20 March 1997 - No 4432



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 127, No. 4432: 20 March 1997<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

20 March 1997




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<br /><br /><br /><title><br /> Oxford University Gazette, 20 March 1997: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

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section



Decree (1): Establishment of a
Committee for the Environment

Explanatory note

Council has given thought to
the absence from the University's current committee
structure of any body which has responsibility for giving
overall consideration to the general environmental
implications of the policies and activities of the
University and its departments. Having consulted the
General Board, the Buildings Committee, and the Health
and Safety Committee, Council has agreed to establish a
Committee for the Environment charged with such
responsibility, and with drawing the attention of
relevant bodies to any environmental issues affected by
their decisions. The new committee will in essence be a
`pressure group' with no executive powers, but with the
role of ensuring that environmental issues are kept (and
of providing Council with the assurance that they are
being kept) clearly in mind. The following decree
establishes the committee accordingly.

Text of Decree (1)

In Ch. II, Sect. I (Statutes, 1995, p. 209),
insert new § 10 as follows and renumber existing
§§ 10--19 (pp. 209--14, as renumbered by Decree
(1) of 3 October 1996, Gazette, p. 54) as
§§ 11--20:

`§ 10. Committee for the Environment

1. There shall be a Committee for the Environment,
which shall consist of:

(1) a member of Council who shall be appointed by the
Vice-Chancellor and who shall be chairman of the
committee;

(2) the Director of the Environmental Change Unit or a
member of the staff of the unit nominated by him or her;

(3) a member of the Health and Safety Committee
appointed by that committee;

(4) a member of the Buildings Committee appointed by
that committee;

(5) a person appointed by the General Board;

(6) a person appointed by the Conference of Colleges;

(7) a person appointed by the Domestic Bursars'
Committee;

(8) a person appointed by the Executive of the Oxford
University Student Union.

The appointed members of the committee shall hold
office for three years and shall be re-eligible. A member
shall demit office if he or she ceases to hold the
qualification by virtue of which he or she was appointed.
Casual vacancies shall be filled for the remainder of the
period of office of the person being replaced.

The committee shall have the power to co-opt up to
three additional members who shall hold office for three
years and shall be re-eligible.

2. The committee

(a) shall advise Council generally on the
environmental implications of the policies and activities
of the University and its departments;

(b) shall draw matters which are of concern
with regard to the protection and improvement of the
environment to the attention of relevant university
bodies, including as may be appropriate Council, the
General Board, the Buildings Committee, the Health and
Safety Committee, the Estates Committee of the Curators
of the University Chest, and the Conference of Colleges;

(c) in order the better to discharge its
obligations under (a) and (b) above,
shall maintain a watching brief in relation to the
development of local, national, and international
environmental policies, and within the University shall
maintain liaison on environmental issues with relevant
departments and committees, with Junior Members of the
University, and with colleges and other societies of the
University.'

2 This decree shall have immediate
effect, provided that the initial periods of office of
the appointed members of the committee shall be so varied
as to procure a regular rotation of subsequent
appointments.

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Decree (2): Composition of the
Committee on Animal Care

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
General Board, amends the composition of the Committee on
Animal Care, so as to provide formally, as has always
been the intention, that the chairman shall not be an
individual who is engaged in work covered by the Animals
(Scientific Procedures) Act 1986.

Text of Decree (2)

In Ch. II, Sect. II, § 2, cl. 2
(Statutes, 1995, p. 216), after `committee,'
insert `who shall be a person not being engaged in work
governed by the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986,
and'.

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Decree (3): Removal of anomalies

Explanatory note

The following decree removes anomalies and makes
consequential amendments to existing decrees which have
been overlooked in recent legislation.

Text of Decree (3)

1 In Ch. II, Sect. XII, cl. 1,
concerning faculties (Statutes, 1995, p.
243), delete `§ 3' and substitute `§ 4'.

[This clause corrects an obsolete cross-
reference.
]

2 In Ch. III, Sect. III, § 5,
cl. 2, concerning the Director of the Pitt Rivers Museum
(p. 250), delete `offer' and substitute `give'.

[This clause introduces uniformity into the
language used to prescribe the lecturing duties of the
holders of the directorships of university
departments.
]

3 In Ch. VII, Sect. I, § 5,
concerning the duties of professors, etc. (p. 357),
delete `clause 8' and substitute `clause 9'.

[This clause corrects an obsolete cross-
reference.
]

4 Ibid., Sect. III, § 100, cl.
1 (3), concerning the Lecturer in the Government of New
States (p. 414), delete `Reader in Commonwealth
Government' and substitute `Director of Queen Elizabeth
House'.

[This clause substitutes a new ex officio
elector to the Lecturership in the Government of New
States for the holder of a readership which no longer
exists.
]

5 In Ch. IX, Sect. I, § 208,
cl. 3 (iii), concerning the Lindsay Memorial Fund (p.
604), delete `Botany' and substitute `Plant Sciences'.

[This clause corrects an obsolete cross-reference
to the former Department of Botany.
]

6 In Ch. XI, Sect. II, § 1,
cl. 15, concerning the Visitatorial Board (p. 695, as
amended by Decree (1) of 23 July 1996,
Gazette, Vol. 126, p. 1426, and subsequently
renumbered, subject to the approval by Her Majesty in
Council of the Statute approved by Congregation on 11
February 1997, by Decree (6) of 6
February 1997, Vol. 127, p. 709), delete `clauses 10 and
11' and substitute `clauses 13 and 14'.

[This clause corrects an obsolete cross-
reference.
]

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section



Decree (4): Establishment of
Directorship of Pre-clinical Studies

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Physiological Sciences Board and with the concurrence of
the General Board, abolishes the post of Pre-clinical
Adviser and establishes in its place a Directorship of
Pre-clinical Studies.

Text of Decree (4)

In Ch. IV (Statutes, 1995, p. 336), delete
Sect. VI and substitute:

`Section VI. Director of Pre-clinical Studies

1. The Director of Pre-clinical Studies shall be
appointed by the Board of the Faculty of Physiological
Sciences on such conditions as to duties and tenure as
the board may determine; provided that

(a) the director shall normally be appointed
in the first instance for a period of three years, at the
end of which he or she may be reappointed for one further
period which shall normally not exceed two years;

(b) the appointment or reappointment of the
director and the conditions determined by the faculty
board shall be subject to the approval of the General
Board;

(c) the appointment or reappointment of the
director shall be made on the recommendation of a
committee appointed by the faculty board, of which the
Regius Professor of Medicine shall be a member and which
may include other persons not being members of the board.

2. The duties of the Director of Pre-clinical Studies
shall include:

(a) to act as an officer of the Medical
School under the Regius Professor of Medicine and to
perform such administrative duties as the Board of the
Faculty of Physiological Sciences may from time to time
determine;

(b) to take strategic responsibility for the
organisation and development of the First BM and of the
other undergraduate courses under the aegis of the
Physiological Sciences Board;

(c) to advise the Secretary to the Board of
the Faculty of Physiological Sciences on matters
concerning the Pre-clinical School;

(d) to advise prospective medical students,
or undergraduates wishing to study Medicine, on matters
concerning the pre-clinical medical course and their
admission as medical students.

3. The Director of Pre-clinical Studies shall receive
an allowance as shall be determined from time to time by
the General Board.'

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Decree (5): Delegation to the
Distinctions Committee of power to confer the title of
Professor, Reader, and Visiting Professor

Explanatory note

As a result of the experience of the first round of the
exercise for the conferment of the title of Professor and
Reader in 1996, the Distinctions Committee made two
recommendations to Council and the General Board about
its powers. Council and the Board have approved these,
and the following decree gives effect to the changes
proposed by the committee.

At present the power to confer the title of Professor or
Reader rests with Council, on the recommendation of the
General Board. Because of the timing of the 1995
distinctions exercise, the Distinctions Committee had to
ask Council to delegate power to it to make the
decisions. It seems more likely than not that the annual
exercises will normally not be completed before the end
of Trinity Term; for the present year, for example, the
committee will not hold its final meeting until 14 July.
Council has therefore agreed, with the consent of the
General Board, to amend the legislation so that power is
given direct to the committee to confer the titles,
subject to report to Council and the Board.

The second change gives the Distinctions Committee
power to confer the title of Visiting Professor. At
present this power rests with Council, on the
recommendation of the General Board. In the 1996
distinctions exercise there was a case where the title of
Visiting Professor was clearly the most appropriate, but
the power to confer it had not been delegated to the
committee and it was therefore necessary to refer the
matter to the Board and thence to Council as a separate
exercise; this was both cumbersome, and unsatisfactory
for the individual concerned. The following decree
therefore gives the committee power to confer the title,
but as an alternative to its exercise by Council since
the latter is necessary for those cases which arise (as
several do each year) outside a distinctions round.

Text of Decree (5)

1 In Ch. VII, Sect. I, § 10, cl. 1
(Statutes, 1995, p. 372), delete `Council,
on the recommendation of the General Board,' and
substitute `Subject to report to Council and the General
Board, the Distinctions Committee of the General Board'.

2 Ibid., § 11 (p. 373), after
`not exceeding five years at a time.' insert `The title
may also be conferred by the Distinctions Committee of
the General Board, subject to the above provisions on
eligibility and on the length of time for which the title
may be held.'

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Decree (6): Sir Edgar Williams
University Parks Tree
Fund

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Curators of the University Parks, allows donations given
in memory of Sir Edgar Williams since his death in July
1995, and similar donations in the future, to be added to
the capital of the Sir Edgar Williams University Parks
Tree Fund. The fund was established in 1993 following the
successful appeal in honour of Sir Edgar's notable
service as Warden of Rhodes House, which was instigated
in 1980, the year of his retirement. The income of the
fund is devoted to the planting and cataloguing of trees
and shrubs in the Parks.

Text of Decree (6)

In Ch. IX, Sect. I, § 371, cl. 1
(Statutes, 1995, p. 673), after `Warden of
Rhodes House, 1952–80, shall' insert `, together
with any further sums contributed in future for this
purpose,'.

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Decree (7): New courses in
Psychodynamic Practice

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the
Committee on Continuing Education and with the
concurrence of the General Board, makes provision for the
award of the Degree of Master of Studies in Psychodynamic
Practice under the supervision of that committee. It also
provides for the nomination of examiners for the new
Postgraduate Certificate in Psychodynamic Counselling and
Postgraduate Diploma in Psychodynamic Practice as well as
for the new M.St. Approval for these three new courses
will be for an initial period of five years, and will be
subject to an annual report to the General Board and a
review to be conducted by the Board in the year 2002.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in
`Examinations and Boards' below.

Text of Decree (7)

1 In Examination Decrees,
1996, p. 644 (as amended by Decree (3) of 12 December
1996, Gazette, p. 486), after

`Professional Archaeology     Committee for Archaeology' 

insert:

`Psychodynamic Practice     Committee on Continuing Education'.

2 Ibid., p. 979 (as amended by the
same decree), after `In Professional Archaeology ...
required.' insert in the right-hand column:

`In Psychodynamic Practice, two or three as required.'

3 Ibid., p. 993, after item (yy)
(as inserted by the same degree) insert:

`(zz) For the nomination of examiners in the
examinations for the Postgraduate Certificate in
Psychodynamic Counselling, for the Postgraduate Diploma
in Psychodynamic Practice, and for the Degree of Master
of Studies in Psychodynamic Practice, a committee of
which the three elected members shall be chosen by the
Board of Studies of the Committee on Continuing
Education.'

4 This decree shall be effective
from 1 October 1997, provided that candidates for the
M.St. in Psychodynamic Practice shall not be admitted
until 1 October 1999.

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Decree (8): Establishment of
Chairmanship of Chemistry

Explanatory note

In Trinity Term 1996, as part
of the regular cycle of departmental and faculty
reviews, the General Board received the report of a
committee established to review the Chemistry
departments. The terms of reference of the review were
`To consider the future of Chemistry in Oxford; the
relationship of Chemistry to cognate subjects; any
changes which would be desirable in the present
organisational and administrative arrangements, in
particular the possible unification of three departments
into one Department of Chemistry, and in the resources,
facilities, and buildings of the Chemistry departments;
and to make recommendations by the beginning of Trinity
Term 1996.'

The review committee confined its formal
recommendations to matters where it regarded action as
vital to the maintenance of Oxford's position at the
forefront of international teaching and research. In
summary, these were identified as:

(a) physical unification on a single site in
a building suitable for modern teaching and research in
Chemistry;

(b) the unification of the three separate
departments into a single Department of Chemistry, headed
by a Chairman of Chemistry advised by a Chemistry
Management Committee;

(c) a greater measure of centralisation in
the management of the undergraduate course.

The General Board, the Physical Sciences Board, the
Interdepartmental Committee for Chemistry, and the
Sub–faculty of Chemistry have all accepted the case
for a unified Department of Chemistry and have agreed
that the early establishment of, and appointment to, the
new post of Chairman of Chemistry is vital to making
progress on the other issues identified in the review.

Following extensive consultations with the heads of
the Chemistry departments and the other holders of
academic posts in the departments, and on the
recommendation of the General Board and the Physical
Sciences Board, the following, preliminary, decree
appoints Professor W.G. Richards, Reader in Computational
Chemistry, as the first Chairman of Chemistry, on the
understanding that by Michaelmas Term 1997 comprehensive
legislation governing the Department of Chemistry and the
Chemistry Management Committee will be promoted by
Council after consultation with the Physical Sciences
Board and the General Board.

Text of Decree (8)

1 There shall be a Chairman of
Chemistry, who shall be responsible to the Physical
Sciences Board and the General Board for, in the first
instance, bringing forward proposals for implementing the
unification of the existing Chemistry departments and the
establishment of a Chemistry Management Committee on the
lines proposed in the report of the review of Chemistry
in May 1996.

2 Professor W.G. Richards is
appointed as Chairman of Chemistry from 20 April 1997 to
30 September 2000.

3 The chairman shall be eligible
for reappointment, provided that he shall not hold the
post for a total period of more than ten years in
aggregate.

4 The chairman shall receive a
stipend equivalent to that of a professor holding a
special allowance under Ch. VII, Sect. I, § 7,
Schedule I (Statutes, 1995, p. 371).

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Decree (9): College
Contributions Scheme unit of statutory endowment income

Explanatory note

The following decree sets the value of the unit of
statutory endowment income for 1996–7 under the
College Contributions Scheme at £102,000.

Text of Decree (9)

The unit of statutory endowment income for 1996–7 is
set at £102,000 under the provisions of Tit. XII,
Sect. I, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1995, p. 81).

