21 March 2002 - No 4618



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 132, No. 4618: 21 March 2002<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

21 March 2002


The following supplements were published
with this Gazette:

Regulations relating to Academic Dress (PDF
file)

Forward Planning for the Oxford University Library
Services
(PDF file)

Note: due to the requirements of the Data Protection Act, some elements of the

printed
Gazette are not reproduced in the Web Gazette.


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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 21 March 2002: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent
entry.]

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COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

Decrees Council has made the following decrees, to come into effect on 5 April.


Decree (1): Arrangements for the Nuffield Benefaction
for the
Advancement of Medicine

Explanatory note

The following decree makes changes to the composition and period of office of the Nuffield
Medical Trustees which a previous decree purported to make in 1998 but which, it was
subsequently discovered, required the agreement of the Charity Commission. This agreement
has now been obtained. Opportunity is also taken in the following decree to bring the stated
powers of the trustees and the Benefaction Committee back into line with the 1936 Deed of
Trust, omitting reference to the General Board and the General Fund (which no longer exist),
to make the composition of the Benefaction Committee consistent with the deed by providing
for NHS representation on the committee, and to delete obsolete parts of the legislation
governing the Nuffield Benefactions.

Text of Decree (1)

1 In Ch. IX, Sect. I, § 248 [1], concerning the Nuffield Benefaction for
the
Advancement of Medicine (Statutes, 2000, pp. 692--4), delete cll. 1--5 and
substitute:

`1. (1) For the purposes of the trust created by the Deed of Covenant and Trust
executed by
Lord Nuffield on 24 November 1936 there shall be a body of trustees, and this body shall
be
composed as follows:

(a) as Chairman, a person who shall be appointed on the occurrence
of each
vacancy by the Chancellor of the University, except that the Chancellor shall at his or her
sole
discretion have the right from time to time to revoke any such appointment;

(b) the Vice-Chancellor;

(c)–(e) three persons appointed by the
Chancellor of the
University;

(f) the Regius Professor of Medicine or, whenever he or she is a
trustee in
another capacity, a person appointed by the Medical Sciences Board;

(g), (h) two persons appointed by Council after
consultation with
the Medical Sciences Board;

(i), (j) two persons appointed by Council after consultation
with the
Chairmen
of the NHS Trusts in the City of Oxford which are concerned with teaching and research and
which include a university-nominated non-executive director on their Trust Boards, and with
the Chairman of the Thames Valley Strategic Health Authority.

(2) If all, or any, of the bodies specified in sub-clause (1) (i),
(j) above
are
reconstituted or abolished, Council shall have power to decide which successor body or
bodies
associated with teaching and research within the Medical School of the University of Oxford
shall be consulted.

(3) The following restrictions shall apply to the appointment of trustees and the
retention
by trustees of their office as trustee:

(a) No person appointed or being a trustee (except a trustee appointed
under
sub-clause (1) (a)–(e) above or the Regius Professor
of
Medicine) may also be a member of the Nuffield Benefaction Committee established under
clause 4 below; if any member of that committee is appointed or becomes a trustee
(otherwise
than under sub-clause (1) (a)–(e) above or as the
Regius
Professor of Medicine), his or her appointment as a trustee shall be inoperative; and if any
trustee (other than one appointed under sub-clause (1)
(a)–(e)
above or the Regius Professor of Medicine) becomes a member of that committee, he or she
shall immediately cease to be a trustee.

(b) No person shall become or remain a trustee after reaching the age
of 70
years.

(c) Appointed trustees shall serve for an initial period of seven years,
and
shall then be eligible for reappointment for further periods of five years at a time, subject
in
both cases to the age limit laid down by (b) above.

(d) The person or body appointing any trustee other than the Chairman
shall
have the power at any time to revoke the appointment of that trustee if the trustee becomes
of unsound mind or goes to reside abroad or otherwise becomes incapable of satisfactorily
carrying out his or her duties as trustee.

(e) Any trustee who desires to retire from his or her trusteeship may
do so
on giving to the University and to the person or body appointing him or her two months'
notice in writing of that desire.

2. The trustees shall have full power:

(1) to determine in their sole discretion from time to time whether any object proposed
to be financed out of the income or capital of the trust fund is inconsistent with the terms of
the deed referred to in clause 1 (1) above;

(2) to appoint their own secretary;

(3) to make rules or by-laws as to their meetings (including what is to be the quorum
for
meetings) and from time to time to alter those rules or by-laws.

3. The duties of the trustees shall be:

(1) to receive and consider an annual statement of the objects proposed to be financed
out
of the trust fund in which shall be included an annual estimate of the income and expenditure
of the trust fund; to determine whether any of the objects proposed to be financed out of the
trust fund are inconsistent with the terms of the trust, and if so to notify in writing the body
submitting the statement of that inconsistency, or if not to pass the annual statement and
estimate;

(2) to receive annual accounts of the income of the trust fund and the expenditure
defrayed from it and of any capital subject to the trust, together with an annual report on the
work carried out under the trust; and to report to the University on the accounts and the
annual report.

4. (1) There shall be a Nuffield Benefaction Committee composed as follows:

(a) the Vice-Chancellor;

(b) the Regius Professor of Medicine;

(c)–(g) the Nuffield Professors of Clinical
Medicine,
Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Anaesthetics, and Orthopaedic Surgery;

( h), (i) two persons, not being Nuffield Professors, who
are members
of the
Faculty of Clinical Medicine and who shall be appointed by the Medical Sciences Board;

(j) the Director of Clinical Studies;

(k) the Director of Postgraduate Medical Education and Training;

(l), (m) two persons appointed by the Thames Valley
Strategic
Health Authority (or, if the Thames Valley Strategic Health Authority ceases to exist, the
relevant successor body) in consultation with the bodies responsible for the management of
the teaching hospitals in Oxford.

(2) The committee shall have power to co-opt not more than two persons as additional
members for periods of two years at a time.

5. (1) The duties of the committee shall be:

(a) having satisfied the Director of Finance and Secretary of the Chest
that
the estimated expenditure is not in excess of the estimated income, to prepare and to submit
to the trustees before the end of each Trinity Term an annual statement of the objects
proposed to be financed out of the trust fund, in which shall be included an annual estimate
of the income of the trust fund and of the cost of carrying the scheme into effect;

(b) to prepare an annual report and annual accounts and to submit them
to the
trustees.

(2) The committee may act notwithstanding any vacancy or vacancies in its
membership.

6. The Secretary of the Medical Sciences Board shall act as secretary of the committee.

7. The Director of Finance and Secretary of the Chest shall, on the requisition of the
committee or in accordance with the provisions of this decree, as the case may be, make
payments out of the income of the trust fund in accordance with the estimates prepared by
the
committee and passed by the trustees, except that capital expenditure may be met out of the
capital of the trust fund if provisions for its repayment out of the income of the trust fund
is
made to the satisfaction of the Director of Finance and Secretary of the Chest.

8. Any of the clauses of this decree may be modified by a further decree, and this
decree
or any further decree may be modified and/or replaced in whole or in part by a statute, if
in
the case of a modification the trustees have first certified in writing to the Vice-Chancellor
that the proposed modification is not inconsistent with the terms of the deed referred to in
clause 1 (1) above.

2 Ibid., delete part [2], concerning Gifts towards costs of
Buildings (p.
694), and part [3], concerning Superannuation Contributions chargeable on Funds of the
Nuffield Benefaction for the Advancement of Medicine (p. 695), and renumber existing part
[4] (p. 696) as part [2].

3 This decree shall have immediate effect, except that existing
trustees
shall hold office under the provisions applying at the time of their appointment.

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Decree (2): Academic Dress

Explanatory note

Council has authorised the Vice-Chancellor to make all regulations relating to academic dress
in future. At present there is a short decree making certain general provisions governing
academic dress (Statutes, 2000, p. 779), under which the Vice-Chancellor has
made detailed
rulings (ibid., pp. 779–83). The following decree accordingly repeals the existing
decree. The new Academic Dress Regulations made by the Vice-Chancellor, as now
authorised by Council, are published in Supplement (1) to Gazette No.
4617, 20
March 2002, p. 909.

Text of Decree (2)

In Ch. XI (Statutes, 2000, p. 779), delete Sect. IV and renumber existing Sectt.
V–XIII
(pp. 783–811) as Sectt. IV–XII.

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SOCIAL SCIENCES BOARD

Decree

The Social Sciences Board, with the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards
Committee of Council, has made the following decree, to come into effect on 5 April.


Decree (3): Increase in the number of compulsory
subjects for
the Honour School of Jurisprudence

Explanatory note

The following decree, made by the Social Sciences Board, on the recommendation of the
Law
Board, with the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council,
increases the number of subjects to be taken in the Honour School of Jurisprudence from 8.5
to 9. This permits an increase in the number of compulsory subjects for the Honour School
from four to seven, as recommended by the Law Faculty's review of the BA.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in `Examinations and Boards' below.

Text of Decree (3)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2001, p. 237, ll. 16–17 and ll.
19–20, in each case
delete `eight standard subjects and one special subject' and substitute `either nine standard
subjects or eight standard subjects and two special subjects'.

2 This decree shall be effective from 1 October 2005.

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EDUCATIONAL POLICY AND STANDARDS
COMMITTEE OF COUNCIL

Decree

The Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council has made the following decree,
to come into effect on 5 April.


Decree (4): Revision of the decree governing the
Degree of
Doctor of Medicine

Explanatory note

Possible changes to the Degree of Doctor of Medicine have been under consideration for
some
time, following the report of a working party of the former Clinical Medicine and
Physiological Sciences Boards. It is clear that there are deficiencies in the present
arrangements for the degree, and in order to deal with these deficiencies, the Educational
Policy and Standards Committee of Council has, on the recommendation of the Medical
Sciences Board, made the following decree. The principal reforms are that the option to
submit published work as a thesis is explicitly restricted to established senior staff; the
minimum period of registration for students submitting a dissertation is increased from four
to six terms from the point of registration; a system of Advisers is instituted to provide
limited support for students submitting a dissertation; students submitting a dissertation are
required to confirm their status as students for the degree not later than six terms after
registration; the application for appointment of examiners for students submitting a
dissertation
may be submitted in advance of the submission of the thesis itself; a thesis may be referred
back for revision and resubmission on one occasion; and a fee schedule is established
commensurate with the proposed new structure for the degree.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in `Examination and Boards' below.

Text of Decree (4)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2001, delete from p. 899, l. 15 to p.
902, l. 3 and substitute:

`§ 3. Status of Student for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine
[1]

1. Any person may be admitted to the status of Student for the Degree of Doctor of
Medicine if

either

(1) he or she has been admitted to the Degree of Bachelor of Medicine and has entered
upon the thirty-sixth term from his or her matriculation, or, in the case of a person who has
incorporated as a Bachelor of Medicine, the thirty-sixth term from the date of his or her
matriculation at the University of Cambridge, or, in the case of a person who has been
admitted to the Second Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Medicine under the
provisions of § 2, cl. 12 of this section, the twenty-seventh term from his or her
matriculation;

or

(2) he or she holds the Degree of Master of Arts of the University (other than a degree
by decree or resolution or an honorary degree), has previously been entered in the Register
of University Medical Students and has passed the First Examination for the Degree of
Bachelor of Medicine of this University, holds a degree qualifying him or her to be placed
on the Medical Register, and has entered upon the thirty-sixth term from his or her
matriculation.

2. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of Faculties and Academic Registrar to keep a
Register of those admitted to the status of Student for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.

3. On application for admission to the status of Student for the Degree of Doctor of
Medicine, the applicant shall state whether he or she will wish to submit as his or her
dissertation a series of papers or books, as permitted under § 7, cl. 2 of this section.

§ 4. Registration for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine

1. Except in the case of submission of published work as a dissertation for the degree,
no
student shall submit a dissertation until at least the beginning of the sixth term after the
Medical Sciences Board has granted his or her admission.

2. A student must carry out the bulk of the research for the dissertation during the
period
in which he or she is registered.

3. If the dissertation, including published work submitted as a dissertation, has not
been
submitted for examination before the fifteenth term after admission has been granted, a
student shall be required to seek readmission.

§ 5. Advisers of Students for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine

1. (1) Except in the case of students submitting published work as a dissertation for the
degree, every student on admission as a Student for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine shall
be allocated to an Adviser in Oxford appointed by the Medical Sciences Board in the
student's
area of research.

