19 March 1998 - No 4469



<p>Oxford University Gazette,<br /> Vol. 128, No. 4469: 19 March 1998<br /></p>

Oxford University Gazette

19 March 1998




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<br /><br /><br /><title><br /> Oxford University Gazette, 19 March 1998: University Acts<br />

University Acts


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
published or recurrent entry.]

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CONGREGATION 16 March


Degree by Special Resolution

No notice to the contrary having been received under the
provisions
of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1997, p. 15),
the
following resolution is deemed to have been approved at noon on
16
March.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the
following:

SUSANNA ELIZABETH BLACKSHAW, St Hilda's College

MARC THOMPSON, Templeton College

ALAN MICHAEL RUGMAN, Templeton College

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section



HEBDOMADAL COUNCIL 16 March


1 Decrees

Council has made the following decrees, to come into effect on
3
April.

List of the decrees:

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section



Decree (1): Removal of anomalies

Explanatory note

The following decree removes anomalies and makes consequential
amendments to existing decrees which have been overlooked in
recent
legislation.

Text of Decree (1)

1 In Ch. III, Sect. LIII, concerning the
School
of Management Studies (Statutes, 1997, p. 319),
delete
cll. 2 and 3 and renumber existing cll. 4--11 (pp. 319--21) as
cll.
2--9.

[The clauses deleted made provision for the separate
post
of
Peter Moores Director of the School of Management Studies, and
the
need to remove them was overlooked when the headship of the
department became a rotatable five-year appointment.
]

2 In Ch. IX, Sect. I, § 102,
concerning
the Field Studies Book Prize (p. 635), delete cl. 3 and
substitute:

`3. The prize shall be awarded jointly by three persons
(hereinafter
called `the awarders') who shall comprise:

(1) the Head of the Department of Zoology or his or her
nominee;

(2) the Director of the Edward Grey Institute of Field
Ornithology
or his or her nominee;

(3) a person appointed by the Board of the Faculty of
Biological
Sciences.'

[The above clause makes provision for an awarder of the
Field
Studies Prize appointed by the Biological Sciences Board to
replace
the holder of the Readership in Animal Ecology ex
officio
,
that post having been abolished.
]

3 In Examination Decrees,
1997,
p. 1057, l. 16, concerning the wording of certain diplomas,
delete
`Diploma in the History of Art,'.

4 Ibid., p. 1087, l. 32, concerning
examinations in respect of which certificates of approval from
candidates' societies are required, delete `The History of Art.'

[Clauses 3 and 4 delete obsolete references to the
Diploma
in
the History of Art, which no longer exists.
]

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section



Decree (2): Establishment of Joint
Honour
School of Modern History and Politics

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Modern
History and Social Studies Boards and with the concurrence of the
General Board, establishes a new Joint Honour School in Modern
History and Politics, together with the associated Honour
Moderations
and Pass Degree. The course is intended to exploit the
complementary
resources available in Oxford in the Modern History Faculty and
the
Politics Sub-faculty and, within existing numbers, to encourage
high-quality applicants who might otherwise be lost to Oxford
given
that such courses are provided elsewhere. Examination will be by
means of written papers, with candidates having the option to
submit
up to two theses.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in `Examinations
and
Boards' below.

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section


Text of Decree (2)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997,
p.
23, after l. 20 insert:

`Modern History and Politics,'.

2 Ibid., p. 61, after l. 38 insert:

`Honour Moderations in Modern History and Politics

Honour Moderations in Modern History and Politics shall be under
the
joint supervision of the Boards of the Faculties of Modern
History
and Social Studies and shall consist of such subjects as they
shall
jointly prescribe.'

3 Ibid., p. 115, after l. 16 insert in the
left-hand column:

`Honour Moderations in Modern History and Politics'.

4 Ibid., p. 120, after l. 10 insert in the
right-hand column:

`Modern History and Politics'.

5 Ibid., p. 121, after l. 42 insert in the
right-hand column:

`Modern History and Politics'.

6 Ibid., after p. 379 insert:

`HONOUR SCHOOL OF MODERN HISTORY AND
POLITICS

(i) DECREE

Honour School of Modern History and
Politics

1. The examination in the Honour School of Modern History and
Politics shall consist of such subjects in Modern History and
Politics as the Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and
Social
Studies shall from time to time in consultation prescribe by
regulation.

2. No candidate shall be admitted to examination in this
School
unless he or she has either passed or been exempted from the
First
Public Examination.

3. The examination in the Honour School shall be under the
joint
supervision of the Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and
Social Studies, which shall appoint a standing joint committee
to
make proposals for regulations concerning the examination. Such
proposals shall be submitted to the boards of the two faculties
which
shall make regulations concerning the examination and which, in
the
case of difference of opinion, shall hold a joint meeting at
which
the matter in dispute shall be resolved by the vote of the
majority.


PASS SCHOOL OF MODERN HISTORY AND
POLITICS

(i) DECREE

Pass School of Modern History and Politics

(Ch. VI, Sect. I. C, § 3)'.

7 Ibid., p. 1018, l. 27, after `English,' insert `in
the
Honour
School of Modern History and Politics,'.

8 Ibid., l. 33, after `English;' insert

`and
in Modern History in Honour Moderations in Modern History and
Politics;'.

9 Ibid, p. 1022, l. 7, after `Politics'
insert

`in Honour Moderations in Modern History and Politics, and'.

10 Ibid., l. 9, after `Politics' insert `in
the
Honour School of Modern History and Politics, and'.

11 Ibid., p. 1038, after l. 43 insert:

`Three in Politics and three in Modern History for Honour
Moderations in Modern History and Politics.'

12 Ibid., p. 1041, after l. 45 insert:

`Four for Modern History          in the Honour School of Modern 
Four for Politics                    History and Politics.'

13 Cll. 1–3, 8, 9, and 11 of this
decree
(governing Honour Moderations) shall be effective from 1 October
1999
(for first examination in 2000); cll. 4–7, 10, and 12
(governing
the Honour School and Pass School) shall be effective from 1
October
2001 (for first examination in 2002).

Key to Decree
(2)

Cl. 1 inserts Modern History and Politics into the list of
subjects
for Honour Moderations.

Cl. 2 provides for Honour Moderations in Modern History and
Politics.

Cll. 3, 4, and 5 provide for the examinations for Modern
History
and Politics in the First and Second Public Examinations and Pass
School respectively.

Cl. 6 provides for the Final Honour School and the Pass School
of
Modern History and Politics.

Cll. 7, 10, and 12 provide for the appointment of examiners
for
the Honour School of Modern History and Politics.

Cll. 8, 9, and 11 provide for the appointment of Moderators
for
Honour Moderations in Modern History and Politics.

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section



Decree (3): Review of BCL/M.Jur. and
establishment of M.Phil. in Law

Explanatory note

The following decree, made on the recommendation of the Law Board
and
with the concurrence of the General Board, provides for changes
in
the arrangements governing admission and examination for the
Degrees
of Bachelor of Civil Law and Magister Juris, following a review
of
these courses by the Law Board. At present, candidates may
supplicate
for the degree of BCL after one or two years of study. For the
one-year BCL, candidates take examinations in four subjects; for
the
two-year BCL, they may either offer a further three subjects, or
follow a course in legal research method and write a thesis. The
M.Jur. is at present a one-year course, for which candidates
offer
either four subjects or three subjects and a dissertation.

Under the new legislation, with effect from admissions in
1999,
the BCL and the M.Jur. will each be awarded to successful
candidates
after a one-year taught course, as part of which candidates for
either degree may offer a dissertation. Candidates taking either
the
BCL or the M.Jur. may apply to continue their studies for a
further
year, in which they will follow a course in legal research method
and
write a thesis of up to 25,000 words. Successful candidates
taking
the two-year course may supplicate for the degree of M.Phil. in
Law,
as well as for the degree of BCL or M.Jur. as the case may be.

The revised decree governing the BCL, M.Jur., and M.Phil. in
Law
is reproduced in full below for clarity, although §§
6 and
7 reproduce §§ 4 and 5 in the existing decre except for
minor amendments in nomenclature.

Associated changes in regulations are set out in `Examinations
and
Boards' below.

Text of Decree (3)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997,
p.
553, after l. 24 insert:

`Law—Law (see Ch. VI, Sect. X (Part 14))'.

2 Ibid., delete pp. 899–902 and
substitute:

`14

TIME AND EXERCISES REQUIRED FOR DEGREES IN
CIVIL
LAW AND FOR THE DEGREES OF MAGISTER
JURIS
AND
MASTER OF PHILOSOPHY IN LAW

(i) DECREE

§ 1. Admission of Candidates for the Degrees of Bachelor of
Civil Law, Magister Juris, and Master of Philosophy in Law

1. Any person may be admitted by the Board of the Faculty of
Law
as a candidate for the Degrees of Bachelor of Civil Law, Magister
Juris, or Master of Philosophy in Law provided that the following
conditions have been satisfied:

(a) The application must be supported by some college
or
hall or other society.

(b) A candidate must either (i) have passed all the
examinations required for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts and have
obtained honours in the Second Public Examination, or have
obtained
honours in a degree examination of another university, such
university having been approved by Council for the purpose of the
status of Senior Student, or (ii) in the opinion of the Board of
the
Faculty of Law, be otherwise adequately qualified to undertake
the
course.

(c) A candidate must satisfy relevant provisions
prescribed in the regulations made by the board, and any
conditions
the board may impose.

2. Any student for these degrees who is not a graduate of the
University may wear the same gown as that worn by Students for
the
Degree of Doctor of Philosophy.


§ 2. Degrees of Bachelor of Civil Law and
Magister
Juris

Any person who has been admitted under the provisions of §
1
above may supplicate for the Degree of Bachelor of Civil Law or
the
Degree of Magister Juris provided:

(i) that he or she has satisfied the examiners in the
examinations prescribed in this section; and

(ii) that he or she has kept three terms of statutory
residence
as a matriculated member of the University after admission as a
Student for the Degree of Bachelor of Civil Law or Magister
Juris,
whichever is the earlier.


§ 3. Degree of Master of Philosophy in
Law

Any person who has been admitted under the provisions of §
1
above may supplicate for the Degree of Master of Philosophy in
Law
provided:

(i) that he or she has satisfied the examiners in the
examinations prescribed in this section; and

(ii) that he or she has kept six terms of statutory residence
as
a matriculated member of the University after admission as a
Student
for the Degree of Bachelor of Civil Law or Magister Juris in Law,
whichever is the earlier.


§ 4. Examinations for the Degrees of Bachelor of
Civil
Law, Magister Juris, and Master of
Philosophy
in Law

1. The examinations for the Degrees of Bachelor of Civil Law,
Magister Juris, and Master of Philosophy in Law shall comprise
such
subjects as the Board of the Faculty of Law shall from time to
time
by regulation determine.

2. The examination shall be under the supervision of the
board.


§ 5. Supervision of Students

Every candidate who elects to offer a thesis or dissertation
shall
seek approval from the Board of the Faculty of Law as prescribed
in
the regulations made by the board. Subject to such approval,
supervision shall be provided as prescribed in Ch. VI, Sect.
XXXI,
§ 4, provided that references to the Degree of Master of
Studies
shall be deemed to refer to the Degrees of Bachelor of Civil Law,
Magister Juris, or Master of Philosophy in Law as the case may
be.


§ 6. Admission of Bachelors of Civil Law and Holders
of the
Degree

of Magister Juris or the Degree of Master of Philosophy
in Law
to the Degree of Doctor of Civil Law

1. Any person who has been admitted to the Degree of Bachelor
of
Civil Law or to the Degree of Magister Juris or Master of
Philosophy
in Law, and who has completed fifteen terms from the date of such
admission, may apply to the Board of the Faculty of Law for leave
to
supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of Civil Law. The application
shall be made through the Secretary of Faculties, and shall be
accompanied by

(1) evidence that the candidate's application has the approval
of
his or her society;

(2) the fee prescribed in Ch. VIII, Sect. I, § 2 (see
Appendix I);

(3) evidence of the candidate's fitness for the degree. This
evidence must consist of three copies of a published book or of
published books or papers, treating in a scientific manner of one
or
more legal subjects and consisting of an original contribution
to the
advancement of knowledge of such substance and distinction as to
give
the candidate authoritative status in some branch or branches of
legal learning. A candidate who submits papers or books which
have
been produced in collaboration shall state in respect of each
item
the extent of the candidate's own contribution.

2. On receipt of the application the Board of the Faculty of
Law,
having determined that the evidence submitted is of the
appropriate
kind, shall appoint not fewer than two judges, who shall report
to
the board on the sufficiency of the evidence.

3. If the board, after consideration of the reports of the
judges, shall approve the evidence as sufficient for the degree,
it
shall give leave to the candidate to supplicate for the degree,
and
shall notify its decision in the University Gazette.
One
copy of the evidence shall remain in the possession of the
University
for deposit in Bodley's Library, provided that no book or paper
of
which the Library already possesses a copy shall be so deposited
except with the consent of the candidate and of the Librarian,
unless
the copy submitted by the candidate shall be of a different issue
or
shall contain alterations or additions.


§ 7. Admission to the Degrees of Bachelor of Civil Law
and
Doctor of Civil Law by Accumulation

1. Any person belonging to one of the following classes may
apply
to the Board of the Faculty of Law for permission to supplicate
for
the Degrees of Bachelor of Civil Law and Doctor of Civil Law at
the
same time under the conditions set forth in this sub-section:

(a) Masters of Arts, except those on whom the degree
has
been conferred by decree or special resolution, who have entered
upon
the sixty-sixth term from their matriculation at this University,
or,
if they have been incorporated in this University, the
sixty-sixth
term from their matriculation at the University of Cambridge or
of
Dublin;

(b) persons on whom the Degree of Master of Arts has
been
conferred by decree or special resolution, other than a degree
honoris causa, and who have entered upon the forty-fifth
term from their admission to that degree;

(c) Doctors of Philosophy, or Masters of Letters or
of
Science or of Studies, who have entered upon the sixty-sixth term
from their matriculation at this University.

2. The application of any such person shall be made to the
board,
and dealt with by the board, in the manner prescribed in §
6
above.

3. If the board approves the evidence as sufficient for the
Degree of Doctor of Civil Law, it shall give leave to the
candidate
to supplicate for the Degrees of Bachelor of Civil Law and Doctor
of
Civil Law at the same time, although the candidate shall not have
passed the examination for the former degree.'

3 Ibid., p. 1053, delete ll. 29–31
and
renumber existing provisos (iii)–(vi) (pp. 1053–5) as
provisos (ii)–(v).

4 Ibid., p. 1054, ll. 21–2, delete
`or in
the examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Civil Law'.

5 Ibid., l. 28, delete `(a)', and
delete ll. 33–5.

6 Ibid., ll. 39–42, delete `or in the
Bachelor of Civil Law Examination ... Degree of Magister Juris'.

7 Ibid., p. 1061, l. 13, delete
`Bachelor of Civil Law,'.

8 Ibid., l. 17, delete `Magister
Juris,'.

9 Ibid., p. 1068, after l. 9 insert:


`(l) Examination for the Degrees of Bachelor of
Civil
Law and Magister Juris

Names of candidates who in [here insert term and
year]
have satisfied [or have been adjudged worthy of distinction
by]
the examiners in
[here insert title of examination].


A. B.—College  

C. D.—Hall  

E. F.—Society  

                                 G. H.           

                                 I. J.  Examiners

                                 K. L.

[Candidates who acquire four or more credits by offering two or
more
of the subjects listed in Schedule E of Part 14, or by offering
one
of those subjects and a dissertation on a topic recognised by the
Graduate Studies Committee in Law as being within the fields of
European and Comparative Law, shall be awarded the title
`Bachelor of
Civil Law [or Magister Juris, or Master
of
Philosophy] in European and Comparative Law'.]'

10 This decree shall be effective from 1
October 1999, provided that candidates admitted in 1998 to the
two-year course for the Degree of Bachelor of Civil Law shall be
examined in 2000 under the decree and regulations as they stood
at 30
September 1999.


Key to Decree (3)

Cl. 1 adds Law to the subjects for the M.Phil.

Cl. 2 inserts the new provisions governing the BCL, M.Jur.,
and
M.Phil. in Law.

Cll. 3–6 remove the provisions for the BCL and M.Jur. to
be
classified; in future, distinctions will be awarded to worthy
candidates.

Cll. 7–9 change the provisions governing the lists of
successful candidates for the BCL and M.Jur.

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section



Decree (4): Election of Assessor over
the
statutory age limit

Notwithstanding the provisions of Tit. IX, Sect. vi, § 1,
cl. 2
(Statutes, 1997, p. 70), Professor R.A. Mayou,
Fellow of
Nuffield College, may serve as Assessor for the year beginning
17
March 1999.

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section



2 Register of Congregation

Mr Vice-Chancellor reports that the following names have been
added
to the Register of Congregation:

Bitel, A., MA, St John's

Blackshaw, S.E., MA, St Hilda's

Butterfield, J.N., MA, D.Phil., All Souls

Leach, E.E., MA, St John's

Rugman, A.M., MA, Templeton

Shepard, A.J., MA, St John's

Thompson, M., MA, Templeton

Weatherill, S.R., MA, Somerville

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section



CONGREGATION 17 March


General Resolution approved nemine
contradicente

That this House take note of the Report of the Commission of
Inquiry.

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section



CONGREGATION 18 March


1 Admission of Proctors

ROGER WILLIAM AINSWORTH, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Catherine's
College, and MICHAEL WILLIAM HART, MA, D.PHIL. (MA Cambridge),
Fellow
of Exeter College, were presented to the Vice-Chancellor and
admitted
to office, the former as Senior Proctor and the latter as Junior
Proctor for the ensuing year.

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section



2 Admission of Assessor

ANGUS MORTON BOWIE, MA, D.PHIL. (MA, PH.D. Cambridge), Fellow of
Queen's College, was presented to the Vice-Chancellor and
admitted to
office as Assessor for the ensuing year.


3 Admission of Pro-Proctors

The Senior Proctor nominated RICHARD JOHN PARISH, MA, D.PHIL. (BA
Newcastle), and THE REVD COLIN PETER THOMPSON, MA, D.PHIL.,
Fellows
of St Catherine's College, to be his Deputies.

The Junior Proctor nominated SUSAN ELIZABETH MARSHALL, MA, and
GUY
ROWLANDS, MA, D.PHIL., Fellows of Exeter College, to be his
Deputies.

The Deputies were presented to the Vice-Chancellor and admitted
to
office.

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section



BOARDS OF FACULTIES

For changes in regulations for examinations, to come into effect
on 3
April, see `Examinations and Boards' below.

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section






<br /> Oxford University Gazette, 19 March 1998: University<br /> Agenda<br />

University Agenda


Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
previously published or recurrent entry.]

