21 March 1996



<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 21 March 1996: University Acts<br />

University Acts


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[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL


1 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts under
the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. vi, cl. 1 (Statutes,
1995, p. 345) has been accorded to the following persons who are
qualified for membership of Congregation:

MIHALY HAJOS, Radcliffe Infirmary

MARCO LEE, Trinity College

ELIZABETH MARTIN, Bodleian Library

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2 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added
to the Register of Congregation:

Hajos, M., MA status, Radcliffe Infirmary

Lee, M., MA status, Trinity

Martin, E., MA status, Bodleian Library

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CONGREGATION 19 March


Declaration of approval of Special
Resolution

That the conferment of the Degree of Master of Arts, honoris
causa
, upon SIR ASHLEY PONSONBY, BT, KCVO, MC, be approved.

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BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 5
April, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

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RULES COMMITTEE

For changes in a regulation made by the Rules Committee, to come into
effect on 5 April, see `Notices' below.





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 21 March 1996: University Agenda<br />

University Agenda


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CONGREGATION 25 March


Degree by Special Resolution

The following special resolution will be deemed to be approved at
noon on 25 March, unless by that time the Registrar has received
notice in writing from two or more members of Congregation under the
provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1995,
p. 13) that they wish the resolution to be put to a meeting of
Congregation.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

JOHN RODNEY CLEMENTS, MA status, Merton College

SERGEI LVOVICH DUDAREV, Linacre College

PATRICK SPENCER GRANT, MA status, D.PHIL., Linacre College

HELENA FRANCIS HAMEROW, D.PHIL., St Cross College

PHILIPP PODSIADLOWSKI, St Edmund Hall

JACK CHARLES TURNER, M.PHIL., Exeter College

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 21 March 1996: Notices<br />

Notices


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

  • *Notices of exhibitions, guided tours, etc.:

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    SENIOR PROCTOR'S ORATION

    The following oration was delivered in Congregation on 13 March by
    J.A. BLACK, B.PHIL., MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Wolfson College, on
    demitting office as Senior Proctor.

    SENIOR PROCTOR: Insignissime Vice-Cancellarie, licetne anglice
    loqui?

    VICE-CHANCELLOR: Licet.

    SENIOR PROCTOR: Later today, the oral literature of the University
    will be expanded by a new corpus of narratives beginning `When I was
    Senior Proctor', `When I was Junior Proctor' and `When I was
    Assessor'.

    But this morning I address you still in the present tense, and by
    tradition briefly. [Procurator Senior gesta illius Anni
    quaecunque occurrerint memoratu digna, brevi oratione
    percensebit
    (from the Senior Proctor's Book of
    1477.]

    Life is brief, too, for Proctors, a single year in which to
    visit as many as possible of the rooms leading off the corridors of
    power. Proctors are immediately visible: their uniform distinguishes
    them from almost everyone else, identifying them as holders of their
    office, not individuals, and emphasising their detached independence.
    And they are anonymous: certainly one loses one's own name for a
    whole year and is addressed only as `Senior Proctor', or whatever.
    Complicated problems are sorted out over the telephone with people
    who know only that they are speaking to a Proctor. They are, of
    course, quite impartial in their judgment of complaints; yet as they
    follow long-overdue reforms through the committees, they have
    convenient opportunities for strongly felt contributions; and they
    are listened to with politeness and respect always. Proctors
    constitute an element of the University's democracy, which is
    achieved not by everyone delivering themselves of an opinion on every
    topic, but by the preservation of opportunities for intervention, as
    and when necessary, by representatives of all relevant interests. And
    while they hold statutory membership of many committees, with a right
    to attend all others, and take a full participation in their
    discussion and business as ordinary members, at the same time
    Proctors also represent a form of internal audit (by simply
    `listening in'): less time-consuming and administratively less
    complex than a visit from the Higher Education Quality Council. After
    a year, one can, unexpectedly, create a meaning for this complex
    bundle of activities, and it shows that there is wisdom in the
    organic growth of institutions. Certainly the office would never be
    invented if the University were being designed (or redesigned) today.
    The Oxford form of Proctorship is unique: it is `our thing'.

    This year we have seen the University still recovering from
    the effects of the DR shift and trying to deal with the departmental
    budgeting problems associated with it by the implementation of
    formula funding. At the same time all universities have suffered
    further cuts in public funding, including what are these days known
    as `efficiency gains', a cruel euphemism just like that by which the
    Greeks called the Black Sea the Hospitable Sea, because of the number
    of shipwrecks. We continue to be subjected to a multitude of external
    assessments—which can so often be not true evaluations of the
    personal experience of education, but merely agreed criteria for
    sharing out scarce public money.

    Despite this, we seek to
    maintain the high world-wide reputation of the University by
    encouraging research, and attracting and retaining the best
    academics, and that includes somehow finding the means to pay our
    professors, as well as all our established lecturers, and readers, at
    appropriate levels. Meanwhile the outcome of the first round of
    promotions to the titular ranks of reader and professor is awaited
    with curiosity; and in the wake of all this it has been discovered
    that contract researchers are now more numerous at Oxford than
    established staff.

    A major decision opening up welcome and far-
    reaching opportunities has been that to establish a new post of
    Director of University Library Services and Bodley's Librarian from
    the beginning of 1997, with a new committee structure. The present
    financial situation reinforces the need for distribution of resources
    through an integrated library service. We hope that the fresh wind of
    a new Director and new committees will blow away the suspicion by
    faculty and other libraries of a Bodleian take-over, and allay any
    anxiety in Bodleian circles that attention to present Oxford users'
    needs will ruin provision for future international scholarship.

    It
    is easy to believe, for any generation of Proctors, that they have in
    their short term witnessed unique events of earth-shaking change. If
    this were truly so, the frequency of earthquakes in the Oxford region
    must be greatly above average. In fact the University is in a state
    of Heraclitean constant change, but the difference for Proctors is
    that they have exchanged the worm's eye view for that of the bird.
    Now the University has an enduring ability to absorb change. That
    venerable giant the Hebdomadal Council is edging towards only its
    150th birthday, while the General Board was a novel phenomenon a mere
    eighty-three years ago. The subjects we study change too, and the
    official demarcations between faculties may be a century or more
    behind the real disciplinary interfaces of today. Reorganisations are
    undoubtedly necessary from time to time, and need not inescapably be
    perceived as shaking the University to its roots.

    Yet a cynic
    might suggest that evolutionary biology, and perhaps ancient history,
    demonstrate that random behaviour is more conducive to an
    institution's survival than too much strategic planning, and more
    recent history leads us to be sceptical about the value of five-year
    plans. But, as the Junior Proctor reminded us in his oration (which
    took the form of a paper to the Planning and Development Committee),
    it is certain that in this University we do not have enough strategic
    planning. Probably there is too much information at the centre and
    too little elsewhere, and if the centre could be relieved of much of
    the burden of routine decision-making it would have the scope to
    tackle more of the strategic issues. A former Proctor described the
    University of the early eighties as totally lacking in strategic
    direction; fifteen years on, we can report that the lack is no
    longer total. Running like an undercurrent through this year, Mr
    Vice-Chancellor, has been the continuing work of your Commission,
    which has indicated that it is addressing these and many other
    issues, and to which we wish good speed.

    There has been change
    this year in the Proctors' Office too. Both Proctors now have basic
    computing facilities at their desks, and can be reached by e-mail.
    Following the report in July last year of a Committee to Review the
    Proctors' Office, a new post has been created to provide support for
    the Proctors and to manage the office, functions which have hitherto
    been performed by the Marshal. His duties as head of the Security
    Service have grown considerably in recent years and, given his
    continuing responsibility for the University Police and for
    ceremonial events, it has become increasingly difficult for one
    person to cover the whole range of work. At the same time, the nature
    of the Proctors' work has been changing and they now need more
    support in an increasing range of administrative duties. It will be
    our successors who will have full benefit of the new Clerk to the
    Proctors (as his provisional, but probably permanent title, is),
    although it is good to see that he is getting his hand in already.
    For many Junior Members especially, he will be the first point of
    contact in the Proctors' Office. He has already seen the stacks of
    files tied with red tape, and he may well wish to embark on
    computerised indexing of the records.

    The Proctors have continued
    their traditional and statutory work of seeing that examinations are
    properly conducted, work which is central to the University's
    existence. This ranges from visits to the examination
    halls—where on one occasion even Proctorial eyebrows were raised
    when it transpired that the person who had turned up in a T-shirt and
    shorts, under an MA gown and hood, was one of the examiners—to a
    more general overview of the examination system. Overall we are
    satisfied by what appears to us an exceptionally high standard of
    examining throughout the University, with remarkably few lapses. At
    the planning level, we have tried to give advice in drafting new
    examination regulations; this can speed their passage through the
    committees. A working party on the revision of the Examination
    Decrees and Regulations
    , on which both Proctors sat, will
    propose the development of faculty or course handbooks, and a read-
    only version of the Decrees available via the network,
    while retainin g the circulation of a single book to all members of
    Congregation for the foreseeable future.

    Oversight of all
    examinations facilitates the identification of problem areas across
    the faculties, and it has become clear that there is a need to
    ensure that the best examining practices are widely disseminated. The
    Junior Proctor has proposed, and the General Board has disposed: an
    Examinations Policy Committee will come into being, to advise the
    Proctors in strategic review of such matters as the proper role of
    external examiners (—they should be listened to), policy on
    vivas (—there should be more of them), disparities between
    honour schools (—there should be fewer of them), examination
    conventions and marking scales (—there should be some). It might
    also revisit the question of anonymity in the examination process.

    For graduate taught courses, I have encouraged the development of a
    set of agreed guidelines on which to assess alternative forms of
    examination. Many faculties now favour pre-submitted essays, week-
    long projects, three-week written assignments on lecture courses and
    a whole range of innovative tests. With convincing rationale and
    justification, there is every reason to encourage these developments,
    which offer candidates a wider range of opportunities to demonstrate
    their abilities, so long as concerns about maintenance of standards,
    adequacy of assessment, practicality of examining, and precautions
    against cheating, collusion, and plagiarism can be
    satisfied—again, this underlines the importance of vivas.

    Another aspect of Proctorial responsibility in respect of
    examinations is that of dealing, I hope humanely, with the complaints
    of candidates. We live today, we are told, in a `complaint culture',
    where complaints are to be welcomed as an opportunity to improve the
    `services' offered by the `organisation'.

    That may be so. But it has to be said that by persisting in the use
    of the metaphors of production and consumption for the activities of
    the mind, of buying and selling to describe the process of education,
    we can be fallaciously persuaded that `customers' have a unique
    charter to judge the quality (that over-used word) of what is
    `provided'.
    There are even signs of a tendency to think that a degree is a right
    once a sufficiently large sum of money is paid.

    Traditionally the
    Senior Proctor has been concerned with graduate examinations,
    predominantly the D.Phil. Complaints have, very approximately,
    tripled over the last decade (or doubled, proportionately to student
    numbers). According to the most accurate figures available, of those
    candidates submitting for the D.Phil. who are recommended instead for
    the M.Litt. or M.Sc. without referral, over a half lodge complaints.
    Under the current procedures, this category of students receives no
    official feedback from their examiners concerning the respects in
    which their work has been judged unsatisfactory, and that
    disappointment is certainly an element in what leads them to
    complain. Failure or recommendation for the lower degree requires
    detailed justification from the examiners, and the candidate deserves
    to receive an explanation.

