2 May 1996


University Acts

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[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 29 April

Degree by Special Resolution

No notice to the contrary having been received under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1995, p. 13), the following resolution is deemed to have been approved at noon on 29 April.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

WILLIAM OSMOND CHARLES MICHAEL COOKSON, D.PHIL., Green College

PETER ROBERT FRANKLIN, St Catherine's College

DIRK OBBINK, Christ Church

DOMINIC CHRISTOPHER O'BRIEN, Balliol College

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HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL

1 Status of Master of Arts

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the status of Master of Arts under the provisions of Ch. V, Sect. vi, cl. 1 (Statutes, 1995, p. 345) has been accorded to the following persons who are qualified for membership of Congregation:

 

DAWN CHATTY, Queen Elizabeth House

OLIVER JAMES DYAR, Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics

CATHERINE MARJORIE HOGAN, Examination Schools

HARUNAGA ISAACSON, Wolfson College

PHILIPPE LAPLACE, Faculty of Modern Languages

MICHAEL ANTHONY MCSHANE, Department of Paediatrics

DAVID GEORGE MASON, Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics

DAVID JOHN MILLER, University Offices

FRANCIS JOHN ODLING-SMEE, Institute of Biological Anthropology

FRANCIS JOHN DOLBEN POTT, Faculty of Music

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2 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been added to the Register of Congregation:

Catling, R.W.V., MA, Keble
Chatty, D., MA status, Queen Elizabeth House
Cookson, W.O.C.M., MA, D.Phil., Green College
Dyar, O.J., MA status, Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics
Franklin, P.R., MA, St Catherine's
Gray, R.G., MA, M.Sc., Trinity
Green, E.H.H., MA, Magdalen
Hogan, C.M., MA status, Examination Schools
Isaacson, H., MA status, Wolfson
Laplace, P., MA status, Faculty of Modern Languages
McShane, M.A., MA status, Department of Paediatrics
Mason, D.G., MA status, Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics
Miller, D.J., MA status, University Offices
Obbink, D., MA, Christ Church
O'Brien, D.C., MA, Balliol
Odling-Smee, F.J., MA status, Institute of Biological Anthropology
Pott, F.J.D., MA status, Faculty of Music
Raven, J.R., MA, D.Phil., Mansfield

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BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect on 17 May, see `Examinations and Boards' below.


University Agenda

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[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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Notices

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • *Notices of exhibitions, guided tours, etc.:

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    SIR JOHN RHYS PRIZE 1996

    The Prize has been awarded to ALUN R. JONES, Jesus College.

    Proxime accessit: HEATHER WILLIAMS, St Hilda's College.

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    ROCHE PRIZE IN LABORATORY MEDICINE 1996

    The Prize has been awarded to DAVID A.J. LLOYD, Magdalen College.

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    L.J. WITTS PRIZE IN HAEMATOLOGY OR GASTROENTEROLOGY 1995–6

    The Prize has been awarded to MATTHEW ERIC JAMES CALLISTER, St Hugh's College.

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    SPEAKING BY JUNIOR MEMBERS IN CONGREGATION

    Mr Vice-Chancellor has, with the agreement of Council, approved the following arrangements for junior members to speak in Congregation under the terms of Ch. I, Sect x (Statutes, 1995, p. 199), which reads as follows:

    `Any junior member as defined in Tit. XIV, Sect. iv, § 1, cl. 2, may speak at a meeting of Congregation, if called upon to do so by the Chairman at the Chairman's discretion, provided that the Chairman may at any time terminate a debate on the floor of the House and proceed to the final speeches and the taking of a vote.'

    The Chairman of Congregation will normally expect to call upon nominated representatives of the Oxford University Student Union if they wish to speak in debate, and will normally expect to call upon junior members to speak only from among those who have given advance notice of their wish to be called. Should the Chairman consider that the number of junior members who have given such notice is excessive, he or she will have to be selective in calling upon them. The Chairman will try to ensure a balanced debate in relation to the apparent spread and strength of views held by junior members. If informed selection is to be possible it is desirable that when giving notice of the wish to be called a junior member should indicate (a) whether he or she intends to support or oppose the motion before the House, (b) whether he or she would speak on behalf of any club, committee, group, or association, (c) whether he or she is supported by other junior members (up to twelve of whom might sign the notice).

    If the number giving notice is small they will all be admitted to the floor of the House although this does not ensure their being called. In other cases some selection may be necessary at the stages of both admission and calling of speakers. If there is to be time to tell applicants whether they will be admitted notice will have to be received in good time. Junior members should therefore send in such notice, in writing, to the Registrar to be received at the University Offices not later than 10 a.m. on the Monday preceding the debate in question. The name of any representative nominated by OUSU should also be communicated to the Registrar, in writing, through the President by that time. A notice will then be posted in the University Offices and on the gate of the Clarendon Building not later than 10 a.m. on the morning of the debate, indicating whether all applicants will be admitted to the floor of the House or, if selection has had to take place, the names of those selected for admission to the floor.

    Junior members not admitted to the floor of the House will normally be permitted to listen to the debate from the gallery. Junior members on the floor of the House will be asked to remain in their places while a vote is being taken.

    Under Tit. XIV, Sect. IV, § 1, cl. 2, junior members are defined as `those persons who, having been admitted to matriculation, are residing to fulfil the requirements of any statute, decree, or regulation of the University or reading for any degree, diploma, or certificate of the University and who have not proceeded to membership of Convocation'. (Membership of Convocation is normally obtained by taking the MA degree.)

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    ISIS INNOVATION LIMITED

    2 South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3UB

    Isis Innovation, a wholly-owned company of the University, was established in 1988. The company has been formed to exploit know-how arising out of research funded by the UK Government through the Research Councils and funded by other bodies where the rights are not tied. The function of the company is to ensure that the results of research bring rewards to Oxford, and to the inventors, who are given a financial incentive for exploitation.

    Isis seeks licensees willing to pay lump sums and/or royalties for the use of know-how arising out of research. Isis also exploits the intellectual property of the University by setting up individual companies using venture capital or development capital funds.

    Isis' services are also available to individuals who wish to exploit the results of research supported by non-Research Council sources, when there are no prior conditions on the handling of the intellectual property rights. Isis Innovation has at its disposal a small pre-seedcorn fund for paying the costs of protecting intellectual property rights and for taking work to a stage where its potential can be assessed.

    Isis finds industrial partners to ensure that new ideas can be developed for market requirements. The company has established the Oxford Innovation Society for major industrial companies, so that they can have a window on Oxford technology and an opportunity to license and invest where appropriate.

    A brochure explaining Isis' activities is available. Please contact the above address, or the telephone and fax numbers given below.

    Members of the University should contact Dr James Hiddleston if they wish to take advantage of the services that Isis provides. (Telephone: (2)72411; fax: (2)72412.)

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    EUROPEAN HUMANITIES RESEARCH CENTRE

    The centre has moved from 47 Wellington Square to larger premises at 37a St Giles', Oxford OX1 3LD, and may be contacted by telephone on Oxford (2)80742, by fax on Oxford (2)80470, or by e-mail on ehrc@modern-languages. The centre now includes the main office as well as a publications room, some accommodation for visiting fellows, and a Film Study Centre. Dr Helen Watanabe-O'Kelly is Director of the European Humanities Research Centre for 1995–6, and Mrs Kareni Bannister, Publications and Development, is responsible for its day- to-day running. The centre is open during office hours on week-days.

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    EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES CENTRE

    Workshops

    The ETRC organises a number of workshops on various topics each term, which are mainly intended for small groups to learn about specific aspects of audiovisual activity, and to have the opportunity to obtain hands-on experience.

    In order to allow each workshop to be tailored to the needs of the participants, all those attending are asked to complete a short questionnaire a few days before the workshop outlining their previous experience in this field, if any, and any particular interests or problems that they may have. In certain situations, if the questionnaires indicate too wide a range of experience, it may be desirable to spilt the group into two parts and to arrange a new date for one of these sub-groups.

    The workshops organised for Trinity term are shown below.

    22 May: Presenting Computer Displays in Lectures
    29 May: Making Audio recordings
    5 June: Editing off-air recordings and other videotapes

    The workshops on camcorder techniques and editing are not being presented this term, but will be replaced in Michaelmas Term with a more comprehensive workshop occupying two afternoons.

    Advance booking is required for all workshops, and bookings must be made no later than the Wednesday preceding the workshop, in order to allow participants to complete and return a short questionnaire indicating their previous experience, if any, and those aspects in which they are most interested, if known.

    All workshops start at 5 p.m. and take place in the ETRC, 37 Wellington Square. Places may be booked on any course by telephone ((2)70526), by e-mail (ETRC@etrc.ox.ac.uk) or via the centre's WWW pages (http://www.etrc.ox.ac.uk/etrc.html).

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    MUSEUM OF THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE

    Exhibition now open

    The geometry of war, 1500–1750: an exhibition of instruments, books, and illustrations on practical geometry and the art of warfare (until 30 November)

    The museum is open Tuesday–Saturday, 12 noon–4 p.m. Admission is free.

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    CONCERTS

    Faculty of Music

    THE ALLEGRI STRING QUARTET will give the following concerts, in the Holywell Music Room. The cost of tickets is as follows: evening concerts, £8 (£6 for OAP/unwaged, £4 students); lunch- time concert, £5.50 (£4, £2.50); all three concerts, £19 (£14, £9). Tickets may be obtained from Blackwell's Music Shop (telephone: Oxford 261384); student tickets may also be obtained from the Music Faculty.

    The quartet will hold open rehearsals in the Holywell Music Room from 2 to 5.30 p.m. approximately on 3 May and 29 May.

    Friday, 3 May, 8 p.m.: Haydn, Quartet in D minor, op. 76, no. 2; Rawsthorne, Clarinet Quintet; Mozart, Clarinet Quintet in A major, K.581 (with James Campbell, clarinet).

    Tuesday, 14 May, 1.10 p.m.: Arnold, Phantasy Vita Abundans; Gershwin, Lullaby; Milhaud, La Création du Monde, arranged for piano quintet (with Robert Sherlaw Johnson, piano).

    Wednesday, 29 May, 8 p.m.: Haydn, Quartet in B flat, op. 76, no. 4; Stravinsky, Concertino; Schoenberg, Quartet no. 2, op. 10 (with Catherine Pierard, soprano).


    Balliol College

    PAUL LEWIS will give a recital of piano works, including Beethoven's Sonata op. 27, no. 2, cMoonlight, and Schumann's Carnaval, op. 9, at 9 p.m. on Sunday, 12 May, in the hall, Balliol College.

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    UNIVERSITY CLUB

    Wine-tastings

    The following wine-tastings will be held at 5.45 p.m. on Wednesdays in the University Club, 6–8 South Parks Road. All members and their guests are welcome, the fee being £2 per person.

    8 May: Chardonnays from around the world.

    12 June: wines for summer drinking.

    Lectures

    Contents of this section:

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    INAUGURAL LECTURE

    Professor of European Thought

    PROFESSOR J. BURROW will deliver his inaugural lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 7 May, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `A common culture? Nationalist ideas in nineteenth-century European thought.'

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    ASTOR LECTURE

    PROFESSOR HENRY WEINBERG, University of California at Santa Barbara, will lecture at 2.15 p.m. on Thursday, 9 May, in the Hume-Rothery Lecture Theatre, the Department of Materials. The lecture will be followed by tea in the Holder Building Common Room.

    Subject: `Scanning probe microscopy studies of semiconductor surfaces.'

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    GRINFIELD LECTURES ON THE SEPTUAGINT

    The Septuagint as a cultural document (second series)

    DR TESSA RAJAK, Head of the Department of Classics, University of Reading, will deliver the second series of her Grinfield Lectures at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Collier Room, Regent's Park College.

    13 May: `Greek as a Jewish language: translation and literature.'

    20 May: `The Greek Bible and the language of power.'

    27 May: `In and out of the Bible: Greek additions to the biblical text.'

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    CHERWELL-SIMON MEMORIAL LECTURE 1996

    PROFESSOR U. AMALDI, University of Milan and European Laboratory for Particle Physics, CERN, will deliver the Cherwell-Simon Memorial Lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Friday, 24 May, in Lecture Theatre A, the Zoology/Psychology Building.

    Subject: `When nothing is something: a history of the vacuum.'

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    HALLEY LECTURE 1996

    PROFESSOR D. GOUGH, Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, will deliver the Halley Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 7 May, in the Lecture Theatre, the University Museum.

    Subject: `The seismic structure of the sun.'

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    JAMES FORD SPECIAL LECTURE IN BRITISH HISTORY

    DR M. ASTON, FBA, FSA, F.R.HIST.S., will deliver a James Ford Special Lecture at 5 p.m. on Friday, 10 May, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `Obliteration and memory in the English Reformation.'

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    HUSSEY LECTURE ON THE CHURCH AND THE ARTS

    PROFESSOR PETER S. HAWKINS, Professor of Religion and Literature, Yale University, will deliver the eighth annual Hussey Lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 13 May, in the Lecture Hall, the Taylor Institution.

    Subject: ` "Take it and read": an invitation to the Divine Comedy.'

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    ILCHESTER LECTURE

    PROFESSOR IGOR SHAITANOV, Russian State University for the Humanities, Moscow, will deliver an Ilchester Lecture (in Russian) at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 9 May, in the Taylor Institution Annexe, 47 Wellington Square.

    Subject: `Iosif Brodskii i metafizicheskaya traditsiya v Rossii.'

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    SPECIAL LECTURE

    SIR REX HUNT, formerly Governor of the Falklands, will lecture at 1.30 p.m. on Friday, 10 May, in Rhodes House.

    Subject: `The Falklands, past, present, and future.'

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    BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

    J.W. Jenkinson Memorial Lecture

    DR S.K. MCCONNELL, Stanford, will deliver a Jenkinson Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Monday, 13 May, in Lecture Theatre A, the Zoology/Psychology Building.

    Subject: `Asymmetric divisions and mammalian neurogenesis.'

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    CLINICAL MEDICINE

    Epidemiology and Social Medicine Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 1 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Abraham Lecture Theatre, Green College.

    Further information may be obtained from Sue Ziebland (telephone: Oxford 319126), or Tim Lancaster (telephone: Oxford 319124).

    A. MCMICHAEL, LSHTM
    7 May: `Climate change and human health: is it real? Is it science?'

    S. DARBY, CEU
    14 May: `The effects of HIV and HCV on the UK haemophilia population.'

    L. PEDERSEN, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, and J. KOVAL
    21 May: `Psychosocial factors in initiation of smoking in adolescents.'

    J. LUMLEY, NPEU
    28 May: `Does prolonged lactation prevent premenopausal breast cancer?'

    DR V. BERAL, CEU
    4 June: `The epidemiology of breast cancer.'

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    CLINICAL MEDICINE AND PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

    The following seminars will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the Lecture Theatre, the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology.

    Convener: H. Waldmann, BM, MA, D.Phil., Professor of Pathology.

    PROFESSOR C. GRAHAM
    9 May: `Insulin-like growth factor II in growth.'

    DR M. HULETT, Melbourne
    30 May: `The Fc receptor–immunoglobulin interaction: characterisation and manipulation for the treatment of immune complex induced inflammatory disease.'

    PROFESSOR SIR HENRY HARRIS
    6 June: `A different approach to the study of tumour suppression.'

    PROFESSOR P.C.L. BEVERLEY, Edward Jenner Institute for Vaccine Research
    13 June: `CD45, Duffy, and T cell differentiation.'

    PROFESSOR D. OSMOND, McGill
    27 June: `B lymphocytopoiesis in bone marrow: production, selection, and micro-environmental organisation of precursor B cells.'

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    LITERAE HUMANIORES

    PROFESSOR C. LE ROY, University of Paris I (Sorbonne), will lecture at 4.30 p.m. on Wednesday, 15 May, in the Ashmolean Museum.

    Convener: J.J. Coulton, MA, Reader in Classical Archaeology.

     

    Subject: `Tlos and Oinoanda: a tale of two cities in Northern Lycia.'

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    David Lewis Lecture

    PROFESSOR MICHAEL JAMESON, Crossett Professor of Humanities Emeritus, Stanford University, will deliver the David Lewis Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 29 May, in the Garden Quad Auditorium, St John's College.

    Subject: `The rituals of Athena Polias in Athens.'

