20 January 2000 - No 4535



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 130, No. 4535: 20 January 2000<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

20 January 2000



The following supplement was published
with this Gazette:

Appointments


University Health and
Safety
information


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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 20 January 2000: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 17 January


Degree by Special Resolution

No notice to the contrary having been received under the provisions
of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1997, p. 15), the
following resolution is deemed to have been approved at noon on 6
December.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

ALEXANDER GUEMBEL, Lincoln College

BRONWEN MARGOT MORGAN, MA status, St Hilda's College

MICHELANGELO ZACCARELLO, Pembroke College

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HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL 17 January


1 Decrees

Council has made the following decrees, to come into effect on 4
February.

Decree (1): Removal of anomalies

Explanatory note

The following decree removes anomalies and makes consequential
amendments to existing decrees which have been overlooked in recent
legislation.

Text of Decree (1)

1 In Ch. I, Sect. I, § 1, cl. 3 (f),
concerning admission to degrees (Statutes, 1997, p.
184), Ch. VII, Sect. III, § 215, cl. 1, concerning the Professor
of Music (p. 479, as renumbered by Decree (1) of 29 October 1998,
Decree (1) of 14 January 1999, and Decree (1) of 18 March 1999,
Gazette, Vol. 129, pp. 276, 580, 938), and Ch. IX, Sect.
I, § 239, concerning Music Libraries and Collections, under
Ellis Memorial Library (p. 687) (twice) and Retford Collection (p.
688), in each case before `Professor of Music' insert `Heather'.

[Now that there is a titular Professor of Music as well as the
statutory professor, it is desirable to specify that the above
references are to the latter, i.e. the Heather Professor.
]

2 In Ch. II, Sect. VI, cl. 1, concerning heads
of division (p. 243, as amended by Decree (1) of 4 November 1999,
Gazette, p. 294), after `The head of each division shall
be appointed' insert `, subject to the approval of Council,'.

[The decree providing for the appointment of heads of division
omitted, in error, the requirement that such appointments be subject
to the approval of Council, as had been agreed by Congregation on the
recommendation of the Joint Working Party on Governance.
]

3 In Ch. II, Sect. IX, items (1)–(3), (4),
(5), and (6)–(9), concerning the Board of the Faculty of
Management (Statutes, 1997, p. 256, as amended by Decree
(1) of 28 May 1998, Gazette, Vol. 128, p. 1284), in each
case delete `School of Management Studies' and substitute `Said
Business School'.

4 Ibid., item (4), delete `clauses 15 and 16 of
Decree (1) of 17 July 1997' and substitute `Ch. III, Sect. LIII, cll.
15 and 16'.

5 Ibid., item (5), before `Director' insert
`Peter Moores'.

6 In Ch. III, Sect. LIII, title, concerning the
School of Management Studies (p. 319, as amended by Decree (1) of 19
March 1998 and Decree (1) of 28 May 1998, Gazette, Vol.
128, pp. 930, 1284), delete `, School
of
1' and the corresponding footnote.

7 Ibid., delete cl. 1 and substitute:

`§ 1. Said Business School'.

8 Ibid., insert Decree (1) of 17 July 1997 (pp.
350–4).

9 Ibid., cl. 1, as amended by cl. 8 above, after
`requirements of the School.' insert `The School shall promote study
and research within the field of Management Studies.'

10 Ibid., cl. 15 (p. 353), delete `Ch. III,
Sect. LIII' and substitute `any statute, decree, or regulation to the
contrary'.

11 Ibid., delete `Committee for the School
(currently known as the Committee for the School of Management
Studies)' and substitute `Board of the Faculty of Management'.

12 Ibid., delete `Council for Business Studies
(currently known as the Council for Management Studies)' and
substitute `Council for the Said Business School'.

13 Ibid., as amended by cll. 6–12 above,
before existing cl. 2 (p. 320, as amended by Decree (1) of 19 March
1998 and Decree (1) of 28 May 1998) insert:

`§ 2. Council for the Said Business School'.

14 Ibid., delete `2. There shall be ... (2) the
Director of the School of Management Studies' and substitute:

`1. There shall be a Council for the Said Business School consisting
of:

(1) the Vice-Chancellor;

(2) the Peter Moores Director of the Said Business School'.

15 Ibid., items (3)–(6) (as amended by
Decree (2) of 18 March 1999, Gazette, Vol. 129, p. 938),
in each case delete `School of Management Studies' and substitute
`Said Business School'.

16 Ibid., renumber existing cll. 3–4 (pp.
320–1, as amended by the same decrees) as cll. 2–3.

17 Ibid., cl. 3, as renumbered, delete `School
of Management Studies' and substitute `Said Business School'.

18 In Ch. VII, Sect. I, § 7, SCHEDULE IV,
concerning departmental allowances (p. 395, as amended by Decree (2)
of 16 July 1998, Gazette, Vol. 128, p. 1474), delete
`Deputy Director of the School of Management Studies' and
substitute:

`Deputy Directors of the Said Business School'.

19 Ibid., Sect. III, § 191, cl. 2 (8), (9)
and cl. 3 (8), (9), concerning the Professors of Management Studies
(p. 468), § 192, cl. 3 (8), (9), concerning The Peninsular and
Oriental Steam Navigation Company Professor of Management Studies (p.
469), § 193, cl. 2 (8), concerning the Peter Moores Professor of
Management Studies (p. 470), § 194, cl. 3 (8), (9), concerning
the American Standard Companies Professor of Operations Management
(p. 470), and § 196, cll. 2, 3, and 5, concerning the Rhodes
Lecturers in Management Studies (p. 471, as renumbered by Decree (1)
of 20 October 1998, Gazette, Vol. 129, p. 276), in each
case delete `Committee for the School of Management
Studies1' and the corresponding footnote and substitute
`Board of the Faculty of Management'.

20 Ibid., § 191, cl. 2 (3) and § 193,
cl. 2 (3), in each case delete `Director of the School of Management
Studies1' and the corresponding footnote and substitute
`Director of the Said Business School'.

21 Ibid., § 196, cl. 4, delete `Committee for the School' and
substitute `faculty board'.

22 Ibid., Sect. VII, § 1, SCHEDULE and § 2, SCHEDULE A,
concerning the holding of fellowships (pp. 536, 537), in each case
delete `Director of the School of Management Studies1' and
the corresponding footnote and substitute `Director of the Said
Business School'.

23 In Ch. IX, Sect. I, § 233, cll. 1 and 3, concerning the
Peter Moores Fund (p. 684), in each case delete `School of Management
Studies1' and the corresponding footnote and substitute
`Said Business School'.

24 Ibid., cll. 2 and 3, and § 234, cl. 2, concerning the J.P.
Morgan Prize in Finance, in each case delete `Committee for the
School of Management Studies1' and the corresponding
footnote and substitute `Board of the Faculty of Management'.

25 In Ch. XI, APPENDIX, concerning harassment (p. 797), after
`Brazilian Studies Centre' insert:

`Said Business School'.

26 Ibid. (p. 798), delete `School of Management Studies1'
and the corresponding footnote.

[Cll. 3–26 above make changes consequential on the
renaming of the School of Management Studies as the Said Business
School, and of the establishment of the Management Board in place of
the Committee for the School.
]

27 In Ch. III, Sect. LIII, § 1, cl. 13 concerning the Said
Business School (p. 319, as amended by cll. 7–8 above), after
`held for a period of five years' insert `, or such other period as
Council may determine from time to time,'.

28 Ibid., after `renewed for' delete `periods of five years' and
substitute `such periods'.

29 In Ch. VII, Sect. I, § 5. B, cl. 5, concerning the
assignment of departments (p. 389, as amended by Decree (2) of 19
February 1998, Gazette, Vol. 128, p. 756), delete `not
less than five years' and substitute `five years, or such other
period as the Board may determine from time to time'.

[Cll. 27–9 above introduce flexibility, in accordance with
current practice, into the period for which a head of department is
appointed.
]

30 In Ch. IV, Sect. XII, cl. 2 (a), concerning the
University Verger (Statutes, 1997, p. 362, as renumbered
by Decree (2) of 9 October 1997, Gazette, Vol. 128, p.
118), delete `, Convocation, and Council' and substitute `and
Convocation'.

[The University Verger is no longer required to attend at
meetings of Council.
]

31 In Ch. VII, Sect. VII, § 1, SCHEDULE, concerning entitlement
to hold fellowships (p. 536), delete:

`Bodley's Librarian

Sub-Librarians in Bodley's Library'

and substitute:

`Director of University Library Services and Bodley's Librarian

Keepers in Bodley's Library'.

32 Ibid., § 2, SCHEDULE A, concerning qualification for
professorial fellowships, delete:

`Bodley's Librarian Sub-Librarians in Bodley's Library'.

33 Ibid., SCHEDULE B (p. 537), delete `sub-librarians, Librarians of
the Ashmolean Museum and Taylor Institution,'.

[Cll. 31–3 above update references to senior librarian
posts which have subsequently been retitled.
]

34 In Ch. IX, Sect. I, § 225, cl. 1 (a), concerning
the Mathematical Prizes (p. 675), delete `is (i) a Bachelor ...
Master of Science' and substitute:

`(i) has satisfied the examiners in a Final Honour School, or

(ii) is a Probationer Research Student or a Student for the Degree
of Master of Letters or Master of Philosophy or Master of Science or
Doctor of Philosophy'.

35 Ibid. (p. 676), delete cl. 2 (c) and substitute:

`(c) One prize shall be awarded (and its amount fixed) by
the examiners in the Honour School of Mathematics, if, in their
opinion, a candidate submits work of sufficient merit in that
examination.

(d) Two prizes shall be awarded (and the amounts of each
fixed) by the examiners in the Honour School of Mathematical
Sciences, if, in their opinion, candidates submit work of sufficient
merit in that examination.'

36 Ibid., renumber existing sub-cl. (d) as sub-cl.
(e).

[Cll. 34–6 above make consequential changes in the decree
governing the Mathematical Prizes which were overlooked when the
arrangements for registering graduate students were changed, and when
the Honour School of Mathematical Sciences was established.
]

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Decree (2): Further co-optation to the Physical Sciences Board

Notwithstanding the provisions of Ch. II, Sect. VI, § 6, cl. 1
(Statutes, 1997, p. 250), the Board of the Faculty of
Physical Sciences is permitted to co-opt a fifth additional member
for Hilary and Trinity Terms 2000.

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CONGREGATION 18 January


1 Declaration of approval of unopposed
Statutes promulgated on 14 December

No notice of opposition having been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor
declared the Statutes (1) concerning the composition of the Council
of the University and (3) establishing an E.P. Abraham Professorship
of Cell Biology approved.


2 Promulgation of Statute

A form of Statute was promulgated. No notice of opposition having
been given, Mr Vice-Chancellor declared the preamble carried of the
proposed Statute changing the arrangements for the nomination of
Delegates of the University Press.

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3 Declaration of approval of Special
Resolution

That the site on the Old Road Campus, Headington, currently occupied
by Building 667, plus sufficient additional space as is necessary to
construct a building of up to approximately 6,800 sq.m., be allocated
for the Trials and Epidemiology Building.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 20 January 2000: University Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 8 February 2 p.m.


3 Voting on Special Resolutions authorising
expenditure from the Higher Studies Fund

(1) That the Curators of the University Chest be authorised to
make available to Council each year a sum based on the total annual
uncommitted income in both the unearmarked part of the Higher Studies
Fund and the Social Studies Fund over the period to the end of
2005–6. Such expenditure shall be subject to regular monitoring,
including written reports to the Trustees of the Higher Studies Fund.

(2) That the Curators of the University Chest be authorised to
expend from the unearmarked part of the Higher Studies Fund a sum of
£85K over three years to cover the cost of a postdoctoral
research assistant, together with a grant of £4.5K per annum for
five years to fund visitors to Oxford for visiting seminar
programmes, both grants being in support of the incoming Wallis
Professor of Mathematics.

(3) That the Curators of the University Chest be authorised to
expend from the unearmarked part of the Higher Studies Fund a grant
of £55K over two years to provide funding for a postdoctoral
research assistant, this grant being in support of the Royal Academy
of Engineering/AEA Technology/INSS Research Professor in
Microanalytical Techniques.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 20 January 2000: Notices<br />

Notices


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or
recurrent entry.]

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WHITE'S PROFESSORSHIP OF MORAL PHILOSOPHY

JOHN BROOME (BA Cambridge, MA London, PH.D. MIT), Professor of Philosophy,
University of St Andrews, has been appointed to the professorship with effect
from 1 September 2000.

Professor Broome will be a fellow of Corpus Christi College.

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ANDREW COLIN PRIZE 1999

The Prize, for the best performance in Russian in the Preliminary Examination
for Modern Languages, has been awarded jointly to PETER JOHN STEGGLE,
Trinity College, and JONATHAN TURNER, University College.

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MRS CLAUDE BEDDINGTON MODERN LANGUAGES PRIZE
1999

The Prize, for the best performance in German in the Preliminary Examination
for Modern Languages, has been awarded jointly to CHRISTINA MARIE VON
LOEPER, St Hilda's College, and MARINA JOSEPHA ANNA S. HAMILTON-BAILLIE,
Hertford College.

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CYRIL JONES MEMORIAL PRIZE 1999

The Prize, for the best performance in Spanish in the Preliminary Examination
for Modern Languages, has been awarded to SIMON FRANCIS PIESSE, St
Peter's College.

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CLAUDE MASSART PRIZE 1999

The Prize, for special meritorious performance in French Literature in the
Preliminary Examination involving Modern Languages, has been awarded jointly
to CLARE HAIDEE BLACKBURNE, New College, and NICHOLAS PETER GRAHAM,
Christ Church.

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COMPOSITION OF AN ELECTORAL BOARD

The composition of the electoral board to the post below, proceedings to fill
which are currently in progress, is as follows:

Wilde Professorship of Mental Philosophy


                                                 Appointed by

The Principal of Linacre (Chairman)     Mr Vice-Chancellor[1]
The President of Corpus Christi                  ex officio
Professor D. Dennett                             Council
Dr J. Heal                                       General Board
Professor A.D. Milner                            General Board
Dr M.W. Brewer                                   Literae Humaniores Board
Professor C.A.B. Peacocke                        Literae Humaniores Board
Professor P. Harris                              Psychological Studies Board
Professor J.P. Griffin                           Corpus Christi College 

[1] Appointed by Mr Vice-Chancellor under the provisions of Tit. IX, Sect. III,
cl. 2 (Statutes, 1997, p. 67).

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UNIVERSITY ENVIRONMENT COMMITTEE

The University's Environment Committee was established in Trinity Term
1997 to monitor environmental performance and encourage feasible
improvements. As a first step, the committee proposed a set of environmental
targets to guide the University's central services, departments, and colleges,
and on 12 July 1999, Hebdomadal Council adopted the targets below:

The University undertakes:

—to develop a `green' transport strategy by encouraging the use of
energy-efficient public or communal transport, bicycles, and walking for travel
to the University and discouraging the unnecessary use of private motor
transport, with the aim of reducing traffic and parking in the city centre;

—to accept a share of the UK's commitment to a reduction in carbon
dioxide emissions both by attaining greater efficiency in total energy
consumption and by continuing to examine the possibility of purchasing
electricity from `green' sources;

—to ensure that any new building or refurbishment takes the widest
possible consideration of environmental impacts and is planned and carried out
to ensure the greatest energy efficiency which is reasonable in the
circumstances;

—to introduce university-wide purchasing policies which encourage the
use of sustainable products;

—to work with the Southern Universities Purchasing Consortium and
encourage all purchasing officers to consider future purchasing of technology
with reduced environmental impacts, in order to encourage such products onto
the market;

—to consider the feasibility of other measures such as combined heat and
power plants (CHP plants) and solar energy;

—to review opportunities and implement measures for reducing the use of
water;

—to review opportunities and implement measures for the reduction of
waste and the recycling of materials;

—to review its policies for managing its investment in land and buildings
to avoid adverse environmental impact.