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Decree (10): Endowment grants
from the College Contributions Fund

Explanatory note

Council decided, following the review of the College
Contributions Scheme, that a Grants Subcommittee of the
College Contributions Committee should be established,
consisting mainly of college bursars, to scrutinise
prospective recipient colleges' financial position and to
make recommendations for the disbursement of funds. It
was also decided, following the review, that the fund
should be used mainly for increasing the permanent
endowment of the poorer colleges and that the
disbursement of funds should be made on an annual basis.
The following decree authorises the endowment grants
which Council has decided, on the recommendation of the
College Contributions Committee, to make out of the
accumulated balance of the College Contributions Fund
under Tit. XII, Sect. I, cl. 2 (b)
(Statutes, 1995, p. 80).

Text of Decree (10)

The following amounts shall be paid in 1997 to the
colleges named in each case under the provisions of Tit.
XII, Sect. I, cl. 2 (b) as grants for the
enlargement of the permanent endowment of those colleges.

    
                                                  £  
 
                           Pembroke College   550,000     

                           St Edmund Hall     550,000    
  
                           St Peter's College 550,000     

                                            ----------         
                                
                                              £1,650,000  
    
                                            ----------         
 

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Decree (11): Conferment of
title of Bodley's Librarian Emeritus

The title of Bodley's Librarian Emeritus is conferred on
D.G. Vaisey, MA, Fellow of Exeter College and Keeper of
the University Archives.

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2 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of
Arts under the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. VI, cl. 1
(Statutes, 1995, p. 345) has been accorded
to the following person who is qualified for membership
of Congregation:

FRANCES MARY DEWEY, Wolfson College

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3 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have
been added to the Register of Congregation:

Bindslev, H., MA, D.Phil., University

Dewey, F.M., MA status, Wolfson

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CONGREGATION 19 March


1 Admission of Proctors

MARTIN ERIC CEADEL, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of New College,
and ANNETTE MARIANNE VOLFING, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of
Oriel College, were presented to the Vice-Chancellor and
admitted to office, the former as Senior Proctor and the
latter as Junior Proctor for the ensuing year.

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2 Admission of Assessor

ROGER JAMES GOODMAN, MA, D.PHIL. (BA Durham), Fellow of
St Antony's College, was presented to the Vice-Chancellor
and admitted to office as Assessor for the ensuing year.

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3 Admission of Pro-Proctors

The Senior Proctor nominated DAVID PALFREYMAN, MA (MBA
Aston), and RICHARD GEORGE RATCLIFFE, MA, D.PHIL.,
Fellows of New College, to be his Deputies.

The Junior Proctor nominated RICHARD ALAN CROSS, MA,
D.PHIL., and JOHN MICHAEL SPIVEY, MA, D.PHIL. (BA
Cambridge), Fellows of Oriel College, to be his
Deputies.

The Deputies were presented to the Vice-Chancellor and
admitted to office.

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BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into
effect on 4 April, see `Examinations and Boards' below.




<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 20 March 1997: University<br /> Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • CONGREGATION 25 March

  • CONGREGATION 29 April 2 p.m.

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue


    CONGREGATION 24 March


    Degree by Special Resolution

    The following special resolution will be deemed to be
    approved at noon on 24 March, unless by that time the
    Registrar has received notice in writing from two or more
    members of Congregation under the provisions of Tit. II,
    Sect. VI, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1995, p. 13) that
    they wish the resolution to be put to a meeting of
    Congregation.

    Text of Special Resolution

    That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the
    following:

    CAROL SCOTT LEONARD, St Antony's College

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    section



    CONGREGATION 25 March


    Notice

    The meeting of Congregation is cancelled. The sole
    business comprises questions to which no opposition has
    been notified and in respect of which no request for an
    adjournment has been received, and Mr Vice-Chancellor
    will accordingly declare the statute approved and the
    preambles adopted without a meeting under the provisions
    of Tit. II, Sect. iii, cl. 11 (Statutes,
    1995, p. 8).

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    section



    CONGREGATION 29 April 2 p.m.

    ¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that
    written notice of any opposition to the preambles of the
    following statutes, signed by at least two members of
    Congregation, must be given to the Registrar by
    noon on Monday, 21 April
    (see the Guide to
    Procedures in Congregation cited in the note at the end
    of `University Agenda').


    Promulgation of Statutes


    Statute (1): Establishment of
    parallel three- and four-year courses to replace the
    existing Honour School of Natural Science (Geology/Earth
    Sciences)

    Explanatory note

    The following statute, and the decree to be made by
    Council if the statute is approved, which are promoted on
    the recommendation of the Physical Sciences Board and
    with the concurrence of the General Board, establish a
    new undergraduate course structure in which candidates
    will have the choice of either a three-year course
    leading to the existing qualification of BA in Natural
    Science (Geology) or a four-year course leading to the
    new degree of Master of Earth Sciences (M.Earth Sc.).

    In common with other parallel three/four-year
    courses, the new structure will offer two distinct but
    complementary undergraduate courses, providing a balanced
    programme in Geology which will cater for a range of
    career options. In recent years, an average of 40 per
    cent of Oxford Geology graduates have gone straight into
    non-scientific careers, in such fields as banking,
    insurance, business consultancy, and commerce; so there
    is a strong case for continuing to offer a three-year
    honours degree for those students who would benefit from
    the kind of wide-ranging scientific training which would
    not only stimulate and test them intellectually, but also
    provide them with quantitative skills which would confer
    extra advantages in their subsequent careers. The
    four-year course will prepare a student for research, or
    for other further career development in a science-based
    direction.

    The proposed move to a three/four-year course
    structure was recently endorsed both by the assessors on
    the 1995 HEFCE teaching quality audit of Oxford Earth
    Sciences, and by the 1996 General Board committee to
    review the Department of Earth Sciences.

    The M.Earth Sc., like the M.Eng, M.Phys., and
    M.Chem., will be awarded in place of the BA,
    and the legislation provides for those who are awarded it
    to become members of Convocation after the lapse of the
    same period of time as that after which holders of the BA
    are entitled to supplicate for the MA, and to enjoy all
    the privileges of an MA of the University.

    (1) WHEREAS it is expedient to establish the
    Degree of Master of Earth Sciences, NOW THE UNIVERSITY OF
    OXFORD, in exercise of the powers in that behalf
    conferred upon it by the Universities of Oxford and
    Cambridge Act, 1923, and of all other powers enabling it,
    ENACTS, clauses 1 and 2 being subject to the approval of
    Her Majesty in Council, AS FOLLOWS.

    1 In Tit. II, Sect. II, cl. 1,
    concerning the composition of Congregation
    (Statutes, 1995, p. 5), after `Master of
    Chemistry,' insert `Master of Earth Sciences,' and after
    `or Master of Chemistry' insert `or Master of Earth
    Sciences'.

    2 In Tit. III, cl. 3, concerning
    Convocation (p. 29), after `Master of Chemistry' insert:

    `Master of Earth Sciences'.

    3 In Tit. XI, cl. 4, concerning
    degrees of the University (p. 77), after `Master of
    Biochemistry' insert:

    `Master of Earth Sciences'.

    4 Clauses 1 and 2 of this statute
    shall be effective from the date on which they are
    approved by Her Majesty in Council; clause 3 shall have
    immediate effect.

    Decree to be made by Council if the Statute is
    approved

    1 In Ch. I, Sect. I, FIRST SCHEDULE
    (Statutes, 1995, p. 183, as amended by
    Decree (1) of 29 February 1996, Gazette,
    Vol. 126, p. 816), insert new item 26 as follows and
    renumber existing items 26-8 as items 27- 9:

    `26. Master of Earth Sciences

    Ego A. B. etc. testor E. F. (or, if more than one, X,
    Y, etc.), e collegio (or aula or societate) C. D., quem
    (or quos) per integrum tempus ad gradum Magistri in
    Scientiis Terrenis per statuta requisitum intra
    academiam, prout statuta requirunt, cubile et victum
    continue sumpsisse scio, quatenus examen publicum
    subierit (or subierint) et reliqua compleverit (or
    compleverint) omnia quae per statuta Universitatis
    requiruntur (nisi quatenus cum eo dispensatum fuerit),
    gratiam (or gratias) a collegio suo (or aula sua or
    societate sua) pro gradu Magistri in Scientiis Terrenis
    concessam (or concessas) fuisse; fide mea data huic
    Universitati.

                                   A. B. dec. Coll. C.'
    
    

    2 Ibid., SECOND SCHEDULE, item 23 (p. 186), after
    `Chemistry,' insert `Earth
    Sciences
    ,'.

    3 Ibid., after `Chimia' insert
    `or Scientiis Terrenis'.

    4 Ibid., THIRD SCHEDULE, item 21
    (p. 188), after `Chemistry,' insert
    `Earth Sciences,'.

    5 Ibid., after `Chimia' insert
    `or Scientiis Terrenis'.

    6 Ibid., FOURTH SCHEDULE, item 16
    (p. 190), after `Chemistry,' insert
    `Earth Sciences,'.

    7 Ibid., after `Chimia' insert
    `or Scientiis Terrenis'.

    8 Ibid., Sect. III, cll. 2
    (a) (twice) and 16 (pp. 191 and 194, as amended
    by Decree (2) of 21 June 1996, Gazette,
    Vol. 126, p. 1282), in each case after `Chemistry,'
    insert `Earth Sciences,'.

    9 Ibid., Sect. IV, cl. 1 (p. 194),
    after `Master of Chemistry' insert:

    `Master of Earth Sciences'.

    10 Ibid., Sect. VIII, cl. 1 (p.
    197), after `Chemistry' insert `Earth Sciences or'.

    11 Ibid., footnote 1, after
    `Chemistry' insert `or Earth Sciences'.

    12 Ibid. (p. 198), after `Chemistry'
    insert `or Earth Sciences'.

    13 In Examination
    Decrees
    , 1996, p. 19, ll. 14 and 19, in each case
    after `Chemistry' insert `or Earth Sciences'.

    14 Ibid., p. 21, l. 8, after
    `CHEMISTRY' insert `OR EARTH SCIENCES'.

    15 Ibid., ll. 13, 18, and 28, in
    each case after `Chemistry' insert `or Earth Sciences'.

    16 Ibid., p. 412, after l. 18 insert
    new cl. 5 as follows and renumber existing cll. 5--13
    (pp. 412--4) as cll. 6--14:

    `5. (a) Save as provided in cl. 5 (c)
    below, the name of a candidate offering either Geology in
    the three- year course or Earth Sciences in the four-year
    course shall not be published in a Class List until he or
    she has completed Parts A and B of the respective
    examinations.

    (b) A student who has been admitted to the
    Status of Senior Student may be admitted to Part A of
    either the three-year course or the four-year course in
    the term in which he or she has completed not fewer than
    five terms of residence.

    (c) In such cases as shall be approved by the
    Board of the Faculty of Physical Sciences, a Senior
    Student may be deemed to have satisfied the Examiners in
    Part A of the four-year course in Earth Sciences and may
    be admitted to Part B of the examination in the term in
    which the student has completed at least six terms of
    residence.

    (d) The Examiners in Earth Sciences for the
    four- year course shall be entitled to award a pass or
    classified honours to candidates in the Second Public
    Examination who have reached a standard considered
    adequate. The Examiners shall give due consideration to
    the performance in both parts of the examination. A
    candidate who obtains only a pass or fails to satisfy the
    Examiners may enter again for Part B of the examination
    on one, but not more than one, subsequent occasion.

    (e) A candidate adjudged worthy of honours in
    the Second Public Examination for the four-year course in
    Earth Sciences may supplicate for the Degree of Master of
    Earth Sciences provided that he or she has fulfilled all
    the conditions for admission to a degree of the
    University as specified in Ch.I, Sect. I, § 1, cl.
    1.'

    17 Ibid., p. 845, l. 10, after
    `Chemistry' insert `or Earth Sciences'.

    18 Ibid., p. 985, l. 39, delete
    `Physical Sciences' and substitute `Geology or Earth
    Sciences in the Honour School of Natural Science'.

    19 Ibid., p. 1027, l. 4, after
    `Master of Chemistry,' insert
    `Master of Earth Sciences,'.

    20 Ibid., p. 1059, l. 21, after
    `M.Chem.' insert `or the M.Earth Sc.'

    21 Ibid., l. 36, after `M.Chem.' insert `or the Degree
    of M.Earth Sc.'

    22 Clause 9 of this decree shall be effective from the
    date on which clause 2 of Statute (...) approved by
    Congregation on ... is approved by Her Majesty in
    Council; the remaining clauses shall have immediate
    effect.

    Key to Decree

    Cll. 1--7 provide for admission to the degree of M.Earth
    Sc.

    Cl. 8 provides for the incorporation to the Oxford
    M.Earth Sc. of holders of the Cambridge M.Sci. in the
    appropriate subject.

    Cl. 9 provides for holders of the new degree to be
    admitted to membership of Convocation.

    Cll. 10--12 determine the academic precedence of
    holders of the new degree.

    Cl. 13 dispenses candidates with Senior Status from
    the requirement to have passed the First Public
    Examination as a condition of supplication for the new
    degree.

    Cll. 14 and 15 extend the present provisions
    governing the time and exercises required for the degree
    of BA so as to cover the new degree.

    Cl. 16 provides for candidates attaining honours in
    the relevant honour school to be eligible to supplicate
    for the new degree.

    Cl. 17 inserts a reference to the new degree into the
    provisions governing the award of the relevant higher
    doctorate.

    Cl. 18 provides for the appointment of examiners for
    the new degree.

    Cl. 19 provides for the form of class and pass lists
    for the new degree.

    Cl. 20 provides for the issue of certificates to
    holders of the new degree.

    Cl. 21 provides that students for the new degree
    shall pay university composition fees at the same rate as
    those working for the degree of BA.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Statute (2): Replacement of the
    Committee for the Scientific Collections with Visitors of
    the Oxford University Museum of Natural History

    Explanatory note

    Among the recommendations of the Review Committee for the
    University Museum accepted by the General Board were the
    change of the museum's name to the Oxford University
    Museum of Natural History and the replacement of the
    Committee for the Scientific Collections in the
    University Museum with Visitors of the museum. The change
    of name has already been implemented. The following
    statute, and the decree to be made by Council if the
    statute is approved, establish the Visitors of the Oxford
    University Museum of Natural History to replace the
    Committee for the Scientific Collections, and effect
    consequential changes required elsewhere in the relevant
    legislation.

    (2) WHEREAS it is expedient for the Committee
    for the Scientific Collections to be replaced with
    Visitors of the Oxford University Museum of Natural
    History, THE UNIVERSITY ENACTS AS FOLLOWS.

