400 p.m.
including utilities. Spacious accommodation includes loft, dining-room/sun room,
and 2.5 bathrooms. Tel.: Oxford 454274.

Headington: 4-bedroom house. sitting-room, dining-room,
large
kitchen, garage, gardens. Convenient for schools and hospitals. Available 15
Aug.
1999–31 July 2000. £950 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford (2)76202 or 761316, e-mail:
alan.bowman@christ-church.oxford.ac.uk.

Fully-furnished house to let: very quiet stret in East Oxford,
bookshelves galore, 2 bedrooms, new bathroom, garden, easy walking distance
from university and city centre, available Sept.–May or Sept.–Aug.
£650 p.c.m. E-mail: dn44@umail.umd.edu.

Eighteenth-century thatched cottage in village 8 miles from
Oxford, close to Thames. Three double bedrooms, 2 reception, conservatory,
modern kitchen, c.h., garden, oak beams, open fires. To let May or June or
Sept.
£225 p.w. Tel.: 0171 625 1219.

West Osney: very quiet terrace house, available 3/4 months
early May–late Aug. Situated near meadows and river. One double
bedroom,
large kitchen with washing machine, new gas cooker, fridge, freezer,
dining-room,
lounge, sitting-room/study, 40-ft. garden and patio, gas c.h. Fifteen minutes'
walk
from town centre. £650 p.m. including Council Tax and utility bills. Tel.:
Oxford 728743.

Pretty 2-bedroom house close to Folly Bridge to let from May
1999. Loft studio, bosky garden, gas c.h., and dining extension add to its
charms.
£750 p.m. Suit academic couple. Tel.: 0171 727 9750, e-mail:
judicaton@hotmail.com.

House in Cowley: 4 bedrooms (3 double, 1 single), large
sitting/dining-room, washing machine, attractive garden. Available immediately.
£800 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 249199.

Berkeley, California: Redwood cabin, comfortably modernised
and
furnished, fully equipped, in quiet wooded setting behind University with
short
walk to campus. Double bedroom, study, large living area, kitchen; split level
on
hillside with decks. Car possible. Available from May for short or longer lets.
£350 p.w. inclusive. Brundin, tel.: Oxford 243466 (son of owner) or 001 510
8489479 (owner).

Careful tenants wanted for 3-bedroom house in Headington,
end
June–mid-Sept. £750 p.c.m. Cat and garden to be cared for. Tel.:
Oxford
751295.

Fully-furnished house to let from 1 Sept. Percy Street,
Oxford.
Suit family or 3/4 sharing. Kitchen, dining-room, sitting-room (or can be 4th
bedroom), 3 bedrooms, downstairs bathroom with shower and w.c., upstairs
w.c.,
washing machine and drier, fridge/freezer, good garden shed, lockable side
entrance to garden. Well maintained. £850 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 554384.

Horton-cum-Studley, village 4 miles East of Oxford. Charming
3-bedroom house with 2 reception, large kitchen, bathroom with w.c., shower
room
with w.c., c.h., garage, garden, excellent views of the countryside. Available
mid-
Oct.–beginning Dec. 1999. Price negotiable. Contact Catherine Shephard,
tel./fax: Oxford 351520, e-mail: catherine.shephard@btinternet.com.

Make finding accommodation a pleasure, not a chore. Finders
Keepers is dedicated to making it easy for visitors to Oxford to find the right
property. Browse through our Web site for up-to-date detailed information on
properties available and make use of our interactive database, priority
reservation service (credit cards accepted), welcome food pack, personal
service,
and much more. Call us and you will not need to go elsewhere. For further
information contact Finders Keepers, 226 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford
OX2
7BY. Tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk; Internet site:
http://www.finders.co.uk.

An Englishman's home is his castle—so the saying goes.
We
cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking
quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be
able
to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising
in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim
is
to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Visit our Web site
at:
http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the properties that we have
currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or e-mail us with
details
of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.:
Oxford 764533, fax: 764777, e-mail: info@qbman.co.uk.