(2) In the case of students working outside Oxford, each student shall be required to
seek
additional advice from a senior member of the academic or clinical staff at the institution at
which the research is to be pursued; and the student shall notify the Medical Sciences Board
of the name of that person and provide a written statement signed by that person confirming
that he or she is willing to undertake the role of an additional Adviser.

2. (1) It shall be the duty of the Adviser to offer support and assistance to the student
in
the manner prescribed in the Memorandum of Guidance for Advisers and Students
for
the Degree of Doctor of Medicine
as published from time to time by the Medical
Sciences Board.

(2) The Adviser shall submit reports on the progress of the student's work at the
beginning of each Michaelmas and Trinity Term, and the reports of Advisers outside Oxford
shall, in the case of the relevant students, also be received by the Adviser in Oxford.

(3) It shall be the responsibility of the Adviser at the host institution (whether that is
Oxford or elsewhere) to inform the Medical Sciences Board if he or she is of the opinion that
the student is unlikely to reach the standard required for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.

3. (1) Except when approval has been given for submission of published work as a
dissertation for the degree, it shall be the duty of every Student for the Degree of Doctor of
Medicine to seek the advice of the Adviser (or, in the case of students working outside
Oxford, both Advisers) at an early stage of the proposed research and to seek comments on
his or her dissertation before its submission.

(2) During the course of the research the student shall maintain contact with the
Adviser
or Advisers in the manner prescribed in the Memorandum of Guidance for Advisers
and
Students for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine
.

§ 6. Confirmation of status as a Student for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine

1. (1) Except in the case of submission of published work as a dissertation, a student
registered for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine must, not later than the sixth term and not
earlier than the third term after that in which he or she was admitted to the status of Student
for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine, apply to the Medical Sciences Board for confirmation
of that status.

(2) Except in the case of students submitting published work as a dissertation, all
Students
for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine shall have their status confirmed before they may make
an application for the appointment of examiners.

2. Students applying for confirmation of status shall submit their application to the
Medical Sciences Board through the Secretary of Faculties and Academic Registrar; and each
application shall be accompanied by:

(1) a report on the work undertaken since registration;

(2) a statement from the Adviser at the place where the work is being undertaken
commenting on whether the student's progress provides firm evidence that the work when
completed is likely to reach the standard required for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.

3. (1) If, after considering a student's application for confirmation of status, the
Medical
Sciences Board concludes that the student's progress does not warrant confirmation, the
board
may permit the submission of a further application not later than the third term after the
original application.

(2) If the second application is unsuccessful, the student's name shall be removed from
the Register of Students for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.

4. Except in the case of submission of published work as a dissertation for the degree,
a
Student for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine shall cease to hold that status unless it has
been
confirmed within nine terms of his of her admission to that status.

§ 7. Examination of Students for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine

1. A Student for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine who has, where applicable, fulfilled
the requirements set out in §§ 4 and 6 of this section, and whose status has not
expired, may apply to the Medical Sciences Board for the appointment of examiners and for
leave to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.

2. (1) A Student for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine may

either

(a) submit a dissertation upon a subject which, together with the
proposed
manner of treating it, has previously been approved by the Medical Sciences Board;

or

(b) in exceptional circumstances, submit as his or her dissertation a
series of
papers or books published at least twelve months before the proposed date of submission, if
the previous approval of the Medical Sciences Board has been given after consideration of
the
seniority of the student (who shall be required to have held a career-grade post for a period
of at least fifteen years prior to submission), and the opinions of any referees who may be
consulted.

(2) Submission of published works as a dissertation shall be permitted only when there
is evidence of outstanding quality in the scientific papers or other works intended for
submission; it shall also be a requirement that the published works be accompanied by a
general introduction and a general conclusion and that they form a continuous theme.

3. Applications for the appointment of examiners and for leave to supplicate shall be
made
to the Medical Sciences Board through the Graduate Studies Office and shall include:

(1) a statement by the candidate that the thesis is his or her own work, except where
otherwise indicated;

(2) a statement by the candidate of what part, if any, of the thesis has already been
accepted, or is concurrently being submitted, for any degree or diploma or certificate or
other
qualification in this University or elsewhere;

(3) a statement, where applicable, from the Adviser at the place where the research was
undertaken certifying that the candidate has sought his or her advice as appropriate;

(4) a statement from the candidate's college in support of the application;

(5) two printed or typewritten copies of an abstract of the thesis, which shall not
normally
exceed 300 words in length.

4. Where the Medical Sciences Board has given approval for submission of published
work as a dissertation, two printed or typewritten copies of the thesis may be submitted by
the student immediately after approval, in a format which is in accordance with the
instructions obtainable from the Medical Sciences Board through the Graduate Studies Office.

5. In all other cases, students shall submit an application in accordance with clause 2
above up to four months in advance of submitting two printed or typewritten copies of the
thesis in a format which is in accordance with the instructions obtainable from the Medical
Sciences Board through the Graduate Studies Office.

6. If a student has not submitted his or her thesis for examination within twelve months
from submission of the application under the provisions of clause 2 above, then the
application shall lapse.

7. (1) On receipt of an application the Medical Sciences Board shall appoint two
examiners, neither of whom shall be the student's Adviser, and one of whom shall be
external
to the University.

(2) The duties of the examiners shall be: (a) to consider the thesis and
the
abstract of it submitted by the candidate, except that they shall exclude from consideration
in
making their report any part of the thesis that either has already been accepted, or is
concurrently being submitted, for any degree or diploma or certificate or other qualification
in this University or elsewhere, or does not represent the candidate's own work;

(b) to examine the candidate orally in the subject of his or her thesis,
unless,
in exceptional circumstances in the case of submission of published work as a dissertation,
the board agrees, on the recommendation of the examiners, to dispense with this
requirement;

(c) to report to the Medical Sciences Board through the Secretary of
Faculties
and Academic Registrar on the scope, character, and quality of the work submitted, in the
manner prescribed in clause 9 below; (d) to return to the candidate the copies
of
the thesis and abstract.

8. (1) The Medical Sciences Board shall have power to make regulations concerning
the
notice to be given of the oral examination, and of the time and place at which it may be held.

(2) The examination may be attended by any member of the University in academic
dress,
while non-members may attend only with the consent of the examiners.

(3) The Vice-Chancellor and Proctors after consultation with the board may decide
(either
at their own discretion or at the request of the student or the supervisor or department) to
forbid the attendance of any person or all persons (other than the examiners and the
candidate)
or to impose any condition on attendance if and to the extent that such action is in their view
necessary to protect the interests of the University or the candidate or both, and the
examiners
shall be informed accordingly and shall include this information in the notice of examination.

9. Having completed the examination, the examiners may make one of the following
recommendations in their report to the Medical Sciences Board, or they may alternatively
proceed in accordance with the provisions of clause 10 below:

(1) that the board grant the student leave to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of
Medicine; if making this recommendation, the examiners shall include in their report
statements that:

(a) the student possesses a comprehensive knowledge of the particular
field
of learning in which the thesis falls;

(b) the thesis embodies original observations on either clinical or
experimental
material;

(c) the work done by the student and embodied in the thesis has
resulted in
an original and substantial contribution to medical science;

(d) the thesis is presented in a lucid and scholarly manner;

(e) the student has presented a satisfactory abstract of the thesis;

(f) in their opinion the thesis merits the award of the Degree of Doctor
of
Medicine;

(2) that the board offer the student the option of reference of the thesis back to him or
her
in order that he or she may revise it for re-examination for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine
on not more than one occasion, on the basis that the thesis has not reached the standard
required for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine; if making this recommendation, the
examiners
shall annex to their report to the board a statement, for transmission to the student, setting
out
the respects in which the thesis falls below the standard required for the degree and what
changes are necessary for it to reach that required standard, and setting a deadline (subject
to
the agreement of the board) for resubmission;

(3) that, in the case of a student whose thesis has already been referred back on one
occasion, the student's application for leave to supplicate be refused; if making this
recommendation, the examiners shall annex to their report a statement, for transmission to
the
student, setting out the respects in which the thesis falls below the standard required for the
degree.

10. (1) If the examiners are satisfied that the student's thesis is of sufficient merit to
qualify for the degree but consider, nevertheless, that before the thesis is deposited the
student
should make minor corrections (which are not sufficiently substantial to justify reference back
for re-examination), they shall require the student to correct the thesis to their satisfaction
before they submit their report.

(2) If the student has not completed these corrections within three calendar months of
the
date of the oral examination, his or her name shall be removed by the Secretary of the
Faculties and Academic Registrar from the Register of Students for the Degree of Doctor of
Medicine, except that the board may, on good cause shown by the student, grant an extension
of time of three further calendar months in which the student may fulfil this requirement
before the removal of his or her name from the Register.

(3) No subsequent extension shall be granted, but it shall be open to a student who has
failed to fulfil this requirement within those three or six months in total, as the case may be,
to apply to the board for reinstatement as a Student for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine,
with the support of his or her college and Adviser(s), upon submission to the Secretary of
Faculties and Academic Registrar of a copy of his or her thesis incorporating the required
corrections, and upon payment of such reinstatement fee as may from time to time be
prescribed by Council by decree; leave to supplicate shall not be granted until this fee has
been paid.

11. The Medical Sciences Board may exempt a candidate who is being
re-examined under the
provision of clause 9 (2) above from a further oral examination, if the examiners are able
to
certify that they are satisfied without examining the candidate orally that they can recommend
to the board in the terms required by clause 9 (1) above that he or she be given leave to
supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.

12. In an exceptional case in which the Medical Sciences Board is unable to
accept the
examiners' recommendation, or in which the examiners cannot reach an agreed
recommendation, the board shall have power to appoint one or two new examiners, as it
deems necessary, to conduct such further examination of the candidate as the board may
require.

13. (1) A student who has been granted leave to supplicate by the board shall
be required to
submit to the Secretary of Faculties and Academic Registrar a copy of his or her thesis,
incorporating any amendments or corrections required by the examiners and approved by the
board, with a view to deposit in the Bodleian or other appropriate university library.

(2) Leave to supplicate shall in all cases be conditional upon fulfilment of this
requirement.

14. (1) It shall be the duty of the Secretary of Faculties and Academic Registrar
to notify the
student of the board's decision as soon as may be.

(2) The Secretary of Faculties and Academic Registrar shall also be responsible for
publishing at the end of each academic year (except in so far as it may be necessary not to
publish any name in order to comply with the provisions of the Data Protection Act 1998)
the
names of those students to whom permission to supplicate has been granted during that year,
together with a statement of the subject of the thesis written by each.

15. When, on the conclusion of an investigation of a complaint made by a
student, the
Proctors recommend that a student be re-examined, the board shall have power to hold a new
examination.'

2 Ibid., p. 902, l. 4, renumber existing § 4 as § 8.

3 Ibid., p. 1053, after l. 7 insert new item (b)
as follows
and reletter existing items (b)--(d) (ll. 8--25) as items
(c)–(e):

`(b) On admission to the Status of Student 
for the Degree of DM and for each subsequent 
year that the name of the student remains on 
the register of students for the degree                    250.00'.

4 Ibid., l. 23, delete `334.00' and substitute `350.00'.

5 Ibid., after l. 29 insert:

`(e) On resubmission for the degree of DM              350.00'.

6 This decree shall be effective from 1 April 2002, except that
students
whose proposed outlines for submission (or resubmission) of a dissertation have been
approved before 1 April 2002, and students who were first examined before 1 April 2002 but
who will be seeking permission to resubmit after that date, shall be examined under the
provisions governing the Degree of Doctor of Medicine as they stood before that date
(Examination Decrees, 2001, pp. 899–902).

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Footnote

[1] Students whose proposed outlines for submission (or
resubmission) of a dissertation have
been approved before 1 April 2002 will be examined under the provisions governing the
Degree of Doctor of Medicine as they stood before that date (Examination
Decrees
, 2001, pp.
899–902). Students who were first examined before 1 April 2002 but who will be
seeking permission to resubmit after that date will also be re-examined under the old
provisions.


Return to text

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CONGREGATION 19 March


Declaration of approval of Resolutions approving the
conferment of Honorary Degrees

(1) That the conferment of the Degree of Master of Arts, honoris
causa
, upon
MARGARET GOODALL (BA Leeds) be approved.

