21 January 1999 - No 4498



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 129, No. 4498: 21 January 1999<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

21 January 1999


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<br /><br /><br /><title><br /> Oxford University Gazette, 21 January 1999: University<br /> Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 18 January


Degree by Special Resolution

No notice to the contrary having been received under the
provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes,
1997, p. 15), the following resolution is deemed to have been
approved at noon on 18 January.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the
following:

ROBERT JOHN SERVICE, St Antony's College

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HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL 18 January


1 Decrees

Council has made the following decrees, to come into effect on
5
February.

List of the decrees:


Decree (1): Format of degree ceremonies

Explanatory note

Strong representations have been made recently to the Proctors
about the increasing tendency for degree ceremonies to last
longer than the seventy-five or ninety minutes which had been
typical. This creates practical difficulties for all concerned,
and seems to be largely the result of the growing number of
different degrees for which candidates are presented. Following
consultation with Deans of Degrees, the Proctors have suggested,
and Council has agreed, that two changes should be made to the
format of degree ceremonies in order to reduce their length
somewhat, while fully preserving their traditional character.

The first change is to combine the forms of supplication. At
present the Proctors are required to read out a separate
supplicat for each degree, irrespective of the
number of candidates to be admitted to that degree. In future the
Proctors will introduce each complete group of candidates by a
single supplicat, which will include all the degree
titles and individual names in that group.

The second change is to combine the currently separate forms
of supplication, presentation, charging, and admission of
candidates for the four- year undergraduate degrees of
M.Biochem., M.Chem., M.Earth Sc., M.Eng., M.Math., and M.Phys.
which have replaced the BA/MA in the subjects concerned. As these
are in effect variants of the same degree, and there are
relatively few candidates for each of them at any single
ceremony, this arrangement should result in a significant saving
of time without producing an inappropriate or unduly large
group.

The following decree makes formal provision for the new
arrangements.

Text of Decree (1)

1 Ch. II, Sect. I, § 2, cl. 2
(Statutes, 1997, p. 185), delete `divided into
groups of degrees,'.

2 Ibid., cl. 3, delete `each group of names
has' and substitute `the names have'.

3 Ibid., Second Schedule (p. 192), delete
items 1--24 and substitute:

`1. Degrees in person

`Supplicant venerabili Congregationi Doctorum et Magistrorum
regentium hi Studiosi (or hae Studiosae) qui compleverunt omnia
quae per statuta requiruntur (nisi quatenus cum eo dispensatum
fuerit); ut haec sufficiant, quo admittantur ad gradum
enumeratum.

Doctoris in Sacra Theologia

A. B. e collegio C. D. E. e collegio F. [etc.]

Baccalaurei in Iure Civili et Doctoris in eadem
facultate

A. B. e collegio C.

Doctoris in Iure Civili

A. B. e collegio C.

Doctoris in Medicina

A. B. e collegio C.

Doctoris in Litteris

A. B. e collegio C.

Doctoris in Scientia

A. B. e collegio C.

Doctoris in Musica

A. B. e collegio C.

Doctoris in Philosophia

A. B. e collegio C.

Magistri in Chirurgia

A. B. e collegio C.

Magistri in Scientia

A. B. e collegio C.

Magistri in Litteris

A. B. e collegio C.

Magistri in Philosophia

A. B. e collegio C.

Magistri in Studiis

A. B. e collegio C.

Magistri in Theologia

A. B. e collegio C.

Magistri in Educatione

A. B. e collegio C.

Magistri in Negotiis Administrandis

A. B. e collegio C.

Magistri in Artibus

A. B. e collegio C.

Magistri in Biochimia, vel Chimia, vel Scientiis
Terrenis, vel Ingeniaria, vel Mathematicis, vel Physica

A. B. e collegio C. D. E. e collegio F. [etc.]

Baccalaurei in Sacra Theologia

A. B. e collegio C.

Baccalaurei in Iure Civili

A. B. e collegio C.

Magistri Iuris

A. B. e collegio C.

Baccalaurei in Medicina

A. B. e collegio C.

Baccalaurei in Musica

A. B. e collegio C.

Baccalaurei in Philosophia

A. B. e collegio C.

Baccalaurei in Artibus

A. B. e collegio C.

Baccalaurei in Bellis Artibus

A. B. e collegio C.

Baccalaurei in Theologia

A. B. e collegio C.

Baccalaurei in Educatione

A. B. e collegio C.'

4 Ibid., renumber existing item 25 (p. 195)
as item 2.

5 Ibid., Third Schedule (p. 197), delete
item 21 and substitute:

`21. Master of Biochemistry, Chemistry, Earth Sciences,
Engineering, Mathematics, Physics

Insignissime, etc., praesento vobis hos meos scholares in
facultate Artium, ut admittantur ad gradum Magistri in Biochimia,
vel Chimia, vel Scientiis Terrenis, vel Ingeniaria, vel
Mathematicis, vel Physica prout in schedula a Registrario
publicata scriptum est.'

6 Ibid., Fourth Schedule (p. 199), delete
item 16 and substitute:

`16. Master of Biochemistry, Chemistry, Earth Sciences,
Engineering, Mathematics, Physics

Domini, ego admitto vos ad gradum Magistri in Biochimia,
vel Chimia, vel Scientiis Terrenis, vel Ingeniaria, vel
Mathematicis, vel Physica prout in schedula a Registrario
publicata scriptum est; insuper auctoritate mea et totius
Universitatis, do vobis potestatem legendi, et reliqua omnia
faciendi quae ad eundem gradum spectant.'

Key to Decree (1)

Cll. 1 and 2 remove the requirement for the Proctors to read out
a separate supplicat for each degree.

Cll. 3 and 4 provide for the new form of supplicat.

Cl. 5 provides for the new form of presentation.

Cl. 6 provides for the new form of admission.

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section



Decree (2): Electoral Board for the
Readership in the History of Medicine

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Modern
History Board (after consultation with the Clinical Medicine and
Physiological Sciences Boards, the Management Committee for the
Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, and the Committee for
the History of Science and Technology) and with the concurrence
of the General Board, amends the legislation governing the
composition of the electoral board for the Readership in the
History of Medicine to create a nine-member board. It also
provides for one member to be appointed after consultation with
the Wellcome Trust, given that the reader is ex officio
Director of the Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine.

Text of Decree (2)

1 In Ch. III, Sect. xliii, cl. 3
(Statutes, 1997, p. 312), insert new items (2) and
(3) as follows and renumber existing items (2)--(7) as items
(4)--(9):

`(2) the head of the college with which the readership shall
be for the time being associated, or, if the head is unable or
unwilling to act, a person appointed by the governing body of the
college;

(3) a person appointed by the governing body of the college
specified in (2) of this clause;'.

2 Ibid., item (4), as renumbered by cl. 1
above, after `Council' insert `after consultation with the
Wellcome Trust'.

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Decree (3): New provisions governing the
making of joint appointments with NHS Trusts

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Clinical
Medicine Board and with the concurrence of the General Board,
makes provision for the appointment, jointly with NHS Trusts, of
senior clinical (A + B) lecturers for fixed terms of five years,
and precludes the reappointment of a senior clinical lecturer for
a second fixed term without reapplication in competition with
others, and an appointment for more than two fixed terms in all.

Text of Decree (3)

1 In Ch. VII, Sect. V, § 9
(Statutes, 1997, p. 534), delete cl. 2 and
substitute:

`2. The holder of a joint appointment shall, on the university
side, be appointed for a period of five years. No person shall
be
reappointed unless this be on reapplication in competition with
others following advertisement of the post, and no person shall
be appointed for more than two periods in all. Each appointment
shall be made on the recommendation of a committee appointed by
the faculty board and consisting of not less than five persons,
including at least one medically qualified representative of the
appropriate NHS authority, and where appropriate a person from
one of the pre-clinical departments.'

2 This decree shall have immediate effect,
provided that any appointment made before the date of effect
shall continue to be governed by the legislation in force at the
time of that appointment.

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Decree (4): Withdrawal of Supplementary
Subject `Molecular Aspects of Biochemistry and Biophysics' from
the Honour School of Natural Science

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Biological Sciences Board and with the concurrence of the General
Board, withdraws the Supplementary Subject `Molecular Aspects of
Biochemistry and Biophysics' from the Honour School of Natural
Science. This change is made on the ground that demand for the
course has, over a period of years, remained low, even allowing
for the fact that it is a specialised option.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in `Examinations
and Boards' below.

Text of Decree (4)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998,
p. 406, ll. 7--8, delete `Molecular Aspects of Biochemistry and
Biophysics;'.

2 Ibid., ll. 40--1, delete `Supplementary
Subjects' and substitute `Supplementary Subject'.

3 Ibid., ll. 41--2, delete `, and Molecular
Aspects of Biochemistry and Biophysics'.

4 This decree shall be effective from 1
October 1999.

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Decree (5): Consent to amendments to
Statutes of St Hilda's College

The consent of the University is given to the amendments to
Statutes II and III of St Hilda's College approved by the
Governing Body on 17 June 1998 and 29 November 1995 respectively,
in so far as such consent is required by Section 7 (2) of the
Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923.

Note. The effects of the amendments are:

(1) to provide for the retirement of the Principal at the age
of 67 years;

(2) to give voting rights to Official and Beale Fellows in the
first year of their election.

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2 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been
added to the Register of Congregation:

Carasso, H.M., MA, St Anne's

Service, R.J., MA, St Antony's

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CONGREGATION 19 January


1 Declaration of approval of unopposed
Statute promulgated on 15 December

No notice of opposition having been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor
declared the Statute establishing a Norman Collisson
Professorship of Musculo-skeletal Science approved.

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2 Promulgation of Statutes

Forms of Statutes were promulgated. No notice of opposition
having been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor declared the preambles
carried of the proposed Statutes (1) removing an anomaly, (2)
establishing a Barnett Professorship of Social Policy, and (3)
establishing a Professorship of Sociology.


3 Declaration of approval of Special
Resolution approving the conferment of an Honorary Degree

That the conferment of the Degree of Master of Arts, honoris
causa
, upon ZAIN AZAHARI BIN ZAINAL ABIDIN be approved.

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BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect
on 5 February, see `Examinations and Boards' below.





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 21 January 1999: University<br /> Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 9 February 2 p.m.

¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that
written notice of any intention to vote against, or any
proposed amendment to, the enacting parts of the statutes
at item (1) below, or of any intention to vote against
the preamble of the statute at item (2) below, or the
special resolutions at item (3) below, signed in each
case by at least two members of Congregation, must be
given to the Registrar by noon on Monday, 1 February (see
the Guide to Procedures in Congregation cited in the note
at the end of `University Agenda').

1 Voting on Statutes promulgated
on 19 January

Statute (1): Removal of
an anomaly

Statute (2):
Establishment of Barnett Professorship
of Social Policy

Statute (3):
Establishment of Professorship of
Sociology


2 Promulgation of Statute

Statute: Committee for the History of Science and
Technology

Explanatory note

The Modern History Board, following consultation with the
Committee for the History of Science and Technology and
the Management Committee for the Wellcome Unit for the
History of Medicine and with the concurrence of the
General Board, wishes to extend the remit of the
Committee for the History of Science and Technology to
encompass the History of Medicine, and to bring within
its remit the oversight of teaching in this subject on
behalf of the faculty board. The following statute, and
the decree to be made by Council if the statute is
approved, provide for this.

WHEREAS it is expedient to extend the remit of the
Committee for the History of Science and Technology to
include the History of Medicine, the university enacts as
follows.

In Tit. VIII, Sect. VI, cl. 1 (Statutes,
1997, p. 64), after `Committee for the History of
Science' insert `, Medicine,'.

Decree to be made by Council if the Statute is
approved

1 In Ch. III, Sect. XLIV, title (Statutes,
1997, p. 313), after `Committee for the History of
Science' insert `, Medicine,'.

2 Ibid., cl. 1, after `Committee
for the History of Science' insert `, Medicine,'.

3 Ibid. (p. 314), after `in the
field of the History of Science' insert `, Medicine,'.

4 Ibid., cl. 2 (a), after
`History of Science' insert `, Medicine,'.

5 Ibid., insert new cl. 2
(b) as follows and reletter existing cll. 2
(b)--(i) as cll. 2 (c)--(j):

`(b) to have oversight of the Modern History
Board's teaching in the History of Medicine, and to
report on this to the Modern History Board;'.