    In Tit. VIII, Sect. VI, cl. 1 (Statutes,
    1995, p. 62, as amended by Statute (2) approved by
    Congregation on 3 December 1996, Gazette,
    pp. 401, 433), delete `Committee for the Scientific
    Collections in the Oxford University Museum of Natural
    History' and after `Advisory Council for Ornithology'
    insert:

    `Visitors of the Oxford University Museum of Natural
    History'.

    Decree to be made by Council if the Statute is
    approved

    1 In Ch. III, Sect. III, § 4, cl. 4 (6), concerning
    the Committee for the Pitt Rivers Museum
    (Statutes, 1995, p. 250, as amended by
    Decree (1) of 5 December 1996, Gazette, p.
    432), delete `Principal Curator' and substitute
    `Director'.

    2 Ibid., Sect. LVII, cl. 1 (6),
    (7), concerning the Committee for the Museums and the
    Scientific Collections

    (p. 306, as amended by the same
    decree), delete `Principal Curator' and substitute
    `Director'.

    3 Ibid., Sect. LXXI, concerning the
    Committee for the Scientific Collections in the Oxford
    University Museum of Natural History (p. 317, as amended
    by the same decree and by Decree (2) of 6 February 1997,
    Gazette, p. 708), delete title and
    substitute `Oxford University Museum of Natural
    History
    '.

    4 Ibid., delete cll. 1 and 2 and
    substitute:

    `1. The Visitors of the Oxford University Museum of
    Natural History shall comprise:

    (1) a chairman who shall be appointed by the Vice-
    Chancellor;

    (2) one of the Proctors or the Assessor as may be
    agreed between them;

    (3), (4) two persons appointed by the General Board,
    of whom one shall be a person who is not a resident
    holder of a teaching, research, or administrative post in
    the University or in any college or other society;

    (5), (6) two persons appointed by Council, of whom
    one shall be a person who is not a resident holder of a
    teaching, research, or administrative post in the
    University or in any college or other society;

    (7) the Linacre Professor of Zoology or his or her
    nominee;

    (8) the Professor of Zoology or his or her nominee;

    (9) the Professor of Geology or his or her nominee;

    (10) the Professor of the Physics and Chemistry of
    Minerals or his or her nominee.

    The Visitors may co-opt up to three other members,
    who need not be members of Congregation. Members shall
    hold office for a period of three years, and shall be
    re-eligible. Any or all of the Curators of the four
    Collections may be invited by the Visitors to attend
    meetings, or parts thereof, but shall not have voting
    rights.

    The director of the museum shall act as secretary
    to the Visitors provided always that the Visitors at
    their discretion may require the director to withdraw
    from part or all of any meeting.

    2. The duties of the Visitors shall be

    (a) to establish, maintain, and as necessary
    modify the general policy framework governing the
    museum's operations;

    (b) to exercise responsibility for the care
    and maintenance of the collections in the museum,
    including the acquisition and disposal of collections and
    specimens;

    (c) to have general oversight of the museum's
    finances, and to present annually to the General Board an
    estimate of receipts and expenditure for the ensuing
    financial year;

    (d) to appoint staff for the museum, in
    particular staff to assist the curators appointed under
    clause 3 below in the maintenance of the collections,
    and, subject to the provisions of any statute, decree, or
    regulation of general application, to determine their
    duties and conditions of service;

    (e) to co-ordinate activities to raise
    additional funds for the museum;

    (f) to prepare annually for submission to
    Congregation a printed report of the activities of the
    Visitors.'

    5 Ibid., delete cl. 3 (p. 318) and
    renumber existing cll. 4–7 (as amended by Decree (2)
    of 6 February 1997) as cll. 3–6.

    6 Ibid., cll. 4 (7)–(9) and 5
    (a) as renumbered, in each case delete
    `Committee for the Scientific Collections' and substitute
    `Visitors of the Oxford University Museum of Natural
    History'.

    7 Ibid., cl. 5 (a),
    (b) (twice), (c), and (d) as
    renumbered, in each case delete `committee' and
    substitute `Visitors'.

    8 Ibid., cl. 5 (a) and
    (b) as renumbered, in each case delete `its' and
    substitute `their'.

    9 Ibid., cl. 5 (a) as
    renumbered, delete `it has' and substitute `they have'.

    10 Ibid., cl. 5 (c) as
    renumbered, delete `it' and substitute `they'.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Statute (3): Bampton and Sarum
    Lecturerships

    Explanatory note

    The University in 1779 accepted a benefaction to
    establish the Bampton Lecturership, the holder of which
    is required to give eight divinity lecture sermons in
    Hilary and Trinity Full Terms annually (or, since 1910,
    biennially) in the Church of St Mary's. Although this is
    not specified in the original bequest, the lectures have
    traditionally been given on Sundays, and it is laid down
    in the present statute that they should be. In 1952, in
    order to widen eligibility for the lecturership beyond
    clergymen of the Anglican Communion, part of the income
    of the fund was used to set up the Sarum Lecturership,
    which is open to persons of high scholarship who profess
    the Christian Faith.

    The Bampton Electors consider, in consultation
    with the Theology Board, that it is now desirable to
    change the arrangements for the Bampton Lecturership to
    enable the lectures to be given on any day of the week,
    not just Sunday, and in just one term if thought
    appropriate, instead of having to be spread over two
    terms as at present. This is both to encourage greater
    attendance and to facilitate scholarly interchange after
    the lectures and also, if thought appropriate, the
    election of distinguished lecturers from overseas who
    could not attend for the duration of two terms. The
    opportunity is taken in addition to make other minor
    changes to facilitate the operation of the Bampton
    Lectures.

    It is also now expedient to abolish the Sarum
    Lectures, which are considered to have become unnecessary
    in so far as since 1990 the Bampton Lecturership has been
    open to both men and women, and to suitable persons
    unconnected with churches within the Anglican Communion.
    It is proposed to utilise the moneys thus saved to
    further the purposes of clause 11 (c) of the
    existing statute (namely the making of grants for the
    promotion of studies in the theological subjects
    specified in the statute), in particular in helping to
    refinance the Regius Professorship of Moral and Pastoral
    Theology, and in holding occasional special lectures to
    be given by eminent theologians.

    The following statute, and the decree to be made
    by Council if the statute is approved, provide
    accordingly.

    (3) WHEREAS it is expedient to change the
    arrangements for the Bampton Lectures in order to
    encourage greater attendance and to facilitate scholarly
    interchange, and WHEREAS forty copies of the lectures are
    no longer sufficient to supply all the specified
    recipients, and WHEREAS it is now expedient to abolish
    the Sarum Lectures and to use the money thus saved for
    the promotion of the study of Theology generally, NOW THE
    UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD, in exercise of the powers in that
    behalf conferred upon it by the Universities of Oxford
    and Cambridge Act, 1923, and of all other powers enabling
    it, ENACTS, subject to the approval of Her Majesty in
    Council, AS FOLLOWS.

    1 In Tit. XV, Sect. I, heading
    (Statutes, 1995, p. 113), delete `and
    Sarum'.

    2 Ibid., cl. 2, delete `Sundays in'
    and substitute `days in either or both of'.

    3 Ibid., cl. 4, delete `forty
    copies ... one copy being' and substitute `sufficient
    copies of his or her lecture sermons for one copy to be'.

    4 Ibid., cl. 5, after `he' insert
    `or she'.

    5 Ibid., delete cll. 6–10 (pp.
    113–14), and renumber existing cl. 11 as cl. 6.

    6 Ibid., cl. 6 as renumbered, after
    `charge on the' delete `annual'.

    7 Ibid., delete `or Sarum Lecturer,
    as the case may be,' and substitute `Lecturer'.

    8 Ibid., delete `(b)
    towards ... Sarum Lectures;' and substitute:

    `(b) towards other costs associated with the
    Bampton Lectures;'.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Decree to be made by Council if the Statute is
    approved

    1 In Ch. VII, Sect. I, § 2, cl. 16, concerning
    posts established by statute or decree
    (Statutes, 1995, p. 355), delete `Sarum
    Lecturership'.

    2 Ibid., Sect. IV, § 3, cl. 9,
    concerning university lecturerships (p. 493), delete
    `Sarum Lecturer'.

    3 In Ch. XI, § 3, title,
    concerning sermons (p. 691), delete `on Sunday
    mornings
    '.

    4 Ibid., cl. 1 (p. 691), after
    `Bampton Lecturer' insert `(in the event that the Bampton
    Lectures are delivered on Sunday mornings)'.

    5 Ibid., cl. 3, delete `Sundays in'
    and substitute `days in either or both of'.

    Key to Decree

    Cll. 1 and 2 remove references to the Sarum Lecturership
    from the schedules specifying posts which are exempted
    from certain provisions applying to posts generally.

    Cll. 3–5 permit the Bampton Lectures to be
    delivered on a day other than Sunday, and in only one
    term.




    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 20 March 1997: Notices<br />

    Notices


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
    previously published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue



    UNIVERSITY PREACHERS


    Trinity Term 1997

    Thursday, 24 April, at 8 a.m. Holy Communion
    (Latin). At St
    Mary's.

    Sunday, 27 April, at 10 a.m. THE RT. REVD
    AND RT HON. THE LORD RUNCIE, Honorary Fellow of Brasenose
    College, Honorary Fellow of Merton College, sometime
    Archbishop of Canterbury. (St Mark's Day
    Sermon.
    ) At Magdalen College.

    Sunday, 4 May, at 10 a.m. JOANNA TROLLOPE,
    novelist. At St Mary's.

    Sunday, 11 May, at 10 a.m. DR SHEILA
    CASSIDY. At St Mary's.

    *Whit Sunday, 18 May, at 10 a.m. THE REVD DR
    HENRY CHADWICK, KBE, FBA, Honorary Student of Christ
    Church, sometime Dean of Christ
    Church, sometime Regius Professor of Divinity. At
    the Cathedral.

    *Trinity Sunday, 25 May, at 10 a.m. THE RT.
    REVD DR MICHAEL NAZIR-ALI, Bishop of Rochester.
    At All Souls College.

    Sunday, 1 June, at 10 a.m.
    THE REVD ANTHONY MEREDITH, SJ, Lecturer in Heythrop College,
    University of London, sometime Tutor at Campion Hall. At St
    Mary's.

    Sunday, 8 June, at 10 a.m. DR JANE SHAW,
    Fellow of Regent's Park
    College. At St Mary's.

    Sunday, 15 June, at 10 a.m. THE RT. REVD
    JAMES JONES, Bishop of
    Hull. At St Mary's.

    *Commemoration Sunday, 22 June, at 10 a.m.
    THE RT. REVD DR GEOFFREY ROWELL, Bishop of Basingstoke,
    Emeritus Fellow of Keble College. At St Mary's.

    Sunday, 29 June, at 10 a.m. DR PAULA
    CLIFFORD, Lecturer in French at Magdalen and Somerville
    Colleges. (St John Baptist's Day Sermon.)
    At Magdalen College.

    *On these days Doctors will wear their robes.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ORATION BY THE SENIOR PROCTOR

    SENIOR PROCTOR: Insignissime Vice-Cancellarie,
    licetne anglice loqui?

    VICE-CHANCELLOR: Licet.

    SENIOR PROCTOR:

    What is a proctor? When David
    Copperfield put that question to his friend Steerforth,
    Steerforth replied: `Why, he is ... a functionary whose
    existence, in the natural course of things, would have
    terminated about two hundred years ago.' Of course that
    was not a university proctor, but a legal official in
    London. Yet even at Oxford, where outsiders suspect that
    all sorts of activities go on that ought to have
    terminated two hundred years ago, and where it is at
    least true that antique job-titles persist more than in
    many other places, that of proctor is often seen as
    particularly obscure. I can understand that colleagues at
    the Sorbonne may be unaware of the existence of the
    Liber procuratorum nationis anglicanae (alemanniae,
    picardiae, gallicanae
    , etc.) in universitate
    parisiensi
    in the fourteenth and fifteenth
    centuries, but the level of knowledge is scarcely more
    impressive here: the eyes of colleagues glaze over as
    they ask: `Now what exactly does your job entail?'

    Several different replies are possible, and I shall begin
    with an oblique one. In some ways, the Proctors and
    Assessor may be thought to resemble Government Ministers,
    perhaps Ministers without portfolio. The Assessor,
    however, does have an identifiable portfolio, for student
    welfare. The original intention, when the post was
    created in 1960, was to provide representation on Council
    and other central bodies for the women's colleges,
    graduate colleges and new societies, but the Franks
    Report in 1966 suggested that the full integration of
    those bodies into the mainstream of university life
    logically entailed the abolition of the post of Assessor.
    Instead, I am happy to say, it was redefined with a new
    orientation. The Assessor now chairs a number of
    important committees, namely the Access Funds Committee
    of Council, the Committee on Student Hardship, and the
    Clubs Committee, and sits ex officio on the
    Equal Opportunities Committee of Council and the General
    Board, and on the Committee on Student Health. The
    outgoing Assessor has worked tirelessly on these and many
    other matters, and in particular has done much to raise
    awareness among both Junior and Senior Members of the
    real financial hardship experienced by some 10 per cent
    of the student body, and of the various actual and
    potential means of alleviating that hardship, which
    affects not just individuals but the whole academic
    community, for instance by delaying thesis completion
    rates among fourth-year graduates.

    If the Assessor has a portfolio for student welfare, and
    the Senior and Junior Proctor are more like Ministers
    without portfolio, would it not be appropriate to see
    them as a triumvirate, and indeed to call them all
    Proctors? Hebdomadal Council has taken an important step
    in that direction, but it has clearly not been willing to
    go the whole way. The step has been to recognize that it
    is no longer justifiable to define the post of Assessor
    as a part-time one. The last few Assessors have put in at
    least as many hours as the Proctors, and it was
    demonstrably unfair to expect them to carry on giving
    undergraduate tutorials and possibly lectures as well.
    The Assessor's stipend has also been increased, from one-
    half to two-thirds of that of the Proctors. That makes a
    point about work-load, but also about responsibility.
    There is indeed a significant overlap between the
    responsibilities of the Assessor on the one hand and the
    Proctors on the other, but there are also major
    differences. The Assessor has no responsibility for
    examinations or for student discipline: if there is an
    unseemly episode, it is not the Assessor who gets a
    telephone call from the Vice-Chancellor. On the other
    hand, the Assessor's role in administering hardship and
    other funds carries with it an important financial
    responsibility which is in practice much greater than
    that of the Proctors, whatever delusions of grandeur the
    Senior Proctor may have when attending finance committees
    or signing the University payroll.