The committee has also been authorised to publicise and promote these
targets and to review progress towards them periodically. This progress
depends very much on all members of the University, and the Environment
Committee urges the University as a whole, to consider what steps its members
can take, individually and collectively, towards the achievement of these
targets.

Environment Prize

With these new targets in mind, the committee is keen to encourage students
to raise awareness of environmental issues within their colleges and/or
departments. Two prizes (£200 and £100) will be awarded to students
who can demonstrate that they have made a major contribution to improving
the environment of the University, either through their college or department.
The prizes will be given for the greatest enhancement of any one or more of
the nine objectives detailed above, particularly in an innovative way that
could be replicated by other colleges and/or departments.

Entries must be signed by the head of department or college to verify
that the achievements are actual. Achievements must have been identified up
to and including the end of eighth week of Trinity Term. The closing date for
submissions is midday on Friday, 23 June.

Entries should be handed in to: Ms S. Cowburn, Secretary to the
University Environment Committee, University Offices, Wellington Square,
Oxford OX1 2JD (telephone: Oxford (2)70193).

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CIRCULATION OF THE GAZETTE TO
RETIRED SENIOR MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY

It has been decided that any former member of Congregation over the age of
seventy-five who is resident in Oxford may continue to receive the
Gazette, if he or she so wishes, on application in writing to the
Information Office, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD. Such
applications must be renewed at the beginning of each academic year.

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DISCOUNT ON PERSONAL INSURANCE POLICIES
AVAILABLE TO STAFF AND MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY

Royal Sun Alliance, the main insurer of the University, provides discounts for
members, staff, their families, and pensioners of the University of Oxford. The
following savings can be achieved:

Household (buildings and/or contents: 20 per cent;

Travel (including winter sports): 12.5 per cent;

Private car: 40 per cent off premium.

The University acts solely as an introducer of business to Royal Sun Alliance,
receiving no commission or other remuneration, with all savings passed on to
the subscribing member. For further information, a brochure may be obtained
from Graham Waite (telephone: (2)80307), or Andy Darley (telephone: (2)70110)
at the University Offices. To obtain a quotation or receive specific information
on the covers available, telephone Royal Sun Alliance's regional office on 0800
300 822, quoting the appropriate reference: SCH266 for car insurance;
otherwise 34V0067.

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GUIDELINES FOR LEAVE FOR ACADEMIC STAFF

The General Board's regulations in respect of sabbatical leave and dispensation
from CUF lecturing obligations are set out in Ch. VII, Sect. I of the Statutes
(1997, pp. 384--6). Provisions for other leave are set out in the same section
(pp. 382--3). The following guidelines describe the General Board's policy and
practice in respect of applications for leave which do not fall within the
category of straightforward sabbatical leave or dispensation, i.e. special leave.

1. Applications for leave to hold some public offices or certain research
awards

(a) Applications for leave to accept an appointment in the public
service of national importance are normally granted by the General Board,
provided that the purpose of the leave can be shown to be compatible with
the academic interests of the faculty, the faculty board lends its support to
the application, and it is clear that the individual intends to return to
university service after the period of leave. Leave for this purpose for heads
of departments or professors can, however, be problematic, for obvious
reasons.

(b) Applications to national bodies for prestigious and
competitive research awards (such as British Academy Research Readerships
and Senior Research Fellowships, EPSRC Senior or Advanced Fellowships and
Nuffield Foundation Social Science Research Fellowships) should be made to the
General Board through the faculty board. It is usual for such national bodies
to specify that applications should be made through the employing institution,
and in Oxford's case this involves routing the application via the faculty
board to the General Board. The University will normally support such
applications for prestigious awards, but it is necessary for the faculty board
and the General Board to consider carefully what replacement teaching
arrangements will be required if an application is successful.

Leave granted under (a) and (b) does not count against
sabbatical entitlement: indeed the rules of some research awards specifically
forbid this. However, as in other cases of special leave, the period of leave
does not count as qualifying service for the purpose of calculating future
entitlement to sabbatical leave, and sabbatical leave is not normally granted
in the period immediately preceding or following periods of such leave,
although some flexibility may be exercised in respect of periods of special
leave not exceeding one year, especially in connection with the holding of
research awards.

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2. Applications for leave for other purposes

All other applications for leave are initially considered in terms of application
for sabbatical leave, until entitlement to sabbatical leave is exhausted. In other
words, if an individual applies for leave under this section for any term which
he or she would be entitled to take as sabbatical leave, any leave granted for
that term will be granted as sabbatical leave. Such leave may also be granted
as sabbatical leave in advance of entitlement: in other words, sabbatical leave
will be granted for a term which the applicant would not normally be entitled
to take as sabbatical leave, and leave for the term in question will then be
deemed to be taken in a later term (normally not more than six terms later).
In this way the leave will count against an individual's sabbatical entitlement:
taking the individual's service as a whole, the leave will not be in addition to
the standard sabbatical entitlement. For sabbatical leave to be granted in
advance of entitlement, an academic case must be made by the faculty board
to the Appointments Committee of the General Board.

When sabbatical leave entitlement had been exhausted, an application has to
be considered in whole or in part as one for special leave. In such cases,
faculty boards are required, when making recommendations to the
Appointments Committee of the General Board, to specify whether, and if so
how, the grant of such leave would be in the academic interests of the
faculty. Where there is no statement of academic interest, or this statement is
not persuasive, special leave will not be granted.

Applications for special leave cover many kinds of situation. One would be an
unrepeatable opportunity to pursue academic interests where the applicant is
ineligible for sabbatical leave. In such a case it would be necessary for the
faculty board to demonstrate the academic advantage (to the University rather
than to the individual) of the individual being able to accept the opportunity,
and for an explanation to be given of why such an opportunity could not be
taken up at a later period when the applicant would be entitled to sabbatical
leave. Another situation where special leave might be applied for would be
where there was a need for fieldwork for a period exceeding one year, which
could therefore not be accommodated within the sabbatical provisions. In such
a case it would be expected, as usual, that as much of the leave as possible
would be taken as sabbatical or sabbatical in advance of entitlement, and the
faculty board would again need to demonstrate the academic advantage to the
University of the application's being granted.

Very occasionally applications are made for leave to enable someone to accept
an appointment in another academic institution (other than a routine visiting
appointment held during sabbatical leave). In such instances, the faculty
board would need to make an extremely convincing case as to desirability of
the individual being offered reversionary rights to his or her university post
for any application to be successful. Factors taken into account would include
all relevant circumstances relating to the individual's role within the faculty
and the consequences for the faculty, in terms of the refilling of the post, if
leave were not to be granted and the individual were therefore to resign. On
this latter point, it should be noted, of course, that if leave is granted and
the individual subsequently resigns during the period of leave or at the end
of it, the uncertainty about the long-term filling of the post will have been
exacerbated. The longer the appointment in the other institution the less likely
it is that leave will be granted; leave will not be granted save in the most
exceptional circumstances to enable someone to decide whether to accept a
permanent appointment elsewhere.

In each of the situations outlined above, applications are considered on their
academic merits, but it is emphasised that the nature of special leave is that
it is granted exceptionally rather than automatically. Advice on the likelihood
of success of any application can be obtained from the Secretary of Faculties
or the secretary of the Appointments Committee of the General Board.

The General Board takes the view that academic staff are specifically
appointed to undertake both teaching and research, and (although the Board
would support arrangements whereby teaching in excess of a contracted or
reasonable stint was relieved) an extremely good case needs to be made in
support of an application for special leave which would have the result of the
individual's teaching being conducted mainly or wholly by someone else. This
is a especially true given that the sabbatical leave scheme has been preserved
intact throughout retrenchment, so providing the opportunity for individuals
to concentrate on research in one term out of every seven. Willingness to
forgo university stipend or the ease with which funding for a replacement
appointment may be attracted will not be sufficient to guarantee in any way
the success of an application for special leave.

It is emphasised that any application for leave, including any application for
funding which might result in the need for leave from university duties to be
granted, must be made to the General Board through the faculty board (and
head of department, in departmentally organised faculties). In every case the
academic advantage to the institution will be the general criterion by which
applications will be considered: in every case the General Board requires
details of any necessary substitute arrangements, including those relating to
examining and graduate supervision.

It is recognised that some offers are made to individuals at short notice.
Given the fact that all members of the academic staff have clear obligations
to the University under the terms of their contracts, however, no such offer
should be accepted without the explicit approval of the General Board under
the procedures set out above: for this reason any prospect of such an offer,
however indefinite, must be discussed (in strict confidence) with Dr Whiteley,
secretary to the Appointments Committee of the General Board, at the very
earliest opportunity. Delay in bringing to the attention of the University the
possibility that an offer may be made will mean that if applications and
substitute arrangements then have to be considered at short notice, this might
compromise the chance of leave being granted.

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3. Stipendiary arrangements

Leave granted under the above arrangements is normally without university
stipend, but the precise implications for payment can vary. In some cases the
leave is clearly unpaid, such as when appointments in the public service are
held. In other cases, such as the holding of prestigious research awards, the
University is expected to continue paying the individual, while the
grant-giving body provides support for the University to employ a
replacement: or the grant-giving body supplies a sum of money which is
equivalent to that paid by the University under normal circumstances to the
individual. Although this is technically special leave without university
stipend, the University will continue to pay the stipend to the individual
through the payroll mechanism, being reimbursed by the award-giving body.
Special leave under any other arrangement will mean the University will cease
to make payments of stipend and national insurance and superannuation
contributions. In general, except where the rules of grant-giving bodies in
respect of major competitive awards specify otherwise, it is expected that the
normal result of the granting of an application for special leave will be the
release to the University of the full salary and on-costs of the substantive
university appointment, which may be available, with the agreement of the
General Board, to the faculty board for the making of any necessary
replacement appointment. This is particularly important given the University's
practice of advertising temporary university lecturerships, for example,
without cash-limited salary scales.

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ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY TEACHERS

The Association of University Teachers is both a professional association and
a trade union, committed to the advancement of university education and
research. At the national level, the AUT is the recognised union for academic
and academic-related staff. Besides its concern for more general questions of
university education and research, the AUT negotiates salary levels and
conditions of employment with the Committee of Vice-Chancellors and
Principals.

The Oxford branch of the AUT is open for membership to university and
college employees, whether academic or academic-related. It has over 900
members. It is the official body with which the University discusses priorities
and problems bearing on education and research, and negotiates solutions to
them. Discussions between the Oxford AUT and university officers occur
formally once per term at a meeting of a Joint Consultative Committee, but
there are many other informal meetings to discuss particular problems,
including those affecting the conditions of employment of academic and
academic-related staff, such as the `waiver clause' for those employed on
contract grants. The local AUT also provides confidential advice on problems
relating to terms and conditions of employment.

Application for membership and other enquiries can be made to Mrs Anne
Hendry, Administrative Secretary, Oxford AUT, New Barnett House, 28 Little
Clarendon Street, Oxford OX1 2HY (telephone and fax: (2)70418, e-mail:
aut@ermine.ox.ac.uk) (9.30 a.m.--4.30 p.m., Tuesday--Thursday).

Enquiries may also be directed to Terry Hoad (Honorary Secretary), St
Peter's College (telephone: (2)78888, e-mail: terry.hoad@spc.ox.ac.uk), or Chris
Talbot, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Roosevelt Drive, Headington,
Oxford (e-mail: ctalbot@well.ox.ac.uk).

General meetings of the Oxford AUT take place on Tuesday of third week in
each term. The Hilary Term meeting will be held at 1.15 p.m. on Tuesday, 1
February, in Blackhall, Queen Elizabeth House, 21 St Giles'. All AUT members
and non-members will be welcome.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 20 January 2000: Lectures<br />

Lectures


Contents of this section:

Return to Contents Page of this issue



SPEAKER'S LECTURES IN BIBLICAL STUDIES
1999–2001

Future hope and present reality

ANDREW CHESTER, University Lecturer, the Divinity School, University
of Cambridge, will deliver his first series of Speaker's Lectures at
5 p.m. on the following Tuesdays in the Examination Schools.

1 Feb.: `Future hope and the end of time.'

8 Feb.: `Prophecy: true or false?'

15 Feb.: `Land and nation.'

22 Feb.: `Kingdom and Messiah.'

29 Feb.: `Resurrection and transformation.'

7 Mar.: `Paradise restored.'

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CAMERON MACKINTOSH LECTURES

PROFESSOR NICHOLAS HYTNER will lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 4
February, in the Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, St Catherine's
College.

There will be an open meeting for students connected with drama the
following day, Saturday, 5 February (time and venue to be announced).

Subject: `An anti-hauteur view of
directing.'

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NEWS INTERNATIONAL VISITING PROFESSOR OF
BROADCAST MEDIA

The illusion of information

PROFESSOR ROGER GRAEF will lecture at 6 p.m. on the following days.
The lecture on 24 January will be given in Exeter College; the final
two lectures will be given in Green College.

Mon. 24 Jan.: `Now you see it, now you don't: visions
of reality in the twenty-first century.'

Tue. 1 Feb.: `Secrets of the cutting-room.' (Master-
class/workshop
)

Tue. 8 Feb.: `Moveable feast: ethics in the media.'

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ANTHROPOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY

Social Geography seminar series

The following seminars will be held at 4.45 p.m. on Fridays in the
Senior Common Room, the School of Geography.

Conveners: G.C. Clarke, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Urban
and Social Geography, G.C.K. Peach, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Social
Geography, and A. Lemon, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer (CUF) in
Geography.

PROFESSOR PEACH

21 Jan.: `New religions in the cultural geography
of England.'

DR A. LEMON

28 Jan.: `Ethnicity and voting in South Africa,
1948–99.'

K. HANSING

4 Feb.: `Rasta, race, and revolution: transnational
connections in 1990s Cuba.'

DR A. SIVES

11 Feb.: `Political violence in Jamaica.'

M. NEWTON

18 Feb.: `The children of Africa in the colonies;
slaves and free people of colour in emancipation era Barbados,
1810s to 1830s.'

DR M. FITZGERALD

25 Feb.: `Police searches in London: matters
arising?'

DR D. HOWARD

3 Mar.: `Race, colour, and ethnicity in the
Dominican Republic.'

DR V. ROBINSON

10 Mar.
: `Geography and refugee studies.'

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Institute of Social and Cultural
Anthropology

Ethnicity and Identity Seminar: Death

The following seminars will be held at 11 a.m. on Fridays in the
Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology.

Conveners: Shirley Ardener and Dr Ian Fowler.