6 Ibid., cl. 2 ( h), as
relettered by cl. 5 above, after `History of Science'
insert `, Medicine,'.

7 Ibid., § 3, cll. 1, 2, and
4, and § 4, cl. 2 (p. 315), in each case after
`Committee for the History of Science' insert `,
Medicine,'.

8 In Ch. IX, Sect. I, § 193,
cl. 1 (p. 665), after `Committee for the History of
Science' insert `, Medicine,'.

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3 Voting on Special Resolutions
approving the conferment of Honorary Degrees

(1) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of
Civil Law, honoris causa, upon JUSTICE AHARON
BARAK (LL M, LL D Hebrew University of Jerusalem),
President of the Supreme Court of Israel, be approved.

(2) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of
Letters, honoris causa, upon DAME MURIEL SPARK,
DBE, C.LIT., writer, be approved.

(3) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of
Letters, honoris causa, upon JEAN-PIERRE
VERNANT, Professeur Honoraire au Collège de
France, be approved.

(4) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of
Letters, honoris causa, upon SIR TONY WRIGLEY,
MA (MA, PH.D. Cambridge), Master of Corpus Christi
College, Cambridge, President of the British Academy,
Visitor of Harris Manchester College, be approved.

(5) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of
Science, honoris causa, upon SIR JOHN WALKER,
MA, D.PHIL., FRS, Honorary Fellow of St Catherine's
College, Fellow of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge,
Director of the Medical Research Council Dunn Human
Nutrition Unit, Cambridge, be approved.

(6) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of
Science, honoris causa, upon ANDREW JOHN WILES,
MA (MA, PH.D. Cambridge), FRS, Honorary Fellow of Merton
College and of Clare College, Cambridge, Eugene Higgins
Professor of Mathematics, Princeton University, be
approved.

(7) That the conferment of the Degree of Doctor of
Music, honoris causa, upon SIR SIMON RATTLE,
CBE, Honorary Fellow of St Anne's College, conductor, be
approved.

¶ If the Special Resolutions are approved, the
honorary degrees will be conferred at the Encaenia on 23
June 1999.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 21 January 1999: Notices<br />

Notices


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

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ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS AND
SOCIAL STUDIES FACULTY LIBRARIES


Closure of the libraries during
summer 1999

The Social Studies Libraries Committee wishes to advise
members of the University that a new Economics Library
will be opened on 31 August in the ground floor of a
building designed by Sir Norman Foster and Partners. It
will be located off Manor Road next to the St Cross
Building. Stock from the present Institute of Economics
and Statistics Library as well as the economics
collection from the Social Studies Faculty Library will
be transferred to the new building.

Painting and reclassification work in the Main Reading
room of the Social Studies Faculty library will
necessitate its closure during July and August. The
Periodicals Reading Room will continue to be opened and a
book retrieval service will be offered to library users.
Normal lending will be possible for all non-economics
material during July and August. The economics stock will
be available only for short-loan borrowing.

The Social Studies Faculty library will be completely
shut for four days, 25--30 August, reopening on 31
August.

The Economics and Statistics Library will operate as
usual until 16 August. The library will then be shut for
two weeks, reopening as the Economics Library in the new
building on 31 August.

The Social Studies Libraries Committee apologises for any
inconvenience which this closure may cause. Any member of
the University who has specific queries or suggestions is
invited to contact the librarian, Margaret Robb
(telephone: (2)78709 or (2)71071, e-mail:
margaret.robb@socstud.ox.ac.uk).

An exhibition showing details of the new library can be
viewed in the main reading room of the Economics and
Statistics Library, St Cross Building, Manor Road.

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WIDOWS OF FORMER MEMBERS OF THE
UNIVERSITY'S PENSION SCHEMES

From time to time the attention of the University is
drawn to individual cases of financial hardship among
widows of former members of the Federated Superannuation
System for Universities (FSSU) and the University of
Oxford Employees Pension Scheme (EPS). Limited resources
are available to alleviate proven cases of hardship and
any enquiry should be addressed to the Superannuation
Officer, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford
OX1 2JD. All cases are dealt with in the strictest
confidence.

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DISCOUNT ON PERSONAL INSURANCE
POLICIES AVAILABLE TO STAFF AND MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY

Sun Alliance Connections, the personal insurances
division of the main insurer of the University, provides
discounts for members, staff, their families, and
pensioners of the University of Oxford. The following
savings can be achieved:

Household (buildings and/or contents: 20 per cent;

Travel (including winter sports): 12.5 per cent;

Private medical expenses: 10 per cent;

Private car: 5 per cent.

The University acts solely as an introducer of business
to Sun Alliance Connections, receiving no commission or
other remuneration, with all savings passed on to the
subscribing member. For further information, a brochure
may be obtained from Graham Waite (telephone: (2)80307),
or Gill Tombs (telephone: (2)70110) at the University
Offices. To obtain a quotation or receive specific
information on the covers available, telephone Sun
Alliance Connections' regional office on 0800 300 822,
quoting the appropriate reference: SCH266 for car
insurance; otherwise 34V0067.

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UNIVERSITY CLUB


Wine-tastings

Wine-tastings will be held at 5.45 p.m. on the following
Wednesdays in the University Club (6 South Parks Road).
All members and their guests are welcome, the fee being
£2 per person.

17 Jan.: Wines from the Rhône
valley.

17 Mar.: Wines from South Africa and South
America.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 21 January 1999: Lectures<br />

Lectures


Contents of this section:

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issue



INAUGURAL LECTURES


Peter Moores Professor of
Management Studies

PROFESSOR COLIN MAYER will deliver his inaugural lecture
at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 18 February, in the Examination
Schools. The Vice-Chancellor will be present, and the
lecture will be followed by a reception at the Schools
(telephone for further information: (2)88654).

Subject: `Firm control.'



Cameron Mackintosh Visiting
Professor of Contemporary Theatre

PROFESSOR DIANA RIGG will deliver her inaugural lecture
at 5 p.m. on Friday, 29 January, in the Bernard Sunley
Lecture Theatre, St Catherine's College.

Subject: `Theatre.'

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DRUE HEINZ PROFESSOR OF AMERICAN
LITERATURE


Postponement of inaugural
lecture

The inaugural lecture which was to have been given by
PROFESSOR R.L. BUSH on Tuesday, 23 February, has been
cancelled. A new date will be announced later.

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section



CARLYLE LECTURES

Political thinking in the early Middle Ages

JANET L. NELSON, King's College, London, will deliver the
Carlyle Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following Thursdays in
the Examination Schools.

21 Jan.: `Trends.'

28 Jan.: `Peers.'

4 Feb.: `Patriarchs.'

11 Feb.: `Councils.'

18 Feb.: `Rites.'

25 Feb.: `End-times.'

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HERBERT SPENCER LECTURES
1998–9

Democracy in practice and in theory (amended notice)

The Herbert Spencer Lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on
Tuesdays in the Examination Schools. The lectures will be
open to the public.

This notice replaces that published in the
Gazette of 14 January.

Details of the final lecture in the series (2 March) will
be announced later.

DR A. RYAN

26 Jan.: `No more than two cheers for
democracy?'

DR L. SIEDENTOP

2 Feb.: `Democracy in Europe.'

PROFESSOR L. MENAND, City University, New York

9 Feb.: to be announced.

PROFESSOR G. KATEB, Princeton

16 Feb.: `Wildness and conscience:
Thoreau and Emerson.'

PROFESSOR R. SCRUTON, Birkbeck College, London

23 Feb.: `Democratic destruction.'

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J.W. JENKINSON MEMORIAL LECTURE

DR D. SOLTER, Max-Planck Institute of Immunobiology,
Freiburg, will deliver a Jenkinson Lecture at 5 p.m. on
Monday, 15 February, in Lecture Theatre A, the
Zoology/Psychology Building. Tickets are not required for
admission.

Subject: `Maternal messages—how to read
them, and what do they tell?'

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section



ANTHROPOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY


Institute of Social and
Cultural Anthropology

Ethnicity and identity seminar: artisans, crafts, and
local identities

The following seminars will be given at 11 a.m. on
Fridays in the institute.

Conveners: S. Ardener, I. Fowler, J.
Webber.

DR N. ARGENTI, East Anglia

22 Jan.: `Apprenticeship, hierarchy, and
dissent in Oku: negotiating identity among wood-
carvers of the Cameroon.'

MS V. JOSHI

29 Jan.: `The warp and weft of
nationalism: the revival of ethnic identity among the
Nagas of north-east India.'

DR C. HARRIS

5 Feb.: `Representing Tibetan identity:
"minority" artists and the People's
Republic of China.'

DR R. BARNES

12 Feb.: `Weaving identity: new textiles
in Kedang, Eastern Indonesia.'

DR L. SCIAMA

19 Feb.: `Environment, tradition, and
identity in Venetian crafts.'

DR D. MACLEOD

26 Feb.: ` "The sea is
everything": fishermen of the Canary Islands in
their sociocultural context.'

DR I. FOWLER, Oxford Brookes

5 Mar.: `Iron-working and identity in
the Cameroon grassfields.'

DR N. BARLEY, British Museum

12 Mar.: `Identity and embodiment among
African potters.'

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CLINICAL MEDICINE

University Department of Cellular Science:
haematology seminars

The following seminars will be held at 12 noon on
Tuesdays in the Haematology Seminar Room, the John
Radcliffe Hospital.

DR C. HATTON

26 Jan.: `Apoptosis.'

PROFESSOR D.Y. MASON

2 Feb.: `Human lymphoma: advances and
future challenges.'

DR H. EAGLETON

9 Feb.: case presentation.

DR J. BOULTWOOD

16 Feb.: `Molecular basis of the 5q-
syndrome.'

DR A. RAHEMTULLA

23 Feb.: `The role of CD4 and CD40L in
immune development.'

DR R. FUGE

2 Mar.: case presentation.

DR K. ROBSON

9 Mar.
: `Haemochromatosis: a common genetic
disease.'

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MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

Department of Statistics: Probability, Statistics,
and Operations Research Seminars

The following seminars will be given at 2.15 p.m. on
Thursdays in the Department of Statistics.

Convener: P. Clifford, MA, Reader in
Mathematical Statistics, and A.M. Etheridge, MA, D.Phil.,
University Lecturer (CUF) in Mathematics.

DR C. DONNELLY

28 Jan.: `Mad statistics: BSE and
vCJD.'

PROFESSOR D. SIEGMUND, Stanford

4 Feb.: `Tail probabilities via a change
of measure.'

DR R. STEVENS, Diabetes Research Laboratory, Oxford

11 Feb.: `Predicting life expectancy in
cohorts of diabetes patients.'

PROFESSOR C. MCDIARMID

18 Feb.: `Concentration.'

DR M. LUNN

25 Feb.: `Competing risks, including
applications to data from clinical trials.'

PROFESSOR E. RENSHAW, Strathclyde

4 Mar.: `Can MCMC be usefully applied to
stochastic processes with hidden birth times?'

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MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

Italian Graduate Seminars

The following seminars will take place at 5 p.m. on
Tuesdays in Room S.7, 47
Wellington Square.

Convener: M.L. McLaughlin, MA, D.Phil.,
University Lecturer in Italian.

F. PEDRIALI, Edinburgh

26 Feb.: ` "Gli occhi del
Lazio": symmetries of closure in Gadda's
Ouer pasticciaccio brutto de via
Merulana
.'

G. WALKER

9 Feb.: `The relationship between the
Laurentian Orlando and Pulci's
Morgante.'

M. ZACCARELLO, University College, Dublin

23 Feb.: `Morfologia e patologia della
transmissione nei sonetti del Burchiello.'

G. PIERI, Cardiff

9 Mar.: `Andrea Camilleri: an
introduction.'

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MODERN HISTORY

Seminar in medieval history

The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on Mondays
in the Wharton Room, All Souls College.

Conveners: R.R. Davies, MA, D.Phil., Chichele
Professor of Medieval History, and J.R.L. Maddicott, MA,
D.Phil., University Lecturer (CUF) in Modern History.

M. ORMROD, York

18 Jan.: `The English state and the
Plantagenet empire, 1259–1360: a fiscal
perspective.'

G. VIRÁGOS

25 Jan.: `Living standards of the
Hungarian nobility: thirteenth- to fifteenth-century
residences and their social context.'