(2) That the conferment of the Degree of Master of Arts, honoris
causa
, upon
ROY GOODWIN be approved.

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COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of
Congregation:

Bradlow, A., Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Gao, G.F., D.Phil., Hertford

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DIVISIONAL AND FACULTY BOARDS

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on
5 April, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 21 March 2002: University Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent
entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



CONGREGATION 23 April 2 p.m.

¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that written notice of any intention to
vote against the resolutions below, signed in either case by at least two members of
Congregation, must be given to the Registrar by noon on Monday, 15
April
(see the Guide to Procedures in Congregation cited in the note at the end
of
`University Agenda').


Voting on Resolutions authorising expenditure from
the Higher
Studies Fund

(1) That the University be authorised to expend from the part of the Higher Studies
Fund
earmarked for Physical Chemistry the sum of £55K for equipment to include an
Organic
Molecular Beam Epitaxy system.

(2) That the University be authorised to expend from the unearmarked part of the
Higher
Studies Fund the sum of £40K for postdoctoral support for the Professor of
Nanomaterials.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 21 March 2002: Notices<br />

Notices


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent
entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



ORATION BY THE SENIOR PROCTOR

The following Oration was delivered in Congregation on 13 March by D.J. WOMERSLEY,
MA, D.PHIL. (MA, PH.D. Cambridge), Fellow of Jesus College, on demitting office as
Senior Proctor.

SENIOR PROCTOR: Insignissime Vice-Cancellarie, licetne anglice loqui?

VICE-CHANCELLOR: Licet.

SENIOR PROCTOR: Mr Vice-Chancellor, it is said that when, on his death-bed, he was
asked
whether or not he renounced the devil and all his works, Voltaire replied: `surely this is no
time to be making new enemies.'

The Proctors and the Assessor for 2001--2 are now, Sir, on their metaphorical
death-beds, and—in a spirit of charity still greater than Voltaire's—would not wish
in these closing moments to part on bad terms with even the University's old enemies. But
perhaps forbearance may come more easily to us than it did to our predecessors, since during
our year of office those enemies have been surprisingly subdued. When I recall the oration
delivered here a year ago by former Senior Proctor Slater, what I remember most vividly is
the expression he gave to his sense that (as he put it) `we are living in an institution under
siege'. His Proctorship, of course, coincided with the War of Laura Spence, that most
extraordinary of clashes between the University and government. Little wonder, then, that
his
oration read at moments like a despatch sent back from a forward and exposed position
which
was suddenly coming under heavy fire. But when this year's Proctors had been given watch
and ward and tremblingly ascended the battlements, they rubbed their eyes in surprise,
because
it seemed that overnight (or perhaps that should read, over lunch) the besieging forces had
folded up their tents and departed. During the past twelve months a General Election, and
then
momentous international events, have distracted our political paymasters, and given the
current
Proctors—I can still refer to them as such for ten minutes or so—a quieter watch
than their predecessors. Of course, we have not been left entirely to ourselves. As was
acutely
pointed out some weeks ago in a seminar on the legal aspects of the work of the Proctors'
Office organised for the benefit of the Senior and Junior Proctors-elect, the public culture
of
our time views the principle of self-regulation with suspicion. In this respect the universities
are no more picked upon than the legal and medical professions. Increasing external
regulation, whether in the form of the QAA or the various Acts which hold implications for
the activities of the University, such as the Human Rights Act, or recent legislation on
disability and discrimination, or impending legislation concerning police forces, will for the
foreseeable future constrain the University's ability to chart its own course.

Nevertheless, in the past twelve months the University has been able to focus inwards,
and for the outgoing Proctors and Assessor this has meant that we have been able without
too
many external distractions to scrutinise the bedding down of the new governance procedures.
Overall it is our perception that these changes are, as you yourself have put it, Sir, releasing
energy within the University. But there is still some scope for fine-tuning. Council has
sometimes put us in mind of the early Tudor House of Commons, whose Members would
occasionally stare at one another in silence for want of a clear idea of what should happen
next. Perhaps more lay-members would improve things. But an even larger Council would
bring only one advantage, that it would in future be impossible to meet in the Van Houten
Room. So there would have to be a cull of the internal membership. The nature of the
problem suggests that perhaps a mobility scheme restricted to members of Council would be
the answer, though we shrink from making so bold a recommendation. The Proctors and
Assessor have also tried, in so far as we could, to keep the sub-committees of Council on
an
even footing of importance. The uncorrected tendency seems to be for PRAC to assume
pre-eminence amongst these committees. It has therefore been a satisfaction for us to observe
that over the year the other sub-committees (including particularly EPSC) have developed
a sharper sense of what their business is, and of how it should be pursued.

I was asked recently by a classically-educated friend about the etymology of the word
`Proctor'. Was it, he wondered, derived from the Greek word `[proktos]', meaning (as he
translated it, in fact not altogether accurately) `a buttock'? No, I assured him, it was in fact
a contraction of the Latin word `procurator', meaning a manager. Or, so I thought. But the
experience of office has suggested to me—if I can rise for one last time into the idiom
of so many of the letters which have gone out over my signature during the past twelve
months—that the case for a Greek etymology for the word `Proctor' deserves to be
reopened. We might begin with the question of number. The Roman procurator tended to
work alone. The History of the University, however, instructs us that there
have
always and ever been two Proctors—a striking circumstance which naturally reinforces
the claims of the Greek derivation. But it is when we turn our attention to the question of
function that the case for the Greek etymology becomes, I think, unanswerable. When we
consider what the Proctors do and how they spend their days, we can truly see why they
may,
without any undue imaginative strain, be thought of as the buttocks of the University.

As soon as the Proctors arrive in office, they are plied with food and drink. Coffee and
biscuits are the perpetual accompaniment to their working day, and when in the evening the
last file has been closed, and the last crumbs of biscuit eaten, more often than not there will
be a feast or a dinner to make sure that the pangs of hunger remain firmly banished. Not
only
do they consume more. They also move less. Their dignity demands that they should be more
visited than visiting, but whenever they do have to stir outside Wellington Square, they can
summon a car. So, over time, the lean academic is metamorphosed into the plump Proctor.
But this is a strictly functional process. For the Proctors—as the Greek etymology
instructs us—are best thought of as two adjacent parts of the body of the University
which, on account of their positioning and their steadily greater fleshiness, are over the year
increasingly well-adapted to the absorption of impacts which might otherwise do widespread
damage. You will have sensed, Sir, that my attention is swivelling towards the subject of
complaints.

The role of the Proctors in adjudicating complaints belongs to the nobler part of their
office, in which they act the part of tribunes or ombudsmen. Our impression has been that,
when one takes account of the scale of the University's activities, the incidence of complaint
is pleasingly small. Of course, much that could ripen into serious grievance is dealt with
effectively at a local level, without ever coming officially to the notice of the Proctors. For
this reason the Junior Proctor and I have welcomed EPSC's recent initiatives to regularise
and
codify these local instruments of resolution.

Of the complaints which did reach us, it is even more gratifying to be able to report that
in almost all cases they seemed to have arisen as a result of what one might call untreated
misunderstanding, rather than any serious error or wrongdoing. There is no reason for
complacency on this score; complaints were upheld in the course of the
year.
But, in general, we demit office having witnessed that the University is overwhelmingly
staffed by intelligent and responsible people, honestly striving by their own best lights to
pursue the ideals for which the University stands. This fact does not receive wide coverage
in the newspapers. All the more reason to proclaim it today.

The march of humanity towards freedom can, we know, only rarely take the high road.
Too often it must double back, win its way by stealth and sidle down the alleys of obliquity.
Let us celebrate, then, the astonishingly direct bound towards liberty which the University
is
just on the point of making. Unless the Privy Council rejects the legislation which the
University has placed before it, a despotism under which the University has silently suffered
from its earliest years will soon be utterly destroyed. I refer to the disciplinary powers of the
Proctors themselves, that awesome instrument of oppression which Proctors Slater and
Sharpe
handed on to us with its edge still intact, but which has slipped from our grasp, and shivered
into fragments against the Human Rights Act.

This trimming of the Proctors' powers has come about as a result of the redrafting of
the University's Statutes, a work of great labour carried out with efficiency and good humour
by the Principal of St Hugh's, the Master of St Cross, and Professor Freedland, assisted by
Miss Noon, Mrs Barnwell, and Mr Hall. For the most part, this has involved the
rationalising
and pruning of a body of legislation which threatened to choke itself in the luxuriance of its
waste fertility. But it was also necessary to bring the University's legislation into line with
the law of the land, where that had overtaken it, and so the power of the Proctors to
investigate, prosecute, and adjudicate a case was done away with on the grounds of its
incompatibility with the Human Rights Act. A new structure of University Courts has been
created, in which the Proctors will appear as prosecutors, but not as judges.

And yet, on close inspection, the redrafting has not in every detail tended towards
greater liberation for the downtrodden multitudes of the University. The Senior Proctor-elect
pointed out at the recent meeting of the Rules Committee that under the new Statutes the
representation of junior members on the Disciplinary Court had been done away with. A
regrettable development, no doubt: and especially regrettable from my standpoint, since I had
just assured the junior members on that committee that their rights of representation in the
University's disciplinary procedures had been meticulously preserved in the new
Statutes.

It could be that I fell into that oversight because I have relaxed too much in the
delightful company of the Junior Proctor and the Assessor. In one of his works, Burke talks
about the solemnity with which the Romans regarded the bonds forged in professional life:
`Even the holding of offices together, the disposition of which arose from chance not
selection, gave rise to a relation, which continued for life ... [and] was looked upon with a
sacred reverence.' `Sacred reverence' might be pitching it a little high, even for this year's
Proctors and Assessor, although we have rubbed along together extremely well, and one of
the year's pleasures has been the gradual revelation of character in one's colleagues. For
instance, the Junior Proctor has so impressed the Assessor and myself with his scrupulous
fairness of mind that we have rechristened him `Equity' Walford. Time and time again, when
to our jaded tutor's eye nothing more was needed than the firm application of authority, he
has persuaded us that a milder course was the one to take. For his part, the Assessor has
been
remarkable for his time-keeping. At not just the eleventh hour, but frequently the fifty-ninth
second of the fifty-ninth minute of the eleventh hour, and when the pathetically risk-averse
Proctors have been hanging about for five minutes or so, the Assessor has arrived for a
meeting, his cheek alight with the healthy glow of high-speed cycling. And what of the
Senior
Proctor? More inclined to slap than the Junior Proctor, less prepared to dash than the
Assessor, he finds himself somewhere betwixt and between; which, as our positioning before
you today suggests, is probably where he should be.

One reason why we have been so contented in each other's company is certainly that,
like all our predecessors, we have been looked after exceedingly well. The support which we
have received from the Clerk to the Proctors, from the Assistant Clerk, from the constables,
and from the secretaries in the Proctors' Office has been quite first-rate. And when we have
set foot outside the Proctors' corridor and entered the wider world of Wellington Square, we
have been deeply impressed by the dedication and professionalism of the University's civil
service. We end our year of office convinced that the University is exceptionally
well-run.

Writing about the English constitution, Bagehot drew a famous distinction between what
he called its `dignified' and its `efficient' parts. In the constitution of the University, it is the
Proctors' privilege to have a foot on both sides of that divide, and so, having spoken for a
while about the way the University is administered, I should reflect for a moment on what
we
have experienced of its dignity. In recent orations the ceremonial aspects of the Proctorship
have not received much attention. This is surprising, since the Junior Proctor and I have
found
that our ceremonial duties have added colour and interest to our time in office. We have been
present at a number of openings of buildings, and so have had the opportunity to be
impressed, Sir, by your ability to clothe unchanging sentiment in varied language. Encaenia
was a high spot of our summer, graced as it was by glorious weather and a bumper crop of
dignitaries. For the Proctors it was enlivened, too, by mild anxieties. Would the honorands
come forward in the right order? Would we give them the right scroll? Would they then sit
in the right place? Would the Chancellor have admitted them to the right degree?
Uncertainties which, in 2001, it would not in every instance have been possible to resolve
with a simple answer of `yes'.