DR N. BARLEY, Museum of Mankind, London

21 Jan.: `Death and the multiplicity of
identity.'

DR N. ALLEN

28 Jan.: `Death and reincarnation—a South
Asianist's perspective.'

DR L. MARTINEZ, SOAS, London

4 Feb.: `Death and women in a Japanese village.'

DR J. WALDREN

11 Feb.: `Death in Majorca; sharing eternity with
"the Other" .'

DR J. HOCKEY, Hull

18 Feb.: `Social death before death: social life
after death.'

M. KURZEM

25 Feb.: ` "Where I lay buried"; piecing
together a Holocaust biography from Belarus 1941.'

DR J. LITTLEWOOD, South Bank University, London

3 Mar.: `Mortuary rituals for a nobody; death of
the unborn.'

DR A. WALTER, Reading

10 Mar.: `Remembering the dismembered body.'

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CLINICAL MEDICINE

Nuffield Department of Surgery

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on the days shown in
the Seminar Room (Level 6), the Nuffield Department of Surgery, the
John Radcliffe Hospital.

D. KOO

Thur. 3 Feb.: `Ischaemia/reperfusion injury in
renal transplantation.'

PROFESSOR D.WRAITH, Bristol

Tue. 8 Feb.: `The immune repertoire and peripheral
tolerance.'

PROFESSOR R. PHILIPS

Tue. 15 Feb.: `The immune response to HIV.'

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Clinical Endocrine and Metabolic Meetings

The following meetings will be held at 12.45 p.m. on Wednesdays in
the Committee Room, Green College.

PROFESSOR S. O'RAHILLY, Cambridge

26 Jan.: `Obesity and insulin resistance: lessons
from human experiments of nature.'

S. ATKIN, Hull

2 Feb.: `Clinical and laboratory studies on the
human anterior pituitary and prolactinomas.'

DR J. MIELL, King's College, London

9 Feb.: `Honey, I shrunk the mice!'

J. ARMITAGE

16 Feb.: `Lipid-lowering trials in diabetes.'

DR J. SHAW, Manchester

23 Feb.: `Diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes and the role
of the oral glucose tolerance test.'

DR A. SOUTAR, Imperial College, London

1 Mar.: `Characterisation of known and novel
defects in patients with phenotypic familial
hypercholesterolaemia.'

DR P. TRAINER, Manchester

8 Mar.: `Growth hormone receptor antagonist therapy
for acromegaly.'

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ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE, MEDIEVAL
AND MODERN LANGUAGES, MODERN HISTORY

Language and history

The following interdisciplinary seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on
Tuesdays in Oriel College.

Conveners: D.F. Cram, MA, University Lecturer in
Linguistics, R.J.W. Evans, MA, D.Phil., Regius Professor of Modern
History, and S. Romaine, MA, Merton Professor of English Language.

N. WOODS, Sussex

25 Jan.: `Sound changes in New Zealand English:
real or apparent?'

P. MORGAN, Swansea

1 Feb.: `New words for an ancient language: the
expansion of Welsh vocabulary in the eighteenth and early
nineteenth centuries.'

E. NOWAK, Leipzig

8 Feb.: `Missionary linguistics: the Moravians in
Greenland and Labrador.'

PROFESSOR ROMAINE

15 Feb.: `Glottal goofs and the greengrocer's
glottal: signs of identity and signs of discord in the
revitalisation of Hawaiian.'

DR CRAM

22 Feb.
: `History, politics, and Celtic grammar: Edward
Lhuyd (1707) and William Shaw (1778).'

L. PETER, London

29 Feb.: `The Holy Crown of Hungary in political
rhetoric.'

R. STEADMAN-JONES, Sheffield

7 Mar.: `Whose language? Whose knowledge? Colonial
representation of Indian and African languages in the Romantic
period.'

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LITERAE HUMANIORES

Late Roman History Seminar: Defining heresy in the late antique
and early medieval world

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the
Classics Faculty Centre, 67 St Giles'.

Convener: C. Humfress, MA, Carlyle Research Fellow in the
History of Political Thought, St Catherine's College.

DR H. CHADWICK

20 Jan.: `The concept of orthodoxy.'

M. SCHOFIELD

27 Jan.: `Philosophical haeresis: a
school of thought.'

D. HUNT

3 Feb.: `Fourth-century emperors and the formation
of Christian orthodoxy.'

S. BROCK

10 Feb.: `Who is the heretic? Differing
perspectives on the aftermath of Chalcedon.'

N. MCLYNN

17 Feb.: `Heretics in town: the Apollinarist
interlude in Nazianzus.'

P. GARNSEY

24 Feb.: `Heresy and social radicalism in late
antiquity.'

M. INNES

2 Mar.: `Defining a Christian empire: heresy and
unity in Carolingian Europe.'

A. CAMERON

9 Mar.: `Byzantium: a persecuting society?'

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MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES


Oxford Centre for Industrial and Applied
Mathematics

Differential equations and applications seminars

Unless indicated otherwise, the following seminars will be held at 5
p.m. on Thursdays in the common room, Dartington House. The co-
ordinators are S.J. Chapman, S.D. Howison, and J.R. Ockendon
(telephone: Oxford (2)70506).

Details of the 10 February seminar will be announced later.

DR W. LEWIS, Warwick

20 Jan.: `From the Laplace–Young equation to
the XK8 convertible hood model.'

DR R. PETERSEN

27 Jan.: to be announced.

DR C. HILLS

3 Feb.: `A three-dimensional analogue to the Taylor
paint-scraper.'

PROFESSOR J.P. KEATING, Bristol

17 Feb.: `Random matrix theory and [zeta] (½
+ it).'

PROFESSOR S. CHILDLESS, Courant Institute, New York University

Mon. 21 Feb., 3.30 p.m.: `Flapping in two
dimensions.' (Special seminar)

PROFESSOR R. GRIMSHAW, Loughborough

24 Feb.: `Models for instability in inviscid fluid
flows.'

DR H. BYRNE, Nottingham

2 Mar.: `Different approaches to modelling
avascular tumour growth.'

PROFESSOR P.G. DRAZIN, Bristol

9 Mar.: `Continued fractions and generalised Pade
approximation.'

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MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

Paget Toynbee Lectures

Dante's `chiara favella': scatology and obscenity in the
Commedia

PROFESSOR Z. BARANSKI, Reading, will deliver the Paget Toynbee
Lectures at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Taylor Institution. The
lectures on 17 February and 2 March will take place in Room 3; the 24
February lecture in Room 10b.

Convener: M.L. McLaughlin, MA, D.Phil., University
Lecturer In Italian.

17 Feb.: `Stercus and
scurrilitas in Dante.'

24 Feb.: `\Inferno\ XVIII and the "Sins of the
Tongue".'

2 Mar.: `Science, sex, and poetry:
Purgatorio XXV.'

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MODERN HISTORY, THEOLOGY

The history of Christianity: how we got to where we are now
(lectures to celebrate the beginning of a new millennium)

This series of lectures will continue, at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
Examination Schools.

Conveners: Dr Henry Mayr-Harting, Regius Professor of
Ecclesiastical History, and the Rt. Revd Richard Harries, Bishop of
Oxford.

A. MURRAY

18 Jan.: `The later Middle Ages.'

PROFESSOR D. MCCULLOCH

25 Jan.: `The Reformation.'

DR J. SHAW

1 Feb.: `The late seventeenth and eighteenth
centuries.'

DR J. GARNETT

8 Feb.: `The nineteenth century.'

PROFESSOR A. HASTINGS

15 Feb.: `The twentieth century.'

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ORIENTAL STUDIES

Medieval Studies Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in Lecture
Room 1, the Oriental Institute.

Conveners: J.S. Meisami, MA, University Lecturer in
Persian, and W.L. Treadwell, MA, D.Phil., Samir Shamma Lecturer in
Islamic Numismatics.

PROFESSOR A. NYMARK, Hofstra

25 Jan.: `The Ribats of Paykand: schools for
scholars, merchants' warehousese, or military garrisons?'

DR G. SCATTOLIN, PISAI, Rome, and Theological Institute, Cairo

1 Feb.: `The mystical experience of `Umar ibn al-
Farid through poem the "Great Taiyya".'

DR G. VAN DEN BERG, Cambridge

23 Feb.: `Badakshani poems attributed to Rumi.'

DR A. HUNSBERGER

29 Feb.
: `Nasir-i Khusraw: the exilic poetic voice.'

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PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

DR D. PARKER, ICI Technology, Wilton Centre, Middlesbrough, will give
a seminar at 2.30 p.m. on Wednesday, 9 February, in the ICL Lecture
Theatre.

Convener: M.L.H. Green, MA, Professor of Inorganic
Chemistry.

Subject: `Divergence/convergence of homogeneous and
heterogeneous catalysis.'

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Theoretical Chemistry Group Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Large
Lecture Theatre, the Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
Laboratory.

For details of the Newton-Abraham Lecture (24 January), see below.

Convener: M.S. Child, MA, Coulson Professor of
Theoretical Chemistry.

DR P.E. SAALFRANK, University College, London

31 Jan.: `The theory of photo-induced surface
reactions.'

DR J. ROBBINS, Bristol

7 Feb.: `Pauli exclusion principle from
nonrelativistic quantum mechanics.'

PROFESSOR R.N. DIXON, Bristol

14 Feb.: `Photodissociation dynamics of H20.'

PROFESSOR D.L. ANDREWS, East Anglia

21 Feb.: `Developments in the theory of resonance
energy transfer.'

DR R. BULLA, Augsburg

28 Feb.: `Strong electronic correlation and low
energy scales: a view from the Numerical Renormalisation
Group.'

A. PALSER

6 Mar.: `Electronic structure of carbon nanotubes.'

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Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory: Newton-Abraham
Lecture

PROFESSOR STUART A. RICE, Frank P. Hixon Distinguished Service
Professor, the James Franck Institute, the University of Chicago, and
Newton-Abraham Visiting Professor, will deliver the Newton-Abraham
Lecture at 4.15 p.m. on Monday, 24 January, in the PTCL Lecture
Theatre.

Subject: `Coherence versus chaos: active control of
molecular dynamics.'

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Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory: other lectures by
the Newton-Abraham Visiting Professor

PROFESSOR STUART A. RICE will lecture at 11.15 a.m. on the following
days in the PTCL Lecture Theatre.

Tue. 1 Feb.: `Active control of molecular
dynamics.'

Thur. 3 Feb.: `Equilibrium and dynamical properties of
quasi-two-dimensional colloid assemblies I.'

Tue. 8 Feb.: `Equilibrium and dynamical properties of
quasi-two-dimensional colloid assemblies II.'

Thur. 10 Feb.: `Structure of inhomogeneous liquid
metals: the liquid vapour interface.'

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Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory: departmental
seminars

The following seminars will be given at 2.15 p.m. on Mondays in the
PTCL Lecture Theatre.

PROFESSOR R.E. PALMER, Birmingham

14 Feb.: `Seven wonders of the nano world.'

PROFESSOR D. BERATAN, Pittsburgh

21 Feb.: `Exploring optical rotation angles: a
collaboration between theory, spectroscopy, and natural products
synthesis.'

PROFESSOR CH. JUNGEN, Paris-Sud, Orsay

28 Feb.: `High resolution in the time and frequency
domains: from hyperfine interactions to wavepacket motion in
molecular Rydberg states.'

PROFESSOR R.M. SIMMONS, King's College, London

6 Mar.: `Single molecule mechanics in biology.'

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Condensed Matter Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Thursdays in the
Simon Room, the Clarendon Laboratory.

Conveners: J.F. Ryan, MA, Professor of Physics, and J.T.
Chalker, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in Physics.

PROFESSOR A. WATTS

20 Jan.: `Solid state NMR and its application to
biological membranes.'

DR R.A. SMITH, Birmingham

27 Jan.: `Dirt and magnetism: two ways to kill a
superconductor.'

DR C. MELLOR, Nottingham

3 Feb.: `Ballistic phonon studies of the lowest
Landau level.'

DR S. HAYDEN, Bristol

10 Feb.: `Spin fluctuations and unconventional
superconductivity.'

DR C. DENNISTON

17 Feb.: `Non-equilibrium phase-dynamics of liquid
crystals.'

DR M. TURNER, Warwick

24 Feb.: `Protein–DNA interactions: co-
operativity, molecular springs, and genetic recombination.'

DR D. VAUX

2 Mar.: `Fluorescence resonance energy transfer: an
emerging tool in cell biology.'

DR A.C. MACIEL

9 Mar.: `One-dimension electrons in semiconductor
nanostructures.'

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Pulsed Power/Plasma Group

PROFESSOR R.N. FRANKLIN, Open University, will give a seminar at 4.15
p.m. on Thursday, 3 February, in Lecture Room 5, the Department of
Engineering Science.

Subject: `When is the Boltzmann relation valid in
electronegative plasmas?'

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Department of Earth Sciences

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Mondays in the
Lecture Theatre, the Department of Earth Sciences.

DR P. MARSHALL, Forensic Seismology Unit, AWE Blacknest

24 Jan.: `The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty
verification system.'

DR E. BUROW, Université P. and M. Curie, Paris

31 Jan.: `Erosional forcing of mountain building
and basin subsidence: insights from physical and numerical
modelling.'

DR A. BRIAIS, CNRS, Toulouse

7 Feb.: `Segmentation of mid-ocean ridges:
observations from satellite altimetry and comparison with
results of numerical models.'

PROFESSOR H. ELDERFIELD, Cambridge

14 Feb.: `Glacial–interglacial changes in
ocean composition: new approaches using foraminiferal shell
chemistry.'

PROFESSOR J. WOODHOUSE

21 Feb.: `Seismic imaging of the mantle: recent
processes.'

DR R. BOEHLER, Max-Planck Institut für Chemie, Mainz

28 Feb.
: `Phase behaviour and geochemistry in the deep
earth.'

PROFESSOR W. JENKINS, Southampton Oceanography Centre

6 Mar.: `Helium-3 in the Pacific Ocean: one man's
noise is another man's signal.'

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Materials Modelling Laboratory Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 12 noon on Fridays in Lecture
Room 7, the Engineering and Technology Building.

Conveners: R.E. Rudd, MA, Senior Research Fellow, Linacre
College, and D.G. Pettifor, MA, Isaac Wolfson Professor of
Metallurgy.

PROFESSOR PETTIFOR

21 Jan.: `Materials modelling: lessons for the
millennium.'

DR S.G. ROBERTS

28 Jan.: `Modelling the plastic zone in
fracture.'

DR N.M. HARRISON, Imperial College, London

4 Feb.: `Hybrid density functionals in strongly
interacting systems—band gaps, spin coupling, and orbital
ordering.'

DR R. MEIER, DSM Research

11 Feb.: `The combinatorial approach for materials
design.'

PROFESSOR SIR S.F. EDWARDS, Cambridge

18 Feb.: `New insights into granular materials.'

DR P.L.A. POPELIER, UMIST

25 Feb.: `Chemical information for materials hidden
in the electron density.'

DR M.R. WILSON, Durham

3 Mar.: `Modelling of liquid crystals and polymers
via large-scale simulations.' (Joint MML/Interdepartmental
Polymer Seminar
)

PROFESSOR A. MOVCHAN, Liverpool

10 Mar.: `Regularised evolution models for
dislocations in a lattice.' (In association with
OCIAM
)

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PSYCHOLOGICAL STUDIES

Department of Experimental Psychology

The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
Weiskrantz Room (C.113), the Department of Experimental Psychology.

Conveners: S.D. Iversen, MA, Professor of Psychology, and
P.E. Bryant, MA, Watts Professor of Psychology.