B. KEMP, Reading

1 Feb.: `Twelfth-century English
archdeacons: their reputations revisited.'

L. SAGE

8 Feb.: to be announced.

R. MCKITTERICK, Cambridge

15 Feb.: `Social memory, commemoration,
and the book in the early Middle Ages.'

P. SINCLAIR

22 Feb.: `The northern gentry under
Henry II.'

M. CLANCHY, London

1 Mar.: `Abelard and the Schools.'

P. HORDEN, Royal Holloway College, London

8 Mar.: `Family and charity in the
earlier Middle Ages.'

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section


Commonwealth History Graduate Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays
in the Modern History Faculty.

PRS presentations will be given on 5 March and 12
March.

DR B. STANLEY, Cambridge

22 Jan.: `Church, state, and the
"Hierarchy of Civilisation": the making of
the "Missions and Governments" Report at
the World Missionary conference, Edinburgh 1910.'

DR E. NESBITT, Warwick

29 Jan.: ` "I'm Asian, I'm
British": researching young British Sikhs' and
Hindus' identity.'

DR S. ANSARI, Royal Holloway College, London

5 Feb.: `Spiritual leaders versus wily
politicians: changes and continuities in the role of
pirs in twentieth-century Sind.'

S. MANDELBROTE, Cambridge

12 Feb.: `Reluctant imperialists? The
SPG and Barbados, 1710–1834.'

PROFESSOR A. PORTER, King's College, London

19 Feb.: `Evangelicalism, Islam, and
millennial expectation in the nineteenth century.'

DR P. CAREY

26 Feb.: `Islam's encounter with the
West: the case of the Netherlands Indies/Indonesia,
1755–1942.'

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section



MUSIC

V. VAVOULIS will give the following lecture-demonstration
at 1.15 p.m. on Tuesday, 2 February, in the Bate
Collection of Musical Instruments, the Music Faculty.
Tickets, costing £1.50 by reservation, may be
obtained from the Faculty Secretary (telephone:
(2)76133).

Subject: `Two early English harpsichords in
the Bate Collection.'

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section



ORIENTAL STUDIES

Medieval Studies Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays
in Lecture Room 1, the Oriental Institute.

Conveners: J.S. Meisami, MA, University
Lecturer in Persian, W.L. Treadwell, MA, Samir Shamma
Lecturer in Islamic Numismatics, and C.F. Robinson, MA,
University Lecturer in Early Islamic History.

DR S. SVIRI

26 Jan.: ` "And the myrtle trees
are but the righteous" (B. Talmud): comparative
notes to the study of walaya in early
Islam.'

DR S. HAMDANI, George Mason University

2 Feb.: `The dialectic of power: Sunni-
Shi`i debates in tenth-century North Africa.'

PROFESSOR R. ZIPOLI, Venice

9 Feb.: `Obscenity in neo-Persian verse:
editions, translations, and critical works.'

DR C. VAN RUYMBEKE, Brussels

16 Feb.: `A botanical investigation of
the miniatures in Shah Tahmasp's
Khamsa.' (Lecture with
slides
)

DR WENCHIN OUYANG, SOAS

23 Feb.: `The dialectic of past and
present in Naguib Mahfrouz's The Journey of Ibn
Fattouma
.'

DR A. LALANI, London

2 Mar.: `Al-Baqir's role in the
development of Shi`i thought.'

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section



PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Oxford Physics Colloquia

The following lectures will be given at 4.15 p.m. on
Fridays in the Lindemann Lecture Theatre, the Clarendon
Laboratory.

Conveners: R.J. Nicholas, MA, D.Phil.,
Professor of Physics, and G.G. Ross, MA, Professor of
Theoretical Physics.

PROFESSOR A.M. HILLAS, Leeds

29 Jan.: `First fruits of a new branch
of astronomy: TeV gamma rays.'

DR E. YOUNG

5 Feb.: `Oxygen, isotopes, and the
formation of the solar system.'

DR R. DENDY, Culham Science Centre

19 Feb.: `Sandpiles, silos, fusion, and
astrophysics.'

PROFESSOR NICHOLAS

26 Feb.: `The fractional quantum Hall
Effect—new particles, fractional charges, and
excitement in a quantum field.'

PROFESSOR E. KAPON, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology

5 Mar.: `Quantum wires and quantum dots:
shaping electrons in artificial nanostructures.'

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section


Theoretical Chemistry Group Seminars

The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on Mondays
in the Seminar Room, the New Chemistry Laboratory.

Convener: M.S. Child, MA, Coulson Professor
of Theoretical Chemistry.

DR A. LOUIS, Cambridge

25 Jan.: ` "Giving entropy a
hand": the critical role of non-additivity in
binary colloidal mixtures.'

PROFESSOR J. TENNYSON, University College, London

1 Feb.: `Spectroscopy of water on the
sun and elsewhere.'

DR D. COOPER, Liverpool

8 Feb.: `Modern valence bond theory.'

PROFESSOR P.V. COVENEY, Queen Mary and Westfield College,
London

22 Feb.: `Multiscale modelling and
simulation.'

PROFESSOR CHILD

1 Mar.: `Adiabatic and non-adiabatic
cyclic geometric phase.'

PROFESSOR J.-P. HANSEN, Cambridge

8 Mar.: `Effective interactions between
colloidal particles in suspension: the subtle games
of entropy.'

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section


Department of Materials: colloquia

The following colloquia will be held at 2.15 p.m. on
Thursdays. The meeting on 4 February will take place in
Lecture Room 2, the Thom Building, the Department of
Engineering Science; other meetings will take place in
the Lecture Theatre, the Hume-Rothery Building.

Conveners: P.R. Wilshaw, MA, D.Phil.,
University Lecturer in Electrical and Magnetic Properties
of Materials, and G.A.D. Briggs, MA, Reader in
Materials.

PROFESSOR M.W. HOSSEINI, Strasbourg

21 Jan.: `Molecular tectonics: an
approach to molecular networks.'

DR J. HIGGINS, Imperial College

28 Jan.: `Polymer blends—mixing,
demixing, and compatibilisation.'
(Interdepartmental Polymer Seminar)

PROFESSOR G. KRAUSS, Colorado School of Mines

4 Feb.: `Steel: the next hundred years.'
(Interdepartmental Condensed Matter
Seminar
)

PROFESSOR T. PAGE, Newcastle

11 Feb.: `The uses and abuses of nano-
indentation.'

PROFESSOR K. O'GRADY, Bangor

18 Feb.: `The determination of
activation volumes in thin film recording media.'

PROFESSOR T.S. JONES, Imperial College

25 Feb.: `Strain relaxation and quantum
dots in InAs/GaAs heteroepitaxy.'
(Interdepartmental Condensed Matter
Seminar
)

DR A.J. WILKINSON

4 Mar.: `Fatigue of textured
polycrystals.'

DR S. NEWMAN, British Steel, Swindon Technology Centre

11 Mar.: `On-line structure monitoring
by laser ultrasonics in rolling and heat treatment of
steel.'

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section


Condensed Matter Physics

The following seminars will be held at 4.15 p.m. on
Thursdays in the Simon Room, the Clarendon Laboratory.

For seminars to be given by Professor G. Krauss, on 4
February, and Professor T.S. Jones, on 25 February
(Interdepartmental Condensed Matter Seminars), see under
`Department of Materials' above.

DR O. PETRENKO, Warwick

21 Jan.: `Magnetic frustration and order
in gadolinium gallium garnet.'

PROFESSOR M.J. COOPER, Warwick

28 Jan.: `Studying magnetism with X-
rays—the synchrotron revolution?'

DR J. HICKEN, University of Exeter

18 Feb.: `Picosecond optical pump-probe
spectroscopy of spin dynamics in ferromagnetic thin
films.'

DR M. BLENCOWE, Imperial College, London

4 Mar.: `Quantum aspects of mesoscopic
mechanical systems.'

DR S.J. BLUNDELL

11 Mar.: `Whirling in a vortex:
implanting muons in organic superconductors.'

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section


Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Planetary Physics seminars

The following seminars will be given at 4.15 p.m. on
Thursdays in the Dobson Lecture Room, the Atmospheric
Physics Laboratory. Because on rare occasions the
arrangements need to be changed, anyone intending to come
to Oxford specially to attend should check first by
telephoning Oxford (2)72933.

DR N.F. ARNOLD, Leicester

21 Jan.: `Solar-terrestrial influences
on weather and climate.'

DR H.K. ROSCOE, British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge

28 Jan.: `Dynamics and precipitation
over the Antarctic plateau: why is it a desert?'

MS K. KOUTOULAKI, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

4 Feb.: `Non-thermal emission by ozone
in the middle atmosphere.'

DR T. STOCKDALE, European Centre for Medium Range
Forecasting, Reading

11 Feb.: `Seasonal forecasting at the
ECMWF.'

MS E.F. SHUCKBURGH, Cambridge

18 Feb.: `A global view of atmospheric
transport and mixing.'

DR M. LÓPEZ-PUERTAS, Instituto de
Astrofísica de Andalucía

25 Feb.: `Non-LTE in the atmosphere:
what we learned from UARS and future prospects for
Envisat/MIPAS.'

C.A. NIXON

4 Mar.: `Remote sounding of the
atmosphere of Titan.'

PROFESSOR W.J. JENKINS, Southampton Oceanography Centre,
Southampton University

11 Mar.: `Studying ocean ventilation and
circulation with transient tracers.'

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section


Astrophysics colloquia

The following colloquia will be held at 4.15 p.m. on
Tuesdays in the Nuclear and Astrophysics Lecture Theatre.

Conveners: H. Tadros and A.E. Lynas-Gray.

DR J. KNAPPEN, Hertfordshire

26 Jan.: `Barred galaxies.'

DR R.A. LAING, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

2 Feb.: `Low-luminosity radio jets as
decelerating relativistic flows.'

DR C.M. BAUGH, Durham

9 Feb.: `The epoch of galaxy
formation.'

DR S. CHATY, Centre d'Étude Spatiale des
Rayonnements

16 Feb.: `Multi-wavelength study of the
microquasar GRS 1915+105 and of high energy binary
sources in the galaxy.'

PROFESSOR R.D. BLANDFORD, California Institute of
Technology

23 Feb.: `Fast and slow accretion on to
black holes.'

DR A. OMONT, Institut d'Astrophysique, Paris

2 Mar.: `Highly redshifted molecular
observations.'

DR M. RUFFERT, Edinburgh

9 Mar.: `Merging neutron stars and gamma
ray bursts.'

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section


Physical Earth Science Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on
Fridays in the coffee room, the Department of Earth
Sciences.

Convener: N. Mitchell.

N. SKIPPER, UCL

22 Jan.: `Neutron scattering under
sedimentary basin conditions.'

A. ROBERTS, Southampton

29 Jan.: `How does Earth's magnetic
field behave during a polarity reversal?'

E. FIELDING

5 Feb.: `Distinguishing tectonic from
non-tectonic surface deformation with SAR
interferometry.'

G. PEARSON, Durham

12 Feb.: `Chemical signatures from the
K-T boundary: do we know what hit us?'

A. POLIAKOV, Montpellier

19 Feb.: `Magmatism and faulting in slow
spreading ridges.'

J. HANSEN

26 Feb.
: `Stochastic dynamic prediction:
ensemble construction and assessment.'

G. FOULGER, Durham

5 Mar.: `Non-double couple
earthquakes.'

S. KOHN, Bristol

12 Mar.: `Water storage in the mantle;
experimental studies of minerals, melts, and fluids.'

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section



PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Jenkinson Seminars

The following seminars will be given at 2 p.m. on
Tuesdays in the Lecture Theatre, the Department of Human
Anatomy and Genetics.

DR H. SKAER, Sheffield

26 Jan.: `Seeing and breathing: parallel
developmental events in flies and vertebrates.'

PROFESSOR P. HOLLAND, Reading

2 Feb.: `The origin and evolution of Hox
gene clusters.'

DR M. COHN, Reading

9 Feb.: `Limb evolution and
development.'

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section


Pharmacology and anatomical neuropharmacology
seminars

The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on
Tuesdays in the Lecture Theatre, the Department of
Pharmacology.