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    MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

    Mathematical biology and ecology seminars

    The following seminars will be held in Lecture Room 3, the Mathematical Institute. With the exception of the meeting to be held at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, 22 May, they will take place at 2.30 p.m. on Fridays.

    Convener: P.K. Maini, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in Mathematical Biology.

    N. BRITTON, Bath
    17 May: `Army ants: specialists in carnage and conservation.'

    D. BENTIL, Vermont
    22 May: `Modelling renal blood flow autoregulation, acid-base equilibrium, and replacement of kidney function by dialysis therapy.'

    E. WILSON, Surrey
    24 May: `Analysis of reaction–diffusion system modelling man–environment–man epidemics.'

    C. GILLIGAN, Cambridge
    31 May: `Making sense of biological epidemics: where models meet data.'

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    MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

    Graduate seminar in Celtic

    The following seminars will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Thursdays in Jesus College (XVII/1).

    Convener: D.E. Evans, MA, Jesus Professor of Celtic.

    DR G.R. ISAAC, Freiburg
    9 May: `New readings in the Gododdin.'

    DR S.M. DAVIES, Cardiff
    23 May: `Storyteller, scribe, and translator: performing the Mabinogion.'

    MISS A. PRICE
    6 June: ` "Y Cyfarwydd Cymraeg": techniques of familiarisation in the stories of Y Dþr Mawr Llwyd by Robin Llywelyn.'

    MISS H. WILLIAMS
    13 June: `Dafydd ap Gwilym: Europhile?'

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    French literature from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the Danson Room, Trinity College.

    Conveners: Dr J.A. Mallinson, Trinity College, S. Pierse, Trinity College, and A. Charlton, New College.

    W. BARBER, Voltaire Foundation
    9 May: `Voltaire and natural science: apples to fossils.'

    N. PEACOCK, Glasgow
    23 May: `Looking at Molière.' (With slides)

    R. COOPER
    6 June: `De la dignité des braguettes.'

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    Oxford Italian Graduate Seminar and Oxford–Reading Italian Seminar

    The following seminars will be held at 3 p.m. on Fridays. The 31 May lecture will take place in the Seminar Room, the Department of Italian Studies, the University of Reading; other seminars will take place in Room S.7, 47 Wellington Square.

    Convener: M.L. McLaughlin, MA, D.Phil., University Lecturer in Italian.

    PROFESSOR M.J.B. ALLEN, UCLA
    3 May: `Pico, Ficino, and the cultura hominis.'

    PROFESSOR T.J. CACHEY, Notre Dame
    10 May: `Voyage literature from Petrarch to Tasso.'

    DR R. MIDDLETON
    17 May: `The absence of che in fifteenth-century Italian.'

    DR L. PARISI, Oxford Brookes
    31 May: `Borgese e Manzoni.'

    MS D. HOLMES
    14 June: `The figure of the dictator in Silone's exile writings.'

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    MODERN HISTORY

    Creole histories and societies

    The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on the days shown in the Modern History Faculty. With the exception of the final meeting, to be held on Friday, 14 June, they will take place on Mondays.

    Conveners: M.A. Vaughan, MA (Ph.D. London), Rhodes Lecturer in Commonwealth Studies, and S. Trapido, MA (Ph.D. London), University Lecturer in the Government of New States.

    T. ROOPNARAINE, Cambridge
    6 May: `Diamonds and dislocation: Creole identity in the Guyanese hinterland.'

    R. BLACKBURN, New Left Review
    13 May: `The making of Creole societies in the Americas.'

    G. FREDRICKSON, Stanford
    20 May: `Reform and revolution in the American and South African freedom struggles.'

    J. PARKER, Keele
    27 May: `Mankraloi, merchants, and mulattoes: Carl Reindorf and the politics of race in early colonial Accra.'

    DR VAUGHAN
    3 June: `We are all Creoles now: cultural theory and Indian Ocean history.'

    PROFESSOR R.R. POSNER
    10 June: `Creoles and Creolisation from a linguist's point of view.'

    J. COMAROFF, Chicago
    14 June: `New persons, old subjects: of rights, righteousness, and the double self.' (Joint meeting with the World History Seminar)

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    World History Seminar: race, ethnicity, and states

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Fridays in the Danson Room, Trinity College. Undergraduates are welcome to attend.

    C. BAYLY, Cambridge
    3 May: `Patriotism and nationalism in India.'

    M. FRANCIS
    10 May: `Shifts in Victorian civilisation and their application among Canadian Indians.'

    B. SIMS, Cambridge
    17 May: `Ethnicity and the German nation 1780–1850.'

    R. MOTTAHEDEH, Harvard
    24 May: `Modern Islamist notions of pluralism.'

    R. DAVIES
    31 May: `Sorting out ethnic identities in Britain and Ireland in the Middle Ages.'

    I. OCHILTREE
    7 June: `Race, state, and violence: lynching in South Africa and the southern United States.'

    J. COMAROFF, Chicago
    14 June: `New persons, old subjects: of rights, righteousness, and the double self.'

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    ORIENTAL STUDIES

    Lectures in Korean Studies 1996

    PROFESSOR WON CHONG-KEUN, Department of International Trade and Business, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Seoul, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 23 May, in Lecture Room 1, the Oriental Institute.

    Convener: J.B. Lewis, MA, Korea Foundation Lecturer in Korean Studies.

     

    Subject: `Korean investment in the United Kingdom.'

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    Topics in Ancient Near Eastern Studies and Egyptology

    The following seminars will be held at 2.30 p.m. on Tuesdays in Lecture Room 1, the Oriental Institute.

    Conveners: M.A. Collier, MA, Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, All Souls College, S. Dalley, MA, Senior Research Fellow, Somerville College, and E. Robson (B.Sc. Warwick), Junior Lecturer in Akkadian.

    H. MCCALL
    14 May: `The beast that knows no boundaries: the sphinx from age to age.'

    D. ROWAN, British Museum
    28 May: to be announced.

     

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    PHYSICAL SCIENCES

    Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Mondays in the Main Lecture Theatre, the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory.

    Convener: M.L.H. Green, MA, Professor of Inorganic Chemistry.

    DR C.M. DOBSON
    6 May: `The structural basis of proteins (and metalloproteins) folding.'

    PROFESSOR G. DEMAZEAU, Bordeaux
    13 May: `The stabilisation of the highest oxidation states of transition metals: co-ordination chemistry in solid lattices.'

    PROFESSOR B.L. VALLEE, Harvard
    20 May: `Functional zinc binding motifs in enzymes and other proteins.'

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    Department of Materials: colloquia

    The following colloquia will be held at 2.15 p.m. on Thursdays in the Lecture Theatre, the Hume-Rothery Building.

    Details of the 13 June seminar will be announced later.

    Conveners: J.M. Sykes, MA, University Lecturer in Materials Science, G.A.D. Briggs, MA, University Lecturer in Metallurgy, and P.R. Wilshaw, MA, D.Phil., Research Fellow, Department of Materials.

    PROFESSOR YASUHIRO SHIRAKI, Tokyo
    2 May: `Formation and optical properties of SiGe/Si quantum structures.'

    PROFESSOR H. WEINBERG, California at Santa Barbara
    9 May: Scanning probe microscopy studies of semiconductor surfaces.' (Astor Lecture and Interdepartmental Condensed Matter Seminar)

    DR I. BOND, Taywood Aero Laminates
    16 May: `Wood composites: optimum fatigue-resistant materials for wind turbine blades.'

    PROFESSOR K. BOWMAN, Purdue
    23 May: `Textures and anisotropy in ceramics.'

    DR J. RYAN
    30 May: `V-groove quantum wires: self-organised growth, fast carrier dynamics, low threshold lasers.' (Interdepartmental Condensed Matter Seminar)

    PROFESSOR J. TITCHMARSH, Sheffield Hallam
    6 June: `Multivariate statistical analysis of EDX spectra.'

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    Materials Modelling Laboratory Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 1.15 p.m. on Fridays in Lecture Room 7, the Engineering and Technology Building.

    Conveners: D.G. Pettifor, MA, Isaac Wolfson Professor of Metallurgy, and A.P. Sutton, MA, M.Sc., University Lecturer in Materials Science.

    PROFESSOR J.R. WILLS, Cambridge
    3 May: `Variational methods for stress analysis in composites.'

    DR E. TSYMBAL
    10 May: `Modelling of the giant magneto-resistance effect.'

    PROFESSOR R. CHANTRELL, Keele
    17 May: `Micromagnetics of granular thin films.'

    DR P.A. MADDEN
    24 May: ` "Covalent" effects in "ionic" solids.'

    PROFESSOR M.F. ASHBY, Cambridge
    31 May: `Modelling for materials selection.'

    PROFESSOR K.J. JOHNSON, Cambridge
    7 June: `Continuum modelling of the interaction between adhesion and friction.'

    Discussion, led by DR J.R. OCKENDEN
    14 June: `Modelling of plasticity via dislocations.'

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    Solid-state seminars

    The following talks on the chemistry, structure, and properties of solids will be given at 11.45 a.m. on Tuesdays in the Abbot's Kitchen, the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory.

    Convener: A.M. Chippindale, MA, D.Phil., Supernumerary Junior Research Fellow, New College.

    DR P.A. ANDERSON, Birmingham
    7 May: `Metal clusters in zeolite cages.'

    PROFESSOR B. FOXMAN, Max Planck Institute, Mainz
    14 May: `Single-crystal reactions of metal carboxylates: a look at synthesis, structure, and physical change in the solid state.'

    DR E. YOUNG
    21 May: `Carrier flow mass spectrometry and UV laser ablation: new methods for microanalysis of oxygen isotope ratios in mineral materials.'

    DR K. MURDOCH
    28 May: `Laser spectroscopic studies of hole- burning, energy transfer, and multi-photon processes in rare- earth doped crystals.'

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    PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

    Pharmacology and anatomical neuropharmacology seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Lecture Theatre, the University Department of Pharmacology. DR D.A. TERRAR
    7 May: `A possible role for cyclic ADP-ribose in cardiac excitation–contraction coupling.'

    DR G. RIEDEL, York
    14 May: `Metabotropic glutamate receptors: possible roles in learning and synaptic plasticity.'

    PROFESSOR A.J. WILLIAMS, National Heart and Lung Institute, London
    21 May: `Single channel properties of ryanodine receptors.'

    PROFESSOR H. WATKINS
    28 May: `Cardiac hypertrophy resulting from mutations in contractile protein genes.'

    PROFESSOR W. SIEGHART, Vienna
    4 June: `Structure and pharmacology of GABAA receptor subtypes.'

    PROFESSOR A.S. MILTON, Aberdeen
    11 June: `Burn, Oxford for a start.'

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    Additional seminar

    DR R. WONG, Washington University, St Louis, USA, will hold a seminar at 12 noon on Wednesday, 22 May, in the Sherrington Room, the University Laboratory of Physiology.

    Convener: J.C. Ellory, MA, Reader in Human Physiology.

     

    Subject: `Retinal waves and the development of visual connections.'

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    Oxford Signalling Group

    The followig lectures will be given at a meeting of the Oxford Signalling Group to be held at 5.45 p.m. (reception from 5 p.m.) on Thursday, 6 June, in the Department of Pharmacology.

    J. FREARSON, Babraham Institute, Cambridge: `Tyrosine phosphatases in T-cell signalling.'

    A. CARMO, MRC Cellular Immunology Unit>: `CD53 regulation of tyrosine phosphatases.'

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    SOCIAL STUDIES

    J.A. BARNES, reporter and analyst, National Journal, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 9 May, in the Large Lecture Room, Nuffield College.

    Convener: B.E. Shafer, MA, Mellon Professor of American Government.

     

    Subject: `Picking presidents in 1996: from the invisible primary to the conservative crusades.'

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    The State of the Union: issues in contemporary British democracy

    The following meetings will be held at 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in St Antony's College.

    Conveners: A.H. Brown, MA, Professor of Politics, Dr Calum Macdonald, MP, and Ms Emma Nicholson, MP.

    MR J. BIFFEN, MP, and LORD PLANT, Master, St Catherine's College
    7 May: `Westminster: time for another Great Reform Act?' (Chair: Ms Nicholson)

    MR P. SHORE, MP, LORD KINGSLAND, and MR G. RADICE, MP
    14 May: `Europe and the UK: time to call a halt to ever-closer union?' (Chair: Lord Dahrendorf)

    MR P. MANDELSON, MP, AND MS S. MCDONALD, Channel 4
    21 May: `Are the mass media undermining British democracy?' (Chair: Dr Macdonald)

    DR J. HENDRON, MP, and MR R. MCCARTNEY, MP
    4 June: `Northern Ireland: what is to be done?' (Chair: Ms Nicholson)

    MR E. GARNIER, QC, MP, DR MACDONALD, and MS NICHOLSON
    11 June: `The state of the Union.' (Chair: Professor Brown)

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    MCDONNELL–PEW CENTRE FOR COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE AND THE MRC RESEARCH CENTRE IN BRAIN AND BEHAVIOUR

    Cognitive Neuroscience Seminars

    The following seminars will be given on Wednesday, 8 May, in Lecture Theatre C, the Department of Experimental Psychology.

    PROFESSOR NED BLOCK, MIT
    11.15 a.m.: `Reductionism and consciousness.'

    PROFESSOR S. CAREY, MIT
    4.30 p.m.: `Numerical representation in primates and human infants.'

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    COMPUTING LABORATORY

    Programming Research Group

    Special Departmental Seminars

    The following seminars will be held at 4.15 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Lecture Theatre, the Computing Laboratory.

    PROFESSOR L.G. VALIANT, Harvard
    7 May: `Cognitive computation.'

    DR A. EDALAT, Imperial College, London
    14 May: `Dynamical systems measures and fractals via domain theory.'

    PROFESSOR I.S. DUFF, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory
    28 May: `Basic linear algebra sub-programs (BLAS): their design and use in the efficient solution of dense and sparse equations on high performance computers and RISC work- stations.'

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    DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL STUDIES

    Affirming the comprehensive ideal

    The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on Wednesdays in the Department of Educational Studies. The meetings will be followed by a reception.

    15 May: Effective learning

    B. CLARKE, head teacher, Peers School, Oxford: `What comprehensive schools do better.'
    J. ABBOTT, Director, Education 2000: `Information technology and the comprehensive ideal.'

    29 May: The organisation of comprehensive education in the future

    TIM BRIGHOUSE, Chief Education Officer, Birmingham: `A local democratic framework.' PROFESSOR S. RANSON, Birmingham: `The comprehensive school within the learning society.'

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    ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE UNIT

    R. WILLIAMS, Science Unit, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, will give a seminar at 2.15 p.m. on Monday, 6 May, in the Main Lecture Theatre, the School of Geography.

    Subject: `Communicating the environment in Australia.'

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    PHONETICS LABORATORY

    The speaking brain: an interdisciplinary series of seminars

    The following talks will be held at 2 p.m. on Fridays in Room 207, the Centre for Linguistics and Philology, Walton Street, unless stated otherwise.

    Convener: J.S. Coleman, MA, University Lecturer in Phonetics.

    DR C. MUMMERY, Institute of Neurology, London
    24 May (location to be announced): `Imaging words in the brain—from perception to meaning.'

    DR G. GREEN, Newcastle
    31 May: `How does the auditory system analyse the acoustic features of speech?'

    PROFESSOR M. HALLE, MIT
    5 June, Room 2, Taylor Institution: `On words, phonemes, and features.'

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    Phonetics seminars

    DR R. OGDEN, York, will give a seminar at 2 p.m. on Friday, 3 May, in Room 207, the Centre for Linguistics and Philology.

    Convener: J.S. Coleman, MA, University Lecturer in Phonetics.

     

    Subject: `Ambisyllabicity, prosodic elements, and word joins in Finnish.'

    PROFESSOR M. HALLE, MIT, will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 4 June. The location of the seminar will be announced later.

    Convener: J.S. Coleman, MA, University Lecturer in Phonetics.

     

    Subject: `On the accentuation of words in Indo-European.'

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    QUEEN ELIZABETH HOUSE

    Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women

    Richards Lecture

    DR HENRIETTA L. MOORE, Reader in Anthropology and Director of the Gender Institute, London School of Economics, will deliver the Richards Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 15 May, in the Taylor Institution.

    The Richards Lecture is given in honour of Dr Audrey Richards (1899–1984), formerly President of the Royal Anthropological Institute and of the African Studies Association.