But on the ceremonial side it is the Degree Days which most occupy the Proctors. The
Degree Ceremony might (perhaps unkindly) be described as an occasion on which something
which nobody understands happens twice. If so, then, this proves only that understanding is
no necessary condition of pleasure. From the Proctors' seats it is clear from the expressions
on the faces of the graduands as they are acclaimed on re-entering the Sheldonian that great
goodwill towards the University is generated by this ceremony. The University therefore
owes
a debt of gratitude to all those who deal so impeccably with the clerical and choreographical
aspects of the Degree Days: to the Bedels, to the staff of the Sheldonian, to those in the
Registry and Proctors' Office, as well as to the Deans of Degrees.

Perhaps at this point I could also add my own personal expression of gratitude to the Bedel
of Divinity, Mr Holman, for the unexpected medical examination he administered to me in
the middle of a degree ceremony, when he calmly handed me the wrong list of
supplicats. This, I can assure Congregation, is a much more searching test
of
cardiac function than anything currently available from BUPA. With collaboration from the
Medical Sciences Division it might even be developed into a useful source of additional
income for the University.

Just before taking up office, Sir, I read the following shocking sentiment: `Throughout
all this business, the Senior Proctor has acted a part of the utmost villainy. Indeed, he
embodies in his own person all that is most defective in the University.' There are a number
of former Senior Proctors present here today, Sir; and you will have noted, as have I, those
whose complexion has risen by a shade or two in the past few moments. Alas, they have
incriminated themselves unnecessarily. My quotation was in fact written two hundred and
seventy years ago, as part of the pamphlet war which followed the disputed election to the
Keepership of the Ashmolean in 1732. At those words, `disputed election to the Keepership
of the Ashmolean in 1732', I seem to see a ripple of recognition run through the room.
Nevertheless, let me quickly rehearse this famous chapter in the history of the
University.

On 14 April 1731, John Andrews, a Fellow of Magdalen, was elected Keeper of the
Ashmolean, and was duly installed three days later. But his appointment was not universally
popular. In particular, the President of Trinity College, George Huddesford, resented
Andrews's election. Huddesford had run Andrews very close: there were six Electors, and
three of them—Dr Shippen of Brasenose, the Bishop of Bristol, Dr Bradshaw, and the
Professor of Physick, Dr Woodford—had supported Huddesford. But a change of
Proctors then occurred, and the incoming men—Oliver Battely of Christ Church and
Thomas Foxley of Brasenose—threw in their lot with Huddesford, who suddenly had
five
of the six electors in his pocket. This apparently so frightened Dr Andrews that on 14
February 1732, accompanied by Dr Shippen, he surrendered the keys of the Ashmolean to
Huddesford in exchange for £50, and crept away back down the High Street, a
shattered
and defeated figure.

But how did it happen that Andrews's election was reopened? Here, Sir, I am afraid
it is impossible entirely to shield from blame one of your predecessors in the
Vice-Chancellorship: the redoubtable Robert Shippen, Principal of Brasenose. In many ways,
Vice-Chancellor Shippen embodied early eighteenth-century Oxford. His political ally,
Thomas Hearne, tells us that Shippen was cunning, worldly, and indolent. Others report that
he was a heavy and a hardened drinker. And in the controversies which gusted across the
University in those tempestuous years, he did not bother to disguise the fact that he was an
unflinching Tory zealot.

However, Sir, Dr Shippen also had his weaknesses. Amongst the constellation of his
virtues, continence in particular shone with only a faint and a flickering light. For he was,
as
Hearne also tells us, a `strange lover of women'. Dr Huddesford (whose wife was
uncommonly attractive) understood well this aspect of the Vice-Chancellor's character, and
he so arranged matters that Dr Shippen was ... well, shall we say, able to see more of Mrs
Huddesford, and that more often, than he otherwise might. So, led on by the prospect of
access to the pretty wife of the President of Trinity, Dr Shippen prevailed on the new
Proctors
to transfer their votes to Dr Huddesford, who thereby became Keeper of the Ashmolean, with
£50 a year and nothing in the way of duties.

Much in this episode offers itself for comment in the light of the events of our year in
office. What impact, for instance, might the Human Rights Act have had on these
eighteenth-century misdemeanours? It certainly seems as if at least Mrs Huddesford's right
to privacy was invaded. And what should we make of Dr Shippen's superb completeness of
corruption, able in a single titanic act to fuse together adultery, malversation of endowment,
intimidation, and maladministration? Had this year's Proctors encountered red-blooded
sinners
of Principal Shippen's calibre, Sir, instead of the trickle of piecemeal malefactors who
actually came our way, you would have found us much more tenacious of the full range of
disciplinary powers which the redrafted Statutes have taken from us.

But the real consolation in this episode, for anyone on the verge of taking up the
Proctorship, is the example given by Mr Battely and Mr Foxley of weakness and
incompetence. Surely, you think, I will be able to do it better than that. But will the
incoming
Proctors need to go back as far as two hundred and seventy years for their encouraging
examples of incompetence? The question will be soon answered. After their celebratory
lunches, and as they settle for the first time into the Proctorial chairs, there will come a
gentle
knock at the door, and Dr Gasser will enter, with a soft tread, bearing many files.

Proctorial year 2001–2

Summary of Offences

(totals for 2000–1 given in brackets)


Offence                    Number of                  Result
                            cases

Breach of University Statutes 

(Occupation of university property and disruption of university activities) 15 (15) 1 @ £25 1 @ £30 2 @ £35 4 @ £40 6 @ £55 1 `Not Guilty' Breach of Rules Committee Regulations (Misconduct after examinations) 14 (18) 2 @ £30 3 @ £35 4 @ £40 2 @ £45 2 @ £50 1 technically `Guilty', no punishment imposed (Visiting Student) Breach of University Statutes (Misuse of University property— computing network) 9 (13) 1 @ £25 2 @ £30 4 @ £35 1 @ £60 1 `Reprimand' Breach of University Statutes (Defacement of University property) 1 (1) 1 @ £20 Breach of Rules Committee Regulations (Fly-posting) 6 (0) 1 @ £20 1 @ £20 2 @ £25 2 @ £30 1 @ £35 Breach of Proctors' Examination Regulations (Conduct at examinations) 6 (1) 1—essay ruled inadmissible 1–original examination set aside: resubmission of thesis not allowed before November 2001 1—two essays submitted to be disregarded: remainder of examination to continue as normal 1—requirement to review/revise project-report by 13.08.01, with signed statement as being own work. Reviewed /revised project-report to be `down-marked' by 10. 1—expelled 1—case referred to University Disciplinary Court Breach of University Statutes (Obstruction of university employees) 1 (4) Found `Guilty'; no separate penalty imposed Breach of University Statutes (Engaging in offensive behaviour/ language) 2 (2) 1—reprimand 1 `Not Guilty'

Total number of offences: 54 (58)

Total taken in fines: £1,600 (£1,715)

Cases dealt with by University Disciplinary Court: 1 (compulsory fail in
First
Public Examination and expelled)


Proctorial year 2001–2

Summary of complaints received


The 94 complaints received the during Proctorial Year 2001–2 (or in a few instances
carried forward from the previous year) may be categorised as follows:

Examination: 74

(undergraduate 58, graduate 16)

These included 22 requests for verification of results that did not subsequently develop into
substantive complaints. Of the remaining 52 complaints: 41 were dismissed, seven were
upheld in whole or in part, and four remain under investigation.

Equal opportunities: 0

Harassment: 3

One case was dealt with as a disciplinary matter of `offensive behaviour'; one case was
redirected into Staff Grievance procedures relating to matters other than harassment; and the
third case involved a non-member of the University who agreed to desist from behaviour that
had been received as unwelcome.

Maladministration: 5

One case was upheld (car-parking); three were dismissed; and one remains under
investigation.

Quality of/access to teaching, research, or support facilities: 0

Suspension/rustication from the University: 0

Student Union (OUSU): 1

The complaint related to Freshers' Fair 2001: OUSU was reminded about its obligations
under
the Code of Practice on Freedom of Speech.

Other: 11

Two complainants were referred to colleges because the cases were outside the Proctors'
jurisdiction. None of the remaining nine complaints (mostly relating to student clubs and
societies) was upheld.

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UNIVERSITY DISCIPLINARY COURT

At its annual meeting in Hilary Term the Rules Committee established panels of ten members
of Congregation and ten Junior Members from which vacancies on the University
Disciplinary
Court are to be filled. Names have been drawn by lot from these panels by the Registrar.
The
appointments to the Court with effect from the first day of Trinity Term 2002 are:

Congregation: PROFESSOR R. RATCLIFFE (New College), to serve until
the
last day of Hilary Term 2004, vice Professor H. McQuay.

Junior Members: MR J.-Y. CHEONG (Lady Margaret Hall) and MS B.
SAVAGE (Green College), each to serve until the last day of Hilary Term 2003,
vice Mr B. Irons and Mr S. Maffei.

From the panel of four names established by the Rules Committee, the Vice-Chancellor has
reappointed MR H.W.B. MENDUS (Simms Solicitors) to serve as Clerk of the University
Disciplinary Court from the first day of Trinity Term 2002 until the last day of Hilary Term
2003.

In all cases, the appointments will terminate earlier if the amended Statute on Discipline
(which will have the effect of reconstituting the Disciplinary Court) comes into force.

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CAMDEN PROFESSORSHIP OF ANCIENT
HISTORY

ALAN KEIR BOWMAN, MA (MA, PH.D. Toronto), Student of Christ Church and
University Lecturer (CUF) in Ancient History, has been appointed to the professorship with
effect from 1 October 2002.

Dr Bowman will be a fellow of Brasenose College.

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PROFESSORSHIP OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES

TIMOTHY JOHN MORRIS (BA Cambridge, M.SC., PH.D. London), Professor of
Organisational Behaviour, Imperial College, London, has been appointed to the professorship
with effect from 1 September 2002.

Professor Morris will be a fellow of Templeton College.

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CONFERMENT OF THE TITLE OF VISITING
PROFESSOR

The Medical Sciences Board has conferred the title of Visiting Professor in Experimental
Psychology on J. ATKINSON (B.SC. Bristol, PH.D. Cambridge), currently Professor of
Psychology, University College, London, and Vice-Dean (Faculty of Life Sciences) and
Director, Undergraduate Teaching and Learning Unit, Life Sciences, University College,
London, and Medical Research Council Senior External Scientific Staff, for a period of three
years from 1 April 2002.

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UNDERGRADUATE EXPEDITIONS 2002

Approval has been given on behalf of Council for the expeditions detailed below to have the
right to use the title `Oxford University Expedition to'. In each case the expedition title, the
leader's name, and the area of interest is given.

Papua

James Gilbert, Balliol College.

A kayaking expedition combining adventure and anthropological and ecological research in
Bintuni Bay, Vogelkopf Peninsula, West Papua.


Hong Meigui Yunnan

Hilary Greaves, St Catherine's College.

An exploration of deep limestone caves in the north of Yunnan Province, China.


Tormenta

Chris Rogers, Somerville College.

An expedition to explore extremely deep caves in the Picos de Europa mountains of Northern
Spain.


Nepal

Alice Tedd, St Catherine's College.

An initial feasibility study of micro hydro power in two rural villages in the Arun Valley.


Krakatau

Sallie Burrough, St Catherine's College.

An ecological study of the biodiversity of the Krakataun Islands and their local use and
perception.


High Andean Mountain Biking

Matthew Sell, Harris Manchester College.

To journey by bicycle 800 miles along the Bolivian Altiplano, across the Uyini salt flats and
to ascend the 20,000ft volcano, Anucanquilcha.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 21 March 2002: Lectures<br />

Lectures


Contents of this section:

Return to Contents Page of this issue



ROMANES LECTURE

NEIL MACGREGOR, Director, the National Gallery, will deliver the Romanes Lecture at
5.45 p.m. on Tuesday, 23 April, in the Sheldonian Theatre.

Subject: `The perpetual present: the ideal of art for all.'

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LYELL LECTURES IN BIBLIOGRAPHY

Designing Boswell's Life of Johnson

PROFESSOR BRUCE REDFORD, University of Boston, James P.R. Lyell Reader in
Bibliography 2001–2, will deliver the Lyell Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following days
in Lecture Theatre 2, the St Cross Building.

Fri. 3 May: `Imprinting Johnson.'

Tue. 7 May: `Representing Johnson.'

Thur. 9 May: `Dramatising Johnson.'

Tue. 14 May: `Transmitting Johnson.'