  • *
    Note on procedures in Congregation
  • *
    List of forthcoming Degree Days
  • *
    List of forthcoming Matriculation Ceremonies

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue



    CONGREGATION 24 March


    Notice

    The meeting of Congregation is cancelled. The sole
    business comprises questions to which no opposition has
    been notified and in respect of which no request for an
    adjournment has been received, and Mr Vice-Chancellor
    will accordingly declare the preambles adopted and the
    special resolutions carried without a meeting under the
    provisions of Tit. II, Sect. iii, cl. 11
    (Statutes, 1997, p. 8).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    CONGREGATION 28 April 2 p.m.

    ¶ Members of Congregation are reminded that
    written notice of any intention to vote against the
    preambles of the following statutes, signed by at least
    two members of Congregation, must be given to the
    Registrar by noon on Monday, 20 April (see the Guide to
    Procedures in Congregation cited in the note at the end
    of `University Agenda').


    Promulgation of Statutes


    Statute (1): Revision of Title
    XIII, concerning university discipline

    Explanatory note

    In Michaelmas Term 1996 Council referred the report of
    the University's Committee to Review Disciplinary
    Procedures and the interim report of the Harassment
    Review Committee to the Conference of Colleges for the
    Conference's views on the various recommendations. The
    Conference in turn set up a small working party under the
    chairmanship of the Principal of St Hugh's to consider
    the reports. The report of that working party was
    considered by Council's General Purposes Committee in
    Michaelmas Term 1997. In the light of consideration of
    the various recommendations made, a substantial revision
    of the provisions of Title XIII has been undertaken.

    The purpose behind the following amended statute is
    four-fold. First, to enable greater congruence of action
    between the University and colleges by the adoption of
    common definitions and offences (although it is
    appreciated that not all colleges will necessarily wish
    to adopt the model by-laws put forward by the Conference
    of Colleges Working Party). Secondly, and in line with
    recommendations contained in the report prepared for the
    CVCP in 1994 (the Zellick Report), the range of offences
    has now been widened to include violent and offensive
    behaviour and misuse of drugs. Thirdly, and again in line
    with recommendations contained in the Zellick Report, the
    amendments are intended to clarify the University's
    procedures.

    Fourthly, the amendments are intended to replace the
    regulation on harassment with two new offences in Title
    XIII. The first of these is the offence, recommended by
    Zellick, of `violent, indecent, disorderly, threatening,
    or offensive behaviour or language' which will catch any
    substantial act of harassment. The second new offence is
    one of harassment, to catch behaviour where, while a
    particular incident might not individually attract
    disciplinary censure, repeated incidents cause offence
    and may warrant disciplinary action.

    (1) WHEREAS it is expedient, in the light of
    the review undertaken by the University of its
    disciplinary procedures, to revise Title XIII of the
    Statutes, NOW THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD, in exercise of
    the powers in that behalf conferred upon it by the
    Universities of Oxford and Cambridge Act, 1923, and of
    all other powers enabling it, ENACTS, subject to the
    approval of Her Majesty in Council, AS FOLLOWS.

    Delete Title XIII (Statutes, 1997, pp.
    97–105) and substitute:

    `TITLE XIII

    OF UNIVERSITY DISCIPLINE

    (This Title is a `Queen-in-Council'
    statute—see Title XIV, Section VII.
    )

    1. For the purposes of this Title, the following
    words shall have the following meanings:

    (a) `college' shall include any of the
    societies recognised in Title VII;

    (b) the
    term `Junior Member' shall include both a member of the
    University who has not been admitted to membership of
    Convocation, and a member of the University who has been
    admitted to Convocation but who is registered as a
    student, or as a candidate, for a degree or diploma of
    the University;

    (c) `expulsion' by the University shall mean
    the permanent loss of membership of the University and
    college (and where college statutes or by-laws so
    provide, loss of membership of the University shall also
    mean loss of membership of the college concerned);

    (d) `banning' by the University shall mean a
    withdrawal of the rights of access to specified premises
    or facilities for a fixed period or pending the
    fulfilment of certain conditions;

    (e) `rustication' by the University shall
    mean the withdrawal of the right of access to the
    premises or facilities of the University for a fixed
    period or pending the fulfilment of certain conditions;

    (f) `suspension' by the University shall mean
    a withdrawal of the right of access as in (e)
    above where action is taken as an interim measure pending
    further investigation, or where action is required in a
    non-disciplinary situation. Such withdrawal may be for a
    limited period pending the fulfilment of certain
    conditions, or may be indefinite;

    (g) `in a university context' shall mean any
    of the following:

    (i) on university/college premises;

    (ii) in the course of university activity in Oxford,
    be it academic, sporting, cultural, or social;

    (iii) in the course of university-based activities
    outside Oxford, such as field trips, laboratory or
    library work, or sporting, musical, or theatrical tours;

    ( h) an `offence' shall be any breach of
    clause 2 below, breaches of the regulations and rules
    covering the dress of Junior Members, the use of
    libraries, or conduct in examinations, breaches of any
    regulations or rules relating to clubs, publications, and
    motor vehicles, breaches of any regulations made by the
    Rules Committee, or breaches of any rule referred to in
    clause 6 below;

    (i) `harassment' shall mean a course of unwarranted
    behaviour such as to cause and as may reasonably be
    expected to cause such distress or annoyance as seriously
    to disrupt the work or substantially to reduce the
    quality of life of another person.

    2.

    (a) No member of the University shall in
    a university context intentionally or recklessly

    (i) disrupt or attempt to disrupt teaching or study
    or research or the administrative, sporting, social, or
    other activities of the University, or disrupt or
    attempt to disrupt the lawful exercise of freedom of
    speech by members, students, and employees of the
    University and by visiting speakers, or obstruct or
    attempt to obstruct any employee or agent of the
    University in the performance of his or her duties;

    (ii) damage or deface any property of the University
    or of any college or of any member, officer, or employee
    of the University or of any college, or knowingly
    misappropriate such property;

    (iii) occupy or use or attempt to occupy or use any
    property or facilities of the University or of any
    college except as may be expressly or impliedly
    authorised by the university or college authorities
    concerned;

    (iv) forge or falsify any university certificate or
    similar document or knowingly make false statements
    concerning standing or results obtained in examinations;

    (v) engage in any activity likely to cause injury or
    to impair safety;

    (vi) engage in violent, indecent, disorderly,
    threatening, or offensive behaviour or language;

    (vii) engage in any dishonest behaviour in relation
    to the University or the holding of any university
    office;

    (viii) refuse to disclose his or her name and other
    relevant details to an officer or an employee or agent
    of the University or of any college in circumstances
    where it is reasonable to require that that information
    be given;

    (ix) use, offer, sell, or give to any person drugs,
    the possession or use of which is illegal;

    (x) engage in the harassment of any member, visitor,
    employee, or agent of the University or of any college.

    (b) Every member of the University shall, to
    the extent that such provisions may be applicable to that
    member, comply with the provisions of the Code of
    Practice on Freedom of Speech issued from time to time by
    Council pursuant to the duty imposed by Section 43 of the
    Education (No. 2) Act 1986 and duly published in the
    University Gazette.

    3. There shall be a Rules Committee, the constitution
    and powers of which shall be as set out in Schedule I
    hereto.

    4. Alleged breaches of clause 2 above shall be dealt
    with in the following manner:

    (a) In the case of a Senior Member of the
    University who is an employee of the University,
    complaints shall be made to the Registrar, who shall
    invoke the relevant procedures under Title XVI, Part III.

    (b) In the case of a Senior Member of the
    University who is not an employee of the University and
    who is not registered as a student for a degree or
    diploma of the University, complaints shall be made to
    the Registrar, who shall notify the relevant authority.

    (c) In the case of a Junior Member, alleged
    breaches shall be dealt with by the procedure set out
    below.

    5. A penalty of suspension or rustication imposed by
    a college shall apply also to university premises and
    facilities, subject to a right of appeal in writing to
    the Proctors, who shall have discretion to hear oral
    representations from the Junior Member concerned. Where
    the Proctors are satisfied that there are special
    circumstances, they may permit the Junior Member
    concerned to continue to have access to university
    premises and facilities, with or without conditions as to
    such access.

    6. The Proctors shall have power, if they consider
    the matter urgent, to make rules to cover a matter not
    covered by clause 2 above or by any other provision. Such
    rules shall have immediate effect, and shall be
    published. Any exercise of this power shall be reported
    at once to the Rules Committee, and the rule shall lapse
    unless the Rules Committee confirms it by a regulation,
    in the same or substantially the same terms, made and
    published in the University Gazette within
    three weeks of Full Term from the day the rule was made
    by the Proctors. If the rule is not confirmed, it shall
    none the less have effect from the time at which it was
    made until the time the Rules Committee decides not to
    confirm it, or until it lapses, whichever is the earlier.

    7. The Proctors shall have the duty of taking such
    steps as they may consider necessary to enforce and
    prevent breaches of clause 2 above, the regulations made
    by the Rules Committee, and the regulations, rules, or
    other provisions covering the matters referred to in
    clause 6 above; and to identify those responsible when an
    offence has been committed. They shall have the power to
    summon any member of the University before them to assist
    them in their inquiries, and failure to attend without
    reasonable cause shall be an offence under clause 2
    (a) (i) above.

    8. If the Proctors believe that there is prima facie
    evidence that an offence has been committed they shall,
    if they decide to proceed,

    (a) if the alleged offender is a Senior
    Member, inform him or her in writing of the offence
    alleged against him or her and that the charge will be
    brought to the attention of the Registrar, who shall
    invoke the relevant procedures under Title XVI, Part III
    if the Senior Member is an employee of the University,
    and who shall in any other case notify the relevant
    authority;

    (b) if the alleged offender is a Junior
    Member, inform him or her in writing of the alleged
    offence and summon him or her before them. In the event
    of non-compliance, they may rusticate the Junior Member
    concerned. In the event that the Junior Member notifies
    the Proctors in writing that he or she proposes to opt
    for a hearing before the Disciplinary Court, the Proctors
    may dispense with his or her personal attendance.

    9.

    (a) When a Junior Member attends under
    clause 8 above, the Proctors shall

    (i) if the offence is a minor offence, inform the
    person charged that the offence will be dealt with by
    them;

    (ii) in any other case, offer the person charged the
    choice between having the charge dealt with by them and
    having it dealt with by the Disciplinary Court. If in
    their opinion the circumstances of the case so warrant,
    the Proctors may refuse to deal with the charge and may
    instead refer it for consideration by the Disciplinary
    Court.

    (b) An offence shall be treated as a minor
    offence when the Proctors are satisfied that they should,
    if the charge were proved, not impose expulsion,
    rustication, or a monetary penalty exceeding the sum set
    out in (c) below.

    (c) The maximum financial penalty excluding
    damages which may be imposed in the case of a minor
    offence shall be £60, and in any other case shall be
    £1,000.

    (d) From 1 October 1998 the maximum penalties
    shall be fixed every three years by Council by a decree
    to be published with the University's financial decrees,
    provided always that any increase in the amount shall not
    exceed the increase over the preceding three years in the
    Retail Price Index.

    10. The Disciplinary Court shall be constituted in
    accordance with the provisions of Schedule II hereto.

    11. If the alleged offence is one for which the alleged
    offender is liable to be prosecuted in a court of law,
    the Proctors shall not proceed, if at all, unless they
    are satisfied either that any criminal proceedings in
    respect of that act or conduct have been completed,
    whether by conviction or acquittal or discontinuance of
    the proceedings, or that the alleged offender is unlikely
    to be prosecuted in a court of law in respect of that act
    or conduct.

    12. In the event that criminal proceedings are pending or
    that the Proctors are of the opinion that action is
    necessary to safeguard the interests of other members of
    the University, the Proctors shall be entitled to suspend
    the alleged offender from some or all of the premises or
    facilities of the University pending the outcome of such
    criminal proceedings or hearing before the Proctors or
    the Disciplinary or Appeal Court. A Junior Member
    suspended in this way for more than seven days shall have
    a right of appeal to the Vice-Chancellor or to his of her
    duly authorised deputy.

    13. In the event that a Junior Member has been convicted
    of a criminal offence of such seriousness that an
    immediate term of imprisonment might have been imposed
    (and whether or not such a sentence was in fact imposed
    on the Junior Member), the Proctors shall have power to
    expel such Junior Member or to impose such lesser penalty
    as they think fit, subject to a right of appeal to the
    Disciplinary Court.

    14. If the offence is to be dealt with by the Proctors,
    the person charged shall have the right to have the
    proceedings adjourned so that he or she may prepare his
    or her defence. The Proctors and the person charged may
    call witnesses (and failure by a member of the University
    to attend when summoned shall, unless there was
    reasonable cause for such failure, be an offence under
    clause 2 (a) (i) above) and may question any
    witness. The person charged may bring any member of
    Congregation to help him or her in his or her defence. If
    the Proctors find the charge proved, they may, subject to
    the provisions of clause 9 above, impose such penalty as
    they think fit.

    15. There shall be no appeal from decisions taken by the
    Proctors on minor offences unless the Junior Member
    concerned is given leave to appeal by the Chairman of the
    Disciplinary Court.

    16. The Disciplinary Court shall hear

    (a) appeals from decisions taken by the
    Proctors under clause 14 above, on offences where the
    person charged elected to have the case dealt with by the
    Proctors, or from decisions taken on minor offences where
    leave has been given under clause 15 above;

    (b) cases of offences where the person
    charged or the Proctors have elected to have the case
    dealt with by the Disciplinary Court.

    17. Where a case is referred for hearing before the
    Disciplinary Court, the person charged shall be given the
    choice of a hearing in public or in private, and with or
    without two Junior Members sitting on the court under the
    provisions of clause 1 of Schedule II.

    18. Notice of intention to appeal under clause 16
    (a) above must be lodged with the Proctors
    within seven days of the Proctors' decision and specify
    whether the appeal is against verdict or penalty, or
    both. The appellant must in addition state within
    fourteen days of the Proctors' decision the grounds for
    his or her appeal, whether he or she wishes two Junior
    Members to sit on the Disciplinary Court under the
    provisions of clause 1 of Schedule II, and whether he or
    she wishes the Disciplinary Court to sit in public.

    19. In the case of appeals under clause 16 (a)
    above, the Proctors and the Chairman of the Disciplinary
    Court shall have power to suspend the application of a
    penalty pending the outcome of an appeal against the
    imposition of that penalty.

    20. Subject to the provisions of this statute, the
    Disciplinary Court shall determine its own procedure and
    shall be empowered to make interlocutory orders on
    procedural matters. It shall also have power to strike
    out an appeal on the grounds of non-prosecution.

    21. In any case before the Disciplinary Court, the person
    charged may be represented by any person he or she
    chooses (including, if he or she so wishes, a barrister
    or solicitor engaged in professional practice).

    22. The Chairman of the Disciplinary Court shall be
    empowered to act alone in uncontentious procedural or
    technical matters.

    23. (a) In the case of a hearing under clause 16
    (a) above, the Disciplinary Court, if it finds
    the case proved, may confirm, reduce, or increase the
    penalty imposed by the Proctors, and the Disciplinary
    Court's decision in such cases shall be final.

    (b) In the case of a hearing under clause 16
    (b) above, the Disciplinary Court, if it finds
    the case proved, may impose such penalty as it thinks
    fit.

    24. The Disciplinary Court may reach a decision by a
    simple majority of members present and voting.

    25. The Disciplinary Court shall sit in private unless
    the person charged asks that the hearing be held in
    public.

    26. In all cases coming before the Disciplinary Court,
    the onus of proof shall lie on the Proctor bringing the
    charge, and the burden of proof shall be to the civil
    standard. He or she and the person charged may call
    witnesses, may be represented by anyone they choose
    (including, if they so wish, a barrister or solicitor
    engaged in professional practice), and may cross-examine
    any witness. Failure by a member of the University to
    attend when summoned to appear before the Court as
    defendant or witness, unless after inquiry the Court is
    satisfied that there was reasonable cause for such
    failure, in the case of a Junior Member shall be
    summarily punishable by the Court by fine, suspension
    from membership of the University, or rustication, on
    such terms as the Court may think fit; and in the case of
    a Senior Member shall be punishable by making a complaint
    to the Registrar, who shall invoke the relevant
    procedures under Title XVI, Part III. The person charged
    shall be given a reasoned decision in writing.

    27. In the case of conviction by the Disciplinary Court
    under clause 16 (b) above, the person convicted
    may appeal, against sentence or conviction or both, to an
    Appeal Court, which shall be constituted in accordance
    with the provisions of Schedule III hereto.

    28. The Chairman of the Disciplinary Court or of the
    Appeal Court may suspend the application of a penalty
    pending the outcome of an appeal against the imposition
    of that penalty under clause 23 (b) above.

    29. No witnesses or new evidence shall be allowed (unless
    the Appeal Court is satisfied that a serious miscarriage
    of justice might otherwise result, in which event it may
    either hear and act upon such new evidence or remit the
    case to be heard again by the Disciplinary Court), but
    the Proctor bringing the charge and the appellant may be
    represented by any person they choose (including, if they
    so wish, a barrister or solicitor engaged in professional
    practice). The Appeal Court, if it affirms the decision
    of the Disciplinary Court, may confirm or reduce the
    penalty imposed by the Disciplinary Court, and its
    decision shall be final. The appellant shall be given a
    reasoned decision in writing.

    30. The Clerk of the Disciplinary Court shall be
    responsible in all cases under clause 16 (b)
    above for keeping such records as may be required should
    there be an appeal under Clause 23 (b) above.
    Written notice of an appeal under clause 23 (b)
    above must be lodged with the Clerk within a week of the
    Disciplinary Court's decision, and when lodging the
    appeal the appellant must state whether he or she wishes
    the appeal to be held in public, and whether he or she
    wishes to be represented by a solicitor or barrister
    engaged in professional practice. The Clerk shall at once
    inform the Vice-Chancellor, who shall thereupon appoint
    another member of the panel set up under clause 6 of
    Schedule II below, to make the necessary arrangements for
    the hearing of the appeal and to act as Clerk of the
    Appeal Court.

    31. The Appeal Court may reach a decision by a simple
    majority of members present and voting. If any one
    vacancy shall occur in the Appeal Court after the hearing
    of a case has begun, the remaining members may, if they
    think fit, complete that hearing and decide upon it.

    32. Subject to the provisions of this statute, the Appeal
    Court shall determine its own procedure.

    33. The Appeal Court shall sit in private unless the
    appellant asks that the hearing be held in public.

    34. In the event of any dispute or uncertainty, and
    notwithstanding the provisions of Title I, the Appeal
    Court shall be empowered to interpret Statutes, Decrees,
    and Regulations as they bear on cases before it.