    Subject: `Symbolism, sex, and psychoanalysis.'

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    CENTRE FOR SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES

    Annual Lecture in Socio-Legal Studies

    PROFESSOR M. PRICE, Danciger Professor of Law, Benjamin N. Cardozo Law School, New York, will deliver the second Annual Lecture in Socio-Legal Studies at 5.30 p.m. on Friday, 10 May, in the Examination Schools. The meeting will be chaired by Mr Hugo Young.

    Subject: `Space, place, race, face: post-global media law.'

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    HARRIS MANCHESTER COLLEGE

    Idreos Lectures in Science and Religion

    Genetics and theology

    PROFESSOR R. COLE-TURNER, Professor of Theology, Memphis Theological Seminary, will deliver the Idreos Lectures at 5 p.m. on the following days in Harris Manchester College.
    Wed. 8 May: `The anxiety of change.'

    Thur. 9 May: `The humility of hope.'

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    KEBLE COLLEGE

    Eric Abbott Memorial Lecture

    DAVID HARE, playwright, will deliver the Eric Abbott Memorial Lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Friday, 10 May, in the chapel, Keble College.

    Subject: `When shall we live?'

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    LADY MARGARET HALL

    Philip Maurice Deneke Lecture 1996

    THE REVD DR JOHN COOK, President, the Henry Luce Foundation, will deliver the Deneke Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 7 May, in the Talbot Hall, Lady Margaret Hall.

    Subject: `Missing the point: a theology of culture in the work of Mondrian, Kandinsky, and Rothko.'

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    NUFFIELD COLLEGE

    PROFESSOR M. LEVI, Washington, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 15 May, in Nuffield College.

    Convener: Federico Varese, Nuffield College.

     

    Subject: `Analytical narrative—a rational choice approach to comparative and historical research.'

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    PEMBROKE COLLEGE

    Blackstone Lecture

    THE RT. HON. SIR RICHARD SCOTT, V.-C., will deliver the twentieth Blackstone Lecture at 11.30 a.m. on Saturday, 11 May, in the Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, the St Cross Building.

    Subject: `Ministerial accountability.'

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    ST ANTONY'S COLLEGE

    European Studies Centre

    Public Lecture

    PROFESSOR R. RÜRUP, Technical University of Berlin, will lecture at 8.30 p.m. on Monday, 13 May, in the Seminar Room, 70 Woodstock Road.

    Subject: `Jewish history in Berlin—Berlin in Jewish history, 1750–1933.'

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    Konrad Adenauer Memorial Lecture

    PROFESSOR A. BARING, Berlin, will deliver the Konrad Adenauer Memorial Lecture at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 22 May, in the New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College (access via the Lodge).

    Subject: `Adenauer's legacy.'

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    Latin American Centre

    Mexican workshop

    The following workshop will be held on Tuesday, 21 May, in the Latin American Centre.

    LIC. ENRIQUE MÁRQUEZ, El Colegio de México
    2.15 p.m.: `La crisis politica de Mexico.'

    PROFESSOR J.A. HELLMAN, York University, Canada
    3.15 p.m.: `Reconceptualising the Mexican political system.'

    PROFESSOR W. CORNELIUS, California
    5 p.m.: `The democratisation of local politics: a reconsideration of centre–periphery relations in the Mexican political system.'

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    Lecture

    JORGE CASTAÑEDA, UNAM, Mexico, will lecture at 11.15 a.m. on Friday, 17 May, in the Latin American Centre.

    Subject: `Political reform in Mexico.'

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    Seminar

    KEVIN MIDDLEBROOK, California, will give a seminar at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 11 June, in the Latin American Centre.

    Subject: `Turning points: labour and politics in contemporary Mexico.'

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    Middle East Centre

    Hamid Enayat Lecture

    PROFESSOR NASR ABU-ZAID, Leiden, will deliver the thirteenth Hamid Enayat Lecture at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 9 May, in the New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College.

    Subject: `Reformation of Islamic thought: some questions and some suggestions.'

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    WOLFSON COLLEGE

    Isaiah Berlin Lecture

    DR CONOR CRUISE O'BRIEN will deliver the annual Isaiah Berlin Lecture at 6 p.m. on Thursday, 16 May, in the hall, Wolfson College. The lecture is open to the public.

    Subject: `Edmund Burke and Thomas Jefferson: mutually antipathetic minds.'

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    REGENT'S PARK COLLEGE

    Centre for the Study of Christianity and Culture

    JACKIE HAWKINS, editor, The Way, will lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 14 May, in Regent's Park College.

    Subject: `Feminist visions—the Church of the future.'

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    FRIENDS OF THE PITT RIVERS MUSEUM

    Beatrice Blackwood Lecture

    HOWARD MORPHY, Curator of Anthropology, Pitt Rivers Museum, will deliver the Beatrice Blackwood Lecture at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, 8 May, in the Inorganic Chemistry Lecture Theatre. The lecture is open to the public.

    Enquiries may be made to Oxford 54281.

    Subject: `Hunting art.'

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    OXFORD ITALIAN ASSOCIATION

    PROFESSOR G.A. HOLMES, FBA, will lecture at 8 p.m. on Thursday, 2 May, in Lecture Room 1, St Anne's College.

    Subject: `Art and love in the High Renaissance.'

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    Advertisements

    Contents of this section:


    How to advertise in the Gazette

    Terms and conditions of acceptance of advertisements

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    Bodleian Shop

    When did you last visit the Bodleian shop? The best- selling items at the moment are: the Bodleian document bag in smart black canvas, the Relativity mouse mat, also in black, and a mug bearing Edward Lear's portrait of his cat, Foss. The shop is open Mon.–Fri., 9 a.m.–6 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–12.30 p.m. See the Bodleian's Shopping Arcade on the Internet: http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/arcade/.

     

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    Royal Shakespeare Company

    The RSC's Oxford office is organising return coach trips to Stratford evening performances. Each £25 ticket includes transport and a free upgrade to best stalls or circle seat. Coaches depart St Giles' at 5.45 p.m. for Macbethon Mon., 13 May, and for As You Like Iton Thur., 17 May. Tel. for bookings (RSC Oxford): Oxford 511434.

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    Tuition Offered

    St Edward's School: the school offers a rich academic, sporting, and cultural environment from which pupils can take their place in society with confidence and understanding. 570 pupils from 13 to 18; 75 per cent boarding, 25 per cent day; full co- educational from 1997. We are able to offer a number of bursaries to the value of 30 per cent of the fees to the children of University teachers and administrators. These are in addition to our Academic, Music, Art, and All-rounder Scholarships and will be awarded to bright children. St Edward's School is a Registered Charity and exists to provide high-quality education for boys and girls. For further details and a prospectus, contact Mrs Anne Brooks, St Edward's School, Oxford OX2 7NN. Tel.: Oxford 319200, fax: 319202.

    Piano lessons: children and adults. All grades. Beginners welcome. Experienced teacher. Miss P. Read, BA (Hons.), LRAM. (Jericho.) Tel.: Oxford 510904.

     

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    Services Offered

    Restoration and conservation of antique furniture by John Hulme. Twenty-five years' experience. All aspects of repair, carcass-work, veneer, inlay, polishing, stain removal, upholstery, cane/rush seating. Furniture-making and copying. Collection and delivery. 11a High Street, Chipping Norton. Tel./fax: 01608 641692.

    S.J.H. Carpentry: built-in wardrobes, bookcases, kitchens, doors and windows fitted; all general carpentry. Tel.: 01235 529990, mobile: 0378 949872.

    Jeanne Bliss, landscape designer. A two-hour initial visit: £30. Garden plans. A two-year phased programme. Garden design with colour slides. Tel.: Oxford 515379.

    Furniture: individual pieces and fitted furniture designed and made by Piers Roberts from workshops in Thame. From tables, chairs, cabinets, desks to fitted bedrooms, kitchens, studies. For the home, office, or garden. Tel.: 01844 218929 or 201325.

    Stella Campion, gold and silversmith; Goldsmiths' Crafts Council first prize winner 1994. I can design a unique hand- made piece for your anniversary, gifts, or awards. A friendly and efficient service. Gold work and repousséea speciality. Tel.: Oxford 790867.

    Frederick and Sudabeh Hine. Persian carpet dealers. We specialise in large and extra-large hand-knotted oriental carpets and runners and our list includes over 100 such pieces from Iran, Turkey, Afghanistan, and China; we can search other importers' stocks for hard-to-find items if necessary. We also keep quantities of traditional hand-made nomadic and village rugs and kelims at warehouse prices. Business hours: 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Mon.–Sat. Old Squash Court, 16 Linton Road, Oxford. Tel./fax: Oxford 59396.

    Finders Keepers à La Carte—a new concept: a selection of services available to tenants of Finders Keepers rental properties, designed to enhance comfort, convenience, and enjoyment whilst renting Finders Keepers' properties. Call us for your menu. Finders Keepers Ltd., 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE (tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 56993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk); also 27 St Clement's, Oxford OX4 1DJ (tel.: Oxford 200012, fax: 204844, e- mail: stclements@finders.co.uk).

    Gardens creatively designed, planted, and maintained. Portfolio available on request. Colin Broad. Tel.: Oxford 882711.

    Micro Instruments Ltd. are an Oxford-based company whose prime business is in the sales and servicing of optical microscopes and micromanipulation equipment. Holding agencies for Carl Zeiss, Leica, Nikon, Narashige, De Fonbrune, and other leading manufacturers, we have for the past 35 years been able to assist in the selection and supply of equipment for microscopy all over the UK and overseas. For further information and assistance please contact us. Tel.: 01993 883595, fax: 01993 883616.

    Professional IT solutions: KGH Computing Solutions offers expert advice on all PC requirements. Particular expertise in database design and implementation (Access, dBase, FoxPro); Local Area Networks (Novell, WFWG, Windows 95) and connection to TCP/IP (University Network); consultancy and specification for new PCs and upgrades. Contact Keith Hatton. Tel.: 01734 625707 (answerphone), or 0850 064387 (mobile); fax: 01734 625708; e-mail: 100415.314@compuserve.com.

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    Domestic Services

    Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work, competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning. For free estimates and friendly advice, call Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford 726983 or Abingdon 555533.

     

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    Situations Vacant

    Music teachers required to give general interest lectures to American study-abroad undergraduates over the period 18–29 July and 22 Aug.–2 Sept. The classes are from 5 p.m. to 6.30 p.m. Contact the Bursar, Worcester College, for further details. Tel.: Oxford (2)78335.

    Abingdon School—required from Sept. 1996: Biology teacher, full- or part-time, for one year. Also Religious Studies teacher, part-time, 8–9 hours p.w. for one year. Closing date: 10 May. Applications and names of two referees to the Acting Headmaster, Abingdon School, Abingdon, Oxon. OX14 1DE.

    Sale Support Assistant: 6-month contract, salary negotiable. New avenues for your library experience. B.H. Blackwell is an internationally renowned supplier of books and journals to customers across the globe. Our client base is expanding fast, mainly due to the success of our sales teams based out in the field. Now we seek a highly literate and organised person to work in our Periodicals Division and provide support for the American/Australian market area. This varied role will involve anything from preparing bids, proposals, and sales letters through to writing and co- ordinating the production of promotional material. Standardising parts of our tendering process will be another important responsibility and you will also track the success of various new sales initiatives such as the introduction of on-line products. A knowledge and understanding of journal publishing gained in a library environment is essential to succeed. You will also be computer- literate in both spreadsheets and word-processing (preferably Amipro) and will have the commercial acumen to compose complex bids and tenders. A knowledge of Spanish would be highly desirable. Closing date: 10 May. Send c.v., quoting ref. JO970, to Angela Williams, Personnel Dept. B.H. Blackwell Ltd., Hythe Bridge Street, Oxford OX1 2ET.

    Oxford Interactive Learning is a small newly-created department of Oxford University Press which has been set up to develop innovative learning materials to be published both electronically and by more traditional means. We need a researcher whose key responsibilities will include gathering and assessing information in the areas of education and technology and creating and maintaining an archive of relevant and current information on markets, players and technological innovations. Candidates will hold a university degree or equivalent, preferably in a subject involving the handling of research data and/or statistics. Experience of research methodologies and the ability to analyse data quantitatively and qualitatively are also required. You must be a competent user of word processing, database and spreadsheet software and be familiar with computer research tools. An enthusiasm for and interest in publishing and electronic means of distribution is highly desirable. This post is offered on an initial one year contract. Salary will be c.£16,000 per annum plus a range of supporting benefits. Please apply in writing with a full cv and current salary details, clearly stating which position you are interested in, to Charlotte Kerr, Personnel Officer. Oxford University Press, Walton Street, Oxford OX2 6DP.

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    Houses to Let

    Three-bedroom detached house with garage in secluded drive in North Oxford available Sept.–end of June, for visiting academics only. £925 p.c.m. inc. of council tax. Tel.: Oxford 722630.

    Old Marston: quaint 18th-c. 2-bedroom cottage, with pretty garden, light and sunny first-floor living-room, furnished and equipped. Available Aug. £625 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 200012.

    Semi-detached house in North Oxford, available from 1 Aug.: 3 bedrooms, living-, dining-room, kitchen with gardens (fish- pond) and garage; furnished and equipped to a high standard; auto- washing machine, satellite TV, etc.; cycle distance to city centre and easy access to schools and buses; very quiet area and close to Cutteslowe Park. Suit caring non-smoking academic visitors or family. Six months min. £650 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 510683 (after 7 p.m.), or (2)73146; e-mail: xie@robots.oxford.ac.uk.

    Brand-new 2-bedroom bungalow in quiet position in Cowley; fully furnished to a high specification, gas c.h., parking, small walled garden, close to local shops, bus routes, library, swimming-pool, etc. Long let preferred. Available from May. £650 p.c.m. Tel./fax: Oxford 361772.

    Furnished semi-detached house in Sandhills (3½ miles from centre, opposite Thornhill Park and Ride for easy access to Oxford); 1 double bedroom, 2 single bedrooms (1 unfurnished), bathroom with electric shower, living-room, dining-room, fitted kitchen; gas c.h.; fridge, cooker, microwave, telephone; off-street parking; garden. £475 p.c.m. Available immediately for 6 months–1 year. Tel.: Oxford (2)78172, e-mail: anita.browne@las.ox.ac.uk.

    Very peaceful, sunny, detached Cotswold stone cottage (Oxford 20 minutes) on ancient farm in Windrush valley. Wonderful views and walks. Furnished/unfurnished; 2 bedrooms, study, oil-fired c.h., insulation, log stove, shed, garage, tennis. Six months min. £600 p.c.m. Tel.: 01993 822152.

    17 June–8 July: 4-bed, 2-bath detached house in North Oxford cul-de-sac ending Cutteslowe Park; large lounge overlooking lovely garden; large kitchen; washing-machine, drier. Close to buses. Utilities inc. £200 p.w. Tel.: Oxford 515119.

    Headington area: house available, professionals only, from July for 6 months; all modern conveniences; off-road parking; very large garden overlooking golf course. £700 p.m. inc. of bills except telephone. Tel.: Oxford 69609.

    Furnished central North Oxford house to let from 1 Oct.; walk to colleges, train station and bus station; near Port Meadow; c.h., recently redecorated, 3 desks, filing cabinets, several large closets, secluded garden, garden furniture, terrace, 3 bedrooms, 1½ bathrooms, washing-machine, drier, telephone, linen, dishes, 2 bicycles. Suitable for visiting academics. £870 p.m. Tel. (J. Mackrell): Oxford 775567 (evenings), or (A. Gaston, Canada): 613 7451368, fax: 613 7450299, e-mail: gastont@nwrc.cws.doe.ca.

    Berkeley, California, USA, Sept. 1996–May 1997: house with garage and small yard, 10 minutes' drive from the University of California; 1½ blocks from bus line; 2 bedrooms, living-room, dining-room, 1 bath, washer-drier, porch; fully furnished in quiet, tree-lined neighourhood in walking distance of shops, stores, bookstores, restaurants. Weather moderate all year round. No pets or smokers. Rent $1,300 p.m. Lynn Rhodes, 726 Neilson Street, Berkeley\, CA 94707. Tel.: 510 525 2643.

    Modern 3-bedroom detached house, 2 miles city centre; kitchen/family room, dining-room, lounge; fully furnished; cat in residence; secluded garden, off-road parking. Available 22 July–4 Sept. Non-smokers. £250 p.w. Tel.: Oxford 744232.