    When people ask me what the job consists of, I generally
    mention five main areas: Committees, Examinations,
    Discipline, Ceremonial, and Ombudsman-like work. It is
    the first of these, in particular, that accounts for the
    similarity between the schedules of the Assessor and the
    Proctors. Each of us sits on more than fifty committees:
    Hebdomadal Council, the General Board, many of the sub-
    committees of each of those bodies, including the
    wonderfully-named Standing Committee on Standing
    Committees, and a whole range of Boards of Curators,
    Delegates, Trustees, Visitors and other committees, some
    meeting frequently, others rarely. We are privileged to
    obtain wide experience of the University's administration
    and take part in decision-making. We may not have much
    expertise, or at least not initially, but we have read
    our papers and listened, we have become familiar with the
    essential jargon of RAWP (the Resource Allocation Working
    Party), rafts, ratchets and ring-fencing, of footprints
    and spines and overheads, and we have gradually been able
    to participate more actively in discussion, always being
    listened to with courtesy and attention. One aspect of
    our role on committees is that of `tribunes of the
    people', asking the questions and making the points that
    occur to an ordinary CUF or University Lecturer. The
    `tribune of the people' argument was explicitly used to
    justify the decision to make the Senior Proctor one of
    the five members of a new Committee to Review the
    Salaries of Senior University Officers. In return, there
    is an obvious benefit to the whole community, namely that
    we are then able to disseminate a certain understanding
    of `the system' in our colleges, to student
    representatives, and more generally. If Coopers and
    Lybrand, and the Commission of Inquiry, have been minded
    to recommend little change to the role of the Proctors
    and Assessor in the governance of the University, it must
    be because they recognize these practical points. They
    may also have noticed that former Proctors and Assessors
    provide a pool of people with interest and experience who
    may at a future date be prepared to serve on committees
    or fill other responsible positions in the University or
    in public life. Proctors pop up in the most unexpected
    places. I happened to be reading the entry in Who's
    Who
    of the Chief Executive of the Higher Education
    Funding Council for England the other day, and found to
    my consternation that he had been Senior Proctor in
    1975—6.

    I should like to move straight to the fifth area
    mentioned above, which I have called `Ombudsman-like
    work'—and I note in passing that it was my pleasure,
    at the Lord Mayor's Christmas Reception, to meet my
    predecessor but thirty, Sir David Yardley, until recently
    the Local Administration Ombudsman. This area too is
    something that is at least partly shared by the Proctors
    and the Assessor. The new Proctors' and Assessor's
    Memorandum
    —the change in title from
    Proctors' Memorandum is
    significant—announces in its Introduction: `The
    Proctors and Assessor are available if students wish to
    consult them in confidence for help, information, or
    advice about University matters or any other matters
    outside the sphere of their college advisers.' That
    happens not infrequently, but it is not only Junior
    Members who consult us or our experienced staff.
    Conversely, we ourselves consult widely, both formally
    and informally. Under the general heading of `Ombudsman-
    like work' I would include the constant probing,
    encouraging, and oiling of wheels that goes on, and in
    which all three of us are involved. It may arise out of a
    discussion in a committee, or a query from a colleague,
    or personal experience, or a sense of opportunity or
    disquiet, but whatever the origin, the Proctors and the
    Assessor are well placed to ask questions and get things
    moving. Another name for it is `networking'. In this
    connection, I should like to thank you, Sir, for making
    time to see us on Tuesday mornings during term, when we
    could raise with you any matters that had come to our
    attention and that we thought should be aired with you.
    That kind of ready access is invaluable, and we have
    greatly appreciated it.

    The remaining three areas of examinations, discipline and
    ceremonial duties are traditionally the business of the
    Proctors alone, and not of the Assessor. Yet it has
    seemed appropriate for the Assessor, who alone of the
    three sits on the Advisory Committee of Council on
    Degrees by Diploma and Encaenia Honorary Degrees, to play
    an official part at Encaenia and at conferments of
    Degrees by Diploma, and there may be other ceremonial
    occasions, such as University Sermons, where the presence
    of the Assessor in an official if voluntary capacity
    would not be inappropriate. It is arguable, too, that
    there is a certain overlap between the Assessor's concern
    for the well-being of Clubs and the Proctors'
    responsibility for their formal regulation. This year,
    for instance, the Assessor and I have scrutinized the
    affairs of several Clubs whose operation has given cause
    for concern, and in more than one case we have taken
    action which could properly be called disciplinary.

    Ceremonial duties, discipline and examinations
    nevertheless remain largely the concern of the Proctors.
    In relation to the first of these, we have enjoyed
    pretending to be native Latin-speakers at degree
    ceremonies and at the termly Latin Communion, which has
    seen a revival of the ancient custom by which a Proctor
    served as Assistant Celebrant; we have attended
    University Sermons and witnessed the handing over of the
    gloves after the Court Sermon; we have attended the
    Chancellor and various distinguished guests; we have
    enjoyed the extraordinary combination of full-blown
    British pageantry and quiet African dignity in the garden
    of Buckingham Palace; we have sworn in a Bedel, several
    Pro-Vice-Chancellors, two Clerks to the Market, and the
    new Director of University Library Services and Bodley's
    Librarian; and on these and other occasions we have
    admired the sure handling of all ceremonial matters by
    the Vice-Chancellor's Secretary and the University
    Marshal in their different but complementary spheres, and
    the confidence-inspiring reliability of the Verger and
    the Bedels.

    The Proctors' and Assessor's Memorandum,
    this year transformed in content, style and livery,
    points out that `the Proctors no longer prowl the streets
    of Oxford after dark to make sure that students are
    wearing their academic gowns and keeping out of ale-
    houses', and explains their role in enforcing student
    discipline in terms of `ensuring that regulations
    designed to maintain the orderly working of the
    University are implemented'. That implies partnership
    with student representatives at least as much as punitive
    intervention, and we have appreciated our regular
    meetings with the Executive of the Student Union and with
    the Presidents of Junior and Middle Common Rooms and
    College Student Unions, out of which have come some
    constructive ideas for working together. It also implies
    partnership with college deans, with whom we also have a
    valuable termly meeting, and with the Thames Valley
    Police. Over the past two years the Proctors have also
    been heavily involved in the deliberations of the
    Committee to Review Disciplinary Procedures which has now
    presented both its main report and a supplementary report
    to Council. Several important recommendations are still
    under discussion by the Conference of Colleges, but the
    idea of partnership has been a key one here too, in the
    form of `congruent action' by University and College
    authorities.

    It has been necessary to investigate possible breaches of
    regulations, and in some cases to proceed to a Court.
    Computer misuse has again been of particular concern this
    year. The Proctors' Court has no statutory existence as
    such, and the arrival of the Clerk has even deprived it
    of its permanent court-room, but it offers a practical
    and simple way for the Proctors to discharge their
    statutory duty to `investigate complaints ... ensure that
    the statutes, customs and privileges of the University
    are observed' (Tit. IX.vi.3.5, Statutes,
    1995, p. 68) and `enforce and prevent breaches' of
    statutes and regulations (Tit. XIII.10, p. 97). In
    Trinity Term, in particular, these Courts can take an
    inordinate amount of time, and it may be necessary to
    call on Pro-Proctors in future to spread the load. We
    have greatly appreciated the willingness of our
    splendidly professional Pro-Proctors to assist us outside
    the Examination Schools and to represent us on a wide
    range of other occasions: we hope that the prospect of
    some limited court duty in addition would not be too
    daunting.

    Complaints may of course relate to matters other than
    breaches of regulations, and we have investigated a fair
    number. Although the Proctors are not fully independent
    in the Nolan sense, i.e. external to the University,
    Oxford has always valued their independence in such
    investigations, and that message has recently been
    reiterated by Council in its response to the interim
    report of a CVCP working party to consider some of the
    recommendations in the Second Report of the Nolan
    Committee. I am pleased to report that in one area, that
    of postgraduate degrees, there has been a decrease in the
    number of complaints this year. I hope this is a trend
    that will continue. It may be that the constant process
    of clarifying what is expected from candidates and
    examiners—this year again the wording of the various
    documents has been modified in the light of
    experience—is paying off. I hope that the new
    timetable proposed by the Graduate Studies Committee of
    the General Board for confirmation of status nine terms
    after admission as a graduate student, rather than six
    terms after transfer to D.Phil. status as at present,
    together with a new recommended point of compulsory self-
    assessment six terms after admission, will be a further
    help in avoiding problems in the final stages of thesis
    preparation.

    Other examination matters are largely the concern of the
    Junior Proctor, who has dealt with everything with great
    enthusiasm, efficiency and tact, ably supported by Linda
    Mason, now redesignated Assistant Clerk to the Proctors,
    and by the new Clerk of the Schools and her staff. They
    have sorted out innumerable queries and problems, and
    have kept sometimes wayward Chairmen of Examiners in
    order. The marking conventions for all First and Second
    Public Examinations are currently being scrutinized in
    the hope of being able to achieve better Quality
    Assurance. The precise meaning of the term Enhancement,
    mysteriously coupled with Quality Assurance in TQA
    documentation, is unclear, but perhaps it could be
    applied, inter alia, to the various
    research projects that are seeking a better understanding
    of why women achieve less good degree results in some
    subjects than they might be expected to, with the aim of
    developing the fairest possible examination system.

    When we took up office a year ago, Coopers and Lybrand
    had not yet reported on the governance of the University;
    the possibility of a large benefaction for the Management
    School was a dark secret known only to a few; the results
    of the RAE were a long way off; and many retired members
    of Congregation were blissfully unaware that they had
    lost their voting rights. Some of these are still live
    issues, others have already begun to slide back into
    obscurity. Sometimes the developments of more lasting
    significance are those that do not make the headlines. I
    think in particular of two initiatives attributable to
    our immediate predecessors, the Examinations Policy
    Committee, which has now settled into a pattern of termly
    meetings, and a plea for strategic academic planning,
    which has borne fruit in the new standing orders of the
    Planning and Development Committee of the General Board,
    and also in a new Planning and Resources Sub-Committee of
    the Resources Committee, charged among other things with
    establishing the academic priorities of the University
    over the next decade or so. Together with the Master of
    Balliol's Working Party on Sites, which has come up with
    a medium-to-long-term strategy for the geographical
    development of the University, these bodies provide
    welcome evidence of a shift away from essentially
    reactive attitudes towards something more proactive.
    There have been calls for the University to take an
    independent line on courses, fees, and funding more
    generally, instead of meekly accepting whatever the
    Funding Council and the research councils decide. We
    shall await with interest the recommendations of the
    Commission of Inquiry on those and other subjects. At the
    very least we shall need to find more money for bursaries
    and graduate studentships, as the flow of externally-
    funded grants and studentships slows to a trickle.

    Not everything is changing, of course. I was interested
    to read the following entry in a diary kept by the Senior
    Proctor in 1945–6: `In the afternoon a tiresome
    meeting of the Joint Advisory Science Committee: The
    Science Professors seem to suffer from a delusion that
    there is a conspiracy by the University, and by Council
    ... in particular, to ill-use them and to keep them in
    the dark about everything. Perhaps this delusion would
    not be so strong were they not dissatisfied with the
    proposed increase in their salaries.'

    Until seven years ago Proctors regularly complained about
    having to attend meetings of Congregation for which there
    was no business. That requirement was then abolished, and
    in some years there were no meetings of Congregation at
    all, or rather none at which a division was taken. I must
    confess that I had never attended a debate in
    Congregation until last Hilary Term. This year there have
    been several occasions on which important issues have
    been discussed, and most members must have become aware
    of the value and power of Congregation. There was even a
    certain excitement in counting and announcing the votes,
    not least when it was a question of seeing if the magic
    figure of 75 votes in favour of a resolution would be
    achieved, so making a postal vote mandatory if Council
    wished to maintain its opposition. Yet the debates were
    largely formal, in that the interventions were almost all
    written in advance, and there was little if any genuine
    dialogue. It has been suggested that the Cambridge system
    of Discussions might usefully be tried here, and I hope
    some thought will be given to that.

    Among the changes that have taken place in the University
    in the past year, one stands out, and that is the
    abolition of the Curators of the Bodleian Library after
    383 years, having been established on the death of Sir
    Thomas Bodley in 1613. The Proctors and Assessor were
    privileged to take part regularly in the meetings of the
    Curators and the Standing Committee until the last, and
    then to undertake a final Visitation of Duke Humfrey: in
    the event more of a perlustration, whereas our distant
    predecessors would personally check the volumes on the
    shelves each year. Reading through the two leather-bound
    handlists stamped `Pro. Sen.' for `Procurator Senior',
    and dated 1614, I came across an addition in another
    hand, made therefore somewhat later in the century: under
    `Libri Artium', after Strabo, Spinosa and Stobaeus,
    appeared the entry `Shak-speare'. It had no doubt been a
    difficult decision, whether to spend scarce money on the
    works of a lightweight modern author, and a playwright at
    that, rather than those of a good solid philosopher,
    theologian or ancient writer. Of course this First Folio
    was disposed of by the Bodleian as soon as the improved
    second edition came out in 1632, and was only reacquired
    at great expense this century. Not that the books were in
    much danger of being disturbed by readers in earlier
    times: as late as 1831 an average of only four readers a
    day used the Bodleian [BC 89(107), p. 7]. Now there are
    huge numbers of readers, increasingly from outside
    Oxford, and equally huge numbers of visitors, for the
    management of whom a scheme was approved by Council in
    January, for submission to the National Lottery Heritage
    Fund. A survey of visitors in the immediate vicinity of
    the Bodleian undertaken by the consultants for the scheme
    found that 47 per cent knew no facts at all about the
    Bodleian. Perhaps the version of the University motto
    displayed above the north door of the Divinity School,
    looking down on the area in which future parties of
    visitors will be corralled awaiting admission, could, as
    a contribution to the University's mission statement, be
    adapted to read: Dominus illuminatio eorum:
    May the Lord enlighten them!

    Every Proctor and Assessor will have his or her favourite
    committees. Among mine have been the Estates Committee,
    which has not only been on progress to the farms up on
    the Welsh marches, but has been pursuing an active and
    successful trading policy, with several site visits
    during the year, resulting in a steady improvement of the
    urban property portfolio; the Delegates of the University
    Press and its Finance Committee, to which come regular
    reports of enormous successes right across the world and
    of scarcely less enormous challenges and problems faced
    and overcome, all on a scale hitherto quite alien to a
    CUF Lecturer in an Arts Faculty (the Press was no doubt
    prudent to add to its portfolio of journals during the
    year a new title Disasters, to complement
    the existing Survival); and the Curators of
    the Botanic Gardens and the Parks. The last-named were
    heavily involved in the negotiations over the possible
    need to make alternative provision of sports facilities
    for the Mansfield Road Club, as was the Committee for
    Sport, on which I have also served. I am very glad to say
    that the vote in Congregation did not signal the end of
    the University's interest in the matter of sports
    facilities. Earlier this month Council took the decision
    to launch a wide-ranging review of the provision of
    facilities for University sport for all students and
    staff, and with several major developments already in the
    pipeline, I am sure that sport at Oxford will soon be
    flourishing even more than at present.