    35. If during a hearing before the Disciplinary Court or
    the Appeal Court the conduct of any person is disorderly
    or otherwise in breach of clause 2 above in respect of
    the Court, the Court shall, if he or she is a Junior
    Member of the University, have summary power to fine,
    suspend from membership of the University, or rusticate
    him or her, on such terms as the Court may think fit, and
    if he or she is a Senior Member of the University, have
    power to make a complaint to the Registrar, who shall
    invoke the relevant procedures under Title XVI, Part III.
    A Junior Member of the University convicted under this
    clause shall be given a reasoned decision in writing.

    36. (a) In the case of conviction by the
    Disciplinary Court acting in the exercise of the summary
    powers conferred on it under clauses 26 and 35 above, the
    person convicted may appeal against conviction or against
    a monetary penalty exceeding the amount of the maximum
    penalty which the Proctors may impose for minor offences
    under clause 9 (c) above or against a sentence
    of rustication or suspension of membership of the
    University, or against both conviction and such sentence,
    to an Appeal Court constituted as under Schedule III
    below. The appellant may be represented by any person he
    or she chooses (including, if he or she so wishes, a
    barrister or solicitor engaged in professional practice).
    Written notice of such an appeal must be lodged with the
    Clerk of the Disciplinary Court within seven days from
    such conviction, and when lodging the appeal the
    appellant must state whether he or she wishes the appeal
    to be held in public and whether he or she wishes to be
    represented by a solicitor or barrister engaged in
    professional practice. The Clerk shall at once inform the
    Vice-Chancellor, who shall thereupon appoint another
    member of the panel set up under clause 6 of Schedule II
    below, to make the necessary arrangements for the hearing
    of the appeal and to act as Clerk of the Appeal Court,
    which shall hear the appeal according to whatever
    procedure the Court shall think fit. If the Appeal Court
    affirms the conviction, the Court may confirm or reduce
    the penalty imposed by the Disciplinary Court, and its
    decision shall be final. The appellant shall be given a
    reasoned decision in writing. Notwithstanding the right
    of appeal hereby conferred, the Disciplinary Court shall
    (unless satisfied that a serious miscarriage of justice
    might otherwise result) continue the hearing of the case
    during which the offence summarily punished was
    committed.

    (b) In the case of conviction by the Appeal
    Court acting in the exercise of the summary powers
    conferred on it under clause 35 above the person
    convicted may apply in writing to the High Steward within
    seven days from such conviction for leave to appeal
    against conviction or against a monetary penalty
    exceeding a sum equivalent to twice the amount of the
    maximum penalty which the Proctors may impose for minor
    offences under clause 9 (c) above or against a
    sentence of rustication or suspension from membership of
    the University or against both conviction and such
    sentence. If he or she allows the application, the High
    Steward (or any person being a barrister or solicitor of
    not less than five years' standing, and not being a
    member of the Appeal Court, whom the High Steward shall
    nominate as his or her deputy) shall hear the appeal
    according to whatever procedure the High Steward (or his
    or her deputy) shall think fit. If the High Steward (or
    his or her deputy) affirms the conviction, he or she may
    confirm or reduce the penalty imposed, and his or her
    decision shall be final. Notwithstanding any application
    for leave to appeal (whether or not granted), the Appeal
    Court shall (unless satisfied that a serious miscarriage
    of justice might otherwise result) continue the hearing
    of the appeal during which the offence summarily punished
    was committed.

    37. The Proctors shall at the end of Hilary Term in each
    year make a report to Congregation giving the number and
    kinds of offences dealt with during the year by them, by
    the Disciplinary Court, and by the Appeal Court, and
    giving the number and kinds of penalty imposed.

    38. At the conclusion of a hearing before the
    Disciplinary or the Appeal Court, the court shall be
    empowered to direct the University to pay costs to the
    Junior Member; the amount of such costs shall be at the
    discretion of the Court concerned.

    39. (a) Where any fine is imposed upon a Junior
    Member, whether by the Proctors under clause 14 above or
    by the Disciplinary Court under clauses 23, 26, and 35
    above or by the Appeal Court under clause 35 above, it
    shall be paid within seven days whether or not an appeal
    is pending, and in the event of non-payment the Proctors
    or the Disciplinary Court or the Appeal Court, whoever or
    whichever imposed the fine, may rusticate the Junior
    Member.

    (b) Fines or any damages imposed by the
    Proctors shall be paid through the Clerk to the Proctors
    and fines or any damages imposed by the Disciplinary
    Court or the Appeal Court shall be paid through the
    respective Clerks of the Courts.

    SCHEDULE I

    Rules Committee

    1. There shall be a Rules Committee consisting of:

    (1) the Senior Proctor (or in his or her absence the
    Junior Proctor), who shall act as chairman;

    (2), (3) the two persons who will be Proctors in the
    following year;

    (4), (5) two College Deans appointed by a special
    meeting to which each college or other society included
    in Title VII except the Permanent Private Halls shall be
    entitled to send two representatives;

    (6) one member of Congregation appointed by Council;

    (7), (8) two Junior Members (who must at the time
    they take up office have been matriculated for at least
    three terms) elected by the Council of the Oxford
    University Student Union from among its members;

    (9), (10) two Junior Members (who must at the time
    they take up office have been matriculated for at least
    three terms) elected by the Executive of the Oxford
    University Student Union not necessarily from among its
    members;

    (11), (12) two Junior Members elected by the Graduate
    Committee of the Oxford University Student Union from
    among its members.

    The members under (4)–(6) shall hold office for
    three years, and shall not be eligible for reappointment
    until the expiry of three years from the date on which
    their period of office expires. The members under
    (7)–(12) shall hold office for one year and shall
    not be eligible for reappointment under (7)–(12). If
    a member under (4)–(12) dies or resigns or leaves
    the University during his or her period of office, his or
    her place shall either be filled for the remainder of his
    or her period of office by the body which appointed him
    or her or (if the appointing body shall so decide) be
    left vacant. If he or she dies or resigns or leaves the
    University before the expiry of one-half of his or her
    period of office, the rules about re-eligibility shall
    apply to his or her successor as if his or her successor
    had served for a full period; otherwise the rules shall
    not apply. Except in the case of casual vacancies, the
    members under (4)–(12) shall take up office on the
    Wednesday in the week after the end of Michaelmas Full
    Term.

    2. The Rules Committee shall make regulations for the
    conduct of Junior Members governing such matters as it
    shall think fit, except that it shall not make
    regulations

    (a) covering matters covered by clause 2 of
    Title XIII above;

    (b) covering the dress of Junior Members, the
    use of libraries, or conduct in examinations.

    3. The Rules Committee shall in each Hilary Term
    review the regulations of the committee in force and
    shall make any amendments or new regulations it considers
    necessary before the end of each Hilary Full Term. Any
    such amendments or new regulations shall be published as
    having effect from the beginning of the following
    Michaelmas Full Term. The Proctors shall arrange for all
    the regulations of the committee to be printed, and for
    copies to be sent to each college and other society for
    distribution to all Junior Members on first coming into
    residence. The committee shall not make or amend
    regulations at other times except for regulations
    confirming a rule made by the Proctors under clause 6 of
    Title XIII above.

    4. Any six members shall constitute a quorum for
    meetings of the Rules Committee. In the case of equality
    of votes at any meeting at which not all members are
    present, the matter shall be adjourned until a further
    meeting. If at this further meeting the voting is still
    equal, or if there is an equality of votes at a meeting
    at which all members are present, the chairman shall have
    a casting vote.

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    section


    SCHEDULE II

    Disciplinary Court

    1. The Disciplinary Court shall consist of three
    members of Congregation, not being Proctors or persons
    who will be Proctors in the following year or persons who
    have been Proctors during the preceding five years,
    except that two Junior Members appointed in the way laid
    down in clause 4 below shall also be members of the Court
    if the person charged so wishes and Junior Members so
    appointed consent to serve.

    2. The three Congregation members of the Disciplinary
    Court shall hold office for two years. Of the two members
    of the Court other than the chairman one shall retire at
    the beginning of each Trinity Term. In the case of these
    two members the Rules Committee shall in each Hilary Term
    draw up a list of ten names from which the Registrar
    shall by lot

    (a) fill the vacancy that will arise at the
    beginning of the following Trinity Term;

    (b) fill any ad hoc vacancy that
    may arise through the inability or refusal of a member to
    attend any particular hearing;

    (c) fill any vacancies that may arise through
    any member dying, resigning, or leaving the University; a
    person so appointed shall hold office for the remainder
    of the period of the person whom he or she replaces.

    3. The High Steward shall appoint the chairman of the
    Disciplinary Court, to serve for two years, from amongst
    members of Congregation who are barristers or solicitors
    of at least five years' standing or who have judicial
    experience, provided that if the chairman is unable to
    attend on any occasion the High Steward, or if he or she
    is unable to act the Vice-Chancellor, shall appoint a
    member of Congregation who is a barrister or solicitor of
    at least five years' standing or who has judicial
    experience to act for him or her on that occasion. If a
    vacancy arises through the chairman dying or resigning or
    ceasing to be a member of Congregation before the
    completion of his or her period of office, the person
    next appointed shall hold office for the remainder of the
    period of the person whom he or she replaces.

    4. The Junior Members of the Disciplinary Court under
    clause 1 above shall hold office for one year from the
    beginning of Trinity Term. The Rules Committee shall in
    each Hilary Term draw up a list of ten names from which
    the Registrar shall by lot

    (a) fill the vacancies that will arise at the
    beginning of the following Trinity Term;

    (b) fill any ad hoc vacancy that
    may arise through the inability or refusal of a member to
    attend any particular hearing;

    (c) fill any vacancies that may arise through
    any member dying, resigning, or leaving the University; a
    person so appointed shall hold office for the remainder
    of the period of the person whom he or she replaces.

    5.

    (a) If any member of the Disciplinary
    Court is prevented from attending after a hearing has
    begun, the remaining members may complete that hearing
    and reach a decision. If more than one vacancy in a Court
    originally of three members, or more than two vacancies
    in a Court originally of four or five members, shall
    arise, the proceedings shall start afresh.

    (b) Whenever any case, the hearing of which
    has already begun, is still outstanding at the beginning
    of Trinity Term, any member or members of the
    Disciplinary Court then retiring in accordance with the
    provisions of clauses 2 and 4 above shall,
    notwithstanding those provisions, continue to serve as a
    member or members of the Disciplinary Court for the
    purpose of such a case until the hearing thereof has been
    completed, a decision reached, and a reasoned decision
    given in writing.

    6. The Disciplinary Court shall always have a Clerk
    of the Court, who shall be appointed by the
    Vice-Chancellor from a panel of four names, consisting of
    solicitors practising in Oxford or members of
    Congregation who have practised as barristers or
    solicitors, drawn up by the Rules Committee in each
    Hilary Term.

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    section


    SCHEDULE III

    Appeal Court

    1. There shall be an Appeal Court which shall consist
    of:

    (1) the High Steward as chairman, provided that if he
    or she is unable to attend on any occasion he or she, or,
    if he or she is unable to act, the Vice-Chancellor, shall
    appoint a person who is a barrister or solicitor of at
    least five years' standing to act for him or her;

    (2), (3) two persons other than the Vice-Chancellor
    and Proctors appointed for each occasion by Council, not
    necessarily from its own number, in the absence of the
    Proctors and any members of the Disciplinary Court who
    are at the time members of Council.'

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    section



    Statute (2): Establishment of
    Andreas Idreos Professorship of Science and Religion

    Explanatory note

    Dr Andreas Idreos has offered the University the sum of
    £1.1m which, together with the sum of £200,000
    obtained from other sources, will endow a Professorship
    of Science and Religion. The following statute, and the
    decree to be made by Council if the statute is approved,
    accept this munificent benefaction and establish the
    Andreas Idreos Professorship of Science and Religion
    accordingly.

    (2) WHEREAS it is expedient to establish an
    Andreas Idreos Professorship of Science and Religion, for
    which a munificent benefaction has been offered, THE
    UNIVERSITY ENACTS AS FOLLOWS.

    In Tit. XIV, Sect. II, cl. 1 (Statutes,
    1997, p. 111), after `Boden Professorship of Sanskrit'
    insert:

    `Andreas Idreos Professorship of Science and Religion'.

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    section


    Decree to be made by Council if the Statute is
    approved

    1 In Ch. II, Sect. VI, § 1, SCHEDULE, concerning
    official members of faculty boards
    (Statutes, 1997, p. 246), under Theology,
    after `Philosophy of the Christian Religion, Nolloth'
    insert:

    `Science and Religion, Andreas Idreos'.

    2 In Ch. VII, Sect. I, § 5.
    B, SCHEDULE A, concerning professorships (p. 393), after
    `Boden Professor of Sanskrit' insert:

    `Andreas Idreos Professor of Science and Religion'.

    3 Ibid., Sect. III, concerning
    particular professorships (p. 507), insert new § 292
    as follows and renumber existing §§
    292–302 (pp. 507–13, as renumbered by Decree
    (2) of 11 December 1997, Gazette, p. 498) as
    §§ 293–303:

    `§ 292. Idreos Professor of Science and Religion

    1. The University accepts with deep gratitude the
    benefaction from the late Dr Andreas Idreos, together
    with any further sums received for the same purpose, for
    the establishment of the Andreas Idreos Professorship of
    Science and Religion.

    2. The Andreas Idreos Professor of Science and
    Religion shall engage in advanced study and research and
    shall lecture and give instruction in questions raised
    for Theology by the Natural and Human and Social
    Sciences, and the impact of Theology on the Natural and
    Human and Social Sciences.

    3. The professor shall be elected by an electoral
    board consisting of:

    (1) the Vice-Chancellor, or, if the head of the
    college specified in (2) of this clause is
    Vice-Chancellor, a person appointed by Council;

    (2) the head of the college to which the
    professorship shall be for the time being allocated by
    Council under any decree in that behalf, or, if the head
    is unable or unwilling to act, a person appointed by the
    governing body of the college;

    (3) A person appointed by the governing body of the
    college specified in (2) of this clause;

    (4) a person appointed by Council;

    (5), (6) two persons appointed by the General Board;

    (7)–(9) three persons appointed by the Board of
    the Faculty of Theology.

    4. The professor shall be subject to the General
    Provisions of the decree concerning the duties of
    professors and to those Particular Provisions of the same
    decree which are applicable to this chair.'

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    section



    Statute (3): Vinerian
    Scholarship

    Explanatory note

    Following a review of the BCL and the M.Jur. (see Decree
    (3) of 19 March 1998 in `University Acts' above), Council
    has agreed, on the recommendation of the Law Board, that
    in addition to a prize for the best overall performance
    in the BCL, there should also be provision for a single
    proxime accessit award. The following statute provides
    accordingly. At the same time opportunity is taken to
    remove gender-discriminatory language from the existing
    statute.

    (3) WHEREAS it is expedient to establish a
    proxime accessit award in addition to the Vinerian
    Scholarship for work of the highest merit in the BCL, the
    university enacts as follows.

    1 In Tit. XV, Sect. VI, cl. 2
    (Statutes, 1997, p. 125), after `One
    Vinerian Scholarship' insert `and one award of proxime
    accessit'.

    2 Ibid., delete `shall be such
    sum,' and substitute: `and proxime accessit award shall
    be set at such sums, together'.

    3 Ibid., after `the scholar'
    insert `and proxime accessit award winner'.

    4 Ibid., delete `his election' and
    substitute `their election'.

    5 Ibid., cl. 3, delete `his work
    renders him' and substitute `his or her work renders the
    candidate'.

    6 Ibid., cl. 3, after `election to
    the scholarship.' insert `The award of proxime accessit
    shall be awarded by the examiners for the Degree of
    Bachelor of Civil Law to the candidate whose work in the
    examination for that degree is of the second highest
    merit if in their opinion his or her work renders the
    candidate worthy of the award.'

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    section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 19 March 1998: Notices<br />

    Notices


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a
    previously published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue



    DIRECTORSHIP OF THE ASHMOLEAN
    MUSEUM

    CHRISTOPHER PAUL HADLEY BROWN (PH.D. London), Chief
    Curator, the National Gallery, has been appointed to the
    directorship with effect from 1 June 1998.

    Dr Brown will be a fellow of Worcester College.

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    section



    ORATION BY THE SENIOR PROCTOR

    The following oration was delivered in Congregation on 18
    March by M.E. CEADEL, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of New College,
    on demitting office as Senior Proctor.

    Senior Proctor: Insignissime Vice-Cancellarie,
    licetne Anglice loqui?

    Vice-Chancellor: Licet.

    Senior Proctor: Even in English, Mr
    Vice-Chancellor, it is difficult to convey how peculiar
    and how enjoyable the Junior Proctor, the Assessor and I
    have found our year, and in particular to do so within
    the small but variable attention span of an audience
    mostly itching to install its man and repair to its
    once-in-twelve-years luncheon.

    The Proctorship is peculiar in the extent to which it
    fuses executive, legislative, judicial, and Ombudsman
    responsibilities: on a good day Proctors act as
    prosecutor, judge, and jury in respect of regulations
    which they themselves have made, and investigate
    complaints against decisions which they themselves helped
    to take. This fusion makes for a job which is big and
    complex enough to be absorbing; and each area of
    responsibility persuades its incumbents they are being
    useful.

    In their executive role, which is shared by the Assessor,
    the Proctors may occasionally make a substantive
    contribution. Going further in a direction indicated by
    recent Proctors, we launched a proposal, adopted by the
    General Board last Friday as a farewell gift to us, that
    the appointment of examiners and setting of examination
    conventions become the responsibility of Faculty Boards.
    Much more important, however, by simply attending as many
    meetings as possible the Proctors and Assessor
    continuously offer the procedural assurance that even the
    most inbred of University committees is subject to
    scrutiny by college-chosen representatives of what the
    outgoing Assessor calls `the lumpen tutoriat'. The
    Proctors' power to issue examination regulations and
    emergency rules on their own authority enables the
    University rapidly to close loopholes exposed by
    disciplinary cases, and thereby to stay merely one step
    behind the most ingenious young minds in the country. And
    the Proctors' free-ranging judicial and Ombudsman roles
    allow the University to deal with most offences and
    complaints without resort to the much more time-consuming
    alternatives of disciplinary courts and tribunals.

    We feel that it is as Ombudsmen that Proctors are now
    most useful. Admittedly, the Proctors' inability to
    intervene on matters of academic judgement
    inevitably disappoints some would-be appellants against
    what they believe to be harsh decisions by examiners,
    supervisors, or faculty boards; but the Proctors'
    willingness to take up procedural complaints
    in an independent and industrious manner seems to be
    appreciated. At present, such complaints are commonest in
    the area of graduate research, where the financial
    investment by students, particularly those from overseas,
    is considerable and where make-or-break decisions are
    made in relative isolation by a supervisor or pair of
    examiners. In future, complaints will presumably be
    received in greater numbers from undergraduates required
    to pay a tuition fee. This year we upheld, at least in
    part, five procedural complaints from graduate students
    and one from an undergraduate. Our conviction is that
    procedural standards are generally very high in this
    University; but, having discovered the odd pocket into
    which best practice has not penetrated, we strongly
    endorse the North Commission's recommendation of an
    Educational Policy and Standards Committee. In their
    Ombudsman role Proctors are also approached from time to
    time by Senior Members of the University: we are
    conscious of having rarely managed to achieve the
    substantive outcomes that they wanted, but hope that we
    were able to reassure them that due process had been
    observed.