    Echoing the words of my predecessor of
    last year, I have to report that nearly 70 per cent of all graduate
    examination complaints have come from overseas students. I have no
    single explanation for this, since not everything can be explained by
    cultural differences; but it seems that we are still failing our
    overseas students. Ever more rigorous monitoring of progress for all
    students is certainly a desideratum, especially at the crucial first
    stage of transfer (the point at which a candidate can reasonably
    expect to feel `on course' towards a doctorate); perhaps it is an
    advantage that we are not being pressurised now to accept ever
    greater numbers. But pre-eminently, there is the need to make
    absolutely clear the University's expectations from the very
    beginning, so that students can learn to match those to their own.

    The Assessor shares the committee round with the Proctors. Otherwise
    her principal concern is with student financial hardship. A survey is
    gathering information on current student income, expenditure and
    indebtedness, on applications to Access and hardship funds, on the
    amount of paid work students need to undertake in term-time and
    vacation, and the effects of financial pressure on their health,
    academic performance and career plans. It will help the University to
    target assistance to students in financial difficulty, and provide
    reliable evidence for use in responses and representations to outside
    agencies. The present Gazette supplement Notices of
    University Scholarships, etc., will be expanded to include all
    hardship-related funds, with an index to guide applicants to
    appropriate sources of funding, and extra copies will be printed, to
    be available all year round.

    The Assessor also takes a special
    responsibility for about 240 student clubs and societies. In the
    light of the Clubs Committee's concern about the possibility of clubs
    incurring debts, the Rules Committee has now made it a requirement
    for the treasurers of clubs, societies, and organisations for
    publications to forward to the Proctors each term a copy of the
    accounts for the previous term, signed by the Senior Member. The new
    regulations also include a formal statement that the Proctors may
    withhold or withdraw registration from clubs, societies, and
    publications if there is reason to do so.

    Computers are
    increasingly a part of all our lives. The Marshal, for example, is
    only too well aware of widespread computer theft, which the Security
    Service tries to keep track of. Tens of thousands of pounds worth of
    equipment can be removed in a few minutes by expert thieves. Almost
    all research students, as well as many undergraduates, now use a
    computer. At the research level, consequently, I have strongly
    encouraged a move to consult faculties about allowing students to
    submit an electronic copy of their thesis along with the paper
    version, surely to the convenience of many examiners now; and about
    making it possible for candidates to include, as part of their
    theses, extra material which could only be fully and appropriately
    considered if submitted in electronic form, so as to widen the scope
    of doctoral assessment.

    But just as the Proctors of earlier this
    century held all-too-frequent `motor courts' to deal with offences
    involving motor vehicles, so we have found ourselves dealing with a
    veritable epidemic of `computer investigations', as foretold by my
    predecessor. The considerable increase even from last year is
    ominous. In a typical scenario, late on a Friday night or in the
    small hours of Saturday morning, first-year undergraduates in a
    college computer room log in and talk to or mail other students, it
    may be indulging in harmless `play' activities, but sometimes sending
    messages which are deeply offensive to the recipients; in extreme
    cases the harm done has been even more serious. Our students gain
    access to sophisticated computing equipment and learn the techniques
    to operate it, yet some are slow to acquire the necessary ethical
    overlay to regulate their behaviour (—etiquette seems too feeble
    a term). They have never had access before to Unix servers, and mail
    and talk facilities are no velties; they may have received minimal
    training in the use of them. There is a need here, not just for
    another unread booklet, but for explanations, social education. This
    is something which the University, and the colleges, will need to
    take increasingly seriously.

    The Proctors have a responsibility
    to set bounds to the exuberance of post-examination celebrations, and
    the continued use of the Merton Street exit appears the best way to
    control the crowds, at least in the vicinity of the Examination
    Schools. From microscopic traces of `trashing' on the streets of
    Oxford, archaeologists of the future may be able to reconstruct the
    diet of late-twentieth-century students: baked beans, eggs, flour,
    spaghetti, and of course `fizzy liquid'.

    But for late-twentieth-century residents, it is no joke, it can be
    offensive and dangerous, and it does the University's name no good.
    This is a perennial problem, exacerbated nowadays by the example set
    by Formula One racing drivers and by television slapstick. As usual
    the University Constables and Special Constables exercised their
    function as efficiently as their numbers permit, ably assisted by our
    Pro-Proctors, with the co-operation of the Thames Valley Police and,
    we are happy to report, of the vast majority of examination
    candidates.

    The University's disciplinary procedures were
    comprehensively reviewed by a committee of which my predecessor, and
    then I, were successively members, and which reported in January. Its
    central concern was with unsatisfactory aspects of the procedures of
    the Disciplinary and Appeal Courts (the upper reaches of the
    University's disciplinary system); but the opportunity was taken for
    a wide range of recommendations on such questions as Proctorial
    jurisdiction in examinations open to non-members of the University, a
    category not foreseen by the Statutes. There is no comprehensive
    listing of disciplinary offences at Oxford; instead they occur
    scattered across many sections of the Statutes, Examination
    Decrees, Proctors' Memorandum
    and elsewhere; and the report
    draws attention to the desirability of a full codification of
    offences and a full listing of potential penalties, in a spirit of
    transparency and accessibility. Council has endorsed the majority of
    its recommendations, and this should lead in due course to a radical
    rewriting of Title XIII (the main disciplinary statute) and a
    fundamental repackaging of the material which has accumulated over
    the years in the Proctors' Memorandum. (I must confess
    to wondering if it is really necessary to include the information
    that car parking is not permitted in the University Offices.) The
    report also identified an approach to `serious' offences, making it
    clear that (with a certain few exceptions) the University should
    not attempt to deal using its own procedures with
    offences which would attract a custodial sentence on conviction. This
    may commend itself to college jurisdictions. The committee also gave
    a reminder that, under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971, the University
    as a landlord is not in a position to be ahead of the law. Finally
    the development is envisaged of a concordat between college and
    university disciplinary authorities to ensure that appropriate
    congruent action is taken by all parties involved. This might
    eventually extend to the unevenness between colleges perceived by
    Junior Members in the categorisation of offences and the levels of
    penalties.

    Both Proctors, and the Assessor, serve during their
    year of office as Delegates of the University Press, and this affords
    the opportunity to observe at close quarters a great international
    publishing enterprise, recently enlarged with a potentially extremely
    successful extension into Latin America. During this year, the
    Delegates met outside Oxford for the first time ever in the history
    of the Press. That visit to OUP New York was primarily to inaugurate
    the new offices there, but it has also heralded a divisional
    reorganisation and a realignment of the publishing business between
    Oxford and New York. The procession of the Oxford and US Delegates
    along Madison Avenue in full academical dress and the July heat,
    headed by an officer of the New York Police Department, was an
    extraordinary event. Frankly, we felt as if we had been beamed down
    from another planet. Mistaking us for the practitioners of yet
    another cult, the majority of New Yorkers were unmoved, even if (as
    the New York Times reported) one fell off his roller-blades in
    surprise. But the Proctors were nearly called upon to intervene when
    a Pro-Vice-Chancellor was interrogated by the police outside the
    Cuban Embassy, `seeking shelter' as he said, `from the rain'.

    Among other agreeable aspects to the year, it has been a great
    pleasure to put faces to names (some previously known only as sets of
    initials) of many of the staff of the University Offices, and to get
    to know them as they go about their work. We have been impressed by
    well-run committees and their efficiency as they produce papers
    which, contrary to a widespread belief, are not generated
    spontaneously in Wellington Square but respond to concerns raised by
    Senior (and sometimes Junior) Members of the University. I feel
    sure, Sir, that a reforming Vice-Chancellor will spare a thought for
    the resource needs of the University's civil service.

    Notable
    visitors to Oxford during the year included President
    Árpád Göncz of Hungary, fluent not only in
    English but also in the Common Speech of Middle-earth, as the
    translator into Hungarian of the works of J.R.R. Tolkien; and the
    Secretary-General of the UN, Dr Boutros Boutros-Ghali, who delivered
    the Cyril Foster Lecture. As a rare avocation the Proctors were able
    to inspect the summer camp of the University Air Squadron at St
    Mawgan. The `Dinosaur Roadshow' attracted over 18,000 visitors to the
    University Museum. And after months encased in scaffolding, the
    Ashmolean Forecourt Development was completed and opened in February,
    and its restaurant has already been reviewed in the Oxford Magazine.
    University life is enlivened by many ceremonies. Some are performed
    early on dark winter mornings by small groups in panelled rooms in
    the University Offices. The grandest and most public of all is
    Encaenia. Among this year's honorands, David Hockney and Betty
    Boothroyd also received from my colleague a unique Proctorial
    dispensation to smoke in academic dress. An honorary degree was
    conferred also on Arthur Miller. Memorial services have been held for
    Lord Warnock, former Vice-Chancellor; for Freddie Beeston, former
    Laudian Professor of Arabic; and also for a former Junior Proctor,
    Paul Hayes, who died after a long illness.

    The Proctorial cycle
    was invented in 1628 by a Professor of Geometry. It has been adjusted
    regularly, from 1960 incorporating the Assessorship also; and this
    year three more colleges, Templeton, Mansfield, and Harris
    Manchester, will join the club. My own college has previously held
    the Assessorship twice, and I thank the Fellows of Wolfson for
    electing me to be their first Proctor, and for their support and
    encouragement during the year.

    We owe a great debt to the Marshal,
    who has patiently encouraged another stable of Proctors, discreetly
    keeping us on course; and we hope that the coming year will bring him
    satisfying developments of his new responsibilities. We are grateful
    to all the staff of the Proctors' Office, who have ministered
    faithfully and cheerfully to our needs for twelve months. Our thanks
    go also to the Bedels, always ready with a cheerful word of
    encouragement on great occasions, and to the University Verger. We
    are particularly grateful too to our four Pro-Proctors, Peter Baker,
    Dan Isaacson, Ellen Rice, and Chris Schofield, who have represented
    us at Degree Ceremonies and in attending University Sermons (where
    once upon a time one of their duties was to range the streets and
    taverns during sermon hours).

    It is possible, I suppose, that two
    Proctors might not work well together. Indeed, a decree of 1304
    provides for Congregation to be summoned by one Proctor only, in the
    (apparently all too common) event of his colleague being unreasonably
    obstructive. [ Altero Procuratorum, et forte minus juste
    aliquoties, contradicente
    (recorded in the Junior
    Proctor's Book
    of 1407: 32, 58).] However, I consider myself
    to have been quite exceptionally fortunate in my Proctorial
    colleague; we have often transgressed the bounds conventionally
    separating our duties, functioning much more as a double act than
    either of us expected. Likewise we both feel that we could not have
    had a better colleague than this year's Assessor, who has devoted far
    more than half of her time to assessing; we have worked closely with
    her, relishing in particular those endless discussions over tea,
    especially about the future of the University's library services.

    A manuscript note in the Senior Proctor's Book of 1477
    records that each Proctor `enters cheerfully' on his term of office,
    and `departs even more cheerfully'.
    [Laetus intrat jucundior extrat.]

    I, and I believe
    I can speak for my colleague and for the Assessor too, have valued
    highly, and enjoyed much, the privilege of our offices and the
    responsibilities we have exercised, serious and sometimes solemn, but
    with many cheerful moments. Now it is time to hand over to our
    successors, whom we wish well as they enter on the Outward Bound
    course of Proctorship. We meanwhile shall take back to our colleges
    and faculties a store of specific knowledge that will be useful, for
    some years at least, and changed perspectives that will endure, like
    the already germinated seed of the dying Agave ferox
    which burst into spectacular centennial flower in the Botanical
    Gardens this year.

    Many of those present will recall the defeat of
    the proposal to put a road through Christ Church Meadows; but I
    cannot think that anyone remembers the earlier plan to put a railway
    on a viaduct over the Isis perilously close to the winding glades and
    island walks of the Cherwell. It was in 1895. [ Gazette,
    27 October 1895; 29 January 1896.]