    Pleasant furnished house in Risinghurst; 1 single and 2 double bedrooms, lounge-cum-diner, study, gas c.h., appliances; good decorative order; small secluded garden; off-street parking. £595 p.c.m. Dr Basu. Tel.: 01734 860630 or 01734 875123, ext. 4344.

    Only the best is good enough for Finders Keepers' clients and tenants. We aim for 100 per cent in everything we do; on call 24 hours a day, 365 days of the year to offer a caring, comprehensive service. We are an `Investor in People' and National Winners of the Best Letting and Management Company Award for the second consecutive year—call us to find out why the best is not the most expensive. Finders Keepers Ltd., 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE (tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 56993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk); also 27 St Clement's, Oxford OX4 1DJ (tel.: Oxford 200012, fax: 204844, e-mail: stclements@finders.co.uk).

    Osney: 3-bedroom terrace house in excellent condition 10 minutes' walk from central Oxford in secluded district by the river. Fully furnished and equipped, gas c.h., fitted kitchen, washing-machine, freezer, fridge, phone, TV, garden with patio and seats. Available July for 1 year. Only visiting academics considered. £700 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 862347.

    Headington, close to hospitals, shops, schools, and buses: 3-bedroom bungalow; 1 master bedroom with en-suite shower and w.c., 1 single bedroom, other bedroom/study, family bathroom, gas c.h., attached garage, telephone, security system, sun-lounge, modern fitted kitchen with automatic washing-machine and drier, waste disposal unit. From 1 Aug., £625 p.c.m. Fully furnished. Unsuitable for sharers. Tel.: O1993 881667 or 01993 704858.

    Premier offer a fine selection of property for long or short let. Similar properties always required. Competitive fees and the friendliest service in the city. Call Jan Bartlett at Premier, 207 Cowley Road. Tel.: Oxford 792299, fax: Oxford 798087.

    An Englishman's home is his castle—so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding area we may be able to help. QB management is one of Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and most helpful service in Oxford. Please telephone or fax us with details of your requirements and we will do whatever we can without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 64533, fax: 64777.

     

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    Flats to Let

    Wytham Abbey, Oxford: spacious 3-bedroom 2-bathroom apartment on 2 floors, part of listed manor house situated 3 miles from city centre and lying in 3,000 acres of countryside. Fully equipped and luxuriously appointed. Available from 1 Sept. Tel.: Oxford 247200, fax: 724762.

    Peaceful east Oxon. village, extremely spacious 2- bedroom flat, first floor of former vicarage, part furnished, suit quiet single professional person or couple. £550 p.c.m. inc. heating. Tel.: Oxford 200012.

    St Clement's, walking distance of city centre: 2- bedroom apartment on two floors with roof-top patio garden; spacious accommodation; no parking; available 1 June. £725 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 200012.

    Attractive modern luxury flat in prestigious area of North Oxford: double bedroom; c.h.; fully equipped (inc. TV); garage; easy walking distance to Science Area and town. Available now. £500 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 511825 (evenings and Sundays).

    Spacious well-equipped 2-bedroom modern furnished flat, with garage, etc., to let; North Oxford, near Cutteslowe Park and buses to city centre. Available from late June. £600 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 53100, e-mail: gittins@stats.ox.ac.uk.

    Central North Oxford: 2-bedroom apartment with 2 bathrooms, lounge, kitchen-diner, well placed for the academic and business centre; best suited to professionals and mature academics. £675 p.c.m. Available 20 May. Tel.: Oxford 516144.

    North Oxford : 1 Sept. 1996–30 June 1997, £520 p.m., fully-furnished ground-floor flat; dining-room/study, hall, living-room/study, bedroom, shower-room, kitchen; dish-washer, washing-drying machine, electric stove, etc.; c.h.; car-port; garden. Stone, 266 Moore Street, Princeton, NJ 08540.

    Central North Oxford, 10 minutes from city centre: delightful and very comfortable flat available in quiet, civilised family house: large double bedroom, single bedroom, drawing-room, kitchen, bathroom. Off-street parking, garden. Regret no children or pets. Tel.: Oxford 52400.

     

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    Summer Lets

    Islip: lovely spacious period cottage in beautiful village (conservation area), 5 miles from central Oxford, available Sat. 27 July–Sat. 31 Aug. In very quiet lane with easy access to city by bus, train, or car. Sitting-room, dining-hall, large conservatory/playroom, very large kitchen/dining-room (Aga, electric hob and oven, microwave, dish-washer, fridge, freezers, cooler), laundry-room (washing-machine and drying area), 4 bedrooms (sleeps 7), 2 bathrooms, dressing-room and shower-room; large and pretty garden with terrace; garage. £350 p.w. inc. some housekeeping. Tel.: Oxford 841759, fax: 371939.

    Spacious 4-bedroom house available for whole of Aug. with possibility of last week of July; within minutes of Summertown shopping area and short bus ride to city centre; attractively furnished; all modern service facilities; bath and shower-rooms, 2 reception rooms, very spacious kitchen-diner, conservatory, large garden. £300 p.w. all inc. Tel.: Oxford 511007 (evenings), (2)70490 (day); fax: (2)70757.

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    Accommodation Offered

    Large bedsit to let in east Oxford: c.h., own cooking facilities and fridge, shared bathroom, optional telephone line; central Oxford 10 minutes; suit non-smoking female with references. Available 1 June, £260 p.m. inc. Second bedsit also available. Tel.: Oxford 242075.

    Alternative medicine centre. Space available. Therapy and treatment rooms. Consulting and counselling rooms. Every facility. Very moderate rates. Central North Oxford. Tel. for further details: Oxford 511111 (9 a.m.–12 noon).

    Central North Oxford: Victorian house available July for 6 months plus; comfortable family accommodation; sleeps 6; £200 p.w. Also central North Oxford, studio flat; suit couple or single person; available shortly, for 6 months plus. £100 p.w. Apply: 123 South Avenue, Abingdon, Oxon.

     

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    Accommodation Sought

    Premier have a fine selection of short lets for overseas visitors. We also require substantial executive style detached furnished/unfurnished in any area, rent level £2,000 p.c.m., 2/3-year let, for US visiting lady. Call Jan Bartlett at Premier. Tel.: Oxford 792299.

    Visiting American academic seeks 1–2-bedroom furnished flat with kitchen facilities or house in the Oxford area, 1 July–15 Aug. Tel. (Dr Bruce Hindmarsh): Oxford 62637, or fax (Dr Frank A. James, USA): 407 875 0879.

    New Zealand professor and 3 teenage children seek 3- bedroom accommodation, 8 July–3 Aug. Oxford references available. Tel.: Oxford 221002.

    Last week in Aug.: parents (University of Glasgow), bride (Brasenose), and bridesmaids need accommodation in Oxford to prepare for wedding. Min. of 3 bedrooms required; meticulous care taken. Contact John or Stella Money. Tel.: 0141-334 3813 (h), or 0141-330 6719 (univ.).

    Visiting American professor with family (sister, brother-in-law) seeks to rent 2/3-bedroom furnished house/flat in Oxford (within walking/cycling distance of Queen's College), for 5 weeks, 24 June–29 July. Dr Albert Koppes. Tel.: 001 310 338 7301, fax: 001 310 338 1976, e-mail: akoppes@lmumail.lmu.edu.

    Academic Spanish family of 4 (daughters aged 5 and 7) require flat or house to rent 30 June–18 Aug. The family always spend their summers in Oxford and know it well. Tel.: Oxford 513788.

    Going abroad? Or just thinking of letting your property? QB Management are one of Oxford's foremost letting agents and property managers. We specialise in lettings to both academic and professional individuals and their families, and have a constant flow of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our services, or if you simply need some informal help and advice without obligation, telephone us. Tel.: Oxford 64533, or fax: 64777. n

     

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    Accommodation Sought to Rent or Exchange

    Sydney: family on UK sabbatical Jan.–June 1997 seeks house-swap or rent. We offer lovely detached house on quiet street; 2 large beds, 2 small beds/study, kitchen/family/dining area, double living-room, 2 baths; best appliances f & f; large garden; pool. Lovely inner harbourside suburb, close shops, schools, bus, ferry, 10 minutes drive/bus downtown. We require well-equipped 2–3-bed/study house in Oxford/area, close to shops, primary school, rail station. Douglas Tomkin. Fax: 00 612 330 8877, e-mail: douglas.tomkin@uts.edu.au.

    Visiting professor, wife and son seek quiet, three-bedroom house in North Oxford or surrounding area, Aug.–Jan. Off-street parking and washer-drier preferred. Non-smokers. No pets. British, now based in US. Looking to rent or exchange our well-appointed house in quiet neighbourhood 30 minutes north of New York City. Will take good care of your home. Tel: 1-(914) 365-6631, e-mail: kottie_christieblick@socsd.lhric.org.

    Jerusalem: academic family seeks house-swap or rent July/Aug., for 6–12 months; we offer lovely fully-equipped apartment to sleep 5; huge balconies; views; heating; close to shopping, transport, schools, health centre; 5 minutes' drive to university, 10 minutes to centre and sight-seeing. Car-swap possible. We seek 4-bedroom furnished accommodation, North Oxford, Headington, Kidlington, etc. Dr B. Czaczkes. Fax: 00 972 2 881341, e-mail: msbc @pluto.huji.ac.il.

     

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    Holiday Lets

    French Alps: beautiful family flat to rent; sleeps 6–8; 3 bedrooms, living-room with fireplace, kitchen, bathroom, separate w.c., fully equipped and furnished; every room accesses beautiful terrace (80 sq. yds.); telephone, TV, view, indoor garage; in Morzine-Avoriaz, 1 hour's drive to Geneva airport, 1/2-hour's drive to Thonon-Evian; all mountain sports available; tennis; Olympic swimming-pool; ice-rink. FF 4,500 p.w., May–Nov. Mrs Rovet. Tel.: 33 1 30.82.26.13, fax: 33 1 30.82.23.39; e-mail: jrovet@world- net.fr.

    Paris: edge of Latin Quarter, room in quiet comfortable flat, available May–end of Aug. FF 4,000 per fortnight, less if long-term. Mrs Rovet. Tel.: 33 1 30.82.26.13, fax: 33 1 30.82.23.39; e-mail: jrovet@world-net.fr.

    Provence—Mormoiron: period farmhouses to let on English-run vineyard. Beautiful countryside. Avignon 10 minutes. 2–8 people. Tel.: 33 90.61.88.78, fax: 33 90.61.98.05.

    Casa Quintino: old Tuscan farmhouse in peaceful countryside with distant views of ancient Etruscan town of Volterra; 20 minutes from San Gimignano, 1 hour Florence, Siena, Pisa; 3 bedrooms (sleeps 7 comfortably); fully equipped kitchen. Available from 15 June, £250–£450 p.w. Tel.: Oxford 727394 (evenings).

    Holiday family accommodation, central North Oxford: charming Victorian house, sleeps 6, £280 p.w. Also studio flat for couple, £170 p.w. Both residences centrally heated, washer/driers, microwaves plus conventional cookers, fridge/freezers, colour TVs, linen; telephones optional. Tel.: Oxford 59911.

    Italy, outskirts Verona, charming ground-floor flat in fine 15th-c. villa: own entrance, large bed-sitting room, ditto kitchen dining room, secure parking, use of garden area. £250 p.w. inc. all services and weekly cleaning. Vacancies June, July, Aug. Tel. (Moore): 01844 238247, or, in Verona, Contessa Da Sacco: 00 45 526 499.

    Peleponnese: unique, recently reconstructed house in the Byzantine Castro of Monemvasia; sleeps 4 (1 double, 2 singles), fully equipped kitchen and bathroom, verandah with views of Cape Malea; under-floor c.h.; open fire. £400 p.w.. Adjacent apartment sleeps 4 also available, £300 p.w. For brochure, tel.: 0181-977 3490 (evenings), or send postcard to: Kate Rendall, Monemvasia 23070, Lakonia, Greece.

    Czech Republic, for a holiday full of pleasant surprises; fairy-tale woodland cottage available May–Oct.; 30 minutes Prague; sleeps 4+; wood fires, lake, views, walks, mushrooms, castles, sunshine; abundant food and wine; low prices; English- speaking owner. From £225 p.w. Tel.: 0171-373 0667.

    Villa with garden and wonderful views, 40 minutes from Florence; all mod. cons.; swimming and sports facilities nearby; sleeps 8; available late July–mid-Sept. £325 p.w. Lukes. Tel. (Italy): 00 39 55 8428317.

    House for Sale

    Portland Road, Summertown: attractive 1930s family house with south-facing garden, in very popular area close to excellent schools, bus route to town, and local shops; large sitting- room, dining-room, big kitchen, 4 bedrooms with built-in wardrobes, bathroom, study in large insulated wooden cabin in garden with own radiator, phone, etc.; period features; gas c.h.; also workshop in garden which is well planted, with a mature walnut tree, pond, flower-beds, lawn, terrace. Possibility of extension. £220,000. Tel.: Oxford 54058, or 226490 (day).

     

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Grants and Research Funding

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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LADY ALLEN SCHOLARSHIP

The trustees of the late Lady Consuelo Maria Allen wish to offer a Lady Allen Scholarship for research study in Spain, tenable for one year with effect from 1 October 1996.

The Lady Allen Scholarship is open to students who are working for a higher degree of the University of Oxford in the field of Spanish history, literature, languages, music, and other cultural aspects of Spain. Because of Lady Allen's interest in promoting cultural understanding between Spain and the United Kingdom, preference may be given to candidates who are citizens of the United Kingdom.

The trustees will offer an award towards the cost of either research study in Spain or a taught course at a Spanish university in the field described above. The award will be tenable for either one academic year or one twelve-month period, as appropriate, and will be in the region of £5,000, the precise level to be set at the discretion of the trustees, depending on the estimated costs.

A committee comprising representatives from the Modern History Board, the Modern Languages Board, and other boards as appropriate, will draw up a short-list of candidates on the basis of their academic merit for the consideration of the trustees. The trustees will award the scholarship primarily on the basis of academic merit, but if all other things are equal, they may give preference to a candidate from Exeter College.

Application is by a form available from the Administrator, Faculty of Modern History, Broad Street (telephone: (2)77253), together with a proposal, not exceeding four sides of A4 paper, setting the academic context of the work which the applicant wishes to undertake in Spain and outlining what he or she would hope to achieve during tenure of the Allen Scholarship. The deadline for applications, which should be addressed to the Administrator of the Modern History Faculty, is 7 June. Applicants are asked to arrange for two references, one of which must be from their supervisor, to be received by the Administrator by the same date.

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SIR JOHN HICKS FUND

The Committee for the Sir John Hicks Fund invites applications from members of the University for grants towards the costs of research in economic history. Applications will be considered from undergraduates, graduate students, and members of academic staff, and may related to research into the economic history of any period or country.

Applicants should (a) provide sufficient information about the general nature of their research to establish that it falls within the field of economic history; and (b) specify the precise nature and cost of the expenditure for which a grant is requested. They should also give the name of one referee who might be consulted by the committee.

It is intended by the committee that grants should normally be made for sums of up to £250, though this may on occasion be exceeded. Retrospective grants will be made only in exceptional circumstances.

The committee will consider applications twice in each year. The closing date for the first round is Monday of the third week of Hilary Term, and for the second round Monday of the third week of Trinity Term. Applications should be sent to Mrs E.A. Macallister, Secretary of the Committee for the Sir John Hicks Fund, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD.

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Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties and committees will come into effect on 17 May.

1 Board of the Faculty of Anthropology and Geography and Committee for Archaeology

(a) Honour Moderations in Archaeology and Anthropology

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

1 In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 28, l. 17, delete `Case studies in archaeological methods' and substitute `The nature of archaeological enquiry'.

2 Ibid., l. 22, after `available to' insert `the chairman of'.

3 Ibid., l. 27, after `of study.' insert `These notebooks must bear the candidate's examination number but not the candidate's name, which must be concealed.'

4 Ibid., l. 28, after `course of practical work' insert `to the satisfaction of the examiners'.

(b) Honour School of Archaeology and Anthropology

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

1 In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 140, l. 3, after `available to' insert `the chairman of the'.

2 Ibid., l. 9, after `of study.' insert `These notebooks must bear the candidate's examination number but not the candidate's name, which must be concealed.'