    Mr Vice-Chancellor, not the least pleasure of being a
    Proctor or Assessor is the sheer variety and
    unpredictability of the job, despite all those
    committees. The legal expertise of the Junior Proctor has
    been frequently called upon, to our collective benefit
    and relief. He and the Assessor have been splendidly
    stalwart and companionable colleagues at all times. They
    have taken everything in their stride, including the
    acquisition of a wife in one case, and of a daughter in
    the other. There is no time to pay tribute to all the
    many other conscientious, hard-working, patient and
    thoroughly excellent people with whom it has been our
    privilege to rub shoulders. If it should occur to you,
    Sir, or to the Higher Education Quality Council, to
    wonder how the staff of the University at all levels
    score so highly on all these counts, perhaps I can let
    you into a secret. One day I turned my computer on, and
    before it ran a virus check, I saw the words flash
    briefly on to the screen: `Checking Integrity ... 66 per
    cent ... 80 per cent ... ` etc. The Clerk to the Proctors
    has been everything that one could wish a chef de
    cabinet
    to be. I would also like to say a special
    word of thanks to the University Marshal, who has been a
    pillar of strength, and has done his best to keep us all
    up to his very high standards; and to all the staff of
    the Proctors' Office, including the University Police.
    Now I knew that there had been a certain amount of
    turnover in the ranks of the Police, but I was taken
    aback to read the following note in the Minutes of the
    Delegacy for Military Instruction: `BULLDOG LIFE
    EXPECTANCY. With the increased flying duties of the
    Bulldogs their life expectancies will be reduced. A
    replacement is being sought.' I trust, Sir, that neither
    you nor our successors will stand for that, and will
    insist on an ample supply of Bulldogs, who are defined in
    the Shorter OED as `the Proctor's
    [sic] attendants'. Seriously, we do rely
    heavily on our Constables and Special Constables, and we
    appreciate the cheerful way in which they have coped this
    year with the new patrol system.

    The Report of the Hart Committee in 1969 recommended that
    the election of Proctors should take place a full year
    before they assumed office, rather than three months as
    had previously been the case, so that the Proctors-elect
    could act as Pro-Proctors during that run-in period,
    rather on the Cambridge model. While we have enjoyed our
    year to the full, and while we have arranged several
    induction sessions for our successors, we are glad that
    Hart's suggestion has never been pursued: two years in
    harness would be excessive. Whether it is none the less
    beneficial to have a whole year to prepare oneself for
    Proctorship or Assessorship is debatable. It does mean,
    though, that as of last week we know not only who our
    immediate successors are, but who their successors will
    be. We wish them as pleasant, interesting and varied a
    time in office as it has been our privilege to enjoy. I
    began with David Copperfield; let me end
    with The Pickwick Papers, and take for
    myself and my colleagues Mr Pickwick's words in the final
    chapter of that work, when he announces the dissolution
    of the Club after two eventful years: `... numerous
    scenes of which I had no previous conception have dawned
    upon me—I hope to the enlargement of my mind, and
    the improvement of my understanding. If I have done but
    little good, I trust I have done less harm, and that none
    of my adventures will be other than a source of amusing
    and pleasant recollection to me in the decline of life.
    God bless you all!'

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    section


    Proctorial Year 1996–7: Summary of Offences

    Breach of Examination
    Regulations
    (conduct after examinations)

    84 cases

    Fine 56 @ £30

    Fine 3 @ £25


    Fine 3 @ £50


    Fine 1 @ £15


    Fine 6 @ £45


    Fine 3 @ £40


    Fine 4 @ £20


    Fine 2 @ £35


    Case dismissed 5


    Guilty—no penalty imposed 1

    Breach of University Regulations (obstruction)

    4 cases

    Fine 3 @ £30


    Fine 1 @ £40

    Breach of University Regulations (fly-posting)

    1 case, not proven

    Harassment

    4 cases

    Fine 1 @ £50


    Not guilty 2


    Case in Progress 1 (Junior Member opted for case to be
    heard by Disciplinary Court)

    Breach of Examination
    Regulations
    (using unfair means)

    8 cases

    1—Case deferred for
    medical reasons


    1—Examiners instructed to
    `fail' his examination


    3—Not guilty


    1—Examiners instructed to
    reduce degree classification


    2—Charges dropped in
    view of candidate's decision
    to withdraw from University

    Breach of University
    Regulations
    (non-bona fide use of
    University Computer System)

    5 cases

    Fine 1 @ £300


    Fine 1 @ £60


    Fine 1 @ £40


    1—case in progress


    1—referred to Disciplinary
    Court [Junior Member opted for case to be heard by
    Disciplinary Court but
    withdrew from University before the hearing (charges
    remain on file)]

    Breach of University
    Regulations
    (removal/defacement of
    library books)

    3 cases

    Fine 1 @ £35


    2 cases—1 total of £50 and
    allowed to use library only
    on restricted terms

    Breach of University
    Regulations
    (Misrepresentation)

    1 case in progress

    Total number of cases: 110

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    WELDON MEMORIAL PRIZE 1996

    The Prize has been awarded to DR MARTIN A. NOWAK
    (DR.RER.NAT., MAG.RER.NAT. Vienna; UNIV.DOZ. Vienna), Wellcome
    Senior
    Research Fellow, Head of the Mathematical Biology Group
    in the Department of Zoology and Fellow of Keble College.

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    section



    ARNOLD ANCIENT HISTORICAL ESSAY
    PRIZE 1997

    The Prize has been awarded jointly to SIMON GATES and
    EMILY MACKIL, both of St John's College.

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    section



    CHARLES OLDHAM SHAKESPEARE PRIZE
    1997

    The examiners have not awarded the prize this year but
    SAMUEL J. GILPIN, Christ Church, was honourably mentioned
    and has been awarded a prize from the Charles Oldham
    Fund.

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    section



    APPOINTMENTS BY THE VICE-
    CHANCELLOR AND PROCTORS

    The Vice-Chancellor and Proctors, acting under Tit. II,
    Sect. ix, cl. 4 (d) (Statutes,
    1995, p. 15), have made the following appointments from
    the first day of Trinity Term 1997:

    As a member of the Buildings Committee

    Until the first day of Michaelmas Term 1999
    pE.W. GILL, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Worcester

    As a member of the Oxford and Cambridge Examinations
    and Assessment Council

    For three years

    pJ. LANGTON, MA, Fellow of St John's

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    section



    KEYS TO THE UNIVERSITY PARKS

    The Curators of the University Parks give notice that the
    locks to the Parks will be changed in the week beginning
    5 May 1997.

    In Hilary Term 1996 the Explanatory Note to a decree
    amending that governing the Curators of the University
    Parks stated that the gates to the University Parks had
    locks which were of an obsolete pattern and which would
    shortly need to be replaced (Gazette, Vol.
    126, 14
    March 1996, p. 866). It also noted that, owing to the
    presence of the Marston--Oxford cycle track and footpath
    on the south side of the
    Parks, there was now a route between South Parks Road and
    Ferry Road,
    Marston, open twenty-four hours a day, except on 1
    January and 25 December of each year. In these
    circumstances, the Curators of the Parks would no longer
    be issuing keys to the gates of the University Parks to
    members of the University. In reaching this decision, the
    curators had been influenced by a number of factors: (1)
    It was impossible to make the Parks' boundaries totally
    secure from illegal entry, and the curators did not have
    the resources to enable them to protect legitimate
    key-holders when the Parks closed. (2) It had been the
    habit of some key-holders to admit non-key-holders after
    the gates had been locked. This had led to those admitted
    being unable to get out without either climbing out (and,
    on occasion, causing damage while doing so) or calling
    out the Superintendent to open a gate. (3) Regrettably,
    some key-holders had removed padlocks from those gates to
    which fixed locks could not be fitted. This had been a
    continuing, costly problem. (4) Closure of the Parks to
    all persons after sunset would make the effective
    protection of buildings and equipment by the University
    Security Service more practicable.

    The locks still need to be changed but the curators have
    now revised their proposal with regard to the issue of
    keys: a limited number of keys to the new locks will be
    available, on application, and on payment of a deposit of
    £100 and an annual fee of £10. The deposit will
    be refundable on return of the key, less any sums
    outstanding from the annual charge, which will be payable
    in advance. Application forms for keys are available from
    Mr C.E. Willis, University Offices, Wellington Square,
    Oxford OX1 2JD. Initial applications will be considered
    by the curators; if the number of applications received
    by 30 April exceeds the number of keys available,
    allocations will be made on the basis of need as
    reasonably determined by the curators. When all keys the
    curators have agreed to allow into circulation have been
    issued, no more keys will be issued until key-holders
    return their keys. Persons to whom the curators have
    issued keys (for the old locks) may return them for a
    refund of their deposit. The keys should be returned,
    with an indication of the approximate date of issue, to
    Mr Willis at the above address.

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    section



    TAYLOR INSTITUTION LIBRARY


    Closure of Slavonic Section

    The Curators of the Taylor Institution give notice that
    the Slavonic Section of the Taylor Institution Library at
    47 Wellington Square will be closed on
    Thursday, 27 March.

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    section



    OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS

    Members of the University are asked to note that the
    Walton Street entrance is now closed to visitors,
    although members may continue to deliver packages to the
    Walton Street lodge at any time, including out of office
    hours and at weekends. The main entrance to the Press for
    visitors is now situated in Great Clarendon Street.
    People who prefer not to climb the steps may use the lift
    situated by the entrance to Oxuniprint: please telephone
    in advance for directions.

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    section



    Educational Technology
    Resources Centre

    The Educational Technology Resources Centre will be
    operating a limited service for two weeks, from 24 March
    to 4 April. Anyone who requires any audio-visual or
    televisual services during this period is asked to
    contact the department before Wednesday, 19 March, to
    make arrangements.

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    section





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 20 March 1997: Lectures<br />

    Lectures


    Contents of this section:

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue



    INAUGURAL LECTURES


    Khalid bin Abdallah Al-Sa'ud
    Professor for the Study of the Contemporary Arab World

    PROFESSOR C.D. HOLES will deliver his inaugural lecture
    at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 29 April, in the Examination
    Schools.

    Subject: `The debate poem: a genre of
    Gulf vernacular literature.'

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    section



    Harold Vyvyan Harmsworth
    Professor of American History

    PROFESSOR R.L. MIDDLEKAUFF will deliver his inaugural
    lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 13 May, in the Examination
    Schools.

    Subject: `Democracy in America before
    Tocqueville.'

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    section



    JAMES FORD SPECIAL LECTURE IN
    BRITISH HISTORY

    PROFESSOR J. CANNON, CBE, will deliver a James Ford
    Special Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 16 May, in the
    Examination Schools.

    Subject: ` "We have the power": the
    English Ascendancy 1707–1801.'

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    section



    CHERWELL–SIMON MEMORIAL
    LECTURE 1997

    PROFESSOR BERTRAND HALPERIN, Professor of Physics,
    Harvard
    University, will deliver the Cherwell–Simon Memorial
    Lecture at 4.30
    p.m. on Friday, 9 May, in Lecture Theatre A, the
    Zoology/Psychology
    Building.


    Subject: `Electrons, quantum mechanics,
    and strong magnetic

    fields.'

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    section



    HALLEY LECTURE 1997

    PROFESSOR J.A.M. MCDONNELL, FRAS, Professor of Space
    Physics and Head of the Unit for Space Sciences and
    Astrophysics, University of Kent, will deliver the Halley
    Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 6 May, in the Lecture
    Theatre, the University Museum.

    Subject: `In the beginning was the COMET...'

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    section



    O'DONNELL LECTURE IN CELTIC
    STUDIES 1996--7

    PROFESSOR DONNCHADH Ó CORRÁIN, University
    College, Cork, will deliver the O'Donnell Lecture for
    1996--7 at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 8 May, in the Taylorian
    Hall, the Taylor Institution.

    Subject: `Vikings in Ireland and Britain: a
    reconsideration.'

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    section



    MYRES MEMORIAL LECTURE

    PROFESSOR J.N. COLDSTREAM, FBA, FSA, Professor of
    Classical Archaeology, University College, London, will
    deliver the Myres Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 5
    May, in the Headley Lecture Theatre, the Ashmolean
    Museum.

    Subject: `Light from Cyprus on the "Dark
    Age" of Greece?'

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    section



    WILDE LECTURES IN NATURAL AND
    COMPARATIVE RELIGION

    Medieval Pentecostalism---the tradition of
    charismatic Christian enthusiasm in Western Europe,
    c.1000--1500

    DR GARY DICKSON, Senior Lecturer in History, University
    of Edinburgh, will continue the Wilde Lectures in Natural
    and Comparative Religion on the following Wednesdays. The
    lectures will be delivered at 5 p.m. in the Examination
    Schools, and will be followed by discussion.

    30 Apr.: `Crowd and charisma: leadership and
    followership.'

    7 May: `Peace and violence; orthodoxy and
    heresy.'

    14 May: `Memory, mythistory, and the
    creation of institutions.'

    21 May: `Pentecostalism, politics, and
    theocratic populism in the Middle Ages.'

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    HENSLEY HENSON LECTURES 1997

    History, theology, biblical criticism: the
    end-of-century

    interactions

    THE REVD PROFESSOR JAMES BARR will deliver the Hensley
    Henson
    Lectures at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Examination
    Schools.

    1 May: `The new profile of discussion about
    the bible.'

    8 May: `History, criticism, and
    ideology.'

    15 May: `Ideology and theology.'

    22 May: `Story, historicity, and theology.'

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    section



    DASTURZADA DR JAL PAVRY
    MEMORIAL LECTURE 1997

    DR J. LIPNER, Cambridge, will deliver the Dasturzada Dr
    Jal Pavry
    Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 13 May, in the
    Examination
    Schools.

    Subject: `The shaping of religious identity:
    an overview with an
    Indian theme.'

    Seminars

    Dr Lipner will give the following seminars at 5 p.m. on
    Tuesdays in
    the Oriental Institute.


    20 May: `Religious identity and the
    dynamics of religious
    encounter.'


    27 May: `Religious identity: a vision
    for the future.'

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    INTER-FACULTY COMMITTEE FOR
    AFRICAN STUDIES

    PROFESSOR M. MAMDANI, Centre for African Studies,
    University of Cape Town, will deliver a special African
    Studies lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 28 April, in the
    Oakeshott Room, Lincoln College.

    Subject: `Between justice and reconciliation:
    reflections on
    Rwanda and South Africa.'