    My predecessor of exactly a
    century ago, speaking at this occasion in this place, expressed his
    relief that the scheme had been abandoned in 1896, ending his oration
    (and I paraphrase), `so it will be possible to continue enjoying the
    delights of Mesopotamia'.
    [ Oxford Magazine, 29 April 1896.]

    Mr Vice-
    Chancellor, I now echo those sentiments.

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Proctorial year 1995–6

    Summary of Offences

    Offence: Breach of Examination Regulations (conduct
    after examinations).

    Number of cases: 86.

    Result: 15 fines £60, 2 fines £40, 44 fines
    £30, 4 fines £25, 3 fines £20, 8 fines £15, 1
    fine £10, 3 not guilty, 2 case dismissed. Total of £24.58
    `damages'.

    Offence: Breach of University Regulations
    (obstruction).

    Number of cases: 3.

    Result: 1 fine £60, 1 fine £20, 1 letter of
    apology to constable.

    Offence: Breach of University Regulations (`fly-
    posting').

    Number of cases: 2.

    Result: 1 joint fine £20.

    Offence: Breach of Examination Regulations (using unfair
    means).

    Number of cases: 7.

    Result: 1 fine £100; reprimanded; failed on
    assignment; not permitted to enter for that assignment again.

    1 fail on the essay; resit paper and submit new work.

    1 fail on one paper; no mitigation on any other part of exam;
    Proctors to be consulted before name included on Class/Pass List; if
    fails to obtain Honours and wishes to sit for Honours on later
    occasion will need prior permission of Proctors.

    1 failed paper; Proctors to be consulted before name placed on any
    exam list; highest mark permitted will be `pass' degree.

    1 not permitted to enter any exam of this University
    or matriculate, for three years from 1 October 1995.

    1 thesis withdrawn and cannot be resubmitted; may not read for
    higher degree of this University without permission of the
    Proctors.

    1 not guilty.

    Offence: Breach of University Regulations (failing to
    answer summons to appear before Proctors).

    Number of cases: 2.

    Result: 2 no action.

    Offence: Breach of University Regulations (non bona-fide
    use of University Computer System).

    Number of cases: 2.

    Result: 1 fine £100, 1 fine £60.

    Offence: Breach of University Regulations
    (removal/defacement of library books).

    Number of cases: 2.

    Result: 2 fines £50.

    Total number of cases: 104.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    PROPOSALS FOR HONORARY DEGREES TO BE
    CONFERRED AT THE ENCAENIA IN 1997, AND FOR DEGREES BY DIPLOMA

    Council's Advisory Committee for Degrees by Diploma and Encaenia
    Honorary Degrees gives preliminary consideration both to proposals
    received from members of Congregation for the conferment of degrees
    by diploma upon royal personages and heads of state on occasions
    other than Encaenia, and to proposals for the conferment of Encaenia
    honorary degrees. The current membership of the committee is: Sir
    Keith Thomas, President of Corpus Christi (Pro-Vice-Chancellor, in
    the chair); Dr N.P. Bowles, St Anne's (Assessor 1996–7, ex
    officio
    ); Dr P.A.W. Bulloch, Balliol (Assessor 1995–6,
    ex officio); Professor J. Griffin, Balliol (Public Orator,
    ex officio); Mr A.B. Atkinson, Warden of Nuffield; Professor
    J.M. Brady, Keble; Dr M.S. Butler, Rector of Exeter; Professor
    M.L.H. Green, St Catherine's; Dr H.D. Johnstone, St Anne's; Professor
    E.A. Roberts, Balliol; Professor Sir David Weatherall, Christ Church;
    Professor C.J. White, Worcester. The committee finds it helpful to be
    able to review all proposals together, in a standard format. Members
    of Congregation who wish to make suggestions to the committee about
    honorary degrees to be conferred at the Encaenia in 1997, or about
    degrees by diploma, are therefore asked to do so on a special
    proposal form, copies of which are obtainable from Mrs J. Pengelly at
    the University Offices, Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70128).
    Completed forms should be returned to her not later than
    Friday, 10 May 1996.

    Members of Congregation wishing to suggest candidates are asked in
    particular to note the following points:

    (a) under Council's standing orders, no member of Council
    or of the advisory committee shall forward to that committee or
    propose directly to Council the name of any person for any honorary
    degree unless he or she is prepared personally to recommend that the
    conferment of such a degree be seriously considered;

    (b) while informal soundings within the University on any
    proposal will often be desirable, every effort should be made to
    ensure that publicity is not at any stage given to any proposal for
    the conferment of an honorary degree.

    The advisory committee will report to Council early in Michaelmas
    Term, submitting a short-list of candidates for further
    consideration. Council will then decide which proposals should be
    referred to its Committee on Honorary Degrees. The final list of
    proposed honorands, drawn up by Council in the light of the latter
    committee's report, will be submitted to Congregation for approval in
    accordance with the requirement of Tit. II, Sectt. VI and VIII
    (Statutes, 1995, pp. 13–14).

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    RULES COMMITTEE


    The Disciplinary Court

    The Rules Committee gives notice that it has, under the provisions of
    Tit. XIII, cll. 15 and 17 (Statutes, 1995, pp.
    98–9), drawn up lists of ten members of Congregation and of ten
    Junior Members who have agreed to serve, if required to do so, as
    members of the Disciplinary Court.

    The ten members of Congregation are:

    Dr D.S. Fairweather, Corpus Christi

    Dr M.J.O. Francis, Wolfson

    The Revd S. Innes, Greyfriars

    Dr R.J. Jacoby, Linacre

    Mr A. Jones, Pembroke

    Dr J. Logue, Somerville

    Dr L.J. Smith, Harris Manchester

    Dr B.J. Stapleton, Balliol

    Dr J.H.M. Taylor, St Hilda's

    Mr B.E. Woolnough, St Cross

    The ten Junior Members are:

    Ms S. Akhtar, St John's

    Ms S.A. Bayes, St Catherine's

    Mr A.C. Clifford, Nuffield

    Ms T.R. Curristine, Trinity

    Mr M.W. Greenwood, Kellogg

    Mr J.K. Kirk, Magdalen

    Mr M. Knowles, Worcester

    Mr D.T.D. O'Riordan, Hertford

    Mr M.E. Saunders, Christ Church

    Ms Y. Tun, Oriel

    The panels will remain in force until the first day of Trinity Term
    1997.

    The Registrar has drawn by lot the name of Dr D.S. Fairweather,
    Corpus Christi, to fill the vacancy occurring on the Disciplinary
    Court at the beginning of Trinity Term 1996 in respect of a Member of
    Congregation. The names of the two Junior Members who have similarly
    been selected by lot to fill the vacancies occurring at the same date
    are:

    Ms S. Akhtar, St John's Mr A.C. Clifford, Nuffield

    The members of the Disciplinary Court (and their periods of office)
    are therefore:

    Professor R.M. Goode, St John's (Chairman), until the first
    day of Trinity Term 1997

    Dr D.S. Fairweather, Corpus Christi, until the first day of Trinity
    Term 1998

    Dr E.J. Garnett, Wadham, until the first day of Trinity Term 1997


    Ms S. Akhtar, St John's, until the first day of Trinity Term 1997


    Mr A.C. Clifford, Nuffield, until the first day of Trinity Term
    1997

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Regulations for 1996-7

    The Rules Committee, acting under the provisions of Tit. XIII, cl. 6
    (Statutes, 1995, p. 96), has reviewed the regulations of
    the committee currently in force as set out in Ch. XI, Sect. VIII
    (Statutes, 1995, pp. 715–9).

    The committee has agreed to make various amendments to its first
    regulation, which concerns clubs, societies and publications, in the
    light of proposals put forward by the Clubs Committee. The amendments
    are intended (a) to ensure that clubs, societies and
    publications keep their accounts up to date, to bring the accounts to
    the attention of senior members, and to enable the Marshal, the
    Proctors and the Assessor to have an earlier warning of impending
    financial trouble; (b) to give the Proctors the right not to
    register, or to de-register, an organisation, which hitherto they
    have not had; and (c) to correct some anomalies. The
    amendments will come into effect from the beginning of Michaelmas
    Term 1996.

    The committee has agreed that its other regulations should remain
    in force for 1996-7.

    Amendments to a regulation

    1 In Ch. XI, Sect. VIII, § 1, cl. 1
    (b) (Statutes, 1995, p. 716), delete `it'.

    2 Ibid., cl. 3, delete `clauses 4 and 5 below'
    and substitute `clauses 5 and 6 below'.

    3 Ibid., insert new cl. 4 as follows and renumber
    existing cll. 4–5 as cll. 5–6:

    `4. The Proctors may not unreasonably withhold or withdraw
    registration.'

    4 Ibid., cl. 5 (i) (e)–(g)
    (as renumbered) (pp. 716–17), in each case delete `cl. 4' and
    substitute `cl. 5'.

    5 Ibid., cl. 5 (i) (g) (as renumbered)
    (p. 717), after `who shall keep a proper record of its financial
    transactions' insert `which shall be available for inspection at the
    request of the Senior Member or the Proctors; and shall forward to
    the Proctors by the end of the first week of each term a copy of the
    accounts for the preceding term1 signed by the Senior Member for
    retention on the Proctors' files'.

    6 Ibid., insert footnote:

    `1 Any transactions in the vacation should be included in
    the
    accounts for the following term.'

    7 Ibid., cl. 5 (i) (m) (as renumbered),
    delete `All clubs, societies, and publications' and substitute `All
    clubs, societies, and organisations'; and in each of the three places
    in which the word appears, delete `publication' and substitute
    `organisation'.

    8 Ibid., cl. 5 (ii) (as renumbered), after `the
    Proctors shall have discretion to dispense from the qualifications
    required under sub–clauses (i) (e), (f),
    (g), ( h), (k), and (l)' insert
    `,and from the requirement to submit termly accounts under
    sub–clause (i) (g),'.

    9 Ibid., cl. 6 (i) (c) (as renumbered),
    delete `; and' and substitute `which shall be available for
    inspection at the request of the Senior Member or the Proctors; and
    forward to the Proctors by the end of the first week of each term a
    copy of the accounts for the preceding term1 signed by the Senior
    Member for retention on the Proctors' files;'.

    10 Ibid., cl. 6 (1) (d) (as renumbered),
    delete `.' and substitute `; and' and insert (e):

    `(e) All organisations for publications with a turnover in
    excess of £15,000 in the preceding year, or which, owing to a
    change in the nature or scale of their activities, confidently expect
    to have such a turnover in the current year, shall submit their
    accounts for audit by the University's auditors (or other auditors
    approved in advance by the Proctors). Accounts shall be ready for
    audit within four months of the end of the financial year of the
    organisation for the publication, and the costs of the audit shall be
    borne by the organisation for the publication. If requested by the
    auditors, the organisation for the publication shall submit accounts
    and related materials as a basis for a review of accounting
    procedures, the cost likewise to be borne by the organisation for the
    publication.'

    11 Ibid., cl. 6 (ii) after `dispense from the
    requirement of sub–clause (i) (b)' insert `and from the
    requirement to submit termly accounts under sub–clause (i)
    (c)'.

    12 Ibid., insert cll. 7 and 8:

    `7. Any breach of this regulation shall be a university offence.

    8. Failure to comply with this regulation may result in the club,
    society, or organisation (including one for the publication of a
    journal, newspaper, or magazine) being deregistered by the Proctors.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    KHALID BIN ABDULLAH AL SAUD PROFESSORSHIP
    FOR THE STUDY OF THE CONTEMPORARY ARAB WORLD

    CLIVE DOUGLAS HOLES (MA, PH.D. Cambridge, MA Birmingham), Fellow of
    Trinity Hall and Lecturer in Islamic Studies, University of
    Cambridge, who has been appointed to the professorship, will take up
    his duties on 1 January 1997.