3 Ibid., l. 10, after `course of practical work' insert `to the satisfaction of the examiners'.

4 Ibid., p. 142, l. 10, delete `with the thesis' and substitute `at the same time that the thesis is submitted, but in a separate sealed envelope addressed to the chairman of the examiners.'

5 Ibid., p. 140, delete l. 51.

6 Ibid., p. 141, delete l. 4.

7 Ibid., renumber existing items [f]–[g] under Schedule A as items [e]–[f] and existing items [i]–[l] as items [g]–[j].

8 Ibid., l. 12, delete `The spread of farming in Africa' and substitute `Farming and early states in Sub-Saharan Africa'.

9 Ibid., l. 25, after `the candidate.' insert `All copies must bear the candidate's examination number but not his/her name.'

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2 Board of the Faculty of Biological Sciences

(a) Honour School of Natural Science ([from 1 October 1996: Molecular and Cellular] Biochemistry): Part I

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

1 In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 439, l. 33, after `own work.' insert: `This certificate must be placed in a sealed envelope addressed to the Chairman of Examiners and submitted with the notebooks. Each notebook, and the envelope containing the certificate, must be clearly labelled with the candidate's number. The name and college of the candidate must not appear on any of the notebooks or on the envelope.'

2 Ibid., ll. 36–8, delete from `The examiners shall' to `proceed to Part II.' and substitute:

`In assessing the record of practical work and exercises in data handling, the examiners shall have regard to the attendance record of the candidates at each and every class provided, and to the marks recorded for each and every class provided. Candidates whose overall performance in either the written papers or in practical work and data handling is judged by the examiners to be insufficient to warrant the award of Honours may either be deemed to have failed the examination, or may, at the discretion of the examiners, be awarded a Pass degree. Candidates in either category will not be allowed to proceed to Part II.'

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(b) Honour School of Natural Science ([from 1 October 1996: Molecular and Cellular] Biochemistry): Part II

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

1 In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 440, l. 20, after `the first draft.' insert: `This statement must be submitted at the same time as the project in a sealed envelope addressed to the Chairman of Examiners. Each project, and the envelope containing the statement, must be clearly labelled with the candidate's number. The name and college of the candidate must not appear on the project or on the envelope.'

2 Ibid., delete from `It shall be the duty' in l. 49, p. 440, to l. 2, p. 441, and substitute:

`It shall be the duty of the Secretary of the Sub-faculty to submit this proposal to the Chairman of the Sub-faculty and to the Chairman of Examiners for approval. The Chairman of the Sub-faculty and the Chairman of the Examiners shall determine the option (if any) in which the proposed essay falls. In the event of the two Chairmen not giving their joint approval, the candidate shall write the essay on a topic from the list published by the Examiners. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of the Sub-faculty to communicate the outcome of the submission to the candidate, stating the option in which the essay is to be written, not later than 12 noon on Monday of the third week of Hilary Term in the academic year in which the examination is to be taken.'

3 Ibid., p. 441, after l. 7, insert: `The essay (two copies) must be legibly typed on one side only of A4 paper, held firmly in a stiff cover, and submitted by Friday of the fifth week of the Full Term in which the examination is held, addressed "The Clerk of the Schools, Oxford, for the Chairman of the Examiners in the Final Honour School of Natural Science (Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry Part II)".'

4 Ibid., l. 12, after `as the essay.' insert: `This certificate must be submitted at the same time as the essay in a sealed envelope addressed to the Chairman of Examiners. Each essay, and the envelope containing the certificate, must be clearly labelled with the candidate's number. The name and college of the candidate must not appear on the essay or on the envelope.'

5 Ibid., delete ll. 19–23.

6 Ibid., p. 440, l. 40, before `topic' insert: `subject that falls within a'.

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3 Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine

Second Examination for the Degree of BM

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 872, l. 27, delete `and Rheumatology'.

2 Ibid., l. 37, delete `options' and substitute `special study subjects'.

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4 Board of the Faculty of English Language and Literature

(a) Moderations in English Language and Literature

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 43, delete ll. 9–12, and substitute: `Candidates will be expected to answer questions on such topics as: the nature of `literary' language, of literary form; textuality and intertextuality; theories of the novel; problems of interpretation; the production and reception of literary texts; the relation of literature to gender, to history, to ideology, to psychoanalysis; theories of culture, of cultural difference.'

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(b) Honour School of English Language and Literature

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

1 In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 216, ll. 10–11, delete `The thesis . . . own work,' and substitute: `A certificate signed by the candidate to the effect that the thesis is the candidate's own work, placed in a sealed envelope bearing the candidate's examination number and addressed to the Chairman of Examiners, must be presented together with the thesis.'

2 Ibid., p. 217, ll. 19–20, delete `Each essay . . . work.' and substitute: `A certificate signed by the candidate to the effect that each essay is the candidate's own work, placed in a sealed envelope bearing the candidate's examination number and addressed to the Chairman of Examiners, must be presented together with each essay.'

3 Ibid., delete from l. 34 on p. 215 to l. 4 on p. 216 and substitute:

`an essay of about 6,000 words on any subject which forms part of, or is connected with, the subjects of the course being offered, provided that the candidate has obtained approval of the subject from the Deputy Chairman of the Board of the Faculty of English Language and Literature by the end of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination[1] ; or (b) any essay or part of an essay which he has already sent in, or proposes to send in, for any University essay prize, the whole not exceeding about 6,000 words, provided that its subject is, in the opinion of the Deputy Chairman of the Board, relevant to the study of the English language or of'.

4 Ibid., p. 217, after l. 26 insert:

`(g) Essays deemed to be of excessive length may be penalised.'

5 Ibid., p. 222 (as modified by change in regulations 1, Para 3, in Gazette , 13 July 1995, p. 1395), after `(w) Language, Film and the Media' insert `[The numbers entering for this paper may be restricted.]'.

6 Ibid., in the final line of (i)(a), replace `at' with `from' and at the end of the line insert `by Monday of the fifth week in the Trinity Term preceding that in which it will be examined.

5 Boards of the Faculties of English Language and Literature and Modern History

(a) Honour School of Modern History and English

(i) With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 401, ll. 33–4, delete `This certificate . . . thesis.' and substitute: `This certificate, placed in a sealed envelope bearing the candidate's examination number and addressed to the Chairman of Examiners, must be presented together with the thesis.'

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

1 In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 399, delete ll. 18–45 and insert: `Each candidate shall offer seven papers as set out below. Papers will be of three hours' duration, except where otherwise indicated. The subjects of the examination in the Honour School shall be: (i) and (ii) Two compulsory interdisciplinary papers, chosen from the list below (candidates should note that this list will vary from time to time, according to the availability of teaching resources, but will always cover a range of periods):

(a) Literature and Religion in Early Modern England

(b) Mapping New Territories, c.1770–1830

(c) The Dangerous Flood of History: Literature and Politics in the 1930s.

Further details of the interdisciplinary papers will be available from the English Faculty Office and Modern History Faculty Office.

(iii) A period of British History not taken in Honour Moderations.

(iv) and (v) Two subjects from Course One or Course Two of the Honour School of English Language and Literature [the English Board may wish to specify at least one compulsory paper].

(vi) and (vii) Either two papers from the Honour School of Modern History, which shall consist of a Special Subject, or some combination of a Further Subject, General History Period, or additional British History period (though with only one Further Subject allowed)

or one additional subject from the Honour School of English Language and Literature, plus one subject from the Honour School of Modern History which shall be either a Further Subject, a General History period or an additional British History period.

The rules for extended essays shall follow those of the parent Schools, except that candidates may substitute an extended essay for one of the interdisciplinary papers provided that they are not offering more than one extended essay elsewhere in the syllabus. When an extended essay is to be substituted for an interdisciplinary paper, the candidate should write, through the Senior Tutor of his or her college or society, to request the approval of the Chairman of the Examiners for the Joint School of Modern History and English for the proposed essay title, not later than the Friday of the second week of the Michaelmas Full Term immediately preceding the examination. Notification of whether or not approval is forthcoming will be given by the Friday of Week Four of that term. Essays on approved interdisciplinary titles, which should be of up to 6,000 words, should be submitted to the Chairman of the Examiners for the Joint School of Modern History and English at the Examination Schools, Oxford, by the Friday of Eighth Week of the Hilary Full Term preceding the examination.

A thesis may be offered as under the existing regulations of the Modern History syllabus, provided that no more than one thesis can be submitted if extended essays are offered.'

2 Ibid., delete pp. 400–1.

3 Ibid., p. 402, delete ll. 1–7.

(b) Pass School of Modern History and English

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 402, delete ll. 15–25 and insert:

`(a) One of the interdisciplinary papers as prescribed for the Honour School of Modern History and English (candidates should note that this list will vary from time to time, according to the availability of teaching resources; details of the interdisciplinary papers available in any given year may be obtained from the English Faculty Office and Modern History Faculty Office);

(b) Two papers as prescribed for the Honour School of Modern History: (i) one period paper on the History of the British Isles not taken in the First Public Examination; and (ii) one paper taken from the list of Further Subjects (candidates should note that not all Further Subjects will be available to all candidates in every year). A thesis may be offered in accordance with the detailed regulations for the Honour School of Modern History in lieu of either (i) or (ii);

(c) Two papers as prescribed for the Honour School of English Language and Literature.'

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6 Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores

(a) Honour Moderations in Classics

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

1 In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 28, l. 39, delete `Virgil' and substitute `Virgil'.

2 Ibid., p. 31, l. 3, delete `Philoetetes' and substitute `Philoctetes'.

3 Ibid., p. 40, delete l. 23 and substitute: `Augustine: Confessions I–IV, Clark (Cambridge University Press)'.

(b) Honour School of Literae Humaniores

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees , 1995, delete from p. 282, l. 45 to p. 283, l. 6 and substitute:

`(a) Thucydides and Rhetoric with special reference to the following texts. Compulsory passages for translation and comment will be set from those in list (a).

(alpha) Thucydides I. 20–3, 31–44, 66–88, 139–46; II. 34–65; V. 86–116.
Herodotus VII. 8–19.
Gorgias, Helen .
Antiphon, Tetralogies .
Euripides, Supplices 399–597, 837–917.

(beta) Thucydides III. 1–85.
Herodotus I. 26–33, VII. 44–55.
Gorgias, Palamedes, Epitaphios (frag. 5–6).
Antiphon, De Caede Herodis .
Plato, Menexenus .
Andocides, de Mysteriis .
Lysias 2.
Euripides, Supplices 1–398, 598–836, 918–end.

7 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and Modern Languages Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

(As for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores (see 6 (b) above).)

8 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and English Language and Literature

Honour School of Classics and English

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)]

(As for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores (see 6 (b) above).)

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9 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and Modern History

Honour School of Ancient and Modern History

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

1 In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 136, ll. 23–4, delete `will be set specifically for this honour school' and substitute `is a modified version of that set for the Honour School of Modern History'.

2 Ibid., l. 27, delete `the first section, and in each of their answers to that section' and substitute `each section, and in their answers in the first section'.

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10 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and Oriental Studies

Regulations for Philosophy in some of the Honour Schools

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 481, l. 28, after `Mathematics and Philosophy' insert `Oriental Studies'.

2 Ibid., p. 487, l. 32, delete `132, and 133' and substitute `and 132 may be offered only by candidates in Literae Humaniores and Oriental Studies , and subject 133'.

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11 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and Theology

Honour School of Philosophy and Theology

(i) With immediate effect (for first examination in 1996)

As for the Honour School of Theology (see 21 (a) (i) below).

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

As for the Honour School of Theology (see 21 (a) (ii) below).

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(iii) With effect from 1 October 1996 for one year (for first examination in 1997 only)

As for the Honour School of Theology (see 21 (a) (iii) below).

(iv) With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

As for the Honour School of Theology (see 21 (a) (iv) below).

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12 Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences

Honour Moderations in Mathematics and Computation

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

1 In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 56, after l. 12 insert: `Practical weight: one-sixth. Paper of 2 hours 30 minutes.'

2 Ibid., after l. 26 insert: `Paper of 3 hours.'

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13 Board of the Faculties of Mathematical and Physical Sciences

(a) Honour School of Engineering and Computing Science

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

1 In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 188, delete ll. 13–20 and substitute:

`Candidates will be required to take three papers as follows:

at least one of:

IE1, Information Engineering I
IE2, Information Engineering II

plus one or two papers chosen from a selection of those available for Section II of the Honour School of Computation. Specification of which Section II papers may be taken will be published in the University Gazette by the Standing Committee for Engineering and Computing Science two years in advance of the relevant examination. The subjects of papers IE1 and IE2 are specified in the appended schedule. The subjects of Section II shall be published in the University Gazette .

Performance in papers from Section II of the Honour School of Computation will be taken to include performance both in the written paper and any practical work associated with the papers. The examiners will consider all papers as having equal weight. Any practical work associated with papers from Section II of the Honour School of Computation must'.

2 Ibid., p. 188, l. 44, delete `and IE3'.

3 Ibid., delete from p. 186, l. 33, to p. 188, l. 11 and substitute:

`Candidates will be required to take seven written papers as follows: Papers A1, A2, A3, and B4 in the Honour School of Engineering Science, Papers ECS1 and ECS2 as specified in the appended schedule,

one of the following:

Paper B3 in the Honour School of Engineering Science,
or ,
Paper ECS3, or ECS4, or ECS5, or ECS6 as specified in the appended schedule.

In addition the following, as specified in the appended schedule, shall each be considered by the Examiners as equivalent to one written paper:
ECS7 Practical work,
ECS8 Engineering and Society coursework,
ECS9 Project report.

In the assessment of Paper ECS7 the examiners shall taken into consideration failure of a candidate to complete practical work associated with the Engineering papers to a level prescribed from time to time by the Sub-faculty of Engineering Science. Failure to complete coursework modules to a satisfactory standard will also be taken into account, except that exemption from the requirement to complete coursework modules shall be granted to a candidate who, in Trinity Term of the second year, completes an approved exchange scheme. The Chairman of the Sub-faculty of Engineering Science shall provide a list, by the end of the sixth week of the Trinity Term in the year of the Part I examination, showing the extent to which each candidate has satisfied these requirements.

By noon on Friday of the ninth week of Trinity Term in the year preceding the Part I examination, each candidate shall submit a portfolio for Engineering and Society coursework (ECS8) containing one essay or report on each of three approved topics as specified in the regulations of the Honour School of Engineering Science.

By noon on Friday of the fourth work of Trinity Term in the year of the Part I examination, candidates shall submit the following:

Reports of practical exercises associated with Paper ECS1. For a report to be considered by the examiners, it must be signed by a demonstrator and must be accompanied by a statement that it is the candidate's own work except where otherwise stated.

The project report ECS9.

Work submitted for ECS1, ECS8, and ECS9 shall be addressed to the Chairman of Examiners, Honour School of Engineering and Computing Science, c/o Clerk of the Examination Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford.

Reports of practical exercises associated with papers ECS2, ECS3, ECS4, ECS5, ECS6 shall be submitted as specified in the regulations for the examination from which they are drawn.

Candidates may resubmit practical work and work previously submitted for ECS7, ECS8, ECS9. It must be physically presented at the time and in the manner prescribed for current submission. No such work will be accepted if it has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another honour school or degree of this University, or for a degree of any other institution.

Candidates may be examined viva voce at the examiners' discretion.

Schedule

ECS1 Structures, Algorithms, and Numerical Computation

Practical weight: one-sixth. Paper of 2 hours 30 minutes.

Structures and Algorithms: Elementary propositional and predicate calculus. Mathematical induction. Discrete mathematics: basic properties of sets, relations and functions, sequences, bags, trees. Examples in specifying information systems.

Orders of growth: the big-O notation and its basic properties, lower and upper bounds, simple recurrence relations. Complexity of standard algorithms for matrix multiplication, solution of linear equations. Searching algorithms: bisection, Fibonacci search. Sorting algorithms in memory and on backing store, Dynamic programming. The fast Fourier transform and simple applications.

Numerical Computation:

Discretisation of partial differential equations by finite difference, finite volume, and finite element methods; stability, mesh adaption, error estimates, and implementation issues. Iterative methods; conjugate gradient and multi-grid. Solution of non-linear equations; regions of convergence, bifurcation.