PROFESSOR S. TIPPER, Bangor

1 Feb: `Frames of reference in attention.'

PROFESSOR R. PLOMIN, Institute of Psychiatry, London

8 Feb.: `Genetics and general cognitive
ability.'

PROFESSOR J. BELSKY, Birkbeck College, London

15 Feb.: `The effects of eary child-care on social
and emotional development in the first three years.'

DR D. MARESCHAL, Birkbeck College, London

22 Feb.: `Mechanisms of categorisation in
infancy.'

PROFESSOR P. GARETY, St Thomas's Hospital, London

29 Feb.: `Cognitive processes in psychosis: theory
and therapy.'

PROFESSOR B. BUTTERWORTH, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and
Department of Psychology, London

7 Mar.: `Mathematics and the brain.'

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SOCIAL STUDIES

PROFESSOR J.W. CEASER will give the Senior Research Seminar in
American Politics at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 26 January, in the Chester
Room, Nuffield College.

Convener: B.E. Shafer, MA, Mellon Professor of American
Government.


Subject: `The public philosophy as an organising
concept in the study of American politics.'

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African Studies Seminar: medicine, science, and society in Africa

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in St
Antony's College. The 3 February seminar will be held in the Nissan
Institute; other seminars will take place in the Fellows' Dining
Room.

Conveners: W. Beinart, MA, Rhodes Professor of Race
Relations, M.J. Dobson, MA, D.Phil., Acting Director, the Wellcome
Unit for the History of Medicine, and M. Malowany (Ph.D. McGill),
Unit Fellow, the Wellcome Unit.

C. CAMPBELL, LSe

20 Jan.: `Sexual health, communities, and
development: grassroots participation in HIV-prevention among
South African sex workers.'

M. TAMARKIN, Tel Aviv

27 Jan.: `Habitat and habitus: ecology, culture,
identity, and politics among Cape Afrikaner sheep farmers in the
late nineteenth century.'

DR DOBSON and DR MALOWANY

3 Feb.: `DDT and malaria control in East Africa,
1945–60: discoveries, debates, and dilemmas' (with
film).

L. CARPENTER

10 Feb.: `Seven-year trends in HIV infection rates,
and changes in sexual behaviour, among adults in rural
Uganda.'

M. JENNINGS

17 Feb.
: `Health and disease amongst the early UMCA
missionaries in Tanganyika.'

H. DENHAM

24 Feb.: `Race, nutrition, and disease: the African
Research Survey and British colonial agendas for health-care in
the 1930s.'

S. MAHONE

2 Mar.: `Tropical disease and the nature of lunacy
in British East Africa 1910–60.'

O. SICHONE, Cape Town

9 Mar.: `Alien natives: the lives of East African
migrants in Cape Town.'

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African Studies Seminar: additional seminars

The following seminars will be held as shown.

J. HOWE, Delft

Tue. 8 Feb., 5 p.m., Buttery, St Antony's: `The
future of surface transport in Africa.'

R. WINKS, Yale

Wed. 1 Mar., 12 noon, Schools: `The rise of the
concept of the national park.'

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African Studies Seminar: co-sponsored workshops and conferences


10–12 Mar., St Antony's: `Anthropology and
Africa: a cross-cultural investigation, 1880–1960.' Contact
Helen Denham (e-mail: helen.denham@history.ox.ac.uk).

5 May, University College, London: `New African
diasporas.' Contact Dr Khalid Koser (e-mail:
kkoser@geography.ucl.ac.uk).

6 May, St Antony's: `Researching Africa: methods and
reflections' (postgraduate workshop). Contact Ben Page (e-mail:
ben.page@geog.ox.ac.uk), or Mark Leopold, St Anne's College,
Oxford OX2 6HS.

13–14 May, St Antony's: `Sierra Leone: conflict
resolution, peace-building, and post-conflict reconstruction.'
Contact Sheu Othman (e-mail: shehu.othman@qeh.ox.ac.uk), or
Tunde Zack-Williams (e-mail: abzw@cableinet.co.uk).

3 June, St Antony's: Britain–Zimbabwe Society
Research Day. Contact David Maxwell, Department of History,
University of Keele, Staffs. ST5 5AH (e-mail:
hia@cc.keele.ac.uk).

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THEOLOGY

Comparative approaches in the study of religions

The following interdisciplinary seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on
Tuesdays in the Blue Boar Seminar Room, Christ Church.

Conveners: J.S.K. Ward, DD, Regius Professor of Divinity,
and W.M. Morgan, MA, Lecturer in World Religions, Mansfield College
and Westminster College.

PROFESSOR WARD

25 Jan.: `Is comparative theology possible?'

DR N. ALLEN

8 Feb.: `An Indo-European comparativist looks at
the Buddha's biography.'

PEGGY MORGAN

22 Feb.: `Problems and possibilities in the
comparative study of religions.'

PROFESSOR R. NEVILLE, Boston University

7 Mar.: `The Boston University Project in
Comparative Studies.'

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COMPUTING LABORATORY


Strachey Lecture

PROFESSOR JOHN HUGHES, Chalmers University, will deliver the Strachey
Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 25 January, in the Computing
Laboratory.

Subject: `The challenge of optimality in program
specialisation.'

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DEPARTMENT FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

The evolution of life on earth

The following lectures will be given at 8 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
University Museum of Natural History.

Tickets are required for admission. A series ticket costs
£29.50; tickets for individual lectures cost £5.25 (subject
to availability). Tickets may be obtained from the Weekly Class
Administrator, OUDCE, Rewley House, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1
2JA (telephone: Oxford (2)70391/(2)70308/(2)70360). Cheques should be
made payable to the OUDCE.

PROFESSOR J.M. SMITH, Sussex

8 Feb.: `Origins of life.'

PROFESSOR P. CRANE, Kew Gardens

15 Feb.: `The evolution of plants: insights from
the fossil record.'

DR R. FORTREY, Natural History Museum, London

22 Feb.: `Life: chapters from an unauthorised
biography.'

PROFESSOR SIR RICHARD SOUTHWOOD

29 Feb.: `Animals and plants—the evolution of
herbivory.'

PROFESSOR K. THOMSON

7 Mar.: `Living fossils in the sea.'

DR A. MILNER, Natural History Museum, London

14 Mar.: `The dinosaurs: a continuing success
story.'

PROFESSOR V. REYNOLDS

21 Mar.: `The chimpanzees of Africa: resourceful
yet dynamic.'

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CENTRE FOR CRIMINOLOGICAL RESEARCH

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the
Old Library, All Souls College.

Conveners: A.J. Ashworth, DCL, Vinerian Professor of
English Law, and R. Young, MA, University Lecturer in Criminal
Justice.

DR J. GOODEY, Leeds

26 Jan.: `The criminalisation of British Asians?
Research from Bradford and Leeds.'

DR A. COYLE, King's College, London

9 Feb.: `Human rights and prisons: an international
perspective.'

PROFESSOR G. RICHARDSON, Queen Mary and Westfield College, London;
chair, Mental Health Legislation Scoping Study Review Team

23 Feb.: `Reviewing the Mental Health Act: the
problem of mentally disordered offenders.'

D. ROSE, BBC journalist and author of In the Name of the Law:
the Collapse of Criminal Justice


8 Mar.: `The death of due process: capital
punishment in the United States.'

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LANGUAGE CENTRE

Lunchtime seminars in applied linguistics

The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Mondays in Room 301,
the Language Centre (12 Woodstock Road). Refreshments will be
available in the Language Centre reception area from 12.30 p.m.

MRS M. CHARLES

24 Jan.: `The role of introductory "It"
patterns in the constructing of an appropriate academic
persona.'

DR A. FRANKENBERG-GARCIA, ISLA, Lisbon

7 Feb.: `Using a translation corpus to sort out
Portuguese–English cross-linguistic influence.'

DR R. VANDERPLANK

21 Feb.: `What makes a good "language
keeper"? Success and failure in the Lambda Project.'

DR E. MACARO

6 Mar.: `An analysis of code switching in foreign
language classroom discourse.'

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MAISON FRANÇAISE

Seminar in Modern French History and Politics

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
Maison Française.

C. CROSSLEY, Birmingham

25 Jan.: `Thinking and imagining the future in
nineteenth-century France.'

S. HAZAREESINGH

1 Feb.: `Building the new republic from below: the
propaganda of the "Société d'instruction
républicaine", 1870–7.'

V. DIMIER, Institut d'Études Politiques, Grenoble

8 Feb.: `Trading places: resettling colonial
administrators in the French prefectoral corps.'

R. GILDEA

15 Feb.: ` "Ici commence la France
libre"? Ironies of the Liberation, 1944–5.'

A. KAHAN, Florida

22 Feb.: `Endings and beginnings: political
discourse in nineteenth-century France.'

L. JAUME, Institut d'Études Politiques, Paris

29 Feb.: `Comment sortir de l'Empire?'

S. AUDOIN ROUZEAU, Université de Picardie Jules-Verne

7 Mar.: `Pour une histoire du combat aux dix-
neuvième et vingtième siècles.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


French Language-World Literature Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
Maison Française.

D. SAINT-JACQUES, Université de Laval, Québec

25 Jan.: `Mondialisation et littérature
nationale: le cas du Québec.'

D. MAGETTI, Lausanne

15 Feb.: `La littérature de langue
française en Suisse.'

P.-P. FRAITURE, Oxford Brookes

29 Feb.: `Colonialisme et littérature en
Belgique francophone.'

C. BRITTON, Aberdeen

7 Mar.: `Split personalities in the works of Fanon
and Glissant.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


Other lectures

The following lectures will be given at 5.15 p.m. on the days shown
in the Maison Française (unless indicated otherwise).

J.-C. COLLIARD, Université de Paris I, member of the
Conseil Constitutionnel

Fri. 28 Jan.: `Une institution politique majeure:
le Conseil Constitutionnel.'

J. RANCIÈRE, École des Hautes Études en Sciences
Sociales, Paris

Thur. 10 Feb.: `Politics and police.'

E. TERRAY, École des Hautes Études en Sciences
Sociales, Paris

Thur. 17 Feb., 8 p.m.: `La politique contre la
loi.'

P. CLAVAL, Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne

Tue. 22 Feb., 4.30 p.m., School of Geography: to be
announced.

N. QUESTIAUX, former Minister and member of the Conseil
d'État


Thur. 9 Mar.: `Living up to equality: principles
and practice as seen by women in the French Conseil
d'État
.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


Debates

The following debates will be held at 8 p.m. on the days shown in the
Maison Française.

G. GRUNBERG, CNRS and CEVIPOF, and S. HAZAREESINGH

Thur. 10 Feb.: `Le socialisme français face
au 21e siècle.'

P. CLAVAL, Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne, and PROFESSOR CERI
PEACH

Tue. 22 Feb.: `Les relations franco-brittaniques en
géographie: une entente cordiale?'

D. BENSAÏD, Université de Paris VIII, and S. BUDGEN,
Cambridge

Thur. 24 Feb.: `A new radicalism in French
political philosophy.'

A. BADIOU, Université de Paris VIII, and E. KOUVELAKIS,
Wolverhampton

Thur. 2 Mar.: `What is a political truth?' and
`Politics and its limits.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


Other meetings


Fri. 3 Mar., 8 p.m.: `Club or federation? The
European Union after enlargement.' (European Movement
conference
.)

Fri. 10 Mar.–Sun. 12 Mar., St Antony's College:
`Anthropology and Africa: a cross-colonial investigation,
1880–1960.' (Colloquium: Maison Française,
African Studies Programme, Institute of Social and Cultural
Anthropology. Please book in advance: Nathalie Jas
(n_jas@hotmail.com) or Helen Denham (tel.: Oxford 274609, e-
mail: helen.denham@history.ox.ac.uk
).)

Sat. 11 Mar., 10 a.m.–4 p.m., St Hugh's College:
`Dix-septième siècle et traduction.'
(Translation Research in Oxford meeting. Please book in
advance: Edith McMorran, St Hugh's College (tel.: Oxford
274996
).)

Fri. 31 Mar.–Sat. 1 Apr.: `Histoire et
anthropologie de l'Islam méditerranéen: Lucette
Valensi à l'oeuvre.' (Colloquium.)

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NISSAN INSTITUTE OF JAPANESE STUDIES

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
Lecture Theatre, the Nissan Institute.

PROFESSOR MASANORI NAKAMURA, Hitotsubashi University, Tokyo
25 Jan.: `From Taishô democracy to militarist
transformation: Japan in the inter-war period.' (In
Japanese, with an English summary distributed
)

PROFESSOR MEGUME SUTÔ, Chûô University, Tokyo

1 Feb.: Japanese corporate governance in
transition: some new developments.'

PROFESSOR NAOTO NONAKA, Gakushûin University, Tokyo

8 Feb.: `Politicians, bureaucrats, and policy-
making: the system, stability, and change.'

P. HILL, Stirling

15 Feb.: `Botaihô: Japanese organised
crime and measures to combat it in the 1990s.'

DR HIROSHI HOSHI, School of Oriental and African Studies, London

22 Feb.: `Complex predicate formation in Japanese:
a
(non-) configurational analysis.'

DR I. STANDISH, School of Oriental and African Studies, London

29 Feb.: `Myth and masculinity in the Japanese
cinema' (with video clips).

DR L. CONNORS, School of Oriental and African Studies, London

7 Mar.: `Stepping forward or stumbling? The
politics of administrative reform in Japan.'

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QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

Contemporary South Asia Seminar

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursdays in the
Blackhall Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House.

Conveners: Dr Nandini Gooptu, Dr Judith Heyer, and
Professor Barbara Harriss-White.

G. GANGOLI, LSE

20 Jan.: `Legal discourses around prostitution in
India: state and feminist perspectives.'

N. HOSSAIN, IDS, Sussex

27 Jan.: `Suspicion and support: NGOs and
Bangladeshi élite discourses of poverty.'

A. WYATT, Bristol

3 Feb.: `Economic globalisation and the Indian
state.'

M. LAU, SOAS

10 Feb.: `About the role of law in a lawless state:
the example of Pakistan.'

C. WATT, Cambridge

17 Feb.: `Voluntarism, associational cultures, and
civil society in India, 1900–20 and beyond.'

A. MCMILLAN

24 Feb.: `BJP or NDA? Patterns of voting in recent
elections in India.'

A. SENGUPTA

2 Mar.: `Embedded or stuck?: the study of social
embeddedness, state capacity, and formal and informal
institutional structures in the Indian state.'

S. BOSE, LSe

9 Mar.: `Breaking the deadlock: an alternative
approach to Kashmir.'

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SAÏD BUSINESS SCHOOL

SBS–SKOPE seminars: employment, work, and strategy

The following seminars will be held at 5.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
Saïd Business School, 59 George Street.

Further information may be obtained from Elaine Durham, Saïd
Business School, 59 George Street, Oxford OX1 2BE (telephone: Oxford
(2)88650, e-mail: elaine.durham@sbs.ox.ac.uk).

Conveners: Owen Darbishire (Saïd Business School),
Ken Mayhew (SKOPE), and Mari Sako (Saïd Business School).

DR P. RYAN, Cambridge

25 Jan.: `Decentralisation and derecognition in
employment relationships.'

DR H. STEEDMAN, LSE

1 Feb.: `International comparisons of quality in
higher education: engineering and computer science.'

PROFESSOR D. MARSDEN, LSE

8 Feb.: `A theory of employment systems.'

DR M.F. O'CREEVY, Open University, and PROFESSOR S. WOOD, Sheffield

15 Feb.: `Evaluating European employee relations
practices: involvement, fairness, and performance.'

PROFESSOR M. TERRY, Warwick Business School

22 Feb.: to be announced.

PROFESSOR S. WOOD, Sheffield Business School, DR L. DE MENEZES,
Goldsmiths' College, London, and DR A. LASAOSA, LSE

29 Feb.: `Human resource management and
performance: evidence from WERS 1998.'

PROFESSOR C. CROUCH, European University Institute

7 Mar.: to be announced.

PROFESSOR J. LIEBESKIND

16 Mar.: `Ownership, control, and incentives in new
biotechnology firms.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


Oxford Financial Research Centre Workshops

The Oxford Financial Research Centre (OFRC) will be running two
workshops in finance during Hilary Term. The workshop on 4 February
will be devoted to an overview of opportunities for undertaking
postgraduate research in finance in the University. The workshop on 3
March will be an opportunity for postgraduate students and faculty in
any department of the University to present papers in finance. The
workshops will take place in the Saïd Business School's Seminar
Room, 59 George Street.