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    MODERN HISTORY, SOCIAL STUDIES

    Economic History Seminar, Trinity Term

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays
    in the European Studies Centre, St Antony's College.

    Conveners: C.H. Feinstein, MA, Chichele
    Professor of American History, J.S. Foreman-Peck, MA,
    University Lecturer in Economic History, T. Leunig, MA,
    D.Phil., Nuffield College Prize Research Fellow, and A.
    Offer, MA, D.Phil., Reader in Recent Social and Economic
    History.

    D. HENDRY

    29 Apr.: `Demand for broad money over
    the long run.'

    PROFESSOR JOSE MORILLA CRITZ, Alcala

    6 May: `Western European agriculture
    1850–1914.'

    G. CAMERON

    13 May: `Economic convergence between US
    and Japanese manufacturing since the mid-1950s.'

    PROFESSOR L. NEAL, Illinois–Urbana

    20 May: `John Law's speculative attack
    on the South Sea Bubble: international capital
    movements in the first emerging markets.'

    PROFESSOR K. HARLEY, Western Ontario

    27 May: `Cotton textile exports: prices,
    profits, and welfare.'

    PROFESSOR M. THOMAS, Virginia

    3 June: `How the US labour market worked
    one hundred years ago.'

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    THEOLOGY


    Ian Ramsey Centre Seminars in
    Science and Theology

    Interdisciplinary discussions of the relation of theology
    and the
    sciences, including medicine, will be held at 8.15 for
    8.30 p.m. on
    the following Thursdays in the Hood Room, St Cross
    College.

    1 May: DR ANGELA VINCENT, Reader in
    Neurology; DR A. PEACOCKE
    and DR MARGARET YEE, Ian Ramsey Centre.

    15 May: DR J.WEAVER, Geology and Pastoral
    Theology, Regent's
    Park; DR R. HARNISH, Physics and Old
    Testament, New College.

    29 May: DR OLIVERA PETROVICH, Experimental
    Psychology, Wolfson; DR N. SOLOMON, Fellow of the
    Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies.

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    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM

    Tin-glaze pottery past and present

    The following lectures will be given at 2.30 p.m. on
    Saturdays in the Headley Lecture Theatre, the Ashmolean
    Museum. There is no charge for admission.

    The lectures are given in association with an
    exhibition of recent work by Alan Caiger-Smith at the
    Oxford Gallery, 23 High Street, 21 April–21 May.

    M. ARCHER, formerly Senior Researcher, Ceramics, Victoria
    and Albert Museum

    26 Apr.: `British delftware and the tin-
    glaze tradition.'

    T. WILSON

    3 May: `The flowering of Italian
    Renaissance maiolica.'

    J. ALLAN

    10 May: `Tin-glaze in the world of
    Islam.'

    A. CAIGER-SMITH, tin-glaze potter and author

    17 May: `Tin-glaze pottery and the
    present day.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS

    Florence Nightingale Lecture

    SIR WALTER BODMER, FRS, will lecture at 5.30 p.m. on
    Thursday, 1 May, in the Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, St
    Anne's College.

    Subject: `The somatic evolution of cancer.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ALL SOULS COLLEGE

    Chichele Lectures 1997

    The Chichele Lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on the
    following Fridays in the Old Library, All Souls
    College.

    DR D. PERLER

    9 May: `John Norris.'

    S. MANDELBROTE

    23 May: `All Souls from the Civil War to
    the Restoration.'

    DR J. BENNETT

    30 May: `Wren.'

    DR J. CLARKE

    6 June: `Warden Niblett.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 20 March 1997: Grants and<br /> Funding<br />

    Grants and Research Funding


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
    previously published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue


    African Studentships

    The Rhodes Race Relations Fund Committee of the Social
    Studies Board invites applications for up to three
    Studentships in African Environmental History from
    persons who will be registered as graduate students of
    the University from October 1997. Preference may be given
    to those whose work involves the study of southern
    African environmental history.

    Applicants for the studentship(s) may be candidates
    for admission, or already registered as graduate
    students. The successful applicant, if not already a
    member of an Oxford college, may be offered a place at St
    Antony's College. Candidates without any existing college
    association should name St Antony's as their college of
    first choice on their graduate application form. The
    scholarship will cover college and university fees and a
    maintenance allowance for two years in the first instance
    with possible extension to a third year. The scholarships
    will normally cover university fees at the home rate,
    although in exceptional circumstances supplemental grants
    may be made in order to meet (or to go some way towards
    meeting) the difference between the home and the overseas
    fee.

    Application forms and further particulars are available
    from Charles Shaw, University Offices, Wellington Square,
    Oxford OX1 2JD. Applications should be sent to reach him
    by 1 May.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section





    <br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 20 March 1997: Examinations and<br /> Boards<br />

    Examinations and Boards


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
    previously published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue



    CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

    With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in
    regulations made by boards of faculties and the Committee on
    Continuing Education will come into effect on 4 April.


    1 Boards of the Faculties of Literae
    Humaniores and Theology

    (a) Honour School of Philosophy and Theology


    With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

    1 As for the Honour School of Theology (see 4
    (a) below).

    2 In Examination Decrees, 1996,
    p.
    494, l. 4, after `Honour School of Theology' insert `(except
    paper
    3)'.

    3 Ibid., l. 5, after `thesis.' insert: `In
    paper
    (i) the question containing passages for comment will
    not be
    compulsory for candidates in the Honour School of Philosophy and
    Theology.'

    (b) Pass School of Philosophy and Theology

    With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in
    1999)

    In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 495, l. 15, after
    `(b) Theology.' insert: `In paper
    (b)(i)
    the question containing passages for comment will not be
    compulsory
    for candidates in the Pass School of Philosophy and Theology.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    2 Board of the Faculty of Mathematical
    Sciences

    (a) Honour Moderations in Mathematics, Honour

    Moderations in Mathematics and Computation, Honour
    Moderations in
    Mathematics and Philosophy

    With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in
    1998)

    In Examination Decrees, 1996, delete from `The
    examiners...' to `calculator' on ll. 29–30 on p. 44, ll.
    44–5 on p. 47 and ll. 21–2 on p. 49, and in each case
    substitute: `The use of calculators, restricted to a list of
    models
    provided by the Chairman of the Moderators not later than the
    Wednesday of the fourth week of the Michaelmas Full Term
    preceding
    the examination, shall be permitted'.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    (b) Honour School of Mathematical Sciences

    With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in
    1998)

    In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 290, ll. 6–8,
    delete `In approving a subject for Section o, the Board shall
    determine the number of questions to be set in the corresponding
    paper.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    3 Board of the Faculty of Physical
    Sciences

    Honour School of Engineering Science

    With immediate effect

    In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 172, l. 37, after
    `taken' insert:

    `A candidate may if he or she wishes submit to the Chairman
    of the
    Sub-faculty one alternative essay title to
    replace one of those in the "alternative approved
    topic"
    section of the published list of titles. Such submission must
    take
    place before noon on Friday of the seventh week of Hilary Full
    Term
    and the alternative title shall be
    adjudged acceptable or otherwise by noon on Friday of
    the eighth week. Those candidates who may wish to make an earlier
    submission are welcome to do so.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    4 Board of the Faculty of Theology

    (a) Honour School of Theology

    With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in
    1999)

    1 In Gazette, Vol. 126, No. 4408,
    11
    July 1996, p. 1378, col. 1, under paper (4), delete `A large
    choice ...
    all other candidates.' and substitute:

    `Questions will be set on the theology of the individual
    gospels
    (not just those specified), Pauline theology, the historical
    Jesus,
    the ethics of the New Testament, and the different methods of New
    Testament interpretation.

    There will be a compulsory question containing passages for
    comment
    from Matthew, John, Romans, and
    1 Corinthians, printed in both Greek and English. Candidates who
    have
    not passed either paper 6 (New Testament Greek) or paper 7
    (Biblical
    Hebrew) in the Preliminary

    Examination for Theology will have to comment on passages from
    Matthew 5–7, 26–8, and John 1–6 which will be
    printed
    only in Greek. The passages printed only in Greek will be
    optional
    for all other candidates.'

    2 Ibid., col. 2, second line, after `(except'
    insert `paper 3 and'.

    3 Ibid., under Alternative Track B.II., after
    `and any ONE paper not already offered chosen from amongst the
    papers in Section A and B (except' insert `paper 3 and'.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    (b) Passs School of Theology

    With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in
    1999)

    1 As for the Honour School of Theology (see 4
    (a) above).

    2 In Examination Decrees, 1996,
    p.
    518, l. 35, after `Theology.' insert `Candidates may not offer
    both
    paper 3 and paper 4. In paper 4 the question containing passages
    for
    comment will not be compulsory for candidates for the Pass
    School.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    5 Committee for Continuing Education

    (a) Postgraduate Certificates (Continuing Education)

    Psychodynamic Counselling

    With effect from 1 October 1998

    In Examination Decrees, 1996, after l. 34 insert:

    `Psychodynamic Counselling

    1. Course

    (a) The course will consist of lectures, tutorials,
    seminars, classes, and workshops on psychodyamic theory,
    philosophy,
    and techniques. Self exploration will be undertaken in small
    experimental groups. The course will be taken on a part-time
    basis
    over a period which shall be of one year's duration.

    (b) The course will consist of three study terms,
    each of
    ten weeks, covering: (i) The Psychodyamic
    Approach—Definition;
    (ii) Process and Skills in early Sessions; (iii) Practicalities,
    Technique, and Ethical Implications.

    2.Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners
    in the
    following:

    (a) attendance at weekly classes, a weekend school,
    individual tutorials, and review and revision days;

    (b) two written assignments, each of no more than
    4,000
    words and each on one key psychodynamic concept;

    (c) one written assignment, of no more than 4,000
    words,
    to provide a critique of interpersonal processes and techniques
    in
    action;

    (d) an assignment on an area of special interest, of
    no
    more than 4,000 words;

    (e) termly reports from a candidate's course tutor.
    The assignments under (b)–(d) will be
    forwarded to the examiners c/o Registry, Department for
    Continuing
    Education, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA, for consideration
    by
    the examiners by such date as the examiners shall determine and
    shall
    notify candidates before the start of the academic year in which
    the
    assignment is due.

    3. Candidates may be required to attend a viva voce
    examination at
    the end of the course of studies.

    4. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners in
    2(b)–(d) above may be permitted to
    resubmit
    work in the part orparts of the examination which they have
    failed
    for examination on not more than one occasion which shall
    normally be
    within one year of the original failure. Approval for deferral
    must
    be obtained from the relevant board of studies.

    5. The examiners may award a distinction to candidates for the
    certificate.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    (b) Postgraduate Diploma (Continuing Education)

    Psychodynamic Practice

    With effect from 1 October 1997

    In Examination Decrees, 1996, after l. 45 insert:

    `Psychodynamic Practice

    1. Course

    (a) The course will consist of lectures, tutorials,
    seminars, classes, and supervised practice on the theory and
    practice
    of Psychodyamic Practice. Candidates will be required to
    undertake
    personal therapy. The course will be taken on a part-time basis
    over
    a period which shall be of two years' duration.

    (b) The course places equal emphasis on theory,
    practice,
    and the candidate's personal development. In the first year
    candidates will study the Historical and Theoretical Perspective,
    the
    Psychiatric Perspective, the Current Perspective, and the
    Developmental Perspective. In the second year candidates must
    choose
    one module from the three offered which will be (1) Brief `focal'
    Counselling and Psychotherapy, (2) Long-term and/or Intensive
    Counselling and Psychotherapy, (3) Group and Organisational
    Dynamics.

    2.Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners
    in the
    following:

    (a) attendance at weekly classes, sensitivity group
    sessions, tutorials, a weekend school, and review and revision
    days;

    (b) five written assignments as follows:

    (i) an initial case study, of no more than 3,000
    words;

    (ii) a second case study, of no more than 6,000 words;

    (iii) three elaborated extracts from a candidate's placement
    log;

    (c) a dissertation of no more than 10,000 words to
    be
    submitted by 1 September of the second year of the course. The
    subject of the dissertation will be submitted for approval by the
    external moderator following consultation with the module tutor
    and
    course director by noon on Friday of the last week of Michaelmas
    Full
    Term in the second year of the course;

    (d) participation in a minimum of 25 placement
    supervisions to include at least 200 hours of client/patient
    contact;

    (e) participation in a minimum of 80 hours of
    personal
    therapy and submission of a statement from a candidate's personal
    therapist that there is no obstacle to the candidate continuing
    to
    work with patients/clients;

    (f) submission of termly reports from both academic
    and
    clinical tutors in the first year and from the module tutor in
    the
    second year;

    (g) confirmation from the sensitivity group
    co-ordinator
    that there are no ethical reasons why the candidate should be
    discouraged from commencing professional work.

    The assignments under (b) and the dissertation under
    (c) will be forwarded to the examiners c/o Registry,
    Department for Continuing Education, Wellington Square,
    Oxford OX1 2JD for consideration by such date as the
    examiners shall determine and shall notify candidates
    before the start of the academic year in which the assignment is
    due,
    except that the dissertation must be submitted by 1 September of
    the
    second year of the course.

    3. Candidates may be required to attend a viva voce
    examination at
    the end of the course of studies.

    4. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners in any of the
    assignments in 2(b) or the dissertation may be permitted
    to
    resubmit work in the part or parts of the examination which they
    have
    failed for examination on not more than one occasion which shall
    normally be within one year of the original failure. Approval for
    deferral must be obtained from the relevant board of studies.
    Candidates who fail to obtain a satisfactory report of their
    placement at the end of the first year will be given additional
    support. Candidates who fail to obtain a satisfactory report at
    the
    end of the second year may be permitted by the examiners to
    continue
    in the placement until the required standard is reached, for a
    period
    of no more than one year after the end of the second year.

    5. The examiners may award a distinction to candidates for the
    diploma.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    (c) Master of Studies

    Psychodynamic Practice

    With effect from 1 October 1999

    In Examination Decrees, 1996, after l. 34 insert:

    `Psychodynamic Practice

    Applicants will normally be expected to have satisfactorily
    completed
    the Postgraduate Diploma in Psychodynamic Practice. Applicaitons
    for
    exemption from this requirement will be considered by the
    relevant
    board of studies.

    1. Candidates shall be expected to attend a course on research
    methods, group clinical seminars, and to continue to undertake
    personal therapy and supervision. The course will be taken on a
    part-time basis for a period of one year's duration.