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Flats to Let

Flat to rent, available May (long let only). Modern decor and
furnishings, 1 double bedroom, living-room, kitchen, bathroom, c.h., all
facilities,
private parking. Quiet Banbury Road location, 1.5 miles city cente. Non-smoker.
£575 p.m. plus Council Tax. Tel.: 01993 852196.

High Street flat to let, available immediately until 31 Aug.
Opposite Magdalen College. Accommodation comprises 1 double bedroom, lounge-
diner with study area, kitchen, bathroom. Fully equipped and furnished.
£625 p.c.m. including utilities. References and deposit will be required.
Contact Mrs S. Williams, Administrator, Stanford University Centre in Oxford.
Tel.:
Oxford 728782, e-mail: stanford@sable.ox.ac.uk.

Newly-converted self-contained basement studio with private
entrance, in St Clements area of Oxford, short walk to city centre.
Bed/sitting-
room with cooking facilities, gas coal-effect fire, shower room. Fully furnished.
Suit professional/academic/graduate. £450 p.c.m. including gas, electricity,
Council Tax. Tel.: Oxford 436381.

St Clements/East Oxford borders. Spacious, modern, ground-
floor, 2-bedroom apartment with private parking. Large lounge/diner, fitted
kitchen with appliances including washer. double bedroom, single bedroom,
bathroom with power shower, gas c.h., communal drying room, courtyard.
Available 1 May. £675 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 798737.

Jericho: excellent furnished ground-floor flat in prime
central
location. Double bedroom, bathroom, large sitting-room/dining-room/kitchen.
Shared use of courtyard garden. Garage if required. Available immediately.
Suit
non-smoking professionals; no children. £560 p.c.m. including heating and
lighting. Tel.: Oxford 310800.

North Oxford (Summertown), self-contained, ground-floor,
furnished flat, for non-smoking couple or single person. Separate entrance
hall,
sitting-room, double bedroom, kitchen, bathroom, Available immediately.
£450
p.c.m. including c.h. (electricity extra). Tel.: Oxford 512959 or (2)77281.

Elegant 1-bedroom ground-floor flat in St Margaret's Road,
central North Oxford. Double bedroom, large sitting-room, kitchen, bathroom.
Fully
furnished, newly decorated, washing machine and gas c.h. Use of charming
shared garden. £725 p.c.m. plus bills. Available now. Let of 6 months or
longer preferred. Tel.: Oxford 343384.

Central North Oxford: 10 minutes' walk from city centre, all
main
university buildings, and parks, and very close to the river. Available for
short/long let. Two exceptionally well-furnished, comfortable flats in extremely
quiet, civilised, large Victorian house in this exclusive, leafy, residential
Victorian
suburb, with large, light, airy rooms. (1) First-floor (available now): double
bedroom, drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom. (2) Ground-floor (available now):
1
double, 1 single bedroom, drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom. Off-street parking;
large secluded garden. Tel./fax: Oxford 552400.

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Summer Lets

Spacious family house, Summertown, North Oxford. Edwardian
detached house available from 26 July to 31 Aug. Within minutes of
Summertown
shopping area, buses to city centre, swimming pool, tennis courts, and
countryside walks. Fully equipped and attractively furnished, all mod. cons.
including washing machine, drier, dishwasher, microwave, TV, video, hi-fi. Four
bedrooms, a large attic for children to play, bathroom with w.c., shower room,
separate w.c., 2 reception, large dining-room, large kitchen leading to
conservatory-living-room and garden. Tel.: Oxford 511007 (evenings) or
(2)70490
(day), fax: (2)70757.

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Accommodation Offered

Bed-and-breakfast available in the warm comfortable home
of
a semi-retired academic couple in exclusive, leafy, central North Oxford; within
easy walking distance of the city centre and all main university buildings; a
stone's throw from the river, parks, excellent pubs and restaurants and a
9–9 corner shop. All rooms have colour TV, microwave, tea- and coffee-
making facilities, c.h., and independent heating. Refrigerators available. Very
moderate terms. Tel./fax: Oxford 557879, mobile: 0374 434489.