Any member of the University interested in attending the workshops or
presenting a paper should contact Elaine Durham, Saïd Business
School, 59 George Street, Oxford OX1 2BE (telephone: Oxford (2)88650,
e-mail: elaine.durham@sbs.ox.ac.uk).

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CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES

The interplay between informal practices and the state law in
post-Communist countries

The following seminars will take place at 5 p.m. on the days shown.
Unless indicated otherwise, they will take place on Tuesdays in the
Centre for Socio-Legal Studies.

Convener: Dr Marina Kurkchiyan, North Fellow, Centre
for Socio-Legal Studies and Keble College.

PROFESSOR M. LIGHT, LSE

25 Jan.: `Can democratic law be successfully
exported? Some evidence from ten years of election observation
in Russia and Ukraine.'

DR T. GINSBURG, Legal Adviser, Iran–USA Claims Tribunal, The
Hague

1 Feb.: `Comparative administrative procedure:
evidence from East Asia and implications for post-Communist
reforms.'

PROFESSOR E. BARKER, LSE

8 Feb.: `Controlling freedoms: the fate of
alternative religions in post-Communist societies.'

DR KURKCHIYAN

Thur. 10 Feb., Examination Schools: `The
illegitimacy of law in post-Communist societies: an internal
point of view.' (North Lecture)

DR N. MACFARLANE

15 Feb.: `Culture, politics, and the rule of law in
the Caucasus.'

DR S. AKINER, SOAS

22 Feb.: `Law and society in central Asia.'

DR S. ASHWIN, LSE

29 Feb.: `The regulation of the employment
relationship in Russia: the Soviet legacy.'

DR B. ROZUMILOWICZ

7 Mar.: `Media law in transition: formal frameworks
and actual practices in Poland, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan.'

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WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE

Understanding twentieth-century health-care through oral history

The following seminars will be held at 2 p.m. on Mondays in the
Wellcome Unit, 47 Banbury Road.

Conveners: M.J. Dobson, MA, D.Phil., Acting Director, the
Wellcome Unit, and S. Harper, D.Phil., Research Associate, the
Wellcome Unit.

DR R. FERGUSON, Caledonian University, Glasgow

24 Jan.: `Autonomy, tension, and trade-off:
attitudes to district nursing.'

DR S. ANDERSON, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

31 Jan.: `The chemist's story.'

DR M. RHODES, Birmingham

7 Feb.: `Births, bedpans, and bugs: professional
education for midwives.'

DR K. FISHER

14 Feb.: `The understanding and practices of birth
control.'

DR D. ATKINSON, Open University

21 Feb.: `A history of learning disabilities.'

PROFESSOR N. SMALL, Bradford

28 Feb.: `The modern hospice movement.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


NGOs, international organisations, and tropical health and
medicine (workshop series)

The following workshops will be held at 2 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
Wellcome Unit.

Conveners: O. Barrow (Ph.D. London), Research Fellow, the
Wellcome Unit, and M. Jennings, BA, D.Phil., Research Officer, the
Wellcome Unit.

DR C. NEVILL and DR S. COLLINS

1 Feb.:
(C.N.) `The history of AMREF.'

(S.C.) `Emergency relief and practice: improving professional
standards.'

PROFESSOR P. WEINDLING and DR M. BLACK

15 Feb.:
(P.W.) `German representation in the
League of Nations health organisations: the role of the
malariologist, Bernard Nocht.'

(M.B.) `The history of UNICEF.'

DR D. ANDERSON and DR A. KLEIN

29 Feb.: `Doing drugs in Africa and dealing with
the data.'

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All SOULS COLLEGE

Foreign Policy Studies Programme: the United States and the world

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Old
Library, All Souls College.

Conveners: Sir Julian Bullard and Professor Robert
O'Neill.

STROBE TALBOTT, Deputy US Secretary of State

21 Jan.: `Balance-sheet for the 1990s: how well has
the US done?'

SHASHI THAROOR, Director of Communications and Special Projects,
Office of the UN Secretary General

28 Jan.: `The US and the UN.'

AMBASSADOR YUKIO SATOH, Permanent Representative of Japan to the
United Nations

4 Feb.: `The US and East Asia.'

SIR JOHN KERR, Permanent Under-Secretary, Foreign and Commonwealth
Office

11 Feb.: `The US and the UK.'

GEN. KLAUS NAUMANN, former Chairman, NATO Military Committee

18 Feb.: `The US and NATO.'

Speaker to be announced

25 Feb.: `The US and Russia.'

R.W.APPLE, The New York Times

3 Mar.: `US domestic politics and foreign
policy.'

DR LYNN DAVIS, former Under Secretary of State and currently Deputy
Director, the National Security Strategy Group

10 Mar.: `Foreign policy challenges for the next
administration.'

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CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE


Bateson Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR D. KARLIN, Department of English, University College,
London, will deliver the F.W. Bateson Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on
Wednesday, 16 February, in the Examination Schools.

Subject: `The figure of the singer.'

Return to List of Contents of this section



LINACRE LECTURES


Linacre Lectures 2000

Consciousness of connections: global environments in the new
millennium

The following lectures will be given at 5.30 p.m. on Thursdays in
Lecture Theatre A, the Zoology/Psychology Building.

THE HON. MAURICE STRONG, Chairman, the Earth Council

27 Jan.:: `Global sustainable development.'

PROFESSOR M. LANGTON, University of Northern Territories, Australia

3 Feb.: `Indigenous concepts of connectedness and
the new environmentalism.'

PROFESSOR H. GIRADET, Urban Futures, London

10 Feb.: `Cities, people, planet.'

DR C. JUMA, Harvard

17 Feb.: `International trade and environment.'

PROFESSOR S. YEARLEY, York

24 Feb.: `Social movements as problematic agents of
global environmental change.'

PROFESSOR E.P. ODUM, Georgia

2 Mar.: `The transformation of ecology.'

P. MELCHETT, Executive Director, Greenpeace UK

9 Mar.: `Global citizens—campaigning for
environmental solutions.'

PROFESSOR M. CASTELLS, Berkeley

15 June: `Global networks and local societies:
cities in the information age.'

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ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE


Asian Studies Centre

Special Seminars

The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on the days shown in
the Clock Room, St Antony's College.

R. MYERS, Stanford

17 Feb.: `The divided China problem: an essay in
conflict avoidance.'

MING-KUAN LEE, Hong Kong Polytechnic University

22 Feb.: `Status, class, and citizenship:
stratification and inequality in China's transition from
socialism.'

I. BURUMA

29 Feb.: `Opposition and dissent in Chinese
communities: a critical comparative assessment.'

Return to List of Contents of this section



European Studies Centre

Balkan history and politics

The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
seminar room, 70 Woodstock Road.

Convener: R. Clogg, MA, Senior Research Fellow, St
Antony's College.

V. KARIDIS, BBC Greek Service

25 Jan.: `The Greek merchants of southern Russia,
1774–1861.'

DR D. LIVANIOS, Cambridge

1 Feb.: `Christian Ottoman princes: the loyalties
of Alexander and Nicholas Mavrocordatos, 1664–1730.'

SIR MICHAEL LLEWELLYN SMITH, formerly HM Ambassador in Athens

15 Feb.: `Greece, Britain, and Europe: a current
perspective.'

DR E. GINIO

22 Feb.: `Aspects of conversion to Islam in
eighteenth-century Salonica: the evidence of the court
registers.'

PROFESSOR N. DIAMANDOUROS, Greek Ombudsman

29 Feb.: `Prospects for democracy in south-east
Europe.'

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ST HUGH'S COLLEGE


Henry Rowlatt Bickley Memorial Lecture

PROFESSOR ROGER PARKER, Professor of Music, University of Cambridge,
will deliver the seventeenth Henry Rowlatt Bickley Memorial Lecture
at 5.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 16 May, in the Mordan Hall, St Hugh's
College.

Subject: `Elisabeth's last act: Verdian history and the
close of Don Carlos.'

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TRINITY COLLEGE


Richard Hillary Lecture

BERYL BAINBRIDGE will deliver the Richard Hillary Lecture at 5 p.m.
on Wednesday, 2 February, in the St Cross Building.

Subject: `What makes a writer?'

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CAMPION HALL


Martin D'Arcy Memorial Lectures

Paul of Antioch and Ibn Taymiyya: the modern relevance of a
medieval polemic

DR THOMAS MICHEL will deliver the Martin D'Arcy Memorial Lectures at
5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Examination Schools.

27 Jan.: `Features of the Muslim–Christian polemical
tradition.'


3 Feb.: `The Christian prophet and the Prophet of
Islam.'

10 Feb.: `The divine word and scripture in Islam and
Christianity.'

17 Feb.: `God's unity and trinity: the
Islamic–Christian debate.'

24 Feb.: `Sin and redemption in Christianity and
Islam.'

2 Mar.: `Moving beyond the burdens of history.'

Return to List of Contents of this section





<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 20 January 2000: Grants and Funding<br />

Grants and Research Funding


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



RESEARCH SERVICES OFFICE

The Oxford University Research Services Office (RSO) is based in
the University Offices, Wellington Square (with a satellite
office in the Medical School Offices, Level 3, John Radcliffe
Hospital). The RSO is part of the Finance Division of the
University's central administration.

The RSO processes and approves all applications to outside
bodies for research grants and approves research-related
agreements on behalf of the University. It also acts in an
advisory capacity for those seeking outside funding or requiring
information about specific initiatives (e.g. LINK, ROPA, Teaching
Company Schemes, EU research programmes, etc.).

The RSO produces a weekly bulletin on funding opportunities,
electronic Research Funding News
(eRFN), which is available to members of the
University via the World Wide Web at:
http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/erin/. Research-related information
other than that regarding funding opportunities is communicated
via the RSO's electronic Bulletin Board, which is updated on an
ad hoc basis. This is also available to members of
the University via the World Wide Web at:
http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/rso/oxonly/bboard.htm.

Research contracts with industry are negotiated through the
RSO, which deals with research-related agreements covering the
sponsorship of research, clinical trials, services to industry,
confidentiality issues, material transfer, and consultancy.
Contact details for members of the RSO are as follows:

Ms Catherine Quinn, Director (telephone: (2)70158, e-mail:
catherine.quinn@admin. ox.ac.uk);

Dr Richard Liwicki, Head of Research Contracts Administration
(telephone: (2)70011, e-mail: richard.liwicki@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Mr Pierre-Manuel Espinasse, Head of Research Grants
Administration (telephone (2)70043, e-mail:
pierre.espinasse@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Ms Stephanie Malcolm, Research Grants Administrator (telephone
(2)70145, e-mail: stephanie.malcolm@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Dr Michael Halsey, Assistant Registrar, John Radcliffe Hospital
satellite office (telephone: (2)22604, e-mail:
michael.halsey@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Ms Kathryn Dally, Administrative Officer (telephone: (2)80319,
e-mail: kathryn.dally@ admin.ox.ac.uk);

Ms Grace Garland, Research Administration Officer (telephone:
(2)80666, e-mail: grace.garland@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Ms Linda Andrews, Research Administration Officer (telephone:
(2)22131, e-mail: linda.andrews@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Dr Clara Ovenston, Research Administration Officer (telephone:
(2)70142, e-mail: clara.ovenston@admin.ox.ac.uk);

Ms Barbara Murray, Research Administration Officer (telephone:
(2)70039, e-mail: barbara.murray@admin.ox.ac.uk).

Enquiries relating to day-to-day processing of research grant
applications should be addressed to the RSO's Research Grants
Office (telephone: (2)70146), or, in the case of certain clinical
departments, to the RSO satellite office, the Medical School
Offices, Level 3, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington (telephone:
(2)22544).

General enquiries may be addressed, in the first instance,
to Mrs Jane Taylor (telephone: (2)70143), who will be pleased to
direct calls to the appropriate member of staff.

Return to List of Contents of this
section


Submitting research grant applications to external sponsors

Members of the University are reminded that all applications for
external research funding support must be endorsed on behalf of
the University through the RSO before they are despatched to the
sponsor, whether or not this is required by the funding body.

The reasons for the requirement are (i) to ensure that the
funds being requested are adequate for the purpose and that the
costing rules of the sponsor have been applied correctly, and
(ii) to ensure that the University could undertake the
obligations arising from an award and that these do not
contravene university policy.

The detailed arrangements are as follows: applicants for
research grants should submit the original plus one copy of their
application, together with a completed copy of the University's
outside grants form, to the Research Services Office, Wellington
Square (telephone (2)70146), leaving three clear working days for
it to be processed.

In connection with the acceptance of awards and signature of
contracts it should be noted that Statutes, Tit. X, cl. 3,
provides that `no official of the University or any other person
employed by the University or working in or in connection with
any department of or under the control of the University shall
in connection with any invention, discovery, or patent, or ...
process, or manufacture have authority to make any
representations on behalf of the University or to be concerned
in any transaction whatsoever in connection therewith on behalf
of the University except with the express consent of Council'.

The Research Services Office has been given authority to
approve research funding applications to external sponsors and
the terms of contracts in straightforward cases under this
provision; in more complicated cases, specific authority is
necessary.

Enquiries related to any aspect of externally sponsored
research should be directed to the Research Services Office,
whose staff would be pleased to help.

Return to List of Contents of this
section



GERALD AVERAY WAINWRIGHT RESEARCH
FELLOWSHIP IN NEAR EASTERN ARCHAEOLOGY

The Board of Management of the Gerald Averay Wainwright Near
Eastern Archaeological Fund invites applications for the
Wainwright Fellowship from 1 October 2000. This is a postdoctoral
Research Fellowship for the purpose of carrying out research into
the non-classical archaeology of any country or countries of
North Africa and the Near East (from Morocco to Afghanistan). The
stipend of the post will be £16,286, with an additional
allowance for research expenses (currently of up to £2,500).
These rates are subject to annual review. A fellow may be
appointed for up to three years.

Further details may be obtained from Mrs A. Slater, the Oriental
Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE (e-mail:
alix.slater@orinst.ox.ac.uk), to whom applications (nine copies,
or two from candidates overseas), should be submitted by 10
March. Applications should include the names of two referees, who
should be asked to write direct to Mrs Slater by the closing
date. Interviews will be held on 8 May (subject to confirmation).

Return to List of Contents of this
section



OXFORD ITALIAN ASSOCIATION


Grants to promote Italian culture

The Oxford Italian Association offers modest top-up grants, not
normally of more than £100, to assist graduate students and
others to promote aspects of Italian culture in Oxford. Such
grants may be used, for instance, to help stage an Italian play,
to contribute to research expenses (including travel to Italy),
and other activities which the committee judge to be of value in
this area. Applications, with a brief account of the project and
if possible a supporting note from a tutor, should be sent by 12
March to Professor J.R. Woodhouse, Taylor Institution Annexe, 47
Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JF. Applications arriving after
that date may be considered for future grants.