DR S. RAKOVIC

26 Jan.: `Actions of cADP-ribose in the
heart.'

PROFESSOR M. DUNNE, Sheffield

2 Feb.: `Controlling insulin disease:
new insights, through a rare disease.'

PROFESSOR R. FLOWER, St Bartholomew's Hospital, London

9 Feb.: `Lipocortin 1: a second
messenger of glucocorticoid action.'

PROFESSOR S.G. HAWORTH, University College, London

16 Feb.: `Pulmonary vascular remodelling
in the developing lung.'

PROFESSOR S. NAHORSKI, Leicester

23 Feb.: `Regulation of metabotropic
receptor mediated Ca+ signalling in model
cells.'

DR KENICHI KATO

2 Mar.: `Effects of endothelin-1 in the
vasculature.' (Provisional title)

DR R. ROBERTSON, Imperial College, London

9 Mar.: `Voltage-gated K channels: from
subtypes to synapses.'

PROFESSOR A. GURNEY, Strathclyde

16 Mar.: `Potassium channels in the
pulmonary circulation: modulation by hypoxia.'

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section



PSYCHOLOGICAL STUDIES

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on the
days shown in the Weiskrantz Room (C.113), the Department
of Experimental Psychology. They will take place on
Tuesdays, with the exception of the seminar to be held on
Wednesday, 17 March.

Conveners: S.D. Iversen, MA, Professor of
Psychology, and P.E. Bryant, MA, Watts Professor of
Psychology.

DR J. LOCKE, Sheffield

2 Feb.: `Sex and status in the
volubility of primates: clues to the origin of vocal
languages.'

PROFESSOR E. ROLLS

9 Feb.: `What are emotions? Why do we
have them? What are their brain mechanisms?'
(McDonnell–Pew Seminar in Cognitive
Neuroscience
)

PROFESSOR T. CROW

16 Feb.: `How schizophrenia tells us
about the origin and nature of language.'

DR A. HARVEY

23 Feb.: `Acute stress disorder:
critique of a new diagnosis and preliminary
findings.'

DR T. MOFFITT, Institute of Psychiatry, London

2 Mar.: `Findings about violence from
the Dunedin study.'

DR J. OAKHILL, Sussex

9 Mar.: `Children's difficulties in text
comprehension: causal issues?'

PROFESSOR M. TOMASELLO, Max Planck Institute, Germany

17 Mar.: `Cultural learning in children
and chimpanzees.' (McDonnell–Pew
Seminar
)

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section



SOCIAL STUDIES

P.J. MARTIN will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 26
January, in the Chester Room, Nuffield College.

Convener: B.E. Shafer, MA, Mellon Professor
of American Government.

Subject: `Strategy and outcome in the
judicial decision-making: three cases from the Burger
Court.'

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section


Bilateral relations in west Europe

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays
in the European Studies Centre, St Antony's College.

Convener: A.F. Deighton, MA, University
Lecturer in European Politics.

DR K. LARRES, Queen's, Belfast

2 Feb.: `British–East German
relations in the 1950s.'

DR MIKAEL AF MALMBORG

9 Feb.: `Scandinavia and the European
Great Powers.'

MS T. DELPECH, Director, Strategic Affairs, National
Atomic Agency, Paris

16 Feb.: `Britain, France, and
Europe.'

PROFESSOR G.-H. SOUTOU, Paris IV

23 Feb.: `Franco-German relations from
Pompidou to Mitterand.'

DR A. GLEES, Brunel

2 Mar.: `Britain and Germany: the Cold
War and beyond.'

DR A. MISSIROLI, Western European Union Institute of
Security Studies, Paris

9 Mar.: `Italy between France and
Germany: an unequal triangle.'

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section



THEOLOGY

MARGARET WERTHEIM, author of the best-selling book
Pythagoras' Trousers, will lecture at 5 p.m.
on Tuesday, 16 February, in the Theology Faculty
Centre.

Subject: `Space, spirit, and Pythagoras'
trousers.'

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section



INTER-FACULTY SEMINAR

Restoration to Reform, 1660–1832: British
political, literary, intellectual, and social history

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays
in the Upper Common Room, St Anne's College.

Conveners: Dr R. Ballaster, Professor M.
Butler, Dr F. Dabhoiwala, Dr C. Gerrard, Dr T. Keymer,
Professor R. Lonsdale, Dr J. Raven, and Dr I. Rivers.

DR J. MULLAN, University College, London

25 Jan.: `Writing the history of
eighteenth-century literature.'

DR N. GROOM, University of Exeter

8 Feb.: `Forgery and authenticity: the
romantic posterity of Thomas Chatterton.'

N. GLAISYER, Cambridge

22 Feb.: ` "All useful things fit
for the Understanding of a plain Man": John
Houghton's periodical project, 1692–1703.'

PROFESSOR I. GRUNDY, Alberta

8 Mar.: ` "Destined for something
higher"? Potential and achievement in Lady Mary
Wortley Montagu.'

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section



INSTITUTE OF ARCHAEOLOGY

Medieval archaeology seminar

The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on
Wednesdays in the Lecture Room, the Institute of
Archaeology.

Convener: H.F. Hamerow, MA, D.Phil.,
University Lecturer in European Archaeology (Early
Medieval).

H. GITTOS

27 Jan.: `Liturgy and archaeology.'

K. ULMSCHNEIDER

3 Feb.: `Minsters, markets, and metal-
detectors: settlement and economy in Middle Saxon
Lincolnshire.'

G. KEEVIL

10 Feb.: `Research strategies for the
medieval abbey at Eynsham.'

S. SEMPLE

24 Feb.: `Boundaries and Anglo-Saxon
churches.'

B. KJOLBE-BIDDLE

10 Mar.: `The Old Minster, Winchester.'

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section



COMPUTING LABORATORY


Numerical Analysis Group

Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminars

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will
take place at 3 p.m. on Thursdays in the OUCL Lecture
Theatre.

The co-ordinators are J.D.P. Donnelly and J. Scott (RAL).
Further information is available from Shirley Day
(telephone: Oxford (2)73885).

PROFESSOR C.J. BUDD, Bath

21 Jan.: `Between a rock and a compact
space.'

PROFESSOR V. DOUGALIS, Athens

28 Jan.: `The numerical solution of
Boussinesq equations.'

DR A. TREFETHEN, NAG Ltd.

4 Feb., 2 p.m., RAL: to be announced.

PROFESSOR I. SLOAN, New South Wales

11 Feb.: `Solving parabolic problems
without time-stepping.'

PROFESSOR M. GILES

18 Feb.: `Adjoint recovery of
superconvergent integral functionals from PDE
approximations.'

DR YIFAN HU, Daresbury Laboratory

Tue. 23 Feb., 2 p.m., RAL: `Problems and
algorithms for dynamic load balancing and unsymmetric
matrix ordering in parallel computation.'

DR R. FREUND, Bell Laboratories

4 Mar.: `Krylov-subspace techniques for
interconnect-dominated circuit simulation.'

PROFESSOR D. SORENSEN, Rice University

11 Mar.: `New approaches to large-scale
eigenanalysis.'

PROFESSOR D. ESTEP, Georgia Institute of Technology,
Atlanta

18 Mar.: `Estimating the error of
numerical solutions of reaction-diffusion equations.'

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section



QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE


Refugee Studies Programme

Seminars on forced migration

The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on
Wednesdays in the Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen
Elizabeth House.

Further information is available from Dominique Attala,
Refugee Studies Programme, Queen Elizabeth House, 21 St
Giles', Oxford OX1 3LA (telephone: Oxford (2)70722, fax:
(2)70721, e-mail: rspedu@qeh.ox.ac.uk, Internet:
http://www.qeh.ox.ac.uk/rsp/).

MS L. SACHS, UNHCR, London

27 Jan.: `Media and public images of
refugees.'

DR A. BLOCH, East London

3 Feb.
: `The role of citizenship rights in the
social and economic integration of refugees in
Britain.'

DR T. GALVIN, Trinity College, Dublin

10 Feb.: `Refugees and asylum
seekers—Ireland's dilemma or Ireland's
opportunity?'

DR F. YASAMEE, Manchester

17 Feb.: `The displacement of
populations for security reasons during the Ottoman
period.'

MS E. WILLIAMS, Reading

24 Feb.: `Forced migration and nomads: a
changing image of a shifting culture.'

DR D. HADLEY, Sheffield

3 Mar.: `Migration and forced migration
in early medieval Europe.'

PROFESSOR C. KEELY, Georgetown: `Rethinking the refugee
regime(s): the end of the Cold War makes a difference.'

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section


Short courses

The following courses will be given at the times shown in
Queen Elizabeth House. For further information, see
details above.

PROFESSOR K. ELMADMAD, Casablanca

27–8 Mar.: `Islam, human rights,
and refugees.'

PROFESSOR J.C. HATHAWAY, Michigan

15–16 May: `The law of refugee
status.'

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section



SAID BUSINESS SCHOOL


P.D. Leake Lectures in
Accounting 1999

PROFESSOR N. BRUNSSON, City of Stockholm Professor of
Public Management, Stockholm School of Economics, will
lecture on the organisational functions of accounting on
Wednesday, 17 March (9 a.m. and 2 p.m.), and Thursday, 18
March (9 a.m.), in Lecture Theatre 1, St Anne's College.
Further information may be obtained from Deborah Lisburne
at the Said Business School (telephone: 228521, e-mail:
Deborah.Lisburne@sbs.ox.ac.uk).

Subject: `Accounting, rationality, and
organisational reform.'

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section



CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES

Environmental Law Seminar Series

J. WERKSMAN, SOAS, London, will give the first in this
series of seminars at 5 p.m. on Monday, 25 January, in
the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies.

The full programme of seminars will be published later.

Subject: `Principles and practice of
international environmental policy: global negotiations
on climate change.'

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section



CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE


Corpus Christi Classical
Seminar: Constructing Time

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on
Wednesdays in the Seminar Room, Corpus Christi
College.

CHRISTOPHER BURNAND

27 Jan.: `Playing with time: Cicero on
Roman oratory.'

RICHARD FOWLER

3 Feb.: `Calibrating the
Hellenistic.'

LIN FOXHALL

10 Feb.: `The running sands of time:
archaeology and short-term time.'

GILLIAN CLARK

17 Feb.: `We live in Christian
times.'

ADRIAN GRATWICK

24 Feb.: `Pliny, the obelisk, and Novius
Facundus.'

KATHERINE CLARKE

3 Mar.: `Space, time, and place:
Strabo's eternal triangle.'

TESSA RAJAK

10 Mar.: `Reckoning the end of days in
post-Bibical Judaism.'

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section



F.W. Bateson Memorial Lecture
1999

PROFESSOR CLAUDE RAWSON, Department of English, Yale
University, will deliver the F.W. Bateson Memorial
Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 10 February, in the
Examination Schools.

Subject: `Killing the poor: an Anglo-Irish
theme.'

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section



Lowe Lectures in Palaeography

Manuscripts and method: the transmission of Vegetius

PROFESSOR MICHAEL REEVE, Kennedy Professor of Latin,
Cambridge, will deliver the Lowe Lectures in Palaeography
at 5 p.m. on the following Mondays in the Examination
Schools.

25 Jan.: `A proposal about Modestus.'

1 Feb.: `A man on a horse.'

8 Feb.: `R.'

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section



ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

Special lecture

DR J. HAMILTON, Alistair Horne Visiting Fellow, will
lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 11 March, in the New
Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

Subject: `Art, science, and
song—researching across boundaries in mid-
nineteenth-century British culture.'

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section


African Studies Seminar: identity and ethnicity in
Southern Africa

Unless otherwise indicated, the following seminars will
be given at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Fellows' Dining
Room, St Antony's College.

A day workshop on Nigeria will be held on Tuesday, 26
January (further details are available from Truus
Dearing, St Antony's College).

A discussion on identity and ethnicity will be held at 1
p.m. on Thursday, 11 March.

S. MARKS, SOAS

21 Jan.: `Time was when the white man
was Master and all white man's values
prevailed—Jan Smuts, white race identity, and
the racial order in South Africa.'

A. MLAMBO, Zimbabwe

Wed. 27 Jan., 5.30 p.m.: `African
scholarship at the Zimbabwe International Book Fair:
North–South links in African studies.'
(Commentators: S. Mhlaba, T. Ranger, M.
Ling)

S. DUBOW, Sussex

28 Jan.: `Colonial identity and
indigenous knowledge in the nineteenth-century
Cape.'

T. RANGER

4 Feb.: `Pre-colonial African
identities.'

M. VAUGHAN

11 Feb.: `Slavery and colonial identity
in Mauritius.'

S. PARNELL, Cape Town

18 Feb.: `Categories of difference:
poverty, race, and urban change in South Africa.'

S. JEPPIE, Cape Town

25 Feb.: `Place and identity: the
constitution of Islamic identity in the modern
Western Cape.'

(1) E. AKYEAMPONG and (2) P. LA HAUSSE, Cambridge

4 Mar., 1 p.m.:

(1) `An eco-social
history of south-eastern Ghana.'