Thur. 16 May: `Taming Johnson.'

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CLARENDON LECTURES IN FINANCE

PROFESSOR M. BRENNAN will deliver the Clarendon Lectures in Finance at 5.30 p.m.
on the following days in the Saïd Business School, Park End Street.

Wed. 5 June: `Trade and information.'

Thur. 6 June: `Structural uncertainty and portfolio strategy.'

Fri. 7 June: `Information and valuation.'

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LIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

ESRC Transnational Commmunity Research Programme: The cultural politics of
transnationalism

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the Senior Common Room,
the School of Geography and the Environment.

Convener: Dr S.A. Vertovec.

J. NIELSEN, Birmingham

2 May: `Transnational Sufism: a case study.'

S. PATTIE, University College, London

9 May: `Transforming transnational narratives in
Armenia.'

T. CHEESMAN, Wales

16 May: `Translational community: Kanak attack in
Alemania.'

K. ROBINS, Newcastle

23 May: `Banal transnationalism.'

M. STEWART, University College, London

30 May: `Hungary's status law and issues of citizenship.'

P. DRESCH

6 June: `Debates on marriage and nationality in the United Arab
Emirates.'

R. MANDEL, University College, London

13 June: `The return of the citizen in German debates on
identity and nationhood.'

Z. LAYTON-HENRY, Warwick

20 June: `The limits of transnationalism.'

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MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Hinshelwood Lectures

PROFESSOR P.G. DE GENNES, École Supérieure de Physique et de Chimie
Industrielles and the Collège de France, Paris, will deliver the Hinshelwood Lectures
at 11.15 a.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays in the the Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
Laboratory, commencing on Tuesday, 7 May.

Convener: J. Klein, MA, Dr Lee's Professor of Chemistry.

Subject: `Facets of soft matter.'

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MEDICAL SCIENCES

Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology

The following seminars will be given at 1 p.m. on Mondays in the Lecture Theatre, the
Oxford Eye Hospital, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

Convener: J.J. Harding, MA status, Professor of Ocular Biochemistry.

PROFESSOR H.-L. FUCHSBAUER, Darmstadt

22 Apr.: `Lens transglutaminase—a target for preventative
therapy of cataractogenesis?'

DR P. EATON, King's College, London

29 Apr.: `The responses of [alpha]-crystallin and hsp27 to
ischaemia and reperfusion in the heart.'

PROFESSOR A.J. BRON

20 May: `Unravelling keratoconus: a teasing problem.'

A. PURKISS, Birkbeck College, London

27 May: `Structure, stability, and unfolding lens gamma S-
crystallin.'

R. LIM, Sydney

10 June: `Cataract and the Blue Mountain Eye
Study—ocular associations.'

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Sir William Dunn School of Pathology: Norman Heatley Lecture

PROFESSOR G. BLOBEL, Rockefeller University, New York, will deliver the tenth annual
Norman Heatley Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 30 April, in the Lecture Theatre, the Sir
William Dunn School of Pathology.

Subject: `Protein targeting.'

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SOCIAL SCIENCES


Winchester Visiting Lecture

PROFESSOR R.O. KEOHANE, James B. Duke Professor of Political Science, Duke
University, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 14 May, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `The globalisation of informal violence and theories of world
politics.'

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THEOLOGY

Interdisciplinary Seminars in the Study of Religions

The following seminars will be given at 3.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Examination Schools.
The details given differ from those previously advertised.

Conveners: J.S.K. Ward, B.Litt., MA, Regius Professor of Divinity,
and W.M. Morgan, MA status (BA Nottingham, MA Lancaster), Lecturer in the Study of
Religions, Mansfield College.

DR I. HARRIS, University College of St Martin, Lancaster

30 Apr.: `Pol Pot and Buddhism: the fate of Cambodian
Buddhism 1970–9.'

PROFESSOR D. ECK, Harvard

7 May: `A new religious reality: the challenges of pluralism in
multireligious societies.' (Astor Lecture)

DR M. RAPHAEL, Cheltenham and Gloucester College

14 May: `Jewish women's consecration of space and time in
Auschwitz: a Jewish feminist reading of the memoir literature.'

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Ian Ramsey Centre

Science, religion, and medicine: promising new directions

Seminars in this series will be held at 8.15 for 8.30 p.m. on Thursday, 2 May, and
Thursday, 16 May, in the Hood Room, St Cross College.

On Thursday, 30 May, a conference on the subject `Consciousness and human responsibility'
will be held in the University Museum of Natural History, 5–9.30 p.m. The speakers
will be Lord Winston and Lord Habgood. To register, contact Dr Margaret Yee, Ian Ramsey
Centre, 41 St Giles', Oxford (e-mail: margaret.yee@theology.ox.ac.uk).

Conveners: Professor J.H. Brooke and Dr Margaret Yee.

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RUSKIN SCHOOL OF DRAWING AND FINE
ART


John Berger Lecture

PATRICK WRIGHT will deliver the John Berger Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 24 April,
in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `Deep and true? The cultural life of the English landscape.'

The John Berger Lectures take place on an occasional basis and focus on various
aspects of art history. The series is organised by The Laboratory at the Ruskin School of
Drawing and Fine Art. The overall title salutes the seminal and ongoing contribution of John
Berger to the study of the visual arts.

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OXFORD CENTRE FOR HEBREW AND JEWISH
STUDIES


David Patterson Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 8 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Oxford Centre for
Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Yarnton Manor. A minibus will leave from the Playhouse,
Beaumont Street, at 6.40 p.m. and 7.30 p.m., and return from Yarnton Manor at 9.45 p.m.
(single fare: £1.50; students £1.10).

Convener: R. Nettler, MA status, University Research Lecturer in
Oriental Studies.

AMIR OR, Helicon Society for the Advancement of Poetry in Israel

24 Apr.: `Hebrew poetry at the turn of the millennium.'

DR E. OTTOLENGHI

1 May: `Missing the target: the (not so) unforeseeable
consequences of Israel's electoral reform.'

PROFESSOR S. MAYNE, Ottawa

8 May: `A rich garland: an introduction to Jewish Canadian
poetry.'

PROFESSOR D. WEBER, Mount Holyoke College

15 May: `The limits of empathy: Hollywood's representation
of Jews in Crossfire and Gentleman's
Agreement
.'

DR M. FREUD-KANDEL

22 May: `The historical role of the Chief Rabbi in Anglo-
Jewry.'

DR G. ZUCKERMANN, Cambridge

29 May: `The Israeli language: Mosaic or mosaic?'

DR P. VAN BOXEL

5 June: `Censorship of Hebrew books in sixteenth-century
Italy.'

FELIX POSEN

12 June: `Secular Judaism: recent developments in teaching
Judaism as a culture and civilisation.'

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MAGDALEN COLLEGE


Waynflete Lectures

The elite university and democracy

PROFESSOR SHELDON ROTHBLATT, University of California, Berkeley, will deliver
the Waynflete Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Auditorium, Magdalen
College.

Mon. 13 May: `The research university in Britain and America.'

Wed. 15 May: `Much ado about elites.'

Mon. 20 May: `Higher education for all?'

Wed. 22 May: `Exceptions to the rule: national differences in the
twenty-first century.'

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ST CROSS COLLEGE


St Cross College Visiting Fellow Lecture

PROFESSOR K. LINDLEY, Professor of Early Modern History, University of Ulster, and
Visiting Fellow, St Cross College, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 7 May, in the
Examination Schools.

Subject: `Religious toleration in seventeenth-century England.'

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TRINITY COLLEGE


Margaret Howard Lecture

THE RT. HON. LORD JUSTICE LAWS will deliver the Margaret Howard Lecture at 5.45
p.m. on Thursday, 16 May, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building.
Admission is free.

Subject: `From Homer to Socrates—the rule of law in Greek
literature.'

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 21 March 2002: Grants and Funding<br />

Grants and Research Funding


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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<br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 21 March 2002: Examinations and Boards<br />

Examinations and Boards


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent
entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the Educational Policy and Standards Committee of Council, and, where
applicable, of divisional boards, the following changes in regulations made by
divisional and faculty boards will come into effect on
5 April.


1 Mathematical and Physical Sciences Board

M.Sc. in Computer Science

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2001, p. 699, delete ll.
22–4 and
insert:

`(i) Candidates shall submit a written assignment on each of seven and
no more than eight topics chosen from a list of topics approved by the organising committee
and published in the University Gazette by not later than the
Friday of
eighth week of the Trinity Term in the academic year preceding the examination. The list
of courses shall be divided into two sections: Section A and Section B. Candidates shall be
required to select at least four topics from Schedule B.'

2 Ibid., p. 700, l. 1, delete `three' and substitute `four'.

3 Ibid., p. 700, l. 29, delete `two' and substitute `three'.

4 Ibid., delete from p. 700, l. 42 to p. 701, l. 19.

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2 Medical Sciences Board

(a) Doctor of Medicine

With effect from 1 April 2002 (for first examination in 2004)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2001, p. 916, after l. 45 insert:

`DM

1. Admission

Students qualified under Ch. VI, Sect. xi, § 3 may apply for admission as a
Student for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine to the Medical Sciences Board through the
Secretary of Faculties and Academic Registrar. Such applications shall be accompanied by:

(i) a completed application form (obtainable from the Graduate Studies
Office);

(ii) a statement of not more than 1,500 words outlining the proposed scope of the
research to be undertaken and a provisional thesis title;
and, in the case of students wishing to submit published work, the following additional
information:

(iii) a list of the works to be submitted, details of their publication, and a statement on
whether any part of the work to be submitted has previously been accepted for a degree. A
student who submits work that has been produced in collaboration shall state in respect of
each item the extent of his or her own contribution. This statement must be certified by each
of the senior primary authors (where he or she is not the student) in the case of each piece
of collaborative work submitted.

A set of published works may constitute an acceptable dissertation but only if with the
addition of a general introduction and general conclusion they form a continuous theme.

2. Confirmation of Status

Students who have been admitted to DM status, and intend to submit a dissertation for
a thesis, must, not later than six terms and not earlier than three terms after admission to DM
status, apply for confirmation of that status.

The requirements for confirmation of status are:

(i) completion by the student of the appropriate form

(obtainable from the Graduate Studies Office);

(ii) submission by the student of a report of no more than 2,500 words on the work
undertaken since registration, including a comprehensive outline of the research topic, details
of progress made, and the anticipated timetable for submission of the thesis;

(iii) completion of the appropriate form (obtainable from the Graduate Studies Office)
by the Adviser at the place where the work is being undertaken.

The application shall be directed to the Graduate Studies Committee of the Medical
Sciences Board, which shall
appoint two assessors competent in the student's area of
research (who may include the Adviser in Oxford in the case of students working outside
Oxford). The assessors shall submit to the board's Graduate Studies Committee a report
(using a form obtainable from the Graduate Studies Office) after considering the student's
report and, if necessary, interviewing the student. Before a decision is reached on whether
or not confirmation of status should be approved the Graduate Studies Committee shall take
into account the comments made on the application by the Adviser at the place of work and
that Adviser's biannual report.

If the Graduate Studies Committee does not consider that the student's progress
warrants confirmation of status it may either: (a) permit the resubmission of
the application on one further occasion not later than the third term after the original
application; or (b) reject the application.

A copy of the assessors' report, amended as necessary by the Graduate Studies
Committee, will normally be made available to the student.

3. Theses

The requirements for the submission of a thesis are as
follows:

(i) The completion by the student of the appropriate form (obtainable
from the Graduate Studies Office). The form may be submitted immediately in the case of
students submitting published work as a dissertation and up to four months in advance of
submitting the thesis in the case of other students.

(ii) The submission of two printed or typewritten copies of the thesis and two printed
or typewritten copies of an
abstract, formatted and supplied according to the instructions obtainable from the Medical
Sciences Board through the Graduate Studies Office.

4. Oral Examinations

(i) The place, day, and hour of examination shall be fixed by the
examiners, who shall be responsible for informing the student of them by post, and it shall
be the duty of the student to ensure that any letter addressed to him or her is forwarded to
him or her if away. The examiners shall allow reasonable time for receiving an
acknowledgement from the student of their summons. The day shall be fixed by the
examiners to suit their own convenience but they are asked, in order that the student may
know what arrangements he or she may safely make, to give the student early information
of the date fixed, even though it may be some considerable time ahead.