House-share in south Oxford (Marlborough Road); sunny
bedroom; shared kitchen, bathroom, and large reception room; garden front
and
back; fat affectionate cat. £300 p.c.m. plus bills. Available 1 May or
sooner.
Tel.: Oxford 727725 (h), or 556767, ext. 4649 (w); e-mail: schads@oup.co.uk.

Two properties, North Oxford, well within ring road. Both
quiet,
with lovely views to open countryside, near bus route. (1) Self-contained,
luxury,
open plan accommodation with patio. Suit visiting academic, single/couple.
Available from end Apr. £650 p.m. (single), £700 p.m. (couple),
including
electricity. (2) Beautiful, unusual, open-plan, fully-furnished modern house.
Off-
street parking and small patio garden. Suit visiting academic/professional
couple.
£895 p.m. including Council Tax and water rates. Available from July 1999.
Regret no children, pets, or smokers. Tel.: Oxford 515085, e-mail:
trishaboyd@hotmail.com.

Available from June 1999: family accommodation in central
North
Oxford—excellent schools; three-quarters of attractive Victorian
well-equipped
house; 28-ft. sitting-room; 3 double bedrooms, etc; courtyard garden; parking;
10
minutes' walk to city centre; close to water meadows and scenic canal.
£1,100
p.c.m. (excluding bills). Tel.: Oxford 559911.

North Oxford : short or long let; independent male graduate
to
share quiet house facing the Thames and Port Meadow. Spacious room. Share
of
kitchen. £70 p.w. including bills. Tel.: Oxford 515379.

Two attractive double rooms in large, comfortable, 4-bedroom
house. Gas c.h., dishwasher, washing machine, drier. Small garden. Pleasant
East
Oxford location. Suit non-smoking graduates or professionals. £340 and
£310 p.c.m. Contact Stephen, tel.: Oxford (2)71914 (office), 791079
(home).

Spacious and beautiful family house available to rent for
month
Aug. All modern facilities; lovely garden; 5 minutes from summertown shopping
area; regular bus service to city centre. Rent £1,200 p.m. including all
services. Precise dates and rent are flexible and negotiable. Self-contained
studio
flat attached to main house, suit single person, might also be available for
same
period, £400 inclusive. Contact Prof. G.A. Dover, tel.: Oxford 554300
(Wed.–Sun.) or 0116 2523983 (Mon.–Wed. morning).

Single room in quiet, modern, city centre flat, available
immediately. Two-minute walk from Oxford station; off-street parking available.
Would suit young professional/academic female, non-smoker. Weekday let
preferred. £300 p.c.m., including bills (except phone). Tel.: Oxford 722783
(after 7 p.m.).

Large double bed-sitting room with private bathroom in
central
Oxford, close to city cntre and Christ Church. Available for short lets.
Recently
re-furbished and decorated. Own telephone, fridge, and basic cooking
facilities.
£300 p.c.m. (£375 for 2 people) plus share of heating bills. Tel.:
Oxford724840.

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Accommodation Sought

Visiting professor requires accommodation for 2 adults and
2
children for May and June. Strong preference for North Oxford, but will
consider
others within walking distance of city centre. Will consider house swap,
current
residence is a 4-bedroom house in Cconcord, Massachusetts (suburban Boston),
and is well suited for small children. Contact Bill Welhelm. Tel. (USA): 001 617
552
3990, e-mail: william.wilhelm@bc.edu.

Female graduate student seeks accommodation (full board) for
period 10 May–10 July 1999, in central Oxford or the Headington area.
House-
, dog-, or baby-sitting possible. The less expensive the better. Reference from
Oxford University professor available. Please contact Regina, tel. (Hungary):
00
36 30 9105353, e-mail: Saphier@westel900.net, local contact: tel.: Oxford
727261.

Visiting professor and wife need 2-bedroom, fully-furnished
apartment/flat, with c.h., laundry facilities, parking garage; near to Oxford
University; for period 1 July–30 Nov. 1999. Responses to Dr H.T. Debas,
240 St Francis Blvd, San Fransisco, CA 94127, USA. Fax: (415) 502 0317, e-mail:
kdebas@medsch.ucsf.edu.