(2) `The making of Zulu identity.'

D. JAMES, LSE

11 Mar.: `Reclaiming a lost land in the
new South Africa: discourses of Christianity, custom,
and development.'

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section


Latin American Centre

Social and economic history of Latin America

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on
Mondays in the Centre.

F. ROCCHI, University Di Tella and LSE

25 Jan.: `The birth of a consumer
society in Argentina (1860–1930).'

R. THORP

1 Feb.: `The state and the private
sector in historical perspective.'

R. MILLER, Liverpool

8 Feb.: `Imperialism, dependency, and
business history in Latin America.'

(1) E. DORE, Portsmouth, (2) T. KRISTIANSEN, and (3)
K. BOYLAN

15 Feb.:

(1) `One step forward, two
steps back: gender and state in Latin America's long
nineteenth century.'

(2) `Looking for allies:
battered wives and the state in
nineteent-century Cajamarca,
Peru.'

(3) Comment.

C. LEWIS, LSE

22 Feb.: `State and economic policy in Latin
America since 1930: assessing efficacy and
outcome.'

D. NUGENT, Colby College

1 Mar.: `Before history and prior to
politics: region, tradition, and modernity in the
northern Peruvian Andes.'

N. MANRIQUE

8 Mar.: `Ethnicity and nationalism in
nineteenth-century Peru.' (To be
confirmed
)

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section


Institutional change and decentralisation in Latin
America

The following seminars will be given at 5 p.m. on
Tuesdays in the Latin American Centre.

A. ANGELL

26 Jan.: `Why is the process of decentralisation
in Chile so limited?'

P. LOWDEN

2 Feb.: `Decentralisation in Colombia:
crisis at the centre, solutions at the local
level?'

R. THORP

9 Feb.: `Decentralisation and the
stimulus for economic growth.'

G. GRAY-MOLINA

16 Feb.: `Decentralisation in Bolivia:
revisiting the social capital debate.'

A. STEPAN (to be confirmed)

23 Feb.: `On the politics of
decentralisation in Brazil.'

A. NICKSON, Birmingham

2 Mar.: `Rethinking educational
decentralisation in Latin America.'

R. VELÁSQUEZ

9 Mar.: `Strengthening local government
in Bogotá, 1991–7.'

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section



ST HILDA'S COLLEGE


Women in Whitehall

The following lectures will be given at 5.30 p.m. on the
days shown in the Jacqueline du Pré Building, St
Hilda's College. With the exception of the lecture to be
given on Friday, 5 March, they will take place on
Wednesdays.

MS M. NEVILLE-ROLFE, Regional Director, Government Office
for the North-West

27 Jan.: `Labour's regional policies:
sea change or just moving the deck chairs?'

DAME STELLA RIMINGTON, DCB, former Director General, the
Security Service

10 Feb.: `Managing secrecy.'

MS P. DENHAM, former Regional Director, Government Office
for the North-East

17 Feb.: `From industrial policy to the
regeneration of north-east England.'

BARONESS PARK OF MONMOUTH

5 Mar.: `Difficult places.'

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section



REGENT'S PARK COLLEGE


Centre for the Study of
Christianity and Culture

The idea of a Celtic Christianity

The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on
Wednesdays in Regent's Park College. Further details may
be obtained from Alan Kreider, Regent's Park College
(telephone: Oxford (2)88140, fax: (2)88121, e-mail:
alan.kreider@regents.ox.ac.uk).

DR J. WOODING, Institute for Advanced Celtic Studies,
Dublin

27 Jan.: `The idea of the Celt.'

DR T. O'LOUGHLIN, Lampeter

3 Feb.: `Mission in early Ireland.'

E. JOHNSTON

10 Feb.: `The "pagan" and
"Christian" identities of the Irish female
saint.'

DR M. LOW, Glasgow

17 Feb.: `The natural world.'

DR I. BRADLEY, St Andrews

24 Feb.: `Post-Reformation readings of
Celtic Christianity.'

DR M. ATHERTON

3 Mar.: `The Anglo-Saxon context.'

DR D. MORGAN, Bangor

10 Mar.: `Poetry and the people in
twentieth-century Wales: the case of D. Gwenallt
Jones (1899–1968).'

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section


The novel, spirituality, and modern culture

The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on
Thursdays in Regent's Park College. Further details may
be obtained from Alan Kreider, Regent's Park College
(telephone: Oxford (2)88140, fax: (2)88121, e-mail:
alan.kreider@regents.ox.ac.uk).

S. MAITLAND, Kettering

21 Jan.: `The contemporary novel
v. Christian experience: an unresolvable
conflict?'

T. DAVIS BUNN, Henley

11 Feb.: `People of the Book: the
Christian novel and American culture.'

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section



HUMAN POPULATION GENETICS
JOURNAL CLUB

An interdisciplinary journal club in the area of human
population genetics is held every second Monday in term,
in weeks 2, 4, 6, and 8, in the seminar room, ground
floor, Department of Statistics, 1 South Parks Road.
Anyone interested is welcome.

Notices of the papers for discussion are sent in advance
by e-mail. Anyone who wishes to have his/her name added
to the e-mail list should send a request to
david.goldstein@zoology. (Owing to a hardware problem,
the existing list has been destroyed, so those who were
on that list should also e-mail David Goldstein.)

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section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 21 January 1999: Grants and Funding<br />

Grants and Research Funding


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



RESEARCH SERVICES OFFICE

The Oxford University Research Services Office (RSO) is based in
the University Offices, Wellington Square (with a satellite
office in the Medical School Offices, Level 3, John Radcliffe
Hospital). The RSO is part of the Finance Division of the
University's central administration.

The office processes and approves all applications to outside
bodies for research grants and approves research-related
agreements on behalf of the University. It also acts in an
advisory capacity for those seeking outside funding or requiring
information about specific initiatives (e.g. LINK, ROPA, Teaching
Company schemes, EU research programmes, etc.).

The RSO produces a weekly bulletin on funding opportunities,
electronic Research and Industry News (eRIN), which is available
to members of the University via the World Wide Web at:
http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rcso/erin/.

Research contracts with industry are negotiated through the RSO,
which also deals, inter alia, with various intellectual
property matters, including other research-related agreements
covering clinical trials and services, services to industry,
confidentiality issues, material transfer and consultancy.
Contact details for members of the RSO, from whom advice may be
sought are as follows:

Ms Catherine Quinn, Director

(telephone: (2)70158, e-mail:
catherine.quinn@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Mr Pierre-Manuel Espinasse, Research Grants and European Liaison
Officer (telephone: (2)70043, e-mail:
pierre.espinasse@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Dr Michael Halsey, Assistant Registrar - Senior Contracts
Officer

(telephone: (2)70011, e-mail:
michael.halsey@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Dr Richard Liwicki, Assistant Registrar, John Radcliffe Hospital
satellite office

(telephone: 553 22604, e-mail:
richard.liwicki@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Ms Kathryn Dally, Administrative Officer

(telephone: (2)80319,
e-mail: kathryn.dally@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Ms Grace Garland, Administrative Officer

(telephone: (2)80666,
e-mail: grace.garland@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Ms Linda Jones, Administrative Officer

(telephone: 553 22131,
e-mail: linda.jones@admin.ox.ac.uk).

Enquiries relating to day-to-day processing of research grant
applications should be addressed to the RSO's Research Grants
Office, Room 330, the University Offices (telephone: (2)70146),
or, in the case of certain clinical departments, to the RSO
satellite office, the Medical School Offices, Level 3, John
Radcliffe Hospital, Headington (telephone: 553 22544).

General enquiries may be addressed, in the first instance, to Mrs
Jane Taylor (telephone: (2)70143), who will be pleased to direct
calls to the appropriate member of staff.

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section


Administrative procedures in respect of externally sponsored
research

Members of the University are reminded that it is a requirement
of the General Board that all applications for externally funded
support must be endorsed on behalf of the University through the
Research and Commercial Services Office before they are
dispatched to the sponsor, whether or not this is required by the
funding body. (This includes, for example, bodies such as the
Leverhulme Trust, and other charities and EU programmes which do
not specifically ask for administrative authorisation.)

The reason for the requirement is twofold: namely (i) to ensure
that the funds being requested are adequate for the purpose and
the costing rules of the funding body have been applied
correctly, and (ii) to ensure that the University would be in a
position to undertake the obligations arising from an award and
that these do not contravene University policy.

The detailed arrangements are as follows: applicants for
research grants should submit their applications, together with
a completed copy of the University's outside grant form (OG12),
to Room 330, Research Services Office, University Offices,
Wellington Square, telephone (2)70146—leaving three clear
working days for them to be processed.

In connection with the acceptance of awards and signature of
contracts it should be noted that Statutes, Tit. X, cl. 2,
provides that `no official of the University or any other person
employed by the University or working in or in connection with
any department of or under the control of the University shall
in connection with any invention, discovery, or patent, or ...
process, or manufacture have authority to make any
representations on behalf of the University or to enter into any
contract on behalf of the University or to be concerned in any
transaction whatsoever in connection therewith on behalf of the
University except with the express consent of Council'.

The relevant officials in the Research and Commercial Services
Office have been given authority to approve applications for
external funds in support of research and the terms of contracts
in straightforward cases under this provision: in more
complicated cases, specific authority is necessary.

Enquiries related to any aspect of externally sponsored
research should be directed to the Research Services Office,
whose staff would be pleased to help.

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section





<br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 21 January 1999: Examinations and Boards<br />

Examinations and Boards


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



SUB-FACULTY OF ENGINEERING SCIENCE


Honour Schools of Engineering Science
Part I 2000, Engineering and Computing Science Part I 2000, and
Engineering and Materials Part I 2000

Engineering and Society

Alternative approved topics for `Engineering and Society' for the
Part I examination in 2000 are:

a. History of Technology.

b. Completion of a language course organised by the University
Language Centre on behalf of the Sub-faculty of Engineering
Science (subject to availability).

c. Computing.

d. Materials.

Details will be circulated to candidates.

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section



CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in
regulations made by the Board of the Faculty of Biological
Sciences will come into effect on 5 February.


Board of the Faculty of Biological
Sciences

Honour School of Natural Science

With effect from 1 October 1999

1 In Examination Decrees, 1998, p. 407, ll.
19–20, delete `Molecular Aspects of Biochemistry and
Biophysics'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 31–6.

3 Ibid., ll. 40–1, delete `Molecular
Aspects of Biochemistry and Biophysics'.

4 Ibid., p. 426, delete ll. 39–49.

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section



EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR
OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards and
committee give notice of oral examination of their candidates as
follows:

Anthropology and Geography

N. BANKS, Linacre: `Cultural values and the adoption of efficient
technologies'.

Environmental Change Unit, Wednesday, 3 February,
2 p.m.


Examiners: I. Cooper, A.P. Rogers.

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section


Biological Sciences

F.B. SYMONS, St Hugh's: `Studies in lepidopteran evolution'.

University Museum of Natural History, Friday, 22 January, 2 p.m.


Examiners: S.J. Simpson, K.J. Gaston.

K. TALBOT, Exeter: `The molecular pathogenesis of autosomal
recessive spinal muscular atrophy'.

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Headington, Tuesday,
16 February, 2 p.m.


Examiners: A.P. Monaco, P.N. Leigh.

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section


English Language and Literature

C. PHELPSTEAD, Wolfson: `Dialogues on sainthood: a Bakhtinian
reading of saints' lives in the Icelandic Kings' Sagas'.

English Faculty, Tuesday, 26 January, 11 a.m.


Examiners: C.A. Larrington, J. Jesch.

R.J. RYAN, St John's: `Region, state, and nation: the Republic
of Ireland and Scotland'.

Wadham, Friday, 29 January, 2 p.m.


Examiners: J.B. O'Donoghue, N. Corcoran.

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section


Law

S. DEGELING, St Peter's: `Victims and carers: liabilities in tort
and unjust enrichment'.

St Hugh's, Friday, 12 March, 11.15 a.m.


Examiners: L.D. Smith, G. Jones.

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section


Mathematical Sciences

A. FEARNHEAD, Merton: `Some models of light interacting with
matter'.

Mathematical Institute, Wednesday, 17 February, 2 p.m.