(ii) Notice of the examination shall be given by the examiners to the Graduate Studies
Office.

(iii) If, owing to illness or other urgent or unforeseen cause, an examiner is unable to
attend the examination,
it shall be postponed to a later date, except that, if the Proctors are satisfied that
postponement will be a serious hardship to the student, the examiner may authorise
another person to attend the examination as a substitute. The substitute shall not be required
to sign the report, but he or she shall receive such remuneration as the Vice-Chancellor and
Proctors shall determine.'

2 Ibid., p. 917, l. 22, delete `and DM'.

3 Ibid., l. 23, delete `or DM'.

4 Ibid., p. 918, l. 4, delete `or "DM THESIS" as
appropriate'.

5 Ibid., l. 7, delete `and DM'.

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(b) Honour School of Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiologyy

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 2001, p. 458, delete ll. 35–9 and substitute:

`(a) Candidates taking papers in Psychology

Candidates must offer six papers for Part II unless they are taking three or more
subjects in Physiological Sciences in which case the total number of papers is five. At least
one and at most three of the papers must be in Psychology, the others to be chosen from
those available in Philosophy and/or Physiology below. Candidates taking three papers in
Psychology may offer a research project or a Library Dissertation in place of one of the three
Psychology papers. Candidates taking two papers in Psychology and three
papers in Physiology may offer a Research Project in place of one of the two Psychology
papers.

(b) Candidates not taking papers in Psychology

Candidates must offer eight papers for Part II unless they are taking three or more
subjects in Physiological Sciences in which case the total number of papers is seven.'

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3 Board of the Faculty of Law

Final Honour School of Jurisprudence

(i) With effect from 1 October 2004 (for first examination in 2005)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2001, p. 241, delete l. 10.

2 Ibid., p. 242, delete l. 23.

(ii) With effect from 1 October 2005 (for first examination in 2006)

In Examination Decrees, 2001, p. 238, ll. 19–21 and 23–5, delete
`eight
standard subjects ... one special subject' and substitute `standard subjects 1, 2, 3, 4, 10, 13,
and 14, and either in two further standard subjects from 5–9, 11, 12, and 15–21
or in one further standard subject from 5–9, 11, 12, and 15–21, and in two
special subjects.'

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4 Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern
Languages

Preliminary Examination for Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

In Examination Decrees, 2001, p. 86, delete ll. 22–3 and substitute:

`Portuguese: The paper will consist of (a) audio or visual listening
comprehension exercises; (b) translation into Portuguese; (c)
monolingual exercises.'

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5 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern
Languages and English Language and Literature

Preliminary Examination in English and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

As for the Preliminary Examination for Modern Languages (see 4 above).

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6 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern
Languages and Modern History

Preliminary Examination in Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

As for the Preliminary Examination for Modern Languages (see 4 above).

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7 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern
Languages and Oriental Studies

Preliminary Examination in European and Middle Eastern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

As for the Preliminary Examination for Modern Languages (see 4 above).

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8 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern
Languages and Philosophy

Preliminary Examination in Philosophy and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

As for the Preliminary Examination for Modern Languages (see 4 above).

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9 Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies

M.Phil. in Oriental Studies (Modern Chinese Studies)

With effect from 1 October 2002 (for first examination in 2003)

1 In Examination Decrees, 2001, p. 588, l. 10, after
`(group C),'
insert `or modern art and literature (combined) (group D),'.

2 Ibid., p. 589, delete ll. 24–40.

3 Ibid., p. 589, after l. 40 insert:

`Group D: Modern Art and Literature

Candidates will be introduced to the development of modern Chinese painting and
fiction throughout the twentieth century. They will learn about the major artists and writers;
the modes of production; influences from abroad; the effect of politics, especially extreme
Leftist policies such as the Cultural Revolution; trends and fashions; and the fragmentation
of contemporary arts and literature. Topics include the following:

(i) Art and Literature 1900–49

Chinese painting 1900–49; addressing the past

Chinese painting 1900–49: approaching the foreign

May 4th and Republican Fiction

Leftist ideology and practice in fiction

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(ii) Art and Literature 1949–2000

Painting 1949–79: from the Yan'an Forum to the Cultural Revolution

The Avant-garde in Art, 1979–

Taiwan fiction

Fiction and the State 1949–79

Post-reform fiction: unity to fragmentation'.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 21 March 2002: Colleges<br />

Colleges, Halls, and Societies


Contents of this section:

Return to Contents Page of this issue



OBITUARIES


Corpus Christi College

A.P. ROBERT, HIS HON. JUDGE, HYWEL WYN JONES, MA, 30 July 2001; commoner
1940, scholar 1941–2 and 1946–8. Aged 78.

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Exeter College

OWEN JOHN BEILBY, 2001; commoner 1931.

BASIL GRAHAM CHUBB, 23 October 2001; commoner 1931. Aged 89.

JOCELYN TICKNER DEMANT, 1 December 2001; commoner 1953. Aged 66.

KENNETH FREDERICK HAWKSFORD, 2001; commoner 1947.

PETER JOHN TROTMAN HERBERT, 19 November 2001; commoner 1959. Aged
64.

DAVID SCOTTON HUELIN, 17 January 2002; commoner 1933. Aged 87.

MICHAEL STANLEY HUNTER JONES, 2 November 2001; France Scholar 1935. Aged
85.

WESLEY WENTE POSVAR, 27 July 2001; Rhodes Scholar 1948. Aged 75.

KENNETH LUNDIE WATSON, 13 February 2002; commoner 1933. Aged 86.

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Worcester College

ALASTAIR KENNEDY CASSELS-BROWN, MA, 30 November 2001; Organ Scholar
1945–8. Aged 74.

BRUCE ROLAND GASTON COLEMAN, MA, DIP.ED., 14 March 2001; commoner and
graduate student 1949–53. Aged 72.

PETER MACDUFF CHRISTIAN HARE, MA, 14 June 2001; commoner 1939–40 and
1945–7. Aged 81.

THE REVD CANON ROBIN LANG WILSON JONES, MA, DIP.ED., 6 January 2002;
exhibitioner 1926–30, graduate student 1938–9.

IAN LAUDERDALE SCOTT-CLARK, MA, 12 October 2001; commoner 1949–51.
Aged 75.

DAVID RONALD SOMERVELL, BA; commoner 1931–5.

DAVID WOLFERS, MA, 30 December 2001; exhibitioner 1936–9. Aged 84.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 21 March 2002: Advertisements<br />

Advertisements


Contents of this section:



How to advertise in the
Gazette


Terms and conditions
of acceptance of advertisements

Return to Contents Page of this issue



Oxford Brookes University

Centre for Family and Household Research 2002 Seminar Series: 23
April, Graham Crow (Southampton),Family Solidarities, SGO3, Research Centre. All
seminars will begin at 5.30 p.m. All are welcome. For further information contact: Sara
Ryan, Centre for Family and Household Research, Oxford Brookes University, Gipsy Lane,
Headington OX3 0PB. E-mail: fam@brookes.ac.uk.

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Oxford University Research Staff Society

The Research Staff Society (RSS) membership consists of Post-
doctoral/Junior Research Fellows and Research Assistants who work for the University of
Oxford. As most Research Staff are not attached to a college and may be new to Oxford our
social events provide a unique opportunity to meet researchers outside your group or
department. We aim to provide an interesting and varying social setting in which to mix and
to become a voice for research staff within the University. We run social events each month
to suit all tastes. Please visit our Web site http://users.ox.ac.uk/~rss/, which provides
information on how to join the society as well as details on events which we will be running
in the near future. We hope you will decide to join us and very much look forward to
meeting you at one of our events this year.

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Conference

Enigma and the Intelligence War, a conference organised jointly by
Christ Church, Oxford, and the Bletchley Park Trust, will be held at Christ Church, 1-5
Sept. Speakers include Sir Michael Howard, Lord Dacre, Dr David Kahn, Professor
Chrisopher Andrew, Professor M. R. D. Foot, and WW2 code breakers. For the brochure
or enquiries about this unique event, please e-mail: trevor@academic-study.com, or call
01869 243 195.

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Antiques Bought and Sold

Antiques and decorative objects bought and sold: desks and library
furniture always wanted, also garden stonework. Please call: Greenway Antiques, 90 Corn
Street, Witney, Oxon. Open Mon.,–Fri., 9.30 a.m.–5 p.m., Sat., 10
a.m.–4 p.m. Tel.: 01993 705026, mobile: 07831 585014.

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Periodicals Bought and Sold

Back-issues of scholarly periodicals and journals bought and sold (not
scientific or medical). Graham Jeffrey, Periodicals (est. 1967), 29 Cuddesdon Road,
Horspath, Oxford, OX33 1JD. Tel.: 01865 872528, fax: 776398. E-mail:
gjeffrey1@compuserve.com.

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Office accommodation

Admin. annexe available in secluded North Oxford garden: 4 rooms,
complete facilities, ideal location, self-contained, own entrance, parking. Three minutes town
centre. Tel.: 01865 554326 (mornings).

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Services Offered

Academic Study and Travel is an Oxford-based lifelong learning
agency: AST offers an experienced, professional service in the design, organisation, and
delivery of academic programmes, single lectures, day schools, conferences, study tours, and
summer schools. Projects of all sizes undertaken. Web site: www.academic-study.com. Tel.:
01869 243195, e-mail: trevor@academic-study.com.

Town and Country Trees: arboricultural contractors; modern
arboricultural techniques; local authority approved; safeguarded by full Public Liability
insurance. Free advice and quotations. Tel.: 0845 458 2980 or 07976 261850 (mobile).

Big or small, we ship it all, plus free pick up anywhere in Oxford.
Also 24-hour photocopying, private mailing addresses (24-hour access, and mail forwarding
world-wide), binding, fax bureau, colour photocopying, mailing services, and much more.
Contact or visit Mail Boxes Etc., 266 Banbury Rd., Oxford. Tel.: 01865 514655, fax:
514656, e-mail: summertown@020.mbe.uk.com, also at: 94 London Rd., Oxford. Tel.:
01865 741729, fax: 01865 742431, e-mail: staff@mbeheadington.co.uk.

Long-established Oxford builder: property maintenance, renovations,
extensions. Every aspect of the building trade covered. Free estimates. Academic references
available. Richard Edwards. Tel.: 01865 343562.

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Domestic Services

A 7-year-old girl is looking for a surrogate granny or a companion
who could pick her up from school (3 p.m., North Oxford, 4 times a week), accompany her
for 1-2 hours, preferably in the companion's house, and drop her off at ballet/swimming
pool/etc. Her needs, apart from companionship, are: snack/drink and some conversation or
help with activities like reading, drawing, etc. She is quiet, no fuss young person, and is fun
to be with. Car is not essential but would be VERY welcome. Please call Lidia at 01993
882427, or e-mail: lidiarc@bioch.ox.ac.uk.

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your local
specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also
carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental
rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: 01865 726983
or 01235 555533.

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Tuition Offered

Need help with your academic career? Academic Coach provides help
with c.v's, tendering for research projects, writing for journals, preparing book proposals,
and general academic career development. Contact Ian Finlay at
AcademicCoach@hotmail.com, or call 0794 712 4741 (mobile).

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Situations Vacant

The Aris Trust Centre for Tibetan & Himalayan Studies:
Administrator. Salary: £18,000-£24,000 pro rata, depending on experience and
qualifications. Hours: 36. We are an educational and research Trust based at Wolfson
College. We seek to appoint a full-time administrator for a period of 18 months, with the
possibility of renewal. The successful candidate will be responsible for the day to day
management of the Trust and the administration of a major international academic
conference. Applicants should have previous administrative experience, including office
management and dealing with accounts. Experience of fund-raising and conference
organisation would be an advantage. IT literacy and excellent communication skills, both
written and oral are essential. Meticulous attention to detail is required. This is a challenging
post and the successful candidate will need to have both the ability to work on his or her own
initiative, and as a member of a team. Interest in Tibet and the Himalayas would be an
advantage. For further information, please e-mail: iats@wolfson.ox.ac.uk. Please send c.v.
and covering letter to: The Aris Trust Centre, Wolfson College, Oxford OX2 6UD. The
closing date for applications is Mon., 8 April. Interviews will take place on Wed., 24
April.