    2.Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners
    in the
    following:

    (a) attendance at classes, individual tutorials,
    group
    seminars, and personal therapy sessions;

    (b) submission of a dissertation of no more than
    15,000
    words on a topic selected by the student in consultation with the
    course director and agreed by the external moderator, to be
    forwarded
    to the examiners c/o Registry,
    Department for Continuing Education, Wellington Square, Oxford
    OX1
    2JD, for receipt not later than noon on the last Monday of
    September
    in the year in which the course is studied. Material already
    submitted for the dissertation for the Postgraduate Diploma in
    Psychodynamic Practice may not be included.

    (c) a viva voce examination at the end of the course
    of
    study.

    3. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the
    whole examination.

    4. A candidate whose dissertation fails to satisfy the
    examiner
    may be permitted to resubmit on one further occasion only not
    later
    than one year after the initial failure. Approval for deferral
    must
    be obtained from the relevant board of studies.

    5. If any candidate who is successful in the examination for
    the
    Degree of Master of Studies in Psychodynamic
    Practice has previously successfully completed the Postgraduate
    Diploma in Psychodynamic Practice, the Master of Studies will
    subsume
    his or her diploma.'

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    (d) Diplomas (Continuing Education)

    Diploma in Counselling

    With immediate effect

    1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p.
    931,
    delete ll. 34–49.

    2 Ibid., p. 932, delete ll. 1–6.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR
    OF
    PHILOSOPHY

    The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give
    notice
    of oral examination of their candidates as
    follows:

    Anthropology and Geography

    M.E. SAMERS, St Peter's: `The production and regulation of North
    African immigrants in the Paris automobile industry,
    1970–90'.

    School of Geography, Monday, 28 April, 2.15 p.m.


    Examiners: G.C.K. Peach, M. Dunford.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Law

    M. SNELL, St Edmund Hall: `Data protection and transborder data
    flow:
    a British and Australian perspective'.

    Keble, Friday, 4 April, 11.30 a.m.


    Examiners: I.J. Lloyd, W.E. Peel.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Mathematical Sciences

    M. DREXLER, Magdalen: `Newton's method as a global solver for
    non-linear problems'.

    Computing Laboratory, Monday, 21 April, 2.30 p.m.


    Examiners: G.H. Golub, A.J. Wathen.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Modern History

    J. SILLERY, Queen's: `Salvaging democracy? The United States and
    Britain in British Guiana 1961–4'.

    Brasenose, Monday, 24 March, 3 p.m.


    Examiners: G. Warner, J. Thompson.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Oriental Studies

    C. SCHAMS, St Cross: `The status and functions of Jewish scribes
    in
    the Second Temple period'.

    Oriental Institute, Wednesday, 26 March, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: L. Grabbe, G. Vermes.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section


    Theology

    A.R. MEIN, Corpus Christi: `Ezekiel and the ethics of
    exile'.

    Regent's Park, Tuesday, 15 April, 2.15 p.m.


    Examiners: R.J. Coggins, R.A. Mason.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 20 March 1997: Colleges<br />

    Colleges, Halls, and Societies


    Contents of this section:

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue



    OBITUARIES


    All Souls College

    SIR DENIS RICKETT, KCMB, CB, 26 February 1997; Fellow
    1929–49. Aged 89.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    St Hugh's College

    FLORENCE LOUISE ELISE CAMOUS, 14 January 1997; commoner
    1919–22. Aged 97.

    URSULA MARY NIEBUHR (née Keppel-
    Compton), 10 January 1997; commoner 1926–30. Aged
    89.

    KATHEEN RUBY SMITH (née Mottram), 2
    January 1997; commoner 1928–31. Aged 89.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ELECTIONS OF PROCTORS


    Exeter College

    The college has elected as Proctor for the Proctorial
    year 1998–9 M.W. HART, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of the
    college.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    St Catherine's College

    The college has elected as Proctor for the Proctorial
    year 1998–9
    R.W. AINSWORTH, MA, D.PHIL. (MA Cambridge), Fellow of the
    college.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ELECTION OF ASSESSOR


    Queen's College

    The college has elected as Assessor for the Proctorial
    year 1998–9
    A.M. BOWIE, MA, D.PHIL. (MA, PH.D. Cambridge), Fellow of
    the college.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    ELECTIONS


    All Souls College

    To Senior Research Fellowships (with effect from 1
    January 1998):

    JAMES NOEL ADAMS, D.PHIL. (MA Cambridge), Professor of
    Latin, University of Reading

    JEREMY NICHOLAS BUTTERFIELD (PH.D. Cambridge),
    Lecturer in Philosophy, University of Cambridge

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 20 March 1997: Advertisements<br />

    Advertisements


    Contents of this section:



    How to advertise
    in the Gazette

    "../../../stdg/conds.htm">

    Terms and conditions of
    acceptance of advertisements

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue



    Oxford University Museum of Natural
    History Shop

    Summer-time returns on Easter Sunday. The
    OUMNH Shop stocks unusual dendritic limestone wall-clocks
    alongside attractive baskets of small gemstone eggs.
    Individual polished stone and pyrite eggs in a variety of
    sizes are also available while the toy dinosaur eggs
    continue to hatch. Life-sized Birdmobiles and the range of
    activity and reference books offer holiday entertainment,
    and lovers of soft toys will welcome the newly-arrived
    fledgling owls up from Cornwall. Museum open Mon.–Sat.
    (inc. Easter Monday, 31 Mar.), 12 noon–5 p.m.; Easter
    closing 27–30 Mar. inc.; admission free.


    United Oxford and Cambridge
    University Club

    The London club for all University members.
    Special rates for those with college or University
    appointments or University residence. Modernised and
    reasonable bedroom accommodation. Excellent library
    facilities. Restaurant and squash courts. Full service at
    weekends. Reciprocal arrangements with over 125 clubs
    world-wide. Further details from Derek Conran, Hertford
    College, or Membership Secretary, 71 Pall Mall, London SW1Y
    5HD. Tel.: 0171-930 5151, fax: 0171-930 9490.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Tuition Offered

    Painting in traditional English water-
    colours with Rebecca Hind. One-week intensive courses for
    spring and summer; weekly part-time courses thoughout the
    year. Tel. for brochure: Oxford 340633.

    English language. Academic writing,
    grammar, pronunciation, etc., flexible timetables including
    evenings, Saturdays. Conversation hour, Cambridge exams.,
    general English are best value in Oxford. Writing up?
    Private tuition available with experienced tutors. Free
    test/advice from the Director of Studies Mon.--Fri. 1--5
    p.m. Oxford Language Training, 9 Blue Boar Street (off St
    Aldate's by Christ Church), Oxford. Tel. Oxford 205077,
    e-mail: OLT@dial.pipex.com.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Services Offered

    Gardens creatively
    designed–constructed—planted and maintained.
    Knowledgeable service with 25 years' experience. Portfolio
    available. Colin Broad. Tel./fax: Oxford 882711.

    Frederick and Sudabeh Hine are Persian
    carpet merchants in particular and dealers in oriental rugs
    and runners in general. Visit their gallery/warehouse
    without notice during business hours 10 a.m.–6 p.m.,
    Mon.–Sat., and you will find everything from show-off
    antiques to everyday furnishing pieces. Also specialist
    cleaning and expert conservation repairs. No parking
    problems. The Old Squash Court, 16 Linton Road, North
    Oxford. Tel./fax: Oxford 559396.

    Garden design. Short consultation or
    full-scale design. Let me help you solve your problems and
    create a beautiful and individual garden. Judith Walton.
    Tel.: Oxford 735179.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Domestic Services

    Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by
    Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work,
    competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also
    carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy cleaning,
    flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free
    estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.:
    Oxford 726983 or Abingdon 555533.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Research participants sought

    Participants needed: we are looking for
    healthy men and women to help us with our reseach on
    appetite, sleep, and mood. If you are aged between 18 and
    65, please telephone or write. Participants (AS), Research
    Unit, Littlemore Hospital, Oxford OX4 4XN. Tel.: Oxford
    223130.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Situations Vacant

    Picture librarian required for friendly
    team at specialist garden picture library in Charlbury. You
    will talk to clients, choose images, and do some
    administration. You will need good organisational and
    computer skills. Plant knowledge vital. Andrew Lawson
    Photography. Tel.: 01608 810654, fax: 811251.

    National Association for Able Children in
    Education: general manager required (salary
    £16,000–£19,000). The association's main is
    to help teachers and other professionals to develop
    provision for able pupils in state schools. The manager is
    responsible for day-to- day running of the association's
    activities, including its research centre. S/he supervises
    an administrative assistant and reports to the executive
    committee. Ideal candidate will have substantial previous
    experience of financial and database management, desktop
    publishing, conference organisation, office administration,
    marketing and sales, preferably in an educational
    environment. Job-share candidates considered. Closing date:
    24 Mar. Letters of application with c.v. to: NACE Centre,
    Westminster College, Oxford OX2 9AT.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Houses to Let

    City centre house with view of Thames
    available for 3 months, mid- June–mid-Sept. Fully
    equipped, 3 bedrooms (2 double, 1 single), 2 bathrooms, gas
    c.h., garden, garage. £950 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford
    250462.

    18th-c. thatched cottage, in village 8
    miles from Oxford and close to Thames; 3 double beds, 2
    reception, conservatory, modern kitchen, c.h., garden; oak
    beams, open fires. Long and short lets. Tel.: 0171- 625
    1219.

    Quiet modernised terrace house, fully
    furnished, central North Oxford; c.h., 2 bedrooms, garden.
    Suitable for visiting academics. Available to let to one or
    2 persons only from beginning of Aug. for following academic
    year. Tel.: Oxford 512747.

    Mallams is a long-established independent
    company offering a letting service tailored to the needs of
    the discerning landlord. If you would like further details
    or professional advice on any aspect of the letting market
    please call our Summertown office. Tel.: Oxford 311006, fax:
    311977.

    Available for short summer/holiday lets
    from June, short or long-term from Aug./Sept. Charming
    luxury cottage 14 miles north-west; beams, inglenook fire,
    country antiques, gas c.h., walled south-facing garden,
    garage; double bedroom plus second bedroom/study. Tel.:
    Oxford 510542.

    Family house in Oxford (Jericho): peaceful,
    quiet, and characterful; walking distance of centre,
    station, and Meadow; 2 living rooms, 2 studies, 4 bedrooms,
    farmhouse kitchen; walled garden with patio. Available 9
    Aug.–13 Sept. for let of 3 weeks min. £500 p.w.
    Tel.: Oxford 511212, fax: 516236, e-mail: dugstod@patrol.i-
    way.co.uk.

    Summer let in Oxford: live in comfort near
    the Thames. Centrally heated, 4-bedroom Victorian house.
    Large split-level living-room; bathroom, bidet, and w.c.;
    shower-room, power-shower, and w.c.; fully-equipped kitchen;
    south-facing garden. Available for 6 weeks, 18 July–31
    Aug. Price negotiable. Tel.: Oxford 725193.

    Headington: 4-bedroom house, convenient for
    shops, schools, and hospitals. Fully furnished, gas c.h.,
    garage, gardens front and rear. Available from 1 Sept. 1997
    to 15 Aug. 1998. £900 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford (2)76202
    (day), or 61316 (evening/weekend).

    Finders Keepers has over 60 members of
    staff in 5 offices throughout Oxfordshire dedicated to
    offering an unparalleled standard of service. Voted the
    best Letting and Management Company in the UK for the
    second consecutive year. Why not find out for yourself why
    the best is not the most expensive. For further information
    contact Finders Keepers, 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE.
    Tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 556993, e-mail:
    oxford@finders.co.uk; Internet site:
    http://www.finders.co.uk.

    An Englishman's home is his castle—so
    the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many
    castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental
    accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be
    able to help. QB management is one of Oxford's foremost
    letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics,
    medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to
    offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford.
    Please telephone or fax us with details of your requirements
    and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.:
    Oxford 64533, fax: 64777.

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    section



    Flats to Let

    Available for summer: light, spacious,
    well-furnished one/two- bedroom apartment in North Oxford.
    On second floor of modern block set in well-maintained,
    attractive private grounds. Lounge, kitchen with large
    fridge/freezer, washing machine, cooker, all only one year
    old; large main bedroom, second bedroom fitted as office
    with shelves and computer desk. Available end
    June–Sept.; to view from end Apr. £575 p.c.m. Will
    let for single month. Chris Townsend. Tel.: 0973 158812
    (mobile), e-mail: C.Townsend@sussex.ac.uk.

    Two-bedroom flat in central Oxford
    available early May–mid-Sept. Double and single
    bedroom, bathroom, L-shaped lounge/kitchen/dining- room.
    Would suit couple or small family. £485 p.c.m. exc.
    bills. Contact Domestic Manager, Worcester College. Tel.:
    Oxford (2)78334.

    Summertown: fully-furnished 3-bedroom flat
    in Cunliffe Close available now. Would suit a visiting
    academic family or 3 professionals. £850 p.c.m. Tel.:
    Oxford 554015 (evening).

    Central North Oxford, 10 minutes' walk from
    city centre: delightful and very comfortable flat, available
    April, in quiet, civilised family house: large double
    bedroom, single bedroom, drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom.
    Off-street parking, garden. Regret no children or pets.
    Tel.: Oxford 552400.

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    section



    Accommodation Offered

    Room to let in large quiet house on St
    Margaret's Road; own bath, own fridge, use of kitchen,
    garden, sitting-room. Until the end of June only. £75
    p.w. exc. utilities. Not suitable as a place of work. Tel.:
    Oxford 557995.

    Accommodation offered in North Oxford.
    Academic family visiting USA in the summer are looking for a
    non-smoking house sitter from early July to early Sept. The
    accommodation is a large modern sunny detached house in
    North Oxford. Would suit student finishing thesis.
    References required. Tel: Oxford (2)74305 (office) or 553617
    (home).

    Bed-and-breakfast available in the home of
    a semi-retired academic couple. Warm, comfortable house in
    exclusive central North Oxford within easy walking distance
    of city centre, all main university buildings, parks, river,
    shops, pubs, and restaurants. Every room has tea- and
    coffee-making facilities, microwave, and colour television.
    Very moderate terms. Tel. and fax: Oxford 557879.

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    section



    Accommodation Sought

    Flat or small house (close to Radcliffe
    Infirmary) wanted to rent for Imperial Cancer Research Fund
    for visiting academic family (2 adults, 2 children), 1 Apr.
    1997–31 Mar. 1998. Contact Sarah Jones. Tel.: Oxford
    302202, e-mail: joness@icrf.icnet.uk.

    Young Frenchwoman lawyer seeks a bedsit
    with cooking facilities or temporary flat-share while using
    libraries in Oxford. Preferred dates 6 Apr.–17 May
    (some flexibility). Tel.: Oxford 559181.