Examiners: I.P. Grant, G.L. Sewell.

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section


Modern History

E. GRIMMER-SOLEM, Nuffield: `The science of progress:
the rise of historical economics and social reform in Germany,
1864–94'.

St Antony's, Thursday, 4 February, 10 a.m.


Examiners: A.J. Nicholls, K. Tribe.

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section


Physical Sciences

CHANG CHIN-CHI, Wolfson: `Magneto-optical studies of
semiconductor heterostructures'.

Clarendon Laboratory, Friday, 29 January, 10.15 a.m.


Examiners: J. Singleton, G.P. Srivastava.

YOSHIAKI ISHII, Pembroke: `A microstructural study of oxidation
of zircaloy-2 in air'.

Department of Materials, Tuesday, 26 January, 2 p.m.


Examiners: M.J. Bennett, J.M. Titchmarsh.

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section


Social Studies

H.W. SMITH, Balliol: `Supermarket choice and supermarket
competition: an econometric study'.

Worcester, Wednesday, 3 February, 2 p.m.


Examiners: S.G.B. Cowan, J. Sutton.

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section


Committee for Educational Studies

M.Y. OTHMAN, Green College: `An investigation into the teacher
craft of secondary school mathematics teachers'.

Examination Schools, Wednesday, 27 January, 2.30 p.m.


Examiners: A.E. Pendry, L. Burton.

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section



EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER
OF SCIENCE

The examiners appointed by the following faculty board give
notice of oral examination of their candidate as
follows:

Clinical Medicine

J. SHANAHAN, Green College: `Immunological aspects of primary
sclerosing cholangitis'.

Nuffield Department of Pathology, John Radcliffe Hospital,
Monday, 1 February, 2 p.m.


Examiners: J. O'D. McGee, S.G. HŸbscher.

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section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 21 January 1999: Colleges<br />

Colleges, Halls, and Societies


Contents of this section:

Return to Contents Page of this
issue



OBITUARIES


Christ Church

NORMAN ADES, MA, June 1991; commoner 1949–52.

THOMAS ANTHONY JOHN BOYCE, 31 December 1998; commoner
1962–3.

PETER MICHAEL DELARAGEAZ, MA, July 1998; commoner
1953–6.

PETER DELME-RADCLIFFE, MA, 25 December 1998; commmoner
1927–30.

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section



Jesus College and Merton College

ALEXANDER MACDOUGALL COOKE, 5 January 1999; Exhibitioner,
Jesus College, 1919–21; Fellow, Merton College,
1942–67, Emeritus Fellow 1967. Aged 99.

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section



MEMORIAL SERVICE


Merton College

A Memorial Service for DR ALEXANDER MACDOUGALL COOKE will
be held at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, 20 February, in the
chapel, Merton College.

Further details may be obtained from the Warden's
Secretary.

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section





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 21 January 1999:<br /> Advertisements<br />

Advertisements


Contents of this section:



How to
advertise in the Gazette

"../../../stdg/conds.htm">

Terms and conditions of
acceptance of advertisements

Return to Contents Page of this
issue



The Oxford Greek Plays

Oxford University Classical Drama
Society present Iphigenia at Aulis by Euripides
(performed in Greek) and The
Birds
by Aristophanes (performed in a new English
adaptation). Dates: 27–30 Jan. (second week), times:
2.30 p.m./7.30 p.m. (2.30 p.m./8 p.m. Friday), at the
Oxford Playhouse, Beaumont Street, Oxford (Box Office
tel.: Oxford 798600). Tickets £8, £9, £10.

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section



Balliol College Medical Society

Balliol College Medical Society presents
Samuel Shem, author of the contraversial novel The
House of God
, speaking on `How to stay human in
Medicine: the House of God and Mount Misery'. Thur. 28
Jan., 6.30 p.m., in the Small Lecture Theatre, the
Academic Centre, John Radcliffe Hospital.

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section



Oxford Chamber Music Society

Hilary Term Concerts: 31 Jan., 8 p.m.,
Guarneri Trio Prague (works by Beethoven, Shostakovich
and Suk); 7 Mar., 2.45 p.m., Schubert Ensemble of London
(works by Fauré, Martin Butler, and Schubert).
Holywell Music Room. Tickets £10 (concessions
£4).

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section



Tutor Sought

A-level Geography tutor sought (London
Board) for extra tuition and advice on essay writing.
References please. Tel.: Oxford 513704 (evenings).

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section



Car Parking

Car parking space in central Oxford.
Lockable space close to the central multi-storey car
park. Available 1 year on competitive terms. Contact
Styles and Whitlock, tel.: Oxford 244637.

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section



Tuition Offered

Psychoanalytic Observational Studies.
Applications are invited for the Tavistock-model Oxford
Observation Course. This includes a two-year infant
observation, a two-year young child observation, work
discussion, and theoretical seminars. Part-time, largely
evening-based, modular course, conducted in small groups;
can lead to Postgraduate Diploma/MA from the Tavistock
clinic/University of East London. For details and
application form, please contact Andrea Watson, 12
Rectory Road, Oxford OX4 1BW, tel.: Oxford 243491.
Application should be made before 31 May.

Singing lessons. Highly-experienced
singing teacher has a few vacancies for new students. All
levels from beginner to advanced. Coaching to Diploma
level and Music College entry as well as singing for fun!
contact Mary, tel.: Oxford 512964.

Medical seminar for 14–16 year-olds
hoping to go into medicine, and their parents. Highly
interactive seminar/workshop with specialist contributors
including medical practicioners, academic medics, and
careers advisers. For details, contact Pat Harris at
d'Overbroeck's College, tel.: Oxford 310000.

English tuition given by Oxford-
educated, female, native English speaker; experienced at
teaching individually or in small groups. Also French to
GCSE. Dr D. Martin, tel.: Oxford 559061, e-mail:
djcm@aol.com.

Piano lessons: experienced teacher;
adults and children. All grades. Beginners welcome.
Contact Miss P. Read BA (Hons) LRAM. Tel.: Oxford
(Jericho) 510904.

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section



Services Offered

Tax advice. Ex-KPMG Chartered Accountant
specialises in assisting professionals and small
businesses with tax problems including self-assesment.
Convenient North Oxford premises. To receive further
information, please tel.: Oxford 513381, or e-mail:
100430.145@compuserve.com.

North Oxford Therapy. Confidential
consultation. Anxiety, depression, eating disorders, life
goals, phobias, smoking, stress, trauma, deep hypno-
relaxation. Deeply-relaxing `hypno-massage'. Analytical
therapist. Massage by Revive. Initial consultation free.
Michael Minns DMS, DHP, MHPG. Tel.: Oxford 556368.

Bespoke Garden and Landscape Design.
`One-off' consultancy visits, or sketch and scaled
layouts, planting schemes, construction details and site
supervision, as desired. Nationwide service from
Oxford/Gloucestershire base. Chelsea Gold Medal 1996 and
1997. Contact Jacquie Gordon, tel./fax: 01531 822743.

Shipping? Abyssinia to Zanzibar, New
York to Newmarket. Today, tomorrow, next week? All the
best options are at Mail Boxes Etc. Will collect from
college, home, factory, or elsewhere. Also 24-hour
photocopying, secure mailboxes, computer workstation,
high-grade colour photocopying, faxing, laminating,
binding, etc. 266 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2
7DL. Contact Justin Brookes. Tel.: Oxford 514655, fax:
514656, e-mail: summertown@020.mbe.uk.com.

Personal Computer Consultants: we offer
expert advice and tuition for both hardware and software.
On-site service at home or in the office. We provide
upgrades for most computers, or alternatively we now
supply our range of personally-built to your own
specifications K Tec computers. We will also supply or
source software to match your requirements. For a quality
service matched with competitive prices, contact Chris
Lewis, tel.: Oxford 461222, fax: 461333.

Town and Country Trees: professional
tree surgeons. All aspects of arboriculture undertaken
including orchard and shrub pruning, planting, hedge
trimming, stump grinding, etc. Quality work at
competitive prices. We are fully insured. For a free
quotation, call Paul Hodkinson. Tel.: 01869 351540.

Document editing services. Theses,
research papers, conference papers, and all kinds of
documents and projects edited by experienced freelance
copy-editor. Tel.: Oxford 559061, e-mail:
djcm@aol.com.

Cross Counties Counselling Consultation
Service. Treating all ages;
individuals/families/groups/couples. Specializing: trauma
(PTSD), depression, life crisis, relationships, anxiety,
eating disorders, abuse, school-related problems,
career/personal development issues. Locations: N. Oxford,
Stratford-upon-Avon, Swindon. Barbera A. Martino, BA,
MSW, CTS, CQSW. Prin. Cons. Psychotherapist (UK/USA).
International tel./fax: 44 01386 438010. Free half hour
consultation with treatment.

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section



Domestic Services

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by
Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work,
competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also
carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy
cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning.
For free estimates and friendly advice, call
Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford 726983 or Abingdon 555533.

Czech Au Pair: Michaela seeks au pair
position with friendly family or disabled person. She
speaks fairly good English, plans to attend college, and
seeks a 1-year placement. She has first aid training, and
neither smokes nor drives. Available shortly. M.L. Au
Pairs. I may be offering therapy, so please leave a
message (tel.: Oxford 556368) or e-mail:
michael.minns@talk21.com.

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section



Situations Vacant

Library Assistant (full-time). You will
need previous experience of library and audio-visual
work, and to be able to deal with young people from a
variety of cultural backgrounds. Strong IT skills would
be a distinct advantage. Starting salary in range
£10,881–£12.595, to be linked to an
established scale. contributory pension, 22 days'
holiday, free lunches. For further details, please
contact Maria Andrews, Office Manager, St Clare's,
Oxford, 139 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 7AL. Tel.: Oxford
552031, fax: 310002. Applications close: Mon. 15 Feb.

Office Manager for overseas study
programme. Age 25–30, familiarity with Oxford
University preferred. Send c.v. to Dr Richardson, Flat 8,
Tennyson Lodge, Paradise Square, Oxford OX1 1UD.

Academic Adviser (part-time) to arrange
tutorials for overseas study programme. Oxford graduate,
age 25–30 years preferred. £12–£14
per hour. Send c.v. to Dr Richardson, Flat 8, Tennyson
Lodge, Paradise Square, Oxford OX1 1UD.

Enthusiastic singers required. Two hours
weekly. Modest stipend. The City Church of Oxford.
Bolster your student grant. Cornmarket Street. Tel.:
Oxford 559485.

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section



Houses to Let

Two-bedroom house in central North Oxford, very close to
Green College. Beautifully furnished and very well
equipped, with landscaped garden and off-street parking.
This is a real jewel of a house! Non-smokers only,
please. Available from 1 Feb. 1999 initially until 1
Sept. 1999, but can then be available for another year.
Tel.: Oxford 511382, fax: 316245.

Dorchester-on-Thames. sixteenth-century
house, originally coaching inn, grade 2 listed building;
furnished. Very large lounge/diner, large
kitchen/breakfast room, 3 bedrooms, bathroom with w.c.,
shower room with w.c., utility. Outside: coaching
archway, small backyard, cottage garden. In a beautiful
village with post office, restaurants, pubs, village shop
(late opening); Thames walks; Wittenham Clumps; Iron-Age
fort. Available to end 1999. £1,250 p.m. Tel.:
Oxford 722250.

Cassington easy reach of Oxford and
motorway. Three-bedroom cottage. Furnished. Gas c.h.
Garden and garage. Available now, £700 p.c.m. Tel.:
Oxford 728597, fax: 794606.

Pleasant flat available end Feb. in
Great Milton. One bedroom, bathroom, large living-room,
kitchen, separate w.c., view over garden, small
courtyard. Suit quiet tenant, Regret unsuitable for
children or pets. References please. Tel.: 01844 279202
(evenings).

Central/North Oxford : well-presented,
furnished, terrace house. Two double bedrooms, sitting-
room, dining-room, kitchen/breakfast room, bathroom with
shower, garden. Available immediately to end Mar. Ideal
for visiting academic. £925 p.m. Tel.: Oxford
798738.

Short term holiday/lets in Witney, 12
miles from Oxford. Fully-furnished/equipped cottages in
town centre, convenient for Cotswold touring. Good
frequent bus service into Oxford. Tel.: 01993 703035,
fax: 771014.