Oxford University Rugby Football club require a Club Groundsman.
OURFC are looking for a new Club Groundsman for their ground at Iffley Road, Oxford.
The groundsman would be required to work flexible hours as necessary to prepare and
maintain the pitch, surrounding grounds, and facilities. This is a challenging yet rewarding
position, requiring a person who is highly motivated and organised. An interest and
knowledge of rugby would be advantageous. A 3-bedroom house on the grounds comes with
the position, a competitive salary dependent on experience and qualifications, and entry to
the University pension scheme. For a full job description please call the club on 01865
432000. Applications should be made in the form of a current c.v., including 2 referees with
an accompanying letter of application, and sent to the Administrator at: Oxford University
Rugby Club, Jackdaw Lane, Off Iffley Road, Oxford OX4 1SR. Closing date: Fri., 5
April.

The Examination Schools: Room Assistants. We are looking for a
team of people to work full time, including some Saturdays, for a 6-week period in Trinity
term, to cover the exam season (13 May–21 June), with a possible extension to 12
July. Room assistants will be required to work either at the Examination Schools, High
Street, Oxford, or at Ewert House Examination Hall, Summertown. If you have a preference
please state this clearly in your covering letter. The duties include setting up examination
rooms, tidying up between sessions, laying out script booklets and exam materials, and
delivering packages in central Oxford. If you would like to apply please send a c.v. and
covering letter to the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1
4BG. For further information phone the Deputy Clerk (Building) on 01865 276905.

The Examination Schools: Invigilators. We are looking for reliable
individuals to add to our Register of Invigilators. Work is on a temporary basis during the
main exam period which starts this year on 13 May and finishes on 21 June. There are
openings to work on either a session basis, where you invigilate individual exam sessions
based on your availability for work, or on a block booking basis. A block bookings option
requires a commitment to work one of the following: full time for the 6 week exam period;
specific weeks during the exam period; specific days in the week during the exam period.
these options can be discussed in more details with the Deputy Clerk of Schools (Exams).
The work involves laying out of question papers, completing relevant paperwork, and
invigilating during the examination session. The majority of exam papers are 3 hours
duration which require an invigilation session of approximately 4 hours (morning session:
9 a.m.–1 p.m., afternoon session: 2 p.m.–6 p.m.). The payment details for a
standard invigilator working a 4 hour session are as follows: 4 hr session (for 3 hr papers):
£25.88. There are opportunities for suitable invigilators to act as the senior invigilator
at a higher rate of pay. If you are interested please send a c.v. and covering letter to the
Deputy Clerk of Schools (Exams), Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG.

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Houses to Let

House to let close to Folly Bridge: 3-bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, through
living-room, new fitted kitchen, dining room, gas c.h., Italianate garden. Friendly street.
£1,100 p.c.m. Ready now. Call 0207 727 9750.

To let end of Aug., to end Dec.: terrace house in West Oxford, 10
minutes' walk to central Oxford and bus station, 5 minutes' walk to train station, 15 minutes
to Radcliffe Infirmary. Good condition, 3 bedrooms (inc. 1 study-bedroom). Quiet cul-de-sac
overlooking playing-field, easy access to shops, and countryside. Fully-furnished and
equipped (gas c.h., fireplace, phone, TV + video, fitted kitchen, washer-drier, fridge,
freezer, microwave, bicycles). Small garden with sunny patio. Rent: £850 p.c.m. E-
mail: h.j.glock@reading.ac.uk. Tel.: 01865 794232.

Old house to let for 1 year, from April, £900 p.c.m., at
Cassington (A40): 3 bedrooms, 3 reception rooms; big, unfitted kitchen. Big garden. Prefer
family but would consider 3 postgrads. Tel.: 07812 650 140 mobile until 12 Apr. After that:
00 212 66 01 00 66.

North Oxford : family house to let July/Aug. £400 p.w. Tel.:
0870 2410729, or e-mail david.morgan11@virgin.net.

Stonesfield (delightful village on edge of Cotswolds). First class fully-
furnished 2-bedroom cottage with conservatory–photographs available, for 6 months
let commencing 1 May. Rent, inc., of all bills EXCEPT telephone, £1,100 p.c.m.
THPM 01993 898490.

Make finding accommodation easy. Finders Keepers have a dedicated
approach to helping you find the right property. Browse through our Web site for up-to-date
detailed information on properties available and make use of our interactive database, priority
reservation service (credit cards accepted), personal service and professional advice. For
further information please contact Finders Keepers at 226, Banbury Rd., Summertown,
Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: 01865 311011. Fax: Oxford 556993. E-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk.
Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

An Englishman's home is his castle---so the saying goes. We cannot
pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental
accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB Management
is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical
personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful
service in Oxford. Visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the
properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone, fax, or e-mail us
with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.:
01865 764533, fax: 764777, e-mail: info@qbman.co.uk.

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Summer Let

House overlooking Thames, 5 minutes' walk from city-centre,
available May–Sept. Fully equipped, 3 bedrooms (2 double, 1 single), 2 bathrooms,
gas c.h., garden, garage. £1,000 p.c.m. inc. all service charges except tel., calls. Tel.:
01865 250462.

Comfortable, fully-furnished, 2-bedroom town house in North Oxford,
available for short summer let from 15 Apr.,–31 Aug. Open-plan living room, modern
fitted kitchen with washing machine, and dishwasher, gas c.h., bathroom with electric
shower, small garden, garage. Quiet position, close to Cutteslowe Park, frequent bus route
to city centre. Suitable for a small family. £700 p.c.m. Tel.: 01865 273088, or e-mail:
rimas.juskaitis@eng.ox.ac.uk.

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Flats to Let

Available 1 April (long let only): modern decor and furnishings, 1
double bedroom, living room, kitchen, bathroom, c.h. All facilities. Private parking. Quiet
Banbury Road location, ½ mile city centre. Non-smoker. Monthly rental £600
plus Council Tax. Contact: 01993 852196.

A choice of fully-furnished, modern, 2-bedroom , 2 bathroom
apartments in attractive developments within the ring road. Allocated parking. Available from
mid-Mar. From £795 p.c.m. For more information on these and other properties
available please contact Gay Hawley at Finders Keepers, 27 St Clements, Oxford OX4 1AB.
Tel.: 01865 200012. E-mail: gayh@finders.co.uk, or visit our Web site:
www.finders.co.uk.

Furnished 2-bedroom ground-floor flat to let St Clements/Headington
Hill area. Very close to Brookes University, 10 minutes to city centre, refurbished kitchen
and bathroom, en suiteshower room to main bedroom. Available
immediately. £800 p.c.m. Tel.: 01865 512149.

Central North Oxford, 10 minutes' walk from city centre, University
Parks, all main university buildings, and very close to the river, 2 ground-floor flats: 1
completely refurbished to a high standard, available May. The other flat available mid-
June.Both have 1 double bedroom and 1 large single bedroom, large drawing-room,
bathroom, kitchen in extremely quiet, civilised, large Victorian house in this exclusive, leafy,
residential Victorian suburb. Off-street parking, large secluded garden. Available now.
Tel./fax: 01865 552400.

Large flat in the heart of Venice, near Palazzo Grassi, in the heart of
Venice, with large traditional sitting-room, and separate dining room, well-appointed kitchen,
1 double bedroom with en suitebathroom, second bedroom with twin beds,
third bedroom with 1 bed (+ 1), and a second bathroom. The flat is ideal for a family, in
pristine condition, and available for short periods on a weekly basis at £600 per week.
Tel.: + 39 0423 723582, e-mail: tagariello@libero.it.

Central north Oxford: 1- and 2-bedroom apartments. The ground
floor, 1-bedroom, available in early May at £675 p.c.m. The second-floor, 2-bedroom,
available mid-March at £750 p.c.m. Spacious Victorian property with good security
and parking. Conveniently situated within minutes walk to most university departments and
best suited to visiting mature academics or professionals. Tel.: 01865 516144, or fax 01865
437996.

Very light and spacious top-floor apartment in Rawlinson Road, with
3 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms, and views over communal gardens. The apartment has a large
fully-equipped kitchen with space for dining. Available now, unfurnished with 1 off-street
parking space at £1,000 p.c.m. Ideal for academic or professional couple wanting to
be near Oxford city centre and Summertown shops. For more information please contact Julia
at Finders Keepers, 226 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.: 00 44 (0)
1865 302344 or visit the Finders Keepers Web site at www.finders.co.uk.

Lifestyle Letting & Management, 1 North Parade Avenue:
Summertown Court, Summertown–£750 p.c.m. Superior first-floor, 1-bedroom
apartment, fully-furnished to an exceptional standard. Off-road parking, and close to the local
shops and amenities; Park Close, Cutteslowe– £895 p.c.m. First-floor spacious
apartment with balcony views overlooking the parks. Offering 2 large bedrooms, and a single
bedroom/study. Fully-furnished. Garage and off-street parking. Contact us for a full list of
property: 01865 554577. Fax: 01865 554578, e-mail: lifestyle-lettings@dial.pipex.com, Web
site: www.letitbetter.co.uk.

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Serviced Accommodation

Finally! the luxurious and economical alternative to 5-star luxury
hotels, in central Oxford. Ambassador's Oxford offers clients short-stay 2-bedroom, 2
bathroom–1 en suite–5-star apartments in the centre of Oxford
with allocated parking. Only 3 minutes' walk from the railway station and the Said Business
School. Furnished to a very high standard to include well-equipped kitchen and lounge,
computer, printer, internet access, and weekly Maid Service. From less than £100 per
apartment per night, to accommodate up to 4/5 guests. Contact:
www.ambassadorsoxford.co.uk, or tel.: 07876 203378.

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Accommodation Offered

Paying guests, visiting academics, welcomed for short or long stays
in the comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple, in exclusive, quiet, leafy central
north Oxford, within walking distance of all main university buildings, town centre, parks,
river, good shops, and restaurants. All rooms have colour TV, tea-/coffee-making facilities,
microwave, and refrigerator and/or deep-freeze availability, c.h., and independent heating.
Breakfast included in the very moderate terms. Tel./fax: 01865 557879.

Finders Keepers is celebrating its 30th year as Oxfordshire's leading
letting agent, providing a specialist service to both landlords and tenants throughout the
Oxfordshire and the surrounding counties. With experienced letting and management teams
Finders Keepers provide a high standard of service to all our clients. If you would like more
information about Finders Keepers' services please contact us at our Head Office at 226
Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford, OX2 7BY, tel.: (00 44) (0) 1865 311011, or visit the
Finders Keepers Web site at www.finders.co.uk.

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Accommodation Sought

Visiting academic and spouse seek 1-bedroom furnished flat,with
living room, for the period July–Dec., preferably in central North Oxford area with
parking facility. Non-smokers, no pets. Please contact me at:
enrique.cardenas@sant.ox.ac.uk, or at 01865 558800 in the eves.

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB
Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise
in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a
constant flow of enquiries from good quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If
you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice
without obligation, telephone us: 01865 764533, fax us: 764777, or e-mail us:
info@qbman.co.uk. Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site at:
http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.

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Accommodation Sought to Rent or Exchange

Visiting scholar and family seek Oxford area home to rent or exchange
for home in northern California (near UC Berkeley). Approx. dates: July
2002–Feb.,2003. Our home (4 bedrooms/4 bath) is in Piedmont, California, 15
minutes drive to university or to San Francisco. Highly desirable neighborhood/excellent
schools. Seek exchange or rental in North Oxford or other area with highly regarded primary
and middle school. E-mail: douglass@uclink4.berkeley.edu.

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Accommodation Exchange

We are looking for 3-bedroom accommodation in Oxford during Aug.,
to exchange with our first-floor apartment (large sitting room, dining room, kichen, 2
bathrooms, 2 studios, 4 bedrooms, balcony and garden) in Bologna. Quiet residential area,
next to the city centre, close to bus stop, good parking facilities. TV, wahing machine,
dishwasher, internet PC, CD player. Please contact: Vita Fortunati and Claudio Franceschi,
Via Albertazzi 39/II, 40137 Bologna, Italy. Tel.: + 39 052 349781/303931, e-mail:
fortunat@lingue.unibo.it.

Home exchange near San Francisco: beautiful, 4-bedroom home, 15
minutes to San Francisco available for exchange with similar or smaller home in or near
Oxford, 1 Sept.,–30 Dec. Possible rental from 15 July–30 Aug., also available.
Non smokers, no pets. Chris and Jeanette Tietze, tel.: 001 415 924 1377, fax: 001 415 567
2040, e-mail: ctietze@compuserve.com.