Visiting Canadian Fellow, wife, and child seek furnished flat
or house, preferably within walking distance to the University, for 3- to 4-
month period starting in June or July. Dr Robert Allison. Tel.: +1-905-858-2544,
e-mail: allison@hpl.crestech.ca.

Visiting professor and wife need comfortable and convenient
house or flat in Oxford, 5–19 July. Local references available. Professor
Jerzy Limon. Tel./fax: 00 48 58 629 3689.

Visiting academic and family seeks 3/4-bedroom house close
to city centre to rent for 2-week period, 6 July–6 Aug. Willing to pay up
to £800 p.w. Non-smokers, local references available. James Basker,
Columbia University, tel.: 212 531 3732, e-mail: jgbassist@aol.com.

Norwegian academic visitor with small family seeks (2)/3-
bedrooms within walking/biking distance of city cente, from July/Aug. 1999 to
June/July 2000. Please contact Rev./Major Bard Maeland (+)47 2262 0232, e-mail:
bamaelan@online.no.

Academic couple with child (2 years) and baby, planning
research stay in Oxford Aug. 1999–July 2000/2001, seeks unfurnished
house/flat with small garden (2 bedrooms). Monthly rental up to £650.
Contact Florian Theil, Im Langen Feld 8, D-30880 Laatzen. Tel.: +49 341 9959
709 (office), 511 221393 (home), fax: 9959 658, e-mail: ftheir@mis.mpg.de.

Visiting professor and wife need 2-bedroom fully-furnished
apartment/flat, c.h. laundry facilities, parking garage, near University, for
period 1 July–30 Nov. 1999. Responses to Dr H.T. Debas, 240 St Francis
Blvd, San Fransisco, CA 94127, USA. Fax: 415 502 0317, e-mail:
kdebas@medsch.ucsf.edu.

Visiting fellow from Germany (3 children) seeks 2/3-bedroom
house or flat from 11 Sept. 1999–31 Aug. 2000; preferably North Oxford,
Wolvercote. Offers elsewhere will be considered. Tel.: 0049 351 202 15 17 (after
5 p.m.)—we will ring back, e-mail: Lieb@rcs.urz.tu-dresden.de

One/two-bedroom cottage/flat in, or within driving
distance
of, Oxford for NZ writer and his wife researching at the University.
June–Nov. 1999. Up to £550 p.c.m. Please contact James McNeish, 67
Walter Road, Lowrey Bay, Wellington 6008, NZ. Tel.: 00 64 4 568 9118, e-mail:
national.fellow@nat.lib.govt.nz.

Professional couple with toddler seek to rent 2-bedroom
house or apartment within walking distance of the centre of Oxford, for
2–3 months from May. Dates negotiable. Please tel.: Oxford 241995.

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB
Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers.
We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and
their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good-quality tenants
seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services,
or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation,
telephone us: Oxford 764533, fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk.
Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site at:
http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.

Mallams Residential Letting is well placed to help with your
letting and management requirements. Based in Summertown, we offer a
professional service tailored to your individual requirements. If you are
thinking of letting your property, please call us. Tel.: Oxford 311006, fax:
311977.

Finders Keepers specialises in managing your home or
investment. We have celebrated 25 years in Oxford letting and managing
properties—try us first! Many of our landlords have remained with us
since we opened and are delighted with our service—why not pop in and
read their comments? Contact Finders Keepers, 226 Banbury Road, Summertown,
Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk,
Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

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Accommodation Exchange

Large comfortable house in Headington to exchange for house
near sea in UK/France/Spain for 3 weeks, approx. 20 July–10 Aug. Tel.:
Oxford 769328 (after 6 p.m.), e-mail: gross@bioch.ox.ac.uk.