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    DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY

    On the recommendation of the Biological Sciences Board and the
    General Board, Council has appointed P.C. NEWELL, MA, D.PHIL., D.SC.,
    Fellow of St Peter's College and Reader in Biochemistry, as head of
    the Department of Biochemistry for five years from 1 October 1996.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    SUB-DEPARTMENT OF CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS

    The General Board has appointed R.J. NICHOLAS, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of
    University College and Reader in Physics, as deputy for J.M. Baker,
    MA,
    D.Phil., Fellow of Merton College and University Lecturer in Physics,
    for
    Trinity Term 1996, during which Dr Baker has been granted sabbatical
    leave.

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    RESEARCH LABORATORY OF ARCHAEOLOGY AND THE
    HISTORY OF ART

    The General Board has appointed R.E.M. HEDGES, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of
    St Cross College and University Lecturer in Archaeological Science,
    as deputy for M.S. Tite, MA, D.Phil., Fellow of Linacre College and
    Edward Hall Professor of Archaeological Science, for Trinity Term
    1996, during which Professor Tite has been granted sabbatical leave.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    E.K. CHAMBERS STUDENTSHIP IN ENGLISH
    LITERATURE 1996

    The Studentship has been awarded to MICHAEL R. CLARK, Balliol
    College.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    CHARLES OLDHAM SHAKESPEARE PRIZE 1996

    The Prize has been awarded to CHRISTIAN HITCHINGS, Christ Church.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    UNIVERSITY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 1994-5

    Corrigendum

    In the University Financial Statements 1994-5 (Supplement (1) to
    Gazette No. 4393, 4 March 1996), page 833 (Consolidated
    Cash Flow Statement), in line beginning `Net Cash Inflow/(Outflow)
    before Financing', delete `(25,262)' and substitute `25,262'.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    BODLEIAN LIBRARY

    Work on the electrical fittings in the Lower Reading Room

    From 1 April, necessary work is being carried out on the lighting
    throughout
    the Lower Reading Room. In order to carry out the work it is
    necessary to
    close sections of the reading room in succession. Readers are asked
    for their
    own security not to walk past barriers and notices into closed
    areas.

    The proposed programme for the work is as follows:

    Monday, 1 April. No access to the Lower Reading Room
    from the
    North staircase. The C. Acad. and C. Latin rooms will be completely
    closed;
    the C. Greek room will be open but without electricity. The South
    range will
    be unaffected.

    Tuesday, 2 April. The C. Greek room will be closed. The
    C. Acad.
    and C. Latin rooms will be open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. with power, but
    without
    lighting. There will be no through passage between these rooms and
    the Lower
    Reserve. The South range will be unaffected.

    Wednesday, 3 April. Room B2, where OLIS terminals and
    other
    workstations are concentrated, will be completely closed at the
    beginning of
    the day. There will be no access to this room from either direction
    until
    later in the morning. Other rooms will be unaffected.

    Thursday, 4 April. The Theology (T) section will be
    closed. There
    will be no through passage between the Classics reading rooms and the
    Catalogue and General Reference Section.

    It may become necessary to alter this schedule. The Library
    apologises
    for this major disruption at such short notice.

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    UNIVERSITY APPOINTMENTS


    Department of Materials

    University
    Lecturership
    in Electrical and Magnetic Properties of Materials

    Applications are invited for this post, tenable from 1 October 1996.
    The
    stipend will be according to age, on the scale
    £15,154–£28,215
    per annum. The successful candidate may be offered a tutorial
    fellowship by St
    Anne's College, to which certain allowances are attached.

    Candidates should be able to teach widely within a broad four-year
    Materials
    Science syllabus and to carry out a programme of research into the
    electrical
    and magnetic properties of materials.

    Further particulars, containing details of the duties and the full
    range of
    emoluments and allowances attaching to both the university and
    college posts,
    may be obtained from the Head of Department, Department of Materials,
    Parks
    Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (telephone: Oxford (2)73737, fax: (2)73738,
    e-mail:
    head.department@materials.ox.ac.uk). Applicants should give a full
    postal
    address for reply. The closing date for applications is Tuesday, 30
    April.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    School of Management
    Studies

    University
    Lecturerships in Finance

    In 1996 the School of Management Studies will be launching an MBA and
    as part
    of this is seeking to appoint two University Lecturers in the area of
    Finance.
    The persons appointed will be expected to teach on the MBA programme
    and on a
    range of undergraduate and graduate courses in Management Studies and
    to
    undertake research. Appointment to both posts will be from 1 October
    1996 or
    as soon as possible thereafter.

    On lecturership will be held in conjunction with an official
    fellowship at
    Templeton College. The person appointed will be expected also to
    contribute to
    the college's executive programmes.

    The other lecturership will be held in association with an official
    fellowship
    at St Edmund Hall. The person appointed will be required also to
    provide
    tuition for undergraduates at the college.

    Further details, including salaries and allowances attaching to both
    the
    university and the college posts, may be obtained from Mrs Ingunn
    Seidler,
    University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone:
    Oxford
    (2)70016), to whom completed applications (ten copies) should be sent
    by 26
    April.

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Faculty of Mathematical
    Sciences

    Temporary
    Junior Lecturership in Statistics

    Applications are invited for a temporary Junior Lecturership in
    Statistics,
    tenable from 1 October 1996 until 31 December 1997.

    The stipend will be on the scale £14,317–£15,154 per
    annum.
    There is the possibility of some college teaching for which separate
    payment
    would be made.

    Applications (ten typed copies, or one only from overseas
    candidates),
    together with a full curriculum vitae, list of
    publications,
    statement of research interests, and the names of three referees,
    should be
    sent by Monday, 22 April to the Departmental Administrator,
    Department of
    Statistics, 1 South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3TG (telephone: Oxford
    (2)72869,
    fax: (2)72595), from whom further particulars, containing details of
    the
    duties and the full range of emoluments, may be obtained.





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 21 March 1996: Lectures<br />

    Lectures


    Contents of this section:

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    INAUGURAL LECTURES


    Gert-Rudolf Flick Professor of European Thought

    PROFESSOR J. BURROW will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on
    Tuesday, 7 May, in the Examination School.

    Subject: `A common culture? Nationalist ideas in
    nineteenth-century European thought.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    Harmsworth Professor of American History

    PROFESSOR D.M. KENNEDY will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m.
    on Tuesday, 7 May, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `Can the United States still afford to be a
    nation of immigrants?'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    CLARENDON LECTURES IN ECONOMICS 1996

    Oxford University Press and the Sub-faculty of Economics are pleased
    to announce that PROFESSOR ANDREI SHLEIFER, Harvard University, will
    deliver the Clarendon Lectures on Economics on 7, 8, and 9 May.
    Further details will be published later.

    Subject: `Inefficient markets.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    GAISFORD LECTURE 1996

    PROFESSOR J. GOULD, Bristol, will deliver the Gaisford Lecture at 5
    p.m. on Thursday, 9 May, in St John's College.

    Subject: `Something to do with Dionysos.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    WEIDENFELD VISITING PROFESSOR OF EUROPEAN
    COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 1995–6

    Ascents of love: desire and the good in the Western
    philosophical/literary tradition

    PROFESSOR MARTHA C. NUSSBAUM, Chicago, will lecture at 5 p.m. on the
    following days, as follows: the lectures on 22 April to 13 May
    inclusive will be given in the Examination Schools; the lectures on
    20 and 27 May will be given in the Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, St
    Anne's College.

    Professor Nussbaum will also give seminars at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 7
    May, and Thursday, 23 May, in Lecture Room 1, St Anne's College.


    Mon. 22 Apr.: `Contemplative creativity I:
    Plato.'

    Thur. 25 Apr.: `Contemplative creativity II: Spinoza,
    Proust.'

    Mon. 29 Apr.: `The Christian ascent I: Augustine.'

    Thur. 2 May: `The Christian ascent II: Dante.'

    Mon. 6 May: `The Romantic Ascent I: Emily
    Brontë.'

    Mon. 13 May: `The Romantic Ascent II: Mahler.'

    Mon. 20 May: `Democratic desire: Walt Whitman.'

    Mon. 27 May: `The descent of love: Joyce's
    Ulysses.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    JAMES P.R. LYELL LECTURES IN BIBLIOGRAPHY
    1996

    In praise of scribes: manuscripts and their makers in
    seventeenth-century England

    DR P. BEAL will deliver the following illustrated lectures at 5 p.m.
    on Tuesdays and Thursdays in the St Cross Building.


    14 May: `In praise of scribes.'

    16 May: ` "It shall not therefore kill itself;
    that is, not bury itself": Donne's Biathanatos
    and its text.'

    21 May: `The character of a London scrivener: the
    "feathery scribe" .'

    23 May: ` "Hoping they shall only come to your
    merciful eyes": Sidney's Letter to the Queen and its
    transmission.'

    28 May: ` "The virtuous Mrs Philips" and
    "that whore Castlemaine": Orinda and her apotheosis,
    1664–8.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    THE TIMES LECTURE 1996

    MS D. CAMERON, Strathclyde, will deliver the Times
    Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 25 April, in the St Cross Building.

    Subject: `Language and gender: feminist language reform
    and the history of English.'

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    RATANBAI KATRAK LECTURES 1996

    PROFESSOR PHILIPPE GIGNOUX, Ratanbai Katrak Lecturer 1996, will
    lecture at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination
    Schools.

    Mon. 29 Apr.: `The three immortal souls and other human
    faculties.'

    Wed. 1 May: `Body: anatomy, physiology, and
    medicine.'

    Fri. 3 May: `Cosmic elements and theory of
    microcosm.'

    Mon. 6 May: `Is there an Iranian Shamanism? (1).'

    Wed. 8 May: `Is there an Iranian Shamanism? (2).'

    Fri. 10 May: `Problems of identity and conversion in
    Zoroastrianism.'

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    SIR JOHN HICKS LECTURE 1996

    PROFESSOR JOEL MOKYR, Northwestern University, will deliver the Sir
    John Hicks Lecture on Economic History at 5 p.m. on Friday, 3 May, in
    the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `Famine and mortality: an historical re-
    examination.'

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    CLINICAL MEDICINE

    Nuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

    DR TADASHI KIMURA, Osaka Medical School, Japan, will lecture at 5
    p.m. on Thursday, 28 March, in the Anne Anderson Lecture Theatre,
    Level 3, Nuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Women's
    Centre, the John Radcliffe Hospital.

    Further information may be obtained from Dr S. Phaneuf (telephone:
    Oxford 221022, e-mail: sphaneuf@immsvr.jr2.ox.ac.uk).

    Subject: `Oxytocin receptor investigation: basic
    molecular research associated with a clinical problem.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Oxford Immunology Group

    DR J. SPRENT, Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, La Jolla,
    California, will lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 28 March, in Lecture
    Theatre 2, the Academic Block, the John Radcliffe Hospital. The
    meeting will be chaired by Professor A. McMichael.

    Car parking will be available.

    Subject: `Minimal requirements for stimulating T cells.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section


    Oxford Clinical Neurosciences Lectures

    The following lectures will be held at 11.30 a.m. on Fridays in the
    Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

    DR M. HALLETT, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and
    Stroke, NIH, Bethesda, USA

    19 Apr.: `Motor learning.'

    PROFESSOR D. NEARY, Manchester Royal Infirmary

    17 May: `Differential diagnosis of degenerative
    dementia.'

    PROFESSOR D. MILLER, Institute of Neurology, London

    21 June: `The use of magnetic resonance to
    understand and manage multiple sclerosis.'

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    PHYSICAL SCIENCES


    Hinshelwood Lectures

    PROFESSOR KENNETH B. EISENTHAL, Professor of Chemistry, Columbia
    University, will deliver the Hinshelwood Lectures at 11.15 a.m. on
    Tuesdays and Thursdays in Trinity Term, in the Physical and
    Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, commencing on Thursday, 2 May.