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Holiday Lets

Provence/Languedoc, nr. Uzès: village house with pool.
Beautiful distant views of Cévennes from terrace on one side. All shops 2 minutes,
on the other. Can sleep 9. Phone Salisbury (01722) 743801.

Cornwall, near Sennen Cove: converted barn, sleeps 4/5. Comfortable,
with microwave, washing machine, tumble drier, TV, video. Sea view, small garden.
£150–£350 p.w., inc. of electricity and linen. Visit:
www.hayloftcottage.co.uk, or tel.: 01865 557713.

Provence (Drôme): in a beautifully restored 16th-century house
situated in the village of Grignan, 2 fully and newly equipped apartments within minutes of
lavender fields, village shops, and the local château. Set in lovely countryside with
vineyards and good walking. One sleeps 4, with views on château: £240 (390
euros) p.w., June–Aug.,; £145 (235 euros) thereafter; the other sleeps 2, and
includes secluded terrace: £145 (235 euros) p.w., June–Aug.; £82 (133
euros) thereafter. Contact: 01865 559076 or e-mail: nanefabi@infonie.fr.

Really lovely location in the Upper Tamar Valley, on the borders of
Devon and Cornwall. Recently converted barn with 2 double bedrooms (1 with 4-poster bed),
2 bath-/shower-rooms, large open-plan living-/dining-room/kitchen. Very nicely furnished.
Outdoor heated swimming pool, games room (table tennis, pool, bar billiards, darts). Close
to Eden Project, Dartmoor, and Bodmin Moor, half-hour from coast. Easily accessible from
A30 though set in totally secluded peaceful countryside. Privately owned. Available this
summer for the first time. Contact Michèle Smith on 01865 310998 or e-mail:
michele_irs@yahoo.co.uk for more details or look at our Web site on www.pallastreet.co.uk.
Also available part of Apr.,–mid-July, and from 7 Sept.,: large comfortable 17thy-
century listed farmhouse with 6 double bedrooms, 3 bath/shower-rooms, 2 sitting rooms, and
large farmhouse ktichen. Well-stocked with books and games as well as TV and video.
Shares swimming pool and games room with barn.

South of France: holiday cottage with private shady garden, 300 yards
from sheltered sandy beach in La Ciotat. Sleeps 4 (+ 1 child). Well-equipped kitchen, and
linen provided. Available June, July and Aug., 580 euros p.w. (approx. £360). Tel.:
01869 343037. E-mail: talbotlodg@hotmail.com.

Charming terrace house for short and long lets in conservation zone
of unspoilt Southwold (Suffolk), seconds from the sea. Sleeps 4+. Marvellous area for
walking, cycling (2 bicycles available), church-visiting, bird-watching and pub-hopping. Tel.:
01865 513464 (eves.).

Czech Republic: charming woodland cottage only 30 minutes from
Prague, available May–Oct. Sleeps 5+. Lovely lake for swimming, boating,
surfboarding. Views, walks, woodfires, mushrooms, castles. Good food and wine still a
bargain! English speaking owner. From £280 p.w. Tel.: 0207 373 0667.

South-West France: attractive farmhouse set in over 1 acre garden,
beautiful quiet position, 10 x 5 m. swimming pool, 3 km from medieval village Lauzerte,
autoroute from Bordeaux 2 hours. Golf, tennis and fishing nearby, and Cahors wine region.
Sleeps 6 plus attic bedroom with 5 single beds. Available April £350 p.w.,
May/June/Sept., £500 p.w., longer stays negotiable. Tel.: Helen 01367 810218, Sally
01494 864573.

Mallorca: traditional village house, recently redecorated, with own
swimming pool, and quiet patio area, in excellent location between the coast and mountains.
Close to village shops, bakery, and local restaruants, and with beautiful walks through the
surrounding olive groves, the house provides the perfect base for relaxing by the pool or
exploring the island. Sleeps 6 (3 double rooms). Available for summer lets or out of season.
Call: 01865 429377 or e-mail: emmeline.skinner@sant.ox.ac.uk.

Dordogne/Gironde: delightful restored farmhouse in rural hamlet.
Fully and comfortably furnished with French antiques plus modern conveniences. Private
with stunning views and walks to farmland, woods, and vineyards. Few minutes drive to
village shops and church. Accommodation: study/library and sitting-room with open-plan
kitchen/dining room, fireplace with wood-burning stove; equipped with fridge-freezer,
cooker, and washing machine. Pigeon loft has 2 large bedrooms, 1 can be divided. Huge
cool verandah is for dining and games. The concierge lives opposite and maintains the house
and grounds, and is always available. Meadow and lawned garden with fruit trees. Pool, 10m
x 5m, with paved surround, fenced and maintained by a professional firm. For wine lovers
there are famous vineyards like St.Emilion and Monbazillac, and many local vineyards and
co-operatives are near, and there is tennis, riding, a public pool, swimming lake with water
sports and Chateau Vigiers. Tel.: 01993 881408. E-mail: jangeoff@onetel.net.uk.

Paris 12ème, between Nation and Bastille, small studio, sleeps
2, Rue de Cotte, very near Marché Beauvau, Marché Aligre, "Coulée
Verte"; near the Gare de Lyon. Well equipped; bathroom, kitchen area; digicode, and
interphone; lift. Non-smokers only. £170 p.w., £320 fortnight, £600 four
weeks, no bills. Available 7 April – 30 July. For pictures, more details:- Studio, 3
Hill Top Road, Oxford OX4 1PB, or tel.: 01865 728603, or e-mail:
johnellis46@yahoo.co.uk.

Andalucia, Las Alpujarras: delightful rustic farmhouse set in terraced
olive groves, with own swimming pool, and fantastic mountain views. Sleeps 6 comfortably
(2 doubles, 1 twin), 5 minutes walk to local village, 15 minutes drive to Ugijar market town.
Available year round, £380 per week; also available for longer lets. One and a half
hours from Almeria airport, or 3½ from Malaga. Car hire preferable. For more
information contact tel.: 0779 6167811, or e-mail: jgray58uk@yahoo.co.uk.

Crete. A traditional Cretan house in old town Rethimno, superbly
renovated to provide space and comfort in beautifully furnished surroundings. Elevated, vine-
covered, sitting area with brick barbecue—perfect for alfresco dining. It is in a quiet
area, and close to long, sandy beach, taverns, shops, and the many interesting sights in and
around this historic area. Sleeps 4 (1 double, 1 twin). Available all year round. All linen,
electricity and cleaning inc. 2002 rates on request. Tel./fax: Nikolaos Glinias, 0030 831
56525, e-mail: nglynias@ret.forthnet.gr.

Greek Islands: Skopelos, Alonissos and Skiathos. Lovely island houses
and apartments available for rent. Town, country and seaside locations. Accommodation for
2–8 persons. Prices from £60 p.p.p.w. For information see:
www.holidayislands.com. E-mail: thalpos@otenet.gr, fax: 0030 4240 23057.

Aldeburgh, on the Suffolk Heritage coast: delightful, 2nd-floor
apartment with sea view (no lift). Self-catering, fully furnished, sleeps 3. Close to shops and
concerts. Aldeburgh is an unspoilt seaside town (fresh fish daily!) with strong musical
connections and International Festivals at nearby Snape Maltings. RSPB Minsmere and
National Trust properties are also quite close; two local golf courses. Seasonal prices from
£200 p.w. inc. of electricity, gas, taxes and lock-up garage. Tel.: 01473 730 737, e-
mail: yal20@dial.pipex.com, write: P.O.Box 31, Washbrook, Ipswich, IP8 3HP.

Holiday house in Catalonia: well-appointed, 4-bedroom house in the
unspoilt Catalonian village of Regencos (about 60 miles north-east of Barcelona and 4 miles
inland), near Palafrugell; available 29 Apr.,– 31 May, 17 June–13 July, and
2–29 Sept. Several superb beaches within a radius of 6 miles. The house, which sleeps
7, is on 2 floors, each of which is a self-contained flat with kitchen, bathroom, and
lounge/dining area. The gournd-floor has a large double bedroom and a single, while the
upper floor has a similar double bedroom and a further twin-bedded room. Attractive roof
garden with superb views over surrounding countryside. Spanish maid visits every Sun., and
will cook delicious meals. Charges: £375 p.w., or £650 per fortnight, or
£1,200 per month. Ring Dr Charles Mould, 01451 860876 (fax: 01451 861691), e-
mail: cmm@chalkface.net for further particulars.

Magic Cave. Charming (if tiny) flat for two in Cordes-sur-Ciel, the
fabled Cathar walled city in the Tarn, a veritable jewel of the Middle Ages, and only an hour
from Toulouse airport. Comfortably furnished, with its own kitchen and bathroom, the flat
has access to a separate private garden, and is well placed for sightseeing—ses vues
panoramiques, et tout ca—fabulous markets, restaurants, walking and cycling.
Ludicrously cheap and available all year round–ideal for budget-concious gourmands,
penny-pinching scholars, and cash-strapped lovers of La France Profonde. Tel.: The Aged
Campbell, 00 33 5 6356 1769.

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Narrowboat for sale

"Simplicity": the ideal residential narrowboat on beautiful private
moorings just north of Kidlington, Oxfordshire, with every possible
luxury–dishwasher, washer/dryer, double glazing, c.h., fridge/freezer, leather
upholstery throughout. `Boat of the year 1999'. Built by Kings Ground, 63ft semi-traditional.
Offers around £95,000. Tel.: Ron or Elizabeth on 01869 351861, mobile 0780 308
2766.

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For sale

Baby Grand Piano (Collard & Collard), in excellent condition, forced
to sacrifice itself for older brother's well-being, seeks home with owners who will pay
ransom of £900. Tel.: 01865 241323.
n

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Oxford University Gazette: Appointments, 21 March 2002<br />


Oxford University Gazette: 21 March 2002

Appointments


Vacancies within the University of Oxford:

The University is an equal opportunities employer

MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES
DIVISION
Appointment of Academic Director of the Begbroke Business and Science
Park
UNIVERSITY LECTURERSHIP IN
ASTROPHYSICS

NUFFIELD DEPARTMENT OF CLINICAL
MEDICINE
Clinical Lecturership in Infectious Diseases
Clinical Lecturership in Nephrology and General Medicine
DEPARTMENT OF EXPERIMENTAL
PSYCHOLOGY
University Lecturership in Developmental Psychology
DEPARTMENT FOR CONTINUING
EDUCATION AND
DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS
Fixed-term University Lecturership in Bioinformatics
FACULTY OF MODERN HISTORY
Two-year Junior Lecturership in Colonial and Revolutionary American
History
RESEARCH SERVICES
Appointment of Head of Research Contracts Administration
APPOINTMENT OF CAPITAL PROJECTS
ACCOUNTANT

FINANCE DIVISION
Appointment of Project Administrator---Financial Information Systems

Note: a complete list of current "http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/ps/gp/">University vacancies is available
separately.


Vacancies in Colleges and Halls:

CHRIST CHURCH
Stipendiary Lecturership in Modern History
LADY MARGARET HALL
Stipendiary Lecturership in Applied Mathematics
Stipendiary Lecturership in History
LINACRE COLLEGE
Canadian National Scholarship
A.J. Hosier Studentship
MAGDALEN COLLEGE
Tutorial Fellowship in Social Anthropology
QUEEN'S COLLEGE
Research Fellowship in Physiology
ST JOHN'S COLLEGE
College Lecturership in Applied Mathematics
College Lecturership in Politics
WORCESTER COLLEGE
Wilkinson Junior Research Fellow and Assistant Dean
Non-Stipendiary Junior Research Fellowship in Law


Vacancies outside the University of Oxford:

OXFORD CENTRE FOR ISLAMIC
STUDIES
Fellowship in Anthropology of Muslim Societies
DOWNING COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE
Appointment of Domestic Bursar
TRINITY COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE
Temporary Lectureship in English

All notices should be sent to the Gazette
Office, Public Relations Office, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD
(fax: (2)80522, e-mail: "mailto:gazette@admin.ox.ac.uk">gazette@admin.ox.ac.uk
). The deadline is
5 p.m. on Thursday of the week preceding publication.



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