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Accommodation Offered to Rent or Exchange

Academic couple would like to let out sunny, antique-
furnished apartment (2 bedrooms, dining-room, sitting-room, kitchen,
workroom, 1.5 bathrooms), in northern Chicago (Evanston, near Northwestern
University). Let or exchange for accommodation in/near
Oxford/London/Cambridge etc. June–Aug. 1999. Beach, shops, downtown
trains, restaurants, services—3 minutes by foot. Contact Calvert-
Lee/Kahane, tel.: 1-847/475-7410; e-mail: aka120@nwu.edu.

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Holiday Lets

Mainland Spain, Costa del Sol, Andalusia style English
Riviera, maisonette, £75 p.w.; double bedroom, double salon, grand terrace,
kitchen, bathroom, well-equipped, view over sea, large swimming-pool by step
of maisonette, residential shops and laundry all week. 15 km Marbella, 80 km
Gibraltar. Tel.: Oxford 511657.

North Pembrokeshire coast: snug cottage in secluded rural
setting near sea. Ideal 2/3 but can sleep more. Pets/children welcomed. Stove,
books, garden, walking, public transport. Reasonable weekly rates.
Brochure/information. Tel.: 01348 872080.

Annual multi-trip holiday insurance. From as little as
£26 per year, you can travel as many times as you like. This insurance
is
arranged by Affinity Groups Advantage Limited, an independent intermediary
for selling of general insurance. For further details, tel.: 0345 660453.

Italy, Umbria: Assisi National Park. Two double bedrooms,
kitchen/dining-room, large bathroom. Own road, superb views, wildlife.
Lombardia: Lake Como. Village house apartment closely overlooking lake. One
double bedroom, bathroom, kitchenette, dining/sitting-room, terrace; 20 minutes
Como city. £900 p.m./£300 p.w./£550 per fortnight for either let.
Tel.: Oxford 768775.

Crete: a tradiational Cretan house in Rethimno, superbly
renovated to provide space and comfort in beautifully-furnished surroundings.
Elevated vine-covered sitting area with brick barbecue perfect for al fresco
dining. Situated in the quiet area of the Old Town, near long sandy beaches,
tavernas, shops, and the many interesting sights in and around this historic
area. Sleeps 4 (1 double, 1 twin). Available year round. £250 p.w.,
£900 p.m. Tel./fax: 0030 831 56525.

Tuscany: farmhouse around beautiful medieval village of Loro
Ciuffenna near Florence Sienna and Arrezo. Two bedrooms, attic, 2 bathrooms,
terrace. £300 p.w. (July/Aug. £350 p.w.). Other farmhouses to rent
and apartments with swimming pool. For details, tel.: 0171 3282454, e-mail:
kensaat@zoo.co.uk.

Burgundy (Morvan National Park): 19th-c. stone cottage in
quiet hamlet. Sleeps 5+. Enclosed front and rear gardens backing onto meadow
with stream. Spacious sitting-room, 2 double bedrooms, study, bathroom, fully-
equipped kitchen, washing machine, c.h., telephone, log fires. Ideal for peace
and quiet, walking, swimming in nearby lakes, wine-tasting, and sight-seeing
in Burgundy (half hour from Vézelay and Avallon. Available all dates
except 19 July–14 Aug. inclusive. £225–£275 p.w. Tel.:
Oxford 721539.

Paris: lovely well-appointed 1-bedroom apartment, suit
couple, in 17e; excellent transport, available from 1 July for short or long-
term stay. Rate depends on length of stay. Tel.: 00 1 607 257 3567, e-mail:
price@law.mail.cornell.edu.

Greece: charming old village house to let on the beautiful
island of Skopelos. Tel.: 01280 847849.

French Alps, 1 hour Geneva. Peaceful sunny location, 1 km
centre Morzine, newly-equipped chalet. Sleeps 7/8. Fantastic for summer
holidays. Swimming, walking, riding, paragliding, white water rafting, climbing,
plus tourist attractions galore. £400 p.w. Book now for 2000 Skiing. Tel.:
01295 810063.