Return to List of Contents of this
section





<br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 20 January 2000: Examinations and Boards<br />

Examinations and Boards


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

Return to Contents Page of this issue



BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MATHEMATICAL
SCIENCES AND COMMITTEE ON CONTINUING EDUCATION


M.Sc. in Software Engineering

In accordance with the regulations for these courses, notice is
hereby given that the list of Schedule B modules available in the
period January 2000 to July 2000 will be:

Software Engineering Mathematics

Object Orientation

Requirements Engineering

Software Testing

Specification and Design

Object Oriented Programming

Advanced Concurrency Tools

Practical Software Engineering

Object Oriented Design

Concurrency and Distributed Systems

Critical Systems Engineering

Distributed Objects

Machine-assisted Software Engineering

Software Development Management

Scalable Parallel Programming

Design Patterns

Return to List of Contents of this
section



SUB-FACULTY OF ENGINEERING SCIENCE

HONOUR SCHOOLS OF ENGINEERING SCIENCE PART I 2001,
ENGINEERING AND COMPUTING SCIENCE PART I 2001, AND ENGINEERING
AND MATERIALS PART I 2001


Engineering and Society

Alternative approved topics for `Engineering and Society' for the
Part I examination in 2001 are:

a. History of Technology.

b. Completion of a language course organised and run by the
University Language Centre on behalf of the Sub-faculty of
Engineering Science (subject to availability).

c. Computing.

d. Materials.

Details will be circulated to candidates.

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section



LECTURE LISTS: TRINITY TERM


Timetabling arrangements

Faculties and departments are asked to forward their lecture-list
files as soon as possible after the finalisation of their
arrangements. Details of the dates by which the files are
expected to be supplied have been circulated to faculties and
departments.

The printed lecture lists will be distributed shortly before the
start of term.

Disks, copy, and proofs relating to the Lecture Lists should be
forwarded to Val Wood, Gazette and Lecture Lists
Assistant, Oxenford House, Magdalen Street, Oxford OX1 3AB
(telephone: (2)78121, fax: (2)78180, e-mail:
lecture.lists@admin.ox.ac.uk).

For arrangements concerning the Special Lecture List, see below.

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section



Entries shared between lists

Any faculty member who wishes to place an entry in the lecture
list of another faculty or department is asked to forward the
information as soon as possible, and directly to the
other faculty
.

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section



Special Lecture List

Trinity Term

The Special Lecture List for Trinity Term will appear shortly
before term, at the same time as the other Lecture Lists. It will
include all appropriate lectures for Trinity Term published in
the Gazette during Hilary Term, and also lectures
of which details are received by Monday, 13
March
(ninth week).

Those wishing to contribute to the Special Lecture List are
asked to note that this is a firm deadline, and that items
received after it are unlikely to be included.

Items for the Special Lecture List should be forwarded to Val
Wood, Gazette and Lecture Lists Assistant, Oxenford
House, Magdalen Street, Oxford OX1 3AB (telephone: (2)78121, fax:
(2)78180, e-mail: lecture.lists@admin.ox.ac.uk).

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section



Enquiries concerning proposed dates for
special lectures

Those responsible for arranging lectures intended to be of
interest to a wide university audience may wish to consult the
editor of the Gazette (fax: 556646, e-mail:
gazette@admin.ox.ac.uk), or the Gazette and Lecture
Lists Assistant (details as above), for information on any other
similar lectures, of which details have been received, due to be
given on the proposed date or dates.

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section



Distribution: Standing Orders

Any college, faculty, department, or individual Senior Member
wishing to check or amend a standing order for the lecture lists
should contact the Gazette and Lecture Lists
Assistant (details as above), before the end of the present term.

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section



Board of the Faculty of Literae
Humaniores

The Board of the Faculty recommends that lectures should be given
at the following hours:

Monday       9      Greek History/Latin Literature
            10      Philosophy
            11      Roman History/Greek Literature
            12      Archaeology/Philosophy
            5–7    Free

Tuesday      9      Archaeology
            10      Philosophy
            11      Literature
            12      History
            5–7    Free

Wednesday    9      Roman History/Greek Literature
            10      Philosophy
            11      Latin Literature/Greek History
            12      Archaeology/Philosophy
            5–7    Free

Thursday     9      Literature
            10      Philosophy
            11      Greek History/Latin Literature
            12      Archaeology
            5–7    Free

Friday       9      History
            10      Philosophy
            11      Roman History/Greek Literature
            12      Archaeology/Philosophy
            5–7    Free

Sub-faculty of Languages and Literature

It is recommended that lectures for Honour Moderations should be
given at the following hours whenever possible:

Homer               11 (Wednesdays, Fridays)
Virgil              11 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
Greek Authors       12 (Mondays, Wednesdays)
Latin Authors       11 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
Language Papers     10 (Fridays)
A                   11 (Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, TT;      
                     Mondays, Wednesdays, MT, HT)
C                   10 (Mondays, Wednesdays)
D                   10 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
E                   12
F                   12 (Tuesdays, Thursdays, HT, TT);
                    11 and 12 (Tuesdays, Thursdays, MT)

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section



Board of the Faculty of Medieval and
Modern Languages

Timetable of introductory or survey lectures

The Board of the Faculty recommends that lectures should be given
at the following hours:

Monday      10      French
            11      German
            12      German
Tuesday      9      Italian
            10      Spanish
            11      Italian 
            12      Spanish
Wednesday    9      Russian
            10      French
            11      Linguistics
            12      Linguistics
Thursday     9      Spanish
            10      Russian
            11      Russian
            12      Italian
Friday      10      French
            11      German
            12      Linguistics

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section



Board of the Faculty of Social Studies

The Board of the Faculty recommends that:

(a) lectures for the Preliminary Examination for
Philosophy, Politics, and Economics should be given at the
following times:

Politics    10
Economics   11
Philosophy  12 noon (or a 10 o'clock period not occupied by    
            Politics);

(b) courses of introductory lectures and lectures on
compulsory subjects for undergraduates in their first three or
four terms of work for the Honour School of Philosophy, Politics,
and Economics should normally be given at the following times:

Politics    12 
Economics   11
Philosophy  10

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section



Board of the Faculty of Theology

To avoid clashes with Philosophy lectures members of the faculty
are asked not to offer Theology lectures of interest to those
reading for the Joint Honour School of Philosophy and Theology
at the following times:

Preliminary Examination

Monday to Saturday 12

Honour School

Monday 10 and 12

Tuesday 10

Wednesday 10 and 12

Thursday 10

Friday 10 and 12

Saturday 10

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section



EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF
PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral
examination of their candidates as
follows:

Clinical Medicine

M. BIRDSALL, Green College: `Functional genomics of the ataxia telangiecstasia
gene and protein'.

Institute of Molecular Medicine, Tuesday, 8 February,
2 p.m.


Examiners: C.J. Norbury, A. Lehmann.

A. COWLAND, Queen's: `Investigations into the genetic
associations in myasthenia gravis'.

Nuffield Department of Surgery, Monday, 7 February,
2 p.m.


Examiners: S.E. Marshall, A. Demaine.

Y.R. LIYANGE, Magdalen: `Agrin and aria at the human neuromuscular
junction'.

Institute of Molecular Medicine, Tuesday, 8 February,
10 a.m.


Examiners: D.J. Blake, C.R. Slater.

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English Language and Literature

I.A. GADD, Pembroke: `"Being like a field": corporate identity in the
Stationers' Company 1557–1684'.

Keble, Tuesday, 29 February, 2 p.m.


Examiners: J.W. Archer, M. Bell.

R.J. JONES, Pembroke: `Tobias Smollett: travels through France, Italy, and
Scotland'.

Lady Margaret Hall, Friday, 3 March, 2 p.m.


Examiners: C.H. Gerrard, K.E. O'Brien.

R.L. SASSONE, Wolfson: `Time and Beowulf: the impact
on Anglo-Saxon poetry of Christian and non-Christian Germanic traditions
regarding time'.

Pembroke, Tuesday, 8 February, 2.30 p.m.


Examiners: M.R. Godden, M. Townend.

J. SAUNDERS, Wolfson: `"White slavery": Romantic writers and
industrial workers, 1790–1840'.

St Anne's, Friday, 28 January, 2 p.m.


Examiners: K. Sutherland, A. Janowicz.

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Modern History

E. JABBARI, St Antony's: `Pierre Laroque and the origins of French social
security 1934–48'.

Social Studies

Faculty Centre, Monday, 31 January, 3 p.m.


Examiners: J.E.S. Hayward, P.-J. Hesse.

J. NOTT, Pembroke: `Popular music and the popular music industry in
inter-war Britain'.

Worcester, Monday, 24 January, 2.30 p.m.


Examiners: J. Stevenson, T. Mason.

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Oriental Studies

C.F. STARR, Magdalen: `The Late Qing courtesan novel as text and fiction'.

Institute for Chinese Studies, Friday, 21 January, 2 p.m.


Examiners: T.T. Liu, D. Pollard.

S. VASUDEVA, Wolfson: `The yoga of the Malinivijayottaratantra'.

Wolfson, Tuesday, 25 January, 3 p.m.


Examiners: D.D.S. Goodall, E.G. Kahrs.

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Physical Sciences

R.A. GRIMBLE, Linacre: `Atomic force microscopy: atomic resolution imaging and
force-distance spectroscopy'.

Engineering and Technology Building, Thursday, 27 January, 10.30 a.m.


Examiners: D.G. Pettifor, E. Meyer.

Y. NAKAGAWA, Queen's: `Protein electrochemistry: applications of
sonovalammetry, microelectrode voltammetry, and solid-state voltammetry'.

Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Monday, 31 January,
2.15 p.m.


Examiners: J.R. Dilworth, M. Boutelle.

S.M. PUGH, Linacre: `New imido chemistry with diamide ligands'.

Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Thursday, 27 January, 2.15 p.m.


Examiners: M.L.H. Green, F.G.N. Cloke.

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Physiological Sciences

P. MARGARITIS, Lincoln: `Gene therapy for haemophilia B using modified
defective retroviruses'.

Department of Human Anatomy and Genetics, Monday, 31 January, 10.30 a.m.


Examiners: K.E. Davies, F. Watt.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 20 January 2000: Colleges<br />

Colleges, Halls, and Societies


Contents of this section:

Note: college vacancies will also be found in the
Gazette's "http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/as/">Appointments Supplement.

Return to Contents Page of this issue



OBITUARIES


Christ Church

JOHN RICHARD IM THURN, MA, 30 November 1999; commoner 1948–50.

THOMAS HUSTON MACBRIDE, MA, October 1999; Rhodes Scholar 1935–8.

JOHN WHITAKER SWEET-ESCOTT, 10 December 1999; commoner 1943–4.

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Hertford College

ANDREW MICHAEL GODFREY BARING, 15 October 1999; commoner 1967. Aged 50.

HERON LESLIE CADOUX-HUDSON, 13 November 1999; scholar 1949. Aged 70.

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Keble College

FRANCIS DOUGLAS PRICE, B.LITT., MA, F.R.HIST.S., FSA, 25 December 1999;
Fellow and Tutor in History 1949–82, Dean 1950–62, Emeritus Fellow
1982–5, Honorary Fellow from 1985.

ELLIOT LEE RICHARDSON, December 1999; Honorary Fellow.

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St Hilda's College

JANE ANGELA THOMAS (née Allen), MA, 22 December 1999;
commoner 1959–62. Aged 58.

(GLADYS) MARY VISICK (née Oswin), B.LITT., MA, 1999;
scholar 1937–41.

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St Hugh's College

DR JEAN MARY SHANKS, BM, B.CH., F.R.C.PATH., November 1999; commoner
1944–9; Honorary Fellow, Royal College of Pathologists. Aged 74.

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MEMORIAL SERVICE


Keble College

A Memorial Service for FRANCIS DOUGLAS PRICE, formerly Fellow of the
college, will be held at 11.30 a.m. on Friday, 25 February, in the chapel, Keble
College.

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NOTICES


GREEN COLLEGE


Osler Essay Prize 2000

Friends of 13 Norham Gardens

This prize, to the annual value of £200, is offered by the Friends of 13
Norham Gardens through the generosity of Dr Martin Entin of Montreal,
Canada, for an essay to be submitted by a registered clinical medical student
of
Oxford University (either clinical or preclinical).

The subject chosen should in some way deal with medicine or medical science
in the light of the life and work of Sir William Osler. Students who are
interested in submitting an esay may visit Osler's former home and lib-
rary at 13 Norham Gardens by appointment (telephone: Oxford 512492). Essays
of not less than 2,500 words and not more than 5,000 words should be sent
to Lord Walton of Detchant at 13 Norham Gardens, Oxford OX2 6PS, by
31 May.

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ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE


Prospectus for the Dr Chun-tu Hsueh Travel
Awards

The Dr Chun-tu Hsueh Travel awards have been established to provide
postgraduate students who are working on research degrees in any aspect of
Northeast, Southeast, and/or South Asian Studies with grants towards the cost
of their thesis research. Only students from St Antony's College may apply.

The maximum award available is £500. Students with probationary status,
students for the M.Phil., M.St., or M.Sc. degrees, or students whose thesis
deals only tangentially with Asia are not eligible for consideration.

Among the purposes for which grants may be given are: travel essential to
thesis research, travel to a conference to present a paper related to the
thesis, the acquisition of
material essential to research, and the preparation of artwork or other
material for inclusion in the completed
thesis. Grants for subsistence will not be made; nor is funding available to
present papers at conferences, except when a very strong case can be made
for the relevance of such a presentation to the applicant's thesis research.
Candidates are expected to apply for grants before incurring expenses.

Applications for awards are considered once a year.
Applications should be made on a form available from the Secretary of the
Asian Studies Centre, St Antony's College, Oxford OX2 6JF (e-mail:
asian@sant.ox.ac.uk), and should be submitted by the end of the second week
of Hilary Term.

Applicants are asked to name one referee, normally the thesis supervisor, who
should be requested to send in a
reference directly to the Secretary of the Asian Studies Centre, St Antony's
College, by the deadline.

A subcommittee of the Asian Studies Centre will consider the applications and
announce its decisions by the middle of the sixth week of Hilary Term. It
reserves the right to make no awards, in the event that no suitable
applications are received. Successful candidates will be required to submit a
brief report to the Asian Studies Centre on their use of grants received, and
notify the Centre upon completion of their degrees.

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SOMERVILLE COLLEGE


Appointment of Temporary Stipendiary Lecturer
in French

Somerville College invites applications for the post of Temporary Stipendiary
Lecturer in French for Trinity Term and Michaelmas Term 2000.

The lecturer will be required to provide an annual
average of twelve hours' teaching a week during the two Full Terms (which
each last eight weeks).

The appointment will be for the period 16 April 2000
to 16 December 2000. The stipend will be at point one (£15,334) or point
two (£16,286) of an incremental scale, depending on experience. Payment
will be for two eleven-week periods: four weeks' leave will be paid during the
Long Vacation.

Teaching will be required for papers for the Preliminary Examination, modern
period tutorials, and translation classes. The lecturer will be asked to serve
as Personal Tutor and Director of Studies to those undergraduates reading
French. In addition, the lecturer will normally be expected to help with the
annual undergraduate admissions exercise, and with the organisation of
teaching within the school.

The lecturer will have the use of a teaching room in college and wlll be a
member of the senior common room.
He or she will be entitled to a number of meals in college during Full Term.