    Convener: J.P. Simons, MA, Dr Lee's Professor of
    Chemistry.

    Subject: `Molecules and molecular dynamics at liquid
    interfaces.'

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    INSTITUTE OF VIROLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL
    MICROBIOLOGY

    The following seminars will be held at 4 p.m. on the days indicated
    in the Institute of Virology and Environmental Microbiology. They
    will take place on Fridays, with the exceptions of the meetings to be
    held on Wednesday, 1 May, and Wednesday, 15 May.

    Details of the seminars to be held on 10 and 17 May will be announced
    later.

    DR J. CLEMENT, Queen Astrid Military Hospital, Brussels

    29 Mar.: `Diagnostic pitfalls of TBE screening and
    Lyme disease in Belgium and Germany.'

    PROFESSOR I. MCCONNELL, Cambridge

    26 Apr.: `Animal lentiviruses: their relevance to
    pathogenesis and immunity in HIV.'

    PROFESSOR J. SHEAIL, Institute of Terrestrial Ecology, Monkswood

    1 May: `Environmental management; a UK historical
    perspective.'

    DR A. GRAY, Institute of Terrestrial Ecology, Furzewood

    3 May: `Environmental impact of genetically
    modified crops.'

    DR M. ACREMAN, Institute of Hydrology, Wallingford

    15 May: `Conflicts of development and conservation
    of Sahelian flood-plains—research needs to underpin
    improved management.'

    DR I. JOINT, Plymouth Marine Laboratory

    24 May: `Marine microbiology—from the North
    Atlantic to the Indian Ocean.'

    PROFESSOR A. BULL, Kent

    31 May: `Microbes, dehalogenation, and
    biotechnology.'

    PROFESSOR P.G. STOCKLEY, Leeds

    7 June: `The role of sequence-specific
    RNA–protein interactions in RNA bacteriophage
    morphogenesis.'

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    ST EDMUND HALL


    A.B. Emden Lecture 1996

    PROFESSOR Q. SKINNER, Cambridge, will deliver the A.B. Emden Lecture
    at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 30 April, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `Ancient laughter and modern philosophy.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section



    CAMPION HALL


    Martin D'Arcy Lectures (Campion Hall
    Centenary) 1996

    PROFESSOR RAYMOND E. BROWN, Auburn Distinguished Professor Emeritus
    of Biblical Studies, Union Theological Seminary, New York, will
    deliver the Martin D'Arcy Lectures at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays and Fridays
    23, 26, 30 April, and 3, 7 May, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `New Testament scholarship and Christianity
    today.'

    Return to List of Contents of this section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 21 March 1996: Grants and Funding<br />

    Grants and Research Funding


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or recurrent entry.]

    • *RESEARCH SERVICES OFFICE
    • *RESEARCH AND EQUIPMENT
      COMMITTEE


    • OTHER GRANTS

      Return to Contents Page of this issue


      RESEARCH SERVICES


      Postdoctoral Fellowships for NATO Co-operation Partner Countries

      From 1996 the Royal Society, acting as the UK's national
      administrator for the NATO Science Fellowship Programme, is offering
      additional fellowships for young postdoctoral scientists in
      Co-operation Countries to spend one year at a UK laboratory.
      Co-operation Partner Countries are Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan,
      Belarus, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Estonia, Georgia, Hungary,
      Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Poland, Romania,
      Russia, Slovak Republic, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and
      Uzbekistan.

      Candidates must be nationals of one of the above countries and must
      have already reached postdoctoral (or equivalent) status. The scheme
      carries an upper age limit of forty. (Exceptions may be made for
      applicants who are over forty, but who have only recently received
      their doctorate.) Fellowships are for research in the natural
      sciences, including mathematics, engineering, non-clinical medical
      research, and the scientific research aspects of psychology,
      archaeology, geography, agriculture, and the history of science.

      The programme is supported by NATO. Fellowship holders receive an
      award which covers living costs in the UK, together with a
      contribution towards the international air-fare, research expenses,
      and subsidiary visits.

      Application details can be obtained from the Royal Society, 6 Carlton
      House Terrace, London SW1Y 4AG (telephone: 0171-839 556, ext. 2561,
      fax: 0171-925 2620, e-mail: ezmb016@mailbox.ulcc.ac.uk). Reference
      SGK/JS/NATO should be quoted in correspondence. The closing dates for
      applications are 15 April and 15 September annually.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      ALLIANCE: British Council Franco-British
      Joint Research Programme

      Applications are now invited for the 1997 programme in pure and
      applied sciences, life sciences, and technology. Preference will be
      given to projects which show promise for the development of new co-
      operation between the two countries, with clear potential for
      securing further funding to support the collaboration and the
      involvement of young researchers.

      A limited number of awards are also available for the applied social
      sciences in the following fields only: business and industry;
      economics and finance; education and training; innovation; labour
      mobility and unemployment; law and legislation; political
      institutions and structures; history of science.

      Alliance provides financial support for travel and subsistence up to
      a maximum of three months in each direction in any one year. Support
      is normally provided for two years, with a third year being approved
      in exceptional cases.

      All applications must be made concurrently from their respective
      countries by the French and British groups which propose to
      collaborate. Unilateral applications will not be accepted and British
      applicants should ensure that their French partner makes a matching
      application to the French administration.

      Further information and application forms may be obtained from: the
      British Council, Science Section, 9–11 rue de Constantine, F-
      75007 Paris, France (telephone: +33 1 49.55.73.34, fax: +33 1
      47.05.77.02, e-mail: carole.hemard@bc-paris.sprint.com). Application
      forms will be sent by post only. The closing date for applications is
      1 May.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      OTHER GRANTS


      Violet Vaughan Morgan Commonwealth
      Studentship 1996–7

      Applications are invited for a Violet Vaughan Morgan Commonwealth
      Studentship, to be awarded to a graduate reading for a higher degree
      under the Board of the Faculty of English Language and Literature.
      The studentship is open to citizens of Commonwealth countries
      (including the UK) now reading for the degree of M.St. or M.Phil. who
      propose to apply to read for the degree of D.Phil., or who are
      already reading for the degree of D.Phil. The offer of the
      studentship will be conditional upon the successful candidate's being
      registered for a doctorate.

      The studentship is offered for one year from October 1996 and will be
      renewable for not more than two further years at the discretion of
      the English Board. The studentship will provide a stipend equivalent
      to that provided by a British Academy Studentship, plus approved
      university and college fees (the former at the level for home
      students), but the English Board may reduce the value of the
      studentship if in its opinion the financial resources of the
      successful candidate make it desirable to do so. The studentship will
      normally cover university fees at the home rate, although in
      exceptional circumstances a supplemental grant may be made in order
      to meet (or to go some way towards meeting) the difference between
      the home and the overseas fee.

      Applicants are expected to have applied for either British Academy
      Studentships or ORS awards as appropriate. Applicants should apply in
      writing to the Secretary to the English Board, University Offices,
      Wellington Square, not later than Friday, 10 May. Applications must
      include: a curriculum vitae; a statement of the course
      of study to be pursued (including a research proposal); the names of
      two referees each of whom the applicant has asked to write to the
      Secretary to the English Board by the date mentioned above; details
      of financial resources available to the applicant during his or her
      proposed course of study.

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      Tempus Tacis Programme

      Tempus Tacis is a trans-European co-operation scheme for higher
      education between the European Union and thirteen Partner States
      (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan,
      Moldova, the Russian Federation, Tadjikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine,
      Uzbekistan, and Mongolia). The objectives of Tempus Tacis are to
      promote the quality and support the development and renewal of higher
      education in the Partner States, and to encourage interaction and
      balanced co-operation with higher education institutions in the
      European Union. Tempus Tacis supports high-quality projects which
      will restructure and develop curricula and teaching materials,
      upgrade
      teaching facilities, and improve university administration in higher
      education institutions in the Partner States.

      Funding is available for three types of project: Pre-Joint European
      Projects (Pre-JEPs), Joint European Projects (JEPs), and Compact
      Projects (CPs). Specific priority areas have already been set for
      each individual Partner State.

      Further information, including the Guide for Applicants, is available
      from the International Office, University Offices, Wellington Square,
      Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: Oxford (2)70105). The deadline for
      submission of applications for a Pre-JEP or CP grant in 1996–7
      is 20 June 1996.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      Entente Cordiale Scholarships

      The Entente Cordiale Scholarships Scheme is designed to promote
      higher education, to encourage contacts, and increase exchanges
      between France and the United kingdom. Forty scholarships are being
      financed by the private sector this year for outstanding postgraduate
      students who wish to study for a year at a university or `Grande
      École' in France. Eligible applicants must hold an MA or
      equivalent in the field of `Sciences humaines et sociales.' Each
      scholarship is awarded for a twelve-month period and covers
      registration fees, living expenses (at present FF 4,500 monthly in
      Paris, FF 3,800 monthly outside Paris), and a special allowance for
      removal costs and the purchase of books.

      Further information and application forms are available from the
      Service Culturel, Ambassade de France, 23 Cromwell Road, London SW7
      2EL (telephone: 0171-838 2055). The deadline for receipt of completed
      applications is 12 April.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      ORS Awards Scheme 1996

      The ORS Awards Scheme for Overseas Research Students, established by
      the Department for Education and administered by the Committee of
      Vice-Chancellors and Principals, provides awards for the partial
      remission of tuition fees to overseas postgraduate students
      registered for research degrees at UK academic institutions. The only
      criteria for the awards are outstanding merit and research potential;
      other factors, such as means, nationality, and proposed field will
      not be taken into account by the national ORS Committee. The value of
      each award is the difference between the 1996–7 univesity
      tuition fee for a UK/EU postgraduate student and the rate chargeable
      to an overseas postgraduate student for his/her particular course of
      study.

      Further information and application material for the 1996 ORS Scheme
      at the University may be obtained from the International Office,
      University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone:
      Oxford (2)70134). The closing date for applications is 29 April.

      Return to List of Contents of this section






      <br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 21 March 1996: Examinations and Boards<br />

      Examinations and Boards


      Contents of this section:

    • EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF
      PHILOSOPHY


      CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

      With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in
      regulations made by the Board of the Faculty of Modern History will
      come into effect on 5 April.


      Board of the Faculty of Modern History


      (a) M.St. in Historical Research

      With immediate effect (for first examination in 1996)

      In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 686, after l. 44
      insert:

      `5. A candidate who fails one element of the examination may resit
      that part at the end of the following long vacation. A candidate who
      fails more than one element and desires to resit must retake the
      entire examination at the end of the next academic year;
      alternatively such a candidate may, if his or her work has been of
      sufficient standard, be awarded the Certificate of Graduate
      Attainment in lieu of resitting.'

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      (b) M.St. in Modern History

      (i) With immediate effect (for first examination in
      1996)

      In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 693, after l. 20
      insert:

      ` A candidate who fails the examination will be permitted to
      retake it on one further occasion only, not later than one year after
      the initial attempt. Such a candidate whose essay has been of
      satisfactory standard may re-submit the same piece of work, while a
      candidate who has reached a satisfactory standard on the written
      papers will not be required to retake that part of the examination.'

      (ii) With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in
      1997)

      1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 691,
      l. 28, delete `essay:' and substitute:

      `essay (not all options may be available in every year):'. 2
      Ibid., p. 692, after l. 11 insert:

      `British Commonwealth History

      A paper on concepts and methods of imperial history

      South Asian History A paper on concepts and methods in South
      Asian History

      British and European History'.