    The Proctorship is effective because to a remarkable
    extent it possesses that most elusive of institutional
    attributes: legitimacy. Those on the receiving end of the
    Proctors' activities—junior members hauled up before
    them, expert committee-goers faced with their uninformed
    interventions, distinguished scholars requested to
    explain their examining or supervisory practices, and
    senior administrators asked to lay bare their
    files—may curse them privately as busybodies, or
    worse, but for the most part accept, if only after a
    cooling-off period, that alternative forms of discipline
    and accountability would be worse. This legitimacy is in
    large part historical: the Proctors have been prominent
    University officers for three-quarters of a millennium.
    It is helped by transience: the individuals holding the
    office were potentially on the receiving end of
    proctorial intrusion last year, and will be so again
    next. It is helped by near-anonymity and ordinariness:
    few people ever know who the current Proctors are (and
    here I would bet that most of my listeners are properly
    ignorant on this score); and although Proctors are
    addressed at degree ceremonies as `egregious', they are
    acceptable precisely because they are nothing of the
    kind. Proctorial legitimacy in Oxford may also have been
    helped by a track record of common sense: mistakes made
    by past Cambridge Proctors allegedly contributed to their
    almost complete loss of power, as we discovered when the
    current office-holders came over earlier this term to see
    how real Proctors live. A legitimate Proctorship offers a
    safety-valve which protects Oxford from all but the most
    intransigent and litigious complainants: it may, for
    example, have helped the University escape some of the
    tensions which have latterly taken up so many column
    inches in the Cambridge Reporter. My final
    complacent observation on legitimacy is to note that the
    current state of the proctorship has found favour not
    only with Coopers & Lybrand and the North Commission
    but also with the undergraduate newspaper Oxford
    Student
    , which on 15 January 1998 published an
    article entitled: `Power, prestige, and sex appeal: the
    Proctors have it all their own way.'

    (Since this
    article also spelled our names correctly, it convinced us
    that the future of British journalism is in
    uncharacteristically safe hands.)

    The Assessorship is peculiar in a different way, being an
    instance of modern tokenism which has fought its way to
    credibility and recognition by North. Invented with
    effect from 1960 to provide a slice of central-university
    action for the women's and non-undergraduate colleges, it
    for years was part-time, plain-clothed, and lacking in a
    role. A succession of excellent incumbents helped it
    evolve: now it is full-time, kits itself out in sub-fusc
    and bands, and has acquired an obvious, important, and
    developing function as quasi-proctor for welfare and
    political correctness. The Assessor takes ultimate
    responsibility for the University's Access and hardship
    funds; and while this job could be handled by the
    University Chest, the Assessorship's quasi-proctorial
    status and method of election improve its relationship
    with the colleges. Among his many initiatives, the
    outgoing Assessor achieved what any self-respecting
    rational-choice theorist would know to be impossible:
    persuading colleges to take on the considerable burden of
    allocating Access funds for undergraduates on the grounds
    that they have more of the necessary information than the
    central University. The Assessor also undertakes many
    student-friendly activities, which this year included
    walking the streets in search of a bigger Students Union
    building. He or she also goes along to the worthier sort
    of University committee, a specialisation which has been
    all the more marked this year for the fact the Assessor
    unwisely missed the meeting at which we shared out the
    committee assignments. At least in principle, therefore,
    the outgoing incumbent had an answer when at one of this
    year's ceremonial functions he was asked by Prince
    Charles: `What do you Assess?' In order to complete
    their emancipation, future Assessors may want to acquire
    a distinctive gown and hood of their own—the Junior
    Proctor and I identified several promising if exotic
    prototypes while inspecting the textile store of the Pitt
    Rivers Museum—although if they do, it seems only
    fair that they should have to stand up, like Junior
    Proctors, while Senior Proctors orate their triumvirates
    into oblivion.

    The full-time contribution of the Assessor has helped the
    outgoing proctorial team to develop what has been
    remarked upon as a particularly good relationship with
    student representatives. We have tried to respond
    constructively to suggestions made at our regular liaison
    meetings. One from a member of the OUSU Executive led us
    to alter our examination regulations to specify that
    colleges should always pass on student complaints to the
    Proctors whether or not they endorsed them. And we were
    able successfully to take forward a proposal from a JCR
    president for an experimental degree day at which college
    year-groups graduate together: this extra pleasure for
    you, Mr Vice-Chancellor, our successors, the
    long-suffering Bedels, and others, will happen on 2
    October 1998, with those graduating this summer from
    Keble and New College being catered for in the morning
    and those graduating from Exeter, LMH and Pembroke in the
    afternoon.

    The high quality of the OUSU and other student
    representatives whom we have encountered has been one
    reason why our year has been enjoyable; but there have
    been others too. It is flattering to be at the centre: on
    day three I had to co-authorise the University's monthly
    salary transfer of £9m, even the Junior Proctor
    expressing surprize when she none the less got paid. It
    is stimulating not only to have a self-importantly full
    diary but also to face the constant possibility of
    unscheduled extra excitements, such as the various
    attempts by the Socialist Students Society to break into
    the University Offices, one of which turned somewhat
    violent, or the warning that an aggrieved student with
    whom we were dealing might be carrying firearms. And it
    is liberating to play so many unfamiliar roles, such as
    barrister, detective, security guard, publisher, property
    developer, non-executive director, mediator, counsellor,
    returning officer, and administrator. Even if the three
    of us have acquired fewer transferable skills than we
    should, we have enriched our stock of fantasies about
    careers we never had.

    We have also met a nice class of person on University
    business. Starting at the top, we have been struck by the
    number of engagements carried out, so affably, by the
    Chancellor. We have found both our Vice-Chancellors to be
    impressive and congenial, and have valued our regular
    meetings with them; furthermore, we have appreciated the
    unsung contribution to the University of their spouses,
    Stephanie North and Mary Louise Hume. We have admired the
    Chairman of the General Board, Glenn Black, one of our
    least contentious proctorial duties having been to
    preside over his re-election for an almost unprecedented
    third year in that most gruelling of jobs. Last night we
    were at a dinner to celebrate the distinguished career of
    the Registrar since 1979, Bill Dorey, who retires at the
    end of this month: we count ourselves fortunate to have
    had the opportunity to glimpse him in action within the
    University Offices, since his studied self-effacement has
    made him too little-known outside them. We have also been
    particularly impressed by Anthony Weale's, Peter Hill's,
    and David Owen's cheerful mastery of their vast agendas,
    by John Clements's concern to make financial management
    more transparent, by Richard Hughes's care in the
    community for graduate students, and by Sarah
    Wolfensohn's calm effectiveness in a difficult post.
    Singling out people in this way is, of course, as
    arbitrary as choosing Nobel laureates, albeit without the
    financial implications, so it is in the spirit of
    indicating the good sense and good humour of the
    University's administration as a whole that we mention
    ten further individuals whose merits we have been well
    placed to appreciate: Frances Barnwell, Fiona Campbell,
    Kate Davenport, Tim del Nevo, Christabel Lee, Rebecca
    Nestor, Jennifer Noon, Laurence Reynolds, Gill Sanders,
    and Jeremy Whiteley.

    Whilst we are in prize-giving mode, we should also like
    to confer the title of most lucid committee-goer upon
    Ralph Walker of the General Board and Press Delegacy, and
    that of most amusing chairman upon Chris Perrins of the
    Buildings Committee; but our nomination in the category
    of most disorganised faculty or department will merely be
    whispered into our successors' ears; and we have
    abandoned our attempt to stigmatise this year's most
    irritating higher-education quango because we could not
    get beyond a long short-list. The Senior Proctor's award
    for cushiest committee goes to the Committee for the
    Archives: it held only two meetings, one of which turned
    seamlessly into a reception; and its refreshingly slender
    paperwork was dominated by picaresque accounts of
    sixteenth-century University life from the indexer of the
    records of the Chancellor's Court, Walter Mitchell. I
    expect that it was mainly for my benefit that he included
    the story of a townsman who in 1581 denounced one of my
    predecessors as `skurvie proctor, knave proctor, and
    shitten proctor', and on being reproved declared
    indignantly that `he had not used the expression
    "proctorly knave", but had only said
    "shitten proctor", which he appeared to think
    was unexceptionable. The proctor very properly contented
    himself with saying: "I thanke yow."'

    That was mild compared with an exchange of courtesies in
    1998 between two male students from the same
    macho culture which left our proctorial
    straight faces severely challenged, but which cannot,
    alas, be quoted or even paraphrased in front of a family
    audience such as this. I can, however, cite the three
    most meretricious arguments put to us while we were
    engaged in the normally serious business of hearing
    disciplinary cases or considering complaints. One student
    caught marking passages in a Bodleian book insisted that
    he had been public-spiritedly rescuing the key points
    which the author must really have wanted to emphasise
    from the mass of verbiage under which he had perversely
    almost buried them. Another student claimed that his
    examiners could not have assessed his finals papers
    accurately because his handwriting had been so bad. And a
    third defended his placing of excrement outside a fellow
    student's room as the expression of a deep commitment to
    non-violence.

    We have also enjoyed the undeserved sympathy of
    colleagues who have assumed that Proctors and Assessors
    shoulder an oppressive burden. They have done so because
    in Oxford administrative jobs are normally piled on top
    of regular duties: indeed, as Senior Proctor-elect two
    years ago I missed Jeremy Black's oration and Toby
    Garfitt's installation lunch because, in addition to my
    CUF load, I was RAE co-ordinator for Politics and
    International Studies and needed every available minute
    of the time of my sub-faculty's one secretary to key the
    data for our 63 members of staff into the HEFCE software
    in time for the March 1996 deadline. That was oppression;
    by comparison, proctoring and assessing, with their
    release from almost all other duties, have, despite long
    hours and occasional crises, been a doddle, at least for
    those who are not worriers by temperament; and they also
    bring extra pay and sabbatical. Tell your friends in
    appropriate colleges aged between 29 and 51.

    When I asked my two colleagues for points that should be
    stressed in this oration, the Junior Proctor's list
    began: `Fun of sharing office; limitless supply of
    biscuits.' This identifies the two factors which most
    explain why this outgoing team has enjoyed itself quite
    so much, namely camaraderie and back-up.

    I have been extremely fortunate in my two comrades. The
    Assessor, Roger Goodman, having arrived at St Antony's
    from a Readership in Social Anthropology at Essex a
    comparatively short time ago, has treated his year in
    Wellington Square partly as field work which he will
    write up in Japan—a much more comprehensible culture
    to him—during the coming twelve months. He has
    shared his insights most entertainingly with the Junior
    Proctor and myself: indeed, based two doors down the
    corridor in the Proctors' Office, Roger has been a
    frequent and welcome visitor to the room we share, often
    drawn in by curiosity as to what the joke was.

    The Junior Proctor, Annette Volfing, was elected to her
    fellowship in German at Oriel even more recently; and
    with hindsight it is surprising that at only one of the
    many functions we attended together were we introduced by
    a Head of House with the remark: `Meet the Senior and
    Junior Proctor. No prizes for guessing which is which.'
    Annette has been the cleverest and most amusing of
    colleagues. In particular, her ability to spot from a
    distance which students were at risk of forming an
    intention to commit a University offence as they
    assembled near the Examination Schools at 12.30 p.m. or
    5.30 p.m. last summer, to disappear rapidly into the
    throng, and to emerge triumphantly with flour, eggs,
    water-pistols, and the satisfaction of having delivered
    Junior Members from temptation, was so uncanny as to
    convince many of us that it was very enlightened of the
    University to allow mere males to hold the office of
    Proctor. (Preventive proctoring of this kind, made
    possible by a rule change introduced by our predecessors,
    resulted in a sharp reduction in both trashing and fining
    in Trinity Term, and may have to be extended to Hilary
    Term examinations in future.) If the 1997–8
    proctorial year is remembered, it will be for its
    marathon-running, rabbit-keeping, Chardonnay-drinking,
    Danish woman Junior Proctor with a pioneering line in
    leather sub-fusc.

    I was assured by Roger and Annette that, as a Senior
    Proctor with nearly two and half times their previous
    length of service in the University combined, I brought
    to the team qualities which it would otherwise have
    lacked. However, when I pressed them as to what these
    were, they could identify only pedantry and a capacity to
    patronise the young, both of which they insisted had very
    occasionally proved useful. As a Politics tutor I have
    amused myself identifying comparators for University
    institutions: your relationship, Mr Vice-Chancellor, with
    the Chairman of the General Board resembles that of the
    President of the French Fifth Republic with his Prime
    Minister; in its transition from a body consisting
    exclusively of ministers without portfolio to one
    including departmental heads too, the General Board is
    adapting to increased pressures in the same way as the
    Soviet Politburo did after 1973 (not an analogy likely to
    comfort Glenn Black); Hebdomadal Council has more than a
    little of the House of Lords about it; and of course the
    college system can do a passable imitation of anarchical
    society as defined, Mr Vice-Chancellor, by your late
    colleague Hedley Bull.

    Roger's, Annette's and my enjoyment of our year has also
    owed much to the excellence of our back-up, epitomised by
    the telepathic appearance of coffee and biscuits on our
    desks. Ours has been the first proctorial team to have
    had the services of Dr Brian Gasser, the Clerk to the
    Proctors, right from the start. (My listeners will
    immediately infer from its quaint title that the
    Clerkship to the Proctors can be traced back as far as
    April Fools' Day 1996.) Brian has quite simply been the
    perfect civil servant, firm but kind towards his charges.
    As perfect civil servants do, he has very occasionally
    felt obliged, in order to protect the dignity of the
    office from the indignity of its temporary incumbents, to
    do a Sir Humphrey on us—most notably when, without
    consultation, he rebuffed a suggestion from advertisers
    working for Morrells that the Proctors might like to help
    launch a new speciality brew, Proctors' Ale. I mention
    this partly to signal that, were Morrells sometime to
    produce an Ex-Proctors' Ale, Annette and I would be
    prepared to help it on its way: so, just conceivably,
    might some other ex-Proctors present, including my
    father-in-law, David Stockton, who gave this oration 26
    years ago. We have also greatly benefited from the
    excellence of the Assistant Clerk, Linda Mason, and our
    secretaries Joely Gibbens and Caroline Beaumont, and of
    three people based outside the Proctors' Office but
    crucial to its operations: the Clerk of Schools,
    Catherine Hogan; the Head Clerk, Philip Moss; and the
    inimitable University Marshal, Ted Roberts, who awarded
    us six out of ten for our first degree ceremony and
    thereafter maintained a tactful silence. So well
    organised and supported is the Proctors' Office nowadays
    that we felt some twinges of embarrassment, Mr
    Vice-Chancellor, whenever we visited your office, where
    secretarial excellence and registrarial propinquity are
    deemed to be an adequate substitute for a Clerk to the
    Vice-Chancellor. We take it for granted that the
    comparatively new-fangled position of Vice-Chancellor
    should not be quite so well looked after as the truly
    ancient position of Proctor; but we feel that the gap
    might be narrowed somewhat.

    Our proctorial year began with the North
    Vice-Chancellorship and the Lucas Report and ended with
    the Lucas Vice-Chancellorship and the North Report.
    Financially, its first half saw the financial corset
    being partially unlaced following the University's
    spectacular success in the 1996 RAE; but its second half
    was dominated by a college-fees crisis in which a
    disastrous job freeze was avoided only by creativity at
    the centre. The year began without a site for the
    Business School, and ended with one which will enhance
    the city if technical obstacles can be overcome. This was
    the year in which Magister in Negotiis
    Administrandis
    first dropped from a Senior
    Proctor's lips at a degree ceremony, though I understand
    it is marketed under the brandname `MBA'. The Proctors
    can reassure those members of the University who had
    reservations about the Business School that, judged by
    its capacity to generate its share of challenges to the
    smooth running of the examination system, it is
    definitively one of us. Ceremonially, the year has been
    all the more congenial for the fact that the Lord Mayor
    has been Bill Baker, the Mansfield Road groundsman: he
    presided with style over the granting to the University
    of the Freedom of the City, though this has not
    emancipated us from planning controls or traffic schemes.
    The undoubted highlight of the year was the visit on 11
    July 1997 of the President of the Republic of South
    Africa, who combined dignity and warmth to a remarkable
    degree; and to my earlier list of roles Proctors play
    should be added holding Nelson Mandela's water glass
    while he addressed this Convocation House from where I am
    standing. Sadly, last month saw the untimely death of the
    first woman Proctor, Theo Cooper of St Hugh's, who was
    installed eighteen years ago.

    Mr Vice-Chancellor, since my listeners are almost audibly
    cursing the Buildings Committee of the 1630s for having
    put in such incongruously puritanical seating, I shall
    now pass to my concluding list of thanks: to Thames
    Valley Police, whose local Area Commander, Cressida Dick,
    is coincidentally the daughter of a former Senior
    Proctor; to the University Constables, George Davies,
    Michael Harvey, Colin Goodenough, Jonathan Solesbury, and
    the part-time `Specials'; to the Bedels, Gerry Holman,
    Michael Simpkins, Gary Jones, and, following Steve
    Brogden's recent retirement, Valerie Boasten, the first
    woman in this historic post; to the Verger, John Dobson;
    and finally to our Pro-Proctors, George Ratcliffe, David
    Palfreyman, Richard Cross, and Mike Spivey, who have
    helped with post-examinations policing and have covered
    for us during summer holidays and at almost all
    University Sermons. We have, however, thoughtfully spared
    them the burden of the social occasions: I compute my
    tally, including my own college's special functions, as
    35 dinners, 16 lunches, and 54 parties; and Annette and
    Roger could claim comparable productivity. Dedication to
    duty on this front has paid off: information I gleaned at
    one party led the General Board to change tack on one
    sensitive and complex issue; and the weight I put on
    through proctorial socialising was on one occasion the
    marginal factor enabling the front door of the University
    Offices to be held against an attempt to push it in. I
    mention this to assure those who issue invitations to
    Proctors and Assessors that they are serving the
    University's best interests.

    Mr Vice-Chancellor, you and I must now wrestle
    momentarily with the Laudian Statutes for the second time
    in six months. Last time, I was admitting you; this time,
    you are discharging us into the curious half-life to
    which former Proctors and Assessors are doomed, in order
    to make way for what the North Report (in paragraph 5.60)
    calls `fresh input annually'. Let us do so expeditiously,
    so as to minimise the interregnum during which, as the
    Marshal likes to warn us, the University is dangerously
    proctorless.