Candidates should apply by letter addressed to the
College Secretary, Somerville College, Oxford OX2 6HD, enclosing six copies of
a curriculum vitae each with a cover sheet and naming two
referees who should be asked by
the candidate to write directly to the College Secretary, marked `Confidential',
by the closing date. The closing date for application is 24 January 2000.
Short-listed candidates are likely to be invited for interview during the week
beginning 7 February.

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<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 20 January 2000: Advertisements<br />

Advertisements


Contents of this section:



How to advertise in the
Gazette


Terms and conditions
of acceptance of advertisements

Return to Contents Page of this issue



Oxford University Newcomers' Club

This club exists to welcome to Oxford the partners and
families of academic visitors and graduate students. Come along to the Club
Room at 13 Norham Gardens any Wednesday morning between 10.30 a.m.and 12
noon, from the week before term starts to the week after term, and
throughout the Summer vacation, and sample our programme of events and
outings.

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Bicycles wanted

Child's bicycles wanted for refugee children. Any condition
acceptable. Bicycle helmets also wanted. Tel.: Oxford 553828.

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Volunteers for Airline Passenger Health Charity

The Aviation Health Institute (AHI) is an Oxford based
medical charity seeking volunteers to help with afternoon office duties such
as help with light mail-out, phone and secretarial duties. The AHI is the
world's first independent non-profit body that carries out research, education
and prevention programmes for airline passenger health affected by flying,
e.g. asthma, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, blood disorders, strokes,
fainting, diabetes, epilepsy, cancers, pregnancy, fear of flying and
transmission of contagious diseases. We provide an invaluable independent
source of information and comment on aviation health issues. If you would like
to help out with our activities on a voluntary basis please telephone Mrs Kidd
on Oxford 739681

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Warneford Hospital

Do you have a problem with your weight? If you would like
to take part in an Oxford University study of three psychological treatments
for weight management please ring Marianne O'Connor on Oxford 226443. To be
eligible you must be: significantly overweight; female, aged between 20 and 59
years; available for 11 months treatment. Certain medical illnesses and
treatments (and pregnancy) may make you ineligible.

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Tuition Offered

GCSE and A level Easter Revision courses. Highly successful
courses which build confidence and exam skills and which can make a
significant difference to students' grades. Tel.: d'Overbroeck's College, Oxford
310000.

Jazz/World Music course for musicians aged 10–14 of all
levels of experience. Feb. half-term. Contact Sami Cohen at d'Overbroeck's
College. Tel.: Oxford 310000.

Year 2K, why not lose weight, improve fitness, feel better?
Personal fitness training and lifestyle management, with Paul Hornsby, one of
the U.K.'s most experienced fitness trainers. Having worked as a trainer for
14 years Paul has got what it takes to make you make a difference to the way
you look and feel. For more information tel.: Oxford 773021, 07715 5842982 or
emial: pjh_personaltraining@yahoo.com.

OXACTS. Oxford Tutorial School of Acting for children (from
7-14 years), the Jericho St Barnabas Community Centre, 33a Canal St., Oxford
OX2 6BQ. Classes in voice production, movement and drama. Sats., 3–6 p.m.
Information, interviews, auditions, tel./fax: Oxford 792965.

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Services Offered

Town and Country Trees, arboricultural contractors. Tree
surgery, felling, planting, hedges, orchard and shrub pruning, stump removal.
Fully qualified, fully insured. Tel.: 01869 351540, or 01993 811115.

Big or small, we ship it all, plus free pick up anywhere in
Oxford. Also 24 hour photocopying, private mailing addresses (24 hour access,
and mail forwarding worldwide), binding, fax bureau, colour photocopying,
mailing services, and much more. Contact or visit Mail Boxes Etc., 266 Banbury
Rd., Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 514655, fax: 514656, e-mail:
summertown@020.mbe.uk.com.

Autogenic therapy, a self-help method, brings about
profound relief from negative stress. It can be taught in small groups or
individually over a period of 8–10 weeks. Individual psychotherapy is also
available from an experienced, qualified practitioner. Tel.: Thomas Goss on
Oxford 351765.

Colourful courtyards with architectural features, imaginative
lighting and paving. Jeanne Bliss, Landscape Designer and Pruning Adviser,
Oxford and California. Tel.: Oxford 515399 for leaflet.

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Domestic Services

Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your
local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college.
Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood
cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice,
call Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford 726983 or Abingdon 555533.

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Situations Vacant

Secretarial/Editorial Assistant. Part-time freelance
opportunity for someone with existing University connection to assist with the
receipt of papers and correspondence with authors for a monthly journal.
Flexible working hours readily arranged. Available from 1 Feb. 2000 with
payment to £500 p.m. Enquiries, expressions of interest to:
richard.brook@materials.oxford.ac.uk or tel.: Oxford 273782, or Richard Brook,
Department of Materials, University of Oxford, OIX1 3PH.

Freelance bookkeeper wanted by Oxford-based publisher
specializing in academic books on Africa, the Caribbean, and the Third World.
Bookkeeper to manage Purchase and Sales Ledgers, in-house Invoicing, and
the production of Management accounts and statistics, using Quick Books.
Minimum 8 hrs p.w., at mutually convenient times. Hourly rate subject to
negotiation. Please send details of experience, available hours, and current
hourly rate to: Office Administrator, James Currey Ltd., 73 Botley Road, Oxford
OX2 0BS.

Oxford Preservation Trust, Assistant Secretary. Oxford
Preservation Trust is a charitable trust established in 1927 to promote
preservation of Oxford's historical, architectural and natural environment. It
owns land and a number of buildings throughout the City and the Green Belt.
The present Assistant Secretary to the Trust is due to retire in Spring 2000.
Applications are now invited for this full-time post. Working alongside the
Secretary you will be responsible for the day to day administration of the
Trust, organising committee meetings, looking after the membership, including
arranging a programme of visits, and the annual Environmental Awards. This
is an interesting and varied post. Applicants should be computer literate and
have a commitment to conservation. A knowledge of Oxford and its countryside
would be an advantage. The salary is related to the University Clerical and
Library Staff Scales, Grade 6 £18,667–£21,646. Please write by
28 January 2000 enclosing a C.V. to Mrs D. Dance, Secretary, Oxford
Preservation Trust, 10 Turn Again Lane, Oxford OX1 1QL. Arrangements should
be made for two references to be sent direct to the Trust.

Somerville College Oxford, Appointment of Temporary
Stipendiary Lecturer in French. The College invites applications for the post
of Temporary Stipendiary lecturer in French for Trinity Term and Michaelmas
Term 2000. The Lecturer will be required to provide an annual average of
twelve hours teaching a week during the two Full Terms (which each lasts
eight weeks). The appointment will be for the period 16 April 2000 to 16
December 2000. The stipend will be at point one (£15,334) or point two
(£16, 286) of an incremental scale, depending on experience. Payment will
be for two eleven week periods; four weeks' leave will be paid during the
Long Vacation. Teaching will be required for papers for the Preliminary
Examination, modern period tutorials and translation classes. The Lecturer will
be asked to serve as Personal Tutor and Director of Studies to those
undergraduates reading French. In addition, the lecturer will normally be
expected to help with the annual Undergraduate Admissions exercise, and with
the organization of teaching within the school. The Lecturer will have the use
of a teaching room in College and will be a member of the Senior Common
Room. He or she will be entitled to a number of meals in College during full
Term. Candidates should apply by letter addressed to the College Secretary,
Somerville College, Oxford OX2 6HD, enclosing six copies of a curriculum
vitae
each with a cover sheet (enclosed) and naming two referees who
should be asked by the candidate to write directly to the College Secretary,
marked `Confidential', by the closing date; (two extra copies of the particulars
are enclosed for the referees). The closing date for application is 24 January
2000. Short-listed candidates are likely to be invited for inteview during the
week beginning 7 February 2000.

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Houses to Let

North Oxford house available from 28 Mar. 2000 for one year
or less. Walk to colleges, train station, and bus station, near Port Meadow,
c.h., recently re-decorated, desks, filing cabinets, several large closets,
secluded garden, 2 1/2 bathrooms, washing machine, drier, telephone, linen,
dishes, 2 bicycles. Suitable for visiting academics. Two bedrooms, £950
p.m.; 3 bedrooms, £1250 p.m (inc. bedsit with separate entrance). Tel.: J.
Mackrell (eves.), Oxford 775567, or Canada: A.Gaston, 613 745 1368, fax. 613 745
0299. E-mail: Tony.Gaston@EC.GC.CA or Gaston@cyberus.ca.

Jericho, available early Jan. for 6 months. Two bedroom,
g.c.h, washing machine etc. Excellent family home. Non-smokers only. £700
p.c.m. Call Ru or Terry on Oxford 559581.

Charming cottage, 12 miles north west of Oxford in a quiet
corner of village. Beams, inglenook fireplace, woodburning stove, g.c.h.,
country antiques, washer/drier, fridge/freezer, bash/shower, small walled
garden, garage, double bedroom, spare bedroom/study. Available from mid-
April. Tel.: Oxford 284225.

Mid-March to mid-June, 3-bedroom 18th century house, 3
miles Oxford city centre, frequent buses. Gas c.h., dishwasher, washing
machine, secluded garden, car-port, non-smoking. £800 p.c.m. Tel. (in
January) 001 212 463 0078; (in February) Oxford 778768.

Moreton in Marsh. 27 miles Oxford, 35 minutes by train.
Elegant Cotswolds stone town house. Sleeps 5. All mod. cons., garden. Available
end Jan. £520 p.c.m. Please tel.: 01608 810549.

Central South Oxford. Completely renovated, attractively
furnished 3-storey Victorian terrace house with garden. Ten minute walk from
city centre, 5 minute walk from river, 2 minute walk from Hinksey Park. Two
double bedrooms, 1 single (with bed plus cot), 2 bathrooms, double reception
room with stripped pine floor, large modern kitchen with French windows
overlooking garden. Gas c.h., fridge, freezer, dishwasher, washing machine,
tumble-drier, 2 TV's. Available 13 Apr.–1 May. £250 p.w. inc. of all
utilities except phone calls. Tel.: Oxford (2)78465 (Mon., Wed., Fri.), or email:
tanya.tsikas@admin.ox.ac.uk.

Central Oxford Rewley Park. Newly-built 2-bedroom terrace
house, within easy walk of the University and city centre. Situated in a quiet
cul-de-sac close by train station. Small garden, with patio. Fully carpeted,
furnished and equipped to a high standard, allocated parking. Available mid-
Jan. either for 6 month minimum at £795 p.c.m. exc. council tax and water
rates, or short let at £865 p.c.m. incl. Apply Dr Josephine Reynell, 70
Southmoor Rd., Oxford OX2 6RB. Tel.: Oxford 516615, fax: Oxford 516616, email:
macdonaldreynell@netscapeonline.co.uk.

Wheatley village (3 miles east of Oxford), 2 double bedrooms,
2 single, 3 receptions, 1 bathroom, 1 shower room. Piano, cellar, south facing
garden, c.h., 2 garages. £1,000 p.c.m. References. Tel.: 01243 528654.

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Flats to Let

An Englishman's home is his castle—so the saying goes.
We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are
seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we
may be able to help. QB Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents,
specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other
professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in
Oxford. Visit our Web site at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all
the properties that we have currently available to let. Alternatively, telephone,
fax, or e-mail us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever
we can without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 764533, fax: 764777, e-mail:
info@qbman.co.uk.

North Parade, charming, fully furnished 1-bedroom flat in
the heart of North Oxford. Available early Jan. £600 p.m. Tel.: Oxford
513816 weekdays.

Furnished, well equipped flat over community centre in
Polstead Road. Would suit graduate or academic visitor with family. Sitting
room, 3 bedrooms (could all be double), kitchen, bathroom, separate W.C.
Available now. Rent £850 p.c.m., reduced to £750 p.c.m. in return for
light duties. For further details and an application form contact Ben Simpson,
tel.: Oxford 274073, e-mail: ben.simpson@wolfson.ox.ac.uk, or write to him at
Wolfson College, Linton Road, Oxford OX2 6UD. Applications will be considered
as soon as possible and applicants may be interviewed.

Murray Court, Banbury Rd, Oxford. Very spacious (200 sq
yds.), quiet, first floor flat. Three double bedrooms, 2 bathrooms (1 en-suite).
Fully furnished to high standard, gas c.h., garage, garden. Within short
walking distance Science Area, University Parks and city centre. Non-smokers
only. Available 1 Jan. 2000. £1,250 p.c.m. Tel.: Brooks Property
Management, Oxford 728597, fax: 794606.

Central North Oxford, 10 minutes walk from city centre, all
main University buildings, and parks, and very close to the river. Available
for short/long let. Exceptionally well-furnished, comfortable flats in extremely
quiet, civilised, large Victorian house in this exclusive, leafy, residential
Victorian suburb, with large, light, airy rooms. First-floor flat available from
11 March, large double bedroom, large drawing room, kitchen, bathroom;
ground-floor available from 1 June, 1 double, 1 single bedroom, drawing-room,
kitchen, bathroom. Off-street parking and secluded garden. Tel./fax: Oxford
552400.

North Oxford , self-contained apartment. Shower room,
kitchen, double bedroom, large sunny south facing sitting room. Gas c.h. all
inclusive, in excellent decorative order and well equipped. Available now.
£695 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 511827 (eves.).

Make finding accommodation easy. Finders Keepers have a
dedicated approach to helping you find the right property. Browse through
our website for up-to-date detailed information on properties available and
make use of our interactive database, priority reservation service (credit
cards accepted), personal service, and professional advice. For further
information contact Finders keepers, 226 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford
OX2 7BY. Tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 556994, email: oxford@finders.co.uk,
internet: http://www.finders.co.uk

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Accommodation Offered

Cotswolds, in tiny hamlet near Burford. Small room with
ensuite shower, breakfast. Evening meal if required. Reasonable rent in return
for occasional dog sitting (5!). Tel./fax: 01993 824477.

Large bedroom and study available in spacious, quiet,
Headington house. Fully furnished. To share with a male doctor. Available
Feb.–July 2000. £450 p.c.m. Email: mina.fazel@virgin.net or tel.: Oxford
767055.

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Accommodation Sought

Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB
Management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers.
We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and
their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good-quality tenants
seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services,
or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation,
telephone us: Oxford 764533, fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk.
Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site at:
http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be marketing your property.

Librarian, working in London but living in central Oxford,
seeks accommodation, 8 Apr.–21 May, while his own flat is temporarily
unavailable. Furnished studio flat or 1-bedroom flat preferred, central/north
Oxford or near railway station if possible. Tel.: Oxford 250917 (answerphone),
email: peter_jackson@link.org.

Visiting MIT academic and family, looking for 3 or more
bedroom, furnished house in the Oxford area during summer 2000 (period
flexible). Contact Dr. Spencer Pitcher, USA, tel.:(001) 617 253 8667, fax: (001)
617 253 0627, email:csp@psfc.mit.edu.

Non-smoking academic and partner wish to rent a furnished
1/2 bedroom flat in Oxford from end March 2000. A central location to town
would be ideal, but suitable accommodation within the ring-road would be
considered. Laundry facilities and parking for 1 car would also be preferable.
contact: Dr Tim Andrews on Oxford 272506, or Tina Shepherd on Oxford 272471
during working hours, or Oxford 721948 during the evenings.