North Oxford furnished bungalow to let
to visiting academic couple, available for 2 months from
22 Mar. Two bedrooms (two others to remain closed), 2
reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast, utility, bathroom,
shower room, garden. £700 p.c.m. plus utilities.
Tel.: Oxford 558790, or fax (All Souls College):
(2)79299.

Terrece house in East Oxford, available
late Mar.–July; fully furnished and equipped. Two
bedrooms, study, bathroom, living/dining-room, kitchen.
£550 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford (2)77375, e-mail:
charles.batty@sjc.ox.ac.uk.

Two-bedroom, Victorian, terrace house;
Iffley Fields. Artists' house; great character,
interesting decor, c.h., mod. cons. Two reception rooms,
large kitchen, bathroom, garden. Quiet, friendly
neighbourhood. Available now, any period 2–6 months.
£650 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 246146.

Sunny Victorian terrace house, Iffley
Fields. Two reception (period fireplaces), modern kitchen
and bathroom, second w.c., large double bedroom,
bedroom/study (double sofa-bed), utilities cellar,
antiques, period pine features, nice garden. Suit couple,
no children. Available late Mar. through Sept. 1999, rent
£750 p.m. including council tax. Tel.: Oxford 798069
or 01873 810982, e-mail: ayers@wadham.oxford.ac.uk.

Two-bedroom house in central North
Oxford, very close to Green College. Beautifully
furnished and very well equipped, with landscaped garden
and off-street parking. This is a real jewel of a house!
Non-smokers only, please. Available from 1 Feb. 1999
initially until 1 Sept. 1999, but can then be available
for another year.

Make finding accommodation a pleasure,
not a chore. Finders Keepers is dedicated to making it
easy for visitors to Oxford to find the right property.
Browse through our Web site for up-to-date detailed
information on properties available and make use of our
interactive database, priority reservation service
(credit cards accepted), welcome food pack, personal
service, and much more. Call us and you will not need to
go elsewhere. For further information contact Finders
Keepers, 226 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY.
Tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 556993, e-mail:
oxford@finders.co.uk; Internet site:
http://www.finders.co.uk.

An Englishman's home is his
castle—so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we
have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking
quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding
area we may be able to help. QB Management is one of
Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in
lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other
professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and
most helpful service in Oxford. Visit our Web site at:
http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the
properties that we have currently available to let.
Alternatively, telephone, fax, or e-mail us with details
of your requirements and we will do whatever we can
without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 764533, fax: 764777, e-
mail: info@qbman.co.uk.

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Flats to Let

Jericho: excellent, furnished, first-
floor flat in prime location. Double bedroom, bathroom,
large sitting-room/dining-room/kitchen. Shared use of
garden. Garage if required. Available immediately. Suit
non-smoking professionals; no children. £715 p.c.m.
including heating and lighting. Tel.: Oxford 310800.

Headington: fully-furnished,
comfortable, self-contained flat available to
postgraduate or professional with shorthold lease of 6
months or more. Separate entrance, with own parking if
required. Very convenient for hospitals, Brookes and
Oxford Universities, and central Oxford. One double
bedroom, bathroom, sitting-room/kitchenette. Combi gas
hot water and c.h. Washing machine and tumble-drier,
electric cooker, microwave, deep-freeze. Own gas and
electricity meters, and telephone. References essential.
Rent £520 p.c.m. Please tel.: Oxford 768925 or 0181
341 3076.

Park Town flat for married couple or
single person. Self-contained, centrally-heated
throughout, comprising double bedroom, sitting-room,
kitchenette with electric cooker and fridge, bathroom
with shower. Telephone available. Attractively furnished;
1 mile from Carfax; very quiet house. Please phone for
interview, or fax. Tel./fax: Oxford 557400.

Elegant 1-bedroom ground-floor flat in
St Margaret's Road, central North Oxford. Double bedroom,
large sitting-room, kitchen and bathroom. fully
furnished; washing machine; gas c.h. Use of charming
shared garden. Available from 1 Feb. 1999; let 6 months
or longer preferred. £725 p.c.m. plus bills. Tel.:
Oxford 343384.

Luxurious 2-bedroom flat in 18th-c.
Woodstock; c.h., phone, washing machine, spin-drier, etc.
Long or short lease. £650 p.c.m. Available now.
Tel.: 01993 811488.

Flat in Victorian house, Iffley Road, 1
mile city centre. Large sitting-room/kitchen, bedroom,
bath/shower. Rent to include council tax, hot water, some
c.h. £460 p.c.m. (low because not self-contained in
daytime). Tel.: 01869 350372.

Central London: London University
professor seeks academic tenant to rent superb large 2-
bedroom flat in sought-after area of Notting Hill.
Available spring/summer 1999 to autumn 2000. Rent
negotiable to right tenant. Tel.: 0171 727 9750.

Unique character first-floor flat in St
Clement's area of Oxford, high-quality modern conversion;
bright, sunny, and spacious; very short walk to city
centre, colleges, parks and river. Two bedrooms,
bathroom, utility/store-room, fully-equipped kitchen,
large sitting/dining-room with coal-effect fireplace.
Fully furnished including washing machine, refrigerator,
microwave; gas c.h.; residents' parking; secure bike
space; courtyard; quiet leafy outlook. Suit visiting
academic/postgrad, or professional. Available now.
£750 p.c.m. Tel.: 01600 860638.

Central North Oxford: 10 minutes' walk
from city centre, all main university buildings, and
parks, and very close to the river. Available now for
short/long let. Two exceptionally well-furnished,
comfortable flats in extremely quiet, civilised, large
Victorian house in this exclusive, leafy, residential
Victorian suburb, with large, light, airy rooms. (1)
First-floor: double bedroom, drawing-room, kitchen,
bathroom. (2) Ground-floor: 1 double, 1 single bedroom,
drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom. Off-street parking;
large secluded garden. Regret no children or pets.
Tel./fax: Oxford 552400.

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section



Accommodation Offered

Bed-and-breakfast available in the warm
comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple in
exclusive, leafy, central North Oxford; within easy
walking distance of the city centre and all main
university buildings; a stone's throw from the river,
parks, excellent pubs and restaurants and a 9–9
corner shop. All rooms have colour TV, microwave, tea-
and coffee-making facilities, c.h., and independent
heating. Refrigerators available. Very moderate terms.
Tel./fax: Oxford 557879, mobile: 0374 434489.

Attractive double room in a very modern,
comfortable, 2-bedroom house. Gas c.h., double glazing,
washing machine, drier. Small garden. Pleasant East
Oxford location. Suit professional; non-smokers please.
£345 p.c.m. Contact Dave, tel.: Oxford 724189.

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section



Accommodation Sought

Academic couple with child (3 years) and
baby (0 years) seeks accommodation in or sufficiently
close to Oxford, for 2 months, May–Apr. 1999. Sub-
periods can also be considered. We need 2 bedrooms; baby
cot not required. Please contact André Lucas,
tel.: +31 20 4446039, fax: +31 20 4446005, e-mail:
alucas@econ.vu.nl.

Finders Keepers specialises in managing
your home or investment. We have celebrated 25 years in
Oxford letting and managing properties—try us first!
Many of our landlords have remained with us since we
opened and are delighted with our service—why not
pop in and read their comments? Contact Finders Keepers,
226 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7BY. Tel.:
Oxford 311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk,
Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

Mallams Residential Letting is well
placed to help with your letting and management
requirements. Based in Summertown, we offer a
professional service tailored to your individual
requirements. If you are thinking of letting your
property, please call us. Tel.: Oxford 311006, fax:
311977.

Going abroad? Or just thinking of
letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's
foremost letting agents and property managers. We
specialise in lettings to both academic and professional
individuals and their families, and have a constant flow
of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property
in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our
services, or if you simply need some informal help and
advice without obligation, telephone us: Oxford 764533,
fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk.
Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site
at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be
marketing your property.
n

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Accommodation Sought to Rent or
Exchange

Academic on sabbatical needs to spend
May 1999 in Oxford and requires accommodation for 2
adults and 2 children. house swap considered. Our house
is situated on the edge of the Scottish Highlands
(Trossachs area) and includes all mod. cons. plus
facilities for young children (cots, high chair, etc.).
contact Dr Matthew Evans, tel.: 01786 467761, e-mail:
mre2@stir.ac.uk.

Visiting professor and spouse seek 1/2-
bedroom apartment or cottage/house, Apr.–June 1999,
in Oxford. Alternatively, house exchange in Oxford for 3-
bedroom bungalow in sunny-seaside Santa Cruz, California,
near University of California. Tel. (USA): 831 426 5224,
fax: 831 459 3518, e-mail: lubeck@cats.ucsc.edu.

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section



Accommodation Offered to Rent
or Exchange

Summertown, Oxford: lovely, 3-bedroom,
Victorian terrace house; fully-furnished/equipped;
available from mid-July 1999. to let or exchange for 1
year minimum (longer if required). Three double bedrooms,
eat-in kitchen overlooking pretty garden, 2 reception
rooms, 1.5 bathrooms, gas c.h., hardwood floors,
washer/drier. Near shops, buses, excellent schools,
university, hospitals, etc. Family owners (prof. mother,
2 children) ideally seeking exchange with New York
apartment in Manhattan. Otherwise, £1,100 or $1,800
p.c.m. exclusive. New York tel.: 212 663 2664, fax: 212
531 1224; London tel.: 0181 874 5909; e-mail:
101642.2251@compuserve.com.

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Holiday Lets

Torehill: comfortable stone-built
country cottage, very suitable for family holidays or as
academic retreat, in Abernethy forest (foothills of
Cairngorms). Sleeps 5. £168 p.w. For details and
dates free, tel.: 0181 341 3076 or Oxford 765446.

Italy, Umbria, Assisi National Park: two
double bedrooms, kitchen/dining-room, big bathroom, own
road. Superb views, wildlife. Lombardia, Lake Como:
village house apartment closely overlooking lake. One
double bedroom, kitchenette, dining/sitting-room,
terrace; 20 minutes Como city. £300 p.w., £550
per fortnight, £900 p.m., for either let. Tel.:
Oxford 768775.

Delicious Irish cottage, Donegal. Open
fires, aga, sleeps 4–6, overlooking lake; rowing
boat and scenery included; pets welcome. You are in the
heart of Ireland's lake district, perfect country
retreat. A place to dream and relax. Beaches, golf,
fishing, good pubs, music, and much more. Tel.: Oxford
327154.

South-west Ireland: comfortable cottage
with lovely sea views and peaceful surroundings near
harbour village. Oil c.h., open fire, own cove, and many
amenities, even studio if wanted. Second comparable
cottage nearby with view to woods. Short or long lets
possible. Tel.: 01367 710693.

Tregreenwell Farm Cottage, St Teath,
North Cornwall. Lovely old farmhouse (c. 1800) has been
caringly divided to provide holiday home of great
character. Set on a 10-acre smallholding in a peaceful
location, it is close to Bodmin Moor, the fishing village
of Port Isaac (5 miles), and the coves and beaches of the
North Cornwall coast. Accommodation comprises a lounge
with wood-burner, well-equipped kitchen/diner, 2 bedrooms
(one double, 1 twin), and bathroom/w.c. Cot and high
chair provided. Full night storage heating. Garden;
parking for 2 cars. Regret no pets. £130-£499
p.w. For details/photograph, tel.: Oxford 300482.

Cornwall solar eclipse camping: includes
large marquee with bar, entertainment nightly.
Toilets/showers. Close to sandy beaches, Mevagissey. Site
open 31 July–28 Aug. 1999. £5 per person per
night, 15 per cent discount before 28 Feb. For brochure,
tel.: 01726 77660/72653. Web site:
http://www.bedbreakfastcornwall.com (link to:
eclipse).

Veneto: modern house in quiet situation
in the foothills of the Dolomites. One hour Venice, 1
hour skiing. Sleeps 7 + cot. All mod. cons., c.h.,
telephone, clothes and dish washers, 2 bathropoms. Lake
swiimming, Palladian villas. Car essential.
£350–450 p.w. Elsie Arnold, tel./fax: Oxford
515264.

Tuscany: family-owned farm, former
Machiavelli property, producing high-quality wine and
cheese, offers farmhouses (sleeping up to 14) and
apartments, and pool. Half hour central Florence.
Tel./fax: 0039 055 824 9120, e-mail: pgklpoggio@FTBCC.it;
Fattoria Corzano and Paterno.