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    section



    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM

    On the recommendation of the Visitors of the Ashmolean
    Museum, the General Board has appointed J.J.L. WHITELEY,
    MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Cross College and Senior
    Assistant Keeper in the Department of Western Art, as
    deputy for T.H. Wilson, MA, Fellow of Balliol and Keeper
    of Western Art, for the period from 11 May to 11 October
    1998, during which Mr Wilson will be on sabbatical leave.

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    section



    COMPOSITION OF ELECTORAL BOARDS

    The composition of the electoral boards to the posts
    below, proceedings to fill which are currently in
    progress, is as follows:

    Professorship of Public Health

    
                                    Appointed by
    
    The Principal of Linacre 
    (Chairman)                Mr Vice-Chancellor
    The Master of St Cross    ex officio
    Professor D.A. Warrell    St Cross College
    Dr Sian Griffiths         Oxfordshire Health Authority
    Sir Kenneth Calman        Council
    Professor N.E. Day        Council
    Dr P. Troop               General Board
    Dr K.A. Fleming           General Board
    Professor Sir David 
    Weatherall                Clinical Medicine Board
    Professor R. Peto         Clinical Medicine Board
    
    
    
    

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    Professorship of General Practice

    The Master of St Cross
    (Chairman)                   Mr Vice-Chancellor
    The President of Kellogg     ex officio
    Dr P. Davies                 Kellogg College
    Professor L. Southgate       Council
    Professor A.-L. Kinmonth     General Board
    Dr L.T. Newman, London       General Board
    Dr K.A. Fleming              General Board
    Dr R.J. Mather               Oxfordshire Health Authority
    Professor Sir John
    Grimley Evans                Clinical Medicine Board
    Professor Sir David
    Weatherall                   Clinical Medicine Board
    
    

    Professorship of Economics

    The Principal of Linacre 
    (Chairman)                  Mr Vice-Chancellor
    The Warden of All Souls     ex officio
    Professor P. David          All Souls College
    Professor D.F. Hendry       Council
    Professor D.M.G. Newbery    General Board
    Professor K.W.S. Roberts    General Board
    Dr J.N.J. Muellbauer        Social Studies Board
    Professor P.D. Klemperer    Social Studies Board
    Dr M. Stevens               Social Studies Board
    
    

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    section



    UNIVERSITY OFFICES: PAPERS
    RECEIVED

    The following documents on matters of general interest
    with regard to Higher Education policy, funding, or other
    significant developments have recently been received
    within the University Offices. If any member of
    Congregation would wish to have a copy of any of these
    documents, he or she should apply to the office of the
    Deputy Registrar (Administration) (telephone: (2)70003).
    Where relevant an Internet reference is also given.

    HEFCE recurrent grants to Higher Education
    institutions for 1998–9 and distribution of maximum
    aggregate student numbers. (This document summarises
    HEFCE's allocations of recurrent funding and maximum
    aggregate student numbers to institutions for the
    academic year 1998–9.) Also available on
    http://www.hefce.ac.uk.

    The Learning Age: the Government's Green Paper on
    Lifelong Learning and the Government's response to the
    Dearing and Kennedy Reports. These documents, the
    contents of which are clearly identified, are available
    in full on http://lifelonglearning.co.uk/greenpaper. A
    summary of the Green Paper is available on request.

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    section



    DONALD TOVEY MEMORIAL PRIZE 1998

    The Board of the Faculty of Music proposes to award this
    prize in Trinity Term 1998, provided that there is a
    candidate of sufficient merit.

    The prize (which will be of the value of £1,000
    but which may be augmented should the need arise, at the
    discretion of the Board) is open to men or women without
    regard to nationality, age, or membership of a
    university. It may be awarded either

    (a) to assist in the furtherance of research
    in the philosophy, history, or understanding of music. In
    this case, candidates must satisfy the judges that their
    programme of research lies within this field, and should
    provide testimonials or other written evidence of
    previous attainment which demonstrate their fitness to
    undertake it. Nine-tenths of the prize money will be paid
    to the prize-winner at the time of the award, and the
    remaining one-tenth on approval by the judges of a brief
    report indicating fulfilment of the programme; or

    (b) to assist in the publication of work
    already completed in one of the subjects mentioned above.
    In this case, candidates should submit one copy of the
    work concerned and explain why the prize is needed in
    order to ensure publication.

    Entries, which should include a list of those expenses
    associated with the project for which the prize is
    sought, must reach the Heather Professor of Music,
    Faculty of Music, St Aldate's, Oxford OX1 1DB, on or
    before Friday, 12 June.

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    section



    PRIZES FOR PERFORMANCE IN
    PHYSICS FINALS

    One or more prizes may be awarded by the examiners in
    Physics in the Final Honour School of Natural Science
    each year for performance in that examination, and for
    outstanding work in project work and practical physics by
    candidates for that examination. No special application
    is required. The value of the prizes may be varied. No
    candidate shall be awarded both the Scott Prize and the
    main Gibbs Prize for performance in the Physics Final
    M.Phys. in the same examination. Candidates for the
    Gibbs Prizes must be members of the University who, at
    the time of taking the examination on which the prizes
    are awarded, have not exceeded the twelfth term from
    their matriculation.

    The prizes available in 1998 are as follows.

    Performance in the Examination

    The Scott Prize for Performance in the Physics Final
    M.Phys.
    Examination (£500)

    The Gibbs Prize for Performance in the Physics Final
    M.Phys.
    Examination (£250)

    The Scott Prize for Performance in the Physics Final BA
    Examination

    (£300)

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    section


    M.Phys. Project Prizes

    Smith System Engineering Prize for the overall best
    M.Phys. project

    (£250)

    Gibbs Prize for the best use of experimental apparatus in
    an M.Phys. project (£100)

    Tessella Support Services Prize for the best use of
    software in an M.Phys. project (£100)

    Oxford Lasers Prize for a project in Optical Physics
    (£100)

    Oxford Cryosystems Prize for a project in Condensed
    Matter Physics

    (£100)

    LeCroy Research Systems Prize for a project in Particle
    and Nuclear Physics (£100)

    BP Prize for a project in Theoretical Physics
    (£100)

    BP Prize for a project in an interdisciplinary or general
    area of Physics (£100)

    Prize for a project in Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary
    Physics (£100)

    Prize for a project in Astrophysics (£100)

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    section


    Other prizes for Practical Work

    Magnox Electric Prize for submitted BA practical work or
    essay (£100)

    Gibbs Prizes for Practical Work in Part A (up to three at
    £50)

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    section



    CONCERT


    Faculty of Music

    THE BAND OF INSTRUMENTS, with vocal soloists from the New
    Chamber Opera, will perform Benedetto Marcello's 1731
    oratorio Il piante e il riso delle quattro
    stagioni
    at 8.15 p.m. on Friday, 27 March, in the
    chapel, New College. Tickets, costing £7 (£5)
    are available from Blackwell's Music Shop or at the door.

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    section



    CLUBS COMMITTEE


    Annual Report 1996–7

    In 1996–7 the Clubs Committee received grant income
    of £12,607 from the Committee for the Council
    Departments and a contribution of £10,925 from the
    per-caput levy on colleges; revenue from rent and
    secretarial services amounted to £4,480. These funds
    were used to provide support and facilities for the
    student clubs, societies and publications electing to
    register with the Proctors under the regulations of the
    Rules Committee. Approximately 220 non-sports
    organisations registered in this way, representing a wide
    range of social, cultural, political, religious, academic
    and charitable activities taking place throughout the
    University. The Clubs Committee was also able to provide
    some facilities for University sports clubs (whose
    primary support is through the Committee for Sport and
    Senior Treasurers' Committee).

    Clubs Committee support continued to be channelled mainly
    through its premises at 13 Bevington Road, where
    secretarial services are available and offices and
    storage facilities are rented out. Some £29,000 was
    spent on staff, premises and running-costs, including a
    contribution towards the cost of providing access to the
    University's IT network and the purchase of a replacement
    photocopier. For part of the year, secretarial services
    to student organisations were reduced because of the
    protracted ill-health of the long- serving part-time
    secretary in the Clubs Committee Office; following a
    successful return to duties in Trinity Term 1997, this
    member of staff decided to retire early and a successor
    has been recruited. During the same period the part-time
    assistance provided by a University Constable based in
    the Proctors' Office was withdrawn after the individual
    concerned retired and his replacement was assigned to
    full policing duties under the agreed reorganisation of
    the Proctors' Office. The Clubs Committee made successful
    bids to the Committee for the Council Departments and the
    Conference of Colleges for additional funding to allow
    the recruitment of a part-time Clubs Officer. Based in 13
    Bevington Road with effect from Michaelmas Term 1997,
    this new member of staff will monitor and advise on the
    accounts submitted by student treasurers as part of the
    termly registration process and will assist with the
    running of the Minibus Hire Scheme.

    The Clubs Committee also continued its scheme of
    providing financial assistance to registered student
    organisations (in the form of grants, loans and
    underwriting guarantees): some £3,000 was allocated
    in 1996–7. The Committee had budgeted a sum of the
    order of £5--6k for this purpose and in view of the
    failure to allocate all the monies available it reviewed
    the guidance given to applicants (in the expectation of
    receiving more, and better-quality, applications in the
    future).

    A deficit of £4,813 was recorded on the Committee's
    account at the end of the financial year. In order to
    make its major capital purchases the Committee had
    budgeted for a greater overspend than this and in any
    event was able to cover the deficit from accumulated
    balances.

    The Committee's third main kind of support, funded
    separately and offered in collaboration with the
    Committee for Sport and a local company, remained the
    subsidised Minibus Hire Scheme and associated Driver
    Training Course. The Committee is pleased to report that
    for a second year these arrangements gave student clubs
    and societies access to a plentiful supply of
    high-quality vehicles hired at economic rates, and helped
    to ensure that there were no minibus accidents involving
    personal injury.

    Under the Assessor's chairmanship, the Committee and its
    Clubs Sub-Committee each met once a term. The Committee
    is particularly grateful for the enthusiasm and
    contribution made by the student members in determining
    how best to support the clubs, societies and publications
    which are such an important part of University life.

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    section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 19 March 1998: Lectures<br />

    Lectures


    Contents of this section:

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue



    INAUGURAL LECTURES


    Regius Professor of Modern
    History

    PROFESSOR R.J.W. EVANS will deliver his inaugural lecture
    at 5 p.m. on Monday, 11 May, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `The language of history and the
    history of language.'

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    section



    Harold Vyvyan Harmsworth
    Professor of American History

    PROFESSOR ERNEST R. MAY will deliver his inaugural
    lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 12 May, in the Examination
    Schools.

    Subject: `Shaping forces in American foreign
    policy.'

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    section



    WILDE LECTURES 1997–8

    The religion of the apostle Paul

    DR JOHN ASHTON, formerly University Lecturer in New
    Testament Studies, will continue the Wilde Lectures at 5
    p.m. on the following Mondays in the Examination Schools.
    Each lecture will be followed by discussion.

    27 Apr.: `Paul the prophet.'

    4 May: `Paul the charismatic.'

    11 May: `Paul the possessed.'

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    section



    O'DONNELL LECTURES 1998

    DR NICHOLAS WILLIAMS, Department of Modern Irish,
    University of Dublin, will deliver the O'Donnell Lectures
    at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Hall, the Taylor
    Institution.

    Thur. 21 May: `Gaeilge, Gàidhlig,
    Gaelg—the origins of Manx.'

    Fri. 22 May: `Nebbaz Gerriau dro tho
    Carnoack—a few words about Cornish.'

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    section



    GAISFORD LECTURE

    DR C. SOURVINO-INWOOD will deliver the Gaisford Lecture
    at 5 p.m. on Thursday, 21 May, in the Garden Quad
    Auditorium, St John's College.

    Subject: to be announced.

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    section



    CLARENDON LECTURES IN ECONOMICS
    1998

    Game theory, experimental economics, and theoretical
    computation

    PROFESSOR ALVIN E. ROTH, University of Pittsburgh, will
    deliver the Clarendon Lectures in Economics at 5 p.m. on
    the following days in the Gulbenkian Theatre, the
    Institute of Economics and Statistics, the St Cross
    Building.

    Mon. 27 Apr.: `Matching phenomena in labour
    markets.'

    Tue. 28 Apr.: `Some engineering aspects of
    the design of labour markets.'

    Fri. 1 May: `Learning and fairness.'

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    section



    CLARENDON LECTURES IN MANAGEMENT
    STUDIES 1998

    Managing innovation and change

    PROFESSOR DAVID TEECE, Mitsubishi Bank Professor, Haas
    School of Business, University of California, Berkeley,
    will deliver the Clarendon Lectures in Management Studies
    at 5 p.m. on the following days in the Examination
    Schools.


    Tue. 5 May: `The knowledge economy and
    intellectual capital management.'

    Wed. 6 May: `Innovation and business
    organisation.'

    Thur. 7 May: `Intellectual property,
    technology strategy, and competitive advantage.'

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    section



    ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

    Arnamagaean Digitisation Workshops

    The first of three EU-funded workshops will be held on
    Monday, 30 March, and Tuesday, 31 March, in Room 11, the
    St Cross Building. Delegates from Oxford, Reykjavik, and
    Copenhagen will discuss the cataloguing and description
    of Icelandic and other medieval Scandinavian manuscripts
    in machine-readable form. Further details may be obtained
    from Sue Usher, Librarian, English Faculty Library, St
    Cross Building (telephone: (2)71051, e-mail:
    susan.usher@efl.ox.ac.uk). Observers are welcome, but
    places are limited.

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    section



    LITERAE HUMANIORES

    The following lectures will be given at 5 p.m. on the
    days shown in Corpus Christi College.

    Convener: M. Winterbottom, MA, D.Phil.,
    Corpus Christi Professor of Latin.

    PROFESSOR NIKLAS HOLZBERG, Munich

    Thur. 30 Apr.: `Ter quinque
    volumina
    as carmen perpetuum: the
    division into books in Ovid's
    Metamorphoses.'

    DR A. VARDI, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

    Mon. 4 May: `An anthology of early Latin
    epigrams? A ghost reconsidered.'

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    section



    LITERAE HUMANIORES AND CORPUS
    CHRISTI CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF GREEK AND ROMAN ANTIQUITY

    PROFESSOR RICHARD THOMAS, Harvard, will lecture at 5 p.m.
    on Tuesday, 28t
    April, in the Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College. The
    lecture will be followed by refreshments.

    Conveners : S.J.Harrison, MA, D.Phil.,
    University Lecturer (CUF) in Classical Languages and
    Literature, and M.Winterbottom, MA, D.Phil, Corpus
    Professor of Latin.

    Subject: ``Virgil in a Cold Climate: Europe's
    Poet in Europe's Crisis.'

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    section



    MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

    Paget Toynbee Lectures on Dante 1998

    PROFESSOR PATRICK BOYDE, FBA, Cambridge, will lecture at
    5 p.m. on Mondays 27 April, 4 May, and 11 May, in Room 2,
    the Taylor Institution.

    Convener: J.R. Woodhouse, MA, D.Litt.,
    Fiat–Serena Professor of Italian Studies.

    Subject: `Human vices and humanity's virtues in Dante's
    Comedy.'

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    section



    MODERN HISTORY

    History and memory

    The following lectures will be given at 2 p.m. on
    Tuesdays in the Powicke Room, the Modern History Faculty.

    Conveners: R. Harris, MA, D.Phil., University
    Lecturer (CUF) in Modern History, and M.A. Vaughan, MA,
    Professor of Commonwealth Studies.

    M. CONWAY

    28 Apr.: `National myths, public
    remembrance, and private memory: the case of Belgium,
    1930–50.'

    I. HACKING

    5 May: `Travellers without memory.'

    Z. WAXMAN

    12 May: `The witness in testimony: World
    War I to the Holocaust.'

    PROFESSOR VAUGHAN

    19 May: `Slavery and Creole memory.'

    R. GILDEA

    26 May: `The Resistance myth, the
    Pétainist myth, and other voices.'

    A. GREGORY

    2 June: `Good wars and bad wars:
    ceremonies of commemoration in Britain since 1945.'

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    section


    Seminar in Social and Cultural History,
    1500–1800

    The following seminars will be held at 8.30 p.m. on
    Tuesdays in the Hovenden Room, All Souls College.

    Conveners: R. Briggs, MA, Special Lecturer in
    Modern History, and F. Dabhoiwala, MA, D.Phil., Post-
    Doctoral Research Fellow, All Souls College.

    PROFESSOR O. HUFTON

    28 Apr.: `The widow's mite and other
    strategies: funding the Catholic Reformation.'

    DR M. LAVEN, Cambridge

    5 May: `Nuns and sex in
    Counter-Reformation Venice.'

    PROFESSOR J. DE VRIES, Berkeley

    12 May: `Did a consumer culture emerge
    before the Industrial Revolution?'

    PROFESSOR R. DARNTON, Princeton

    19 May: `Policing a poem in Paris,
    1749.'

    DR G. HUDSON, Wellcome Institute, London

    26 May: `The body and the state in early
    modern England.'

    MS A. SHEPHARD

    2 June: `Manhood, patriarchy, and
    economic status in early modern England.'

    DR N. KENNY, Cambridge

    9 June: `Curiositas in German university
    disserations, 1652--1714.'

    R. WALINSKI-KIEHL, Portsmouth

    16 June: `Men as witches and male
    witch-hunting in early modern Germany.'

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    section



    PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

    The following seminars will be held at 12 noon on
    Wednesdays in the Sherrington Room, the University
    Laboratory of Physiology.

    Convener: J.C. Ellory, D.Sc., Professor of
    Physiology.

    DR S. BRICKLEY, University College, London

    29 Apr.: `Developmental changes in GABA
    A mediated synaptic transmission in the cerebellum.'
    (McDonnell–Pew Seminar)

    DR R. NAVARETTE, Imperial College School of Medicine

    6 May: `The role of excitotoxic
    mechanisms in motoneuron degeneration.'
    (McDonnell–Pew Seminar)

    DR L.M. HENDERSON, Bristol

    13 May: `The proton channel of
    neutrophilis: understanting function via
    mutagenesis.' (Seminar sponsored by the
    Physiological Society
    )

    PROFESSOR E. FRÖMTER, Frankfurt

    20 May: `NaHCO3 cotransport
    in the proximal tubule.' (Seminar sponsored by
    the Physiological Society
    )

    DR D. PRICE, Edinburgh

    27 May: `Regulation of forebrain
    development.' (Jenkinson Seminar)

    PROFESSOR M. ARMSTRONG-JAMES, Queen Mary and Westfield
    College, London

    3 June: `Plasticity of adult barrel
    cortex.' (McDonnell–Pew Seminar)

    PROFESSOR B. HENDRY, King's College, London

    10 June: `Ras superfamily GTPases and
    progressive renal fibrosis.' (Seminar sponsored
    by the Physiological Society
    )

    PROFESSOR S. BROWN, MRC Mammalian Genetics Unit and Mouse
    Genome Centre

    17 June: `The genetics of
    deafness—dissecting the inner ear function.'
    (Seminar sponsored by the Physiological
    Society
    )

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    section



    THEOLOGY

    Ian Ramsey Centre

    Seminars in Science and Theology: the person in
    genetics and theology

    The following seminars will be given at 8.30 p.m. on
    Thursdays in the Hood Room, St Cross College.