      3 Ibid., l. 14, delete:

      `(ii) Statistical methods and computer application;' and
      substitute: `(ii) Quantitative methods and computer applications for
      historians;'.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      (c) M.Sc. in Economics and
      Social History

      (i) With immediate effect (for first examination in
      1996)

      In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 730, to l. 37 add:

      `Such a candidate whose dissertation has been of satisfactory
      standard may resubmit the same piece of work, while a candidate who
      has reached a satisfactory standard on the written papers will not be
      required to retake that part of the examination.'

      (ii) With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in
      1997)

      1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 730,
      delete l. 6 and substitute:

      `(2) Either Quantitative methods and computer applications for
      historians or Introduction to the history of science and technology.
      The second alternative is open only to those writing a dissertation
      in the history of science and technology.'.

      2 Ibid., l. 14, after `a dissertation' insert:

      `(not all options may be available in every year)'.


      (d) M.Phil. in Economic and
      Social History

      (i) With immediate effect (for first examination in
      1996)

      In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 577, delete l. 39 and
      substitute:

      `further occasion only, not later than one year after the attempt.
      Such a candidate whose dissertation has been of a satisfactory
      standard may re-submit the same piece of work, while a candidate who
      has reached a satisfactory standard on the written papers will not be
      required to retake that part of the examination.'.

      (ii) With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in
      1997)

      1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 576,
      delete l. 31 and substitute:

      `(2) Either Quantitative methods and computer applications for
      historians or Introduction to the history of science and technology.
      The second alternative is open only to those writing a dissertation
      in the history of science and technology.'.

      2 Ibid., l. 39, after `a dissertation' insert
      `(not all options may be available in every year)'.

      3 Ibid., p. 577, l. 1, delete `from the list
      drawn up by the examiners'.

      4 Ibid., delete ll. 2–5 and substitute:

      `themes chosen. The themes chosen by the candidate must be
      submitted for approval by the chairman of examiners, c/o the Clerk of
      the Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than the Monday of the
      fifth week of Hilary Term. Candidates will be informed within two
      weeks, by means of a letter directed to their colleges, whether the
      topics they have submitted have been approved. The finished essays
      must be'.


      (e) Regulations of Faculty
      Boards concerning the status of Probationer Research Student and the
      degrees of M.Litt., M.Sc. by Research, and D.Phil.

      With immediate effect (for first examination in 1996)

      1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 827,
      delete ll. 28–30 and substitute `Dispensation from individual
      re-'.

      2 Ibid., l. 32 after. `Studies.' insert:

      `The Certificate of Graduate Attainment or the M.St. in Historical
      Research is a necessary (though not in itself sufficient)
      qualification for students wishing to advance to M.Litt. or D.Phil.
      status, unless they have been dispensed on the grounds that they
      already hold an equivalent qualification.'.

      3 Ibid., l. 40, after `accompanied' insert `(or,
      in the case of candidates for the M.St. in Historical Research,
      followed at the appropriate date)'.

      4 Ibid., l. 43, after `long' insert `(up to
      10,000 words in the case of candidates for the M.St. in Historical
      Research)'.

      5 Ibid., l. 44, after `or' insert `(except in the
      case of candidates for the M.St. in Historical Research)'.

      6 Ibid., p. 828, l. 35, after `accompanied'
      insert `(or, in the case of candidates for the M.St. in Historical
      Research, followed at the appropriate date)'.

      7 Ibid., l. 38, after `long' insert `(up to
      10,000 words in the case of candidates for the M.St. in Historical
      Research)'.

      8 Ibid., l. 39, after `or' insert `(except in the
      case of candidates for the M.St. in Historical Research)'.

      Return to List of Contents of this section



      EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF
      PHILOSOPHY

      The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice
      of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

      Biological Sciences

      G. VIEIRA, Linacre: `Gap dynamics in managed Amazonian forest:
      structural and ecophysiological aspects'.

      Department of Plant Sciences, Saturday, 30 March, 11 a.m.

      Examiners: M.D. Swaine, J. Burley.

      Clinical Medicine

      N. WELLS, Linacre: `Phosphorylation of human topoisomerase II'.

      Institute of Molecular Medicine, Tuesday, 26 March, 2 p.m.

      Examiners: A. Maxwell, J.M. Axton.

      Y. WICKRAMASINGHE, Trinity: `Design and clinical assessment of an
      opto-electronic instrument for monitoring cerebral oxygenation'.

      Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics, Radcliffe Infirmary, Friday, 22
      March, 1 p.m.

      Examiners: R.J. Parsons, J.D. Young.

      Literae Humaniores

      R. CHRISLEY, New College: `Non-conceptual psychological explanation:
      content and computation'.

      St Catherine's, Tuesday, 9 July, 2.30 p.m.

      Examiners: M.W. Brewer, T. Crane.

      Mathematical Sciences

      D.A. BURGESS, Linacre: `Parallel computing for unstructured mesh
      algorithms'.

      Computing Laboratory, Wednesday, 27 March, 2.30 p.m.

      Examiners: K. Parrott, M. Berzins.

      Social Studies

      H.E. JENKINS, Nuffield: `Infrastructure, education, and productivity:
      a multi-country study'.

      Examination Schools, Tuesday, 9 April, 11.30 a.m.

      Examiners: K. Mayhew, J. Haskel.

      Theology

      N. HEAP, Keble: `Robert Hugh Benson, 1871–1914, Catholic
      novelist and apologist: towards the restoration of a portrait'.

      English Faculty Building, Tuesday, 23 April, 2.15 p.m.

      Examiners: A.O.J. Cockshut, D. Newsome.

      Return to List of Contents of this section






      <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 21 March 1996: Colleges<br />

      Colleges, Halls, and Societies


      Contents of this section:

      • OBITUARIES


      • ELECTIONS OF PROCTORS

      • ELECTION OF ASSESSOR

      • ELECTIONS

      • NOTICES:

        Return to Contents Page of this issue



        OBITUARIES


        St Hilda's College

        ENID ADELA HILL (née Malin), BA, DIP.ED., 22 February
        1996; commoner 1934–8. Aged 80.

        MARGARET LUCY WALTER, MA, 4 March 1996; scholar 1922-6. Aged 92.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        St Hugh's College

        IRENE JOYCE BAKER, 28 February 1996; commoner 1935–8. Aged 81.

        AUDREY FLORA LILLIAN STEPHENS (née Fowler), 18
        February 1996; commoner 1925–8. Aged 88.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        ELECTIONS OF PROCTORS


        New College

        The college has elected as Proctor for the Proctorial year
        1997–8 MARTIN ERIC CEADEL, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of the college.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Oriel College

        The college has elected as Proctor for the Proctorial year
        1997–8 ANNETTE MARIANNE VOLFING, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of the
        college.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        ELECTION OF ASSESSOR


        St Antony's College

        The college has elected as Assessor for the Proctorial year
        1997–8 ROGER JAMES GOODMAN, D.PHIL. (BA Durham), Fellow of the
        college.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        ELECTIONS


        Brasenose College

        To an Official Fellowship and Tutorship in Economics (with effect
        from 1 October 1996):

        DR A.S. HURN, D.PHIL. (B.COM. Natal)

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Corpus Christi College

        To a non-stipendiary Junior Research Fellowship (with effect from
        21 April 1996):

        IRENE M.C. TRACEY, MA, D.PHIL., Postdoctoral
        Research Fellow, Department of Clinical Neurology

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Green College

        To a Fellowship by Election:

        WILLIAM OSMOND CHARLES MICHAEL
        COOKSON, D.PHIL. (MB, BS, MD Western Australia), FRACP

        To Honorary Fellowships (Advisory Council):

        FREEMAN JOHN DYSON, FRS

        THE RT. HON. SIR ROBERT FELLOWES, KCB, KCVO

        PETER JAMES DENTON JOB, BA

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Queen's College

        To an Honorary Fellowship (with effect from 1 October 1995):

        SIR COLIN MCCOLL, KCMG, BA

        To a Laming Junior Fellowship:

        ROSALIND H. GRAY, BA, Christ
        Church

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        St Hilda's College

        To Official Fellowships:

        MARIA CROGHAN, MA

        MARGARET LINTERN-BALL (BA, MA Leicester)

        Return to List of Contents of this section


        To an Honorary Fellowship (with immediate effect):

        DR FIONA
        CALDICOTT, BM, B.CH., MA

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        St Hugh's College

        To a Tutorial Fellowship in Law:

        LIONEL D. SMITH, D.PHIL.
        (B.SC. Toronto, LL.B. Western Ontario, LL.M. Cambridge)

        To a Tutorial Fellowship in English:

        PETER MCDONALD, D.PHIL.
        (BA, MA Rhodes)

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        NOTICES


        Balliol College


        Junior Research Fellowship

        Balliol College proposes to elect a non-stipendiary Junior Research
        Fellow from among those successful in obtaining a British Academy
        Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in any subject other than
        Archaeology, English, or History. Candidates interested in being
        considered for this post are invited to apply to the college as well
        as to the British Academy. The closing date for college applications
        is 3 May. Further particulars can be obtained from the College
        Secretary, Balliol College, Oxford OX1 3BJ.


        Appointment of Library Issue Desk Staff

        A part-time member of staff is sought for 17H hours per week
        (afternoons: terms and vacations), beginning on Wednesday, 1 May, or
        as soon thereafter as possible.

        The post involves staffing the
        issue desk, checking readers' cards, running the book loan system,
        answering enquiries (including telephone enquiries), and other
        clerical tasks. The rate of pay is £4.50 per hour.

        Written
        applications, including a curriculum vitae and the names
        and addresses of two referees, should be sent to reach the Librarian,
        Balliol College, Oxford OX1 3BJ, by Wednesday, 10 April. Balliol
        College is an equal opportunities employer.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Exeter College


        Queen Sofía Research Fellowship in Modern
        and Contemporary Spanish Literature

        The college proposes to elect a Queen Sof’a Research Fellow in Modern
        and Contemporary Spanish Literature, from 1 October 1996, or later by
        arrangement. The fellowship is open equally to men and women and is
        tenable for two years in the first instance, renewable for a further
        period of one year only. The college is willing to consider
        applications both from persons about to complete their work for a
        doctorate and from those engaged in postdoctoral research. Further
        particulars may be obtained from the Rector, Exeter College, Oxford
        OX1 3DP (telephone: Oxford (2)79660, fax: (2)79630), to whom
        applications, with a curriculum vitae and the names of
        three referees, should be sent by 15 April.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Pembroke College


        Appointment of Junior Dean

        Pembroke College proposes to appoint a Junior Dean for a period of
        one year from 1 October 1996, with the possibility of renewal for a
        second year. The Junior Dean will be required to reside in college,
        free of charge, and will also receive free meals at high table and a
        stipend (under review) of £1,642 per annum, which will be
        additional to any other income which the appointee may receive. The
        Junior Dean will assist the Dean and other college officers in the
        smooth running of the college. Applicants must be graduates, and it
        is expected that they will be pursuing advanced study or research.

        Applications, including a full curriculum vitae and
        an outline of the academic work which the applicant proposes to
        undertake, should reach the Dean, Pembroke College, Oxford OX1 1DW,
        from whom further particulars may be obtained, by Monday, 15 April.
        Applicants should inform the Dean of the names, addresses, and
        telephone numbers of three referees and arrange for their referees to
        write direct to the Dean by 15 April. If the applicant is a
        registered graduate student, one of the referees must be the
        applicant's university supervisor.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Queen's College


        Lecturership in Philosophy

        The governing body proposes, if a suitable candidate presents himself
        or herself, to elect a Lecturer in Philosophy for one year only with
        effect from 1 October 1996.