Make finding accommodation easy. Finders Keepers have
a
dedicated approach to helping you find the right property. Browse through
our website for up-to-date detailed information on properties available and
make use of our interactive database, priority reservation service (credit
cards accepted), personal service, and professional advice. For further
information contact Finders keepers, 226 Banbury Road, Summertown, Oxford
OX2 7BY. Tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 556994, email: oxford@finders.co.uk,
internet: http://www.finders.co.uk.

Return to List of Contents of this section



Accommodation Exchange

Australian scholar and member of St Hugh's College seeks to
exchange spacious newly renovated 4-bedroom home in leafy suburb of
Canberra close to Australian National University for house in Oxford in May
2000 for approx. 4 weeks. Minimum 1 double bedroom, 1 twin. Tel.: 61 2 6248
7625, email: Rosamund.Dalziell@anu.edu.au.

German family with two children looks for holiday
accommodation exchange. Offer: 2 room loft in Langenargen, pretty village on
Lake Constance, 50 yards from the lake shore, quiet street, sleeping gallery,
roof balcony, sleeps 4, fitted kitchen, washing machine, TV. Any period
considered between May and December, 2000. Exchange wanted in suitable
holiday home, preferably Devon, Cornwall, Wales. Please contact tel./fax:
Germany 6203/181482.

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Holiday Lets

Self-catering accommodation 5 minutes walk to city centre.
We have 4-bedroom self-contained flats to let from July to Sept., fully
equipped kitchens for groups or families. Close to shops, restaurants and
buses. A 24-hour lodge with CCTV. Pleasant gardens in tranquil surroundings.
Use of the adjacent sports ground. Washing machines on site. Free off-road
parking. For rates tel./fax Oxford 725364.

Country lovers' retreat, children and dogs welcome. Beautiful
barn conversion into 2 cottages with panoramic views over secluded valley.
Small mixed organic farm with rare breed animals. Owls, herons, buzzards,
otters, exclusive fishing on farm as well as salmon fishing on River Taw
nearby. Painting and drawing holidays, Tarka trail, RHS Rosemoor, beautiful
North Devon coastline not far. For brochure tel.: 01769 520263. Short breaks
available.

Luxury accommodation in mid-Wales between Hay on Wye and
Builth Wells. Barn conversion completed late 1999. Sleeps 8, full c.h., and fully
equipped kitchen. Ideal location for hill walking, trout fishing, birdwatching,
and pony trekking. For rates tel.: Oxford 864372, after 6.30 p.m.

French country house, 45 mins SE of Bordeaux. Simple but
well equipped. flexible accommodation suits 2 to 12 or more. 5km from village
with basic shops, weekly market, tennis court. Choice of market towns 15-20
mins. Sea 1 hour away. £500 p.w. July and August. £350 other times.
Tel.: 01235 751633.

Poole, Dorset. Luxury, ground floor apartment, situated in
Branksome Park, 5 minutes walk from the beach. Sleeps 4. Small private
garden. Car parking. No children or pets. Tel./fax: 01993 813521.

Dordogne. Charming, traditional, peaceful farmhouse, simply
but fully equipped, on the edge of a small hamlet. Own fenced pool, 2 acres
of meadow and garden, near table d'hote, vineyards, riding, tennis, lake,
castles and market towns. Sleeps 6 (plus 1). Huge cool verandah for games,
barbecue, relaxation. £450–475 p.w. Tel.: 01993 881408,
email:gbutcher@globalnet.co.uk.

Summer rental, Woodstock, near Blenheim Palace. Three-
bedroom furnished house, lounge, dining room, kitchen, bathroom. Quiet cul-
de-sac location, parking and small private garden. Available 1 July–31
Aug. £625 p.c.m. Regret no children. Tel.: 01993 811126, fax: 01993
812422.

Italy, Umbria. `Casa Colonica' on its own road in hills 5 miles
N.E. of Assisi, in National Park, superb views, wild life. Kitchen, dining/sitting
room, 2 double bedrooms, large bathroom, car essential; Lombardia, Lake Como,
in village house, closely overlooking lake, 25 minutes from Como city. One
double bedroom, sitting/dining room, kitchenette, bathroom, open terrace. For
either let, £300 p.w., £550 fortnight. Tel.: Oxford 768775.

Crete. A traditional Cretan house in old town Rethimno,
superbly renovated to provide space and comfort in beautifully furnished
surroundings. Elevated, vine-covered, sitting area with brick
barbecue—perfect for alfresco dining. It is in a quiet area, and close to
long, sandy beach, taverns, shops, and the many interesting sights in and
around this historic area. Sleeps 4 (1 double, 1 twin). Available all year round.
£280 p.w., £1000 p.m. All linen, electricty and cleaning inc. Tel./fax:
Nikolaos Glinias, 0030 831 56525, e-mail: nglynias@ret.forthnet.gr.

Umbria/Tuscany border. Delightfully restored, spacious
farmhouse for rent, 2 double bedrooms, sleeping 4. Also cottage nearby
sleeping 2. For colour brochure tel.: 01923 497845, fax: 01923 354174.
n

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<br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette: Diary, 21 January<br /> - 3 February

Diary


Contents of this section:

Academic Staff
Development Programme Seminars
: places should be booked in advance
through
the Staff Development Office, University Offices,
Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

For the full list of courses, see the HREF="http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/training/">Staff Development
ProgrammeWeb site.

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Contents Page of this issue



Friday 21 January

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Japanese fan paintings' (special exhibition),
1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

DR N. BARLEY: `Death and the multiplicity of identity' (Ethnicity and Identity
Seminar: `Death'), Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

SIR KEITH THOMAS: `Arms and the man' (Ford's Lectures in British History:
`The ends of life: roads to human fulfilment in early modern England'),
Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR A. STEPAN: `The world's religious systems and democracy' (St
Antony's College Jubilee Lecture Series), New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5
p.m.

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Sunday 23 January

PROFESSOR ROBERT GORDON preaches the Macbride Sermon on the Application
of Messianic Prophecy, Hertford, 10 a.m.

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Monday 24 January

ACADEMIC STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME SEMINAR: `Managing and
developing effective teams', 9 a.m. (see information
above
).

DR A. ANKOMAN: `The use and misuse of anthropology in HIV/AIDS research
and prevention in sub-Saharan Africa' (Fertility and Reproduction Seminars),
basement Seminar Room, Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, 11
a.m.

PROFESSOR ROGER GRAEF: `Now you see it, now you don't: visions of reality
in the twenty-first century' (lecture series: `The illusion of information'),
Exeter, 6 p.m.

DR P.J. DALE: `Genetically modified organisms: environmental saviour or
environmental disaster?' (Green College Lectures: `Food for the next
millennium: implications for the environment', Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe
Infirmary, 6 p.m.

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Tuesday 25 January

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Teapots and teacups', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
£1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

PROFESSOR G. HANCOCK: `Lasers in atmospheric chemistry' (Graduate
Interdisciplinary Lectures: `Seeing things in a new light—laser applications
in science and technology', Lindemann Lecture Theatre, Clarendon Laboratory,
4.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR PAUL MULDOON (Professor of Poetry): `The end of the poem: "The
Literary Life" by Ted Hughes' (lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. MACCULLOCH: `The Reformation' (Lecture series to celebrate the
start of a new millennium: `The history of Christianity—how we got to
where we are now'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR M.E. FISHER: `Pictures, models, approximations, and reality: phase
transitions and the role of the theorist' (Wolfson College Lectures: `Physics at
the boundaries'), the Hall, Wolfson, 5 p.m. (open to the public).

P. DUBEN: `Risk, pollution, and regulation' (Oxford Centre for the Environment,
Ethics, and Society seminars), Council Room, Main Building, Mansfield, 5
p.m.

PROFESSOR K. WARD: `Is comparative theology possible?' (Interdisciplinary
Seminars in the Study of Religions: `Comparative approaches in the study of
religions'), Blue Boar Seminar Room, Christ Church, 5 p.m.

C. CROSSLEY: `Thinking and imagining the future in nineteenth-century
France' (Seminar in Modern French History and Politics), Maison
Française, 5 p.m.

D. SAINT-JACQUES: `Mondialisation et littérature nationale: le cas du
Québec' (French Language-World Literature Seminar), Maison
Française, 5 p.m.

C. HUMPHRIES: `Meaningful realism in analysis, interpretation, and performance'
(Graduate Students' Colloquia), Music Faculty, 5.15 p.m.

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Wednesday 26 January

ANDREW LUCAS: organ recital, in series `Bach at Queen's 2000', the chapel,
Queen's, 1.10 p.m. (admission free; retiring collection).

ACADEMIC STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME SEMINARS: `Personal organisation'
and `Evaluation methodologies for technology-assisted teaching and learning',
both at 2 p.m. (see information above).

PROFESSOR N. MACFARLANE: `States, power, and refugees: international
relations and forced migration' (Refugee Studies Centre seminars: `Perspectives
on forced migration'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5
p.m.

C. NUPEN introduces film Remembering Jacqueline du Pré,
Jacqueline du Pré Music Building, St Hilda's, 8 p.m. (tickets
£8/£5 from Oxford Playhouse, tel. 798600; information from (2)76821).

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Thursday 27 January

ACADEMIC STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME SEMINAR: `Dealing with
harassment' (day 1), 10 a.m. (see information
above
).

J.-P. LLEDO: `Chroniques algériennes' (Centre for Cross-Cultural
Research on Women seminars: `Cross-border narratives—between North and
West Africa'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. HEWISON: ` "All my eye and Betty Martin": the formation of
Ruskin's taste and the Ruskin family art collection' (Slade Lectures: `Ruskin
today'), Lecture Hall, University Museum of Natural History, 5 p.m. (open to
the public).

DR THOMAS MICHEL: `Features of the Muslim–Christian polemical tradition'
(Martin D'Arcy Memorial Lectures: `Paul of Antioch and Ibn Taymiyya: the
modern relevance of a medieval polemic'), Schools, 5 p.m.

THE HON. MAURICE STRONG: `Global sustainable development' (Linacre Lectures:
`Consciousness of connections: global environments in the new millennium'),
Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology Building, 5.30 p.m.

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Friday 28 January

ACADEMIC STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME SEMINAR: `Introduction to
strategic planning and management', 9 a.m. (see
information above
).

DR N. ALLEN: `Death and reincarnation—a South Asianist's perspective'
(Ethnicity and Identity Seminar: `Death'), Institute of Social and Cultural
Anthropology, 11 a.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Local Oxfordshire finds', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
£1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.--1 p.m.)

SIR KEITH THOMAS: `Work and vocation' (Ford's Lectures in British History:
`The ends of life: roads to human fulfilment in early modern England'),
Schools, 5 p.m.

MS PATRICIA HEWITT, MP: `Social justice in the knowledge economy' (St
Antony's College Jubilee Lecture Series), New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5
p.m.

J.-C. COLLIARD: `Une institution politique majeure: le Conseil
Constitutionnel
' (lecture), Maison Française, 5.15 p.m.

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Saturday 29 January

ST ANNE'S COLLEGE: `A Feast for the Millennium', with Master of Wine, Jancis
Robinson, and wine historian Hanneke Wilson; reception, 7.30 p.m., dinner, 8
p.m. (tickets £35 from college Development Office: tel./fax (2)74852).

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Sunday 30 January

THE VERY REVD JOHN DRURY preaches, Cathedral, 10 a.m.

COLIN CARR: master-class, Garden Quadrangle Auditorium, St John's, 10 a.m.
(admission by free programme, available from the Porters' Lodge, St John's;
reserved for college members until days before the event).

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Monday 31 January

ACADEMIC STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME SEMINAR: `Listening skills', 9.30
a.m. (see information above).

DR M. KONRAD: `Fertility and the substance of anonymity' (Fertility and
Reproduction Seminars), basement Seminar Room, Institute of Social and
Cultural Anthropology, 11 a.m.

PROFESSOR W.P.T. JAMES: `Feast and famine: the paradox of under- and over-
nutrition' (Green College Lectures: `Food for the next millennium: implications
for the environment', Witts Lecture Theatre, Radcliffe Infirmary, 6 p.m.

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Tuesday 1 February

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Shakespeare's world', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
£1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.)

ACADEMIC STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME SEMINAR: `Examining theses', 2
p.m. (see information above).

DR D. TERRAR: `Lasers in the study of heart muscle contraction' (Graduate
Interdisciplinary Lectures: `Seeing things in a new light—laser applications
in science and technology', Lindemann Lecture Theatre, Clarendon Laboratory,
4.15 p.m.

A. CHESTER: `Future hope and the end of time' (Speaker's Lectures in Biblical
Studies: `Future hope and present reality'), Schools, 5 p.m.

S. HAZAREESINGH: `Building the new republic from below: the propaganda of
the "Société d'instruction républicaine", 1870–7'
(Seminar in Modern French History and Politics), Maison Française, 5
p.m.

PROFESSOR ROGER GRAEF: `Secrets of the cutting-room' (master-
class/workshop, in series `The illusion of information'), Green College, 6
p.m.

DR J. SHAW: `The late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries' (Lecture series
to celebrate the start of a new millennium: `The history of
Christianity—how we got to where we are now'), Schools, 5 p.m.

SIR STEPHEN MOORBATH: `Physics and geological time' (Wolfson College
Lectures: `Physics at the boundaries'), the Hall, Wolfson, 5 p.m. (open to the
public).

A. STIRLING: `Science and precaution in the management of technological risk'
(Oxford Centre for the Environment, Ethics, and Society seminars), Council
Room, Main Building, Mansfield, 5 p.m.

R. STROHM: `Murder in Armenia and voices in opera seria'
(Graduate Students' Colloquia), Music Faculty, 5.15 p.m.

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Wednesday 2 February

MATTHEW HALLS: organ recital, in series `Bach at Queen's 2000', the chapel,
Queen's, 1.10 p.m. (admission free; retiring collection).

BERYL BAINBRIDGE: `What makes a writer?' (Richard Hillary Lecture), St Cross
Building, 5 p.m.

DR N. VAN HEAR: `Undisciplined: the virtues of rootlessness in refugee search'
(Refugee Studies Centre seminars: `Perspectives on forced migration'), Library
Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

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Thursday 3 February

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM exhibition opens: `Golden pages—Qurans and prayer-
books from the H.E. Shaik Ghasan I. Shaker collection' (until 2 April).

ACADEMIC STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME SEMINAR: `Time management', 9.30
a.m. (see information above).

MRS M. CLAPINSON: `Bryon in the family papers' (Friends of the Bodleian
thirty-minute lecture), Cecil Jackson Room, Sheldonian, 1 p.m.

E. TAKYI: `West African narratives in Ghanaian feminist novels' (Centre for
Cross-Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Cross-border
narratives—between North and West Africa'), Library Wing Seminar Room,
Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. HEWISON: ` "I think he must have read my book": Ruskin and
the writing and rewriting of Turner' (Slade Lectures: `Ruskin today'), Lecture
Hall, University Museum of Natural History, 5 p.m. (open to the public).

DR THOMAS MICHEL: `The Christian prophet and the Prophet of Islam' (Martin
D'Arcy Memorial Lectures: `Paul of Antioch and Ibn Taymiyya: the modern
relevance of a medieval polemic'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR M. LANGTON: `Indigenous concepts of connectedness and the new
environmentalism' (Linacre Lectures: `Consciousness of connections: global
environments in the new millennium'), Lecture Theatre A, Zoology/Psychology
Building, 5.30 p.m.

JOHN SCOTT: organ recital, in series `Bach at Queen's 2000', the chapel,
Queen's, 8 p.m. (admission £5/£3).

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