Le Marche: hidden secret of Italy, unspoilt, seductive and
beautiful. Two stone-built, spacious, properties. (1) Cottage: sleeps up to 6 in
3 double bedrooms, beams, wood fire, terracotta and wood floors. (2)
Farmhouse: sleeps up to 12 in 5 double, 1 single. Both newly decorated and
furnished. Lovely garden, pool, stunning mountain views, vineyards, olives,
fruit trees. Porto San Giorgio for Swimming, sandy beaches, water sports;
skiing at Mt Sasso Tetto; market towns; summer opera season at Macerata.
Great location for get-together or quiet escape. Please contact Angela or Barry
Knell, tel.: 01721 742 721, www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~barryk/.

Prince Edward Island, Canada. Original 19th-c. green gabled
4-bedroom farnhouse on a quiet red road, bicycle to white sand beaches, golf,
PEI National Park, boating and fishing harbour. Scope for imagination with a
panoramic view of woodlands, fields, and the Gulf of St Lawrence. Furnished.
£300 p.w. Contact Nedd Kenney, tel.: 001 902 964 3433, e-mail:
neddkenney@yahoo.com.

Greece: detached hosue to the west of Corinth, own garden,
right on the beach, shaded terrace with view to sea, sleeps 6. Near tavernas,
shops, and a good centre for exploring the Peloponnese and Delphi. Available
May–15 July. £250 p.w. Tel.: Oxford 552839.

Farmhouse accommodation in beautiful Dordogne countryside
between Angoulème and Perigeaux. Sleeps 6. Available to rent May/Sept.
from £130 p.w. For details, tel.: 01295 780641.

Skopelos, Skiathos, Alonissos. Lovely island houses available
for rent. Town, country, seaside locations, sleeping 2–8 persons, prices
from £39 per person p.w. For brochure, tel.: 003042422947, fax:
003042423057, e-mail: thalpos@otenet.gr.

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Houses for Sale

Two 4-storey Victorian houses (31/32 Kingston Road)
separated by driveway allowing shared use of the grounds—parking for
5
cars. This adds £30,000 to the value of each flat, for which £50,000
is estimated value of each floor, fully furnished. Flat 31 comprises 3 floors
equipped for multi-occupation. 31A is lower ground floor facing west. Lawns
and gardens. Flats 32 and 32A have 2 floors each. Property value
£520,000. Tel.: Oxford 556460 (preferably before noon).
n

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Flat for Sale

Retirement flat for sale. Two-bedroom ground-floor on small
development, Boars Hill. Entrance hall, lounge/diner, kitchen, bathroom, master
bedroom, second bedroom, 2 good-size built-in wardrobes/store cupboards.
Communal grounds, private parking, laundry, resident manager. This
appartment particularly suitable for those needing extra care, as meals,
cleaning, attendance care, transport to shops provided at extra cost. Tel.:
Oxford 736009.

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For Sale

1955 Citroen Light 15 (Traction Avant). Right-hand drive
with wood dash and leather interior trim. In beautiful condition and a please
to drive subsequent to complete body and mechanical restoration. To view, tel.:
Oxford 284274, e-mail: hugh.forsyth@yahoo.com.

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<br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette: Diary, 23 April<br /> - 6 May

Diary


Contents of this section:

Academic Staff
Development Seminars
: places should be booked in advance
through
the Staff Development Office, University Offices,
Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

For the full list of courses, see the HREF="http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/training/">Staff Development
ProgrammeWeb site.

Return to
Contents Page of this issue



Friday 23 April

ACADEMIC STAFF Development Seminar: `Memory skills', 1.30 p.m. ( HREF="#seminars">see information above).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `An introduction to Egypt of the
Pharaohs', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015,
9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

JONATHAN HARVEY lectures in series `The Composer Speaks', Holywell
Music Room, 5 p.m. (free and open to the public).

OXFORD PHILOMUSICA WINDS (with Olga Balakleets, piano) perform
works by Schumann, Harvey, Crosse, and Mozart, Holywell Music Room, 8
p.m. (full-price tickets £10, from Oxford Playhouse or at the
door).

Return to List of Contents of this section



Saturday 24 April

TRIO FIBONACCI perform new music by Canadian and British composers,
Holywell Music Room, 8 p.m. (tickets £8 (£6/£4
concessions) from Oxford Playhouse or at the door).