        The lecturer will be required to teach
        twelve hours per week for the college and be able in particular to
        offer teaching for the Introduction to Philosophy paper in the PPE
        Preliminary Examination and for the following papers, as specified in
        the Regulations for Philosophy in some of the Honour Schools: 101,
        History of Philosophy from Descartes to Kant; 102, Metaphysics and
        the Theory of Knowledge; 104, Philosophy of Mind; 108, The Philosophy
        of Logic and Language. He or she will be expected to share in the
        general arrangements of tuition for undergraduates studying
        philosophy and will be called on to take part in entrance and other
        examinations for the college. The basic stipend will be £13,500
        per annum (under review), and the lecturer will be entitled to a
        teaching room in college and to free lunch and dinner at the common
        table. Further particulars may be obtained from the College
        Secretary, Queen's College, Oxford OX1 4AW. The closing date for
        applications is 10 April.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        St Catherine's College


        One-year Stipendiary Lecturership in
        Economics

        The college proposes to appoint a six-hour Stipendiary Lecturer in
        Economics for the academic year 1996–7. The lecturer will be
        required to teach (in tutorials and classes) six hours per week on
        average in the eight weeks of each full term. In addition, he or she
        will be expected to play a full role in the running of Honour Schools
        involving Economics, including participating in the admissions
        process, setting and marking college examinations, and the pastoral
        care of undergraduates.

        The lecturer will be expected to teach (in
        tutorials and classes) macro- and micro-economics for the Second
        Public Examination in the Honour Schools involving Economics, to run
        revision classes in these subjects, and to do such special paper
        teaching as falls within his or her research area.

        A teaching
        room will be provided. The lecturer will be a member of the senior
        common room and receive five meals per week, free of charge, during
        full term. The stipend for 1996–7 will be £7,170 (under
        review), and will be pensionable.

        Applications should be addressed
        to the Senior Tutor, St Catherine's College, Oxford OX1 3UJ, and
        should include a curriculum vitae, an indication of
        areas of teaching expertise, and the names of two referees.
        Applicants should ask their referees to write directly to the Senior
        Tutor. Applications and references must arrive by Friday, 26 April.
        Short-listed candidates will be interviewed during the week beginning
        6 May.


        Appointment of part-time General Office
        Secretary/ Assistant

        Applications for this part-time post (twenty hours per week) are
        invited from versatile and numerate persons. The post-holder will be
        based in the General Office but will be required to work for other
        departments under the direction of the Finance Bursar's Secretary.
        Keyboard skills, word-processing, and a good general educational
        background are important. The salary will be on the university
        library and clerical scale, grade 3, currently
        £10,276–£11,895 (under review), pro rata.
        Applications should be made in writing, submitting a curriculum
        vitae
        accompanied by the names and addresses of two referees,
        to the Finance Bursar's Secretary, St Catherine's College, Oxford OX1
        3UL, by 1 April.

        St Catherine's College is an equal opportunities
        employer.

        Return to List of Contents of this section






        <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 21 March 1996: Advertisements<br />

        Advertisements


        Contents of this section:



        How to advertise in the
        Gazette


        Terms and
        conditions of acceptance of advertisements

        Return to Contents Page of this issue



        University Museum Shop

        The Oxford University Museum Shop for tempting non-
        calorific Easter eggs in polished stone. Toy hatching dinosaur,
        tortoise and ostrich eggs, and a range of reference and activity
        books and kits to occupy the holiday can also be purchased. Until
        Sat. 13 Apr., readers brandishing this copy may claim a 10 per cent
        discount on purchases over £5. Museum open Mon.–Sat.,
        12–5 p.m. (inc. Easter Monday); Easter closing 4–6 Apr.
        inc.; admission free.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Volunteers needed to teach English in Poland

        The Anglo-Polish Academic Association (APASS) is
        currently seeking to recruit volunteers to teach English for approx.
        3 weeks in the summer vacation. Polish organisations will provide
        full hospitality and holiday entertainment to the teachers and
        assistance with travel costs is available. Teaching experience is
        welcomed, but not essential. For an information pack, send a stamped
        addressed envelope (9 by 6 inches) and cheque for £2.50 (payable
        to APASS). APASS, 139 Landsdowne Way, Stockwell, London SW8 2NP.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Oxford Friends of Welsh National Opera:
        concert

        `Donald Maxwell sings'—riotously, irreverently,
        to amuse. St Edward's School Hall, Sat. 30 Mar., 8 p.m. Tickets
        £12.50 from Lady Williams, 94 Lonsdale Road, or Dr Peet, 4
        Stephen Road, Headington. Tel.: Oxford 515199 (Lady Williams), or
        61763 (Dr Peet).

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Services Offered

        Micro Instruments Ltd. are an Oxford-based company
        whose prime business is in the sales and servicing of optical
        microscopes and micromanipulation equipment. Hold agencies for Carl
        Zeiss, Leica, Nikon, Narashige, De Fonbrune, and other leading
        manufacturers, we have for the past 35 years been able to assist in
        the selection and supply of equipment for microscopy all over the UK
        and overseas. For further information and assistance please contact
        us. Tel.: 01993 883595, fax: 01993 883616.

        Speech preparation and presentation support: big
        speech? We'll help you structure and prepare your speech to suit
        spoken word. Service includes: audience analysis, keyline extraction,
        graphics (OHP/slides), and coaching. Also professional preparation of
        manuscripts and theses, including illustrating (line art or
        photographic). Contact Harry. Tel.: Oxford 514220, e-mail:
        harrylts@globalnet.co.uk.

        Frederick and Sudabeh Hine, private dealers in
        Oriental carpets, rugs, and kelims. Tribal, village, and town pieces
        from Iran and Afghanistan in traditional sizes and designs. Some
        Anatolian and Old Chinese examples. Authenticity guaranteed. Goods on
        approval. University discount. Open 10 a.m.–6 p.m.,
        Mon.–Sat. Old Squash Court, 16 Linton Road, Oxford. Tel./fax:
        Oxford 59396.

        Garden design. Spring is coming: let me help you put
        your ideas for your garden into action. Short consultation or full-
        scale design. Judith Walton. Tel.: Oxford 735179.

        Professional IT solutions: KGH Computing Solutions
        offers expert advice on all PC requirements. Particular expertise in
        database design and implementation (Access, dBase, FoxPro); Local
        Area Networks (Novell, WFWG, Windows 95) and connection to TCP/IP
        (University Network); consultancy and specification for new PCs and
        upgrades. Contact Keith Hatton. Tel.: 01734 625707 (answerphone), or
        0850 064387 (mobile); fax: 01734 625708; e-mail:
        100415.314@compuserve.com.

        Proof-reading service offered by experienced
        Mac-based copy-editor. Thorough checking for style, grammar,
        punctuation, and consistency. £10 per 1,000 words. Also fast,
        accurate typing service on Apple Macintosh. £3 per 1,000 words.
        Kate Taylor. Tel./fax: 0181-994 6313.

        Tax advice and accountancy. We specialise in
        assisting academics and other professionals with all tax and
        accounting matters. Fast, personal service at competitive rates.
        Contact Dr Charles McCreery. Tassano & Co., 118 Banbury Road, Oxford.
        Tel.: Oxford 513381.

        Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press—the
        University Printers: specialising in booklet and publicity material,
        typesetting, printing, and finishing; Output Bureau provides high-
        quality output from disk from all major DTP programs onto paper,
        bromide, colour-separated positive or negative film; high-quality
        specialist colour copier service. For service, quality, and
        competitive prices contact Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press,
        Walton Street, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 514691, fax: 514010.

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        Domestic Services

        Eighteen-year-old Spanish girl, with good English,
        would like to au-pair for an Oxford family this summer. She is
        available for 3 months, beginning of July to end of Sept. Contact
        Judith. Tel.: 0181-749 5973.

        Children's day nursery—St Paul's Nursery
        (Somerville College), 119A Walton Street, Oxford, offers full- and
        part-time places for children aged from 3 months to 5 years within a
        12-place nursery, set in a homely environment. For further
        information, contact Suzanne Hodgson. Tel.: 01543 416616.

        Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters,
        your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic,
        commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-
        occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For
        free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford
        726983 or Abingdon 555533.

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        Situations Vacant

        Mature Apple Mac amanuensis and secretary sought by
        solicitor/author. Familiarity with Apple Mac 5.1 and tip-top typing
        accuracy essential. Hours by arrangement. Remuneration generous.
        Please write to: Peter Liell, 184 Divinity Road, Oxford OX4 1LR. Fax:
        Oxford 200950.

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        Houses to Let

        California: for sublet, 3-bedroom, 2.5-bath house
        located in landscaped community; 2 pools; adjacent park; near
        University of California, Irvine; 15 minutes to university, 20
        minutes to beach, 45 minutes to LA. Available 1 Sept. 1996–30
        June 1997. Dr M. Axelrod. Tel.: 714 997 6586, fax: 714 997 6697, e-
        mail: axelrod@nexus.chapman.edu.

        Premier offer a fine selection of property for long
        or short let. Similar properties always required. Competitive fees
        and the friendliest service in the city. Call Jan Bartlett at
        Premier, 207 Cowley Road. Tel.: Oxford 792299, fax: Oxford 798087.

        Aug.–Dec.: terrace house, east Oxford, c.1 mile
        from city centre; 3 bedrooms, 2 reception, large kitchen/diner,
        garden; friendly neighbourhood; all mod cons. £600 p.c.m. plus
        utilities. Tel.: Oxford 793378 (evenings) or (2)76595 (day).

        Two-bedroom house in central North Oxford, very
        close to Green College; beautifully furnished and superbly equipped,
        with landscaped garden and off-street parking. This is a real jewel
        of a house. Non-smokers only, please. Available from 1 Oct. for 1
        year. Rent £800 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 511382.

        Very peaceful, rural but accessible (Oxford 20
        minutes) detached pretty 2-bedroom Cotswold stone cottage on ancient
        manor farm; insulation; c.h.; log fire; telephone;
        furnished/unfurnished; garage; garden; tennis; local pub; wonderful
        views and walks. Six months min. Tel.: 01993 822152.

        An Englishman's home is his castle—so the
        saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer
        but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the
        surrounding area we may be able to help. QB management is one of
        Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to
        academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to
        offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Please
        telephone or fax us with details of your requirements and we will do
        whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 64533, fax: 64777.

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        Flats to Let

        Central Headington: large self-contained fully-
        furnished 1-bedroom flat; c.h.; free parking; available early April.
        £130 p.w. plus bills. Tel.: Oxford 60053.

        Spacious North London garden flat for university
        vacation lets (Maida Vale/Kilburn). Suit professional couple or small
        family. Double bedroom, single, kitchen, bathroom, sitting-room. Free
        parking. Excellently situated for all London connections and 1-hour
        drive to Oxford. Tel.: 0171-624 0147.

        Woodstock: fully-furnished ground-floor flat for
        annual rent; hall, kitchen, bathroom, bath and shower, sitting-room,
        double bedroom, private telephone, ample parking, etc. £450
        p.c.m. Available 1 May. Tel.: 01993 811488, or write: Lyon, 1 Brown's
        Lane, Woodstock OX20 1ST.

        Wytham Abbey, Oxford: spacious 3-bedroom apartment
        on 2 floors, part of grade 1 manor house situated 3 miles from city
        centre and set in 3,000 acres of park and woodland. Fully equipped
        and luxuriously appointed. Available July. Tel.: Oxford 247200, fax:
        724762.

        Central North Oxford: luxury fully-furnished flat,
        available now. Large double bedroom, large drawing room, kitchen,
        bathroom; c.h.; off-street parking; large garden. Quiet, civilised
        large family house converted into flats. Ten minutes' walk from city
        centre. Regret no children or pets. Reasonable rent. Tel.: Oxford
        52400.