    DR K. SHARPE, Cincinatti

    30 Apr.: `Human behaviour, genetics, and
    theology.'

    DR J. POULTON, University Research Fellow (Royal
    Society), Paediatric Department, the John Radcliffe
    Hospital

    14 May: `Mitochondrial DNA, evolution,
    and genetic counselling: doctrinal and ethical
    dilemmas.'

    DR N. MESSER, Queen's College, Birmingham

    28 May: `Human cloning and genetic
    manipulation: some theological and ethical issues.'

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    section



    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM


    Daniel Katz Lecture

    PROFESSOR A. COLANTUONO will deliver the Daniel Katz
    Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, 31 March, in the Headley
    Lecture Theatre, the Ashmolean Museum. The lecture
    celebrates the reopening of the Weldon Gallery after a
    project of redecoration, redisplay, and conservation
    generously sponsored by Daniel Katz Ltd. and supported by
    the Association for Business Sponsorship of the Arts.

    Subject : `Nicholas Poussin's
    Exposition of Moses and the poetics of
    the heroic infant.'

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    section



    ST EDMUND HALL


    A.B. Emden Lecture

    SIR MICHAEL HOWARD, Emeritus Professor of Modern History,
    will deliver the A.B. Emden Lecture at 5 p.m. on Tuesday,
    5 May, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `Fin de siècle: reflections
    at the close of the twentieth century.'

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    section



    ST HUGH'S COLLEGE


    Henry Rowlatt Bickley Memorial
    Lecture

    PROFESSOR QUENTIN SKINNER, Regius Professor of Modern
    History, Cambridge, will deliver the sixteenth Henry
    Rowlatt Bickley Memorial Lecture at 5.30 p.m. on Tuesday,
    19 May, in the Mordan Hall, St Hugh's College.

    Subject: `The imagery of government in the
    Italian Renaissance.'

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    section



    UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


    H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture
    1998

    JUSTICE STEPHEN BREYER of the Supreme Court of the United
    States will deliver the H.L.A. Hart Memorial Lecture at 5
    p.m. on Thursday, 7 May, in the Examination Schools.

    Subject: `The work of an American
    constitutional judge.'

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    section



    OXFORD SIGNALLING GROUP

    PROFESSOR MICHAEL GELB, University of Washington,
    Seattle, will speak at the meeting to be held at 12 noon
    on Monday, 30 March, in the Department of Pharmacology.

    Subject: `Enzymes that translocate to
    membranes: lessons from phospholipase A2.'

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    section



    ACTION GROUP AT OXFORD ON
    TEACHING AND LEARNING ENHANCED BY NEW TECHNOLOGY
    (OxTALENT)

    Special guest lecture

    PROFESSOR DIANA LAURILLARD, Open University, will lecture
    at 11.30 a.m. on Thursday, 4 June, in the Computing
    Laboratory Lecture Theatre, the Wolfson Building (north
    entrance).

    Subject: `Rethinking university teaching
    post-Dearing.'

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    section


    Lunchtime seminar series: using the Internet to
    support student learning

    The following seminars will be held at 12.45 p.m. on
    Thursdays in Rewley House. Those who wish to attend are
    asked to register by visiting
    http://www.tall.ox.ac.uk/oxtalent.html, or by telephoning
    Maya Little on Oxford (2)70291.

    J. DARBY, Director, Technology-Assisted Lifelong
    Learning (TALL), Department for Continuing Education, and
    R. MCINTYRE, Information Manager, TALL

    30 April: Introduction and overview.

    J. DARBY

    14 May: `Continuing Education's
    Technology-Assisted Lifelong Learning programme.'

    N.S. GARDNER and DR M. NEWDICK, Department for Continuing
    Education

    21 May: `North American case
    studies.'

    S. MURISON-BOWIE, Director, Interactive Learning, Oxford
    University Press

    28 May: `A publisher's perspective.'

    R. MCINTYRE

    11 June: `How to create an Internet
    course.'

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    section



    INTERNATIONAL LAW ASSOCIATION
    (BRITISH BRANCH)

    LORD WRIGHT OF RICHMOND, GCMG, will be the after-dinner
    speaker at the Annual Spring Conference of the
    International Law Association (British Branch), to be
    held on 24 April in Keble College. The conference, which
    continues on 25 April, is organised in co-operation with
    the Centre for International Studies and the Centre for
    Socio-Legal Studies. Enquiries should be directed to Dr
    Michael Byers, Jesus College.

    Subject: `The role of law in international
    politics.'

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    section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 19 March 1998: Grants and Funding<br />

    Grants and Research Funding


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    OPPENHEIMER FUND

    The Oppenheimer Fund provides grants to assist the academic
    exchange of senior members between the University of Oxford on
    the one hand and universities and similar institutions of higher
    education in the Republic of South Africa on the other.
    Applications are invited from senior members of the University
    who wish either to visit one or more universities in South Africa
    or to invite a staff member from a South African university to
    Oxford. Grants may be awarded to assist with living expenses for
    a maximum of six months, and travel costs. Visits for the sole
    purpose of attending a conference will not normally be eligible
    for support from the fund.

    The maximum level of grants is likely to be up to £1,000
    per month for subsistence and up to £700 for the cost of
    travel between Oxford and South Africa. Applications for grants
    from the fund should include a statement of the purpose of the
    proposed visit, duration and estimated costs, details of any
    other available sources of funding, and, in the case of visits
    to Oxford, a curriculum vitae of the staff member
    it is proposed to invite and a letter of support from a senior
    member at Oxford. Applications should be sent to the
    International Office, University Offices, Wellington Square, by
    30 April.

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    section





    <br /> Oxf. Univ. Gazette, 19 March 1998: Examinations and Boards<br />

    Examinations and Boards


    Contents of this section:

    [Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously
    published or recurrent entry.]

    Return to Contents Page of this issue



    GENERAL BOARD OF THE FACULTIES


    Appointments, reappointments, etc., by
    the General Board; also in Clinical Medicine

    With the approval of the General Board, the following
    appointments and reappointments have been made and titles
    conferred for the periods stated.

    
    1 Appointments
    
    UNIVERSITY LECTURERS
    

    (From 1 October 1998 until 30 September 2003 unless otherwise indicated.) Biological Sciences jane a. endicott, ba (ph.d. Toronto), Fellow-elect of St Cross. In Molecular Biophysics. Mathematical Sciences robert c. griffiths (b.sc., ph.d. Sydney), Fellow-elect of Lady Margaret Hall. In Mathematical Statistics. TEMPORARY JUNIOR LECTURER Medieval and Modern Languages nicoletta m. simborowski, ma. In Italian. From 1 January 1998 until 30 September 1999. INSTRUCTOR IN MODERN LANGUAGES Medieval and Modern Languages eva perera maneiro. In Spanish. From 5 January 1998 until 4 January 2001.

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    2 Reappointments DIRECTOR OF THE FOREIGN SERVICE PROGRAMME Interfaculty Committee for Queen Elizabeth House sir robin fearn, ma. From 1 September 1998 until 30 September 1999. UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

    (From 1 October 1998 until the retiring age unless otherwise indicated) English john s. coleman, ma (ba, d.phil. York), Fellow of Wolfson. In Phonetics. Theology mark j. edwards, ma, d.phil., Student of Christ Church. In Patristics. Committee for the School of Management Studies susan e. dopson, ma (b.sc. Leicester, m.sc. London, ph.d. Birmingham), Fellow of Templeton. In Management Studies

    (Organisational Behaviour). Interfaculty Committee for Queen Elizabeth House nandini gooptu, ma (ma Calcutta, ph.d. Cambridge), Fellow of St Antony's. In South Asian Studies. UNIVERSITY LECTURERS (CUF)

    (From 1 October 1998 until the retiring age unless otherwise stated) English rosalind m. ballaster, ma, d.phil., Fellow of Mansfield. In English. Literae Humaniores martha klein, b.phil., ma, d.phil. (ba Reading), Fellow of Pembroke. In Philosophy. james logue, b.phil., ma, d.phil. (ba Keele, m.phil. London), Fellow of Somerville. In Philosophy.

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    Theology richard a. cross, ma, d.phil., Fellow of Oriel. In Theology. john b. muddiman, ma, d.phil., Fellow of Mansfield. In Theology.

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    3 Conferment of title UNIVERSITY LECTURER (CUF) Literae Humaniores susanne bobzien, ma, d.phil. (ma Bonn), Fellow of Queen's. In Philosophy. From 1 July 1998 until the retiring age. stephen j. harrison, ma, d.phil., Fellow of Corpus Christi. In Classical Languages and Literature. From 1 July 1998 until the retiring age. helen c. steward, ma, d.phil., Fellow of Balliol. In Philosophy. From 1 October 1998 until the retiring age.

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    4 Appointments by the Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine TEMPORARY CLINICAL READER mark s. whiteley, ma status (mb, bs London), frcs. In Vascular Surgery. From 16 February 1998 until 15 May 1998. CLINICAL LECTURERS katherine a. smith, ba, bm, m.r.c.psych. In Psychiatry. From 1 February 1998 until 31 January 2001.

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    5 Reappointments by the Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine TEMPORARY CLINICAL READER david g. lalloo (md Newcastle upon Tyne). In Clinical Medicine. From 1 June 1998 until 31 August 1998. UNIVERSITY LECTURER (MEDICAL) susanna graham-jones, ma, d.phil. (mb, bs London), mrcgp. In General Practice. From 1 May 1998 until 30 April 2001. TEMPORARY CLINICAL READER margaret m. kennedy (mb, b.ch., bao Dublin), mrcpi, mrcpath. In Pathology. From 1 March 1998 until 30 June 1998. CLINICAL LECTURERS crispin h. davies, ma status (b.sc., mb, bs London), mrcp. In Cardiovascular Medicine. From 1 September 1998 until 31 August 2001. JOINT UNIVERSITY/HOSPITAL APPOINTMENT keith e. hawton, ma, dm, f.r.c.psych., Fellow of Green College. In Psychiatry. From 1 April 1998 until 31 March 1999. TUTOR IN GENERAL PRACTICE (part-time) david r. scarfe, ma status (b.sc., mb, bs London). From 1 May 1998 until 30 April 2003.

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    6 Conferment of title by the Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine HONORARY SENIOR CLINICAL LECTURERS ralph p. gregory (bm Southampton), frcp. In Neurology. From 9 February 1998 until 8 February 2003. paul w. johnstone (bm Southampton, m.sc. London), mrcgp. In Public Health Medicine. From 9 February 1998 until 8 February 2003. michael f. murphy (md London), frcp, f.r.c.path. In Blood Transfusion. From 9 February 1998 until 8 February 2003. jacqueline a. palace, (bm Southampton), mrcp. In Neurology. From 9 February 1998 until 8 February 2003. robin m. russell (md London), frca. In Anaesthetics. From 24 January 1998 until 23 January 2003. keith m. willett (mb, bs London), lrcp, frcs. In Orthopaedic Trauma Surgery. From 26 January 1998 until 25 January 2003.

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    7 Reconferment of title by the Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine HONORARY SENIOR CLINICAL LECTURERS

    (title conferred until the retiring age or resignation from the substantive post) grant j.e. bates, bm, ma status. In Otolaryngology. From 1 February 1998. anthony c.d. james, ma status (mb, bs London), mrcp, m.r.c.psych. In Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. From 1 March 1998. robin p. kennett, ma status (md London), frcp. In Clinical Neurology. From 1 April 1998. colin a. milford, ma status (b.sc., mb, bs London). In Otolaryngology. From 1 March 1997.

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    8 Conferment of title of University Research Lecturer The following have been awarded the title of university research lecturer with effect from January 1998 until the end of their substantive appointments. Biological Sciences terence c. butters (b.sc. London, m.phil. CNAA, ph.d. OU), Senior Research Fellow, Glycobiology Institute, Department of Biochemistry. jeyaraney katirithamby, ma (b.sc. Madras, ph.d. London), Research Fellow, Department of Zoology. frances m. platt (b.sc. London, ph.d. Bath), Lister Institute Research Fellow, Glycobiology Institute, Department of Biochemistry. pauline m. rudd (b.sc. London, ph.d. Open), Senior Research Associate, Glycobiology Institute, Department of Biochemistry. pietro d. spanu, ma status (m.sc. Turin, d.phil. Basel), Royal Society University Research Fellow, Department of Plant Sciences. Clinical Medicine jacqueline boultwood (b.sc. Swansea, ph.d. Cardiff), Senior Postdoctoral Research Assistand, Department of Cellular Science. vincenzo cerundolo, mrcpath, Senior Fellow, Institute of Molecular Medicine. roger d. cox (b.sc. Sussex, ph.d. London), Head of Physical Mapping and Gene Identification Group, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics. timothy j. elliott, ba (ph.d. Southampton), Wellcome Senior Research Fellow in Basic Biomedical Science, Department of Clinical Medicine. peter c. harris (b.sc. East Anglia, ph.d. Glasgow), MRC Senior Scientist, Institute of Molecular Medicine. bethan lang, ma status (b.sc., ph.d. London), Research Fellow, Institute of Molecular Medicine. susan e. manley (b.sc. Belfast, ph.d. Bristol), Principal Biochemist, Diabetes Research Laboratory. david m. smith (ba York, m.sc. Reading, ph.d. Kent), Senior Medical Statistician, Centre for Statistics in Medicine. Physical Sciences simon b. calcutt, ma status, d.phil. (b.sc. Southampton), Head of Planetary Experiments Group, Sub-department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Planetary Physics. andrew p. zisserman, ma status (ba, ph.d. Cambridge), EU Research Fellow, Department of Engineering Science. Committee for Educational Studies michael k. summers, ma status (b.sc. Birmingham, m.sc. Essex), Tutor in the Department of Educational Studies

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    DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE

    The Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine has granted leave
    to A. HATTERSLEY, University, to supplicate for the
    Degree of Doctor of Medicine.

    The evidence submitted by the candidate was entitled: `The
    molecular genetics of type 2 diabetes'.

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    section



    DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF SCIENCE

    The Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine has granted leave
    to
    J.M.G. WILLIAMS, St Peter's, to supplicate for the
    Degree of Doctor of Science.

    A list of the evidence submitted by the candidate is
    available at the University Offices.

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    section



    EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR
    OF PHILOSOPHY

    The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give
    notice of oral examination of their candidates as
    follows:

    Biological Sciences

    J. ANSELL, St Edmund Hall: `The epidemiology and control of
    urinary schistosomiasis in schoolchildren'.

    Department of Zoology, Thursday, 26 March, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: J. Webster, P. Whitfield.

    English Language and Literature

    K.S. LANG, St John's: `"The Sentinel" and the evolution
    of Rebecca West's early writing, 1910–22'.

    Worcester, Friday, 29 May, 2.15 p.m.


    Examiners: J.D. Bradshaw, L. Pykett.

    G.R. SARGENT, Linacre: `"A wilderness of mirrors": T.S.
    Eliot, expression and renaissance drama 1916–34'.

    Worcester, Friday, 22 May, 2.15 p.m.


    Examiners: J.D. Bradshaw, M. Dodsworth.

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    section


    Modern History

    P. IRWIN, Magdalen: `Aspects of dynastic kingship in early
    medieval Ireland'.

    Examination Schools, Wednesday, 25 March, 11 a.m.


    Examiners: W. Davies, P. Wormald.

    D. PENNEY, Lincoln: `J.-B. Thiers and the repression of
    superstition in late seventeenth-century France'.

    Examination Schools, Monday, 30 March, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: J.McManners, J. Bergin.

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    section


    Physical Sciences

    C. EASTELL, St Anne's: `Microstructure and properties of high
    temperature superconducting wires'.

    Department of Materials, Thursday, 23 April, 2.15 p.m.


    Examiners: M.L. Jenkins, J.S. Abell.

    YUN FAN, Wolfson: `Enso prediction and predictability in an
    intermediate coupled model'.

    Sub-department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Planetary Physics,
    Monday, 20 April, 10 a.m.


    Examiners: T.W.N. Haine, A. Moore.

    P. THORNEWELL, Lincoln: `Detectors for the Sudbury
    Neutrino Observatory'.

    Nuclear and Astrophysics Laboratory, Thursday, 26 March, 9.30
    a.m.


    Examiners: N.E. Booth, M. Cribier.

    Physiological Sciences

    S. JOHN, Lincoln: `Ex-vivo keratinocyte gene therapy'.

    Institute of Molecular Medicine, Tuesday, 24 March, 1 p.m.


    Examiners: R. Bicknell, F. Watt.

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    section


    Social Studies

    B. BATJARGAL, St Peter's: `New entrepreneurs in post-
    Soviet Russia'.

    St Antony's, Friday, 17 April, 2.15 p.m.


    Examiners: A.H. Brown, T. Cox.

    N.P. TRAINOR, Linacre: `The religious person and the
    public sphere'.

    All Souls, Tuesday, 12 May, 2 p.m.


    Examiners: G.A. Cohen, D. Forrester.

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    section


    Theology

    J. PILSNER, Campion Hall: `The specification of human
    actions in St Thomas Aquinas'.

    Examination Schools, Friday, 17 April, 11.30 a.m.


    Examiners: R. Cross, C. Martin.

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    section





    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 19 March 1998: Colleges<br />

    Colleges, Halls, and Societies


    Contents of this section:

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue



    OBITUARIES


    Corpus Christi College

    DIANE PEREIRA JORGE, M.ST., 12 December 1994; commoner
    1991. Aged 29.

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    section



    Merton College

    ALEXANDER MONTGOMERIE BELL, 28 January 1998; commoner
    1938–9 and 1946–7. Aged 78.

    GEORGE HAUGHTON JACKSON BOVELL, November 1997;
    commoner 1946–8. Aged 79.

    ELVIN DENZIL BURTON, December 1997; commoner
    1946–7. Aged 82.

    MARCUS CECIL CHAPMAN; exhibitioner 1929–32.

    BERNARD MELLOR, 28 January 1998; commoner 1936–40
    and 1947. Aged 80.

    ANDREW RUTHERFORD, 13 January 1998; commoner
    1953–5. Aged 68.

    JOHN RALPH WALLEY, 8 February 1998; Postmaster
    1955–9. Aged 62.

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    section



    St Anne's College

    MISS YOLANDE CANTU; Member of St Anne's Society
    1948–51.

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    section



    ELECTIONS OF PROCTORS


    Lady Margaret Hall

    The college has elected as Proctor for the Proctorial
    year 1999–2000 RICHARD HENRY AUSTEN JENKYNS, MA,
    M.LITT., Fellow of the college.