Dordogne Valley. Stone-built house in an
acre of garden in Lostanges, a small hamlet in the
eastern part of the Dordogne Valley, with a 270-degree
view across a fabulous valley from a large elevated
terrace. Swimming, lake club, tennis, and golf nearby.
Great walking, cycling, and charming villages everywhere.
Sleeps 8–10 people. Available from
£200–£550 p.w. Peter Whitehead, tel.:
01295 670320 for more details and brochure with
photos.

Crete: a traditional Cretan house in
Rethimno, superbly renovated to provide space and comfort
in beautifully-furnished surroundings. Elevated, vine-
covered sitting area with brick barbecue—perfect for
alfresco dining. In quiet area of Old Town, near long
sandy beaches, tavernas, shops, and the many interesting
sights in and around this historic area. Sleeps 4 (1
double, 1 twin). Available year-round. £250 p.w.,
£900 p.m. Tel./fax: 0030 831 56525.

Tuscan hills: restored farmhouse in
superb situation near Siena standing amidst its own
olives and vineyard. Spectacular hill and forest views.
Art, music, food, wine, and walking in plenty. One hour
florence, 45 minutes Siena. Very peaceful with full
services (but no pool), sleeps up to 8 but suitable also
for smaller parties. Tel./fax: 01252 660899.

Crete: a traditional Cretan house in
Rethimno, superbly renovated to provide space and comfort
in beautifully-furnished surroundings. Elevated, vine-
covered sitting area with brick barbecue—perfect for
alfresco dining. In quiet area of Old Town, near long
sandy beaches, tavernas, shops, and the many interesting
sights in and around this historic area. Sleeps 4 (1
double, 1 twin). Available year-round. £250 p.w.,
£900 p.m. Tel./fax: 0030 831 56525.

Tuscan hills: restored farmhouse in
superb situation near Siena standing amidst its own
olives and vineyard. spectacular hill and forest views.
Art, music, food, wine, and walking in plenty. One hour
florence, 45 minutes Siena. Very peaceful with full
services (but no pool), sleeps up to 8 but suitable also
for smaller parties. Tel./fax: 01252 660899.

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section






<br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette: Diary, 22 January<br /> - 4 February

Diary


Contents of this section:

Academic Staff
Development Seminars
: places should be booked in advance
through
the Staff Development Office, University Offices,
Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

For the full list of courses, see the HREF="http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/training/">Staff Development
ProgrammeWeb site.

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Contents Page of this issue



Friday 22 January

DR N. ARGENTI: `Apprenticeship, hierarchy, and dissent in
Oku: negotiating identity among wood-carvers of the
Cameroon' (Ethnicity and Identity Seminar: `Artisans,
crafts, and local identities'), Institute of Social and
Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Some small delights in
eastern art', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for
bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

M. O'HANLON: ` "Mostly harmless"?: "man-catchers" and
the colonial imagination in British New Guinea'
(Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology seminars),
Lecture Theatre, ISCA, 4.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR T.C. SMOUT: `Use and delight: continuity and
change in attitude to nature' (Ford's Lectures in British
History: `Use and delight: environmental history in
Northern England since 1600'), Schools, 5 p.m.

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section



Saturday 23 January

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM study-day: `Asian silks' (tel. to book:
(2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.).

COLIN CARR performs music for unaccompanied cello by
Bach, Crumb, and Piatti, the hall, St John's, 8.30 p.m.
(admission free, subject to availability of space).

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section



Sunday 24 January

THE REVD PROFESSOR WILLIAM JOHNSTONE preaches the
Macbride Sermon on the Application of Messianic Prophecy,
Hertford, 10 a.m.

COLIN CARR: master-class (cello), the auditorium, St
John's, 11 a.m. (admission free, subject to availability
of space).

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section



Monday 25 January

DR K. HAMPSHIRE: `Population mobility and regulation of
fertility among the Fulani of northern Burkina Faso'
(provisional title) (Institute of Social and
Cultural Anthropology Seminars: `Youth, fertility, and
reproductive health'), Seminar Room, ISCA, 11 a.m.

A. WEAR: `The failure of the English Helmontian
revolution in therapeutics' (lecture series: `Medicine
and culture before 1750'), Wellcome Unit, 47 Banbury
Road, 2.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR M. REEVE: `A proposal about Modestus' (Lowe
Lectures in Palaeography: `Manuscripts and method: the
transmission of Vegetius'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR B. SYKES: `The genetic origins of man'
(Green College Lectures: `Genes'), Witts Lecture Theatre,
Radcliffe Infirmary, 6 p.m.

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section



Tuesday 26 January

ACADEMIC STAFF Development Seminar: `Managing and
developing effective teams', 9 a.m. ( HREF="#seminars">see information above).

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Nineteenth-century
French drawings' (special exhibition), 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
£1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

CONGREGATION meeting, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. KAY: `Global business, global economics?'
(Wolfson College Lectures: `Globalisation and
insecurity'), the Hall,
Wolfson, 5 p.m. (open to the public).

R. ORAM: `Creating a shift to more environmentally
friendly transport: the case for tax-free travel
vouchers' (Oxford Centre for the Environment, Ethics, and
Society seminars), Council Room, Main Building,
Mansfield, 5 p.m.

DR A. RYAN: `No more than two cheers for democracy?'
(Herbert Spencer Lectures: `Democracy in practice and in
theory'), Schools, 5 p.m.

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section



Wednesday 27 January

PROFESSOR R. LITTLEWOOD: ` "Moments of creation"---1: the
bodily idioms of cosmology' (Wilde Lectures in Natural
and Comparative Religion: `Religion, restitution, and
agency: lectures in medicine and religious thought'),
Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. CONNORS: `The newest profession' (Slade
Lectures: `Borromini and Baroque Rome'), Lecture Hall,
Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

MS L. SACHS: `Media and public images of refugees'
(Refugee Studies Programme: Seminars on Forced
Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth
House, 5 p.m.

MS M. NEVILLE-ROLFE: `Labour's regional policies: sea
change or just moving the deck chairs?' (lecture series:
`Women in Whitehall'), Jacqueline du Pré Music
Building, St Hilda's, 5.30 p.m.

UNIVERSITY CLUB wine-tasting: wines from the
Rhône valley, 5.45 p.m. (admission £2, for
members and guests).

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section



Thursday 28 January

ACADEMIC STAFF Development Seminar: `Time management',
9.30 a.m. (see information
above
).

DR C. HOYLE: `Negotiating domestic violence' (Centre for Cross-
Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Researching gender,
conflict, and violence'), Library Wing Seminar Room,
Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

J.L. NELSON: `Political thinking in the early Middle
Ages: peers' (Carlyle Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

R. GILDEA: `Terror and talks in occupied France: the
fifty hostages of Nantes–Chateaubriant, 1941'
(seminar in modern French history and politics), Maison
Française, 5 p.m.

N. JAS: `The new historiography of science and
technology and the new century: which perspectives?'
(Modern History Faculty/Maison Française seminar
series: `Science and the new century: Britain, France,
and Germany c. 1900'), History of Science
Seminar Room, Modern History Faculty, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. MELLARS: `Homo sapiens' (Linacre
Lectures: `The peopling of Britain—the shaping of a
human landscape'), Lecture Theatre A, the
Zoology/Psychology Building, 5.15 p.m.

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section



Friday 29 January

ACADEMIC STAFF Development Seminar: `Dealing with
harassment' (day 1), 10 a.m. (see
information above
).

MS V. JOSHI: `The warp and weft of nationalism: the
revival of ethnic identity among the Nagas of north-east
India' (Ethnicity and Identity Seminar: `Artisans,
crafts, and local identities'), Institute of Social and
Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Limoges enamels', 1.15
p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9
a.m.--1 p.m.)

M. ROWLANDS: `Architectural bodies and motion in
Grassfields material culture' (Institute of Social and
Cultural Anthropology seminars), Lecture Theatre, ISCA,
4.30 p.m.

PROFESSOR DIANA RIGG (Cameron Mackintosh Visiting
Professor of Contemporary Theatre): `Theatre' (inaugural
lecture), Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR T.C. SMOUT: `Woods of imagination and
reality' (Ford's Lectures in British History: `Use and
delight: environmental history in Northern England since
1600'), Schools, 5 p.m.

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section



Saturday 30 January

ST ANNE'S COLLEGE: `An evening with Bridget Jones' (an
evening of words and music), Mary Ogilvie Lecture
Theatre, St Anne's, 6.45 p.m. (tickets, inc. dinner,
£30 from St Anne's Development Office: tel./fax
(2)74852).

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section



Sunday 31 January

UNIVERSITY MUSEUM exhibition opens: British Gas Wildlife
Photographer of the Year Competition 1998: the winning
pictures (until 7 March).

THE RT. REVD DR THOMAS BUTLER preaches the Ramsden
Sermon, St Mary's, 10 a.m.

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section



Monday 1 February

DR D. MARTIN: `Chinese birth practices in Hong Kong'
(Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology Seminars:
`Youth, fertility, and reproductive health'), Seminar
Room, ISCA, 11 a.m.

L. KASSELL: ` "Some Red Powder and an Old Manuscript":
alchemy and medicine from St Dunstan to Newton' (lecture
series: `Medicine and culture before 1750'), Wellcome
Unit, 47 Banbury Road, 2.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR M. REEVE: `A man on a horse' (Lowe Lectures
in Palaeography: `Manuscripts and method: the
transmission of Vegetius'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR A. HILL: `Genetics and infection: why are
some of us susceptible?' (Green College Lectures:
`Genes'), Witts Lecture
Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 6 p.m.

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section



Tuesday 2 February

V. VAVOULIS: `Two early English harpsichords in the Bate
Collection' (lecture-demonstration), Bate Collection of
Musical Instruments, Music Faculty, 1.15 p.m. (tickets
£1.50 from Faculty Secretary, (2)76133).

DR S. WILLETT: `Physical insecurity: the globalisation of
the means of war' (Wolfson College Lectures:
`Globalisation and insecurity'), the Hall, Wolfson, 5
p.m. (open to the public).

W. BECKERMAN: `Intergenerational justice and the
environment' (Oxford Centre for the Environment, Ethics,
and Society seminars), Council Room, Main Building,
Mansfield, 5 p.m.

DR L. SIEDENTOP: `Democracy in Europe' (Herbert
Spencer Lectures: `Democracy in practice and in theory'),
Schools, 5 p.m.

DR K. LARRES: `British–East German relations in
the 1950s' (seminar series: `Bilateral relations in west
Europe'), European Studies Centre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

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section



Wednesday 3 February

PROFESSOR R. LITTLEWOOD: ` "Moments of creation"---2:
some generalities in the religious embodiment of women
prophets and divine innovators' (Wilde Lectures in
Natural and Comparative Religion: `Religion, restitution,
and agency: lectures in medicine and religious thought'),
Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. CONNORS: `Sacred theorems' (Slade
Lectures: `Borromini and Baroque Rome'), Lecture Hall,
Taylor Institution, 5 p.m.

DR A. BLOCH: `The role of citizenship rights in the
social and economic integration of refugees in Britain'
(Refugee Studies Programme: Seminars on Forced
Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth
House, 5 p.m.

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section



Thursday 4 February

DR A. FRANKLIN: `The Bodleian Library's collection of
printed ballads, seventeenth to nineteenth centuries'
(Friends of the Bodleian thirty-minute lecture), Cecil
Jackson Room, Sheldonian, 1 p.m. (tel. for further
information: (2)77234).

DR U. VINDHYA: `Comrades and lovers: questions of
revolution and sexuality in the contemporary radical left
movement in Andhra Pradesh' (Centre for Cross-Cultural
Research on Women seminars: `Researching gender,
conflict, and violence'), Library Wing Seminar Room,
Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

J.L. NELSON: `Political thinking in the early Middle
Ages: patriarchs' (Carlyle Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

S. HAZAREESINGH: `A republican in Geneva: Jules Barni
and the transformation of French republicanism' (seminar
in modern French history and politics), Maison
Française, 5 p.m.

W. WILLIAMS: `Racine's monsters' (Maison
Française seminar: `French literature from the
Renaissance to the Enlightenment'), Okinaga Room, Wadham,
5 p.m.

PROFESSOR A. WHITTLE: `Advent of agriculture' (Linacre
Lectures: `The peopling of Britain—the shaping of a
human landscape'), Lecture Theatre A, the
Zoology/Psychology Building, 5.15 p.m.

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section