ECS2 Imperative Programming (Honour School of Computation Paper I.1)

ECS3 Programming Language Principles (Honour School of Computation Paper I.2)

ECS4 Concurrency and Distributed Systems (Honour School of Computation Paper I.3)

ECS5 Architecture (Honour School of Computation Paper I.4)

ECS6 Functional Programming and Algorithm Design (Honour Moderations in Mathematics and Computation Paper A7)

ECS7 Practical work associated with Engineering papers A1, A2, A3 together with coursework modules as specified from time to time by the Standing Committee for Engineering and Computing Science

ECS8 Engineering and Society coursework (Honour School of Engineering Science Part I, Paper A7)

ECS9 Project Report A report on a project carried out under supervision as approved by the Standing Committee for the Honour School of Engineering and Computing Science. The report must not exceed 6,000 words plus twenty-five pages of diagrams, listings, photographs, etc.'

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(b) Pass School of Engineering and Computing Science

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first Part I examination in 1998 and first Part II examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 189, delete ll. 10–11 and substitute: `(i)–(vi) Papers A1, A2, A3, B4, ECS1, ECS2 provided that at least one of papers ECS1 and ECS2 is included;

(vii) one of the papers B3, ECS3, ECS4, ECS5, ECS6;

(viii) Paper ECS9, the Project report.'

2 Ibid., p. 198, l. 16, after `coursework' insert `(Papers ECS7 and ECS8)'.

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14 Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages

(a) Preliminary Examination in Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 101, delete l. 50 `Camoes, Auto de Filodemo'.

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(b) Honour School of Modern Languages

(i) With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

1 In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 416, l. 16, delete `14th' and substitute `17th'.

2 Ibid., p. 426, l. 1, delete `under the regulations for that honour school'.

(ii) With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

1 In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 415, l. 42, delete `The colloquial koine' and substitute `The literary vernacular'.

2 Ibid., p. 419, delete ll. 29–34 and substitute:

`Candidates may choose one of either A or B: [2] A: Byzantine texts:

Paul the Silentiary, Ekphrasis of Haghia Sophia (ed. Friedlander).
Christ and Paranikas, Anthologia graeca carminum Christianorum , pp. 147–236 and 247–52.
The Life of St Andreas Salos (ed. L. Ryden).
Michael Psellos, Chronographia , bk. VI (ed. S. Impellizzeri, vol. 1, pp. 246–320, and vol. 2, pp. 8–152).

B. Medieval vernacular texts:

Digenis Akritis: the Grottaferrata and Escorial Versions (ed. E.M. Jeffreys).
Le Roman de Libistros et Rhodamné (ed. J.A. Lambert). Ptochoprodromos (ed. H. Eideneier).' 3 Ibid., p. 422, delete ll. 18–20 and substitute:

`(1) Digenis Akritis: the Grottaferrata and Escorial Versions (ed. E.M. Jeffreys).

(2) The vernacular verse romances.'

4 Ibid., p. 425, l. 50 et seq., as amended, delete `(as a paper but not as an Extended Essay.)'

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15 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and English Language and Literature

(a) Preliminary Examination in English and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

As for the Preliminary Examination in Modern Languages (see 14 (a) above).

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(b) Honour School of English and Modern Languages

(i) With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 14 (b) (i) above).

(ii) With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 14 (b) (ii) above).

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16 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Literae Humaniores

(a) Preliminary Examination in Philosophy and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

As for the Preliminary Examination in Modern Languages (see 14 (a) above).

(b) Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages

(c) Honour School of Philosophy and Modern Languages

(i) With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 14 (b) (i) above).

(ii) With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 14 (b) (ii) above).

(d) Honour School of Classics and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 161, l. 49, delete `into' and substitute `from'.

2 Ibid., p. 162, l. 33, align `(b)' with `(a)' in l. 32.

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17 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Modern History

(a) Preliminary Examination in Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

As for the Preliminary Examination in Modern Languages (see 14 (a) above).

(b) Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

(i) With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

1 As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 14 (b) (i) above).

2 In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 405, delete ll. 32–5 and substitute:

`One of the Honour School of Modern Languages, Papers IV, V, IX, X, XI.'

3 Ibid., p. 406, l. 21, delete `in the language'.

(ii) With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 14 (b) (ii) above).

18 Boards of the Faculties of Medieval and Modern Languages and Oriental Studies

(a) Preliminary Examination in European and Middle Eastern Languages

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

As for the Preliminary Examination in Modern Languages (see 14 (a) above).

(b) Honour School of European and Middle Eastern Languages

(i) With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 14 (b) (i) above).

(ii) With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

As for the Honour School of Modern Languages (see 14 (b) (ii) above).

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19 Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies

Honour School of Oriental Studies: Egyptology

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 464, delete ll. 46–9 and p. 465, delete ll. 1–2 and substitute:

`2–4 Prepared texts in Old, Middle, and Late Egyptian (lists of texts are available from the Oriental Institute).

Four passages, one in Old Egyptian, two in Middle Egyptian, and one in Late Egyptian, will be set for examination by essay. Candidates must present an essay on one passage. Essays should be typed and provided with proper scholarly apparatus. The passages will be assigned in the Oriental Institute at 10 a.m. on Monday of First Week in Full Term in the term in which the final examination is to be offered, and must be handed in to the Clerk of the Examination Schools no later than 12 noon on Monday of Second Week. Essays should not exceed 2,500 words in length.

Two thirds of the material in the lists of prescribed texts will be selected for examination in papers 2–3. Candidates will be informed of the selection to be examined on Friday of Eighth Week of the Hilary Term preceding the Final examination. The passages to be examined by essay will be drawn from the third of the list of prescribed texts which is not to be examined in papers 2–3.'

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20 Board of the Faculty of Physical Sciences

(a) Honour School of Engineering Science

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first Part I examination in Trinity Term 1998, and first Part II examination in Trinity Term 1999)

In Examination Decrees , 1995, delete from p. 179, l. 27 to p. 184, l. 3 and substitute:

`(ii) Regulations

Part I

Candidates will be required to take seven written papers, each of three hours, as follows: the five papers A1 to A5 in group A together with two papers taken from B1 to B5 in group B. In addition, they will be required to take three coursework subjects A6 to A8, each to be considered by the examiners as equivalent to one written paper.

Group A: Core course

Paper A1. Mathematical Methods.
Paper A2. Electricity and Electronics.
Paper A3. Control, Dynamics, and Computers.
Paper A4. Structures and Materials.
Paper A5. Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.
Paper A6. Engineering Practical Work.
Paper A7. Engineering and Society Coursework.
Paper A8. Part I Design Project.

Group B: Basic Options

Paper B1. Mechanical Engineering.
Paper B2. Civil Engineering.
Paper B3. Electrical Engineering.
Paper B4. Information Engineering.
Paper B5. Chemical Engineering.

Candidates shall be required to submit a portfolio for Engineering and Society coursework (A7) containing one essay or report on each approved topic specified by the Sub-faculty of Engineering Science. Written work shall be typed and each essay or report shall have not more than 2,000 words. Approved topics shall be (a) a management case study AND (b) a safety assessment AND (c) EITHER "the engineering profession" or an alternative approved topic. A list of alternative approved topics shall be published in the Gazette by the Chairman of the Sub-faculty not later than Friday of the first week of Hilary Full Term in the academic year preceding that in which the written examination is to be taken. The portfolio of work shall be submitted to the Chairman of Examiners, Honour School of Engineering Science, c/o Clerk of Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on Friday of the ninth week of the Trinity Full Term of the year preceding the written examinations. The material must be the candidate's own work and the candidate shall sign and present with the portfolio a detachable certificate to this effect.

Essays or reports previously submitted for the Honour School of Engineering Science may be resubmitted. No essay or report will be accepted if it has already been submitted wholly or substantially for another honour school or degree of this University, or for a degree at any other institution. Resubmitted work must be physically presented at the time and in the manner prescribed for submission.

Candidates shall submit to the examiners reports and supporting material on the Part I Design Project (A8) completed as a part of their course of study. The subject of the project shall be approved by the Projects Committee of the Sub-faculty of Engineering Science and the report on the project and supporting material shall be submitted to the Chairman of the Examiners, Honour School of Engineering Science, c/o Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by noon on Friday of the fourth week of Trinity Term in the year of the Part I examination. The examiners shall consider the project report as the equivalent of a written paper. The project report must not exceed 6,000 words plus twenty-five pages of diagrams, photographs, etc.

Project reports previously submitted for the Honour School of Engineering Science may be resubmitted. No project report will be accepted if it has already been submitted wholly or substantially for another honour school or degree of this University, or for a degree at any other institution. Resubmitted work must be physically presented at the time and in the manner prescribed for submission.

In the assessment of Paper A6 the examiners shall take into consideration failure of a candidate to complete the practical work to a level prescribed from time to time by the sub-faculty. Failure to complete coursework modules to a satisfactory standard will also be taken into account by the examiners, except that exemption from the requirement to complete coursework modules shall be granted to any candidate who, in Trinity Term of the second year, participates in an exchange scheme approved by the sub-faculty. The Chairman of the Sub-faculty of Engineering Science shall provide a list, by the end of the sixth week of the Trinity Term in the year of the Part I examination, showing the extent to which each candidate has satisfied these requirements.

Candidates may be examined viva voce at the examiner's discretion.

Part II

In Part II a candidate shall be required to offer three written papers from group C. The detailed requirements and arrangements for written papers, and the list of subjects and the syllabuses from which the papers in group C may be selected shall be approved by the Sub-faculty of Engineering Science and published in the Gazette by the Chairman of the Sub-faculty of Engineering Science not later than the end of the Trinity Full Term of the academic year preceding the year of the examination of part II. The Sub-faculty will divide the papers into Lists; candidates will be required to select their three group C papers from different Lists.

Each individual candidate shall submit two copies of his or her own report on the part II Design Project completed as part of the course of study. The subject of the project shall be approved by the Projects Committee of the Sub-faculty of Engineering Science and the report on the project shall be submitted to the Chairman of Examiners, Honour School of Engineering Science, c/o Clerk of Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by noon on Friday of the fourth week of Trinity Term. The report shall be considered by the examiners in deciding the class of a candidate as equivalent to two written papers. The project report must not exceed 10,000 words plus forty pages of diagrams, photographs, etc. Project reports previously submitted for Part II of the Honour School of Engineering Science may be resubmitted. No project report will be accepted if it has already been submitted wholly or substantially for Part I or for another honour school or degree of this University, or for a degree of any other institution.

Candidates may be examined viva voce at the examiner's discretion.

Schedule

Group A: Core course

Paper A1: Mathematical Methods

Fourier series; convolution; Fourier transforms; spectra; sampling and reconstruction; random processes.

Vector algebra; vector calculus; Gauss' and Stokes' theorems; derivation of vector equations describing properties of continuous media such as continuity and Laplace's equation.

Solution of partial differential equations in two independent variables; boundary conditions; application to engineering problems; the wave equation; wave propagation and dispersion.

Linear transformations and equations; matrix rank and diagonalisation; computation of solutions of simultaneous linear equations, iterative algorithms; eigenvalue computation; curve fitting and algorithms for data approximation; computation solution of differential equations.

Paper A2: Electricity and Electronics

Field effect and bipolar transistors; switching circuits. Differential amplifiers and feedback. Electronic instrumentation and signal conditioning. Interface to computer systems.

Steady electric and magnetic fields. Slowly varying fields; Faraday's law, generation of e.m.f. Rapidly varying fields; Maxwell's equations. Electromagnetic waves and the wave equation. RF to optical examples.

The transmission line; wave propagation and impedance matching. Analogue and digital communication systems. Noise. Introduction to typical systems, including optical fibres.

Introduction to electrical power systems. Magnetic circuits; BH loops, reluctance and inductance. Transformers. Electromechanical energy conversion; d.c. and a.c. machines; design constraints and construction.

Paper A3: Control, Dynamics, and Computers

Introduction to Control, system modelling; steady state and transient behaviour. Stability. Analysis and design of simple control systems, both continuous and discrete time.

Introduction to practical systems including computer implementation.

Dynamics; motion with rotation and translation. Kinematics; motion in rotating frames of reference. Mechanism analysis. Cams and equivalent mechanisms.

Mechanical vibrations; system modelling, applications.

Elements of computer architecture; separation of data and control; hardware description languages; input/output; data buses.

Paper A4: Structures and Materials

Elastic analysis of statically determinate and indeterminate frames; the stiffness matrix method. Shear stresses due to torsion.

Elastic continuum problems in two and three dimensions; equilibrium, compatibility, stress-strain relationships and boudnary conditions. The finite element method in two dimensions.

Elastic instability of struts; plastic collapse of beams and frames.

Alloys and strengthening mechanisms; equilibrium diagrams, diffusion, heat treatment.

Plasticity; microscopic and macroscopic behaviour, Von Mises' yield criterion. Creep. Fracture and fatigue.

Paper A5: Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics

Baisc concepts of fluid mechanics. Hydrostatics. Conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. Stream function. Potential theory. Examples of potential flows. Lift and drag coefficients. Vorticity, circulation. Magnus effect, Kutta-Joukowsky theorem.

Applied fluid mechanics. Dimensional anlaysis, similarity, and model testing.

Turbomachinery. Boundary layer theory. Friction drag. Simple incompressible viscous flows. Turbulent flow in pipes and pipe circuits. Steady flow in open channels. Thermodynamic Machines. Refrigeration systems, steam cycles, internal combustion engines, gas turbine cycles, compressors.

Heat and Mass Transfer. Conduction, radiation, convection, heat exchangers, heat transfer coefficients. Mass transfer by convection and diffusion. An introduction to combustion.

Paper A6: Engineering Practical Work

Practical exercises including: engineering computation, electricity, electronics, control, computer architecture, structures, mechanics, materials, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics.

Paper A7: Engineering and Society

Paper A8: Design Project

Group B: Basic options

Paper B1: Mechanical Engineering

Applications of elasticity and plasticity, mechanics of non-metallic materials, power transmission, dynamics of machines, gas dynamics and hygrometry.

Paper B2: Civil Engineering

Structural design, soil mechanics, hydraulics, civil engineering projects.

Paper B3: Electrical Engineering

Communications systems, electrical properties of materials, signal processing, semiconductor devices, and integrated circuits.

Paper B4: Information Engineering

State-space systems, feedback control, computer-controlled systems, applied estimation, two-dimensional signal analysis, computational geometry.

Paper B5: Chemical Engineering

Chemical thermodynamics, separation processes, chemical reactors, process design.

Group C: Advanced Options

These papers will contain questions on the subjects for each paper as published in the Gazette by the Chairman of the Sub-faculty of Engineering Science.'

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(b) Pass School of Engineering Science

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first Part I examination in Trinity Term 1998, and first Part II examination in Trinity Term 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 184, l. 11, after `A6', insert `A7, A8'.

2 Ibid., p. 184, l. 12, delete `one' and substitute `two'.

3 Ibid., p. 184, l. 12, delete `B6'.

4 Ibid., p. 184, delete ll. 13–14.

5 Ibid., p. 184, l. 18, after `coursework' insert `modules'.

6 Ibid., p. 184, l. 18, delete `These will be taken into consideration in the assignment of the degree' and substitute

`Failure to complete coursework modules to a satisfactory standard will also be taken into account by the examiners, except that exemption from the requirement to complete coursework modules shall be granted to any candidate who, in Trinity Term of the second year, participates in an exchange scheme approved by the Sub-faculty'.

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(c) Honour School of Engineering and Materials

(i) With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

1 In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 204, l. 32, delete `seven' and substitute `six'.

2 Ibid., p. 204, delete ll. 33–8 and substitute `Papers A1, A2, A5 as set for the Honour School of Engineering Science, and:
ME1. Structure of Materials.
ME2. Properties of Materials.
ME3. Structural Transformations.

In addition candidates will sit shortened versions of the Honour School of Engineering Science papers A3 and A4. The results of the two papers (A3s and A4s) in combination will be treated by the examiners as the equivalent of one paper.'

3 Ibid., p. 204, l. 39, after `schedule.' insert:

`They will be required to take three further subjects, each of which will be considered by the examiners as equivalent to one written paper, as follows:

A6, Engineering Practical Work
A7, Engineering and Society Coursework
ME4, Materials Practical Work.'

 

4 Ibid., p. 204, delete ll. 42–50 and p. 205, ll. 1 and 2, and substitute `Candidates shall be required to submit a portfolio for Engineering and Society coursework (A7) as specified in the regulations for the Honour School of Engineering Science.'