Return to List of Contents of this section



Sunday 25 April

TRINITY FULL TERM begins.

THE REVD CANON JOHN MACQUARRIE preaches the St Mark's Day Sermon,
Magdalen, 10 a.m.

PROFESSOR J. MORRILL: `Oliver Cromwell and godly Englishmen'
(public lecture marking the 400th anniversary of the birth of Oliver
Cromwell), the chapel, Mansfield, 5.45 p.m.

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Monday 26 April

DR A. CORNWALL: `Looking for a child: coping with infertility in
Ado-Odo, south-west Nigeria' (Fertility and Reproduction seminars),
Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

PROFESSOR L.N. TREFETHEN (Professor of Numerical Analysis):
`Scientific computing: the finite, the infinite, and the future'
(inaugural lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

F. POUILLON: `Mirrors within mirrors
: 150 years of Algerian painting' (Maison Française
lecture), Middle East Centre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR G. BRESLAUER: `Yel'tsin as Patriarch' (lecture series:
`Russian politics and society: Soviet and post-Soviet'), Lecture
Theatre, New Building, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

THE BRENTANO QUARTET perform works by Purcell, Nicholas Maw, and
Beethoven, the Auditorium, St John's, 8.30 p.m. (admission by
programme, from porters' lodge; reserved for college members until
ten days before the concert).

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Tuesday 27 April

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Watercolours: Cozens to Palmer'
(special exhibition), 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings:
(2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

CONGREGATION meeting, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR L. DASTON: `Can objectivity have a history?' (Sir Isaiah
Berlin Lectures in the History of Ideas: `The ideals and practice of
scientific objectivity'), St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

R. COOPER: `Renaissance Grenoble' (lecture series: `Grenoble et sa
région'), Maison Française, 6 p.m.

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Wednesday 28 April

PROFESSOR P. LUBECK: `Global Islam' (ESRC Research Programme on
Transnational Communities: `Transnational religious communities:
Muslim and Hindu movements and networks'), Seminar Room, School of
Geography, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR N. FRIEDMAN: `The study of evolutionary history:
insights from Queen Victoria' (Waynflete Lectures: `Seminal events in
the evolutionary history of plants'), Grove Auditorium, Magdalen, 5
p.m.

PHILIP HOWARD delivers the Times Lecture, Lecture
Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

DR M. LEACH: `New shapes to shift: war, parks, and the hunting
persona in modern West Africa' (Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on
Women: Audrey Richards Commemorative Lecture), Taylor Institution, 5
p.m.

UNIVERSITY CLUB wine-tasting: Spanish wines, 6 South Parks Road,
5.45 (admission for members and guests, £2 per person).

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Thursday 29 April

DR V. SKULTANS: `Gender and illness narratives in Latvia' (Centre for
Cross-Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Gender and health:
healers, carers, and patients'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen
Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR G. BEST: `Peace conferences and the century of total
war: the 1899 Hague Conference and what came after' (Cyril Foster
Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR L. DASTON: `Objectivity versus truth' (Sir
Isaiah Berlin Lectures in the History of Ideas: `The ideals and
practice of scientific objectivity'), St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

C. MEINEL: `Association as mediators: the
state–science–industry relationship in German chemistry,
1870–1914' (Maison Française seminar series: `Science and
the new century: Britain, France, and Germany .1900'),
History of Science Seminar Room, Modern History Faculty Building, 5
p.m.

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Friday 30 April

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Camille Pissarro', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
£1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

INTERNATIONAL STUDY-DAY (various speakers): `Is there a European
"Third Way"?' (Research Programme: `Culture et
sociétés: comportements politiques'), Maison
Française, 10 a.m.–8.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR M. GOODMAN: `Explaining religious change' (Marett
Memorial Lecture), Saskatchewan Lecture Room, Exeter, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR A. GOUDIE: `The geomorphology of the Oxford region'
(School of Geography Centenary Lectures), School of Geography, 5 p.m.

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Saturday 1 May

DEGREE CEREMONIES, Sheldonian, 11.30 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.