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    section



    Pembroke College

    The college has elected as Proctor for the Proctorial
    year 1999–2000 PAUL WILLIAM SMITH, MA (B.SC., PH.D.
    London, M.SC. Southampton), Fellow of the college.

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    section



    ELECTION OF ASSESSOR


    Nuffield College

    The college has, subject to the coming into effect of
    Decree (4) of 19 March 1998 (see `University Acts'
    above), elected as Assessor for the Proctorial year 1999-
    -2000 PROFESSOR RICHARD ANTHONY MAYOU, BM, MA, M.SC.
    (M.PHIL. London), Fellow of the college.

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    section



    ELECTIONS


    Green College

    To an Honorary Visiting Fellowship:

    PROFESSOR
    JOHN PEARN (B.SC., MB, BS, MD Queensland, PH.D., D.CH.
    London), MRCP

    To a Visiting Fellowship:

    PROFESSOR BILLY F.
    ANDREWS (BS Wake Forest, MD Duke University)

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    section



    Merton College

    To Junior Research Fellowships (with effect from 1
    October 1998):

    KATJA GOEBS (MA Hamburg), St John's College

    CHRISTOPHER HAYES (B.SC. Belfast)

    MARTIN REVERMANN, D.PHIL. (MA Munich), Magdalen
    College

    VLATKO VEDRAL (B.SC., PH.D. London), Imperial College,
    London

    To an Exhibition:

    MISS J.M. KENNY, formerly of
    Stockton Sixth-Form College

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    section



    St Hugh's College

    To a Hodgson Exhibition:

    KEVIN JAMES JOHN
    DONNELLY, formerly of St Edward's, Cheltenham

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    section



    Somerville College

    To a Coombs Scholarship in Physics:

    RICHARD
    JONATHAN ABLEWHITE, formerly of Downham Market Sixth-Form
    Centre

    To a Pope Scholarship in Philosophy and Modern
    Languages:

    ALEXANDER TOTH, formerly of Narrabundah
    College, Australia

    To a Beilby Exhibition in Physics:

    DAVID BUTTLE,
    formerly of the Norton Knatchbull School

    To a Bull Exhibition in Classics:

    ISABELLE
    STERBOUL, formerly of Centre Madeleine Danielou, France

    To a Coombs Exhibition in Modern History:

    EMMA
    LOUISE FURNISS, formerly of Daventry Tertiary College

    To Pope Exhibition in Modern Languages:

    FIONA
    HELEN ORPWOOD, formerly of St Bernard's Convent School,
    Berkshire

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    section






    <br /> Oxford University Gazette, 19 March 1998: Advertisements<br />

    Advertisements


    Contents of this section:



    How to
    advertise in the Gazette

    "../../../stdg/conds.htm">

    Terms and conditions of
    acceptance of advertisements

    Return to Contents Page of this
    issue



    Oxford University Museum of
    Natural History

    A timely visit to the OUMNH shop may
    satisfy your need for non-calorific stone eggs (from
    £1.55). March has seen the arrival of new jewellery
    lines, an invasion by soft toy dinosaurs (£6.99),
    and the landing of a small flock of fanciful ceramic
    dodos (£16.75) from the Chilterns. Several new
    activity books have been joined by an extended range of
    colourful BGS geology guides (£1.95) to South Coast
    and Lake District holiday areas and to some of London's
    tourist spots. Museum closed 9–12 Apr. (inclusive),
    but otherwise open Mon. (inc. Easter Mon.)–Sat.,
    12–5 p.m., free of charge. Sales enquiries: Oxford
    (2)72961.

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    section



    Bodleian Shop

    New in the Bodleian Shop now: book-
    shaped cards: A Girl of Distinction,
    The Cleverest Chap in the School, and 6
    more! Please note opening hours for Mar. are 9
    a.m.–5 p.m. Find us in the entrance to the Old
    Library, access from Radcliffe Square, Broad Street, and
    Catte Street.

    James Fletcher, c/o Balliol College. FA
    Cup Party, Chelsea Supporters Association, May 1997,
    Auckland NZ. Some of your Kiwi mates want to get in touch
    again! Please contact Claire, tel.: 01244 348106, e-mail:
    black@sheep.u-net.com.

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    section



    Tuition Offered

    Are you interested in a different kind
    of teaching experience this summer? St Clare's, Oxford is
    running an International Summer School for 16–19
    year-old students this summer, and admissions are going
    so well that we need to recruit extra teachers and
    supervisory staff. If you are free from 20 June–3
    July 1998, or 8–21 Aug. 1998, and are able to
    deliver courses in subjects such as Development
    Economics, Historical Methodology, or Ecological Crises
    and Sustainable Development, or would like more details,
    please contact Maria Andrews, tel.: Oxford 552031, fax.:
    310002.

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    section



    Services Offered

    Afghan carpets: 30 per cent off our
    usual modest prices for a limited period to reduce large
    stocks of these elegant traditional pieces in elephant's-
    foot design. All are 25–50 years old, in a full
    range of sizes from 2.54 x 1.97 up to 3.93 x 3.06. Any
    colour as long as it's red, ie. pale claret, deep
    burgundy, pink, rose, scarlet, or crimson ground. From
    only £499 per piece. Frederick and Sudabeh Hine,
    tel.: Oxford 559396 (North Oxford).

    J.A. Neil Building, established in
    Oxford since 1981. Construction, restorations, and new
    projects using traditional materials. Quality
    stonewalling, masonry, brickwork, paving, and repointing.
    Tel.: Oxford 761581.

    Fine Furniture: we specialise in
    restoration, and design and make pieces to your
    requirements. Furniture for restoration is surveyed free
    of charge. We will take a brief with no obligation for
    bespoke pieces in the fine art of cabinetry, where true
    inspiration and experienced skills can come together at
    affordable costs. Please contact Forman Fine Furniture,
    tel./fax: 01844 238389, and speak to Danny Forman.

    Persian carpets imported directly from
    Iran; new, old and antique, all sizes. We sell
    handknotted Eastern rugs, runners, and cushions of every
    description, and offer expert repairs and safe cleaning.
    Gallery/warehouse usually open 10 a.m.–6 p.m.,
    Mon.–Sat., but ring first if you can. Frederick and
    Sudabeh Hine, Old Squash Court, 16 Linton Road, North
    Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 559396.

    Cross Counties Counselling and
    Psychotherapy Service. Offices: Oxford, Stratford-upon-
    Avon, Cirencester. Individuals, couples, families,
    groups. Psychoanalytically trained, holistically
    oriented, eclectic approach; specialising in trauma
    (PTSD), depression, life crisis, relationships, stress,
    anxiety, eating disorders, abuse, school-related
    problems. Free half-hour consultation with treatment (see
    brochure). Barbara A. Martino BA, MSW, CTS,
    (licensed/trained UK, USA), tel.: 01386 438010.

    Town and Country Trees: professional
    tree surgery, orchard and shrub pruning, planting, and
    hedges. Quality work at competitive prices. Fully
    insured. Locally based. For a free quotation, please call
    Paul Hodkinson. Tel.: 01993 811115.

    Oxuniprint, Oxford University
    Press—the University Printers: specialising in
    booklet and publicity material, typesetting, printing,
    and finishing; Output Bureau provides high-quality output
    from disk from all major DTP programs onto paper,
    bromide, colour-separated positive or negative film;
    high-quality specialist colour copier service. For
    service, quality, and competitive prices contact
    Oxuniprint, Oxford University Press, Great Clarendon
    Street, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 514691, fax: 514010.

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    section



    Domestic Services

    Blue House: a small intimate nursery for
    children 2–5 years. Established 10 years. Open
    Mon.–Fri., 8.30 a.m.–5.30 p.m., full or half
    days. NNEB staff. All pre-school activities, inc.
    numeracy and literacy skills to prepare children for
    school entry. Our aims are to encourage independence,
    self-confidence, and social skills. Safe secluded garden,
    and conveniently situated next to South Parks. Details
    from Kimberley, tel.: Oxford 247877, or come and visit
    us.

    Carpet/upholstery/curtain cleaning by
    Grimebusters, your local specialists. Quality work,
    competitive prices. Domestic, commercial, college. Also
    carpet/upholstery stain protection, pre-occupancy
    cleaning, flood cleaning/drying, oriental rug cleaning.
    For free estimates and friendly advice, call
    Grimebusters. Tel.: Oxford 726983 or Abingdon 555533.

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    section



    Situations Vacant

    Merton College: Appointment of Welfare
    Adviser. Applications are invited for the newly created
    post of Welfare Adviser (beginning 1 Oct. 1998), to
    facilitate liaison between SCR, MCR, and JCR welfare
    officers. Applicants should already be, or expect to be,
    engaged in academic study at Oxford University at
    postgraduate or postdoctoral level. The appointment will
    be made for 1 year in the first instance, with
    possibility of renewal for up to a maximum 3 years in
    total. The successful candidate will be expected to
    undertake an appropriate course of training in welfare
    issues. The position will carry free board and lodging
    and a stipend of £1,500 p.a. together with some SCR
    rights. Applicants should write to the Warden's Secretary
    not later than Friday 1 May, enclosing c.v. and the names
    of 2 referees, and should request their referees to send
    references direct to the Warden's Secretary, Merton
    College, Oxford OX1 4JD before Fri. 1 May 1998.
    Particulars available on request.

    St Anne's College: Library Assistant.
    Applications are invited for this full-time post, to
    start as soon as possible after 4 May. General library
    duties including enquiry desk work in this large and busy
    college library. Salary scale
    £11,802–£13,491. Further particulars on
    request. Applications and enquiries to David Smith, The
    Librarian, St Anne's College, Oxford OX2 6HS, tel.:
    Oxford (2)74810, e-mail: david.smith@st-annes.ox.ac.uk.
    Closing date: 20 Apr. St Anne's is an equal opportunities
    employer.

    Group 4 in association with Jesus
    College, Oxford are looking to recruit 2 full-time
    security officers to work nights and Sundays. £5 per
    hour for 48 hours p.w. You will display excellent
    communication skills and a professional manner. Reception
    skills an advantage. You must also be aged 21–64 and
    have a 10 year checkable work record. To apply, please
    contact Katherine Jones, tel.: Oxford 244999.

    School Governor required for Milham Ford
    Upper School. Taking girls from year 9 (age 14 upwards),
    this is an interesting school, being the only state
    girls' school in the city. No particular qualifications
    required apart from an interest in education,
    particularly that of girls. The work is voluntary and
    unpaid. Commitment is a minimum of 2 evening sessions per
    month in term time, but there is scope for more
    involvement. For an informal chat, please contact the
    Head, Mrs Gloria Walker, tel.: Oxford 243468. We would
    particularly welcome enquiries from the ethnic
    minorities.

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    section



    Houses to Let

    Furnished Victorian terrace house with
    garden; North Oxford; quiet street close to city centre.
    Two bedrooms, 2 reception rooms, fully-equipped kitchen,
    gas c.h., coal fire. £750 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 556152
    or 554722.

    North Abingdon: 5-bedroom, detached,
    fully-furnished house. Large sitting-room, dining-room,
    study, 2.5 bathrooms, gas c.h., garage, gardener
    included. Very convenient for bus to Oxford. Available 1
    Sept. for 12–13 months. £1,200 p.m.
    (negotiable). Tel.: 01235 523340 (answerphone).

    Well-situated, furnished, terrace house
    in south Oxford. Close to city centre, park, and
    reservoir. Double bedroom, single bedroom, bathroom,
    sitting-room, dining-room, kitchen, and sheltered south-
    facing garden. Washing machine, c.h. Suit couple or 2
    tidy sharers; non-smokers only please. Available
    beginning May for 1 year. £650 p.c.m., inc. Council
    Tax but exc. bills. Deposit and references required.
    Tel.: Oxford 310806.

    Two-bedroom cottage with bathroom,
    kitchen, and sitting room. Rural position, but only 10
    miles south of Oxford. Suit mature person. Available
    immediately. £550 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 821768.

    Superb, modern, architect-designed house
    in North Oxford: 4 bedrooms; fully equipped. On bus
    routes; 25 minutes' walk to town. Available July and Aug.
    Tel.: Oxford 511825 (eve. or Sun.), e-mail:
    l.lyons1@physics.ox.ac.uk.

    Headington: available 1 Aug.–end
    Dec. 1998. Comfortable 4-bedroom family house. Kitchen,
    dining-room, sitting-room, downstairs cloakroom, 2
    bathrooms, box room, large garden, off-street parking.
    £950 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 762450, e-mail:
    c.foot@physics.ox.ac.uk.

    Luxury, unusual, modern house in quiet
    road in North Oxford, within ring road, close to bus
    route. Stunning views to open countryside. Open plan
    design with separate double bedroom and 2 bathrooms.
    Small patio garden, off-street parking. Suit visiting
    academic/professional couple; regret no children, pets,
    or smokers. £1,000 p.m., plus services. Tel.: Oxford
    515085.

    Central North Oxford: attractively-
    furnished, four storey Victorian house in quiet street,
    15 minutes' walk from city centre, quarter of a mile from
    river Thames and Port Meadow. Two double bedrooms and 1
    single; 2 bathrooms, 1 with new shower, both with w.c.;
    double reception room with wood floor, oriental rugs,
    desk; modern pine kitchen/diner with large table.
    Dishwasher, fridge, freezer, gas c.h., washing machine,
    drier; TV, video, stereo, fax, 3 phones. Garden with
    picnic table, chairs, hammock; 4 bicycles. Free street
    parking. £950 p.c.m., inc. utilities and Council
    Tax. Available 3 Aug.–5 Sept. Dr Josephine Reynell,
    tel.: Oxford 513933.

    Woodstock: delightful small period
    cottage in quiet location close to Blenheim Park and town
    centre. Recently refurbished and furnished to high
    standard. One double, 1 single bedroom; bathroom and
    separate w.c.; sitting-/dining-room; fully-equipped
    kitchen; conservatory area leading to small walled
    garden. Gas c.h., telephone. Length of tenancy by
    agreement. £675 p.c.m. Tel.: 01993 812639.

    Charming cottage on edge of village 15
    miles north-west of Oxford. Double bedroom plus spare
    bedroom/study. Furnished and equipped to a very high
    standard. Beams, inglenook fire. South facing; very
    private walled patio garden. Suit caring non-smoking
    couple. Available from late Apr. Tel.: Oxford 510542.

    Old Boar's Hill: country cottage to let
    from Oct. 1998. Delightfully situated, quiet, 3 bedrooms,
    fully-furnished, c.h., all amenities, large secluded
    garden. £650 p.c.m. Contact K. Solomon in Italy,
    tel.: 39 444 324729. Local contact: tel.: Oxford
    512332.

    An Englishman's home is his
    castle—so the saying goes. We cannot pretend that we
    have too many castles on offer but if you are seeking
    quality rental accommodation in Oxford or the surrounding
    area we may be able to help. QB Management is one of
    Oxford's foremost letting agents, specialising in
    lettings to academics, medical personnel, and other
    professionals. Our aim is to offer the friendliest and
    most helpful service in Oxford. Visit our Web site at:
    http://www.qbman.co.uk and view details of all the
    properties that we have currently available to let.
    Alternatively, telephone, fax, or e-mail us with details
    of your requirements and we will do whatever we can
    without obligation. Tel.: Oxford 764533, fax: 764777, e-
    mail: info@qbman.co.uk.

    Make finding accommodation a pleasure,
    not a chore. Finders Keepers is dedicated to making it
    easy for visitors to Oxford to find the right property.
    Browse through our Web site for up-to-date detailed
    information on properties available and make use of our
    interactive database, priority reservation service
    (credit cards accepted), welcome food pack, personal
    service, and much more. Call us and you will not need to
    go elsewhere. For further information contact Finders
    Keepers, 73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE. Tel.: Oxford
    311011, fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk;
    Internet site: http://www.finders.co.uk.

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Flats to Let

    Delightful first floor 1 (double)-
    bedroom mews flat, 7 minutes' walk Carfax. Available Apr.
    for 4–5 months or longer. South-facing terrace,
    recently built and furnished. Covered off-street parking
    for small car. £500 p.c.m., plus bills and Council
    Tax. Suit visiting lecturer or senior research student.
    Tel.: Oxford 241845, after 1 Apr. only please.

    Wootton, near Boars Hill: superior
    spacious first floor apartment, to let unfurnished. Two
    large double bedrooms, spacious living-room, fully-fitted
    kitchen/dining area with fridge and dishwasher, utility
    room with washer-drier, bathroom with bath and shower,
    gas c.h., off-street parking, 2 TV and 3 telephone
    points. Rear garden. On regular bus routes to Abingdon
    and Oxford centre. No smokers, no pets, no children.
    Available May 1998. £595 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford 735660
    (eve./weekend), e-mail: ajmaun@mail.nox.ac.uk.

    Recently-refurbished, fully-furnished,
    luxurious 1-bedroom ground floor flat, in quiet part of
    central North Oxford, very near Port Meadow. Convenient
    for shops, schools, and university. Oak-floored dining-
    room and sitting-room, large carpeted bedroom, basement,
    fully-furnished kitchen with dishwasher, separate washing
    machine/drier, bathroom with separate shower cubicle. Gas
    c.h., 2 telephone and 2 TV points. Charming, secluded,
    paved garden front and rear. Available from 1 Apr.
    £950 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 559614.

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    section



    Summer Let

    Summertown, North Oxford: spacious and
    beautiful 3-bedroom house, all modern facilities, sunny
    garden, quiet residential area, 5 minutes' from
    Summertown shops; near frequent bus service to city
    centre. Available for holiday let 29 Jul.–31 Aug.
    (with some flexibility). £350 p.w., inc. all
    services. Contact Professor G.A. Dover, tel.: Oxford
    554300 (any time Thurs.–Sun.), or 0116 2523983 (day,
    Mon.–Wed.).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Accommodation Offered

    Rose Hill: between Rose Hill and Iffley
    village: 1 room in a spacious fully-furnished house
    shared with 1 tenant. Garden, washing machine, gas c.h.,
    living-room, dining-room. In quiet road near shops and
    bus stop. Non-smoker only. £295 p.c.m. Available
    now. Tel.: Oxford 718909, e-mail:
    joseme@earth.ox.ac.uk.

    Rewley Park, Central Oxford. A selection
    of brand new homes available immediately, ranging from 2-
    bedroom, 2-bathroom luxury apartments (available fully
    furnished and equipped) to 4-bedroom, 3-bathroom family
    house (available furnished/unfurnished). Rewley Park is
    an exciting new development close to Castle Mill stream
    and within an easy walk of the university and city
    centre; would be ideal for visiting academics. Rent from
    £850 p.c.m. (short lets may be considered at a
    higher rent). Please contact Finders Keepers for more
    information. Tel.: Oxford 311011, fax: 556993, e-mail:
    oxford@finders.co.uk.