5 Ibid., p. 205, l. 3, delete `of the two essays' and substitute `The portfolio of work'.

6 Ibid., l. 5, after `examination.', insert `The materials must be the candidate's own work and the candidate shall sign and present with the portfolio a detachable certificate to this effect'.

7 Ibid., l. 8 after `Essays' insert `or reports'.

8 Ibid., l. 10 after `essay' insert `or report'.

9 Ibid., l. 12, after `institution.', insert `Resubmitted work must be physically presented at the time and in the manner prescribed for submission.'

10 Ibid., l. 14, after `study' insert `(papers A6 and ME4)'. 11 Ibid., ll. 14–15, delete `Practical work reports taken together shall be considered by the examiners as equivalent to one written paper'.

12 Ibid., l. 26, after `institution.', insert `Resubmitted work must be physically presented at the time and in the manner prescribed for submission'.

13 Ibid., delete ll. 29–39 and substitute:

`A1, A2, A5, A6, and A7: as specified in the Honour School of Engineering Science

A3s: a shortened version of A3 as specified in the Honour School of Engineering Science

This paper will contain questions on dynamics, kinematics and vibrations; computer architecture.

A4s: a shortened version of A4 as specified in the Honour School of Engineering Science

This paper will contain questions on structural forms and analysis; analysis of elastic continua; structural failure.

ME1: Structure of Materials

Crystallography and crystal defects. Elementary quantum mechanics and bonding. Metals, semiconductors, ceramics, polymers, composites. Statistical mechanics. Electronic structure of materials; physics of semiconductors.

ME2: Properties of Materials

Hardness, toughness, and strength; plasticity; fracture. Ceramics and glasses. Mechanical properties of polymers. Electrical, optical, and magnetic properties of materials.

ME3: Structural Transformations

Thermodynamics and kinetics of phase transformations. Microstructure. Diffusion. Surfaces and interfaces. Engineering alloys.'

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first Part II examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 206, delete l. 11 and substitute `The subjects of these papers shall be published in the University Gazette by the Standing Committee for Engineering and Materials not later than then end of the Trinity Full Term of the academic year preceding the year of the examination of Part II.'

2 Ibid., p. 206, delete ll. 41–51, and p. 207, ll. 1–13.

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(d) Pass School of Engineering and Materials

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first Part I examination in Trinity Term 1998, and first Part II examination in Trinity Term 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 207, l. 23, delete `vii' and substitute `vi'.

2 Ibid., l. 23, after `A1,' insert `A2,'.

3 Ibid., l. 23, delete `A4,'.

4 Ibid., l. 23, delete `A6,'.

5 Ibid., l. 25, delete `(viii) the two extended essays on Engineering and Society.' and substitute: `(vii) Papers A3s and A4s. The results of the two papers (A3s and A4s) in combination will be treated as the equivalent of one paper.

(viii) Paper A7, Engineering and Society'.

6 Ibid., l. 29, after `study', insert `(Papers A6 and ME4)'.

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21 Board of the Faculty of Theology

(a) Honour School of Theology

(i) With immediate effect (for examination in 1996 and 1997)

In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 539, delete ll. 2–15 and substitute:

`Candidates will be expected to answer questions related to the following:

Principles of psychological explanation with particular reference to the psychology of religious experience and behaviour. Methods of investigation in the psychology of religion. The accounts of the psychology of religion given by James, Freud, and Jung, and by more recent scientific investigators. Individual and social factors in the development of religious experience. The psychology of at least one of the following areas of concern for pastoral practice: religious eduction; group relationships; marriage; sickness and health; death and bereavement. Elements of theological psychology: Body and Soul; reason, will, and emotion; religion and the concept of mental health; religious consciousness and prayer.'

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 539, delete ll. 2–15 and substitute: `The paper will cover theories about aspects of behaviour or experience relevant to religion and the empirical evidence on these theories. Psychological research methods and their applicability to different aspects of religion such as conversion, prayer, worship. Cognitive and non-cognitive (i.e. psychoanalytic and affective) accounts of religion. Normal and abnormal religious behaviour. Origin and development of religious concepts. Moral development. Constructs of theological psychology (e.g. soul; conscience, sin, and guilt; repentance; forgiveness; mercy) and their status in contemporary psychology. Psychology applied to pastoral concerns: religious education; marriage; health; death and bereavement; substance abuse.'

(iii) With effect from 1 October 1996 for one year (for examination in 1997 only)

Under the provisions for paper 34 (Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 540), the Theology Board offers the following paper for examination in 1997.

`The Formation of Rabbinic Judaism (70 ce–950 ce)

The course will describe the formation of rabbinic Judaism as reflected in its primary texts. Some reference will be made to the contexts of late Antiquity, early Christendom, and the Zoroastrian and Islamic worlds.

It will consider the following issues:

How did the rabbis translate (Targum) and interpret (Midrash) the Hebrew scriptures? How did they structure the religious system which emerged from their reflections on scripture (Mishna/Tosefta)? What forms of liturgy and spirituality did they create, and how did they relate to the Jewish mystidal tradition?

The Babylonian Talmud and its definition of Torah. Judaism under Islam—the Gaonic period. Confrontation with other faiths, with rationalist philosophy, and with serious critiques of both scripture and the rabbinic tradition.

The following primary rabbinic texts in translation are set for special study:

The Daily Prayer Book of the United Hebrew Congregations of the British Commonwealth of Nations (Centenary Edition, London: Signer's Prayer book Publication Committee, 1990): pages 46, 56 (Amida prayer) and 251–4 (Ethics of the Fathers chapter 1))

The Mishnah translated by H. Danby (London: Oxford University Press, 1933). Tractate Berakhoth chapters 4, 5; tractate Baba Kamma chapter 8.

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(iv) With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 538, delete ll. 37–44 and substitute:

`Candidates will be expected to know at least two of the following options in detail:

(i) K. Marx, Theses on Feuerbach and The German Ideology (ch. 1) (ed. C. Arthur, Lawrence and Wishart, London, 1985), together with Capital (chs. 1 and 13) (Penguin Books, 1990).

(ii) E. Durkheim, The Elementary Forms of the Religious Life (Allen & Unwin, London, 1976).

(iii) M. Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Rise of Capitalism (Harper Collins, 1991).

(iv) E. Troeltsch, The Social Teaching of the Christian Churches (2 Vols. Jn. Knox, 1992).

(v) Religion and History , ed. Adams (T. & T. Clark, 1991).

(vi) Talcott Parsons, Action Theory and the Human Condition (New York, 1978).

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(b) Pass School of Theology

With effect from 1 October 1996 for one year (for examination in 1997 only)

As for the Honour School of Theology (see (a) (iii) above).

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(c) B.Th. in Applied Theology

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997) 1 In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 934, delete l. 8 and substitute: `Candidates will normally be expected to have five GCSE passes, one of which must be in English Language and two of which must be at Advanced Level. Exemptions from this requirement for mature student candidates or those otherwise qualified may be made at the discretion of the supervisory committee.'

2 Ibid., p. 952, delete ll. 1–6 and substitute `Course requirements '.

3 Ibid., p. 936, after l. 8 insert:

`The dated certification of the committee's approval of essay titles (for 7,000, 10,000, and 15,000 word essays, and field studies), the statement from a college officer indicating the nature of the supervision provided (for 10,000 and 15,000 word essays), the certification from the college confirming that the other work in a subject area has been satisfactorily completed (for 7,000 word essays), and the signed statement from the candidate that the essays and field studies are his/her own work (for 7,000, 10,000, and 15,000 word essays, and field studies), must accompany the essays and field studies when submitted for examination. These certificates and signed statements must be submitted separately in a sealed envelope addressed to the Chairman of the Examiners for the Certificates in Theology/Bachelor of Theology, at the above address.'

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22 Standing Committee for EEM and Related Schools

Honour School of Engineering, Economics, and Management

(i) With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 199, delete ll. 17–19.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 31–2 and substitute:

`The industrial attachment and project will normally be arranged by, and must be approved by, the project co-ordinators in Management and/or Engineering. The report shall be on a topic, approved by the standing committee, normally in Management or Engineering. Topics in Economics may be approved, but the project co-ordinators cannot undertake to arrange projects in the field of Economics.'

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first Part I examination in Trinity Term 1998, and first Part II examination in Trinity Term 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees , 1995, p. 197, delete ll. 19–23 and substitute:

`A2 Electricity and Electronics
A3 Control, Dynamics, and Computer
A4 Structures and Materials
A5 Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics
A6 Engineering Practical Work'.

2 Ibid., delete l. 28, and renumber B5 and B6 as B4 and B5.

3 Ibid., delete ll. 32–43 and substitute:

`The list of subjects and the syllabuses from which the papers in Group C may be selected shall be approved by the Sub-faculty of Engineering Science and published by the Chairman of the Sub-faculty of Engineering Science not later than the end of the Trinity Full Term of the academic year preceding the year of the examination of Part II. The Sub-faculty will divide the papers into lists; candidates will be required to select their group C papers from different lists.'

4 Ibid., p. 198, ll. 18–19, delete `eight papers, consisting of any five from Group A' and substitute `nine papers, consisting of all papers in Group A'.

5 Ibid., pp. 198–99, delete sect. 1. and substitute:

`1. Written papers

Candidates will be required to take three papers, consisting of paper E2 and any two papers from E3, E4, E5, M2, M3, M4, and Group C (from which the equivalent of only one paper may be offered). Candidates choosing to offer a paper from Group C must take two papers in which they would be expected to answer, in two hours, three questions from each paper. The results of the two papers in combination will be treated as the equivalent of one paper. The arrangements for the publication and selection of group C papers are specified on p. 197.'


Footnotes

[1] Candidates seeking approval of the subject of their thesis should write to the Deputy Chairman, Board of the Faculty of English Language and Literature, English Faculty Office, St Cross Building, Manor Road.'
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[2] Those who offer B may not offer options (1) and (2) in Paper X.
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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Biological Sciences

A. ATTARAN, Wadham: `CTL cytotoxicity and cytoskeleton: a microscopical study'.
Department of Zoology, Wednesday, 29 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: T.J. Elliott, D. Bray.

S. GREGSON, Jesus: `The early socio-demographic impact of the HIV-1 epidemic in rural Zimbabwe'.
Department of Zoology, Tuesday, 4 June, 11.30 a.m.
Examiners: G.P. Garnett, J. Cleland.

R.D. SHEIL, Linacre: `The ecology of long-term change in a Ugandan rain forest'.
Department of Plant Sciences, Thursday, 16 May, 9.30 a.m.
Examiners: D. Newbery, R.J. Whittaker.

S.D. VASCONCELOS, Linacre: `Studies on the transmission and dispersal of baculoviruses in lepidopteran populations'.
University Museum, Monday, 13 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: S.J. Simpson, A. Cherry.

JIU-YAO WANG, St Cross: `Expression and functional characterisation of carbohydrate recognition domains of bovine conglutinin and human surfactant protein D'.
Glycobiology Institute, Thursday, 16 May, 11 a.m.
Examiners: R.A. Dwek, A.D. Postle.

 

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Clinical Medicine

K.L.R. DUNN, Green College: `Cytotoxicity of Neisseria meningitidis for cultured human endothelial cells'.
Institute of Molecular Medicine, Tuesday, 28 May, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: R. Bicknell, H. Kayhty.

 

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English Language and Literature

J. PAULMAN, Merton: `An illumined chamber: aspects of scientific enquiry into the history of the Earth in selected Gothic novels 1789–1911'.
Exeter, Monday, 6 May, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: M.S. Butler, P.A. Clemit.

J. RAINFORD, St Hugh's: `Olafr Haralddsson, king and saint of Norway, and the development of Skaldic style (c.1015–c.1153)'.
St Cross Building, Friday, 10 May, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: D. Gray, R. McTurk.

 

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Literae Humaniores

R.E. ASH, St Hugh's: `Individual and collective identities in Tacitus's Histories'.
Examination Schools, Wednesday, 26 June, 2 p.m.
Examiners: M.T. Green, C.S. Kraus.

J.E SHERWOOD, Corpus Christi: `Perceptions of gender and the divine in Greek texts of the second and third centuries ad'.
Examination Schools, Friday, 12 July, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: J.A. North, R.C.T. Parker.

 

Modern History

H.-J.K.L.R. VOTH, Nuffield: `Time use in eighteenth- century London: some evidence from the Old Bailey'.
All Souls, Wednesday, 26 June, 9.30 a.m.
Examiners: E.A. Wrigley, C.H. Feinstein.

 

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Psychological Studies

M.P. DA MOTA, Wolfson: `The role of grammatical knowledge in spelling'.
Department of Experimental Psychology, Wednesday, 15 May, 11 a.m.
Examiners: P.L. Harris, P. Seymour.

 

Committee for Management Studies

S.A. WAGNER, St Hugh's: `Environmentally-oriented consumer behaviour: a cognitive study with implications for communications management'.
Templeton, Friday, 3 May, 11.30 a.m.
Examiners: G.R. Foxall, E.B. Howard.

 

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EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF LETTERS

The examiners appointed by the following faculty board give notice of oral examination of their candidate as follows:

Modern History

M.V. WINSTONE, Lincoln: `The church in Cromwellian England: initiative for reform of the ministry during the Interregnum'.
Examination Schools, Thursday, 9 May, 11.15 a.m.
Examiners: C. Holmes, A. Hughes.

 

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Clinical Medicine

R.C. KNAPP, New College: `Noise in magnetic resonance imaging and the role of preamplifier technology'.
MRC Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Unit, Tuesday, 21 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: P. Styles, J.J.K. Best.

 

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Mathematical Sciences

R. PINKETT, Keble: `Hardware/software co-design and digital speech processing'.
Department of Engineering Science, Friday, 3 May, 10 a.m.
Examiners: D.J. Edwards, A. Kay.

 

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Colleges, Halls, and Societies

Contents of this section:

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OBITUARIES

Corpus Christi College

EDWARD SOMERS FLEMING EVANS, MA, 1 March 1996; scholar 1929–33. Aged 85.

GEORGE VAUGHAN HART, 31 January 1996; scholar 1930–4. Aged 84.

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Lady Margaret Hall

VERONICA MARY PALMER, 15 April 1996; commoner 1947–51; Committee Member, Lady Margaret Hall Association, 1989–96. Aged 66.

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Merton College

JOHN MALCOLM FLETCHER, 5 April 1996; commoner 1953–6 and 1958–61. Aged 61.

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St Hilda's College

(CATHARINE) MARY BARNHAM JOHNSON, MA, 20 March 1996; commoner 1914–17. Aged 100.

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St Hugh's College

MARJORIE MARY WROTTESLEY (née Wilde), MBE, 13 March 1996; commoner 1926-9. Aged 88.

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ELECTIONS

Corpus Christi College

To Scholarships:

ANTONIA F. HAMILTON, formerly of Wycombe Abbey School

IAN G. WEBB, formerly of King's School, Rochester

To a Hugh Oldham Scholarship:

DAVID P. COLE, formerly of Whitgift School, Croydon

To Haigh Scholarships:

GRANT K.L. CHUM, formerly of King's School, Canterbury

IAN D. REPATH, formerly of Sedbergh School

To Charles Oldham Scholarships:

BENJAMIN W. AKRIGG, formerly of Watford Grammar School

JONATHAN R.W. PRAG, formerly of Manchester Grammar School

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Magdalen College

Corrigendum

To a Visiting Fellowship (1 January–15 April 1997):

DR R.R. RAINE

Note: Dr Raine's name was misspelt as `Paine' in a notice of election in the Gazette of 25 April (p. 1026).