    Going away for Hilary or Trinity 1998?
    Retired US academic couple will take care of your Oxford
    house/flat and pay expenses; multiple Oxford academic
    references. Talk to us while we're here, until 4 Apr. Tel.:
    Oxford 245586.

    American professor seeks to let furnished
    2- or 3-bedroom house or flat in the Oxford area, 26
    June–10 Aug. Eric Neisser. Fax: 001 201 648 1445; e-
    mail: neisser@andromeda.rutgers.edu.

    American academic family of 4 seeks 2+
    bedroom house or flat for any 4-week period 1 June–9
    Aug. Can provide Oxford references. Dr Trent Foley, Davidson
    College, Box 1719, Davidson NC 28036, USA. Tel.: 704
    8922263, fax: 704 8922005, e-mail: trfoley@davidson.edu.

    Canadian professor and family wish to
    exchange attractive character 3--4 bedroom home in Vancouver
    for a 3--4 bedroom home in Oxford or outlying areas. The
    time-period sought is Sept. 1997–June 1998. Owen
    Underhill, 2016 Kitchener Street, Vancouver, BC, Canada V5L
    2W8. Fax (Canada): 604 291 5907, e-mail: underhil@sfu.ca.

    Professional family (university employees)
    seeks 2/3-bed house to rent in North/central Oxford from the
    end of Apr. for 3–6 months while completing house
    purchase. Non-smokers, animal lovers, and keen gardeners. Do
    you have a house (and pets) that need looking after while
    you are away for several months? Excellent references
    available. Tel.: Oxford 728738.

    Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting
    your property? QB Management are one of Oxford's foremost
    letting agents and property managers. We specialise in
    lettings to both academic and professional individuals and
    their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from
    good-quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If
    you would like details of our services, or if you simply
    need some informal help and advice without obligation,
    telephone us. Tel.: Oxford 64533, or fax: 64777.

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    section



    Accommodation Sought to Rent or
    Exchange

    Visiting American academic seeks furnished
    flat or house in Oxford, June–Sept. House exchange
    possible in San Luis Obispo, CA (midway between LA and SF on
    central CA coast). Two bedroom, 2.5 bath town house, garage,
    pool. Car exchange also possible. Russ Cummings. Tel.: 805
    545 9808, e-mail: rcumming@calpoly.edu.

    English/Italian couple seek house (with
    garden) to swap or rent in or near Oxford from Aug. for 1
    year. We offer Umbrian farmhouse, recently restored to high
    standard; 3 double bedrooms, 2 luxury bathrooms, 2 reception
    rooms with open fireplaces, large kitchen/dining-room. Full
    gas c.h. Olive grove adjacent to house. Peaceful
    surroundings and spectacular views of Umbrian hills and 12
    km from Attiliano giving rail and motorway connections to
    Rome and Florence. Contact Serena Fry-Ferretti, c/o 59
    Lakeside, Oxford OX2 8JQ. Tel.: 0039 64461585 (evenings), or
    0039 744903683 (weekends).

    Visiting American family seeks furnished
    3–4-bedroom house or flat in Oxford, Sept.
    1997–Aug. 1998. Possible house exchange in Amherst,
    Mass.: 3–4 bedrooms, 3 full baths, 2-car garage,
    spacious contemporary design, wooded hillside setting, easy
    access to university, local colleges. James K. Boyce. Tel.
    (USA): 413 256 1853, e-mail: boyce@econs.umass.edu.

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    section



    Accommodation Offered to Rent or
    Exchange

    Oxford–Berkeley: family house in
    Oxford offered in exchange for similar in Berkeley, CA,
    area, July–Dec. Three bedrooms (1 double, 1 twin, 1
    single), 1.5 baths. All appliances, south-facing garden.
    Car exchange also possible. Tel.: Oxford 726919, e-mail:
    cvph2@lboro.ac.uk.

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    section



    Accommodation Exchange

    Recently retired academic couple seek to
    exchange 3-bedroom home in mid-town Toronto for home in
    Oxford/Cotswold area. Would inc. dependable auto and
    references. Suit academic on study leave or similar for
    3–10 months, from Sept. or later. Tel.: 416 481 8140,
    fax: 416 482 9341, e-mail: hcolman@gbc.gbrownc.on.ca.

    Retired non-smoking academic couple seek
    house or apartment exchange in Oxford, preferably starting
    in June or July and flexible as to length of exchange, for
    7-room house in Los Angeles, CA (San Fernando Valley);
    completely air-conditioned, 2 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms; all
    appliances. Also wish to trade cars—Olds 88 automatic,
    AC, sedan. Have lived in Summertown in past and have
    references. Edward A. Reese, 22201 Schoenborn Street, West
    Hills, CA 91304. Tel.: 818 703 6585.

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    section



    Holiday Lets

    North Pembs. coast, cottage to let; ideal
    2/3 but can sleep more. Stove, books, walks, peaceful
    surroundings. Reasonable rates. Tel.: 01348 872080.

    Holiday coastguard cottage overlooking
    Chesil Beach, between Weymouth and Abbotsbury at Langton
    Herring. Comfortably furnished and well equipped but not
    ultra-smart. Two bedrooms (2 twin beds in each, plus one
    cot); sitting-room; colour TV, radio, record-player;
    kitchen/diner, etc. £150–£260 p.w. inc.
    electricity. Apply Simon, Little Orchard, Charlbury, Oxon.
    OX7 3RL. Tel.: 01608 810563.

    Provence: luxury 3-bedroom apartment in
    17th-c. château near Lac de St Croix, with views to
    the mountains of the Gorge du Verdon. Pool, tennis, gardens
    at the château, sailing, canoeing, wind-surfing,
    angling on river and lakes close by, wonderful walking,
    driveable skiing (log fire and heating for winter stays).
    Available now. Priced for 2–6. Tel.: Oxford 510542.

    Well-appointed 3-bedroom house in the
    unspoilt Catalonian village of Regencós (about 60
    miles north-east of Barcelona and 4 miles inland) near
    Palafrugell. Several superb beaches within a radius of 6
    miles. Sleeps 6; on 2 floors, each a self-contained flat
    with kitchen, bathroom, and lounge/dining area; ground floor
    has large double bedroom, upper floor similar bedroom plus
    twin-bed room. Attractive roof garden with superb views over
    surrounding countryside. Spanish maid visits every Sun. and
    will cook delicious meals. £1,000 p.c.m. or £300
    p.w. Dr Charles Mould. Tel.: 01993 831747, fax: 831748,
    e-mail: charles.mould@st-cross.ox.ac.uk.

    South-west France: tranquil roof-terraced
    luxury apartment within tiny walled hill-top medieval
    village; 2 double bedrooms, excellent bathroom and kitchen;
    30-ft south-facing terrace, half-shaded, high above rural
    valley and completely private. Mrs C. Laird. Tel./fax: 00 33
    5 53 70 46 80.

    Dordogne valley: stone-built farmhouse and
    large terrace with 270-degree view overlooking wonderful
    valley. Swimming, tennis, golf, canoeing and numerous
    enchanting restaurants nearby. Great walking and cycling
    everywhere. Splash pool and all mod. cons.
    £175–£575 p.w. Tel. for more details and/or
    brochure: 01295 670320.

    Czech Republic: enchanting woodland cottage
    only half an hour from Prague available May–Oct.
    Sleeps 4+. Lake for swimming, boating. Views, walks, wood
    fires, mushrooms, castles. Good food, and wine still a
    bargain. English-speaking owner. From £260 p.w. Tel.:
    0171-373 0667.

    Holiday in Umbria. Ideal for lovers of
    tranquillity, superb scenery, good food. Perfect for
    visiting Renaissance art treasures. Newly converted flat for
    two, large shaded terrace, magnificent view. Perugia 9 kms,
    Assisi 20 kms. For information telephone Willliam Urquhart.
    Tel.: 01252 877155.

    Tuscany: Italian language/culture, cookery,
    wall painting, gilding, ceramics courses, at 17th-c. manor
    house/garden, medieval hamlet, half-hour from
    sea/mountains—or if you want simply to relax, try just
    B.&B. and our home cooking. Mario/Jane. Tel.: 0039 187 47 12
    49.

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    section



    Houses for Sale

    Summertown: pretty Edwardian terrace house,
    3 bedrooms, excellent condition. No chain. c.£140,000.
    Tel.: Oxford 554278 or (2)77419.

    Edwardian house, with many original
    features, in Hill Top Road, with 3 bedrooms, lounge, dining-
    room, morning room, conservatory, large kitchen/utility,
    bathroom/w.c., separate downstairs w.c. Attractive gardens.
    Well located for schools, Oxford and Brookes universities,
    John Radcliffe and other hospitals, and the city centre. No
    chain. Tel.: Oxford 815166.
    n

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    section





    <br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette: Diary, 21 March<br /> - 5 May

    Diary


    Contents of this section:

    Academic Staff
    Seminars
    : places should be booked in advance through
    the Staff Development Office, University Offices,
    Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

    For the full list of courses, see the HREF="../../supps/1_4410.htm">Staff Development
    Programme supplement.

    Return to
    Contents Page of this issue



    Friday 21 March

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `English furniture', 1.15
    p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30
    a.m.–12.30 p.m.)

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    section



    Saturday 22 March

    HILARY TERM ends.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Monday 24 March

    CHRIST CHURCH Picture Gallery closed (reopens 31 March).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Tuesday 25 March

    THE MEETING of Congregation, due to take place today, is
    cancelled.

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Fabulous furniture',
    1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015,
    9.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m.)

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    section



    Thursday 27 March

    OXFORD UNIVERSITY MUSEUM of Natural History closed
    (reopens 31 March, 12 noon).

    UNIVERSITY OFFICES closed (reopens 1 April).

    SHELDONIAN THEATRE closed (reopens 7 April).

    TAYLOR INSTITUTION LIBRARY (Slavonic Section) closed
    (reopens 1 April).

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    section



    Friday 28 March

    ASHMOLEAN LIBRARY closed (reopens 1 April).

    BODLEIAN LIBRARY closed (reopens 1 April).

    TAYLOR INSTITUTION LIBRARY closed (reopens 1 April).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Tuesday 1 April

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Hoards of treasures',
    1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015,
    9.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m.)

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    section



    Friday 4 April

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Meissen porcelain', 1.15
    p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30
    a.m.–12.30 p.m.)

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    section



    Saturday 5 April

    PITT RIVERS MUSEUM `Pitt Stop' event for children and
    families (not unaccompanied children): `Games people
    play', Main Museum Building, 2–4 p.m. (admission
    free).

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    section



    Tuesday 8 April

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The materials of Asian
    sculpture: smaller carvings', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
    £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30
    a.m.–12.30 p.m.)

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    section



    Wednesday 9 April

    B. LEAR: `Lifting the lid off Tuluma boxes: the material
    culture of the Pacific atoll environment' (Friends of the
    Pitt Rivers Museum lecture series), Pauling Human
    Sciences Centre (58 Banbury Road), 5 p.m.

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    section



    Friday 11 April

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Egypt of the Pharaohs',
    1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015,
    9.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m.)

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    section



    Tuesday 15 April

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Financial management: project
    planning and management', 9.30 a.m.

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Lotus and tulip', 1.15
    p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30
    a.m.–12.30 p.m.)

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    section



    Wednesday 16 April

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Writing research papers,
    abstracts, and posters', 9.15 a.m. ( HREF="#seminars">see information above).

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    section



    Thursday 17 April

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Supervising D.Phil. students',
    9.30 a.m. (see information
    above
    ).

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    section



    Friday 18 April

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Gender in teaching', 9.30 a.m.
    (see information above).

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The Impressionists',
    1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015,
    9.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m.)

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Sunday 20 April

    TRINITY TERM begins.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Tuesday 22 April

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINARS: `Lecturing skills
    practice—arts', 9.30 a.m.; `Lecturing skills
    practice—sciences', 2 p.m. (see
    information above
    ).

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Twentieth-century
    painting in Britain', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel.
    for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m.)

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM study-day: `Woodcuts and wood
    engravings—Dürer to Desmet', 10 a.m.–4
    p.m. (Cost: £19. Tel. for details: (2)78015.)

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    section



    Friday 25 April

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `The Hill Collection of
    Musical Instruments', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel.
    for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m.)

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    section



    Sunday 27 April

    TRINITY FULL TERM begins.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Monday 28 April

    PROFESSOR M. MAMDANI: `Between justice and
    reconciliation: reflections on Rwanda and South Africa'
    (special African Studies lecture), Oakeshott Room,
    Lincoln, 5 p.m.

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    section



    Tuesday 29 April

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Watches as jewellery',
    1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015,
    9.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m.)

    CONGREGATION meeting, 2 p.m.

    PROFESSOR C.D. HOLES (Khalid bin Abdallah Al-Sa'ud
    Professor for the Study of the Contemporary Arab World):
    `The debate poem: a genre of Gulf vernacular literature'
    (inaugural lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

    PROFESSOR J. ROBERTS: `Designing the modern firm: the
    economic logic of strategy and organisation' (Clarendon
    Lectures in Management Studies: `The modern firm:
    economics, strategy, and organisation'), Gulbenkian
    Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

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    section



    Wednesday 30 April

    DR G. DICKSON: `Crowd and charisma: leadership and
    followership' (Wilde Lectures in Natural and Comparative
    Religion: `Medieval Pentecostalism—the tradition of
    charismatic Christian enthusiasm in Western Europe,
    c.1000–1500'), Schools, 5 p.m.

    PROFESSOR J. ROBERTS: `Inside the modern firm:
    internal organisation and management' (Clarendon Lectures
    in Management Studies: `The modern firm: economics,
    strategy, and organisation'), Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre,
    St Cross Building, 5 p.m.

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    section



    Thursday 1 May

    THE REVD PROFESSOR JAMES BARR: `The new profile of
    discussion about the Bible' (Hensley Henson Lectures:
    `History, theology, biblical criticism: the
    end-of-century interactions'), Schools, 5 p.m.

    SIR WALTER BODMER: `The somatic evolution of cancer'
    (Department of Statistics, Florence Nightingale Lecture),
    Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, St Anne's, 5.30 p.m.

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    section



    Saturday 3 May

    DEGREE conferments, Sheldonian, 11.30 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.

    PROFESSOR J. ROBERTS: `The boundaries of the modern
    firm: markets, hierarchies, and more' (Clarendon Lectures
    in Management Studies: `The modern firm: economics,
    strategy, and organisation'), Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre,
    St Cross Building, 4 p.m.

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    section



    Monday 5 May

    UNIVERSITY OFFICES closed (today only).

    PROFESSOR J.N. COLDSTREAM: `Light from Cyprus on the
    "Dark Age" of Greece?' (Myres Memorial Lecture), Headley
    Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean, 5 p.m.

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    section