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Sunday 2 May

LORD HABGOOD: `Varieties of unbelief—moral autonomy' (fourth
Bampton Lecture), St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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Monday 3 May

DR R. INGHAM: `Variations in sexual risks amongst young people in
Europe' (Fertility and Reproduction seminars), Institute of Social
and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

PROFESSOR A. BROWN: `The study of Soviet politics and the politics
of Soviet studies in Britain' (lecture series: `Russian politics and
society: Soviet and post-Soviet'), Lecture Theatre, New Building, St
Antony's, 5 p.m.

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Tuesday 4 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The Chinese lute', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
£1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

CONGREGATION meeting, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR M.B. PARKES: `Which came first, the reader or the
scribe? (The function and processes of handwriting)' (Lyell Lectures
in Bibliography: `Their hands before our eyes: a closer look at
scribes'), Lecture Theatre 2, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J.Y. CAMPBELL: `Who should buy long-term bonds?'
(Clarendon Lectures in Economics: `Strategic asset allocation:
portfolio choice for long-term investors'), Gulbenkian Lecture
Theatre, Institute of Economics and Statistics, St Cross Building, 5
p.m.

G. HOWARD: `The next time you see Paris' (lecture), Maison
Française, 5.15 p.m.

LORD ROTHSCHILD: `The creation of Waddesdon' (Ashmolean Education
Service public lecture), the lecture theatre, Taylor Institution,
5.30 p.m.

DR T. GAVIN: `Iban textiles from Sarawak' (Oxford Asian Textile
Group lecture), Pitt Rivers Research Centre, 64 Banbury Road, 5.45
(admission £2 for visitors; for details, tel. 554281 or
(2)78076).

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Wednesday 5 May

PROFESSOR N. FRIEDMAN: `The origin of photosynthesis and how Earth
turned green' (Waynflete Lectures: `Seminal events in the
evolutionary history of plants'), Grove Auditorium, Magdalen, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J.Y. CAMPBELL: `Is the stock market safer for long-term
investors?' (Clarendon Lectures in Economics: `Strategic asset
allocation: portfolio choice for long-term investors'), Gulbenkian
Lecture Theatre, Institute of Economics and Statistics, St Cross
Building, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R.W. BAGLEY: `Bells, scales, and pitch standards: the
archaeology of music in ancient China' (William Cohn Memorial
Lecture), Headley Lecture Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean, 5 p.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM evening tour: `Eighteenth-century entertaining',
5.30 p.m. (Admission £1.50. Places must be booked: tel.
(2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

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Thursday 6 May

PROFESSOR P. VAN DER VEER: `Cosmopolitanism, secularism, and
transnational religion' (ESRC Research Programme on Transnational
Communities: `Transnational religious communities: Muslim and Hindu
movements and networks'), Seminar Room, School of Geography, 2 p.m.

CHIKAKO OZAWA: `Gendered enlightenment? Ideology and practice in a
Japanese indigenous psychotherapeutic movement' (Centre for Cross-
Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Gender and health: healers,
carers, and patients'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth
House, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR W. BEINART (Rhodes Professor of Race Relations):
`African history, environmental history, and race relations'
(inaugural lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR P. MORGAN: ` "Among our Ancient Mountains ..." (the
appreciation of Welsh mountainscape in the eighteenth and nineteenth
centuries)', O'Donnell Lecture, Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J.Y. CAMPBELL: `Investing for retirement' (Clarendon
Lectures in Economics: `Strategic asset allocation: portfolio choice
for long-term investors'), Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, Institute of
Economics and Statistics, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

J. HARWOOD: `An institutional landscape in transition: German
science c.1900' (Maison Française seminar series:
`Science and the new century: Britain, France, and Germany
.1900'), History of Science Seminar Room, Modern History
Faculty Building, 5 p.m.

D. FOUGEYROLLAS-SCHWEBEL and S. Condon: `Surveys of violence
against women in France: presentation of the problematic of a
quantitative approach' (seminar, chaired by Cathie Lloyd), Maison
Française, 5 p.m.

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