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Merton College

To Postmasterships:

A.J. CHIRNSIDE, formerly of Eton College

MISS K.L. HEFFERNAN, formerly of Wycombe Abbey School

R.L. HEWITT, formerly of Merchant Taylors' School

B.E. WHITE, formerly of Salesian College

To an Exhibition:

MISS C.A. WITT, formerly of Lycée de Sèvres

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Queen's College

To a Holwell Studentship (with effect from 1 October 1996):

TIMOTHY J. MAWSON, BA, M.PHIL., St Peter's College

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St Cross College

To Official Fellowships:

HELENA HAMEROW, MA, D.PHIL. (BA University of Wisconsin–Madison)

IAN PAGE, MA (B.SC. London, M.SC. City), FIEE

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St Hugh's College

To a Tutorial Fellowship in Economics:

JOHN KIM-HO QUAH (B.SC. Singapore, PH.D. Berkeley)

To a Smith-Rippon Scholarship:

NICHOLAS JAMES AUBURY, formerly of Warwick School

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Trinity College

To the James and George Whitehead Travelling Studentship:

KERRY SIOBHAN KIDD, formerly of South Wiltshire Grammar School, Salisbury

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PRIZE

Trinity College

The Lady Astbury Memorial Prize (joint award):

SIMON IAN GOLDBERG

NICOLAS JAMES GRAY

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NOTICES

Green College

Friends Provident Stewardship Joanna Lumley Research Fellowship

Green College proposes to elect a Friends Provident Stewardship Joanna Lumley Research Fellow from 1 September 1996. The successful candidate will be expected to undertake full-time research related to major environmental issues, especially in Africa, and to be based in Oxford. Candidates are expected to produce a written report on their work. The fellowship is open to graduates of any university and may be held in conjunction with another appointment.

The fellowship is in principle non-stipendiary (in other words does not carry a salary) but candidates without outside funding are not excluded. It provides access to all university and college facilities, including dining rights in college, and an academic expenses allowance of £250 a year. It is tenable for a year in the first instance, and may be renewable for a second year.

Application forms are available from the Warden's Secretary, Green College, Oxford OX2 6HG (telephone: Oxford (2)74775). They should be returned, with a full curriculum vitae and details of the proposed subject of research, no later than Friday, 24 May.

Mars Research Fellowship in Nutrition

Green College proposes to elect a Mars Research Fellow from 1 October 1996. The successful candidate should be based in Oxford and have research interests in one of the following main areas: carbohydrate metabolism; the interaction of exercise, nutrition, and health; fats and lipids research; nutritional epidemiology; food selection/appetite regulation; sports nutrition/nutrition for physical activity.

The successful candidate will be expected to maintain a close relationship with Mars Incorporated during the period of the fellowship, and to prepare a written report on the results of his or her research.

The fellowship is open to graduates of any university and may be held in conjunction with another appointment.

The fellowship is non-stipendiary but provides access to all university and college facilities, including dining rights in college, and an academic expenses allowance of £250 a year. It is tenable for one year in the first instance, and may be renewable thereafter on a yearly basis.

Application forms are available from the Warden's Secretary, Green College, Oxford OX2 6HG (telephone: Oxford (2)74775). They should be returned, with a full curriculum vitae and details of the proposed subject of research, no later than Tuesday, 28 May.

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Linacre College

A.J. Hosier Studentship

The Board of Management of the A.J. Hosier Fund proposes to make election to an A.J. Hosier Studentship which will be tenable at Linacre College for the academic year 1996–7 and will have a maximum value of £3,500. Candidates must be honours graduates of a university in the United Kingdom and be citizens of the UK, and must either have commenced reading or intend to commence reading in October 1996 for an advanced degree at Oxford in one of the following subjects: (i) husbandry; (ii) agricultural economics or agricultural statistics; (iii) applied agricultural science.

Applications should be made by letter to the Principal, Linacre College, Oxford OX1 3JA. Candidates are asked to submit a curriculum vitae and to ask two referees to write directly to the Principal by the closing date for applications, 31 May.

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Magdalen College

Visiting Fellowships

The college proposes to elect a Visiting Fellow or Fellows for the academic year 1996–7. In addition, a Robert S. Campbell Visiting Fellow may be elected for research in law, especially commercial or competition law.

A Visiting Fellowship is intended to offer an established scholar, either from abroad or from the United Kingdom, an opportunity to pursue his or her own study and research as a member of the college. Further details and application forms may be obtained from the Clerk to the College, Magdalen College, Oxford OX1 4AU. Completed forms must be returned not later than 23 January 1997.

Junior Research Fellowships 1996–7

The college proposes to elect, in November 1996, one or two Junior Research Fellows, known as Fellows by Examination. Candidates should have an honours degree or its equivalent and no more than four years' graduate study by 1 October 1996.

Each fellowship is tenable for three years at a stipend of £9,553 per annum. The fellow is a member of the governing body of the college and is entitled to free lunches and dinners, to a research allowance, and either to free rooms or to a discretionary housing allowance.

Application forms and further particulars can be obtained from the Clerk to the College, Magdalen College, Oxford OX1 4AU. The closing date is 16 September.

Magdalen College is committed to equal opportunities.

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Mansfield College

Appointment of Graduate Computing Assistant

Mansfield College is looking for a graduate student, to be resident on site in 1996–7, to assist in the management of the college's computers. Familiarity with Microsoft Office, an understanding of ethernetting, and (preferably) a knowledge of Windows NT are required. Free accommodation and telephone, and some free meals, are offered.

Applicants should leave their name and address at: nigel.hall@mansfield.oxford.ac.uk. Further details will then be sent by post.

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Oriel College

The Eugene Lee-Hamilton Prize 1996

The Provost and Fellows of Oriel College offer a prize of £60 for the best Petrarchan sonnet in English submitted by an undergraduate of Oxford or Cambridge, on a subject to be chosen by the candidate. Enjambment between the eighth and ninth lines will be permitted. No candidate may submit more than one sonnet, nor may the prize be awarded more than once to the same person. The competing sonnets should be sent to the Provost, Oriel College, Oxford OX1 4EW, not later than Monday, 3 June. Each sonnet must be accompaned by a certificate from the Head or a Fellow of the candidate's college, stating that the candidate is an undergraduate. c

The winner will have been deemed to have given permission to publish his/her sonnet in the Oriel Record.

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Pembroke College

TEPCO Senior Studentship in Japanese Studies

Pembroke College proposes to elect a TEPCO Senior Student in Japanese Studies from 1 October 1996 or as soon as possible thereafter. The appointment will be for one year in the first instance, renewable for up to a further one year thereafter. The successful candidate will be undertaking study for an advanced degree in the area of Japanese Studies in the University of Oxford, or will intend to do so. He or she will be required to become a member of Pembroke College. The studentship is primarily intended to enable the student to complete a doctoral thesis after termination of a British Academy grant, or to allow a person ineligible for such a grant to continue doctoral research. If the successful candidate is in receipt of no other financial support, the studentship will provide emoluments of, currently, £4,720 per annum. If the student already receives substantial support, the emoluments will be £600 in addition to any award(s) already held. The student will have certain senior common room rights, including some rights to dine free of charge. Accommodation may be provided in college at standard rates subject to availability. Applications, with curriculum vitae and names and addresses of two referees, should reach the Dean of Graduates, Pembroke College, Oxford OX1 1DW, by Friday, 7 June.

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St Antony's College

The Wardenship

The college invites applications for the post of Warden in succession to Lord Dahrendorf, KBE, FBA, who is retiring on 30 September 1997. St Antony's is a postgraduate college within the University of Oxford. It has devoted its energies to the study of international topics broadly defined. Interdisciplinary study is also fostered through the college's long-standing Area Centres. It has an international student body numbering, on average, 250 students from over forty countries. The college also attracts some eighty visiting senior members, from many different countries, each year. The post of Warden is full-time. It carries a salary within the professorial range, and other allowances. Suitably qualified individuals who wish to be considered, or any person who would like to suggest the names of others the college might consider, are invited to write in confidence to Dr Rosemary Foot, Chair of the Search Committee, St Antony's College, Oxford OX2 6JF, from whom further particulars are available. The college's choice will not necessarily be limited to those whose names come forward in this way.

The closing date for applications is 8 May.

The college exists to promote excellence and research, and is an equal opportunities employer.



Diary

Contents of this section:

Academic Staff Seminars: places should be booked in advance through the Staff Development Office, University Offices, Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

For the full list of courses, see the Staff Development Programme supplement.

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Friday 3 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Costume in art', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

 

HAKLUYT SOCIETY: `Science and geography in imperial contexts', Modern History Faculty, 2 p.m. (names in advance to Dr F. Fernandez- Armesto, care of Modern History Faculty).

FRANCO-BRITISH SEMINAR: `Electoral behaviour in Britain and France—protest and tactical voting, party identification and volatility', Maison Française, 2 p.m. (places to be booked one week in advance).

 

PROFESSOR R.E. BROWN: `New Testament scholarship and Christianity today' (fourth of five Martin D'Arcy Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. GIGNOUX: `Cosmic elements and theory of microcosm' (Ratanbai Katrak Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. MOKYR: `Famine and mortality: an historical re- examination' (Sir John Hicks Lecture on Economic History), Schools, 5 p.m.

M. RIOT-SARCEY: `Femmes et démocraties', Maison Française, 5.15 p.m. (admission free, but places to be booked one week in advance).

THE ALLEGRI STRING QUARTET (with James Campbell, clarinet), plays works by Haydn, Rawsthorne, and Mozart, Holywell Music Room, 8 p.m. (tickets £8/£6, from Blackwell's Music Shop; student tickets £4, from Blackwell's or the Music Faculty).

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Sunday 5 May

PROFESSOR URSULA KING: `Christian spirituality, Third World theology, and the voices of women: the spiritual significance of otherness' (seventh Bampton Lecture), St Mary's, 10 a.m.

CHRIST CHURCH PICTURE GALLERY exhibition opens: `Jeff Clarke—new work' (until 5 June).

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Monday 6 May

UNIVERSITY OFFICES closed (today only).

R. WILLIAMS: `Communicating the environment in Australia' (Environmental Change Unit seminar), Main Lecture Theatre, School of Geography, 2.15 p.m.

CONGREGATION elections (23 May): nominations by two members of Congregation to be received at the University Offices by 4 p.m.

ANNUAL ELECTIONS of members of faculty boards (except Clinical Medicine), 30 May: nominations by two electors to be received at the University Offices by 4 p.m.

PROFESSOR M.A. NUSSBAUM (Weidenfeld Visiting Professor): `The Romantic ascent I: Emily Brontë' (lecture series: `Ascents of love: desire and the good in the Western philosophical/literary tradition'), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. GIGNOUX: `Is there an Iranian Shamanism? (1)' (Ratanbai Katrak Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

 

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Tuesday 7 May

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Building the Ashmolean—then and now' (with special exhibition), 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

 

 

PROFESSOR J. BURROW (Professor of European Thought): `A common culture? Nationalist ideas in nineteenth-century European thought' (inaugural lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D.M. KENNEDY (Harmsworth Professor of American History): `Can the United States still afford to be a nation of immigrants?' (inaugural lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR A. SHLEIFER: `Inefficient financial markets' (Clarendon Lectures in Economics: `Inefficient markets'), Schools (East School), 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR D. GOUGH: `The seismic structure of the sun' (Halley Lecture), Lecture Theatre, University Museum, 5 p.m.

THE REVD DR JOHN COOK: `Missing the point: a theology of culture in the work of Mondrian, Kandinsky, and Rothko' (Deneke Lecture), Talbot Hall, Lady Margaret Hall, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R.E. BROWN: `New Testament scholarship and Christianity today' (last of series of Martin D'Arcy Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

DR R. DAWKINS: `In praise of reductionist, adaptationist, progressivist, gradualist, neo-Darwinism' (Oxford History and Philosophy of Biology Programme), Sherrington Room, Department of Physiology, 5 p.m.

MR J. BIFFEN, MP, and LORD PLANT: `Westminster: time for another Great Reform Act?' (lecture series: `The state of the Union: issues in contemporary British democracy'), St Antony's, 5 p.m.

 

DR A. STEWART: `Menarche and other issues in adolescence' (Women's Studies Committee seminars: `Policy, practice, and power: issues in human female reproduction'), Wolfson Hall, Somerville, 8.30 p.m.

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Wednesday 8 May

FRANCO-BRITISH workshop: `Le transfert de concepts et de pratiques dans les sciences des XXIXe et XXe siècles—sciences biologiques et humaines', Maison Française, all day (tel.: (2)77277 or (2)74220).

PROFESSOR A. SHLEIFER: `Origins of investor sentiment' (Clarendon Lectures in Economics: `Inefficient markets'), Schools (East School), 5 p.m.

DR Z. BRZEZINSKI: `Eurasia: post-imperial dilemmas' (Elliott Lecture), Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. GIGNOUX: `Is there an Iranian Shamanism? (2)' (Ratanbai Katrak Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

ARCHBISHOP EMERITUS J.R. QUINN: `Moral life or moral law' (Thomas More Lecture), Catholic Chaplaincy, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. COLE-TURNER: `The anxiety of change' (Idreos Lectures in Science and Technology: `Genetics and theology'), Harris Manchester, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR N. ORME: `Magdalen College and its School' (Waynflete and related lectures: `Oxford and England during the Renaissance and Reformation'), Schools, 5 p.m.

 

PROFESSOR S. ARBER: `Women and income inequality in later life' (Nuffield Women's Group seminars: `Women, poverty, and social policy'), Seminar Room, Nuffield, 5 p.m.

DR S. GRAHAM-BROWN: `The Kurds in Iraq since the 1991 Gulf War' (Refugee Studies Programme: Seminars on Forced Migration), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 5 p.m.

UNIVERSITY CLUB wine-tasting: Chardonnays from around the world, 5.45 p.m. (fee £2).

H. MORPHY: `Hunting art' (Friends of the Pitt Rivers Museum: Beatrice Blackwood Lecture), Inorganic Chemistry Lecture Theatre, 7 p.m.

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Thursday 9 May

H. SUMMERFIELD: `Gender and identity in Cambodia' (Centre for Cross- Cultural Research on Women seminars: `Gender and development—protest and politics'), Library Wing Seminar Room, Queen Elizabeth House, 2 p.m.

PROFESSOR H. WEINBERG: `Scanning probe microscopy studies of semiconductor surfaces' (Astor Lecture), Hume-Rothery Lecture Theatre, Department of Materials, 2.15 p.m.

PROFESSOR J. GOULD: `Something to do with Dionysos' (Gaisford Lecture), St John's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR A. SHLEIFER: `The limits of arbitrage' (Clarendon Lectures in Economics: `Inefficient markets'), Schools (East School), 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR T. NAGEL: `Justice and nature' (Hart Memorial Lecture), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR R. COLE-TURNER: `The humility of hope' (Idreos Lectures in Science and Technology: `Genetics and theology'), Harris Manchester, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR N. ABU-ZAID: `Reformation of Islamic thought: some questions and some suggestions' (Hamid Enayat Lecture), New Lecture Theatre, St Antony's, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR N. ORME: `Oxford and the transformation of English school education 1480–1530' (Waynflete and related lectures: `Oxford and England during the Renaissance and Reformation'), Schools, 5 p.m.

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Friday 10 May

CONFERENCE: `Hong Kong in transition', Modern History Faculty, 10 a.m.

ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Tibet', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015.)

SIR REX HUNT: `The Falklands, past, present, and future' (lecture), Rhodes House, 1.30 p.m.

FRANCO-BRITISH SEMINAR: `Electoral behaviour in Britain and France—the extreme right-wing in Britain and France', Maison Française, 2 p.m. (places to be booked one week in advance).

DR M. ASTON: `Obliteration and memory in the English Reformation' (James Ford Special Lecture in British History), Schools, 5 p.m.

PROFESSOR P. GIGNOUX: `Problems of identity and conversion in Zoroastrianism' (Ratanbai Katrak Lectures), Schools, 5 p.m.

S. GERMAIN: `Famille et legs de mémoire', Maison Française, 5.15 p.m. (admission free, but places to be booked one week in advance).

PROFESSOR M. PRICE: `Space, place, race, face: post-global media law' (Annual Lecture in Socio-Legal Studies), Schools, 5.30 p.m.

DAVID HARE: `When shall we live?' (Eric Abbott Memorial Lecture), the chapel, Keble, 5.30 p.m.

U. VON LERBER plays piano works by Mozart, Beethoven, Chopin, and Rachmaninov, Maison Française, 8.15 p.m. (tel. for reservations one week in advance: (2)74220).

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Saturday 11 May

SIR RICHARD SCOTT: `Ministerial accountability' (Blackstone Lecture), Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, St Cross Building, 11.30 a.m.

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Sunday 12 May

PROFESSOR URSULA KING: `Seeing Christ in all things: the spirit of Christ as a spirit of renewal and transformation for our planet' (eighth Bampton Lecture), St Mary's, 10 a.m.

PAUL LEWIS plays piano works by Beethoven and Schumann, the hall, Balliol, 9 p.m.

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