    Lovely double room to rent in large barn
    conversion. Quiet village 12 miles west of Oxford.
    Bathroom, own TV, ample parking. No smoking. Preferably
    weekdays only. Short or long term. £16 per night.
    Meals extra by arrangement. Tel.: 01235 868973.

    Delightful Woodstock coach house
    adjoining Blenheim Park and within easy reach of Oxford.
    Available immediately for let up to 1 year. Double
    bedroom with breathtaking view, sitting-room, bathroom,
    kitchen, parking space. Recently refurbished and fully
    equipped. Suit non-smoking academic or professional
    couple. £475 plus bills. Tel.: 01993 813569
    (eve.).

    St Clements, available now: comfortable
    self-contained basement studio flat. Own bathroom and
    kitchen, telephone, fax, washing machine, microwave,
    fully equipped, use of garage. £475 p.m. inc. gas,
    electricity, and Council Tax. Available Apr.: attractive
    single room with own shower and basin, use of kitchen.
    £250 p.c.m., inc. bills. Non-smoking woman
    preferred. Tel.: Oxford 721052.

    College-owned properties, available 15
    July–11 Sept., centrally located near to university,
    well equipped, serviced by college scouts. Can be let as
    single properties or individual rooms, sharing
    facilities. Tel.: Oxford (2)79082, e-mail:
    janet.mead@seh.ox.ac.uk.

    Bed-and-breakfast available in the warm
    comfortable home of a semi-retired academic couple in
    exclusive central North Oxford; within easy walking
    distance of the city centre and all main university
    buildings; a stone's throw from the river, parks,
    excellent pubs and restaurants and a 9–9 corner
    shop. All rooms have colour TV, microwave, tea- and
    coffee-making facilities, c.h., and independent heating.
    Refrigerators available. Very moderate terms. Tel./fax:
    Oxford 557879, mobile: 0374 434489.

    Superb new hotel, 1.5 miles from city
    centre. 16 en suite bedrooms; telephone, TV with Sky,
    fridge, kitchenette, mini-bar. Parking. Tourist
    Board—highly commended; RAC—highly acclaimed;
    AA—4 Qs. Single £59.50, double/twin
    £69.50, per room per night. Discounts for long-stay
    guests. Marlborough House Hotel, 321 Woodstock Road,
    Oxford OX2 7NY, tel.: Oxford 311321, fax: 515329, e-mail:
    enquiries@marlbhouse.win-uk.net, Web site:
    http://www.oxlink.co.uk/oxford/hotels/marlborough.html.

    >

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    section



    Accommodation Sought

    Finders Keepers specialises in managing
    your home or investment. We have celebrated 25 years in
    Oxford letting and managing properties—try us first!
    Many of our landlords have remained with us since we
    opened and are delighted with our service—why not
    pop in and read their comments? Contact Finders Keepers,
    73 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE. Tel.: Oxfordd 311011,
    fax: 556993, e-mail: oxford@finders.co.uk, Internet site:
    http://www.finders.co.uk.

    Returning Oxfam staffer seeks 3-bedroom
    furnished house to rent, 3–6 months, from May.
    Marston, Summertown, or Headington areas. Chris Bailey,
    tel.: 0171 221 0745, fax: 0171 229 1336, e-mail:
    michael@oxfam.org.br.

    American visiting fellow, spouse, and
    boys 12 and 14 seek fully-furnished 3- or 4-bedroom house
    in Oxford or environs, from 19 June through 20 Aug. 1998.
    Children will be present for 3 weeks only. Please contact
    in USA: D. Matthews, 6514 Kalama Road, Kapaa, Hawaii
    96746, tel.: 808 821 0479, fax: 808 821 1193, e-mail:
    dbm@aloha.net.

    Visiting US Law professor seeks
    furnished accommodation 26 June–7 Aug. for self and
    2 quiet, well-behaved daughters (5 and 9). Local
    references available. Jane Winn, SMU School of Law,
    Dallas, TX 75275, tel.: 214 768 2583, fax: 768 4330, e-
    mail: jwinn@mail.smu.edu.

    House/animal/granny or other sitting
    offered by mature woman in exchange, or for reduced rent,
    self-contained accommodation; 6 months from Oct. or Nov.
    1998. Barbara Ineson, tel.: Oxford 722432 through April
    (messages may be left thereafter).

    Furnished 3-bedroom house or flat
    needed, May and June 1998, for tidy and responsible
    visiting fellow (Pembroke College) and family of 4
    (children
    ages 14 and 10). Please contact Kate or Lowell Turner,
    tel.: Oxford 556063, or
    (2)76440.

    Visiting German medical research fellow
    and wife seek self-contained 2-room accommodation in
    Oxford, ideally near John Radcliffe Hospital. From 1 May
    1998, for 1 year initially. Tel.: Oxford 222322, e-mail:
    neurosciences@imm.ox.ac.uk.

    Seeking home for 8–12 weeks:
    university professor and spouse, with 2 daughters ages 8
    and 5, seek modest but comfortable 2/3-bedroom furnished
    cottage/flat near the colleges for Trinity Term (mid Apr.
    through June 1998). Exact dates negotiable. Doug and
    Dianne Geivett, 1405 Wickford Drive, Brea, CA 92821, USA.
    Tel.: 562 691 4289, fax: 903 4759, e-mail:
    doug_geivett@peter.biola.edu.

    Going abroad? Or just thinking of
    letting your property? QB Management is one of Oxford's
    foremost letting agents and property managers. We
    specialise in lettings to both academic and professional
    individuals and their families, and have a constant flow
    of enquiries from good-quality tenants seeking property
    in the Oxford area. If you would like details of our
    services, or if you simply need some informal help and
    advice without obligation, telephone us: Oxford 764533,
    fax us: 764777, or e-mail us: info@qbman.co.uk.
    Alternatively, we would invite you to visit our Web site
    at: http://www.qbman.co.uk and see how we could be
    marketing your property.

    Mallams Residential Letting is well
    placed to help with your letting and management
    requirements. Based in Summertown, we offer a
    professional service tailored to your individual
    requirements. If you are thinking of letting your
    property, please call us. Tel.: Oxford 311006, fax:
    311977.

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    section



    Accommodation Exchange

    Boston, Mass.: USA family looking to
    `house swap' with Oxford/Cotswold family; last week in
    June or first week in July (or combination). Our house
    has up to 6 bedrooms. Two dogs in house complete with
    dogsitter. We need 2 bedrooms—2 grown children and 2
    parents. Tel. (USA): 001 781 237 3675.

    Toronto exchange: spacious 2-bedroom, 2-
    bathroom flat. Centrally located, fully equipped,
    tastefully furnished, light and heat included. Seeking to
    exchange for house/flat in North or central Oxford for
    18–24 months, beginning July/Sept. 1998. Fax
    (Moscow): 7 095 921 9491 or (Toronto): 416 972 9179, e-
    mail: ioccmoscow@glas.apc.org.

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    section



    Accommodation Sought to Rent or
    Exchange

    Visiting academic and family (3 children
    aged 6–10) seek furnished 3/4-bedroom house; North
    Oxford or close to John Radcliffe Hospital preferred.
    Beginning mid Aug. 1998 for approximately 1 year. Would
    consider exchange for 4-bedroom house in central
    Auckland, NZ. Tel./fax: 0064 9 6306723, e-mail:
    a.fraser@auckland.ac.nz.

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    section



    Accommodation Offered to Rent
    or Exchange

    Summertown: lovely 3-bedroom Victorian
    terrace house, fully furnished/equipped, to let or
    exchange from summer 1998, for academic year minimum.
    Dates/length of let flexible. Two double bedrooms,
    office/3rd bedroom, eat-in kitchen overlooking pretty
    garden, 2 reception rooms, 1.5 bathrooms, gas c.h.
    Hardwood floors; even a Steinway piano. Near shops, bus,
    excellent schools, university, hospitals, etc. Family
    owners (professional mother, 2 children) ideally seeking
    exchange with New York City academic; require minimum 1
    bedroom plus/doorman apartment in Manhattan. Otherwise
    £1,100 p.c.m. plus bills. Tel.: Oxford 512847, fax:
    515335, e-mail: 101642.2251@compuserve.com.

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    section



    Holiday Lets

    Germany: spacious modern family home
    (hall, large lounge-dining area, 4 bedrooms, study, 2.5
    bathrooms) with extensive garden in leafy suburb of
    Hamburg. Available 27 May–27 Nov. A bargain, due to
    current exchange rate, at £500 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford
    558910 (afternoon/eve.).

    Tarn, south-west France. Close
    Albi/Cordes., convenient Toulouse. 18th-c. farmhouse and
    cottage; beamed ceilings, tiled floors, stone walls,
    wood-burning stoves and c.h., beautifully furnished.
    House sleeps 6; cottage 4. Garden (2 acres) with swimming
    pool, in lovely country setting. Available year round.
    Rent 1 or both; let to only 1 party/period. Colour
    brochure. Tel.: 0161 434 5455 or (USA) 907 346 8350, e-
    mail: akscott@alaska.net.

    Delicious Donegal cottage; open fires,
    Aga. Sleeps 4–6, overlooking lough, surrounded by
    mountains. Ideal for families or couples. Rowing boat,
    canoes, and bicycles included; within easy reach of golf
    courses, fishing, sandy beaches, horse riding and much
    more. From £200. Tel.: Oxford 390402.

    Greece: Skopelos Island. Old house to
    let in quiet area of Skopelos village, 2 minutes' walk
    from the waterfront, with secluded terrace and lovely
    courtyard opening out from the kitchen. Two bathrooms.
    Sleeps 6–8 comfortably. From £50 per day. Tel.:
    01280 848 250 or 847 849.

    Idyllic water mill, central France.
    Sleeps 8–10. Recently restored; large open
    fireplace, ideal for retreat or holiday. Beautiful
    private riverside setting, own river swimming, fishing,
    woodland walks, tennis, riding, mountain biking nearby.
    Still available all year except Aug. Tel./fax: 0181 940
    2395.

    Northumberland, between the Cheviots and
    the sea: stone built cottage in small unspoilt village; 5
    miles from Alnwick Castle, and within easy reach of half
    a dozen more, and miles of beautiful sea shore. Sitting-
    room, 3 bedrooms, kitchen, bathroom. Available June,
    July, Aug. Tel.: 01665 579292.

    Provence: luxury 3-bedroom apartment in
    17th-c. chateau with views to the Gorge du Verdon. Pool,
    tennis, gardens, lakes, river, sailing, walking,
    windsurfing, drive to skiing. Log fire and heating. Real
    home with books, satellite TV, dishwasher, etc. Sleeps 6.
    Available year round. Tel.: Oxford 510542.

    North Pembs.: cottage in secluded
    setting near coast. Stove, books, walks, wildlife, clean
    air. Ideal 2/3, but can sleep more. Available from
    Easter; reasonable weekly rates. For brochure, tel.:
    01348 872080.

    Chateau d'Oex, Switzerland: comfortable
    18th-c. chalet, suit family (maximum 5 adults). Large
    south-facing veranda, garden, breathtaking mountain
    views. Ideal for skiing or walking; Alpine flowers.
    Available year round, minimum 10 days. From 130 Swiss
    francs per day, all inclusive. For further details, tel.:
    Oxford (2)76592.

    Tuscany, Italy: charming 17th-c.
    farmhouse in unspoilt mountain village with magnificent
    views. Spacious accommodation, fully modernised, with
    lovely garden and swimming pool. Near Lucca; easy access
    to Pisa and Florence. Sleeps 8–10. Unavailable most
    Aug. and Sept. Tel.: 0181 446 4913.

    Sympathetically-restored traditional
    Cretan house in heart of old Rethymnon; fully equipped,
    automatic washing machine, patio with barbecue, library
    with English books. Sleeps 4 (1 double, 1 twin). Very
    quiet location with views of fortress, but close to bus
    station, shops, beaches. £250 p.w., £900 p.m.
    Tel./fax: 00 30 831 56525.

    Italy: Lake Como. Village house
    apartment, closely overlooking lake. One double bedroom,
    kitchenette, dining-/sitting-room, terrace. 20 minutes
    Como City. Also: Umbria, Assisi National Park: 2 double
    bedrooms, kitchen/dining-room, big bathroom, own road.
    Superb views; wildlife. Rent for either: £300 p.w.,
    £550 per fortnight, £900 p.c.m. Tel.: Oxford
    763886.

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    section



    Houses for Sale

    Secluded, very quiet, away from traffic:
    1-bedroom house; unique, modern (1974), architect
    designed. Bedroom, sitting-room, bathroom, kitchen.
    Excellent central North Oxford location; easy walking
    distance colleges, labs, libraries. Small, low
    maintenance garden. Residents' street parking.
    £112,500. Tel.: Oxford 515625.

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    section



    Properties for sale at Oxford
    Waterside

    Central North Oxford/Jericho.
    Classically styled homes built by nationally renowned
    quality house-builders, Berkeley Homes. Properties
    available include: 2-bedroom apartments from
    £118,500; 3-bedroom, 2-bathroom houses from
    £169,500; 4-bedroom, 3-storey houses with garages
    from £275,000. Marketing suite and show homes open
    daily, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Tel.: Oxford 311449, or
    726000/515000 (joint selling agents, Savills and Thomas
    Merrifield).

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    section



    For Sale

    Piano for sale: Barratt and Robinson
    upright. Excellent condition, little used. £950.
    Tel.: Oxford 512964.
    n

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    section






    <br /> Ox. Univ. Gazette: Diary, 20 March<br /> - 23 April

    Diary


    Contents of this section:

    Academic Staff
    Seminars
    : places should be booked in advance through
    the Staff Development Office, University Offices,
    Wellington Square (telephone: (2)70086).

    For the full list of courses, see the HREF="http://admin.ox.ac.uk/training/">Staff Development
    ProgrammeWeb site.

    Return to
    Contents Page of this issue



    Friday 20 March

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Viols, violins, and
    virginals: the Hill Collection', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
    £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--1
    p.m.)

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    section



    Saturday 21 March

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM study-day: `Planning Oxford past and
    present' (coincides with exhibition `Hawksmoor and the
    replanning of Oxford'), 9.30 a.m.--4 p.m. (fully booked).

    SEMINAR (Institute of Social and Cultural
    Anthropology) : `Inside the mosque---outside the mosque:
    the anthropology of Muslim prayer across the Indian
    Ocean', Maison Française (continues tomorrow).

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    section



    Monday 23 March

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Effective meetings', 9 a.m. ( HREF="#seminars">see information above).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Tuesday 24 March

    THE MEETING of Congregation, due to take place today, is
    cancelled.

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Mid-career review for
    academic staff' (first of three meetings— HREF="#seminars">see information above).

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM study course: `The splendours of the
    Renaissance: paintings and drawings of the later
    Renaissance', 10 a.m.--4 p.m. (Cost: £19. Tel. for
    bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--12.30 p.m.)

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Lotus and tulip:
    floral motifs through the ages', 1.15 p.m. (Cost:
    £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--1
    p.m.)

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    section



    Wednesday 25 March

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Mid-career review for academic
    staff' (second of three meetings— HREF="#seminars">see information above).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Thursday 26 March

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Mid-career review for
    academic staff' (last of three meetings— HREF="#seminars">see information above).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Friday 27 March

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Financial management, module
    III: project planning and management', 9.30 a.m. ( HREF="#seminars">see information above).

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Hawksmoor and the
    replanning of Oxford' (special exhibition), 1.15 p.m.
    (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30
    a.m.--1 p.m.)

    G. HOWARD: `Shakespeare and company: a bookshop in
    Paris' (Oxford Literary Festival lecture), Maison
    Française, 5.15 p.m.

    THE BAND OF INSTRUMENTS, with vocal soloists from New
    Chamber Opera, perform Benedetto Marcello's 1731 oratorio
    Il pianto e il riso delle quattro stagioni,
    the chapel, New College, 8.15 p.m. (tickets
    £7/£5 from Blackwell's Music Shop or at the
    door).

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    section



    Tuesday 31 March

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Gender in teaching', 9.30 a.m.
    (see information above).

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Myths and rebuses in
    Chinese art', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for
    bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--1 p.m.)

    PROFESSOR A. COLANTUONO: `Nicholas Poussin's
    Exposition of Moses and the poetics of the
    heroic infant' (Daniel Katz Lecture), Headley Lecture
    Theatre, Ashmolean, 5 p.m.

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    section



    Thursday 2 April

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Financial management, module IV:
    budget preparation', 9.30 a.m. (see
    information above
    ).

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    section



    Friday 3 April

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Financial management, module IV:
    budget preparation', 9.30 a.m. (see
    information above
    ).

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Hawksmoor and the
    replanning of Oxford' (special exhibition), 1.15 p.m.
    (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30
    a.m.--1 p.m.)

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    section



    Monday 6 April

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Working together'—for
    academics/administrators and their secretaries, 9.30 a.m.
    (see information above).

    CHRIST CHURCH Picture Gallery closed (reopens 13
    April).

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    section



    Tuesday 7 April

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Camille Pissarro', 1.15
    p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30
    a.m.--1 p.m.)

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    section



    Thursday 9 April

    UNIVERSITY OFFICES closed for normal business (reopen 20
    April).

    SHELDONIAN THEATRE closed (reopens 20 April).

    UNIVERSITY MESSENGER SERVICE suspended until 20 April.

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    section



    Friday 10 April

    ASHMOLEAN LIBRARY closed (reopens 14 April).

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM closed (reopens 13 April, 2 p.m.).

    BODLEIAN LIBRARY closed (reopens 14 April).

    TAYLOR INSTITUTION library closed (reopens 14 April).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section



    Tuesday 14 April

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Japanese prints' (special
    exhibition), 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for
    bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--1 p.m.)

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    section



    Friday 17 April

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Dutch paintings of the
    seventeenth century', 1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel.
    for bookings: (2)78015, 9.30 a.m.--1 p.m.)

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    section



    Monday 20 April

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Pastoral skills for tutors',
    9.30 a.m. (see information
    above
    ).

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    section



    Tuesday 21 April

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM exhibition opens: `Illustrators of the
    1860s: the Forrest Reid Collection of Victorian book and
    periodical illustrations' (until 21 June).

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINARS: `Lecturing skills practice
    for arts', 9.30 a.m.; `Lecturing skills practice for
    sciences', 2 p.m. (see information
    above
    ).

    ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM gallery talk: `Landscape painting',
    1.15 p.m. (Cost: £1.50. Tel. for bookings: (2)78015,
    9.30 a.m.--1 p.m.)

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    section



    Wednesday 22 April

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Time management' (general
    skills), 9.30 a.m. (see information
    above
    ).

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    section



    Thursday 23 April

    ACADEMIC STAFF SEMINAR: `Supervising D.Phil. students',
    9.30 a.m. (see information
    above
    ).

    Return to List of Contents of this
    section