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        Summer Let

        Live in comfort near the Thames only 5 minutes from
        the city centre: 4-bedroom Victorian house, attractive, modernised;
        bathroom with w.c., bidet and sunken bath, shower-room and w.c.,
        large split-level living-room, well-equipped kitchen, c.h. Price
        negotiable. Available 20 July--4 Sept. Single bedsit available before
        and after these dates. Tel.: Oxford 725193.

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        Accommodation Offered

        Four-bedroom house in east Oxford to share with
        contental academic in her thirties. The house, recently modernised,
        has gas c.h. and all mod. cons., a new bathroom and shower, and still
        retains some original features. All rooms are modernly decorated;
        your bedroom and study are overlooking the garden. Available end
        Apr., £300 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 724178.

        Rooms to let for Trinity Term at the Maison
        Française d'Oxford. Good standard of spoken French and English
        required. Rent £37 or £45 p.w. inc. breakfast. Tel.: Oxford
        (2)74220.

        Bedsit to let in North Oxford (city centre 1 mile);
        own shower-room; suitable for visitor or postgraduate, non-smoker;
        short term preferred. £79 p.w. (all inc.). Tel.: Oxford
        53638.

        Bed-and-breakfast available in warm, comfortable
        house in exclusive central North Oxford, within easy walking distance
        of city centre, all main university buildings, parks, river, shops,
        pubs, and restaurants. Every room has tea- and coffee-making
        facilities, microwave, and colour television. Very moderate terms.
        Tel.: Oxford 57879.

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        Accommodation Sought

        Young managing director (American), new to the area,
        looking for comfortable 2-bedroom flat or house in North Oxford,
        Grandpont, Iffley, or outside the city in nice area but within 10
        minutes' drive of Oxford Science Park. Had enough with estate agents,
        believe I am a near-perfect tenant (professional, non-smoker, no
        animals, work long hours, reputable company, age 30, reliable, and
        clean). If you have a place in the £600–£800 range
        (inc.), please call. Also prefer: two personal phone-lines, maid
        cleaning, nice neighbours, access to gym and health food. Tel.:
        Oxford 784411 (day), or 0468 122241 (evening).

        Visiting fellow with wife and two children seeks a
        flat in Oxford for 6–8 weeks in July–Aug. Contact Dr Avi
        Shlaim. Tel.: Oxford 56244.

        American academic family of four seeks to rent house
        in Oxford for Aug. Oxford references available. A.T. Grafton,
        Department of History, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544.
        Fax: 609 258 5326.

        d'Overbroeck's is always looking for more good
        family and self- catering accommodation in North Oxford for A-level
        students. Our academic year runs from Sept. to the end of June and we
        would be particularly interested to hear of any self-contained
        flatlets within family houses which might become available for
        students to share. Rents are paid through the college. If you think
        you can help or would like more information, please telephone. Tel.:
        Oxford 310000.

        Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your
        property? QB Management are one of Oxford's foremost letting agents
        and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and
        professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow
        of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford
        area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply
        need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us.
        Tel.: Oxford 64533, or fax: 64777.

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        Accommodation Exchange

        Fully-furnished flat in Oxford wanted to exchange
        for a fully-furnished apartment in Grasse, French Riviera,
        Sept.–Dec. or longer. Grasse apartment has a bedroom,
        living/dining-room, kitchen, bath/shower, w.c., large balcony
        overlooking St Jacques valley and view of Mediterranean in distance;
        satellite TV, telephone, microwave, washing-machine; car-port, tennis
        court, swimming pool available; in block of 6 apartments—some
        neighbours speak English; suit couple. Owner will carry taxes,
        heating, and electricity bills and will expect the same in Oxford.
        Tel. (France): 93 77 82 78.

        Law student seeks Oxford accommodation, 23
        June–4 Aug. Will trade house: 3 bedrooms, 3 bath, office, 2
        living areas, sunroom, lovely yards; amenities. Inc. pool, tennis,
        and golf membership. 4315 Woodcrest Lane, Dallas, TX 75206. Tel.: 214
        823 3098, e-mail: ldedman@smu.edu.

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        Accommodation sought to rent or exchange

        Danish family seeks to rent 3-bedroom flat/house in
        Oxford for 3 years from 1 Aug. 1996, for family of 4 (2 adults, 2
        children). Exchange of 3-bedroom, 2-sitting-room central Copenhagen
        flat possible. Dr Cecilia Milwertz, Nordic Institute of Asian
        Studies, Leifsgrade 33, 2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark. Tel.: 45 31 54 88
        44, fax: 45 32 96 25 30.

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        Travelling companion sought

        Single traveller seeks companion to Hong Kong and
        possibly China, August. Tel.: Oxford 515173.

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        Holiday Lets

        Cottage for 2 in Gascony. Village with 14th-c.
        château. Irrigated gardens, covered terrace/study, fax,
        printer, hammocks, jacuzzi; swimming, restaurants 1.5 km, market town
        8 km, lake, sailing, skiing 80 km; from late Apr. for short or long
        let. Tel.: Oxford 52560.

        France: Pyrenees foothills, Rousillon; beautiful old
        village farmhouse in peaceful, unspoilt area; forest, sea, mountains,
        castles—much to do. Terrace, garden. Sleeps 4–6,
        expandable. Fully equipped. Available Apr.–20 July, Sept. Tel.:
        0171-624 0147.

        South-west France: tranquil roof-terraced luxury
        apartment within tiny walled hill-top medieval village; 2 double
        bedrooms, excellent bathroom and kitchen; 30-ft south-facing roof
        terrace, half shaded, high above rural valley and completely private.
        Mrs C. Laird. Tel./fax: 00 33 53.70.46.80.

        Lake Garda---Dolomites, near Riva-del-Garda in
        peaceful hillside villa with spectacular mountain panorama,
        self-contained accommodation for two, May--Oct. Separate garden
        entrance with patio; private facilities. £45--£50 per
        night. Excursions to the Dolomites, Verona operas, Trento.
        Wine-tastings. English spoken. Tel./fax: 0039 464 518559, or 0171-359
        1629.

        Portugal: Obidos. Attractive self-contained
        house/apartment in lovely, quiet, unspoilt rural area 90 kms north of
        Lisbon overlooking lagoon and 2 miles from sea; ideal for
        bird-watching, walking, horse- riding. Rent c.£50
        per person per week. Tel.: 00 351 62 979534, or 0171-352 3144.

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        Houses for Sale

        Italy: enchanting Tuscan retreat; 400-year-old
        detached rustic cottage, requiring restoration; 2/3 bedrooms and 3
        other rooms, terrace, and dry cellars; mains water and electricity.
        Superb panoramic views of chestnut forests and Ligurian mountains.
        Tranquil setting with small secluded gardens and sun all day, vines,
        and flagged patio. Magnificent walking with safe woodland trails on
        doorstep leading up to the Appenines. Excellent location, Riviera
        coast 25 miles, A15 autostrada 10, Pisa and Lucca 60, Florence 80.
        Local golf, riding, swimming, and skiing. Freehold £25,000
        o.n.o. Alan and Jennie. Tel.: 00 39 187 427022.

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        Retirement flats for sale

        Finding cooking and housekeeping tiresome? For a
        person over retirement age £30,000 will purchase a single-
        bedroom service flat in a purpose-built block with 24-hour warden
        cover in Summertown area of Oxford. Contact R.A. Birchall, 20
        Plantation Road, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 310091.
        n

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        <br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette: Diary, 22 March<br /> - 25 April

        Diary


        Contents of this section:

        Academic Staff Seminars: places
        should be booked in advance through the Staff Development Office,
        University Offices, Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

        For the full list of courses, see the HREF="../../supps/3_4373.htm">Staff Development Programme
        supplement.

        Return to Contents Page of this
        issue



        Friday 22 March

        ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Eighteenth-century painting', 1.15
        p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Saturday 23 March

        CONFERENCE---Oxford Centre for Durkheimian Studies: `Le malaise
        social: la fin de siècle et Emile Durkheim', Maison
        Française.

        SET 96 (Science, Engineering, and Technology Week):
        `Bodyworks'—talks, displays, and tours, Biochemistry Department,
        1 p.m. (tel. Ms V. Collins: (2)75274).

        SET 96 (Science, Engineering, and Technology Week): `All creatures
        great and small (do we really need them all)?'—talk with hands-
        on activities, University Museum, 2 p.m. (tel. K. Andrews-Speed:
        (2)72965).

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        Sunday 24 March

        SET 96 (Science, Engineering, and Technology Week): `Time
        travel—geology for beginners', all-day tour of Cotswolds and
        Welsh Borders, starting from University Museum (tel. K. Andrews-
        Speed: (2)72965).

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        Monday 25 March

        HILARY TERM ends.

        UNIVERSITY MUSEUM exhibition opens: `The Living Sea'---photographs
        of life in the sea by Linda Pitkin (until 13 May).

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Tuesday 26 March

        ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Sixteenth-century drawings'
        (related to special exhibition), 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel.
        for
        bookings: (2)78015.)

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        Friday 29 March

        ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Spring in the Ashmolean', 1.15
        p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

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        Monday 1 April

        CHRIST CHURCH PICTURE GALLERY closed (reopens 8 April).

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Tuesday 2 April

        ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `An Easter tour of the Ashmolean',
        1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Thursday 4 April

        UNIVERSITY OFFICES closed (reopen 15 April).

        SHELDONIAN THEATRE closed (reopens 15 April).

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        Friday 5 April

        BODLEIAN LIBRARY closed (reopens 9 April).

        ASHMOLEAN LIBRARY closed (reopens 9 April).

        ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM closed (reopens 2 p.m. on Easter Monday, 8
        April).

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        Tuesday 9 April

        ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Glass through the ages', 1.15 p.m.
        (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Thursday 11 April

        ANNA LEWINGTON: `Plants for people' (Botanic Garden 375th
        anniversary lectures: `A retrospective look at the future'), Garden
        Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's, 8 p.m. (admission £6; tel. for
        tickets: (2)76920).

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        Friday 12 April

        ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Nineteenth-century paintings', 1.15
        p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Tuesday 16 April

        ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Lecturing skills---practice', 9.30 a.m.
        and 2 p.m. (see information above).

        ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Pre-Raphaelite painting', 1.15
        p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

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        Wednesday 17 April

        ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Lecturing skills---practice', 9.30 a.m.
        (see information above).

        W. HACKMANN: `Alchemy through art' (Friends of the Pitt Rivers
        Museum lecture), Lecture Room, Pitt Rivers Research Centre, 5 p.m.

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        Thursday 18 April

        ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Information overload---beat the bumph',
        9.15 a.m. (see information above).

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Friday 19 April

        ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Chinese paintings' (special
        exhibition), 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings:
        (2)78015.)

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Saturday 20 April

        TRINITY TERM begins.

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        Sunday 21 April

        TRINITY FULL TERM begins.

        Return to List of Contents of this section



        Monday 22 April

        PROFESSOR M.A. NUSSBAUM (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor):
        `Contemplative creativity I: Plato' (lecture series: `Ascents of
        love: desire and the good in the Western philosophical/literary
        tradition'), Schools, 5 p.m.

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        Tuesday 23 April

        ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Children in art', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
        £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

        PROFESSOR R.E. BROWN: `New Testament scholarship and Christianity
        today' (first of five Martin D'Arcy Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

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        Thursday 25 April

        ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Tutorial teaching', 9.30 a.m. (see
        information above).

        PROFESSOR M.A. NUSSBAUM (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor):
        `Contemplative creativity II: Spinoza, Proust' (lecture series:
        `Ascents of love: desire and the good in the Western
        philosophical/literary tradition'), Schools, 5 p.m.

        DR D. CAMERON: `Language and gender: feminist language reform and
        the history of English' (Times Lecture), St Cross
        Building, 5 p.m.

        Return to List of Contents of this section